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Sample records for a1 receptor a1r

  1. Methods for Tumor Targeting with Salmonella typhimurium A1-R.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) has shown great preclinical promise as a broad-based anti-cancer therapeutic (please see Chapter 1 ). The present chapter describes materials and methods for the preclinical study of S. typhimurium A1-R in clinically-relevant mouse models. Establishment of orthotopic metastatic mouse models of the major cancer types is described, as well as other useful models, for efficacy studies of S. typhimurium A1-R or other tumor-targeting bacteria, as well. Imaging methods are described to visualize GFP-labeled S. typhimurium A1-R, as well as GFP- and/or RFP-labeled cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which S. typhimurium A1-R targets. The mouse models include metastasis to major organs that are life-threatening to cancer patients including the liver, lung, bone, and brain and how to target these metastases with S. typhimurium A1-R. Various routes of administration of S. typhimurium A1-R are described with the advantages and disadvantages of each. Basic experiments to determine toxic effects of S. typhimurium A1-R are also described. Also described are methodologies for combining S. typhimurium A1-R and chemotherapy. The testing of S. typhimurium A1-R on patient tumors in patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse models is also described. The major methodologies described in this chapter should be translatable for clinical studies. PMID:26846809

  2. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting. PMID:26431498

  3. Efficacy of Tumor-Targeting Salmonella A1-R on a Melanoma Patient-Derived Orthotopic Xenograft (PDOX) Nude-Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mako; Zhao, Ming; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Shurell, Elizabeth; Eilber, Fritz C.; Bouvet, Michael; Noda, Makoto; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-targeting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium A1-R (Salmonella A1-R) had strong efficacy on a melanoma patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model. GFP-expressing Salmonella A1-R highly and selectively colonized the PDOX melanoma and significantly suppressed tumor growth (p = 0.021). The combination of Salmonella A1-R and cisplatinum (CDDP), both at low-dose, also significantly suppressed the growth of the melanoma PDOX (P = 0.001). Salmonella A1-R has future clinical potential for combination chemotherapy with CDDP of melanoma, a highly-recalcitrant cancer. PMID:27500926

  4. Comparison of the selective targeting efficacy of Salmonella typhimurium A1-R and VNP20009 on the Lewis lung carcinoma in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-06-10

    Salmonella typhimurium A1-R is auxotrophic for arg and leu, which attenuates growth in normal tissue but allows high tumor targeting and virulence. A1-R is effective against metastatic human prostate, breast, and pancreatic cancer as well as osteosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, and glioma in clinically-relevant mouse models. VNP20009 is also a genetically-modified strain of Salmonella typhimurium that has been tested in Phase I clinical trials, but is more attenuated than S. typhimurium A1-R and in addition of multiple amino-acid auxotrophs, is purine auxotropic with the purI mutation. In the present study, mouse Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing nude mouse models were treated with S. typhimurium A1-R or VNP20009. S. typhimurium A1-R and VNP20009 were both eliminated from the liver and spleen approximately 3-5 days after administration via the tail vein. However, A1-R showed higher tumor targeting and inhibited the Lewis lung carcinoma to a greater extent than VNP20009, with less body weight loss. The mice tolerated S. typhimurium A1-R to at a least 2-fold higher dose than VNP20009 when the bacteria were administered iv. The results of the present study suggest that S. typhimurium A1-R has greater clinical potential than VNP20009. PMID:25714030

  5. Therapeutic efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on human colorectal cancer liver metastasis in orthotopic nude-mouse models.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-10-13

    Liver metastasis is the most frequent cause of death from colon and other cancers. Generally, liver metastasis is recalcitrant to treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on liver metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used in the present study. S. typhimurium A1-R infected HT-29 cells in a time-dependent manner, inhibiting cancer-cell proliferation in vitro. S. typhimurium A1-R promoted tumor necrosis and inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model of HT-29-RFP. In orthotopic mouse models, S. typhimurium A1-R targeted liver metastases and significantly reduced their growth. The results of this study demonstrate the future clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of liver metastasis. PMID:26375054

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on human colorectal cancer liver metastasis in orthotopic nude-mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Liver metastasis is the most frequent cause of death from colon and other cancers. Generally, liver metastasis is recalcitrant to treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on liver metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used in the present study. S. typhimurium A1-R infected HT-29 cells in a time-dependent manner, inhibiting cancer-cell proliferation in vitro. S. typhimurium A1-R promoted tumor necrosis and inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model of HT-29-RFP. In orthotopic mouse models, S. typhimurium A1-R targeted liver metastases and significantly reduced their growth. The results of this study demonstrate the future clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of liver metastasis. PMID:26375054

  7. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in Combination with Trastuzumab Eradicates HER-2-Positive Cervical Cancer Cells in Patient-Derived Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Nan; Murakami, Takashi; Maawy, Ali; Mii, Sumiyuki; Uehara, Fuminari; Yamamoto, Mako; Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously developed mouse models of HER-2-positive cervical cancer. Tumors in nude mice had histological structures similar to the original tumor and were stained by anti-HER-2 antibody in the same pattern as the patient’s cancer. We have also previously developed tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R and have demonstrated its efficacy against patient-derived tumor mouse models, both alone and in combination. In the current study, we determined the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R in combination with trastuzumab on a patient-cancer nude-mouse model of HER-2 positive cervical cancer. Mice were randomized to 5 groups and treated as follows: (1) no treatment; (2) carboplatinum (30 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks); (3) trastuzumab (20 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks); (4) S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 107 CFU/body, ip, weekly, 5 weeks); (5) S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 107 CFU/body, ip, weekly, 5 weeks) + trastuzumab (20 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks). All regimens had significant efficacy compared to the untreated mice. The relative tumor volume of S. typhimurium A1-R + trastuzumab-treated mice was smaller compared to trastuzumab alone (p = 0.007) and S. typhimurium A1-R alone (p = 0.039). No significant body weight loss was found compared to the no treatment group except for carboplatinum-treated mice (p = 0.021). Upon histological examination, viable tumor cells were not detected, and replaced by stromal cells in the tumors treated with S. typhimurium A1-R + trastuzumab. The results of the present study suggest that S. typhimurium A1-R and trastuzumab in combination are highly effective against HER-2-expressing cervical cancer. PMID:26047477

  8. Physicochemical properties of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls aid in predicting their interactions with rat sulfotransferase 1A1 (rSULT1A1)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yungang; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Duffel, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxylated metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyls (OHPCBs) interact with rat sulfotransferase 1A1 (rSULT1A1) as substrates and inhibitors. Previous studies have shown that there are complex and incompletely understood structure-activity relationships governing the interaction of rSULT1A1 with these molecules. Furthermore, modification of the enzyme with glutathione disulfide (GSSG) results in the conversion of some OHPCBs from inhibitors to substrates. We have now examined estimated values for the acid-dissociation constant (Ka) and the octanol-water distribution coefficient (D), as well as experimentally determined dissociation constants for enzyme complexes, to assist in the prediction of interactions of OHPCBs with rSULT1A1. Under reducing conditions, initial velocities for rSULT1A1-catalyzed sulfation exhibited a positive correlation with pKa and a negative correlation with log D of the OHPCBs. IC50 values of inhibitory OHPCBs decreased with decreasing pKa values for both the glutathione (GSH)-pretreated and GSSG-pretreated forms of rSULT1A1. Comparison of GSH- and GSSG-pretreated forms of rSULT1A1 with respect to binding of OHPCB in the presence and absence of adenosine 3’,5’-diphosphate (PAP) revealed that the dissociation constants with the two redox states of the enzyme were similar for each OHPCB. Thus, pKa and log D values are useful in predicting the binding of OHPCBs to the two redox forms of rSULT1A1 as well as the rates of sulfation of those OHPCBs that are substrates. However, the differences in substrate specificity for OHPCBs that are seen with changes in redox status of the enzyme are not directly related to specific structural effects of individual OHPCBs within inhibitory enzyme-PAP-OHPCB complexes. PMID:21130751

  9. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in combination with doxorubicin eradicate soft tissue sarcoma in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takashi; DeLong, Jonathan; Eilber, Fritz C.; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Nan; Singh, Arun; Russell, Tara; Deng, Samantha; Reynoso, Jose; Quan, Cuong; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Chawla, Sant; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    A patient with high grade undifferentiated pleomorphic soft-tissue sarcoma from a striated muscle was grown orthotopically in the right biceps femoris muscle of mice to establish a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. Twenty PDOX mice were divided into 4 groups: G1, control without treatment; G2, Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium)A1-R administered by intratumoral (i.t.) injection once a week for 4 weeks; G3, doxorubicin (DOX) administered by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection once a week for 4 weeks; G4, S. typhimurium A1-R (i.t.) administered once a week for 2 weeks followed by i.p. doxorubicin once a week for 2 weeks. On day 25 from the initiation of treatment, tumor volume in G2, G3, and G4 was significantly lower than G1. Mice found without gross tumor included one mouse (20%) in G2; one mouse (20%) in G3; and 3 mice (60%) in G4. Body weight loss did not significantly differ between the 3 treated groups or from the untreated control. Histological examination revealed eradication of tumor only in G4 where mice were treated with S. typhimurium A1-R followed by DOX. Our present study indicates future clinical potential of combining S. typhimurium A1-R with chemotherapy such as DOX for soft tissue sarcoma patients. PMID:26859573

  10. Degradation of Swainsonine by the NADP-Dependent Alcohol Dehydrogenase A1R6C3 in Arthrobacter sp. HW08

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhai, A’guan; Zhang, Yanqi; Qiu, Kai; Wang, Jianhua; Li, Qinfan

    2016-01-01

    Swainsonine is an indolizidine alkaloid that has been found in locoweeds and some fungi. Our previous study demonstrated that Arthrobacter sp. HW08 or its crude enzyme extract could degrade swainsonie efficiently. However, the mechanism of swainsonine degradation in bacteria remains unclear. In this study, we used label-free quantitative proteomics method based on liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry to dissect the mechanism of swainsonine biodegradation by Arthrobacter sp. HW08. The results showed that 129 differentially expressed proteins were relevant to swainsonine degradation. These differentially expressed proteins were mostly related to the biological process of metabolism and the molecular function of catalytic activity. Among the 129 differentially expressed proteins, putative sugar phosphate isomerase/epimerase A1R5X7, Acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase A0JZ95, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase A1R6C3 were found to contribute to the swainsonine degradation. Notably, NADP-dependent alcohol dehyrodgenase A1R6C3 appeared to play a major role in degrading swainsonine, but not as much as Arthrobacter sp. HW08 did. Collectively, our findings here provide insights to understand the mechanism of swainsonine degradation in bacteria. PMID:27196926

  11. Hyperalgesia, anxiety, and decreased hypoxic neuroprotection in mice lacking the adenosine A1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B; Halldner, L; Dunwiddie, T V; Masino, S A; Poelchen, W; Giménez-Llort, L; Escorihuela, R M; Fernández-Teruel, A; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z; Xu, X J; Hårdemark, A; Betsholtz, C; Herlenius, E; Fredholm, B B

    2001-07-31

    Caffeine is believed to act by blocking adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)R, A(2A)R), indicating that some A(1) receptors are tonically activated. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the second coding exon of the A(1)R (A(1)R(-/-)). These animals bred and gained weight normally and had a normal heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature. In most behavioral tests they were similar to A(1)R(+/+) mice, but A(1)R(-/-) mice showed signs of increased anxiety. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices revealed that both adenosine-mediated inhibition and theophylline-mediated augmentation of excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission were abolished in A(1)R(-/-) mice. In A(1)R(+/-) mice the potency of adenosine was halved, as was the number of A(1)R. In A(1)R(-/-) mice, the analgesic effect of intrathecal adenosine was lost, and thermal hyperalgesia was observed, but the analgesic effect of morphine was intact. The decrease in neuronal activity upon hypoxia was reduced both in hippocampal slices and in brainstem, and functional recovery after hypoxia was attenuated. Thus A(1)Rs do not play an essential role during development, and although they significantly influence synaptic activity, they play a nonessential role in normal physiology. However, under pathophysiological conditions, including noxious stimulation and oxygen deficiency, they are important. PMID:11470917

  12. Adenosine A1 Receptor Suppresses Tonic GABAA Receptor Currents in Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells and in a Defined Subpopulation of Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Rombo, Diogo M; Dias, Raquel B; Duarte, Sofia T; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Lamsa, Karri P; Sebastião, Ana M

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous neuromodulator that decreases excitability of hippocampal circuits activating membrane-bound metabotropic A1 receptor (A1R). The presynaptic inhibitory action of adenosine A1R in glutamatergic synapses is well documented, but its influence on inhibitory GABAergic transmission is poorly known. We report that GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated tonic, but not phasic, transmission is suppressed by A1R in hippocampal neurons. Adenosine A1R activation strongly inhibits GABAAR agonist (muscimol)-evoked currents in Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neurons and in a specific subpopulation of interneurons expressing axonal cannabinoid receptor type 1. In addition, A1R suppresses tonic GABAAR currents measured in the presence of elevated ambient GABA as well as in naïve slices. The inhibition of GABAergic currents involves both protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways and decreases GABAAR δ-subunit expression. On the contrary, no A1R-mediated modulation was detected in phasic inhibitory postsynaptic currents evoked either by afferent electrical stimulation or by spontaneous quantal release. The results show that A1R modulates extrasynaptic rather than synaptic GABAAR-mediated signaling, and that this modulation selectively occurs in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and in a specific subpopulation of inhibitory interneurons. We conclude that modulation of tonic GABAAR signaling by adenosine A1R in specific neuron types may regulate neuronal gain and excitability in the hippocampus. PMID:25452570

  13. Efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in combination with anti-angiogenesis therapy on a pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) and cell line mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Maawy, Ali; Miwa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Mako; Yano, Shuya; Sato, Sho; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R treatment following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy on VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer. A pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) that was VEGF-positive and an orthotopic VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer cell line (MiaPaCa-2-GFP) as well as a VEGF-negative cell line (Panc-1) were tested. Nude mice with these tumors were treated with gemcitabine (GEM), bevacizumab (BEV), and S. typhimurium A1-R. BEV/GEM followed by S. typhimurium A1-R significantly reduced tumor weight compared to BEV/GEM treatment alone in the PDOX and MiaPaCa-2 models. Neither treatment was as effective in the VEGF-negative model as in the VEGF-positive models. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium A1-R following anti-angiogenic therapy is effective on pancreatic cancer including the PDOX model, suggesting its clinical potential. PMID:25402324

  14. The in vivo respiratory phenotype of the adenosine A1 receptor knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Heitzmann, Dirk; Buehler, Philipp; Schweda, Frank; Georgieff, Michael; Warth, Richard; Thomas, Joerg

    2016-02-01

    The nucleoside adenosine has been implicated in the regulation of respiration, especially during hypoxia in the newborn. In this study the role of adenosine A1 receptors for the control of respiration was investigated in vivo. To this end, respiration of unrestrained adult and neonatal adenosine A1 receptor knockout mice (A1R(-/-)) was measured in a plethysmographic device. Under control conditions (21% O2) and mild hypoxia (12-15% O2) no difference of respiratory parameters was observed between adult wildtype (A1R(+/+)) and A1R(-/-) mice. Under more severe hypoxia (6-10% O2) A1R(+/+) mice showed, after a transient increase of respiration, a decrease of respiration frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) leading to a decrease of minute volume (MV). This depression of respiration during severe hypoxia was absent in A1R(-/-) mice which displayed a stimulated respiration as indicated by the enhancement of MV by some 50-60%. During hypercapnia-hyperoxia (3-10% CO2/97-90 % O2), no obvious differences in respiration of A1R(-/-) and A1R(+/+) was observed. In neonatal mice, the respiratory response to hypoxia was surprisingly similar in both genotypes. However, neonatal A1R(-/-) mice appeared to have more frequently periods of apnea during hypoxia and in the post-hypoxic control period. In conclusion, these data indicate that the adenosine A1 receptor is an important molecular component mediating hypoxic depression in adult mice and it appears to stabilize respiration of neonatal mice. PMID:26593641

  15. Tumor-specific cell-cycle decoy by Salmonella typhimurium A1-R combined with tumor-selective cell-cycle trap by methioninase overcome tumor intrinsic chemoresistance as visualized by FUCCI imaging.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Zhao, Ming; Tan, Yuying; Han, Qinghong; Li, Shukuan; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-07-01

    We previously reported real-time monitoring of cell cycle dynamics of cancer cells throughout a live tumor intravitally using a fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI). Approximately 90% of cancer cells in the center and 80% of total cells of an established tumor are in G0/G1 phase. Longitudinal real-time FUCCI imaging demonstrated that cytotoxic agents killed only proliferating cancer cells at the surface and, in contrast, and had little effect on the quiescent cancer cells. Resistant quiescent cancer cells restarted cycling after the cessation of chemotherapy. Thus cytotoxic chemotherapy which targets cells in S/G2/M, is mostly ineffective on solid tumors, but causes toxic side effects on tissues with high fractions of cycling cells, such as hair follicles, bone marrow and the intestinal lining. We have termed this phenomenon tumor intrinsic chemoresistance (TIC). We previously demonstrated that tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) decoyed quiescent cancer cells in tumors to cycle from G0/G1 to S/G2/M demonstrated by FUCCI imaging. We have also previously shown that when cancer cells were treated with recombinant methioninase (rMETase), the cancer cells were selectively trapped in S/G2, shown by cell sorting as well as by FUCCI. In the present study, we show that sequential treatment of FUCCI-expressing stomach cancer MKN45 in vivo with S. typhimurium A1-R to decoy quiescent cancer cells to cycle, with subsequent rMETase to selectively trap the decoyed cancer cells in S/G2 phase, followed by cisplatinum (CDDP) or paclitaxel (PTX) chemotherapy to kill the decoyed and trapped cancer cells completely prevented or regressed tumor growth. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the praradigm of "decoy, trap and shoot" chemotherapy. PMID:27152859

  16. Mice lacking the adenosine A1 receptor have normal spatial learning and plasticity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, but they habituate more slowly.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Masino, Susan A; Diao, Lihong; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Tobeña, Adolf; Halldner, Linda; Fredholm, Bertil B

    2005-07-01

    Using mice with a targeted disruption of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R), we examined the role of A1Rs in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD), and memory formation. Recordings from the Shaffer collateral-CA1 pathway of hippocampal slices from adult mice showed no differences between theta burst and tetanic stimulation-induced LTP in adenosine A1 receptor knockout (A1R-/-), heterozygote (A1R+/-), and wildtype (A1R+/+) mice. However, paired pulse facilitation was impaired significantly in A1R-/- slices as compared to A1R+/+ slices. LTD in the CA1 region was unaffected by the genetic manipulation. The three genotypes showed similar memory acquisition patterns when assessed for spatial reference and working memory in the Morris water maze tasks at 9 months of age. However, 10 months later A1R-/- mice showed some deficits in the 6-arm radial tunnel maze test. The latter appeared, however, not due to memory deficits but to decreased habituation to the test environment. Taken together, we observe normal spatial learning and memory and hippocampal CA1 synaptic plasticity in adult adenosine A1R knockout mice, but find modifications in arousal-related processes, including habituation, in this knockout model. PMID:15858837

  17. Photoaffinity labeling of A1-adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.N.; Cristalli, G.; Grifantini, M.; Vittori, S.; Lohse, M.J.

    1985-11-25

    The ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling. A photolabile derivative of R-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, R-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine (R-AHPIA), has been synthesized as a covalent specific ligand for A1-adenosine receptors. In adenylate cyclase studies with membranes of rat fat cells and human platelets, R-AHPIA has adenosine receptor agonist activity with a more than 60-fold selectivity for the A1-subtype. It competes for (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding to A1-receptors of rat brain membranes with a Ki value of 1.6 nM. After UV irradiation, R-AHPIA binds irreversibly to the receptor, as indicated by a loss of (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding after extensive washing; the Ki value for this photoinactivation is 1.3 nM. The p-hydroxyphenyl substituent of R-AHPIA can be directly radioiodinated to give a photoaffinity label of high specific radioactivity ( SVI-AHPIA). This compound has a KD value of about 1.5 nM as assessed from saturation and kinetic experiments. Adenosine analogues compete for SVI-AHPIA binding to rat brain membranes with an order of potency characteristic for A1-adenosine receptors. Dissociation curves following UV irradiation at equilibrium demonstrate 30-40% irreversible specific binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that the probe is photoincorporated into a single peptide of Mr = 35,000. Labeling of this peptide can be blocked specifically and stereoselectively by adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists in a manner which is typical for the A1-subtype. The results indicate that SVI-AHPIA identifies the ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor, which is a peptide with Mr = 35,000.

  18. Adenosine A1 Receptors Selectively Modulate Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy at the Hyperoxic and Hypoxic Phases by Distinct Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuya; Li, Haiyan; Li, Bo; Zhong, Dingjuan; Gu, Xuejiao; Tang, Lingyun; Wang, Yanyan; Wang, Cun; Zhou, Rong; Li, Yan; He, Yan; Chen, Mozi; Huo, Yuqing; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We critically evaluated the role of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) in normal development of retinal vasculature and pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) by using the A1R knockout (KO) mice and oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model. Methods Mice deficient in A1Rs and their wild-type (WT) littermates were examined during normal postnatal development or after being subjected to 75% oxygen from postnatal day (P) 7 to P12 and to room air from P12 to P17 (OIR model of ROP). Retinal vascularization was examined by whole-mount fluorescence and cross-sectional hematoxylin-eosin staining. Cellular proliferation, astrocyte and microglial activation, and tip cell function were determined by isolectin staining and immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis was determined by TUNEL assay. Results Genetic deletion of the A1R did not affect normal retinal vascularization during postnatal development with indistinguishable three-layer vascularization patterns in retina between WT and A1R KO mice. In the OIR model, genetic deletion of the A1R resulted in stage-specific effects: reduced hyperoxia-induced retinal vaso-obliteration at P12, but reduced avascular area and attenuated hypoxia-induced intraretinal revascularization without affecting intravitreal neovascularization at P17 and reduced avascular areas in retina at P21. These distinct effects of A1Rs on OIR were associated with A1R control of apoptosis mainly in inner and outer nuclear layers at the vaso-obliterative phase (P12) and the growth of endothelium tip cells at the vasoproliferative phase (P17), without modification of cellular proliferation, astrocytic activation, and tissue inflammation. Conclusions Adenosine A1 receptor activity is not required for normal postnatal development of retinal vasculature but selectively controls hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration and hypoxia-driven revascularization by distinct cellular mechanisms. PMID:26720463

  19. Partial adenosine A1 receptor agonism: a potential new therapeutic strategy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Greene, Stephen J; Sabbah, Hani N; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A; Albrecht-Küpper, Barbara E; Düngen, Hans-Dirk; Dinh, Wilfried; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) represents a global public health and economic problem associated with unacceptable rates of death, hospitalization, and healthcare expenditure. Despite available therapy, HF carries a prognosis comparable to many forms of cancer with a 5-year survival rate of ~50%. The current treatment paradigm for HF with reduced ejection fraction (EF) centers on blocking maladaptive neurohormonal activation and decreasing cardiac workload with therapies that concurrently lower blood pressure and heart rate. Continued development of hemodynamically active medications for stepwise addition to existing therapies carries the risk of limited tolerability and safety. Moreover, this treatment paradigm has thus far failed for HF with preserved EF. Accordingly, development of hemodynamically neutral HF therapies targeting primary cardiac pathologies must be considered. In this context, a partial adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) agonist holds promise as a potentially hemodynamically neutral therapy for HF that could simultaneous improve cardiomyocyte energetics, calcium homeostasis, cardiac structure and function, and long-term clinical outcomes when added to background therapies. In this review, we describe the physiology and pathophysiology of HF as it relates to adenosine agonism, examine the existing body of evidence and biologic rationale for modulation of adenosine A1R activity, and review the current state of drug development of a partial A1R agonist for the treatment of HF. PMID:26701329

  20. ATP-Sensitive K+ Channels Regulate the Concentrative Adenosine Transporter CNT2 following Activation by A1 Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duflot, Sylvie; Riera, Bárbara; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Casadó, Vicent; Norman, Robert I.; Casado, F. Javier; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2004-01-01

    This study describes a novel mechanism of regulation of the high-affinity Na+-dependent adenosine transporter (CNT2) via the activation of A1 adenosine receptors (A1R). This regulation is mediated by the activation of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels. The high-affinity Na+-dependent adenosine transporter CNT2 and A1R are coexpressed in the basolateral domain of the rat hepatocyte plasma membrane and are colocalized in the rat hepatoma cell line FAO. The transient increase in CNT2-mediated transport activity triggered by (−)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine is fully inhibited by KATP channel blockers and mimicked by a KATP channel opener. A1R agonist activation of CNT2 occurs in both hepatocytes and FAO cells, which express Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1, SUR2A, and SUR2B mRNA channel subunits. With the available antibodies against Kir6.X, SUR2A, and SUR2B, it is shown that all of these proteins colocalize with CNT2 and A1R in defined plasma membrane domains of FAO cells. The extent of the purinergic modulation of CNT2 is affected by the glucose concentration, a finding which indicates that glycemia and glucose metabolism may affect this cross-regulation among A1R, CNT2, and KATP channels. These results also suggest that the activation of KATP channels under metabolic stress can be mediated by the activation of A1R. Cell protection under these circumstances may be achieved by potentiation of the uptake of adenosine and its further metabolization to ATP. Mediation of purinergic responses and a connection between the intracellular energy status and the need for an exogenous adenosine supply are novel roles for KATP channels. PMID:15024061

  1. Increased Signaling via Adenosine A1 Receptors, Sleep Deprivation, Imipramine, and Ketamine Inhibit Depressive-like Behavior via Induction of Homer1a.

    PubMed

    Serchov, Tsvetan; Clement, Hans-Willi; Schwarz, Martin K; Iasevoli, Felice; Tosh, Dilip K; Idzko, Marco; Jacobson, Kenneth A; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Normann, Claus; Biber, Knut; van Calker, Dietrich

    2015-08-01

    Major depressive disorder is among the most commonly diagnosed disabling mental diseases. Several non-pharmacological treatments of depression upregulate adenosine concentration and/or adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) in the brain. To test whether enhanced A1R signaling mediates antidepressant effects, we generated a transgenic mouse with enhanced doxycycline-regulated A1R expression, specifically in forebrain neurons. Upregulating A1R led to pronounced acute and chronic resilience toward depressive-like behavior in various tests. Conversely, A1R knockout mice displayed an increased depressive-like behavior and were resistant to the antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation (SD). Various antidepressant treatments increase homer1a expression in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Specific siRNA knockdown of homer1a in mPFC enhanced depressive-like behavior and prevented the antidepressant effects of A1R upregulation, SD, imipramine, and ketamine treatment. In contrast, viral overexpression of homer1a in the mPFC had antidepressant effects. Thus, increased expression of homer1a is a final common pathway mediating the antidepressant effects of different antidepressant treatments. PMID:26247862

  2. Increased Signaling via Adenosine A1 Receptors, Sleep Deprivation, Imipramine, and Ketamine Inhibit Depressive-like Behavior via Induction of Homer1a

    PubMed Central

    Serchov, Tsvetan; Clement, Hans-Willi; Schwarz, Martin K.; Iasevoli, Felice; Tosh, Dilip K.; Idzko, Marco; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Normann, Claus; Biber, Knut; van Calker, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Major depressive disorder is among the most commonly diagnosed disabling mental diseases. Several non-pharmacological treatments of depression upregulate adenosine concentration and/or adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) in the brain. To test whether enhanced A1R signaling mediates antidepressant effects, we generated a transgenic mouse with enhanced doxycycline-regulated A1R expression, specifically in forebrain neurons. Upregulating A1R led to pronounced acute and chronic resilience toward depressive-like behavior in various tests. Conversely, A1R knockout mice displayed an increased depressive-like behavior and were resistant to the antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation (SD). Various antidepressant treatments increase homer1a expression in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Specific siRNA knockdown of homer1a in mPFC enhanced depressive-like behavior and prevented the antidepressant effects of A1R upregulation, SD, imipramine, and ketamine treatment. In contrast, viral overexpression of homer1a in the mPFC had antidepressant effects. Thus, increased expression of homer1a is a final common pathway mediating the antidepressant effects of different antidepressant treatments. PMID:26247862

  3. Adenosine A1 Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of AMPA Receptors Contributes to Impairments in Long-Term Potentiation (LTP) in the Middle-Aged Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhicheng; Stockwell, Jocelyn; Cayabyab, Francisco S

    2016-05-01

    Aging causes multiple changes in the mammalian brain, including changes in synaptic signaling. Previous reports have shown increased extracellular adenosine in the aging brain, and we recently reported that activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) induces AMPA receptor (AMPAR) internalization in rat hippocampus. This study investigated whether aging-related changes in the rat hippocampus include altered surface expression of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, and whether these changes correspond to changes in AMPAR surface expression and altered synaptic plasticity. We found reduced A1R surface expression in middle-aged rat hippocampus, and also reduced GluA1 and GluA2 AMPAR subunit surface expression. Using a chemically-induced LTP (cLTP) experimental protocol, we recorded fEPSPs in young (1 month old) and middle-aged (7-12 month old) rat hippocampal slices. There were significant impairments in cLTP in middle-aged slices, suggesting impaired synaptic plasticity. Since we previously showed that the A1R agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) reduced both A1Rs and GluA2/GluA1 AMPARs, we hypothesized that the observed impaired synaptic plasticity in middle-aged brains is regulated by A1R-mediated AMPAR internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Following cLTP, we found a significant increase in GluA1 and GluA2 surface expression in young rats, which was blunted in middle-aged brains or in young brains pretreated with CPA. Blocking A1Rs with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine or AMPAR endocytosis with either Tat-GluA2-3Y peptide or dynasore (dynamin inhibitor) similarly enhanced AMPAR surface expression following cLTP. These data suggest that age-dependent alteration in adenosine receptor expression contributes to increased AMPAR endocytosis and impaired synaptic plasticity in aged brains. PMID:26700433

  4. Adenosine A1, but not A2, receptor blockade increases anxiety and arousal in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Maximino, Caio; Lima, Monica G; Olivera, Karen R M; Picanço-Diniz, Domingos L W; Herculano, Anderson M

    2011-09-01

    Adenosinergic systems have been implicated in anxiety-like states, as caffeine can induce a state of anxiety in human beings. Caffeine is an antagonist at A(1) and A(2) adenosine receptors but it remains unclear whether anxiety is mediated by one or both of these. As the adenosinergic system is rather conserved, we opted to pursue these questions using zebrafish, a widely used model organism in genetics and developmental biology. Zebrafish adenosine 1. 2A.1 and 2A.2 receptors conserve histidine residues in TM6 and TM7 that are responsible for affinity in bovine A1 receptor. We investigated the effects of caffeine, PACPX (an A(1) receptor antagonist) and 1,3-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX) (an A(2) receptor antagonist) on anxiety-like behaviour and locomotor activity of zebrafish in the scototaxis test as well as evaluated the effects of these drugs on pigment aggregation. Caffeine increased anxiety at the dose of 100 mg/kg, while locomotion at the dose of 10 mg/kg was increased. Both doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg induced pigment aggregation. PACPX, on the other hand, increased anxiety at a dose of 6 mg/kg and induced pigment aggregation at the doses of 0.6 and 6 mg/kg, but did not produce a locomotor effect. DMPX, in turn, increased locomotion at the dose of 6 mg/kg but did not produce any effect on pigment aggregation or anxiety-like behaviour. These results indicate that blockade of A(1)-R, but not A(2)-R, induces anxiety and autonomic arousal, while the blockade of A(2)-R induces hyperlocomotion. Thus, as in rodents, caffeine's anxiogenic and arousing effects are probably mediated by A(1) receptors in zebrafish and its locomotor activating effect is probably mediated by A(2) receptors. PMID:21496211

  5. The Heat Shock Cognate Protein hsc73 Assembles with A1 Adenosine Receptors To Form Functional Modules in the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sarrió, Sara; Casadó, Vicent; Escriche, Marisol; Ciruela, Francisco; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    A1 adenosine receptors (A1Rs) are G protein-coupled heptaspanning receptors that interact at the outer face of the plasma membrane with cell surface ecto-adenosine deaminase (ecto-ADA). By affinity chromatography the heat shock cognate protein hsc73 was identified as a cytosolic component able to interact with the third intracellular loop of the receptor. As demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance, purified A1Rs interact specifically with hsc73 with a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range (0.5 ± 0.1 nM). The interaction between hsc73 and A1R led to a marked reduction in the binding of the ligands and prevented activation of G proteins, as deduced from 35S-labeled guanosine-5′-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding assays. Interestingly this effect was stronger than that exerted by guanine nucleotide analogs, which uncouple receptors from G proteins, and was completely prevented by ADA. As assessed by immunoprecipitation a high percentage of A1Rs in cell lysates are coupled to hsc73. A relatively high level of colocalization between A1R and hsc73 was detected in DDT1MF-2 cells by means of confocal microscopy, and no similar results were obtained for other G protein-coupled receptors. Colocalization between hsc73 and A1R was detected in specific regions of rat cerebellum and in the body of cortical neurons but not in dendrites or synapses. Remarkably, agonist-induced receptor internalization leads to the endocytosis of A1Rs by two qualitatively different vesicle types, one in which A1R and hsc73 colocalize and another in which hsc73 is absent. These results open the interesting possibility that signaling via G protein-coupled receptors may be regulated by heat shock proteins. PMID:10866672

  6. Expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide, adenosine A2a receptor and adenosine A1 receptor in experiment rat migraine models

    PubMed Central

    LU, WENXIAN; LI, BIN; CHEN, JINBO; SU, YIPENG; DONG, XIAOMENG; SU, XINYANG; GAO, LIXIANG

    2016-01-01

    A migraine is a disabling neurovascular disorder characterized by a unilateral throbbing headache that lasts from 4 to 72 h. The headache is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, phonophobia and photophobia, and may be worsened by physical exercise. The trigeminovascular system (TVS) is speculated to have an important role in migraines, although the pathophysiology of this disorder remains to be elucidated. Trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) are important components of the TVS. Several clinical cases have provided evidence for the involvement of the brainstem in migraine initiation. Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (ESTG) in rats can activate TVS during a migraine attack. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is an important vasoactive compound produced following TVS activation. Numerous studies have revealed that adenosine and its receptors have an important role in pain transmission and regulation process. However, only a few studies have examined whether adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) and adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) are involved in migraine and nociceptive pathways. In the present study, CGRP, A2aR and A1R expression levels were detected in the TG and TNC of ESTG models through reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Tianshu capsule (TSC), a type of Chinese medicine, was also used in the ESTG rat models to examine its influence on the three proteins. Results demonstrated that CGRP, A2aR and A1R mediated pain transmission and the regulation process during migraine and the expression of the three proteins was regulated by TSC. PMID:26998280

  7. Current status of A1 adenosine receptor allosteric enhancers.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Moorman, Allan R; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is an ubiquitous nucleoside involved in various physiological and pathological functions by stimulating A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). Allosteric enhancers to A1ARs may represent novel therapeutic agents because they increase the activity of these receptors by mediating a shift to their active form in the A1AR-G protein ternary complex. In this manner, they are able to amplify the action of endogenous adenosine, which is produced in high concentrations under conditions of metabolic stress. A1AR allosteric enhancers could be used as a justifiable alternative to the exogenous agonists that are characterized by receptor desensitization and downregulation. In this review, an analysis of some of the most interesting allosteric modulators of A1ARs has been reported. PMID:26144263

  8. Alterations of adenosine A1 receptors in morphine dependence.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Leite-Morris, K A; Sears, M T

    1994-09-19

    The possibility that central adenosine A1 and A2a receptors mediate opiate dependence was examined in morphine-treated mice using radioligand binding methods. Mice treated with morphine for 72 h demonstrated significant increases in naloxone precipitated abstinence behaviors of jumping, wet-dog shakes, teeth chattering, forepaw trends, forepaw tremors and diarrhea compared to vehicle-treated mice. Increased concentrations of cortical adenosine A1 receptor sites, but not striatal adenosine A2a sites, were found in saturation binding studies from morphine-dependent mice. Decreases in cortical A1 agonist binding affinity values along with increases in agonist binding sites were demonstrated in competition binding studies. These results suggest that adaptive changes of upregulation and sensitization of adenosine A1 receptors play a role in mediating the opiate abstinence syndrome. PMID:7820640

  9. Adenosine A1 receptors mediate the intracisternal injection of orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Miyagishi, Saori; Ohhira, Masumi

    2016-03-15

    We have recently demonstrated that orexin acts centrally through the brain orexin 1 receptors to induce an antinociceptive action against colonic distension in conscious rats. Adenosine signaling is capable of inducing an antinociceptive action against somatic pain; however, the association between changes in the adenosinergic system and visceral pain perception has not been investigated. In the present study, we hypothesized that the adenosinergic system may be involved in visceral nociception, and thus, adenosine signaling may mediate orexin-induced visceral antinociception. Visceral sensation was evaluated based on the colonic distension-induced abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in conscious rats. Subcutaneous (0.04-0.2mg/rat) or intracisternal (0.8-4μg/rat) injection of N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), an adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) agonist, increased the threshold volume of colonic distension-induced AWR in a dose-dependent manner, thereby suggesting that CPA acts centrally in the brain to induce an antinociceptive action against colonic distension. Pretreatment with theophylline, an adenosine antagonist, or 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine, an A1R antagonist, subcutaneously injected potently blocked the centrally injected CPA- or orexin-A-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension. These results suggest that adenosinergic signaling via A1Rs in the brain induces visceral antinociception and that adenosinergic signaling is involved in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension. PMID:26944127

  10. Structure of the BoNT/A1--receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Roger M; Frey, Daniel; Wieser, Mara M; Thieltges, Katherine M; Jaussi, Rolf; Capitani, Guido; Kammerer, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A causes botulism but is also used for medical and cosmetic applications. A detailed molecular understanding of BoNT/A--host receptor interactions is therefore fundamental for improving current clinical applications and for developing new medical strategies targeting human disorders. Towards this end, we recently solved an X-ray crystal structure of BoNT/A1 in complex with its neuronal protein receptor SV2C. Based on our findings, we discuss the potential implications for BoNT/A function. PMID:26260692

  11. Central or peripheral delivery of an adenosine A1 receptor agonist improves mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Katz, N K; Ryals, J M; Wright, D E

    2015-01-29

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8 weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of

  12. Astrocyte-derived Adenosine and A1 Receptor Activity Contribute to Sleep Loss-Induced Deficits in Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Memory in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Florian, Cédrick; Vecsey, Christopher G.; Halassa, Michael M.; Haydon, Philip G.; Abel, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) can have a negative impact on cognitive function, but the mechanism(s) by which SD modulates memory remain unclear. We have previously shown that astrocyte-derived adenosine is a candidate molecule involved in the cognitive deficits following a brief period of SD (Halassa et al., 2009). In this study, we examined whether genetic disruption of SNARE-dependent exocytosis in astrocytes (dnSNARE mice) or pharmacological blockade of A1 receptor signaling using an adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (CPT) could prevent the negative effects of 6 hours of SD on hippocampal late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and hippocampus-dependent spatial object recognition memory. We found that SD impaired L-LTP in wild-type mice but not in dnSNARE mice. Similarly, this deficit in L-LTP resulting from SD was prevented by a chronic infusion of CPT. Consistent with these results, we found that hippocampus-dependent memory deficits produced by SD were rescued in dnSNARE mice and CPT-treated mice. These data provide the first evidence that astrocytic ATP and adenosine A1R activity contribute to the effects of SD on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent memory, and suggest a new therapeutic target to reverse the hippocampus-related cognitive deficits induced by sleep loss. PMID:21562257

  13. Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) as a new approach to determine a ligand's kinetic profile. A case in point for the adenosine A1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lizi; de Vries, Henk; IJzerman, Ad P; Heitman, Laura H

    2016-03-01

    Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) is a radio-isotopic technology format used to measure a wide range of biological interactions, including drug-target binding affinity studies. The assay is homogeneous in nature, as it relies on a "mix and measure" format. It does not involve a filtration step to separate bound from free ligand as is the case in a traditional receptor-binding assay. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it has been shown that optimal binding kinetics, next to a high affinity of a ligand, can result in more desirable pharmacological profiles. However, traditional techniques to assess kinetic parameters tend to be cumbersome and laborious. We thus aimed to evaluate whether SPA can be an alternative platform for real-time receptor-binding kinetic measurements on GPCRs. To do so, we first validated the SPA technology for equilibrium binding studies on a prototypic class A GPCR, the human adenosine A1 receptor (hA1R). Differently to classic kinetic studies, the SPA technology allowed us to study binding kinetic processes almost real time, which is impossible in the filtration assay. To demonstrate the reliability of this technology for kinetic purposes, we performed the so-called competition association experiments. The association and dissociation rate constants (k on and k off) of unlabeled hA1R ligands were reliably and quickly determined and agreed very well with the same parameters from a traditional filtration assay performed simultaneously. In conclusion, SPA is a very promising technique to determine the kinetic profile of the drug-target interaction. Its robustness and potential for high-throughput may render this technology a preferred choice for further kinetic studies. PMID:26647040

  14. Dual blockade of the A1 and A2A adenosine receptor prevents amyloid beta toxicity in neuroblastoma cells exposed to aluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Giunta, Salvatore; Andriolo, Violetta; Castorina, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    In a previous work we have shown that exposure to aluminum (Al) chloride (AlCl3) enhanced the neurotoxicity of the amyloid beta(25-35) fragment (Abeta(25-35)) in neuroblastoma cells and affected the expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related genes. Caffein, a compound endowed with beneficial effects against AD, exerts neuroprotection primarily through its antagonist activity on A2A adenosine receptors (A2AR), although it also inhibits A1Rs with similar potency. Still, studies on the specific involvement of these receptors in neuroprotection in a model of combined neurotoxicity (Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3) are missing. To address this issue, cultured SH-SY5Y cells exposed to Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3 were assessed for cell viability, morphology, intracellular ROS activity and expression of apoptosis-, stress- and AD-related proteins. To define the role of A1R and A2ARs, pretreatment with caffein, specific receptor antagonists (DPCPX or SCH58261) or siRNA-mediated gene knockdown were delivered. Results indicate that AlCl3 treatment exacerbated Abeta(25-35) toxicity, increased ROS production, lipid peroxidation, β-secretase-1 (BACE1) and amyloid precursor protein (APP). Interestingly, SCH58261 successfully prevented toxicity associated to Abeta(25-35) only, whereas pretreatment with both DPCPX and SCH58261 was required to fully avert Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3-induced damage, suggesting that A1Rs might also be critically involved in protection during combined toxicity. The effects of caffein were mimicked by both N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, and desferrioxamine, likely acting through distinct mechanisms. Altogether, our data establish a novel protective function associated with A1R inhibition in the setting of combined Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3 neurotoxicity, and expand our current knowledge on the potential beneficial role of caffein to prevent AD progression in subjects environmentally exposed to aluminum. PMID:25058312

  15. Cloning, expression and pharmacological characterization of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hill, R J; Oleynek, J J; Hoth, C F; Kiron, M A; Weng, W; Wester, R T; Tracey, W R; Knight, D R; Buchholz, R A; Kennedy, S P

    1997-01-01

    The role of adenosine A1 and A3 receptors in mediating cardioprotection has been studied predominantly in rabbits, yet the pharmacological characteristics of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptor subtypes are unknown. Thus, the rabbit adenosine A3 receptor was cloned and expressed, and its pharmacology was compared with that of cloned adenosine A1 receptors. Stable transfection of rabbit A1 or A3 cDNAs in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells resulted in high levels of expression of each of the receptors, as demonstrated by high-affinity binding of the A1/A3 adenosine receptor agonist N6-(4-amino-3-[125I]iodobenzyl)adenosine (125I-ABA). For both receptors, binding of 125I-ABA was inhibited by the GTP analog 5'-guanylimidodiphosphate, and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation was inhibited by the adenosine receptor agonist (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine. The rank orders of potency of adenosine receptor agonists for inhibition of 125I-ABA binding were as follows: rabbit A1, N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > or = I-ABA > or = N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine > > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine; rabbit A3, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > or = I-ABA > > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine = N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist rank orders were as follow: rabbit A1, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > 1,3- dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = xanthine amine congener > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline; rabbit A3, xanthine amine congener > 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline. These observations confirm the identity of the expressed proteins as A1 and A3 receptors. The results will facilitate further in-depth studies of the roles of A1 and A3 receptors in

  16. Vitamin D receptor regulation of the steroid/bile acid sulfotransferase SULT2A1.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Bandana; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Song, Chung Seog

    2005-01-01

    SULT2A1 is a sulfo-conjugating phase II enzyme expressed at very high levels in the liver and intestine, the two major first-pass metabolic tissues, and in the steroidogenic adrenal tissue. SULT2A1 acts preferentially on the hydroxysteroids dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone/dihydrotestosterone, and pregnenolone and on cholesterol-derived amphipathic sterol bile acids. Several therapeutic drugs and other xenobiotics, which include xenoestrogens, are also sulfonated by this cytosolic steroid/bile acid sulfotransferase. Nonsteroid nuclear receptors with key roles in the metabolism and detoxification of endobiotics and xenobiotics, such as bile acid-activated farnesoid X receptor, xenobiotic-activated pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor, and lipid-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, mediate transcription induction of SULT2A1 in the enterohepatic system. The ligand-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR) is another nuclear receptor that stimulates SULT2A1 transcription, and the regulatory elements in human, mouse, and rat promoters directing this induction have been characterized. Given that bile acid sulfonation is catalyzed exclusively by SULT2A1 and that the 3alpha-sulfate of the highly toxic lithocholic acid is a major excretory metabolite in humans, we speculate that a role for the VDR pathway in SULT2A1 expression may have emerged to shield first-pass tissues from the cytotoxic effects of a bile acid overload arising from disrupted sterol homeostasis triggered by endogenous and exogenous factors. PMID:16399349

  17. Improvement of Cold Tolerance by Selective A1 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T. F.; Li, D. J.; Jacobson, K. A.; Wang, L. C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Previously we have shown that the improvement of cold tolerance by theophylline is due to antagonism at adenosine receptors rather than inhibition of phosphodiesterase. Since theophylline is a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist for both A1 and A2 receptors, the present study investigated the adenosine receptor subtype involved in theophylline’s action. Acute systemic injection of selective A1 receptor antagonists (1,3-dialkyl-8-aryl or 1,3-dialkyl-8-cyclopentyl xanthine derivatives) significantly increased both the total and maximal heat production as well as cold tolerance. In contrast, injection of a relatively selective A2 receptor antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (compound No. 19), failed to significantly alter the thermogenic response of the rat under cold exposure. Further, the relative effectiveness of these compounds in increasing total thermogenesis was positively correlated with their potency in blocking the A1 adenosine receptor (r= .52, p<0.01), but not in A2 adenosine receptor (r= .20, p<0.2). It is likely that the thermally beneficial effects of adenosine A1 antagonists are due to their attenuation of the inhibitory effects of endogenously released adenosine on lipolysis and glucose utilization, resulting in increased substrate mobilization and utilization for enhanced thermogenesis. PMID:2263650

  18. BLOCKAGE OF A-1 ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR INHIBOTS HEPATIC DNA SYNTHESIS STIMULATED BY TUMOR PROMOTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies with regenerating liver and hepatocyte cultures have shown that the a-1 adrenergic receptor (A1AR) is involved in the early events which transmit a mitogenic signal to hepatocytes after 2/3 partial hepatectomy. n this study, we investigated the role of A1AR in DNA synthes...

  19. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-Il; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y L; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ-binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism. PMID:26348907

  20. Kidney-specific reconstitution of the A1 adenosine receptor in A1 adenosine receptor knockout mice reduces renal ischemia–reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjae; Chen, Sean W.C.; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Yang, Jay; Lee, H. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Genetic deletion of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) increased renal injury following ischemia-reperfusion injury suggesting that receptor activation is protective in vivo. Here we tested this hypothesis by expressing the human-A1AR in A1AR knockout mice. Renal ischemia-reperfusion was induced in knockout mice 2 days after intrarenal injection of saline or a lentivirus encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or EGFP-human-A1AR. We found that the latter procedure induced a robust expression of the reporter protein in the kidneys of knockout mice. Mice with kidney-specific human-A1AR reconstitution had significantly lower plasma creatinine, tubular necrosis, apoptosis, and tubular inflammation as evidenced by decreased leukocyte infiltration, pro-inflammatory cytokine, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in the kidney following injury compared to mice injected with saline or the control lentivirus. Additionally, there were marked disruptions of the proximal tubule epithelial filamentous (F)-actin cytoskeleton in both sets of control mice upon renal injury, whereas the reconstituted mice had better preservation of the renal tubule actin cytoskeleton, which co-localized with the human-A1ARs. Consistent with reduced renal injury, there was a significant increase in heat shock protein-27 expression, also co-localizing with the preserved F-actin cytoskeleton. Our findings suggest that selective expression of cytoprotective A1ARs in the kidney can attenuate renal injury. PMID:19190680

  1. Adenosine A1 receptors heterodimerize with β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors creating novel receptor complexes with altered G protein coupling and signaling.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekera, P Charukeshi; Wan, Tina C; Gizewski, Elizabeth T; Auchampach, John A; Lasley, Robert D

    2013-04-01

    G protein coupled receptors play crucial roles in mediating cellular responses to external stimuli, and increasing evidence suggests that they function as multiple units comprising homo/heterodimers and hetero-oligomers. Adenosine and β-adrenergic receptors are co-expressed in numerous tissues and mediate important cellular responses to the autocoid adenosine and sympathetic stimulation, respectively. The present study was undertaken to examine whether adenosine A1ARs heterodimerize with β1- and/or β2-adrenergic receptors (β1R and β2R), and whether such interactions lead to functional consequences. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies with differentially epitope-tagged A1, β1, and β2 receptors transiently co-expressed in HEK-293 cells indicate that A1AR forms constitutive heterodimers with both β1R and β2R. This heterodimerization significantly influenced orthosteric ligand binding affinity of both β1R and β2R without altering ligand binding properties of A1AR. Receptor-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly increased in cells expressing A1AR/β1R and A1AR/β2R heteromers. β-Receptor-mediated cAMP production was not altered in A1AR/β1R expressing cells, but was significantly reduced in the A1AR/β2R cells. The inhibitory effect of the A1AR on cAMP production was abrogated in both A1AR/β1R and A1AR/β2R expressing cells in response to the A1AR agonist CCPA. Co-immunoprecipitation studies conducted with human heart tissue lysates indicate that endogenous A1AR, β1R, and β2R also form heterodimers. Taken together, our data suggest that heterodimerization between A1 and β receptors leads to altered receptor pharmacology, functional coupling, and intracellular signaling pathways. Unique and differential receptor cross-talk between these two important receptor families may offer the opportunity to fine-tune crucial signaling responses and development of more specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:23291003

  2. Adenosine A1 receptor inhibits postnatal neurogenesis and sustains astrogliogenesis from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Benito-Muñoz, Monica; Matute, Carlos; Cavaliere, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that activation of ATP P2X receptors during oxygen and glucose deprivation inhibits neuroblast migration and in vitro neurogenesis from the subventricular zone (SVZ). Here, we have studied the effects of adenosine, the natural end-product of ATP hydrolysis, in modulating neurogenesis and gliogenesis from the SVZ. We provide immunochemical, molecular and pharmacological evidence that adenosine via A1 receptors reduces neuronal differentiation of neurosphere cultures generated from postnatal SVZ. Furthermore, activation of A1 receptors induces downregulation of genes related to neurogenesis as demonstrated by gene expression analysis. Specifically, we found that A1 receptors trigger a signaling cascade that, through the release of IL10, turns on the Bmp2/SMAD pathway. Furthermore, activating A1 receptors in SVZ-neural progenitor cells inhibits neurogenesis and stimulates astrogliogenesis as assayed in vitro in neurosphere cultures and in vivo in the olfactory bulb. Together, these data indicate that adenosine acting at A1 receptors negatively regulates adult neurogenesis while promoting astrogliogenesis, and that this feature may be relevant to pathological conditions whereby purines are profusely released. GLIA 2016;64:1465-1478. PMID:27301342

  3. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  4. Association of adenosine receptor gene polymorphisms and in vivo adenosine A1 receptor binding in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Hohoff, Christa; Garibotto, Valentina; Elmenhorst, David; Baffa, Anna; Kroll, Tina; Hoffmann, Alana; Schwarte, Kathrin; Zhang, Weiqi; Arolt, Volker; Deckert, Jürgen; Bauer, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) and the interacting adenosine A2A receptors are implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders. Variants within the corresponding genes ADORA1 and ADORA2A were shown associated with pathophysiologic alterations, particularly increased anxiety. It is unknown so far, if these variants might modulate the A1AR distribution and availability in different brain regions. In this pilot study, the influence of ADORA1 and ADORA2A variants on in vivo A1AR binding was assessed with the A1AR-selective positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [(18)F]CPFPX in brains of healthy humans. Twenty-eight normal control subjects underwent PET procedures to calculate the binding potential BPND of [(18)F]CPFPX in cerebral regions and to assess ADORA1 and ADORA2A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) effects on regional BPND data. Our results revealed SNPs of both genes associated with [(18)F]CPFPX binding to the A1AR. The strongest effects that withstood even Bonferroni correction of multiple SNP testing were found in non-smoking subjects (N=22) for ADORA2A SNPs rs2236624 and rs5751876 (corr. Pall<0.05). SNP alleles previously identified at risk for increased anxiety like the rs5751876 T-allele corresponded to consistently higher A1AR availability in all brain regions. Our data indicate for the first time that variation of A1AR availability was associated with ADORA SNPs. The finding of increased A1AR availability in regions of the fear network, particularly in ADORA2A risk allele carriers, strongly warrants evaluation and replication in further studies including individuals with increased anxiety. PMID:24943643

  5. EphA2 Receptor Activation by Monomeric Ephrin-A1 on Supported Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Lin, Wan-Chen; Petit, Rebecca S.; Groves, Jay T.

    2011-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 interacts with its glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked ephrin-A1 ligand in a juxtacrine configuration. The soluble ephrin-A1 protein, without its GPI membrane linker, fails to activate EphA2. However, preclustered ephrin-A1 protein is active in solution and has been frequently used to trigger the EphA2 receptor. Although this approach has yielded insights into EphA2 signaling, preclustered ligands bypass natural receptor clustering processes and thus mask any role of clustering as a signal regulatory mechanism. Here, we present EphA2-expressing cells with a fusion protein of monomeric ephrin-A1 (mEA1) and enhanced monomeric yellow fluorescent protein that is linked to a supported lipid bilayer via a nickel-decahistidine anchor. The mEA1 is homogeneously dispersed, laterally mobile, and monomeric as measured by fluorescence imaging, correlation spectroscopy, and photon counting histogram analysis, respectively. Ephrin-A1 presented in this manner activates EphA2 on the surface of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, as measured by EphA2 phosphorylation and degradation. Spatial mutation experiments in which nanopatterns on the underlying substrate restrict mEA1 movement in the supported lipid bilayer reveal spatio-mechanical regulation of this signaling pathway, consistent with recently reported observations using a synthetically cross-linked ephrin-A1 dimer. PMID:22261062

  6. Characterization of agonist radioligand interactions with porcine atrial A1 adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Leid, M.; Schimerlik, M.I.; Murray, T.F.

    1988-09-01

    The agonist radioligand (-)-N6-(125I)-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyl-adenosine (( 125I)HPIA) was used to characterize adenosine recognition sites in porcine atrial membranes. (125I)HPIA showed saturable binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with a maximum binding capacity of 35 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein and an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.5 +/- 0.4 nM. Kinetic experiments were performed to address the molecular mechanism of (125I)HPIA binding in porcine atrial membranes. (125I)HPIA apparently interacts with the cardiac adenosine receptor in a simple bimolecular reaction. A kinetically derived (125I) HPIA dissociation constant (2.4 nM) was in good agreement with that parameter measured at equilibrium. Guanyl nucleotides negatively modulated (125I)HPIA binding by increasing its rate of dissociation. This finding is consonant with the formation of a ternary complex in porcine atrial membranes, consisting of ligand, receptor, and guanyl nucleotide-binding protein. Prototypic adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited specific binding in a manner consistent with the labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor. The results of these experiments suggest that the adenosine receptor present in porcine atrial membranes, as labeled by (125I)HPIA, is of the A1 subtype.

  7. S100A1 and Calmodulin Compete for the Same Binding Site on Ryanodine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nathan T.; Prosser, Benjamin L.; Varney, Kristen M.; Zimmer, Danna B.; Schneider, Martin F.; Weber, David J.

    2008-01-01

    In heart and skeletal muscle an S100 protein family member, S100A1, binds to the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and promotes Ca2+ release. Using competition binding assays, we further characterized this system in skeletal muscle and showed that Ca2+-S100A1 competes with Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) for the same binding site on RyR1. In addition, the NMR structure was determined for Ca2+-S100A1 bound to a peptide derived from this CaM/S100A1 binding domain, a region conserved in RyR1 and RyR2 and termed RyRP12 (residues 3616-3627 in human RyR1). Examination of the S100A1-RyRP12 complex revealed residues of the helical RyRP12 peptide (Lys-3616, Trp-3620, Lys-3622, Leu-3623, Leu-3624, and Lys-3626) that are involved in favorable hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions with Ca2+-S100A1. These same residues were shown previously to be important for RyR1 binding to Ca2+-CaM. A model for regulating muscle contraction is presented in which Ca2+-S100A1 and Ca2+-CaM compete directly for the same binding site on the ryanodine receptor. PMID:18650434

  8. Role of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Bharmal, N H; Leite-Morris, K A; Adams, W R

    1999-10-01

    The role of adenosine receptor-mediated signaling was examined in the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. CD-1 mice received a liquid diet containing ethanol (6.7%, v/v) or a control liquid diet that were abruptly discontinued after 14 days of treatment. Mice consuming ethanol showed a progressive increase in signs of intoxication throughout the drinking period. Following abrupt discontinuation of ethanol diet, mice demonstrated reversible signs of handling-induced hyperexcitability that were maximal between 5-8 h. Withdrawing mice received treatment with adenosine receptor agonists at the onset of peak withdrawal (5.5 h) and withdrawal signs were blindly rated (during withdrawal hours 6 and 7). Adenosine A1-receptor agonist R-N6(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (0.15 and 0.3 mg/ kg) reduced withdrawal signs 0.5 and 1.5 h after drug administration in a dose-dependent fashion. Adenosine A2A-selective agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethyl-amino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.3 mg/kg) reduced withdrawal signs at both time points. In ethanol-withdrawing mice, there were significant decreases in adenosine transporter sites in striatum without changes in cortex or cerebellum. In ethanol-withdrawing mice, there were no changes in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor concentrations in cortex, striatum, or cerebellum. There appears to be a role for adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the treatment of the ethanol withdrawal syndrome. Published by Elsevier Science Inc. PMID:10548160

  9. Circadian rhythm in adenosine A1 receptor of mouse cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, C.; Rosati, A.M.; Traversa, U.; Vertua, R. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate diurnal variation in adenosine A1 receptors binding parameters, Bmax and Kd values of specifically bound N6-cyclohexyl-({sup 3}H)adenosine were determined in the cerebral cortex of mice that had been housed under controlled light-dark cycles for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found for Bmax values measured at 3-hr intervals across a 24-h period, with low Bmax values during the light period and high Bmax values during the dark period. The amplitude between 03.00 and 18.00 hr was 33%. No substantial rhythm was found in the Kd values. It is suggested that the changes in the density of A1 receptors could reflect a physiologically-relevant mechanism by which adenosine exerts its modulatory role in the central nervous system.

  10. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-05-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses. PMID:27091970

  11. Modulation of bladder function by luminal adenosine turnover and A1 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, H. Sandeep; Herrington, Heather; Roppolo, James R.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    The bladder uroepithelium transmits information to the underlying nervous and musculature systems, is under constant cyclical strain, expresses all four adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3), and is a site of adenosine production. Although adenosine has a well-described protective effect in several organs, there is a lack of information about adenosine turnover in the uroepithelium or whether altering luminal adenosine concentrations impacts bladder function or overactivity. We observed that the concentration of extracellular adenosine at the mucosal surface of the uroepithelium was regulated by ecto-adenosine deaminase and by equilibrative nucleoside transporters, whereas adenosine kinase and equilibrative nucleoside transporters modulated serosal levels. We further observed that enriching endogenous adenosine by blocking its routes of metabolism or direct activation of mucosal A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), a selective agonist, stimulated bladder activity by lowering the threshold pressure for voiding. Finally, CCPA did not quell bladder hyperactivity in animals with acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis but instead exacerbated their irritated bladder phenotype. In conclusion, we find that adenosine levels at both surfaces of the uroepithelium are modulated by turnover, that blocking these pathways or stimulating A1 receptors directly at the luminal surface promotes bladder contractions, and that adenosine further stimulates voiding in animals with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. PMID:22552934

  12. Paeoniflorin Promotes Non-rapid Eye Movement Sleep via Adenosine A1 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Rui; Sun, Yu; Luo, Yan-Jia; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Qu, Wei-Min; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin (PF, C23H28O11), one of the principal active ingredients of Paeonia Radix, exerts depressant effects on the central nervous system. We determined whether PF could modulate sleep behaviors and the mechanisms involved. Electroencephalogram and electromyogram recordings in mice showed that intraperitoneal PF administered at a dose of 25 or 50 mg/kg significantly shortened the sleep latency and increased the amount of non-rapid eye movement (NREM). Immunohistochemical study revealed that PF decreased c-fos expression in the histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN). The sleep-promoting effects and changes in c-fos induced by PF were reversed by 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (CPT), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, and PF-induced sleep was not observed in adenosine A1 receptor knockout mice. Whole-cell patch clamping in mouse brain slices showed that PF significantly decreased the firing frequency of histaminergic neurons in TMN, which could be completely blocked by CPT. These results indicate that PF increased NREM sleep by inhibiting the histaminergic system via A1 receptors. PMID:26491061

  13. The Second Extracellular Loop of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Mediates Activity of Allosteric Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Dylan P.; McRobb, Fiona M.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Purdy, Michael; Figler, Heidi; Marshall, Melissa A.; Chordia, Mahendra; Figler, Robert; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric enhancers of the adenosine A1 receptor amplify signaling by orthosteric agonists. Allosteric enhancers are appealing drug candidates because their activity requires that the orthosteric site be occupied by an agonist, thereby conferring specificity to stressed or injured tissues that produce adenosine. To explore the mechanism of allosteric enhancer activity, we examined their action on several A1 receptor constructs, including (1) species variants, (2) species chimeras, (3) alanine scanning mutants, and (4) site-specific mutants. These findings were combined with homology modeling of the A1 receptor and in silico screening of an allosteric enhancer library. The binding modes of known docked allosteric enhancers correlated with the known structure-activity relationship, suggesting that these allosteric enhancers bind to a pocket formed by the second extracellular loop, flanked by residues S150 and M162. We propose a model in which this vestibule controls the entry and efflux of agonists from the orthosteric site and agonist binding elicits a conformational change that enables allosteric enhancer binding. This model provides a mechanism for the observations that allosteric enhancers slow the dissociation of orthosteric agonists but not antagonists. PMID:24217444

  14. Staurosporine-induced apoptosis in astrocytes is prevented by A1 adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Ballerini, Patrizia; Nargi, Eleonora; Buccella, Silvana; Giuliani, Patricia; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Caciagli, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Renata

    2007-05-11

    Astrocyte apoptosis occurs in acute and chronic pathological processes at the central nervous system and the prevention of astrocyte death may represent an efficacious intervention in protecting neurons against degeneration. Our research shows that rat astrocyte exposure to 100 nM staurosporine for 3h caused apoptotic death accompanied by caspase-3, p38 mitogen-ed protein kinase (MAPK) and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) activation. N(6)-chlorocyclopentyladenosine (CCPA, 2.5-75 nM), a selective agonist of A(1) adenosine receptors, added to the cultures 1h prior to staurosporine, induced a dose-dependent anti-apoptotic effect, which was inhibited by the A(1) receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. CCPA also caused a dose- and time-dependent phosphorylation/activation of Akt, a downstream effector of cell survival promoting phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, which in turn led to inhibition of staurosporine-induced GSK3beta and p38 MAPK activity. Accordingly, the anti-apoptotic effect of CCPA was abolished by culture pre-treatment with LY294002, a selective PI3K inhibitor, pointing out the prevailing role played by PI3K pathway in the protective effect exerted by A(1) receptor activation. Since an abnormal p38 and GSK3beta activity is implicated in acute (stroke) and chronic (Alzheimer's disease) neurodegenerative diseases, the results of the present study provide a hint to better understand adenosine relevance in these disorders. PMID:17400382

  15. Orally Active Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonists with Antinociceptive Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Rittiner, Joseph E.; Randhawa, Amarjit S.; Coleman, Jennifer; Fitzpatrick, Brendan J.; Setola, Vincent; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.; Jin, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists have antinociceptive effects in multiple preclinical models of acute and chronic pain. Although numerous A1AR agonists have been developed, clinical applications of these agents have been hampered by their cardiovascular side effects. Herein we report a series of novel A1AR agonists, some of which are structurally related to adenosine 5′-monophosphate (5′-AMP), a naturally occurring nucleotide that itself activates A1AR. These novel compounds potently activate A1AR in several orthogonal in vitro assays and are subtype selective for A1AR over A2AAR, A2BAR, and A3AR. Among them, UNC32A (3a) is orally active and has dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in wild-type mice. The antinociceptive effects of 3a were completely abolished in A1AR knockout mice, revealing a strict dependence on A1AR for activity. The apparent lack of cardiovascular side effects when administered orally and high affinity (Ki of 36 nM for the human A1AR) make this compound potentially suitable as a therapeutic. PMID:22738238

  16. Basal Levels of AMPA Receptor GluA1 Subunit Phosphorylation at Threonine 840 and Serine 845 in Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babiec, Walter E.; Guglietta, Ryan; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluA1 subunits at two sites, serine 845 (S845) and threonine 840 (T840), is thought to be involved in NMDA receptor-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Importantly, the notion that dephosphorylation of these sites contributes to LTD assumes that a significant fraction of GluA1 subunits are…

  17. Chaperoning of the A1-adenosine receptor by endogenous adenosine - an extension of the retaliatory metabolite concept.

    PubMed

    Kusek, Justyna; Yang, Qiong; Witek, Martin; Gruber, Christian W; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cell-permeable orthosteric ligands can assist folding of G protein-coupled receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); this pharmacochaperoning translates into increased cell surface levels of receptors. Here we used a folding-defective mutant of human A1-adenosine receptor as a sensor to explore whether endogenously produced adenosine can exert a chaperoning effect. This A1-receptor-Y(288)A was retained in the ER of stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells but rapidly reached the plasma membrane in cells incubated with an A1 antagonist. This was phenocopied by raising intracellular adenosine levels with a combination of inhibitors of adenosine kinase, adenosine deaminase, and the equilibrative nucleoside transporter: mature receptors with complex glycosylation accumulated at the cell surface and bound to an A1-selective antagonist with an affinity indistinguishable from the wild-type A1 receptor. The effect of the inhibitor combination was specific, because it did not result in enhanced surface levels of two folding-defective human V2-vasopressin receptor mutants, which were susceptible to pharmacochaperoning by their cognate antagonist. Raising cellular adenosine levels by subjecting cells to hypoxia (5% O2) reproduced chaperoning by the inhibitor combination and enhanced surface expression of A1-receptor-Y(288)A within 1 hour. These findings were recapitulated for the wild-type A1 receptor. Taken together, our observations document that endogenously formed adenosine can chaperone its cognate A1 receptor. This results in a positive feedback loop that has implications for the retaliatory metabolite concept of adenosine action: if chaperoning by intracellular adenosine results in elevated cell surface levels of A1 receptors, these cells will be more susceptible to extracellular adenosine and thus more likely to cope with metabolic distress. PMID:25354767

  18. In Silico Adoption of an Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1

    PubMed Central

    Lanig, Harald; Reisen, Felix; Whitley, David; Schneider, Gisbert; Banting, Lee; Clark, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    A 4.1μs molecular dynamics simulation of the NR4A1 (hNur77) apo-protein has been undertaken and a previously undetected druggable pocket has become apparent that is located remotely from the ‘traditional’ nuclear receptor ligand-binding site. A NR4A1/bis-indole ligand complex at this novel site has been found to be stable over 1 μs of simulation and to result in an interesting conformational transmission to a remote loop that has the capacity to communicate with a NBRE within a RXR-α/NR4A1 heterodimer. Several features of the simulations undertaken indicate how NR4A1 can be affected by alternate-site modulators. PMID:26270486

  19. AMPAR interacting protein CPT1C enhances surface expression of GluA1-containing receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gratacòs-Batlle, Esther; Yefimenko, Natalia; Cascos-García, Helena; Soto, David

    2015-01-01

    AMPARs mediate the vast majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain and their biophysical and trafficking properties depend on their subunit composition and on several posttranscriptional and posttranslational modifications. Additionally, in the brain AMPARs associate with auxiliary subunits, which modify the properties of the receptors. Despite the abundance of AMPAR partners, recent proteomic studies have revealed even more interacting proteins that could potentially be involved in AMPAR regulation. Amongst these, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C) has been demonstrated to form an integral part of native AMPAR complexes in brain tissue extracts. Thus, we aimed to investigate whether CPT1C might be able to modulate AMPAR function. Firstly, we confirmed that CPT1C is an interacting protein of AMPARs in heterologous expression systems. Secondly, CPT1C enhanced whole-cell currents of GluA1 homomeric and GluA1/GluA2 heteromeric receptors. However, CPT1C does not alter the biophysical properties of AMPARs and co-localization experiments revealed that AMPARs and CPT1C are not associated at the plasma membrane despite a strong level of co-localization at the intracellular level. We established that increased surface GluA1 receptor number was responsible for the enhanced AMPAR mediated currents in the presence of CPT1C. Additionally, we revealed that the palmitoylable residue C585 of GluA1 is important in the enhancement of AMPAR trafficking to the cell surface by CPT1C. Nevertheless, despite its potential as a depalmitoylating enzyme, CPT1C does not affect the palmitoylation state of GluA1. To sum up, this work suggests that CPT1C plays a role as a novel regulator of AMPAR surface expression in neurons. Fine modulation of AMPAR membrane trafficking is fundamental in normal synaptic activity and in plasticity processes and CPT1C is therefore a putative candidate to regulate neuronal AMPAR physiology. PMID:25698923

  20. Histone acetylation regulates orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 expression in hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xina; Song, Xuhong; Yuan, Song; Cai, Haitao; Chen, Yequn; Chang, Xiaolan; Liang, Bin; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-12-01

    Hypercholesterolaemia and inflammation are correlated with atherogenesis. Orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1, as a key regulator of inflammation, is closely associated with lipid levels in vivo. However, the mechanism by which lipids regulate NR4A1 expression remains unknown. We aimed to elucidate the underlying mechanism of NR4A1 expression in monocytes during hypercholesterolaemia, and reveal the potential role of NR4A1 in hypercholesterolaemia-induced circulating inflammation. Circulating leucocytes were collected from blood samples of 139 patients with hypercholesterolaemia and 139 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. We found that there was a low-grade inflammatory state and higher expression of NR4A1 in patients. Both total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in plasma were positively correlated with NR4A1 mRNA level. ChIP revealed that acetylation of histone H3 was enriched in the NR4A1 promoter region in patients. Human mononuclear cell lines THP-1 and U937 were treated with cholesterol. Supporting our clinical observations, cholesterol enhanced p300 acetyltransferase and decreased HDAC7 (histone deacetylase 7) recruitment to the NR4A1 promoter region, resulting in histone H3 hyperacetylation and further contributing to NR4A1 up-regulation in monocytes. Moreover, cytosporone B, an NR4A1 agonist, completely reversed cholesterol-induced IL-6 (interleukin 6) and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) expression to below basal levels, and knockdown of NR4A1 expression by siRNA not only mimicked, but also exaggerated the effects of cholesterol on inflammatory biomarker up-regulation. Thus we conclude that histone acetylation contributes to the regulation of NR4A1 expression in hypercholesterolaemia, and that NR4A1 expression reduces hypercholesterolaemia-induced inflammation. PMID:26396259

  1. S100A1 DNA-based Inotropic Therapy Protects Against Proarrhythmogenic Ryanodine Receptor 2 Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ritterhoff, Julia; Völkers, Mirko; Seitz, Andreas; Spaich, Kristin; Gao, Erhe; Peppel, Karsten; Pleger, Sven T; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Friedrich, Oliver; Fink, Rainer H A; Koch, Walter J; Katus, Hugo A; Most, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Restoring expression levels of the EF-hand calcium (Ca2+) sensor protein S100A1 has emerged as a key factor in reconstituting normal Ca2+ handling in failing myocardium. Improved sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function with enhanced Ca2+ resequestration appears critical for S100A1's cyclic adenosine monophosphate-independent inotropic effects but raises concerns about potential diastolic SR Ca2+ leakage that might trigger fatal arrhythmias. This study shows for the first time a diminished interaction between S100A1 and ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) in experimental HF. Restoring this link in failing cardiomyocytes, engineered heart tissue and mouse hearts, respectively, by means of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral S100A1 cDNA delivery normalizes diastolic RyR2 function and protects against Ca2+- and β-adrenergic receptor-triggered proarrhythmogenic SR Ca2+ leakage in vitro and in vivo. S100A1 inhibits diastolic SR Ca2+ leakage despite aberrant RyR2 phosphorylation via protein kinase A and calmodulin-dependent kinase II and stoichiometry with accessory modulators such as calmodulin, FKBP12.6 or sorcin. Our findings demonstrate that S100A1 is a regulator of diastolic RyR2 activity and beneficially modulates diastolic RyR2 dysfunction. S100A1 interaction with the RyR2 is sufficient to protect against basal and catecholamine-triggered arrhythmic SR Ca2+ leak in HF, combining antiarrhythmic potency with chronic inotropic actions. PMID:26005840

  2. The CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone exhibits estrogen receptor agonist activity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Capper, Cameron P; Larios, José M; Sikora, Matthew J; Johnson, Michael D; Rae, James M

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1) is the requisite enzyme for synthesis of sex steroids, including estrogens and androgens. As such, inhibition of CYP17A1 is a target for inhibiting the growth of hormone-dependent cancers including prostate and breast cancer. Abiraterone, is a first in class potent and selective CYP17A1 inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Given that, androgens are the precursors for estrogen production, it has been proposed that abiraterone could be an effective form of treatment for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, though its utility in this context has yet to be established. Abiraterone has a core steroid-like chemical structure, and so we hypothesized that it may bind to nuclear steroid receptors including ER and have estrogenic activity. We tested this hypothesis by investigating abiraterone's ability to directly modulate ER signaling in breast cancer cell line models. We show that abiraterone directly activates ER, induces ER-target gene expression, and elicits estrogen-response-element reporter activity in the ER-positive cell lines MCF-7 and T47D. Abiraterone also induced cell proliferation by ~2.5-fold over vehicle in both MCF-7 and T47D cells. Importantly, abiraterone-induced cell proliferation and ER-activity was blocked by the selective estrogen receptor downregulator (SERD) fulvestrant, confirming that abiraterone directly acts at the ER. These data suggest that abiraterone should be combined with other ER antagonists when used for the clinical management of ER-positive breast cancer. PMID:27083183

  3. Mass spectrometry-based ligand binding assays on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Massink, A; Holzheimer, M; Hölscher, A; Louvel, J; Guo, D; Spijksma, G; Hankemeier, T; IJzerman, A P

    2015-12-01

    Conventional methods to measure ligand-receptor binding parameters typically require radiolabeled ligands as probes. Despite the robustness of radioligand binding assays, they carry inherent disadvantages in terms of safety precautions, expensive synthesis, special lab requirements, and waste disposal. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a method that can selectively detect ligands without the need of a label. The sensitivity of MS equipment increases progressively, and currently, it is possible to detect low ligand quantities that are usually found in ligand binding assays. We developed a label-free MS ligand binding (MS binding) assay on the adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)AR and A(2A)AR), which are well-characterized members of the class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Radioligand binding assays for both receptors are well established, and ample data is available to compare and evaluate the performance of an MS binding assay. 1,3-Dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl-xanthine (DPCPX) and 4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol (ZM-241,385) are high-affinity ligands selective for the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, respectively. To proof the feasibility of MS binding on the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, we first developed an MS detection method for unlabeled DPCPX and ZM-241,385. To serve as internal standards, both compounds were also deuterium-labeled. Subsequently, we investigated whether the two unlabeled compounds could substitute for their radiolabeled counterparts as marker ligands in binding experiments, including saturation, displacement, dissociation, and competition association assays. Furthermore, we investigated the accuracy of these assays if the use of internal standards was excluded. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the MS binding assay, even in the absence of a deuterium-labeled internal standard, and provide great promise for the further development of label-free assays based on MS for other GPCRs. PMID

  4. Differences in adenosine A-1 and A-2 receptor density revealed by autoradiography in methylxanthine-sensitive and insensitive mice

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.F.; Williams, M.

    1988-07-01

    Two strains of inbred mice, CBA/J and SWR/J, have been identified which are, respectively, sensitive and insensitive to the behavioral and toxic effects of methylxanthines. Autoradiographic analyses of brain adenosine receptors were conducted with (/sup 3/H)CHA to label adenosine A-1 receptors and (/sup 3/H)NECA, in the presence of 50 nM CPA, to label adenosine A-2 receptors. For both mouse strains, adenosine A-1 receptors were most highly concentrated in the hippocampus and cerebellum whereas adenosine A-2 receptors were selectively localized in the striatum. CBA/J mice displayed a 30% greater density of adenosine A-1 receptors in the hippocampal CA-1 and CA-3 regions and in the cerebellum as compared to the SWR/J mice. The number of A-2 receptors (Bmax) was 40% greater in the striatum and olfactory tubercle of CBA/J as compared to SWR/J mice. No significant regional differences in A-1 or A-2 receptor affinities were observed between these inbred strains of mice. These results indicate that the differential sensitivity to methylxanthines between these mouse strains may reflect a genetically mediated difference in regional adenosine receptor densities.

  5. Sleep fragmentation impairs ventilatory long-term facilitation via adenosine A1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Michelle; Tartar, Jaime L; Cao, Ying; McCarley, Robert W; White, David P; Strecker, Robert E; Ling, Liming

    2008-01-01

    Sleep fragmentation (SF), a primary feature of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), impairs hippocampal long-term potentiation and causes cognitive/attention deficits. However, its influence upon respiratory control has hardly been studied. This study examined the effect of SF on ventilatory long-term facilitation (LTF, a persistent augmentation of respiratory activity after episodic hypoxia) and the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR), and investigated the role of adenosine A1 receptors in these SF effects in conscious adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. SF, confirmed by sleep architecture recordings, was achieved by periodic, forced locomotion in a rotating drum (30 s rotation/90 s stop for 24 h). LTF, elicited by five episodes of 5 min poikilocapnic hypoxia (10% O2) with 5 min intervals, was measured by plethysmography. Resting ventilation and metabolic rate were unchanged, HVR was reduced (150.6 ± 3.5%versus 110.4 ± 12.3%) and LTF was eliminated (22.6 ± 0.5%versus−0.1 ± 1.3%) shortly after 24 h SF. The SF-induced impairments were SF duration dependent, and completely reversible as HVR (< 24 h) and LTF (< 48 h) returned spontaneously to their pre-SF values. The SF-impaired HVR was improved (130.3 ± 4.2%) and SF-eliminated LTF was restored (19.6 ± 0.9%) by systemic injection of the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-CPT (2.5 mg kg−1) ∼30 min before LTF elicitation. Both HVR and LTF were also similarly impaired by 24 h total sleep deprivation or 24 h repeated cage tapping-induced SF, but not by a 24 h locomotion control protocol for SF. Collectively, these data suggest that: (1) 24 h SF impairs LTF and poikilocapnic HVR; (2) these impairments require A1 receptors; and (3) SF of OSA may exacerbate OSA via impaired ventilatory control mechanisms. PMID:18787037

  6. Harman induces CYP1A1 enzyme through an aryl hydrocarbon receptor mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    El Gendy, Mohamed A.M.; El-Kadi, Ayman O.S.

    2010-11-15

    Harman is a common compound in several foods, plants and beverages. Numerous studies have demonstrated its mutagenic, co-mutagenic and carcinogenic effects; however, the exact mechanism has not been fully identified. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor regulating the expression of the carcinogen-activating enzyme; cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). In the present study, we examined the ability of harman to induce AhR-mediated signal transduction in human and rat hepatoma cells; HepG2 and H4IIE cells. Our results showed that harman significantly induced CYP1A1 mRNA in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Similarly, harman significantly induced CYP1A1 at protein and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the AhR antagonist, resveratrol, inhibited the increase in CYP1A1 activity by harman. The RNA polymerase inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely abolished the CYP1A1 mRNA induction by harman, indicating a transcriptional activation. The role of AhR in CYP1A1 induction by harman was confirmed by using siRNA specific for human AhR. The ability of harman to induce CYP1A1 was strongly correlated with its ability to stimulate AhR-dependent luciferase activity and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. At post-transcriptional and post-translational levels, harman did not affect the stability of CYP1A1 at the mRNA and the protein levels, excluding other mechanisms participating in the obtained effects. We concluded that harman can directly induce CYP1A1 gene expression in an AhR-dependent manner and may represent a novel mechanism by which harman promotes mutagenicity, co-mutagenicity and carcinogenicity.

  7. Dimerization of the EphA1 receptor tyrosine kinase transmembrane domain: Insights into the mechanism of receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Chavent, Matthieu; Chetwynd, Alan P; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-10-28

    EphA1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that plays a key role in developmental processes, including guidance of the migration of axons and cells in the nervous system. EphA1, in common with other RTKs, contains an N-terminal extracellular domain, a single transmembrane (TM) α-helix, and a C-terminal intracellular kinase domain. The TM helix forms a dimer, as seen in recent NMR studies. We have modeled the EphA1 TM dimer using a multiscale approach combining coarse-grain (CG) and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The one-dimensional potential of mean force (PMF) for this system, based on interhelix separation, has been calculated using CG MD simulations. This provides a view of the free energy landscape for helix-helix interactions of the TM dimer in a lipid bilayer. The resulting PMF profiles suggest two states, consistent with a rotation-coupled activation mechanism. The more stable state corresponds to a right-handed helix dimer interacting via an N-terminal glycine zipper motif, consistent with a recent NMR structure (2K1K). A second metastable state corresponds to a structure in which the glycine zipper motif is not involved. Analysis of unrestrained CG MD simulations based on representative models from the PMF calculations or on the NMR structure reveals possible pathways of interconversion between these two states, involving helix rotations about their long axes. This suggests that the interaction of TM helices in EphA1 dimers may be intrinsically dynamic. This provides a potential mechanism for signaling whereby extracellular events drive a shift in the repopulation of the underlying TM helix dimer energy landscape. PMID:25286141

  8. Influence of metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists on the inhibitory effects of adenosine A1 receptor activation in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    de Mendonça, A; Ribeiro, J A

    1997-08-01

    1. Glutamate and other amino acids are the main excitatory neurotransmitters in many brain regions, including the hippocampus, by activating ion channel-coupled glutamate receptors, as well as metabotropic receptors linked to G proteins and second messenger systems. Several conditions which promote the release of glutamate, like frequency stimulation and hypoxia, also lead to an increase in the extracellular levels of the important neuromodulator, adenosine. We studied whether the activation of different subgroups of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) could modify the known inhibitory effects of a selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist on synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. The experiments were performed on hippocampal slices taken from young (12-14 days old) rats. Stimulation was delivered to the Schaffer collateral/commissural fibres, and evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fe. p.s.p.) recorded extracellularly from the stratum radiatum in the CAI area. 2. The concentration-response curve for the inhibitory effects of the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; 2-50 nM), on the fe.p.s.p. slope (EC50 = 12.5 (9.2-17.3; 95% confidence intervals)) was displaced to the right by the group I mGluR selective agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DPHG; 10 microM) (EC50 = 27.2 (21.4-34.5) nM, n = 4). The attenuation of the inhibitory effect of CPA (10 nM) on the fe.p.s.p. slope by DHPG (10 microM) was blocked in the presence of the mGluR antagonist (which blocks group I and II mGluR), (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG; 500 microM). DHPG (10 microM) itself had an inhibitory effect of 20.1 +/- 1.9% (n = 4) on the fe.p.s.p. slope. 3. The concentration-response curves for the inhibitory effects of CPA (2-20 nM) on the fe.p.s.p. slope were not modified either in the presence of the group II mGluR selective agonist, (2S,3S,4S)-alpha-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I; 1 microM), or in the presence of

  9. Influence of metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists on the inhibitory effects of adenosine A1 receptor activation in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    de Mendonça, Alexandre; Ribeiro, J A

    1997-01-01

    Glutamate and other amino acids are the main excitatory neurotransmitters in many brain regions, including the hippocampus, by activating ion channel-coupled glutamate receptors, as well as metabotropic receptors linked to G proteins and second messenger systems. Several conditions which promote the release of glutamate, like frequency stimulation and hypoxia, also lead to an increase in the extracellular levels of the important neuromodulator, adenosine. We studied whether the activation of different subgroups of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) could modify the known inhibitory effects of a selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist on synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. The experiments were performed on hippocampal slices taken from young (12–14 days old) rats. Stimulation was delivered to the Schaffer collateral/commissural fibres, and evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fe.p.s.p.) recorded extracellularly from the stratum radiatum in the CA1 area. The concentration-response curve for the inhibitory effects of the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; 2–50 nM), on the fe.p.s.p. slope (EC50=12.5 (9.2–17.3; 95% confidence intervals)) was displaced to the right by the group I mGluR selective agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DPHG; 10 μM) (EC50=27.2 (21.4–34.5) nM, n=4). The attenuation of the inhibitory effect of CPA (10 nM) on the fe.p.s.p. slope by DHPG (10 μM) was blocked in the presence of the mGluR antagonist (which blocks group I and II mGluR), (R,S)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG; 500 μM). DHPG (10 μM) itself had an inhibitory effect of 20.1±1.9% (n=4) on the fe.p.s.p. slope. The concentration-response curves for the inhibitory effects of CPA (2–20 nM) on the fe.p.s.p. slope were not modified either in the presence of the group II mGluR selective agonist, (2S,3S,4S)-α-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I; 1 μM), or in the presence of the non

  10. Caffeine-induced behavioral stimulation is dose-dependent and associated with A1 adenosine receptor occupancy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Greenblatt, D J; Kent, M A; Cotreau, M M; Arcelin, G; Shader, R I

    1992-05-01

    Caffeine's psychomotor stimulant effects may relate to its blockade of central adenosine receptors. We examined acute caffeine effects on motor activity, adenosine receptor occupancy in vivo, and receptor affinity and density ex vivo. Acute doses of caffeine-sodium benzoate (0, 20, 40, and 60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [0, 0.10, 0.21, 0.31 mu mol/kg]) were given to CD-1 mice and their activity was measured in an animal activity monitor over a 1-hour period. Adenosine receptor occupancy in vivo was quantified in mice 1 hour postdosage, using the high-affinity, A1 receptor selective adenosine antagonist [3H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. Adenosine receptor binding affinities and densities were determined from analyses of binding studies in cortical, hippocampal, and brainstem membranes from treated mice (0 and 40 mg/kg caffeine). Caffeine doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg, corresponding to mean brain concentrations of 5 and 17 micrograms/g, increased all horizontal and vertical motor activity measures and stereotypy counts, as compared to doses of 0 and 60 mg/kg. Additionally, all acute caffeine doses significantly altered specific A1 binding in vivo (decreasing binding between 55% and 73% versus vehicle), presumably as it occupied A1 receptors. Therefore, at doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg, caffeine stimulated motor activity as it occupied A1 receptors; at a dose of 60 mg/kg (mean brain concentration of 26 micrograms/g) caffeine had no stimulant effect even though it appeared to occupy A1 receptors. Acute caffeine dosage did not alter ex vivo adenosine receptor binding affinity or density in any brain regions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1599605

  11. Adenosine A1 Receptor Antagonist Versus Montelukast on Airway Reactivity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Obiefuna, Peter C.M.; Wilson, Constance N.; Mustafa, S. Jamal

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine produces bronchoconstriction in allergic rabbits, primates, and humans by activating adenosine A1 receptors. Previously, it is reported that a high dose of L-97-1, a water-soluble, small molecule adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, blocks early and late allergic responses, and bronchial hyper-responsiveness to histamine in a hyper-responsive rabbit model of allergic asthma. Effects of a lower dose of L-97-1 are compared to montelukast, a cysteinyl leukotriene-1 receptor antagonist on early allergic response, late allergic response, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, and inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid following house dust mite administration. Rabbits received intraperitoneal injections of house dust mite extract within 24 h of birth followed by booster house dust mite injections. Hyper-responsive rabbits received aerosolized house dust mite (2500 allergen units), 1 h after intragastric administration of L-97-1 (1 mg/kg) or montelukast (0.15 mg/kg) and lung dynamic compliance was measured for 6 h. Lung dynamic compliance was significantly higher following L-97-1 at all time points and with montelukast at 60-300 min following house dust mite (P < 0.05). L-97-1 blocks both early and late allergic responses. Montelukast blocks only the late allergic response. Both L-97-1 and montelukast significantly blocked bronchial hyper-responsiveness at 24 h (P < 0.05). Both L-97-1 and montelukast significantly reduced BAL eosinophils at 6 h and neutrophils at 6 and 24 h (P < 0.05). L-97-1 significantly reduced BAL lymphocytes at 6 and 24 h (P < 0.05). Montelukast significantly reduced BAL macrophages at 6 and 24 h (P < 0.05). By blocking both bronchoconstriction and airway inflammation, L-97-1 may be an effective oral anti-asthma treatment. PMID:17027749

  12. Effects of avian triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM-A1) activation on heterophil functional activites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel class of innate receptors called the triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) has been discovered and shown to be involved in innate inflammatory responses. The TREM family has been found in the chicken genome and consists of one activating gene (TREM-A1) and two inhibitory ge...

  13. Regulation of AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 surface expression by PAK3 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Natasha K.; Thomas, Gareth M.; Luo, Junjie; Huganir, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are the major excitatory receptors of the brain and are fundamental to synaptic plasticity, memory, and cognition. Dynamic recycling of AMPARs in neurons is regulated through several types of posttranslational modification, including phosphorylation. Here, we identify a previously unidentified signal transduction cascade that modulates phosphorylation of serine residue 863 (S863) in the GluA1 AMPAR subunit and controls surface trafficking of GluA1 in neurons. Activation of the EphR–Ephrin signal transduction pathway enhances S863 phosphorylation. Further, EphB2 can interact with Zizimin1, a guanine–nucleotide exchange factor that activates Cdc42 and stimulates S863 phosphorylation in neurons. Among the numerous targets downstream of Cdc42, we determined that the p21-activated kinase-3 (PAK3) phosphorylates S863 in vitro. Moreover, specific loss of PAK3 expression and pharmacological inhibition of PAK both disrupt activity-dependent phosphorylation of S863 in cortical neurons. EphB2, Cdc42, and PAKs are broadly capable of controlling dendritic spine formation and synaptic plasticity and are implicated in multiple cognitive disorders. Collectively, these data delineate a novel signal cascade regulating AMPAR trafficking that may contribute to the molecular mechanisms that govern learning and cognition. PMID:26460013

  14. A1-, A2A- and A3-subtype adenosine receptors modulate intraocular pressure in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Marcel Y; Stone, Richard A; Civan, Mortimer M

    2001-01-01

    Despite the potential importance of the mouse in studying the pharmacology of aqueous dynamics, measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) in its very small eye has been problematic. Utilizing a novel servo-null electrophysiologic approach recently applied to the mouse, we have identified a diversity of adenosine-receptor mechanisms in modulating IOP in this species. We report the first evidence that A3 receptors increase IOP in any species, and verify in the mouse reports with larger mammals that A1 receptors lower and A2A receptors increase IOP. PMID:11564641

  15. Evaluation of WO 2012/177618 A1 and US-2014/0179750 A1: novel small molecule antagonists of prostaglandin-E2 receptor EP2.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Thota

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies underscore that prostaglandin-E2 exerts mostly proinflammatory effects in chronic CNS and peripheral disease models, mainly through a specific prostanoid receptor EP2. However, very few highly characterized EP2 receptor antagonists have been reported until recently, when Pfizer and Emory University published two distinct classes of EP2 antagonists with good potency, selectivity and pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this article is to evaluate recently published patents WO 2012/177618 A1 and US-2014/0179750 A1 from Emory, which describe a number of cinnamic amide- and amide-derivatives as a potent antagonists of EP2 receptor, and their neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in an in vivo model. A selected compound from this patent(s) also attenuates prostate cancer cell growth and invasion in vitro, suggesting these compounds should be developed for therapeutic use. PMID:25772215

  16. A1 adenosine receptor deficiency or inhibition reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Bunyen; Smith, Jonathan D.; Rosenfeld, Michael E.; Robinet, Peggy; Davis, Mary E.; Morrison, R. Ray; Mustafa, S. Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Aims The goal of this study was to determine whether the A1 adenosine receptor (AR) plays a role in atherosclerosis development and to explore its potential mechanisms. Methods and results Double knockout (DKO) mice, deficient in the genes encoding A1 AR and apolipoprotein E (apoE), demonstrated reduced atherosclerotic lesions in aortic arch (en face), aortic root, and innominate arteries when compared with apoE-deficient mice (APOE-KO) of the same age. Treating APOE-KO with an A1 AR antagonist (DPCPX) also led to a concentration-dependent reduction in lesions. The total plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels were not different between DKO and APOE-KO; however, higher triglyceride was observed in DKO fed a high-fat diet. DKO also had higher body weights than APOE-KO. Plasma cytokine concentrations (IL-5, IL-6, and IL-13) were significantly lower in DKO. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression was also significantly reduced in the aorta from DKO. Despite smaller lesions in DKO, the composition of the innominate artery lesion and cholesterol loading and efflux from bone marrow-derived macrophages of DKO were not different from APOE-KO. Conclusion The A1 AR may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis, possibly due to its pro-inflammatory and mitogenic properties. PMID:24525840

  17. Altered thermoregulation via sensitization of A1 adenosine receptors in dietary-restricted rats

    PubMed Central

    Jinka, Tulasi R.; Carlson, Zachary A.; Moore, Jeanette T.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Evidence links longevity to dietary restriction (DR). A decrease in body temperature (Tb) is thought to contribute to enhanced longevity because lower Tb reduces oxidative metabolism and oxidative stress. It is as yet unclear how DR decreases Tb. Objective Here, we test the hypothesis that prolonged DR decreases Tb by sensitizing adenosine A1 receptors (A1AR) and adenosine-induced cooling. Methods and results Sprague–Dawley rats were dietary restricted using an every-other-day feeding protocol. Rats were fed every other day for 27 days and then administered the A1AR agonist, N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA; 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Respiratory rate (RR) and subcutaneous Tb measured using IPTT-300 transponders were monitored every day and after drug administration. DR animals displayed lower RR on day 20 and lower Tb on day 22 compared to animals fed ad libitum and displayed a larger response to CHA. In all cases, RR declined before Tb. Contrary to previous reports, a higher dose of CHA (5 mg/kg, i.p.) was lethal in both dietary groups. We next tested the hypothesis that sensitization to the effects of CHA was due to increased surface expression of A1AR within the hypothalamus. We report that the abundance of A1AR in the membrane fraction increases in hypothalamus, but not cortex of DR rats. Conclusion These results suggest that every-other-day feeding lowers Tb via sensitization of thermoregulatory effects of endogenous adenosine by increasing surface expression of A1AR. Discussion Evidence that diet can modulate purinergic signaling has implications for the treatment of stroke, brain injury, epilepsy, and aging. PMID:20186398

  18. An S receptor kinase gene in self-compatible Brassica napus has a 1-bp deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Goring, D R; Glavin, T L; Schafer, U; Rothstein, S J

    1993-01-01

    S locus glycoprotein (SLG) and S locus receptor kinase (SRK) cDNAs were isolated from an S allele present in a number of self-compatible Brassica napus lines. This A10 allele did not segregate with self-incompatibility in crosses involving other self-incompatible B. napus lines. The SLG-A10 cDNA was found to contain an intact open reading frame and was predicted to encode an SLG protein with sequence similarities to those previously associated with phenotypically strong self-incompatibility reactions. SLG-A10 transcripts were detected in the developing stigma at steady state levels even higher than those detected for SLG alleles linked with self-incompatibility. Analysis of the corresponding SRK-A10 cDNA showed that it was very similar to other S locus receptor kinase genes and was expressed predominantly in the stigma. However, a 1-bp deletion was detected in the SRK gene toward the 3' end of the SLG homology domain. This deletion would lead to premature termination of translation and the production of a truncated SRK protein. The A10 allele was determined to represent a B. oleracea S allele based on its segregation pattern with the B. oleracea S24 allele when both these alleles were present in the same B. napus background. These results suggest that a functional SRK gene is required for Brassica self-incompatibility. PMID:8518554

  19. The nuclear receptor Nr4a1 mediates anti-inflammatory effects of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ipseiz, Natacha; Uderhardt, Stefan; Scholtysek, Carina; Steffen, Martin; Schabbauer, Gernot; Bozec, Aline; Schett, Georg; Krönke, Gerhard

    2014-05-15

    Uptake of apoptotic cells (ACs) by macrophages ensures the nonimmunogenic clearance of dying cells, as well as the maintenance of self-tolerance to AC-derived autoantigens. Upon ingestion, ACs exert an inhibitory influence on the inflammatory signaling within the phagocyte. However, the molecular signals that mediate these immune-modulatory properties of ACs are incompletely understood. In this article, we show that the phagocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes was enhanced in tissue-resident macrophages where this process resulted in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling and repression of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-12. In parallel, ACs induced a robust expression of a panel of immediate early genes, which included the Nr4a subfamily of nuclear receptors. Notably, deletion of Nr4a1 interfered with the anti-inflammatory effects of ACs in macrophages and restored both NF-κB signaling and IL-12 expression. Accordingly, Nr4a1 mediated the anti-inflammatory properties of ACs in vivo and was required for maintenance of self-tolerance in the murine model of pristane-induced lupus. Thus, our data point toward a key role for Nr4a1 as regulator of the immune response to ACs and of the maintenance of tolerance to "dying self." PMID:24740500

  20. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 1. Expression of receptor mRNA in four mouse hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Sefc, L; Savvulidi, F; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Hofer, M

    2010-01-01

    Four mouse bone marrow or thymus cell populations, namely granulopoietic/monocytopoietic, erythropoietic, B-lymphopoietic, and T-lymphopoietic precursor cells have been assayed by RT-PCR technique for the presence and relative amounts of adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptor mRNA. It has been found that (i) all four populations studied express all four adenosine receptor subtypes, (ii) the A(1), receptor is the least expressed in all populations studied, (iii) the A(3) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of granulopoietic/monocytopoietic and erythropoietic cells, (iv) the A(2a) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of B-lymphopoietic and T-lymphopoietic cells, and v) the A(2b) receptor does not predominate in any of the precursor cells studied. Our data offer a new possibility for the assessment of the readiness of these cells to respond, by receptor-mediated mechanisms, to adenosine or its analogs present in the tissues as a result of endogenous processes and/or following their administration. PMID:19249907

  1. Allosteric interactions at adenosine A1 and A3 receptors: new insights into the role of small molecules and receptor dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Stephen J; May, Lauren T; Kellam, Barrie; Woolard, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    The purine nucleoside adenosine is present in all cells in tightly regulated concentrations. It is released under a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions to facilitate protection and regeneration of tissues. Adenosine acts via specific GPCRs to either stimulate cyclic AMP formation, as exemplified by Gs-protein-coupled adenosine receptors (A2A and A2B), or inhibit AC activity, in the case of Gi/o-coupled adenosine receptors (A1 and A3). Recent advances in our understanding of GPCR structure have provided insights into the conformational changes that occur during receptor activation following binding of agonists to orthosteric (i.e. at the same binding site as an endogenous modulator) and allosteric regulators to allosteric sites (i.e. at a site that is topographically distinct from the endogenous modulator). Binding of drugs to allosteric sites may lead to changes in affinity or efficacy, and affords considerable potential for increased selectivity in new drug development. Herein, we provide an overview of the properties of selective allosteric regulators of the adenosine A1 and A3 receptors, focusing on the impact of receptor dimerization, mechanistic approaches to single-cell ligand-binding kinetics and the effects of A1- and A3-receptor allosteric modulators on in vivo pharmacology. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24024783

  2. Scavenger receptor class B, type I-mediated uptake of A1AT by pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Angelia D; Petrusca, Daniela N; Justice, Matthew J; Poirier, Christophe; Serban, Karina A; Rush, Natalia I; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Predescu, Dan; Predescu, Sanda; Petrache, Irina

    2015-08-15

    In addition to exerting a potent anti-elastase function, α-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) maintains the structural integrity of the lung by inhibiting endothelial inflammation and apoptosis. A main serpin secreted in circulation by hepatocytes, A1AT requires uptake by the endothelium to achieve vasculoprotective effects. This active uptake mechanism, which is inhibited by cigarette smoking (CS), involves primarily clathrin- but also caveola-mediated endocytosis and may require active binding to a receptor. Because circulating A1AT binds to high-density lipoprotein (HDL), we hypothesized that scavenging receptors are candidates for endothelial uptake of the serpin. Although the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) internalizes only elastase-bound A1AT, the scavenger receptor B type I (SR-BI), which binds and internalizes HDL and is modulated by CS, may be involved in A1AT uptake. Transmission electron microscopy imaging of colloidal gold-labeled A1AT confirmed A1AT endocytosis in both clathrin-coated vesicles and caveolae in endothelial cells. SR-BI immunoprecipitation identified binding to A1AT at the plasma membrane. Pretreatment of human lung microvascular endothelial cells with SR-B ligands (HDL or LDL), knockdown of SCARB1 expression, or neutralizing SR-BI antibodies significantly reduced A1AT uptake by 30-50%. Scarb1 null mice exhibited decreased A1AT lung content following systemic A1AT administration and reduced lung anti-inflammatory effects of A1AT supplementation during short-term CS exposure. In turn, A1AT supplementation increased lung SR-BI expression and modulated circulating lipoprotein levels in wild-type animals. These studies indicate that SR-BI is an important mediator of A1AT endocytosis in pulmonary endothelium and suggest a cross talk between A1AT and lipoprotein regulation of vascular functions. PMID:26092999

  3. Adenosine A1 receptor antagonist prolongs survival in the hypoxic rat.

    PubMed

    Gao, E; Kaplan, J L; Shi, Y; Victain, M; Dalsey, W C; de Garavilla, L

    2001-09-01

    The hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptor (A1AdoR) selective antagonism limits cardiac depression and prolongs survival during acute global hypoxia was tested in a postinsult treatment model using KW-3902 ([8-(noradamantan-3-yl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine]), an A1AdoR selective antagonist. Rats were anesthetized, paralyzed, then ventilated with 8% O2 (hypoxia). In protocol I, 5 min after hypoxia, rats were treated with saline, drug vehicle, or KW-3902 (0.1 mg/kg i.v.). In protocol II, KW-3902 treatment occurred 2.5, 5, or 7.5 min after hypoxia. In protocol I, after hypoxia, left ventricular contractility, heart rate, and systemic mean arterial blood pressure decreased rapidly in saline-and vehicle-treated groups. In contrast, KW-3902 significantly attenuated the decline in these variables. Survival time (the time from the commencement of hypoxia until death) was more prolonged with KW-3902 (109.5 +/- 9.1 min) than with saline (37.6 +/- 5.0 min) or vehicle (35.0 +/- 4.2 min) (p < 0.001). In protocol II, survival time increased from 29.2 +/- 5.5 min in the 7.5-min treatment group to 109.5 +/- 9.5 min (5-min group) and 245.9 +/- 26.1 min (2.5-min group; p < 0.001). KW-3902 prolongs survival in this model, presumably by antagonizing A1AdoR-mediated inhibition of cardiac function. Also, treatment efficacy is highly time dependent. PMID:11486243

  4. Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA Receptor Subunit Alters the Expression of Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, David J.; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H.; Bannerman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit selectively impairs short-term memory for spatial locations. We further investigated this deficit by examining memory for discrete nonspatial visual stimuli in an operant chamber. Unconditioned suppression of magazine responding to visual stimuli was measured in wild-type and GluA1 knockout mice.…

  5. Essential role of adenosine, adenosine A1 receptors, and ATP-sensitive K+ channels in cerebral ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed Central

    Heurteaux, C; Lauritzen, I; Widmann, C; Lazdunski, M

    1995-01-01

    Preconditioning with sublethal ischemia protects against neuronal damage after subsequent lethal ischemic insults in hippocampal neurons. A pharmacological approach using agonists and antagonists at the adenosine A1 receptor as well as openers and blockers of ATP-sensitive K+ channels has been combined with an analysis of neuronal death and gene expression of subunits of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, HSP70, c-fos, c-jun, and growth factors. It indicates that the mechanism of ischemic tolerance involves a cascade of events including liberation of adenosine, stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors, and, via these receptors, opening of sulfonylurea-sensitive ATP-sensitive K+ channels. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7753861

  6. (/sup 3/H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine binding to A1 adenosine receptors of intact rat ventricular myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, D.; Lohse, M.J.; Schwabe, U.

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was the identification of A1 adenosine receptors in intact rat ventricular myocytes, which are thought to mediate the negative inotropic effects of adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine was used as radioligand. Binding of the radioligand to intact myocytes was rapid, reversible, and saturable with a binding capacity of 40,000 binding sites per cell. The dissociation constant of the radioligand was 0.48 nM. The adenosine receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, xanthine amine congener, and theophylline were competitive inhibitors with affinities in agreement with results obtained for A1 receptors in other tissues. Competition experiments using the adenosine receptor agonists R-N(6)-phenylisopropyladenosine, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, and S-N(6)-phenylisopropyladenosine gave monophasic displacement curves with Ki values of 50 nM, 440 nM, and 4,300 nM, which agreed well with the GTP-inducible low affinity state in cardiac membranes. The low affinity for agonists was not due to agonist-induced desensitization, and correlated well with the corresponding IC50 values for the inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. It is suggested that only a low affinity state of A1 receptors can be detected in intact rat myocytes due to the presence of high concentrations of guanine nucleotides in intact cells.

  7. Interaction of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine and κ-opioid receptors in rat spinal cord nociceptive reflexes.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Zepeda, Guillermo A; Herrero-Zorita, Carlos; Herrero, Juan F

    2014-12-01

    Antinociception induced by the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) is linked to opioid receptors. We studied the subtype of receptors to which CPA action is related, as well as a possible enhancement of antinociception when CPA is coadministered with opioid receptor agonists. Spinal cord neuronal nociceptive responses of male Wistar rats with inflammation were recorded using the single motor unit technique. CPA antinociception was challenged with naloxone or norbinaltorphimine. The antinociceptive activity of fentanyl and U-50488H was studied alone and combined with CPA. Reversal of CPA antinociception was observed with norbinaltorphimine (82.9±13% of control) but not with low doses of naloxone (27±8% of control), indicating an involvement of κ-opioid but not µ-opioid receptors. Low doses of CPA did not modify fentanyl antinociception. However, a significant enhancement of the duration of antinociception was seen when U-50488H was coadministered with CPA. We conclude that antinociception mediated by CPA in the spinal cord is associated with activation of κ-opioid but not µ-opioid receptors in inflammation. In addition, coadministration of CPA and κ-opioid receptor agonists is followed by significantly longer antinociception, opening new perspectives in the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:25325292

  8. Role of brainstem adenosine A1 receptors in the cardiovascular response to hypothalamic defence area stimulation in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed Central

    St Lambert, J. H.; Dashwood, M. R.; Spyer, K. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The role of centrally located adenosine A1 receptors in the cardiovascular changes associated with the hypothalamic defence response has been investigated by in vitro autoradiography and the intraventricular application of an A1 receptor antagonist. 2. 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a highly selective adenosine A1 antagonist and its vehicle, ethanol, were administered directly into the posterior portion of the fourth ventricle of alpha-chloralose anaesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated rats. 3. DPCPX (0.01 to 0.3 mg kg-1) caused a dose-dependent decrease in the magnitude of the evoked pressor response (from -13 to -23 mmHg) elicited on hypothalamic defence area stimulation at a dose 10 fold lower than that required to produce an equivalent effect following systemic administration whilst ethanol, the vehicle, had no effect. 4. In vitro autoradiography revealed a heterogeneous distribution of adenosine A1 binding sites in the lower brainstem of rats. Image analysis showed the ventrolateral medulla to have the highest density of A1 receptors. Intermediate levels of binding were seen in caudal regions of the nucleus tractus solitarii and the hypoglossal nucleus. 5. These data imply that a proportion of the cardiovascular response to hypothalamic defence area stimulation are produced by the activation of adenosine A1 receptors localized close to the surface of, or adjacent to, the fourth ventricle in the immediate vicinity of the injection site. PMID:8789379

  9. The Role of cGMP on Adenosine A1 Receptor-mediated Inhibition of Synaptic Transmission at the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Isa; Serpa, André; Sebastião, Ana M.; Cascalheira, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Both adenosine A1 receptor and cGMP inhibit synaptic transmission at the hippocampus and recently it was found that A1 receptor increased cGMP levels in hippocampus, but the role of cGMP on A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission remains to be established. In the present work we investigated if blocking the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway using nitric oxide synthase (NOS), protein kinase G (PKG), and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitors modify the A1 receptor effect on synaptic transmission. Neurotransmission was evaluated by measuring the slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation at hippocampal slices. N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 15 nM), a selective A1 receptor agonist, reversibly decreased the fEPSPs by 54 ± 5%. Incubation of the slices with an inhibitor of NOS (L-NAME, 200 μM) decreased the CPA effect on fEPSPs by 57 ± 9% in female rats. In males, ODQ (10 μM), an sGC inhibitor, decreased the CPA inhibitory effect on fEPSPs by 23 ± 6%, but only when adenosine deaminase (ADA,1 U/ml) was present; similar results were found in females, where ODQ decreased CPA-induced inhibition of fEPSP slope by 23 ± 7%. In male rats, the presence of the PKG inhibitor (KT5823, 1 nM) decreased the CPA effect by 45.0 ± 9%; similar results were obtained in females, where KT5823 caused a 32 ± 9% decrease on the CPA effect. In conclusion, the results suggest that the inhibitory action of adenosine A1 receptors on synaptic transmission at hippocampus is, in part, mediated by the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway. PMID:27148059

  10. Effects of A1 receptor agonist/antagonist on spontaneous seizures in pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Beatriz Oliveira; Hamani, Clement; Ferreira, Elenn; Miranda, Maísa Ferreira; Fernandes, Maria José S; Rodrigues, Antonio M; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G; Covolan, Luciene

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous anticonvulsant that activates pre- and postsynaptic adenosine A1 receptors. A1 receptor agonists increase the latency for the development of seizures and status epilepticus following pilocarpine administration. Although hippocampal adenosine is increased in the chronic phase of the pilocarpine model, it is not known whether the modulation of A1 receptors may influence the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the A1 receptor agonist RPia ([R]-N-phenylisopropyladenosine) and the A1 antagonist DPCPX (8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine) administered to chronic pilocarpine epileptic rats would respectively decrease and increase the frequency of SRS and hippocampal excitability. Four months after Pilo-induced SE, chronic epileptic rats were video-monitored for the recording of SRS before (basal) and after a 2-week treatment with RPia (25μg/kg) or DPCPX (50μg/kg). Following sacrifice, brain slices were studied with electrophysiology. We found that rats given RPia had a 93% nonsignificant reduction in the frequency of seizures compared with their own pretreatment baseline. In contrast, the administration of DPCPX resulted in an 87% significant increase in seizure rate. Nontreated epileptic rats had a similar frequency of seizures along the study. Corroborating our behavioral data, in vitro recordings showed that slices from animals previously given DPCPX had a shorter latency to develop epileptiform activity, longer and higher DC shifts, and higher spike amplitude compared with slices from nontreated Pilo controls. In contrast, smaller spike amplitude was recorded in slices from animals given RPia. In summary, the administration of A1 agonists reduced hippocampal excitability but not the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures in chronic epileptic rats, whereas A1 receptor antagonists increased both. PMID:27371881

  11. Activation of transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3)-mediated Ca2+ entry by A1 adenosine receptor in cardiomyocytes disturbs atrioventricular conduction.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Jessica; Antigny, Fabrice; Robin, Elodie; Frieden, Maud; Raddatz, Eric

    2012-08-01

    Although the activation of the A(1)-subtype of the adenosine receptors (A(1)AR) is arrhythmogenic in the developing heart, little is known about the underlying downstream mechanisms. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel 3, functioning as receptor-operated channel (ROC), contributes to the A(1)AR-induced conduction disturbances. Using embryonic atrial and ventricular myocytes obtained from 4-day-old chick embryos, we found that the specific activation of A(1)AR by CCPA induced sarcolemmal Ca(2+) entry. However, A(1)AR stimulation did not induce Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Specific blockade of TRPC3 activity by Pyr3, by a dominant negative of TRPC3 construct, or inhibition of phospholipase Cs and PKCs strongly inhibited the A(1)AR-enhanced Ca(2+) entry. Ca(2+) entry through TRPC3 was activated by the 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) analog OAG via PKC-independent and -dependent mechanisms in atrial and ventricular myocytes, respectively. In parallel, inhibition of the atypical PKCζ by myristoylated PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor significantly decreased the A(1)AR-enhanced Ca(2+) entry in both types of myocytes. Additionally, electrocardiography showed that inhibition of TRPC3 channel suppressed transient A(1)AR-induced conduction disturbances in the embryonic heart. Our data showing that A(1)AR activation subtly mediates a proarrhythmic Ca(2+) entry through TRPC3-encoded ROC by stimulating the phospholipase C/DAG/PKC cascade provide evidence for a novel pathway whereby Ca(2+) entry and cardiac function are altered. Thus, the A(1)AR-TRPC3 axis may represent a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22692208

  12. Localization of the adenosine A1 receptor subtype gene (ADORA1) to chromosome 1q32.1

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend-Nicholson, A.; Schofield, P.R.; Baker, E.

    1995-03-20

    Adenosine, acting through its receptors, exerts effects on almost all organ systems, influencing a diversity of physiological responses, including the inhibition of neurotransmitter release, the modulation of cardiac rhythmicity and contractility, and the potentiation of IgE-dependent mediator release. Adenosine receptors belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, a class of cell-surface receptors that, when activated, couple to a heterotrimeric G protein complex to effect signal transduction. Molecular cloning and subsequent pharmacological and biochemical analyses have led to the identification of four different subtypes of adenosine receptor. The A3 receptor has been localized to chromosome 3 in the mouse by interspecific backcross analysis, suggesting a human chromosomal localization of 1p13 from known mouse-human linkage homologies. We have previously mapped the A2b adenosine receptor subtype to chromosome 17p11.2-p12 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid DNAs. A previous report has concluded that the Al and A2a receptor subtypes are localized on chromosome 22q11.2-q13.1 and 11q11-q13, respectively, but conflicts with that of MacCollin et al., who have mapped the A2a gene to chromosome 22. In this report, we show that the human A1 adenosine receptor subtype does not map to chromosome 22q11.2-q13.1, but is instead localized on chromosome 1q32. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Activation of the chemosensing transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) by alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Bernhard; Zehfuss, Franziska; Mückter, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Schäfer, Eva; Büch, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel is expressed in different tissues including skin, lung and neuronal tissue. Recent reports identified TRPA1 as a sensor for noxious substances, implicating a functional role in the molecular toxicology. TRPA1 is activated by various potentially harmful electrophilic substances. The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent that binds to numerous biological targets. Although SM is known for almost 200 years, detailed knowledge about the pathophysiology resulting from exposure is lacking. A specific therapy is not available. In this study, we investigated whether the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl-ethylsulfide (CEES, a model substance for SM-promoted effects) and SM are able to activate TRPA1 channels. CEES induced a marked increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in TRPA1-expressing but not in TRPA1-negative cells. The TRP-channel blocker AP18 diminished the CEES-induced calcium influx. HEK293 cells permanently expressing TRPA1 were more sensitive toward cytotoxic effects of CEES compared with wild-type cells. At low CEES concentrations, CEES-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by AP18. Proof-of-concept experiments using SM resulted in a pronounced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in HEK293-A1-E cells. Human A549 lung epithelial cells, which express TRPA1 endogenously, reacted with a transient calcium influx in response to CEES exposure. The CEES-dependent calcium response was diminished by AP18. In summary, our results demonstrate that alkylating agents are able to activate TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 counteracted cellular toxicity and could thus represent a feasible approach to mitigate SM-induced cell damage. PMID:25395009

  14. Adenosine deaminase inhibition enhances the inotropic response mediated by A1 adenosine receptor in hyperthyroid guinea pig atrium.

    PubMed

    Kemeny-Beke, Adam; Jakab, Anita; Zsuga, Judit; Vecsernyes, Miklos; Karsai, Denes; Pasztor, Fanni; Grenczer, Maria; Szentmiklosi, Andras Jozsef; Berta, Andras; Gesztelyi, Rudolf

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that inhibition of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enhances the efficiency of signal-transduction of myocardial A1 adenosine receptors in hyperthyroidism. The inotropic response to N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist resistant to ADA, was investigated in the absence or presence of erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA), an ADA and cGMP-stimulated 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE2) inhibitor, or of pentostatin (2'-deoxycoformycin; DCF), an exclusive ADA inhibitor, in left atria isolated from eu- or hyperthyroid guinea pigs. Both ADA inhibitors enhanced the effect of CPA only in hyperthyroid atria. EHNA significantly increased the Emax (mean+/-S.E.M.) from 83.8+/-1.2% to 93.4+/-1.2%, while DCF significantly decreased the logEC50 from -7.5+/-0.07 to -7.83+/-0.07 in hyperthyroid samples. Conversely, EHNA also diminished the logEC50 (from -7.5+/-0.07 to -7.65+/-0.07) and DCF also raised the Emax (from 83.8+/-1.2% to 85.7+/-2%) in hyperthyroidism, but these changes were not significant. In conclusion, ADA inhibition moderately but significantly enhanced the efficiency of A(1) adenosine receptor signaling pathway in the hyperthyroid guinea pig atrium. This suggests that elevated intracellular adenosine level caused by ADA inhibition may improve the suppressed responsiveness to A1 adenosine receptor agonists associated with the hyperthyroid state. Alternatively or in addition, the role of decreased concentration of adenosine degradation products cannot be excluded. Furthermore, in the case of EHNA, inhibition of PDE2 also appears to contribute to the enhanced A1 adenosine receptor signaling in the hyperthyroid guinea pig atrium. PMID:17574432

  15. Differential cognitive actions of norepinephrine a2 and a1 receptor signaling in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Craig W; Spencer, Robert C

    2016-06-15

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) supports cognitive and behavioral processes that guide goal directed behavior. Moreover, dysregulated prefrontal cognitive dysfunction is associated with multiple psychiatric disorders. Norepinephrine (NE) signaling in the PFC is a critical modulator of prefrontal cognition and is targeted by a variety of drugs used to treat PFC-dependent cognitive dysfunction. Noradrenergic modulation of PFC-dependent cognition is complex, with concentration and receptor-specific actions that are likely dependent on neuronal activity state. Recent studies indicate that within the PFC, noradrenergic α1 and α2 receptors exert unique modulatory actions across distinct cognitive processes that allow for context-dependent modulation of cognition. Specifically, high affinity post-synaptic α2 receptors, engaged at moderate rates of NE release associated with moderate arousal levels, promote working memory. In contrast, lower affinity α1 receptors, engaged at higher rates of release associated with high arousal conditions (e.g. stress), impair working memory performance while promoting flexible attention. While these and other observations were initially interpreted to indicate high rates of NE release promotes the transition from focused to flexible/scanning attention, recent findings indicate that α1 receptors promote both focused and flexible attention. Collectively, these observations indicate that while α2 and α1 receptors in the PFC differentially modulate distinct cognitive processes, this cannot be simply ascribed to differential roles of these receptors in 'focused' vs. 'flexible' cognitive processes. Translationally, this information indicates that: (1) not all tests of prefrontal cognitive function may be appropriate for preclinical programs aimed at specific PFC-dependent disorders and (2) the treatment of specific PFC cognitive deficits may require the differential targeting of noradrenergic receptor subtypes. This article is part of a

  16. Central Activation of the A1 Adenosine Receptor (A1AR) Induces a Hypothermic, Torpor-Like State in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Christopher J.; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2013-01-01

    Since central activation of A1 adenosine receptors (A1ARs) plays an important role in the induction of the hypothermic and hypometabolic torpid state in hibernating mammals, we investigated the potential for the A1AR agonist N6-cyclohexyladenosine to induce a hypothermic, torpor-like state in the (nonhibernating) rat. Core and brown adipose tissue temperatures, EEG, heart rate, and arterial pressure were recorded in free-behaving rats, and c-fos expression in the brain was analyzed, following central administration of N6-cyclohexyladenosine. Additionally, we recorded the sympathetic nerve activity to brown adipose tissue; expiratory CO2 and skin, core, and brown adipose tissue temperatures; and shivering EMGs in anesthetized rats following central and localized, nucleus of the solitary tract, administration of N6-cyclohexyladenosine. In rats exposed to a cool (15°C) ambient temperature, central A1AR stimulation produced a torpor-like state similar to that in hibernating species and characterized by a marked fall in body temperature due to an inhibition of brown adipose tissue and shivering thermogenesis that is mediated by neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract. During the induced hypothermia, EEG amplitude and heart rate were markedly reduced. Skipped heartbeats and transient bradycardias occurring during the hypothermia were vagally mediated since they were eliminated by systemic muscarinic receptor blockade. These findings demonstrate that a deeply hypothermic, torpor-like state can be pharmacologically induced in a nonhibernating mammal and that recovery of normothermic homeostasis ensues upon rewarming. These results support the potential for central activation of A1ARs to be used in the induction of a hypothermic, therapeutically beneficial state in humans. PMID:24005302

  17. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modulation at GPCRs: insight from a binding kinetics study at the human A1 adenosine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Venhorst, Suzanne N; Massink, Arnault; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Vauquelin, Georges; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many GPCRs can be allosterically modulated by small-molecule ligands. This modulation is best understood in terms of the kinetics of the ligand–receptor interaction. However, many current kinetic assays require at least the (radio)labelling of the orthosteric ligand, which is impractical for studying a range of ligands. Here, we describe the application of a so-called competition association assay at the adenosine A1 receptor for this purpose. Experimental Approach We used a competition association assay to examine the binding kinetics of several unlabelled orthosteric agonists of the A1 receptor in the absence or presence of two allosteric modulators. We also tested three bitopic ligands, in which an orthosteric and an allosteric pharmacophore were covalently linked with different spacer lengths. The relevance of the competition association assay for the binding kinetics of the bitopic ligands was also explored by analysing simulated data. Key Results The binding kinetics of an unlabelled orthosteric ligand were affected by the addition of an allosteric modulator and such effects were probe- and concentration-dependent. Covalently linking the orthosteric and allosteric pharmacophores into one bitopic molecule had a substantial effect on the overall on- or off-rate. Conclusion and Implications The competition association assay is a useful tool for exploring the allosteric modulation of the human adenosine A1 receptor. This assay may have general applicability to study allosteric modulation at other GPCRs as well. PMID:25040887

  18. Folate and Thiamine Transporters mediated by Facilitative Carriers (SLC19A1-3 and SLC46A1) and Folate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David

    2013-01-01

    The reduced folate carrier (RFC,SLC19A1), thiamine transporter-1 (ThTr1,SLC19A2) and thiamine transporter-2 (ThTr2,SLC19A3) evolved from the same family of solute carriers. SLC19A1 transports folates but not thiamine. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 transport thiamine but not folates. SLC19A1 and SLC19A2 deliver their substrates to systemic tissues; SLC19A3 mediates intestinal thiamine absorption. The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT,SLC46A1) is the mechanism by which folates are absorbed across the apical-brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine. Two folate receptors (FOLR1 and FOLR2) mediate folate transport across epithelia by an endocytic process. Folate transporters are routes of delivery of drugs for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases. There are autosomal recessive disorders associated with mutations in genes encoded for SLC46A1 (hereditary folate malabsorption), FOLR1 (cerebral folate deficiency), SLC19A2 (thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia), and SLC19A3 (biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease). PMID:23506878

  19. Folate and thiamine transporters mediated by facilitative carriers (SLC19A1-3 and SLC46A1) and folate receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I David

    2013-01-01

    The reduced folate carrier (RFC, SLC19A1), thiamine transporter-1 (ThTr1, SLC19A2) and thiamine transporter-2 (ThTr2, SLC19A3) evolved from the same family of solute carriers. SLC19A1 transports folates but not thiamine. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 transport thiamine but not folates. SLC19A1 and SLC19A2 deliver their substrates to systemic tissues; SLC19A3 mediates intestinal thiamine absorption. The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT, SLC46A1) is the mechanism by which folates are absorbed across the apical-brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine. Two folate receptors (FOLR1 and FOLR2) mediate folate transport across epithelia by an endocytic process. Folate transporters are routes of delivery of drugs for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases. There are autosomal recessive disorders associated with mutations in genes encoded for SLC46A1 (hereditary folate malabsorption), FOLR1 (cerebral folate deficiency), SLC19A2 (thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia), and SLC19A3 (biotin-responsive basal ganglia disease). PMID:23506878

  20. Analysis of flavonoids regulating the expression of UGT1A1 via xenobiotic receptors in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hiura, Yuto; Satsu, Hideo; Hamada, Mika; Shimizu, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 is one of the major metabolic enzymes for the detoxification of harmful xenobiotics in intestines, and its expression is regulated by transcription factors like the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). A screening assay using real-time PCR showed that baicalein and 3-hydroxyflavone induced human UGT1A1 mRNA expression in LS180 cells. Experimental results confirmed that these flavonoids increased UGT1A protein expression as well as its enzymatic activity. The results indicated that baicalein and 3-hydroxyflavone increased the transcriptional activity of UGT1A1 via AhR and PXR, respectively. Observation via immunofluorescence microscopy suggested that baicalein and 3-hydroxyflavone further induced nuclear translocation of AhR and PXR, respectively. In addition, direct interaction between baicalein and AhR or 3-hydroxyflavone and PXR were observed using the quartz crystal microbalance method. These results elucidate the molecular mechanism of flavonoid-induced UGT1A1 gene expression via xenobiotic receptors in the intestines. PMID:24375494

  1. Impairment of ATP hydrolysis decreases adenosine A1 receptor tonus favoring cholinergic nerve hyperactivity in the obstructed human urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ramos, M; Silva, I; Faria, M; Magalhães-Cardoso, M T; Correia, J; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether reduced adenosine formation linked to deficits in extracellular ATP hydrolysis by NTPDases contributes to detrusor neuromodulatory changes associated with bladder outlet obstruction in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The kinetics of ATP catabolism and adenosine formation as well as the role of P1 receptor agonists on muscle tension and nerve-evoked [(3)H]ACh release were evaluated in mucosal-denuded detrusor strips from BPH patients (n = 31) and control organ donors (n = 23). The neurogenic release of ATP and [(3)H]ACh was higher (P < 0.05) in detrusor strips from BPH patients. The extracellular hydrolysis of ATP and, subsequent, adenosine formation was slower (t (1/2) 73 vs. 36 min, P < 0.05) in BPH detrusor strips. The A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of evoked [(3)H]ACh release by adenosine (100 μM), NECA (1 μM), and R-PIA (0.3 μM) was enhanced in BPH bladders. Relaxation of detrusor contractions induced by acetylcholine required 30-fold higher concentrations of adenosine. Despite VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves exhibiting higher A(1) immunoreactivity in BPH bladders, the endogenous adenosine tonus revealed by adenosine deaminase is missing. Restoration of A1 inhibition was achieved by favoring (1) ATP hydrolysis with apyrase (2 U mL(-1)) or (2) extracellular adenosine accumulation with dipyridamole or EHNA, as these drugs inhibit adenosine uptake and deamination, respectively. In conclusion, reduced ATP hydrolysis leads to deficient adenosine formation and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of cholinergic nerve activity in the obstructed human bladder. Thus, we propose that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous adenosine levels and/or A(1) receptor activation might be useful to control bladder overactivity in BPH patients. PMID:26521170

  2. Prolonged P300 latency in children with the D[sub 2] dopamine receptor A1 allele

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Berman, S.M.; Ozkaragoz, T.Z.; Ritchie, T. )

    1994-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated the presence of a hereditary component in the generation of the P300, or P3, a late positive component of the event-related potential. Moreover, the dopaminergic system has been implicated in the P3. In the present study, 98 healthy Caucasian boys, mean age of 12.5 years and of above-average intelligence, were studied. The sample was composed of 32 sons of active alcoholic (SAA) fathers, 36 sons of recovering alcoholic (SRA) fathers, and 30 sons of social drinker (SSD) fathers, with none of them having yet begun to consume alcohol or other drugs. TaqI A D[sub 2] dopamine receptor alleles (A1 and A2) were determined. A significant difference in the frequency of the A1 allele was found among these three groups of boys, with the SAA group having the highest A1 allele frequency (.313), followed by the SRA (.139) and the SSD (.133) groups. The relationship of the A1 and A2 alleles to P3 amplitude and latency was also determined. The results showed no significant difference in P3 amplitude between boys with the A1 and A2 allele. However, P3 latency was significantly longer in the total sample of boys with the A1 allele compared with those carrying the A2 allele. These findings suggest that polymorphism of the D[sub 2] dopamine receptor gene is an important determinant of P3 latency. 84 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Adenosine A1 Receptors in Mouse Pontine Reticular Formation Depress Breathing, Increase Anesthesia Recovery Time, and Decrease Acetylcholine Release

    PubMed Central

    Gettys, George C.; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Methods Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX), or SPA and DPCPX. Results First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (−18%), tidal volume (−12%) and minute ventilation (−16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). DPCPX alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, decrease in RoRR, and decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and DPCPX blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Conclusions Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing. PMID:23263018

  4. Study of an adenosine A1 receptor agonist on trigeminally evoked dural blood vessel dilation in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Honey, A C; Bland-Ward, P A; Connor, H E; Feniuk, W; Humphrey, P P A

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to use intravital microscopy to determine the effect of a selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist, GR79236 (1, 3 and 10 microg/kg i.v.), on neurogenic dural blood vessel dilation in anaesthetized rats. Vasodilation was evoked either by electrical stimulation of perivascular trigeminal nerves or by intravenous CGRP. GR79236 (1-10 microg/kg i.v.) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neurogenic vasodilation, but had no significant effect on dural vasodilation caused by CGRP. GR79236 (1-3 microg/kg i.v.) had no effect on basal dural vessel diameter, but caused transient dose-dependant bradycardia and hypotension. Bradycardia was more prolonged following 10 microg/kg i.v. GR79236. Pre-treatment with the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (1 mg/kg i.v.) prevented the inhibitory effect of GR79236 (10 microg/kg i.v.) on neurogenic vasodilation as well as GR79236-induced bradycardia and hypotension. These data suggest that the inhibition of neurogenic vasodilation by GR79236 is mediated via the activation of prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors. Provided the systemic cardiovascular effects could be limited, such a mechanism may offer a novel approach to migraine therapy. PMID:12100087

  5. HDAC1 bound to the Cyp1a1 promoter blocks histone acetylation associated with Ah receptor-mediated transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Schnekenburger, Michael; Peng, Li; Puga, Alvaro

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic bioactivation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as the environmental procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene, is catalyzed by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase encoded by the substrate-inducible Cyp1a1 gene. Cyp1a1 induction requires trans-activation by the heterodimeric transcriptional complex formed by the liganded Ah receptor (AHR) and its partner, ARNT. Previously, we showed that constitutively bound HDAC1 dissociates from Cyp1a1 promoter chromatin after ligand-mediated induction, concomitantly with the recruitment of AHR/ARNT complexes and p300. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that HDAC1 binding maintains the Cyp1a1 gene in a silenced state in uninduced cells. We find that Cyp1a1 induction by the AHR/ARNT is associated with modification of specific chromatin marks, including hyperacetylation of histone H3K14 and H4K16, trimethylation of histone H3K4, and phosphorylation of H3S10. HDAC1 and DNMT1 form complexes on the Cyp1a1 promoter of uninduced cells but HDAC1 inhibition alone is not sufficient to induce Cyp1a1 expression, although it allows for the hyperacetylation of H3K14 and H4K16 to levels similar to those found in B[a]P-induced cells. These results show that by blocking modification of histone marks, HDAC1 plays a central role in Cyp1a1 expression and that its removal is a necessary but not sufficient condition for Cyp1a1 induction, underscoring the requirement for a concerted series of chromatin remodeling events to complete the initial steps of gene trans-activation by the Ah receptor. PMID:17707923

  6. Ephrin-A1 expression induced by S100A8 is mediated by the toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Omori, Tsutomu; Komatsu, Akiko; Tomita, Takeshi; Deguchi, Atsuko; Maru, Yoshiro

    2013-11-01

    The deregulation of Eph/ephrin protein expression has been shown to lead to tumor development and progression. Both mRNA and protein expression analyses using clinical samples have demonstrated that ephrin-A1 is over-expressed in various cancers and positively correlates with a poor prognosis for cancer patients. The prognosis of cancer patients depends on metastasis to distant organs. We previously demonstrated that ADAM12 metalloproteinase cleaved ephrin-A1 and ADAM12-cleaved ephrin-A1 enhanced vascular permeability by degrading VE-cadherin and the EphA2 receptor at the plasma membrane. An increase of soluble ephrin-A1 levels in the serum facilitated tumor cell recruitment to the lungs, which resulted in lung metastasis. We also found that ephrin-A1 was overexpressed in 3LL tumors, a highly metastatic tumor, in mice and TNFα, an authentic positive regulator of ephrin-A1, was not elevated in the tumors, whereas S100A8 was. Moreover, S100A8 induced ephrin-A1 expression mediated by the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). S100A8 is known to be an endogenous ligand for TLR4 and its expression was shown to be increased in the lungs at the premetastatic phase. Thus, S100A8 and ephrin-A1 contribute to lung metastasis. Therefore, elucidating the regulation mechanism of ephrin-A1 overexpression is of importance and may lead to the development of therapeutic drugs against tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:24103748

  7. 17β-Estradiol Induces Sulfotransferase 2A1 Expression through Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ning, Miaoran; Koh, Kwi Hye; Kim, Heesue

    2014-01-01

    Sulfotransferase (SULT) 2A1 catalyzes sulfonation of drugs and endogenous compounds and plays an important role in xenobiotic metabolism as well as in the maintenance of steroid and lipid homeostasis. A recent study showed that 17β-estradiol (E2) increases the mRNA levels of SULT2A1 in human hepatocytes. Here we report the underlying molecular mechanisms. E2 enhanced SULT2A1 expression in human hepatocytes and HepG2-ER cells (HepG2 stably expressing ERα). SULT2A1 induction by E2 was abrogated by antiestrogen ICI 182,780, indicating a key role of ERα in the induction. Results from deletion and mutation assays of SULT2A1 promoter revealed three cis-elements located within –257/+140 region of SULT2A1 that are potentially responsible for the induction. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay verified the recruitment of ERα to the promoter region. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that AP-1 proteins bind to one of the cis-elements. Interestingly, SULT2A1 promoter assays using ERα mutants revealed that the DNA-binding domain of ERα is indispensable for SULT2A1 induction by E2, suggesting that direct ERα binding to the SULT2A1 promoter is also necessary for the induction. Taken together, our results indicate that E2 enhances SULT2A1 expression by both the classical and nonclassical mechanisms of ERα action. PMID:24492894

  8. Non-genomic effects of the NR4A1/Nur77/TR3/NGFIB orphan nuclear receptor.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Alicja; Strzadala, Leon; Kalas, Wojciech

    2015-03-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1/Nur77/TR3/NGFIB acts primarily as a transcription factor to regulate the expression of multiple genes. However, increasing research attention has recently been given to non-genomic activities of NR4A1. The first description of a non-genomic action of NR4A1 referred to the conversion of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 into a pro-apoptotic protein by direct interaction with NR4A1. In response to certain apoptotic stimuli, NR4A1 translocates from the nucleus to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) where it associates with Bcl-2 and thereby causes apoptosis. Afterwards, it appeared that NR4A1 could also bind and convert other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. The latest studies indicate a significant role of NR4A1 in the process of autophagy. For example, a new NR4A1-mediated pathway specific for melanoma cells has been described where NR4A1 interacts with the adenine nucleotide translocase 1 (ANT1) on the mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM) leading to induction of the autophagy pathway. Moreover, NR4A1 interaction with cytoplasmic p53 may also contribute to the induction of autophagy. In addition to mitochondria, NR4A1 could be translocated to the outer membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and associate with Bcl-2 or translocon-associated protein subunit γ (TRAPγ) causing ER stress-induced apoptosis. NR4A1 also contributes to the proteasomal degradation of β-catenin in colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as to the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) under non-hypoxic conditions. This review summarizes research findings on non-genomic effects of NR4A1 in normal and cancer cells. PMID:25555471

  9. Evidence for deactivation of both ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase by adenosine A1 receptor activation in the rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kitakaze, M; Hori, M; Minamino, T; Takashima, S; Komamura, K; Node, K; Kurihara, T; Morioka, T; Sato, H; Inoue, M

    1994-01-01

    Adenosine, an important regulator of many cardiac functions, is produced by ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. The activity of these enzymes is influenced by several ischemia-sensitive metabolic factors, e.g., ATP, ADP, H+, and inorganic phosphate. However, there is no clear evidence that adenosine itself affects 5'-nucleotidase activity. This study tested whether adenosine decreases the activity of ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from adult male Wistar rats and suspended in the modified Hepes-Tyrode buffer solution. After stabilization, isolated cardiomyocytes were incubated with and without adenosine (10(-9) - 10(-4) M). Ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity was decreased by exogenous adenosine (ectosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity, 20.6 +/- 2.3 vs. 8.6 +/- 1.6 mumol/min per 10(6) cells [P < 0.05]; cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity, 2.47 +/- 0.58 vs. 1.61 +/- 0.54 mumol/min per 10(6) cells [P < 0.05] at 10(-6) M adenosine) after 30 min. The decrease in ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity was inhibited by 8-phenyltheophylline and pertussis toxin, and was mimicked by N6-cyclohexyladenosine, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist. Neither CGS21680C, and A2 receptor agonist, nor cycloheximide deactivated ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. Thus, we conclude that activation of adenosine A1 receptors is coupled to Gi proteins and attenuates ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cardiomyocytes. Images PMID:7989602

  10. Adenosine A1 Receptors in Mouse Pontine Reticular Formation Modulate Nociception Only in the Presence of Systemic Leptin

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sarah L.; Watson, Christopher J.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Human obesity is associated with increased leptin levels and pain, but the specific brain regions and neurochemical mechanisms underlying this association remain poorly understood. This study used adult male C57BL/6J (B6, n = 14) mice and leptin-deficient, obese B6.Cg-Lepob/J (obese, n = 10) mice to evaluate the hypothesis that nociception is altered by systemic leptin levels and by adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation. Nociception was quantified as paw withdrawal latency (PWL) in s after onset of a thermal stimulus. PWL was converted to percent maximum possible effect (%MPE). After obtaining baseline PWL measures, the pontine reticular formation was microinjected with saline (control), three concentrations of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-p-sulfophenyladenosine (SPA), or super-active mouse leptin receptor antagonist (SMLA) followed by SPA 15 min later, and PWL was again quantified. In obese, leptin-deficient mice, nociception was quantified before and during leptin replacement via subcutaneous osmotic pumps. SPA was administered into the pontine reticular formation of leptin-replaced mice and PWL testing was repeated. During baseline (before vehicle or SPA administration), PWL was significantly (p = 0.0013) lower in leptin-replaced obese mice than in B6 mice. Microinjecting SPA into the pontine reticular formation of B6 mice caused a significant (p = 0.0003) concentration-dependent increase in %MPE. SPA also significantly (p < 0.05) increased %MPE in B6 mice and in leptin-replaced obese mice, but not in leptin-deficient obese mice. Microinjection of the mouse super-active leptin antagonist (SMLA) into the pontine reticular formation before SPA did not alter PWL. The results show for the first time that pontine reticular formation administration of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist SPA produced antinociception only in the presence of systemic leptin. The concentration-response data support the interpretation that adenosine A1 receptors

  11. Dipyridamole attenuates ischemia reperfusion induced acute kidney injury through adenosinergic A1 and A2A receptor agonism in rats.

    PubMed

    Puri, Nikkita; Mohey, Vinita; Singh, Manjinder; Kaur, Tajpreet; Pathak, Devendra; Buttar, Harpal Singh; Singh, Amrit Pal

    2016-04-01

    Dipyridamole (DYP) is an anti-platelet agent with marked vasodilator, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity. The present study investigated the role of adenosine receptors in DYP-mediated protection against ischemia reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in rats. The rats were subjected to bilateral renal ischemia for 40 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. The renal damage induced by ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) was assessed by measuring creatinine clearance, blood urea nitrogen, uric acid, plasma potassium, fractional excretion of sodium, and microproteinuria in rats. The oxidative stress in renal tissues was assessed by quantification of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, superoxide anion generation, and reduced glutathione level. The hematoxylin-eosin staining was carried out to observe histopathological changes in renal tissues. DYP (10 and 30 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, i.p.) was administered 30 min before subjecting the rats to renal IRI. In separate groups, caffeine (50 mg/kg, i.p.), an adenosinergic A1 and A2A receptor antagonist was administered with and without DYP treatment before subjecting the rats to renal IRI. The ischemia reperfusion-induced AKI was demonstrated by significant changes in serum as well as urinary parameters, enhanced oxidative stress, and histopathological changes in renal tissues. The administration of DYP demonstrated protection against AKI. The prior treatment with caffeine abolished DYP-mediated reno-protection suggesting role of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors in DYP-mediated reno-protection in rats. It is concluded that adenosine receptors find their definite involvement in DYP-mediated anti-oxidative and reno-protective effect against ischemia reperfusion-induced AKI. PMID:26728617

  12. Circannual Rhythm in Body Temperature, Torpor, and Sensitivity to A1 Adenosine Receptor Agonist in Arctic Ground Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Jasmine M.; Jinka, Tulasi R.; Larson, Lindy K.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Moore, Jeanette T.; Carpluck, JoAnna; Drew, Kelly L.

    2013-01-01

    A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) activation within the central nervous system induces torpor, but in obligate hibernators such as the arctic ground squirrel (AGS; Urocitellus parryii), A1AR stimulation induces torpor only during the hibernation season, suggesting a seasonal increase in sensitivity to A1AR signaling. The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between body temperature (Tb) and sensitivity to an adenosine A1 receptor agonist in AGS. We tested the hypothesis that increased sensitivity in A1AR signaling would lead to lower Tb in euthermic animals during the hibernation season when compared with the summer season. We further predicted that if a decrease in euthermic Tb reflects increased sensitivity to A1AR activation, then it should likewise predict spontaneous torpor. We used subcutaneous IPTT-300 transponders to monitor Tb in AGS housed under constant ambient conditions (12:12 L:D, 18 °C) for up to 16 months. These animals displayed an obvious rhythm in euthermic Tb that cycled with a period of approximately 8 months. Synchrony in the Tb rhythm within the group was lost after several months of constant L:D conditions; however, individual rhythms in Tb continued to show clear sine wave–like waxing and waning. AGS displayed spontaneous torpor only during troughs in euthermic Tb. To assess sensitivity to A1AR activation, AGS were administered the A1AR agonist N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA, 0.1 mg/kg, ip), and subcutaneous Tb was monitored. AGS administered CHA during a seasonal minimum in euthermic Tb showed a greater drug-induced decrease in Tb (1.6 ± 0.3 °C) than did AGS administered CHA during a peak in euthermic Tb (0.4 ± 0.3 °C). These results provide evidence for a circannual rhythm in Tb that is associated with increased sensitivity to A1AR signaling and correlates with the onset of torpor. PMID:23735499

  13. Highlights in basic autonomic neurosciences: Central adenosine A1 receptor – The key to a hypometabolic state and therapeutic hypothermia?

    PubMed Central

    Tupone, D.; Madden, C.J.; Morrison, S.F.

    2016-01-01

    The positive outcome that hypothermia contributes to brain and cardiac protection following ischemia has stimulated research in the development of pharmacological approaches to induce a hypothermic/hypometabolic state. Here we review three papers to highlight the role of the adenosine 1 receptor (A1AR) as a potential mediator and physiological regulator of a hypothermic state in both hibernating and non-hibernating mammals. We would like to emphasize the importance of comparative studies between hibernating and non-hibernating species that could lead to important discoveries on the mechanisms inducing hibernation and how they might be translated to induce a clinically useful hypothermic state. PMID:23465354

  14. Phosphatidic acid phospholipase A1 mediates ER-Golgi transit of a family of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Kunduri, Govind; Yuan, Changqing; Parthibane, Velayoudame; Nyswaner, Katherine M; Kanwar, Ritu; Nagashima, Kunio; Britt, Steven G; Mehta, Nickita; Kotu, Varshika; Porterfield, Mindy; Tiemeyer, Michael; Dolph, Patrick J; Acharya, Usha; Acharya, Jairaj K

    2014-07-01

    The coat protein II (COPII)-coated vesicular system transports newly synthesized secretory and membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi complex. Recruitment of cargo into COPII vesicles requires an interaction of COPII proteins either with the cargo molecules directly or with cargo receptors for anterograde trafficking. We show that cytosolic phosphatidic acid phospholipase A1 (PAPLA1) interacts with COPII protein family members and is required for the transport of Rh1 (rhodopsin 1), an N-glycosylated G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), from the ER to the Golgi complex. In papla1 mutants, in the absence of transport to the Golgi, Rh1 is aberrantly glycosylated and is mislocalized. These defects lead to decreased levels of the protein and decreased sensitivity of the photoreceptors to light. Several GPCRs, including other rhodopsins and Bride of sevenless, are similarly affected. Our findings show that a cytosolic protein is necessary for transit of selective transmembrane receptor cargo by the COPII coat for anterograde trafficking. PMID:25002678

  15. Formyl peptide receptors and the regulation of ACTH secretion: targets for annexin A1, lipoxins, and bacterial peptides

    PubMed Central

    John, C. D.; Sahni, V.; Mehet, D.; Morris, J. F.; Christian, H. C.; Perretti, M.; Flower, R. J.; Solito, E.; Buckingham, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a family of G-protein coupled receptors that respond to proinflammatory N-formylated bacterial peptides (e.g., formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, fMLF) and, thus, contribute to the host response to bacterial infection. Paradoxically, a growing body of evidence suggests that some members of this receptor family may also be targets for certain anti-inflammatory molecules, including annexin A1 (ANXA1), which is an important mediator of glucocorticoid (GC) action. To explore further the potential role of FPRs in mediating ANXA1 actions, we have focused on the pituitary gland, where ANXA1 has a well-defined role as a cell-cell mediator of the inhibitory effects of GCs on the secretion of corticotrophin (ACTH), and used molecular, genetic, and pharmacological approaches to address the question in well-established rodent models. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis identified mRNAs for four FPR family members in the mouse anterior pituitary gland, Fpr-rs1, Fpr-rs2, Fpr-rs6, and Fpr-rs7. Functional studies confirmed that, like dexamethasone, ANXA1 and two ANXA1-derived peptides (ANXA11-188 and ANXA1Ac2-26) inhibit the evoked release of ACTH from rodent anterior pituitary tissue in vitro. Fpr1 gene deletion failed to modify the pituitary responses to dexamethasone or ANXA1Ac2-26. However, lipoxin A4 (LXA4, 0.02-2μM, a lipid mediator with high affinity for Fpr-rs1) mimicked the inhibitory effects of ANXA1 on ACTH release as also did fMLF in high (1-100 μM) but not lower (10-100 nM) concentrations. Additionally, a nonselective FPR antagonist (Boc1, 100 μM) overcame the effects of dexamethasone, ANXA11-188, ANXA1Ac2-26, fMLF, and LXA4 on ACTH release, although at a lower concentration (50 μM), it was without effect. Together, the results suggest that the actions of ANXA1 in the pituitary gland are independent of Fpr1 but may involve other FPR family members, in particular, Fpr-rs1 or a closely related receptor. They

  16. Transient receptor potential A1 channels: insights into cough and airway inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Belvisi, Maria G; Dubuis, Eric; Birrell, Mark A

    2011-10-01

    Cough is a common symptom of diseases such as asthma and COPD and also presents as a disease in its own right. Treatment options are limited; a recent meta-analysis concluded that over-the-counter remedies are ineffective, and there is increasing concern about their use in children. Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) channels are nonselective cation channels that are activated by a range of natural products (eg, allyl isothiocyanate), a multitude of environmental irritants (eg, acrolein, which is present in air pollution, vehicle exhaust, and cigarette smoke), and inflammatory mediators (eg, cyclopentenone prostaglandins). TRPA1 is primarily expressed in small-diameter, nociceptive neurons where its activation probably contributes to the perception of noxious stimuli. Inhalational exposure to irritating gases, fumes, dusts, vapors, chemicals, and endogenous mediators can lead to the development of cough. The respiratory tract is innervated by primary sensory afferent nerves, which are activated by mechanical and chemical stimuli. Recent data suggest that activation of TRPA1 on these vagal sensory afferents by these irritant substances could lead to central reflexes, including dyspnea, changes in breathing pattern, and cough, which contribute to the symptoms and pathophysiology of respiratory diseases. PMID:21972382

  17. Methylglyoxal Activates Nociceptors through Transient Receptor Potential Channel A1 (TRPA1)

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam J.; Filipovic, Milos R.; Leffler, Andreas; de la Roche, Jeanne; Kistner, Katrin; Fischer, Michael J.; Fleming, Thomas; Zimmermann, Katharina; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Reeh, Peter W.; Sauer, Susanne K.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can develop as an agonizing sequela of diabetes mellitus and chronic uremia. A chemical link between both conditions of altered metabolism is the highly reactive compound methylglyoxal (MG), which accumulates in all cells, in particular neurons, and leaks into plasma as an index of the severity of the disorder. The electrophilic structure of this cytotoxic ketoaldehyde suggests TRPA1, a receptor channel deeply involved in inflammatory and neuropathic pain, as a molecular target. We demonstrate that extracellularly applied MG accesses specific intracellular binding sites of TRPA1, activating inward currents and calcium influx in transfected cells and sensory neurons, slowing conduction velocity in unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers, and stimulating release of proinflammatory neuropeptides from and action potential firing in cutaneous nociceptors. Using a model peptide of the N terminus of human TRPA1, we demonstrate the formation of disulfide bonds based on MG-induced modification of cysteines as a novel mechanism. In conclusion, MG is proposed to be a candidate metabolite that causes neuropathic pain in metabolic disorders and thus is a promising target for medicinal chemistry. PMID:22740698

  18. Homeostatic action of adenosine A3 and A1 receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Streitová, Denisa; Vacek, Antonín

    2008-07-01

    Two adenosine receptor agonists, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), which selectively activate adenosine A3 and A1 receptors, respectively, were tested for their ability to influence proliferation of granulocytic and erythroid cells in femoral bone marrow of mice using morphological criteria. Agonists were given intraperitoneally to mice in repeated isomolar doses of 200 nmol/kg. Three variants of experiments were performed to investigate the action of the agonists under normal resting state of mice and in phases of cell depletion and subsequent regeneration after treatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. In the case of granulopoiesis, IB-MECA 1) increased by a moderate but significant level proliferation of cells under normal resting state; 2) strongly increased proliferation of cells in the cell depletion phase; but 3) did not influence cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. CPA did not influence cell proliferation under normal resting state and in the cell depletion phase, but strongly suppressed the overshooting cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. The stimulatory effect of IB-MECA on cell proliferation of erythroid cells was observed only when this agonist was administered during the cell depletion phase. CPA did not modulate erythroid proliferation in any of the functional states investigated, probably due to the lower demand for cell production as compared with granulopoiesis. The results indicate opposite effects of the two adenosine receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic cells and suggest the plasticity and homeostatic role of the adenosine receptor expression. PMID:18445770

  19. Negative Effects of SRD5A1 on Nuclear Activity of Progesterone Receptor Isoform B in JEG3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhuo; Sun, Min; Jiang, Feng; Yao, Yuanqing; Li, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Progesterone withdrawal signals labor in mammals. Elevated intracellular metabolism contributes to progesterone functional withdrawal through unknown mechanism, which is thought to act via progesterone receptor (PR). This study aims to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone withdrawal during pregnancy and labor. We investigated the role of 5α-reductase type I (SRD5A1) in enzymatic catalysis of progesterone and loss of PR function in a human trophoblast choriocarcinoma cell line JEG3. The PR isoform B (PR-B) was robustly expressed in JEG3 cells. The SRD5A1 small-interfering RNA knockdown led to significant increase in PR-B nuclear import, ectopic, whereas SRD5A1 overexpression resulted in remarkable inhibition of nuclear PR-B in P4-treated cells. Repression of SRD5A1 activated PR-B responsive gene, whereas overexpression of SRD5A1 possessed an inhibitory effect. JEG3 cell line is a valuable tool to study mechanisms responsible for loss of PR function and screening of drugs for preterm birth treatment. Our study aims to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone withdrawal during pregnancy and labor. PMID:26243543

  20. The autism-related gene SNRPN regulates cortical and spine development via controlling nuclear receptor Nr4a1.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiping; Zhao, Pingping; Xu, Qiong; Shan, Shifang; Hu, Chunchun; Qiu, Zilong; Xu, Xiu

    2016-01-01

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene, encoding the RNA-associated SmN protein, duplications or deletions of which are strongly associated with neurodevelopmental disabilities. SNRPN-coding protein is highly expressed in the brain. However, the role of SNRPN protein in neural development remains largely unknown. Here we showed that the expression of SNRPN increased markedly during postnatal brain development. Overexpression or knockdown of SNRPN in cortical neurons impaired neurite outgrowth, neuron migration, and the distribution of dendritic spines. We found that SNRPN regulated the expression level of Nr4a1, a critical nuclear receptor during neural development, in cultured primary cortical neurons. The abnormal spine development caused by SNRPN overexpression could be fully rescued by Nr4a1 co-expression. Importantly, we found that either knockdown of Nr4a1 or 3, 3'- Diindolylmethane (DIM), an Nr4a1 antagonist, were able to rescue the effects of SNRPN knockdown on neurite outgrowth of embryonic cortical neurons, providing the potential therapeutic methods for SNRPN deletion disorders. We thus concluded that maintaining the proper level of SNRPN is critical in cortical neurodevelopment. Finally, Nr4a1 may serve as a potential drug target for SNRPN-related neurodevelopmental disabilities, including Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). PMID:27430727

  1. The autism-related gene SNRPN regulates cortical and spine development via controlling nuclear receptor Nr4a1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiping; Zhao, Pingping; Xu, Qiong; Shan, Shifang; Hu, Chunchun; Qiu, Zilong; Xu, Xiu

    2016-01-01

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene, encoding the RNA-associated SmN protein, duplications or deletions of which are strongly associated with neurodevelopmental disabilities. SNRPN-coding protein is highly expressed in the brain. However, the role of SNRPN protein in neural development remains largely unknown. Here we showed that the expression of SNRPN increased markedly during postnatal brain development. Overexpression or knockdown of SNRPN in cortical neurons impaired neurite outgrowth, neuron migration, and the distribution of dendritic spines. We found that SNRPN regulated the expression level of Nr4a1, a critical nuclear receptor during neural development, in cultured primary cortical neurons. The abnormal spine development caused by SNRPN overexpression could be fully rescued by Nr4a1 co-expression. Importantly, we found that either knockdown of Nr4a1 or 3, 3′- Diindolylmethane (DIM), an Nr4a1 antagonist, were able to rescue the effects of SNRPN knockdown on neurite outgrowth of embryonic cortical neurons, providing the potential therapeutic methods for SNRPN deletion disorders. We thus concluded that maintaining the proper level of SNRPN is critical in cortical neurodevelopment. Finally, Nr4a1 may serve as a potential drug target for SNRPN-related neurodevelopmental disabilities, including Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). PMID:27430727

  2. Gustatory receptor neurons in Manduca sexta contain a TrpA1-dependent signaling pathway that integrates taste and temperature.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Anika; Howlett, Natalie; Shukla, Aditi; Ahmad, Farah; Batista, Elizabeth; Bedard, Katie; Payne, Sara; Morton, Brian; Mansfield, Jennifer H; Glendinning, John I

    2013-09-01

    Temperature modulates the peripheral taste response of many animals, in part by activating transient receptor potential (Trp) cation channels. We hypothesized that temperature would also modulate peripheral taste responses in larval Manduca sexta. We recorded excitatory responses of the lateral and medial styloconic sensilla to chemical stimuli at 14, 22, and 30 °C. The excitatory responses to 5 chemical stimuli-a salt (KCl), 3 sugars (sucrose, glucose, and inositol) and an alkaloid (caffeine)-were unaffected by temperature. In contrast, the excitatory response to the aversive compound, aristolochic acid (AA), increased robustly with temperature. Next, we asked whether TrpA1 mediates the thermally dependent taste response to AA. To this end, we 1) identified a TrpA1 gene in M. sexta; 2) demonstrated expression of TrpA1 in the lateral and medial styloconic sensilla; 3) determined that 2 TrpA1 antagonists (HC-030031 and mecamylamine) inhibit the taste response to AA, but not caffeine; and then 4) established that the thermal dependence of the taste response to AA is blocked by HC-030031. Taken together, our results indicate that TrpA1 serves as a molecular integrator of taste and temperature in M. sexta. PMID:23828906

  3. FUS regulates AMPA receptor function and FTLD/ALS-associated behaviour via GluA1 mRNA stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Fujioka, Yusuke; Tanaka, Motoki; Honda, Daiyu; Yokoi, Satoshi; Riku, Yuichi; Ibi, Daisuke; Nagai, Taku; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Katsuno, Masahisa; Inada, Toshifumi; Ohno, Kinji; Sokabe, Masahiro; Okado, Haruo; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Sobue, Gen

    2015-01-01

    FUS is an RNA/DNA-binding protein involved in multiple steps of gene expression and is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, the specific disease-causing and/or modifying mechanism mediated by FUS is largely unknown. Here we evaluate intrinsic roles of FUS on synaptic functions and animal behaviours. We find that FUS depletion downregulates GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptor. FUS binds GluA1 mRNA in the vicinity of the 3′ terminus and controls poly (A) tail maintenance, thus regulating stability. GluA1 reduction upon FUS knockdown reduces miniature EPSC amplitude both in cultured neurons and in vivo. FUS knockdown in hippocampus attenuates dendritic spine maturation and causes behavioural aberrations including hyperactivity, disinhibition and social interaction defects, which are partly ameliorated by GluA1 reintroduction. These results highlight the pivotal role of FUS in regulating GluA1 mRNA stability, post-synaptic function and FTLD-like animal behaviours. PMID:25968143

  4. Season primes the brain in an arctic hibernator to facilitate entrance into torpor mediated by adenosine A1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jinka, Tulasi R.; Tøien, Øivind; Drew, Kelly L.

    2011-01-01

    Torpor in hibernating mammals defines the nadir in mammalian metabolic demand and body temperature that accommodates seasonal periods of reduced energy availability. The mechanism of metabolic suppression during torpor onset is unknown although the central nervous system (CNS) is a key regulator of torpor. Seasonal hibernators such as the arctic ground squirrel (AGS) display torpor only during the winter, hibernation season. The seasonal character of hibernation thus provides a clue to its regulation. In the present study we delivered adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists into the lateral ventricle of AGS at different times of the year while monitoring the rate of O2 consumption and core body temperature as indicators of torpor. The A1 antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT) reversed spontaneous entrance into torpor. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) induced torpor in 6 out of 6 AGS tested during the mid-hibernation season, 2 out of 6 AGS tested early in the hibernation season and none of the 6 AGS tested during the summer, off-season. CHA-induced torpor within the hibernation season was specific to A1AR activation; the A3AR agonist 2-Cl-IB MECA failed to induce torpor and the A2aR antagonist MSX-3, failed to reverse spontaneous onset of torpor. CHA-induced torpor was similar to spontaneous entrance into torpor. These results show that metabolic suppression during torpor onset is regulated within the CNS via A1AR activation and requires a seasonal switch in the sensitivity of purinergic signaling. PMID:21795527

  5. Proximal tubule sphingosine kinase-1 has a critical role in A1 adenosine receptor-mediated renal protection from ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Kim, Joo Yun; Brown, Kevin M.; Haase, Volker H.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Renal ischemia reperfusion injury is a major cause of acute kidney injury. We previously found that renal A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) activation attenuated multiple cell death pathways including necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation. Here, we tested whether induction of cytoprotective sphingosine kinase (SK)-1 and sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) synthesis might be the mechanism of protection. A selective A1AR agonist (CCPA) increased the synthesis of S1P and selectively induced SK-1 in mouse kidney and HK-2 cells. This agonist failed to protect SK1-knockout but protected SK2-knockout mice against renal ischemia reperfusion injury indicating a critical role of SK1 in A1AR-mediated renal protection. Inhibition of SK prevented A1AR-mediated defense against necrosis and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. A selective S1P1R antagonist (W146) and global in vivo gene knockdown of S1P1Rs with small interfering RNA completely abolished the renal protection provided by CCPA. Mice selectively deficient in renal proximal tubule S1P1Rs (S1P1Rflox/flox PEPCKCre/−) were not protected against renal ischemia reperfusion injury by CCPA. Mechanistically, CCPA increased nuclear translocation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α in HK-2 cells and selective hypoxia inducible factor-1α inhibition blocked A1AR-mediated induction of SK1. Thus, proximal tubule SK-1 has a critical role in A1AR-mediated protection against renal ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:22695326

  6. Food Cravings, Food Addiction, and a Dopamine-Resistant (DRD2 A1) Receptor Polymorphism in Asian American College Students

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Joanna; Trang, Amy; Henning, Susanne M; Wilhalme, Holly; Carpenter, Catherine; Heber, David; Li, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives In an era where obesity remains an important public health concern, food addiction has emerged as a possible contributor to obesity. The DRD2 gene is the most studied polymorphism. The aim of this study was to investigate a relationship between food craving and food addiction questionnaires, body composition measurements, and a dopamine-resistant receptor polymorphism (DRD2 A1) among healthy Asian Americans. Subjects/Methods A total of 84 Asian American college students were recruited. Participants underwent body composition measurement via bioelectrical impedance, answered subjective questionnaires, and had blood drawn for genotyping. Results Among Asian American college students, there was no difference in body composition (BMI, percent body fat) between the A1 (A1A1 or A1A2) and A2 (A2A2) groups. There were statistically significant differences in food cravings of carbohydrates and fast food on the Food Craving Inventory between the A1 and A2 groups (p=0.03), but not for sugar or fat. Among female Asian college students, there was also a difference on the Power of Food questionnaire (p=0.04), which was not seen among males. 13 out of 55 females also had > 30% body fat at a BMI of 21.4 to 28.5 kg/m2. Conclusion Greater carbohydrate and fast food craving was associated with the DRD2 A1 versus A2 allele among Asian Americans. Further studies examining the ability of dopamine agonists to affect food craving and to reduce body fat in Asian American are warranted. More studies in food addiction among obese Asian Americans are needed with careful definition of obesity, specifically for Asian women. PMID:27222427

  7. Human Anti-Oxidation Protein A1M—A Potential Kidney Protection Agent in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstedt, Jonas; Tran, Thuy A.; Strand, Sven-Erik; Gram, Magnus; Åkerström, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been in clinical use for 15 years to treat metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT is limited by reabsorption and retention of the administered radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the proximal tubule. Consequently, it is essential to develop and employ methods to protect the kidneys during PRRT. Today, infusion of positively charged amino acids is the standard method of kidney protection. Other methods, such as administration of amifostine, are still under evaluation and show promising results. α1-microglobulin (A1M) is a reductase and radical scavenging protein ubiquitously present in plasma and extravascular tissue. Human A1M has antioxidation properties and has been shown to prevent radiation-induced in vitro cell damage and protect non-irradiated surrounding cells. It has recently been shown in mice that exogenously infused A1M and the somatostatin analogue octreotide are co-localized in proximal tubules of the kidney after intravenous infusion. In this review we describe the current situation of kidney protection during PRRT, discuss the necessity and implications of more precise dosimetry and present A1M as a new, potential candidate for renal protection during PRRT and related targeted radionuclide therapies. PMID:26694383

  8. Human Anti-Oxidation Protein A1M--A Potential Kidney Protection Agent in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahlstedt, Jonas; Tran, Thuy A; Strand, Sven-Erik; Gram, Magnus; Åkerström, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been in clinical use for 15 years to treat metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT is limited by reabsorption and retention of the administered radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the proximal tubule. Consequently, it is essential to develop and employ methods to protect the kidneys during PRRT. Today, infusion of positively charged amino acids is the standard method of kidney protection. Other methods, such as administration of amifostine, are still under evaluation and show promising results. α₁-microglobulin (A1M) is a reductase and radical scavenging protein ubiquitously present in plasma and extravascular tissue. Human A1M has antioxidation properties and has been shown to prevent radiation-induced in vitro cell damage and protect non-irradiated surrounding cells. It has recently been shown in mice that exogenously infused A1M and the somatostatin analogue octreotide are co-localized in proximal tubules of the kidney after intravenous infusion. In this review we describe the current situation of kidney protection during PRRT, discuss the necessity and implications of more precise dosimetry and present A1M as a new, potential candidate for renal protection during PRRT and related targeted radionuclide therapies. PMID:26694383

  9. Anti-nociceptive properties of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol in mice: role of A1 adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, AP; Böhmer, AE; Antunes, C; Schallenberger, C; Porciúncula, LO; Elisabetsky, E; Lara, DR; Souza, DO

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Allopurinol is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme xanthine oxidase, used primarily in the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. It is well known that purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. We hypothesized that the inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol, thereby reducing purine degradation, could be a valid strategy to enhance purinergic activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-nociceptive profile of allopurinol on chemical and thermal pain models in mice. Experimental approach Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of vehicle (Tween 10%) or allopurinol (10–400 mg kg−1). Anti-nociceptive effects were measured with intraplantar capsaicin, intraplantar glutamate, tail-flick or hot-plate tests. Key results Allopurinol presented dose-dependent anti-nociceptive effects in all models. The opioid antagonist naloxone did not affect these anti-nociceptive effects. The non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist caffeine and the selective A1 adenosine-receptor antagonist, DPCPX, but not the selective A2A adenosine-receptor antagonist, SCH58261, completely prevented allopurinol-induced anti-nociception. No obvious motor deficits were produced by allopurinol, at doses up to 200 mg kg−1. Allopurinol also caused an increase in cerebrospinal fluid levels of purines, including the nucleosides adenosine and guanosine, and decreased cerebrospinal fluid concentration of uric acid. Conclusions and implications Allopurinol-induced anti-nociception may be related to adenosine accumulation. Allopurinol is an old and extensively used compound and seems to be well tolerated with no obvious central nervous system toxic effects at high doses. This drug may be useful to treat pain syndromes in humans. PMID:19133997

  10. Forkhead-box A1 suppresses the progression of endometrial cancer via crosstalk with estrogen receptor α.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyun; Bao, Wei; Qiu, Meiting; Liao, Yun; Che, Qi; Yang, Tingting; He, Xiaoying; Qiu, Haifeng; Wan, Xiaoping

    2014-03-01

    Mechanisms governing the function of Forkhead-box A1 (FOXA1), a member of the FOX class of transcription factors, have been extensively studied. However, little is known about the activities and expression pattern of FOXA1 in endometrial cancer (EC). In the present study, we investigated the level of FOXA1 in multiple human EC cell lines and clinical samples by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. FOXA1 overexpression was observed in estrogen receptor (ER)α-positive EC cell lines (P=0.0048). In endometrial tissues, FOXA1 was significantly upregulated in both normal endometrium and well-differentiated endometrial cancer tissues (P<0.001). Functional analyses of FOXA1 were evaluated by MTT, plate colony formation and Transwell assay. The results revealed that forced expression of FOXA1 inhibited EC cell proliferation, whereas FOXA1 depletion promoted cell viability and was associated with tumorigenesis. The nude mouse tumor xenograft assay also confirmed that ablation of FOXA1 expression promoted cell proliferation. Furthermore, we found that knockdown of FOXA1 decreased the expression of ERα, and FOXA1 interacted with this receptor in the EC cell lines. Collectively, these experiments suggest that FOXA1 is a tumor suppressor in EC and has a possible interaction with ERα. PMID:24452315

  11. Biological and Structural Characterization of Glycosylation on Ephrin-A1, a Preferred Ligand for EphA2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Ferluga, Sara; Hantgan, Roy; Goldgur, Yehuda; Himanen, Juha P.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    The EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in a number of malignancies and is activated by ephrin ligands, most commonly by ephrin-A1. The crystal structure of the ligand-receptor complex revealed a glycosylation on the Asn-26 of ephrin-A1. Here we report for the first time the significance of the glycosylation in the biology of EphA2 and ephrin-A1. Ephrin-A1 was enzymatically deglycosylated, and its activity was evaluated in several assays using glioblastoma (GBM) cells and recombinant EphA2. We found that deglycosylated ephrin-A1 does not efficiently induce EphA2 receptor internalization and degradation, and does not activate the downstream signaling pathways involved in cell migration and proliferation. Data obtained by surface plasmon resonance confirms that deglycosylated ephrin-A1 does not bind EphA2 with high affinity. Mutations in the glycosylation site on ephrin-A1 result in protein aggregation and mislocalization. Analysis of Eph/ephrin crystal structures reveals an interaction between the ligand's carbohydrates and two residues of EphA2: Asp-78 and Lys-136. These findings suggest that the glycosylation on ephrin-A1 plays a critical role in the binding and activation of the EphA2 receptor. PMID:23661698

  12. The adenosine/neutrophil paradox resolved: human neutrophils possess both A1 and A2 receptors that promote chemotaxis and inhibit O2 generation, respectively.

    PubMed Central

    Cronstein, B N; Daguma, L; Nichols, D; Hutchison, A J; Williams, M

    1990-01-01

    Occupancy of specific receptors on neutrophils by adenosine or its analogues diminishes the stimulated release of toxic oxygen metabolites from neutrophils, while paradoxically promoting chemotaxis. We now report evidence that two distinct adenosine receptors are found on neutrophils (presumably the A1 and A2 receptors of other cell types). These adenosine receptors modulate chemotaxis and O2- generation, respectively. N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a selective A1 agonist, promoted neutrophil chemotaxis to the chemoattractant FMLP as well as or better than 5'N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA). In contrast, CPA did not inhibit O2- generation stimulated by FMLP. Pertussis toxin completely abolished promotion of chemotaxis by CPA but enhanced inhibition by NECA of O2- generation. Disruption of microtubules by colchicine or vinblastine also abrogated the enhancement by NECA of chemotaxis whereas these agents did not markedly interfere with inhibition by NECA of O2- generation. FMLP receptors, once they have bound ligand, shift to a high affinity state and become associated with the cytoskeleton. NECA significantly increased association of [3H]FMLP with cytoskeletal preparations as it inhibited O2-. Disruption of microtubules did not prevent NECA from increasing association of [3H]FMLP with cytoskeletal preparations. Additionally, CPA (A1 agonist) did not increase binding of [3H]FMLP to the cytoskeleton as well as NECA (A2 agonist). These studies indicate that occupancy of one class of adenosine receptors (A1) promotes chemotaxis by a mechanism requiring intact microtubules and G proteins whereas engagement of a second class of receptors (A2) inhibits O2- generation. Signalling via A2 receptors is independent of microtubules, insensitive to pertussis toxin and is associated with binding of [3H]FMLP to cytoskeletal preparations. PMID:2156895

  13. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide acts at prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors to suppress inhibitory musculomotor neurotransmission in guinea pig colon and human jejunum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Xia, Yun; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the smooth musculature. Exposure to β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD, and adenosine, as well as the purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonists MRS 2179 and MRS 2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically evoked contractions. The results do not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. The influence of β-NAD on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25813057

  14. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide acts at prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors to suppress inhibitory musculomotor neurotransmission in guinea pig colon and human jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Xia, Yun; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J.; Mikami, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the smooth musculature. Exposure to β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD, and adenosine, as well as the purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonists MRS 2179 and MRS 2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically evoked contractions. The results do not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. The influence of β-NAD on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25813057

  15. A1 adenosine receptor-induced phosphorylation and modulation of transglutaminase 2 activity in H9c2 cells: A role in cell survival.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Falguni S; Hargreaves, Alan J; Bonner, Philip L R; Boocock, David J; Coveney, Clare; Dickenson, John M

    2016-05-01

    The regulation of tissue transglutaminase (TG2) activity by the GPCR family is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the modulation of TG2 activity by the A1 adenosine receptor in cardiomyocyte-like H9c2 cells. H9c2 cells were lysed following stimulation with the A1 adenosine receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). Transglutaminase activity was determined using an amine incorporating and a protein cross linking assay. TG2 phosphorylation was assessed via immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. The role of TG2 in A1 adenosine receptor-induced cytoprotection was investigated by monitoring hypoxia-induced cell death. CPA induced time and concentration-dependent increases in amine incorporating and protein crosslinking activity of TG2. CPA-induced increases in TG2 activity were attenuated by the TG2 inhibitors Z-DON and R283. Responses to CPA were blocked by PKC (Ro 31-8220), MEK1/2 (PD 98059), p38 MAPK (SB 203580) and JNK1/2 (SP 600125) inhibitors and by removal of extracellular Ca(2+). CPA triggered robust increases in the levels of TG2-associated phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, which were attenuated by PKC, MEK1/2 and JNK1/2 inhibitors. Fluorescence microscopy revealed TG2-mediated biotin-X-cadaverine incorporation into proteins and proteomic analysis identified known (Histone H4) and novel (Hexokinase 1) protein substrates for TG2. CPA pre-treatment reversed hypoxia-induced LDH release and decreases in MTT reduction. TG2 inhibitors R283 and Z-DON attenuated A1 adenosine receptor-induced cytoprotection. TG2 activity was stimulated by the A1 adenosine receptor in H9c2 cells via a multi protein kinase dependent pathway. These results suggest a role for TG2 in A1 adenosine receptor-induced cytoprotection. PMID:27005940

  16. Prostacyclin receptor expression on platelets of humans with type 2 diabetes is inversely correlated with hemoglobin A1c levels.

    PubMed

    Knebel, Stephanie M; Sprague, Randy S; Stephenson, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate platelet aggregation can result in thrombosis and tissue ischemia. When compared to healthy human platelets, those of humans with type 2 diabetes (DM2) exhibit increased aggregation when stimulated. Activation of the platelet prostacyclin receptor (IPR) results in cAMP accumulation and inhibition of platelet aggregation. We hypothesized that DM2 platelets express decreased IPR when compared to platelets of healthy humans, resulting in decreased IPR agonist-induced cAMP accumulation. We measured IPR expression with radioligand binding of [(3)H]-iloprost, a stable prostacyclin analog, and with Western blotting of the IPR protein. Iloprost-stimulated platelet cAMP levels were used to identify the functional response to IPR activation. IPR binding, expression of the IPR protein and the levels of cAMP in platelets incubated with iloprost were significantly decreased in DM2 platelets when compared to platelets of healthy humans. IPR expression decreased in platelets as glycemic control of the subjects worsened, as indicated by increased hemoglobin A1c levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that reduced IPR expression in DM2 platelets may contribute to platelet hyperactivity in humans with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25617843

  17. Annexin A1 contributes to pancreatic cancer cell phenotype, behaviour and metastatic potential independently of Formyl Peptide Receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Belvedere, Raffaella; Bizzarro, Valentina; Forte, Giovanni; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Parente, Luca; Petrella, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a Ca(2+)-binding protein over-expressed in pancreatic cancer (PC). We recently reported that extracellular ANXA1 mediates PC cell motility acting on Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs). Here, we describe other mechanisms by which intracellular ANXA1 could mediate PC progression. We obtained ANXA1 Knock-Out (KO) MIA PaCa-2 cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology. LC-MS/MS analysis showed altered expression of several proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization. As a result, ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 partially lost their migratory and invasive capabilities with a mechanism that appeared independent of FPRs. The acquisition of a less aggressive phenotype has been further investigated in vivo. Wild type (WT), PGS (scrambled) and ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 cells were engrafted orthotopically in SCID mice. No differences were found about PC primary mass, conversely liver metastatization appeared particularly reduced in ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 engrafted mice. In summary, we show that intracellular ANXA1 is able to preserve the cytoskeleton integrity and to maintain a malignant phenotype in vitro. The protein has a relevant role in the metastatization process in vivo, as such it appears attractive and suitable as prognostic and therapeutic marker in PC progression. PMID:27412958

  18. Annexin A1 contributes to pancreatic cancer cell phenotype, behaviour and metastatic potential independently of Formyl Peptide Receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Belvedere, Raffaella; Bizzarro, Valentina; Forte, Giovanni; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Parente, Luca; Petrella, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a Ca2+-binding protein over-expressed in pancreatic cancer (PC). We recently reported that extracellular ANXA1 mediates PC cell motility acting on Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs). Here, we describe other mechanisms by which intracellular ANXA1 could mediate PC progression. We obtained ANXA1 Knock-Out (KO) MIA PaCa-2 cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology. LC-MS/MS analysis showed altered expression of several proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization. As a result, ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 partially lost their migratory and invasive capabilities with a mechanism that appeared independent of FPRs. The acquisition of a less aggressive phenotype has been further investigated in vivo. Wild type (WT), PGS (scrambled) and ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 cells were engrafted orthotopically in SCID mice. No differences were found about PC primary mass, conversely liver metastatization appeared particularly reduced in ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 engrafted mice. In summary, we show that intracellular ANXA1 is able to preserve the cytoskeleton integrity and to maintain a malignant phenotype in vitro. The protein has a relevant role in the metastatization process in vivo, as such it appears attractive and suitable as prognostic and therapeutic marker in PC progression. PMID:27412958

  19. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 2. Expression of receptor mRNA in resting and lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Hofer, M; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M

    2010-01-01

    Expression of mRNA for adenosine receptor subtypes A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) in normal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages has been investigated using the method of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results have shown a very low, unquantifiable expression of adenosine A(1) receptor mRNA in both normal and LPS-activated macrophages. The other three adenosine receptor mRNAs have been found to be expressed at various but always quantifiable levels. Activation of the macrophages by LPS induced upregulation of the expression of adenosine receptor A(2a) and A(2b) mRNA, whereas the expression of adenosine receptor A(3) mRNA was downregulated. Unstimulated macrophages exhibited a high expression of the A(2b) adenosine receptor mRNA. The findings are discussed from the point of view of the antiinflammatory and hematopoiesis-stimulating roles of the adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:19249906

  20. The diuretic action of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, a selective A1 adenosine receptor antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, R. J.; Bowmer, C. J.; Yates, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    1. The diuretic effect of the selective A1 adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (CPX), was investigated in anaesthetized rats. 2. CPX (0.1 mg kg-1, i.v.) produced significant increases in urine flow, and the excretion rate and fractional excretion of both sodium and chloride. By contrast, CPX administration did not result in any significant change in the excretion of potassium. 3. The diuretic effect of CPX was accompanied by a transient increase in inulin clearance although p-amino-hippurate clearance was unaffected, indicating the CPX induced a temporary elevation of glomerular filtration rate but no change in renal blood flow. 4. The fractional excretion of lithium (a marker of delivery of fluid out of the proximal tubule) was also significantly increased by CPX. However, other measures of tubular function derived from lithium clearance indicated that there were no changes in the handling of sodium or water in the distal regions of the nephron. 5. CPX did not significantly alter the relationship between either free water reabsorption or free water clearance and the distal delivery of sodium, which suggests that CPX does not affect the renal concentration/dilution mechanism. 6. The results of this study show that the diuresis and increased excretion of sodium and chloride induced by CPX (0.1 mg kg-1) in the rat, occurs with only transient elevation in glomerular filtration rate and no change in renal blood flow. The primary reason for the diuresis appears to be inhibition of sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8495243

  1. CD14 as a Mediator of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor-Dependent Anti-apolipoprotein A-1 IgG Chronotropic Effect on Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mannic, Tiphaine; Satta, Nathalie; Pagano, Sabrina; Python, Magaly; Virzi, Julien; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Frias, Miguel A; James, Richard W; Maturana, Andres D; Rossier, Michel F; Vuilleumier, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    In vitro and animal studies point to autoantibodies against apolipoprotein A-1 (anti-apoA-1 IgG) as possible mediators of cardiovascular (CV) disease involving several mechanisms such as basal heart rate interference mediated by a mineralocorticoid receptor-dependent L-type calcium channel activation, and a direct pro-inflammatory effect through the engagement of the toll-like receptor (TLR) 2/CD14 complex. Nevertheless, the possible implication of these receptors in the pro-arrhythmogenic effect of anti-apoA-1 antibodies remains elusive. We aimed at determining whether CD14 and TLRs could mediate the anti-apoA-1 IgG chronotropic response in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVC). Blocking CD14 suppressed anti-apoA-1 IgG binding to NRVC and the related positive chronotropic response. Anti-apoA-1 IgG alone induced the formation of a TLR2/TLR4/CD14 complex, followed by the phosphorylation of Src, whereas aldosterone alone promoted the phosphorylation of Akt by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), without affecting the chronotropic response. In the presence of both aldosterone and anti-apoA-1 IgG, the localization of TLR2/TLR4/CD14 was increased in membrane lipid rafts, followed by PI3K and Src activation, leading to an L-type calcium channel-dependent positive chronotropic response. Pharmacological inhibition of the Src pathway led to the decrease of L-type calcium channel activity and abrogated the NRVC chronotropic response. Activation of CD14 seems to be a key regulator of the mineralocorticoid receptor-dependent anti-apoA-1 IgG positive chronotropic effect on NRVCs, involving relocation of the CD14/TLR2/TLR4 complex into lipid rafts followed by PI3K and Src-dependent L-type calcium channel activation. PMID:26393305

  2. Phorbol ester treatment to mice inhibits DNA binding of the TCDD inducible nuclear dioxin-receptor to Cyp1A1 enhancer elements

    SciTech Connect

    Okino, S.T.; Tukey, R.H. )

    1991-03-15

    The treatment of C57BL/6 mice with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) results in transcriptional activation of the Cyp1A1 and Cyp1A2 genes. Quantitation of mRNA levels and transcription rates demonstrate that post-transcriptional mechanisms are not involved in TCDD induction of the Cyp1A genes. The induction of the Cyp1A genes by TCDD occurs following ligand binding to the dioxin-receptor and accumulation of the ligand-receptor complex in the nucleus. The administration of the tumor promoting agent 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) before or in combination with the administration of TCDD inhibits transcriptional activation of the Cyp1A genes. To analyze the mechanism of this inhibition, methods were developed to determine if the DNA binding potential of the nuclear dioxin-receptor was impaired. Using an oligonucleotide covering the Cyp1A1 xenobiotic responsive element (XRE), gel retardation assays demonstrated that within 1 hour, TCDD induces a nuclear DNA binding protein. This bonding is completely inhibited when incubated with excess XRE. Transcriptional increases in the Cyp1A1 and Cyp1A2 gene follow the appearance of the nuclear dioxin-receptor. When TPA is administered together with TCDD, the ligand dependent accumulation of the nuclear dioxin-receptor is abolished. Similar results are observed if TPA is administered prior to treatment with TCDD. These results indicate that TPA inhibits TCDD induced activation of the Cyp1A genes through a receptor mediated mechanism.

  3. Chemical modification of A1 adenosine receptors in rat brain membranes. Evidence for histidine in different domains of the ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Klotz, K N; Lohse, M J; Schwabe, U

    1988-11-25

    Chemical modification of amino acid residues was used to probe the ligand recognition site of A1 adenosine receptors from rat brain membranes. The effect of treatment with group-specific reagents on agonist and antagonist radioligand binding was investigated. The histidine-specific reagent diethylpyrocarbonate (DEP) induced a loss of binding of the agonist R-N6-[3H] phenylisopropyladenosine ([3H]PIA), which could be prevented in part by agonists, but not by antagonists. DEP treatment induced also a loss of binding of the antagonist [3H]8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine ([3H]DPCPX). Antagonists protected A1 receptors from this inactivation while agonists did not. This result provided evidence for the existence of at least 2 different histidine residues involved in ligand binding. Consistent with a modification of the binding site, DEP did not alter the affinity of [3H]DPCPX, but reduced receptor number. From the selective protection of [3H] PIA and [3H]DPCPX binding from inactivation, it is concluded that agonists and antagonists occupy different domains at the binding site. Sulfhydryl modifying reagents did not influence antagonist binding, but inhibited agonist binding. This effect is explained by modification of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein. Pyridoxal 5-phosphate inactivated both [3H]PIA and [3H]DPCPX binding, but the receptors could not be protected from inactivation by ligands. Therefore, no amino group seems to be located at the ligand binding site. In addition, it was shown that no further amino acids with polar side chains are present. The absence of hydrophilic amino acids from the recognition site of the receptor apart from histidine suggests an explanation for the lack of hydrophilic ligands with high affinity for A1 receptors. PMID:3182861

  4. Human adenosine A1 receptor and P2Y2-purinoceptor-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in transfected CHO cells

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, John M; Blank, Jonathan L; Hill, Stephen J

    1998-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathway can be activated by a variety of heterotrimeric Gi/Go protein-coupled and Gq/G11 protein-coupled receptors. The aims of the current study were: (i) to investigate whether the Gi/Go protein-coupled adenosine A1 receptor activates the MAP kinase pathway in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-A1) and (ii) to determine whether adenosine A1 receptor activation would modulate the MAP kinase response elicited by the endogenous P2Y2 purinoceptor.The selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) stimulated time and concentration-dependent increases in MAP kinase activity in CHO-A1 cells (EC50 7.1±0.4 nM). CPA-mediated increases in MAP kinase activity were blocked by PD 98059 (50 μM; 89±4% inhibition), an inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase 1 (MEKI) activation, and by pre-treating cells with pertussis toxin (to block Gi/Go-dependent pathways).Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated activation of MAP kinase was abolished by pre-treatment with the protein tyrosine inhibitor, genistein (100 μM; 6±10% of control). In contrast, daidzein (100 μM), the inactive analogue of genistein had no significant effect (96±12 of control). MAP kinase responses to CPA (1 μM) were also sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin (100 nM; 55±8% inhibition) and LY 294002 (30 μM; 40±5% inhibition) but not to the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (10 μM).Activation of the endogenous P2Y2 purinoceptor with UTP also stimulated time and concentration-dependent increases in MAP kinase activity in CHO-A1 cells (EC50=1.6±0.3 μM). The MAP kinase response to UTP was partially blocked by pertussis toxin (67±3% inhibition) and by the PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (10 μM; 45±5% inhibition), indicating the possible involvement of both Gi/Go protein and Gq protein-dependent pathways in the overall response to UTP.CPA and UTP stimulated concentration

  5. Metformin suppresses CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2014-10-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1B1 by environmental xenobiotic chemicals or endogenous ligands through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes related to cancer, such as transformation and tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of the anti-diabetes drug metformin on expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and inducible conditions. Our results indicated that metformin down-regulated the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced conditions. Down-regulation of AhR expression was required for metformin-mediated decreases in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, and the metformin-mediated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 reduction is irrelevant to estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling. Furthermore, we found that metformin markedly down-regulated Sp1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. The use of genetic and pharmacological tools revealed that metformin-mediated down-regulation of AhR expression was mediated through the reduction of Sp1 protein. Metformin inhibited endogenous AhR ligand-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression by suppressing tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) expression in MCF-7 cells. Finally, metformin inhibits TDO expression through a down-regulation of Sp1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels. Our findings demonstrate that metformin reduces CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating AhR signaling. Metformin would be able to act as a potential chemopreventive agent against CYP1A1 and CYP1B1-mediated carcinogenesis and development of cancer. PMID:25110054

  6. β-Cell deletion of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 nuclear receptors impedes mitochondrial respiration and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Merrick S; Hancock, Chad R; Ray, Jason D; Kener, Kyle B; Draney, Carrie; Garland, Kevin; Hardman, Jeremy; Bikman, Benjamin T; Tessem, Jeffery S

    2016-07-01

    β-Cell insulin secretion is dependent on proper mitochondrial function. Various studies have clearly shown that the Nr4a family of orphan nuclear receptors is essential for fuel utilization and mitochondrial function in liver, muscle, and adipose. Previously, we have demonstrated that overexpression of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 is sufficient to induce proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined whether Nr4a expression impacts pancreatic β-cell mitochondrial function. Here, we show that β-cell mitochondrial respiration is dependent on the nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized cells was significantly decreased in β-cells lacking Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Furthermore, respiration rates of intact cells deficient for Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 in the presence of 16 mM glucose resulted in decreased glucose mediated oxygen consumption. Consistent with this reduction in respiration, a significant decrease in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion rates is observed with deletion of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Interestingly, the changes in respiration and insulin secretion occur without a reduction in mitochondrial content, suggesting decreased mitochondrial function. We establish that knockdown of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 results in decreased expression of the mitochondrial dehydrogenase subunits Idh3g and Sdhb. We demonstrate that loss of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 impedes production of ATP and ultimately inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that the orphan nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 are critical for β-cell mitochondrial function and insulin secretion. PMID:27221116

  7. Estrogen-related receptor ERRα-mediated downregulation of human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (SULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chaoqun; Zhou, Tianyan; Chen, Yue; Sun, Teng; Zhang, Shufen; Chen, Guangping

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase SULT2A1 catalyzes the sulfation of hydroxysteroids and xenobiotics. It plays an important role in the detoxification of hydroxyl-containing xenobiotics and in the regulation of the biological activities of hydroxysteroids. ERRα is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that is closely related to estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Here we report that the mRNA expression of human SULT2A1 was suppressed by ERRα in Hep G2 cells. To investigate the mechanisms of this regulation, the effects of ERRα on human SULT2A1 promoter transcription in Hep G2 cells were investigated. Reporter luciferase assay results showed that ERRα significantly represses human SULT2A1 promoter transcription in Hep G2 cells. Deletion analysis indicated that human SULT2A1 promoter region between positions −188 and −130 is necessary for its repression by ERRα in Hep G2 cells. The 5’ DNA −188 to −130 region of human SULT2A1 contains IR2 and DR4 hormone response elements and two putative ERRα response elements (ERREs) (ERRE188: GCAAGCTCA and ERRE155: ATAAGTTCA). Interestingly, ERRE188 overlaps with the IR2 element and ERRE155 overlaps with the DR4 element. Our further investigation demonstrated that ERRα represses human SULT2A1 promoter transcription by competing with other nuclear receptors for binding to IR2 or DR4 elements. The interaction of ERRE188 and ERRE155 elements with ERRα was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis. Our results suggest that ERRα may play an important role in regulating the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics and in regulating endogenous hydroxysteroid activities via the regulation of SULT2A1. PMID:21513704

  8. TaLHY, a 1R-MYB Transcription Factor, Plays an Important Role in Disease Resistance against Stripe Rust Fungus and Ear Heading in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zijin; Chen, Jieming; Su, Yongying; Liu, Hanmei; Chen, Yanger; Luo, Peigao; Du, Xiaogang; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Huaiyu

    2015-01-01

    LHY (late elongated hypocotyl) is an important gene that regulates and controls biological rhythms in plants. Additionally, LHY is highly expressed in the SSH (suppression subtractive hybridization) cDNA library-induced stripe rust pathogen (CYR32) in our previous research. To identify the function of the LHY gene in disease resistance against stripe rust, we used RACE-PCR technology to clone TaLHY in the wheat variety Chuannong19. The cDNA of TaLHY is 3085 bp long with an open reading frame of 1947 bp. TaLHY is speculated to encode a 70.3 kDa protein of 648 amino acids , which has one typical plant MYB-DNA binding domain; additionally, phylogenetic tree shows that TaLHY has the highest homology with LHY of Brachypodium distachyon(BdLHY-like). Quantitative fluorescence PCR indicates that TaLHY has higher expression in the leaf, ear and stem of wheat but lower expression in the root. Infestation of CYR32 can result in up-regulated expression of TaLHY, peaking at 72 h. Using VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) technology to disease-resistant wheat in the fourth leaf stage, plants with silenced TaLHY cannot complete their heading stage. Through the compatible interaction with the stripe rust physiological race CYR32, Chuannong 19 loses its immune capability toward the stripe rust pathogen, indicating that TaLHY may regulate and participate in the heading of wheat, as well as the defense responses against stripe rust infection. PMID:26010918

  9. The MTOR LM-MHD Flow Facility, and Preliminary Experimental Investigation of Thin Layer, Liquid Metal Flow in a 1/R Toroidal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, Neil B.; Burris, Jonathan

    2003-07-15

    Fairly recently, a new experimental free surface liquid metal MHD facility, the so-called MTOR facility, has come on-line, and new data has been taken concerning flows of gallium alloy across a moderately strong toroidal field with characteristic 1/R field gradient. The purpose of these experiments has been two-fold: to gather data for benchmarking currently existing one and two dimensional free surface computational flow models (as well as 3D models currently under development), and to investigate phenomena not predicted by models, especially effects of nozzles, drains, waves and turbulence. Data is presented concerning MHD effects on the mean flow height and wave structure, both with and without the so-called Zakharov magnetic propulsion current added to help control and stabilize the flow. The test section is wide enough so that the characteristic factor (Hartmann Number * Aspect Ratio) is less than unity. In this case the Hartmann layer drag effects are small, allowing comparison of experimental data to two-dimensional axisymmetric models. Preliminary conclusions suggest that the field gradient in these experiments does not adversely affect the stability of the surface, and that magnetic propulsion current is effective in flattening and accelerating the liquid metal flow.

  10. Actions of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists on CFTR antibody-inhibited β-adrenergic mucin secretion response

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, M M C; Lloyd Mills, C; Dormer, R L; McPherson, M A

    1998-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis gene protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) acts as a chloride channel and is a key regulator of mucin secretion. The mechanism by which 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) corrects the defect in CFTR mediated β-adrenergic stimulation of mucin secretion has not been determined. The present study has investigated the actions of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists to determine whether ability to stimulate mucin secretion correlates with correction of CFTR antibody inhibited β-adrenergic response and whether excessive cyclic AMP rise is required.CFTR antibodies were introduced into living rat submandibular acini by hypotonic swelling. Following recovery, mucin secretion in response to isoproterenol was measured.The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, 8 cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT) was a less potent stimulator of mucin secretion than was the A2 receptor antagonist dimethylpropargylxanthine (DMPX). A concentration of CPT close to the Ki for A1 receptor antagonism (10 nM) did not stimulate mucin secretion.DMPX, although a potent stimulator of mucin secretion, did not correct CFTR antibody inhibited mucin secretion.CPT corrected defective CFTR antibody inhibited mucin secretion at a high (1 mM) concentration, suggesting a mechanism other than adenosine receptor antagonism.DMPX potentiated the isoproterenol induced cyclic AMP rise, whereas CPT did not.Correction of the defective CFTR mucin secretion response did not correlate with ability to stimulate mucin secretion and did not require potentiation of β-adrenergic induced increases in cyclic AMP. This affords real promise for the development of a selective drug treatment for cystic fibrosis. PMID:9831904

  11. Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen; Zhou, Tianyan; Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia; Chen, Guangping

    2013-04-15

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ► Liver X receptor α mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ► LXRα and RXRα dimerization further activated this induction. ► Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ► LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ► ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.

  12. Amino-substituted 1,8-naphthyridines and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines: new compounds with affinity for A1- and A2-adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Müller, C E; Grahner, B; Heber, D

    1994-12-01

    Two novel classes of adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists, 4-amino-1,8-naphthyridines and 5-aminopyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines, have been identified and investigated in radioligand binding assays. The compounds exhibit affinities for A1 and A2a AR of rat brain in the micromolar range. 1,8-Naphthyridines are non-selective, or somewhat selective for either A1- or A2 AR. Pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines are several-fold selective for A1 AR, the most potent and selective compound being 5-n-butylamino-1,3-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrido-[2,3-d]pyr imi dine-2,4-dione (12) with a Ki value of 1.8 microM at A1 AR and greater than 10-fold A1-selectivity. PMID:7838877

  13. Involvement of Peripheral Adenosine A2 Receptors in Adenosine A1 Receptor–Mediated Recovery of Respiratory Motor Function After Upper Cervical Spinal Cord Hemisection

    PubMed Central

    James, Elysia; Nantwi, Kwaku D

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: In an animal model of spinal cord injury, a latent respiratory motor pathway can be pharmacologically activated through central adenosine A1 receptor antagonism to restore respiratory function after cervical (C2) spinal cord hemisection that paralyzes the hemidiaphragm ipsilateral to injury. Although respiration is modulated by central and peripheral mechanisms, putative involvement of peripheral adenosine A2 receptors in functional recovery in our model is untested. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of peripherally located adenosine A2 receptors on recovery of respiratory function after cervical (C2) spinal cord hemisection. Methods: Respiratory activity was electrophysiologically assessed (under standardized recording conditions) in C2-hemisected adult rats with the carotid bodies intact (H-CBI; n =12) or excised (H-CBE; n =12). Animals were administered the adenosine A2 receptor agonist, CGS-21680, followed by the A1 receptor antagonist, 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX), or administered DPCPX alone. Recovered respiratory activity, characterized as drug-induced activity in the previously quiescent left phrenic nerve of C2-hemisected animals in H-CBI and H-CBE rats, was compared. Recovered respiratory activity was calculated by dividing drug-induced activity in the left phrenic nerve by activity in the right phrenic nerve. Results: Administration of CGS-21680 before DPCPX (n = 6) in H-CBI rats induced a significantly greater recovery (58.5 ± 3.6%) than when DPCPX (42.6 ± 4.6%) was administered (n = 6) alone. In H-CBE rats, prior administration of CGS-21680 (n = 6) did not enhance recovery over that induced by DPCPX (n = 6) alone. Recovery in H-CBE rats amounted to 39.7 ± 3.7% and 38.4 + 4.2%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results suggest that adenosine A2 receptors located in the carotid bodies can enhance the magnitude of adenosine A1 receptor–mediated recovery of respiratory function after C2 hemisection

  14. Dual A1/A2B Receptor Blockade Improves Cardiac and Renal Outcomes in a Rat Model of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Tofovic, Stevan P; Salah, Eman M; Smits, Glenn J; Whalley, Eric T; Ticho, Barry; Deykin, Aaron; Jackson, Edwin K

    2016-02-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is prevalent and often accompanied by metabolic syndrome. Current treatment options are limited. Here, we test the hypothesis that combined A1/A2B adenosine receptor blockade is beneficial in obese ZSF1 rats, an animal model of HFpEF with metabolic syndrome. The combined A1/A2B receptor antagonist 3-[4-(2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-7H-purin-8-yl)-1-bicyclo[2.2.2]octanyl]propanoic acid (BG9928) was administered orally (10 mg/kg/day) to obese ZSF1 rats (n = 10) for 24 weeks (from 20 to 44 weeks of age). Untreated ZSF1 rats (n = 9) served as controls. After 24 weeks of administration, BG9928 significantly lowered plasma triglycerides (in mg/dl: control group, 4351 ± 550; BG9928 group, 2900 ± 551) without adversely affecting plasma cholesterol or activating renin release. BG9928 significantly decreased 24-hour urinary glucose excretion (in mg/kg/day: control group, 823 ± 179; BG9928 group, 196 ± 80) and improved oral glucose tolerance, polydipsia, and polyuria. BG9928 significantly augmented left ventricular diastolic function in association with a reduction in cardiac vasculitis and cardiac necrosis. BG9928 significantly reduced 24-hour urinary protein excretion (in mg/kg/day: control group, 1702 ± 263; BG9928 group, 1076 ± 238), and this was associated with a reduction in focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, tubular dilation, and deposition of proteinaceous material in the tubules. These findings show that, in a model of HFpEF with metabolic syndrome, A1/A2B receptor inhibition improves hyperlipidemia, exerts antidiabetic actions, reduces HFpEF, improves cardiac histopathology, and affords renal protection. We conclude that chronic administration of combined A1/A2B receptor antagonists could be beneficial in patients with HFpEF, in particular those with comorbidities such as obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemias. PMID:26585572

  15. Regulation of GluA1 α-Amino-3-Hydroxy-5-Methyl-4-Isoxazolepropionic Acid Receptor Function by Protein Kinase C at Serine-818 and Threonine-840

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Meagan A.; Wells, Gordon; Bachman, Julia; Snyder, James P.; Jenkins, Andrew; Huganir, Richard L.; Oswald, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Three residues within the AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor subunit GluA1 C terminus (Ser818, Ser831, Thr840) can be phosphorylated by Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PKC). Here, we show that PKC phosphorylation of GluA1 Ser818 or Thr840 enhances the weighted mean channel conductance without altering the response time course or agonist potency. These data support the idea that these residues constitute a hyper-regulatory domain for the AMPA receptor. Introduction of phosphomimetic mutations increases conductance only at these three sites within the proximal C terminus, consistent with a structural model with a flexible linker connecting the distal C-terminal domain to the more proximal domain containing a helix bracketed by Ser831 and Thr840. NMR spectra support this model and raise the possibility that phosphorylation can alter the configuration of this domain. Our findings provide insight into the structure and function of the C-terminal domain of GluA1, which controls AMPA receptor function and trafficking during synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system. PMID:24452473

  16. Synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors is regulated by a CaMKII site in the first intracellular loop of GluA1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Isozaki, Kaname; Roche, Katherine W.; Nicoll, Roger A.

    2010-01-01

    The accumulation of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at synapses is essential for excitatory synaptic transmission. However, the mechanisms underlying synaptic targeting of AMPARs remain elusive. We have now used a molecular replacement approach on an AMPAR-null background to investigate the targeting mechanisms necessary for regulating AMPAR trafficking in the hippocampus. Although there is an extensive literature on the role of the GluA1 C-tail in AMPAR trafficking, there is no effect of overexpressing the C-tail on basal transmission. Instead, we found that the first intracellular loop domain (Loop1) of GluA1, a previously overlooked region within AMPARs, is critical for receptor targeting to synapses, but not for delivery of receptors to the plasma membrane. We also identified a CaMKII phosphorylation site (S567) in the GluA1 Loop1, which is phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we show that S567 is a key residue that regulates Loop1-mediated AMPAR trafficking. Thus, our study reveals a unique mechanism for targeting AMPARs to synapses to mediate synaptic transmission. PMID:21135237

  17. Modulation of cGMP accumulation by adenosine A1 receptors at the hippocampus: influence of cGMP levels and gender.

    PubMed

    Serpa, André; Sebastião, Ana M; Cascalheira, José F

    2014-12-01

    Adenosine A1 receptor is highly expressed in hippocampus where it inhibits neurotransmitter release and has neuroprotective activity. Similar actions are obtained by increasing cGMP concentration, but a clear link between adenosine A1 receptor and cGMP levels remains to be established. The present work aims to investigate if cGMP formation is modulated by adenosine A1 receptors at the hippocampus and if this effect is gender dependent. cGMP accumulation, induced by phosphodiesterases inhibitors Zaprinast (100 μM) and Bay 60-7550 (10 μM), and cAMP accumulation, induced by Forskolin (20 μM) and Rolipram (50 μM), were quantified in rat hippocampal slices using specific enzymatic immunoassays. N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 100 nM) alone failed to modify basal cGMP accumulation. However, the presence of adenosine deaminase (ADA, 2 U/ml) unmasked a CPA (0.03-300 nM) stimulatory effect on basal cGMP accumulation (EC50: 4.2±1.4 nM; Emax: 17±0.9%). ADA influence on CPA activity was specific for cGMP, since inhibition of cAMP accumulation by CPA was not affected by the presence of ADA, though ADA inhibited cAMP accumulation in the absence of CPA. Increasing cGMP accumulation, by about four-fold, with sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 100 μM) abolished the CPA (100 nM) effect on cGMP accumulation in males but did not modify the effect of CPA in female rats. This effect was reversed by 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 100 nM), indicating an adenosine A1 receptor mediated effect on cGMP accumulation. In conclusion, adenosine A1 receptors increase intracellular cGMP formation at hippocampus both in males and females under basal conditions, but only in females when cGMP levels are increased by SNP. PMID:25300679

  18. Metformin suppresses CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2014-10-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1B1 by environmental xenobiotic chemicals or endogenous ligands through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes related to cancer, such as transformation and tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of the anti-diabetes drug metformin on expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and inducible conditions. Our results indicated that metformin down-regulated the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced conditions. Down-regulation of AhR expression was required for metformin-mediated decreases in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, and the metformin-mediated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 reduction is irrelevant to estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling. Furthermore, we found that metformin markedly down-regulated Sp1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. The use of genetic and pharmacological tools revealed that metformin-mediated down-regulation of AhR expression was mediated through the reduction of Sp1 protein. Metformin inhibited endogenous AhR ligand-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression by suppressing tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) expression in MCF-7 cells. Finally, metformin inhibits TDO expression through a down-regulation of Sp1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels. Our findings demonstrate that metformin reduces CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating AhR signaling. Metformin would be able to act as a potential chemopreventive agent against CYP1A1 and CYP1B1-mediated carcinogenesis and development of cancer. - Graphical abstract: Schematic of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene regulation by metformin. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. • Metformin down-regulates the AhR signaling. • Metformin reduces Sp1 protein expression. • Metformin suppresses TDO expression.

  19. The influence of standardized Valeriana officinalis extract on the CYP3A1 gene expression by nuclear receptors in in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Bogacz, Anna; Mrozikiewicz, Przemyslaw M; Karasiewicz, Monika; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Majchrzycki, Marian; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L; Ozarowski, Marcin; Grzeskowiak, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Valeriana officinalis is one of the most popular medicinal plants commonly used as a sedative and sleep aid. It is suggested that its pharmacologically active compounds derived from the root may modulate the CYP3A4 gene expression by activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and lead to pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of valerian on the expression level of CYP3A1 (homologue to human CYP3A4) as well as nuclear receptors PXR, CAR, RXR, GR, and HNF-4α. Male Wistar rats were given standardized valerian extract (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 3 and 10 days. The expression in liver tissue was analyzed by using real-time PCR. Our result showed a decrease of CYP3A1 expression level by 35% (P = 0.248) and 37% (P < 0.001), respectively. Moreover, Valeriana exhibited statistically significant reduction in RXR (approximately 28%) only after 3-day treatment. We also demonstrated a decrease in the amount HNF-4α by 22% (P = 0.005) and 32% (P = 0.012), respectively. In case of CAR, the increase of expression level by 46% (P = 0.023) was noted. These findings suggest that Valeriana officinalis extract can decrease the CYP3A4 expression and therefore may lead to interactions with synthetic drugs metabolized by this enzyme. PMID:25302309

  20. The Influence of Standardized Valeriana officinalis Extract on the CYP3A1 Gene Expression by Nuclear Receptors in In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Mrozikiewicz, Przemyslaw M.; Karasiewicz, Monika; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L.; Ozarowski, Marcin; Grzeskowiak, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Valeriana officinalis is one of the most popular medicinal plants commonly used as a sedative and sleep aid. It is suggested that its pharmacologically active compounds derived from the root may modulate the CYP3A4 gene expression by activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and lead to pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of valerian on the expression level of CYP3A1 (homologue to human CYP3A4) as well as nuclear receptors PXR, CAR, RXR, GR, and HNF-4α. Male Wistar rats were given standardized valerian extract (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 3 and 10 days. The expression in liver tissue was analyzed by using real-time PCR. Our result showed a decrease of CYP3A1 expression level by 35% (P = 0.248) and 37% (P < 0.001), respectively. Moreover, Valeriana exhibited statistically significant reduction in RXR (approximately 28%) only after 3-day treatment. We also demonstrated a decrease in the amount HNF-4α by 22% (P = 0.005) and 32% (P = 0.012), respectively. In case of CAR, the increase of expression level by 46% (P = 0.023) was noted. These findings suggest that Valeriana officinalis extract can decrease the CYP3A4 expression and therefore may lead to interactions with synthetic drugs metabolized by this enzyme. PMID:25302309

  1. Liver X Receptor alpha Mediated Genistein Induction of Human Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen; Zhou, Tianyan; Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia; Chen, Guangping

    2013-01-01

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. PMID:23352501

  2. The orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 specifies a distinct subpopulation of quiescent myeloid-biased long-term HSCs.

    PubMed

    Land, Ruben H; Rayne, Anna K; Vanderbeck, Ashley N; Barlowe, Trevor S; Manjunath, Shwetha; Gross, Matthew; Eiger, Sophie; Klein, Peter S; Cunningham, Nicole R; Huang, Jian; Emerson, Stephen G; Punt, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is maintained throughout life by self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that differentiate to produce both myeloid and lymphoid cells. The NR4A family of orphan nuclear receptors, which regulates cell fate in many tissues, appears to play a key role in HSC proliferation and differentiation. Using a NR4A1(GFP) BAC transgenic reporter mouse we have investigated NR4A1 expression and its regulation in early hematopoiesis. We show that NR4A1 is most highly expressed in a subset of Lin(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) CD48(-) CD150(+) long-term (LT) HSCs, and its expression is tightly associated with HSC quiescence. We also show that NR4A1 expression in HSCs is induced by PGE2, a known enhancer of stem cell engraftment potential. Finally, we find that both NR4A1(GFP+) and NR4A1(GFP-) HSCs successfully engraft primary and secondary irradiated hosts; however, NR4A1(GFP+) HSCs are distinctly myeloid-biased. These results show that NR4A1 expression identifies a highly quiescent and distinct population of myeloid-biased LT-HSCs. PMID:25284014

  3. The orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 specifies a distinct subpopulation of quiescent myeloid-biased long-term HSCs

    PubMed Central

    Land, Ruben H.; Rayne, Anna K.; Vanderbeck, Ashley N.; Barlowe, Trevor S.; Manjunath, Shwetha; Gross, Matthew; Eiger, Sophie; Klein, Peter S.; Cunningham, Nicole R.; Huang, Jian; Emerson, Stephen G.; Punt, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is maintained throughout life by self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that differentiate to produce both myeloid and lymphoid cells. The NR4A family of orphan nuclear receptors, which regulates cell fate in many tissues, appears to play a key role in HSC proliferation and differentiation. Using a NR4A1GFP BAC transgenic reporter mouse we have investigated NR4A1 expression and its regulation in early hematopoiesis. We show that NR4A1 is most highly expressed in a subset of Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ CD48−CD150+ long-term (LT) HSCs, and its expression is tightly associated with HSC quiescence. We also show that NR4A1 expression in HSCs is induced by PGE2, a known enhancer of stem cell engraftment potential. Finally, we find that both NR4A1GFP+ and NR4A1GFP− HSCs successfully engraft primary and secondary irradiated hosts; however, NR4A1GFP+ HSCs are distinctly myeloid-biased. These results show that NR4A1 expression identifies a highly quiescent and distinct population of myeloid-biased LT-HSCs. PMID:25284014

  4. Postsynaptic VAMP/Synaptobrevin Facilitates Differential Vesicle Trafficking of GluA1 and GluA2 AMPA Receptor Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Suleman; Davanger, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate organisms adapt to a continuously changing environment by regulating the strength of synaptic connections between brain cells. Excitatory synapses are believed to increase their strength by vesicular insertion of transmitter glutamate receptors into the postsynaptic plasma membrane. These vesicles, however, have never been demonstrated or characterized. For the first time, we show the presence of small vesicles in postsynaptic spines, often closely adjacent to the plasma membrane and PSD (postsynaptic density). We demonstrate that they harbor vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2) and glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluA1). Disrupting VAMP2 by tetanus toxin treatment reduces the concentration of GluA1 in the postsynaptic plasma membrane. GluA1/VAMP2-containing vesicles, but not GluA2/VAMP2-vesicles, are concentrated in postsynaptic spines relative to dendrites. Our results indicate that small postsynaptic vesicles containing GluA1 are inserted directly into the spine plasma membrane through a VAMP2-dependent mechanism. PMID:26488171

  5. Annexin A1 released from apoptotic cells acts through formyl peptide receptors to dampen inflammatory monocyte activation via JAK/STAT/SOCS signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pupjalis, Danute; Goetsch, Julia; Kottas, Diane J; Gerke, Volker; Rescher, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    The immunosuppressive effects of apoptotic cells involve inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release and establishment of an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, thus limiting the degree of inflammation and promoting resolution. We report here that this is in part mediated by the release of the anti-inflammatory mediator annexin A1 from apoptotic cells and the functional activation of annexin A1 receptors of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family on target cells. Supernatants from apoptotic neutrophils or the annexin A1 peptidomimetic Ac2-26 significantly reduced IL-6 signalling and the release of TNF-α from endotoxin-challenged monocytes. Ac2-26 activated STAT3 in a JAK-dependent manner, resulting in upregulated SOCS3 levels, and depletion of SOCS3 reversed the Ac2-26-mediated inhibition of IL-6 signalling. This identifies annexin A1 as part of the anti-inflammatory pattern of apoptotic cells and links the activation of FPRs to established signalling pathways triggering anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:21254404

  6. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    SciTech Connect

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina; Petrini, Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1.

  7. Crystal structure of murine coronavirus receptor sCEACAM1a[1,4],a member of the carcinoembtyonic antigen family

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Zelus, B. D.; Meijers, R.; Liu, J.-H.; Bergelson, J. M.; Zhang, R.; Duke, N.; Joachimiak, A.; Holmes, K. V.; Wang, J.-H.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School; Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center; Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    CEACAM1 is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family. Isoforms of murine CEACAM1 serve as receptors for mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a murine coronavirus. Here we report the crystal structure of soluble murine sCEACAM1a[1,4], which is composed of two Ig-like domains and has MHV neutralizing activity. Its N-terminal domain has a uniquely folded CC' loop that encompasses key virus-binding residues. This is the first atomic structure of any member of the CEA family, and provides a prototypic architecture for functional exploration of CEA family members. We discuss the structural basis of virus receptor activities of murine CEACAM1 proteins, binding of Neisseria to human CEACAM1, and other homophilic and heterophilic interactions of CEA family members.

  8. Rats fed soy protein isolate (SPI) have impaired hepatic CYP1A1 induction by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a result of interference with aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Rohit; Badger, Thomas M.; Ronis, Martin J.

    2008-03-01

    Consumption of soy diets has been found to reduce cancer incidence in animals and is associated with reduced cancer risk in humans. Previously, we have demonstrated that female Sprague-Dawley rats fed purified AIN-93G diets with soy protein isolate (SPI) as the sole protein source had reduced CYP1A1 induction and basal aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) levels relative to those fed the same diet containing casein (CAS). In the present study, the molecular mechanisms underlying reduced AhR expression have been studied. The SPI-effect on AhR was not observed after feeding diets containing the purified soy isoflavones genistein or daidzein. Rat hepatoma FGC-4 cells were treated with the serum obtained from rats fed CAS- or SPI-containing diets. Reduced AhR levels (P < 0.05) were observed after 24 h exposure to SPI-serum without any changes in the overall expression of chaperone proteins-HSP90 and XAP2. SPI-serum-stimulated AhR degradation was inhibited by treating the cells with the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, and was observed to be preceded by ubiquitination of the receptor. A reduced association of XAP2 with the immunoprecipitated AhR complex was observed. SPI-serum-mediated AhR degradation was preceded by nuclear translocation of the receptor. However, the translocated receptor was found to be unable to heterodimerize with ARNT or to bind to XRE elements on the CYP1A1 enhancer. These data suggest that feeding SPI-containing diets antagonizes AhR signaling by a novel mechanism which differs from those established for known AhR antagonists.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of CaM-kinase kinase via transient receptor potential canonical channels induces the translation and synaptic incorporation of GluA1-containing calcium-permeable AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Dale A; Srivastava, Taasin; Dwarakanath, Diya; Pierre, Philippe; Nygaard, Sean; Derkach, Victor A; Soderling, Thomas R

    2012-06-13

    Glutamatergic synapses in early postnatal development transiently express calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs). Although these GluA2-lacking receptors are essential and are elevated in response to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), little is known regarding molecular mechanisms that govern their expression and synaptic insertion. Here we show that BDNF-induced GluA1 translation in rat primary hippocampal neurons requires the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) via calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK). Specifically, BDNF-mediated phosphorylation of threonine 308 (T308) in AKT, a known substrate of CaMKK and an upstream activator of mTOR-dependent translation, was prevented by (1) pharmacological inhibition of CaMKK with STO-609, (2) overexpression of a dominant-negative CaMKK, or (3) short hairpin-mediated knockdown of CaMKK. GluA1 surface expression induced by BDNF, as assessed by immunocytochemistry using an extracellular N-terminal GluA1 antibody or by surface biotinylation, was impaired following knockdown of CaMKK or treatment with STO-609. Activation of CaMKK by BDNF requires transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels as SKF-96365, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist d-APV, prevented BDNF-induced GluA1 surface expression as well as phosphorylation of CaMKI, AKT(T308), and mTOR. Using siRNA we confirmed the involvement of TRPC5 and TRPC6 subunits in BDNF-induced AKT(T308) phosphorylation. The BDNF-induced increase in mEPSC was blocked by IEM-1460, a selected antagonist of CP-AMPARs, as well as by the specific repression of acute GluA1 translation via siRNA to GluA1 but not GluA2. Together these data support the conclusion that newly synthesized GluA1 subunits, induced by BDNF, are readily incorporated into synapses where they enhance the expression of CP-AMPARs and synaptic strength. PMID:22699894

  10. New Pyrazolo[1',5':1,6]pyrimido[4,5-d]pyridazin-4(3H)-ones Fluoroderivatives as Human A1 Adenosine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Alessia; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Vergelli, Claudia; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Martini, Claudia; Giacomelli, Chiara

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of pyrazolo[1',5':1,6]pyrimido[4,5-d]pyridazin-4(3H)-ones as human A1 adenosine receptor ligands. The tricyclic scaffold was modified at position 6 and 9 by introducing small alkyl chains and substituted phenyls. The most interesting compounds showed Ki for A1 in the submicromolar range (0.105-0.244 µM) and the most interesting term (compound 4c) combined an appreciable affinity for A1 (Ki = 0.132 µM) with a good selectivity toward A2A (43% inhibition at 10 µM) and A3 (46% inhibition at 10 µM). PMID:24061322

  11. Activation of transient receptor potential A1 by a non-pungent capsaicin-like compound, capsiate

    PubMed Central

    Shintaku, Kenji; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zhou, Yiming; Fushiki, Tohru; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Yazawa, Susumu; Tominaga, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Capsiate is produced by ‘CH-19 Sweet’ (Capsicum annuun L.), a non-pungent cultivar of red pepper. Like capsaicin, capsiate is thought to enhance energy metabolism by activating the sympathetic nervous system and suppressing inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms for this are uncertain. We previously reported that capsiate could activate transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a capsaicin receptor. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether capsinoids activate other TRP channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using Ca2+ imaging and whole-cell patch-clamp methods, we analysed the response of TRP channels to three kinds of capsinoids, capsiate, dihydrocapsiate and nordihydrocapsiate, in HEK293T cells expressing TRP channels or in primary cultures of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons. KEY RESULTS We found that in both cell types TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) had a slightly weaker response to capsinoids compared with TRPV1, with the capsiate EC50 for TRPA1 activation being more than that for TRPV1 activation, and that the capsinoid-evoked action was blocked by a specific TRPA1 antagonist. TRPA1 was activated by capsinoids, but not by their degradation products. Amino acids known to participate in TRPA1 activation following cysteine covalent modification or zinc treatment were not involved in the activation of TRPA1 by capsinoid. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Taken together, these results indicate that capsinoids activate TRPA1 by an as yet unknown mechanism, and TRPA1 could be involved in physiological phenomena associated with capsinoid treatment. PMID:21883144

  12. Modulation of dopamine-mediated facilitation at the neuromuscular junction of Wistar rats: A role for adenosine A1/A2A receptors and P2 purinoceptors.

    PubMed

    Elnozahi, Neveen A; AlQot, Hadir E; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; Bistawroos, Azza E; Abou Zeit-Har, Mohamed S

    2016-06-21

    This study aims to understand how dopamine and the neuromodulators, adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) modulate neuromuscular transmission. Adenosine and ATP are well-recognized for their regulatory effects on dopamine in the central nervous system. However, if similar interactions occur at the neuromuscular junction is unknown. We hypothesize that the activation of adenosine A1/A2A and/or P2 purinoceptors may influence the action of dopamine on neuromuscular transmission. Using the rat phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm, we assessed the influence of dopamine, adenosine and ATP on the height of nerve-evoked muscle twitches. We investigated how the selective blockade of adenosine A1 receptors (2.5nM DPCPX), adenosine A2A receptors (50nM CSC) and P2 purinoceptors (100μM suramin) modified the effects of dopamine. Dopamine alone increased indirect muscle contractions while adenosine and ATP either enhanced or depressed nerve-evoked muscle twitches in a concentration-dependent manner. The facilitatory effects of 256μM dopamine were significantly reduced to 29.62±2.79% or 53.69±5.45% in the presence of DPCPX or CSC, respectively, relative to 70.03±1.57% with dopamine alone. Alternatively, the action of 256μM dopamine was potentiated from 70.03±1.57, in the absence of suramin, to 86.83±4.36%, in the presence of suramin. It can be concluded that the activation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and P2 purinoceptors potentially play a central role in the regulation of dopamine effects at the neuromuscular junction. Clinically this study offers new insights for the indirect manipulation of neuromuscular transmission for the treatment of disorders characterized by motor dysfunction. PMID:27060487

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Kinase Inhibitors Synergize with TCDD to Induce CYP1A1/1A2 in Human Breast Epithelial MCF10A Cells.

    PubMed

    Joiakim, Aby; Mathieu, Patricia A; Shelp, Catherine; Boerner, Julie; Reiners, John J

    2016-05-01

    CYP1A1andCYP1A2are transcriptionally activated in the human normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A following exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Shifting MCF10A cultures to medium deficient in serum and epidermal growth factor (EGF) caused rapid reductions in the activated (i.e., phosphorylated) forms of extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs) and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Shifting to serum/EGF-deficient medium also enhanced TCDD-mediated induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 Treatment of cells cultured in complete medium with the EGFR inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa), AG1478, and CI-1033 resulted in concentration-dependent reductions of active EGFR and ERKs, and increased CYP1A1 mRNA content ∼3- to 18-fold above basal level. EGFR inhibitors synergized with TCDD and resulted in transient CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNA accumulations ∼8-fold greater (maximum at 5 hours) than that achieved with only TCDD. AG1478, gefitinib, and TCDD individually induced small increases (∼1.2- to 2.5-fold) in CYP1A1 protein content but did not cause additive or synergistic accumulations of CYP1A1 protein when used in combination. The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD184352 inhibited ERK and EGFR activation in a concentration-dependent fashion without causing CYP1A1 mRNA accumulation. However, cotreatment with PD184352 potentiated TCDD-mediatedCYP1A1induction. TCDD-mediated induction ofCYP1A1in MCF7-TETon-EGFR cells, a MCF7 variant in which EGFR expression can be controlled, was not affected by the activity status of EGFR or ERKs. Hence, EGFR signaling mutes both basal and ligand-induced expression of two aryl hydrocarbon receptor-responsive P450s in MCF10A cultures. However, these effects are cell context-dependent. Furthermore, CYP1A1 mRNA and protein abundance are not closely coupled in MCF10A cultures. PMID:26953171

  14. Dopamine D2-Receptor Antagonists Down-Regulate CYP1A1/2 and CYP1B1 in the Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Harkitis, P.; Lang, M. A.; Marselos, M.; Fotopoulos, A.; Albucharali, G.; Konstandi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic systems regulate the release of several hormones including growth hormone (GH), thyroid hormones, insulin, glucocorticoids and prolactin (PRL) that play significant roles in the regulation of various Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. The present study investigated the role of dopamine D2-receptor-linked pathways in the regulation of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 that belong to a battery of genes controlled by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) and play a crucial role in the metabolism and toxicity of numerous environmental toxicants. Inhibition of dopamine D2-receptors with sulpiride (SULP) significantly repressed the constitutive and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B expression in the rat liver. The expression of AhR, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) was suppressed by SULP in B[a]P-treated livers, whereas the AhRR expression was increased by the drug suggesting that the SULP-mediated repression of the CYP1 inducibility is due to inactivation of the AhR regulatory system. At signal transduction level, the D2-mediated down-regulation of constitutive CYP1A1/2 and CYP1B1 expression appears to be mediated by activation of the insulin/PI3K/AKT pathway. PRL-linked pathways exerting a negative control on various CYPs, and inactivation of the glucocorticoid-linked pathways that positively control the AhR-regulated CYP1 genes, may also participate in the SULP-mediated repression of both, the constitutive and induced CYP1 expression. The present findings indicate that drugs acting as D2-dopamine receptor antagonists can modify several hormone systems that regulate the expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1, and may affect the toxicity and carcinogenicity outcome of numerous toxicants and pre-carcinogenic substances. Therefore, these drugs could be considered as a part of the strategy to reduce the risk of exposure to environmental pollutants and pre-carcinogens. PMID:26466350

  15. hnRNP A1-mediated translational regulation of the G quadruplex-containing RON receptor tyrosine kinase mRNA linked to tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Pierredon, Sandra; Le Bras, Morgane; Iacovoni, Jason S.; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Favre, Gilles; Roché, Henri; Filleron, Thomas; Millevoi, Stefania; Vagner, Stéphan

    2016-01-01

    The expression and role of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) controlling mRNA translation during tumor progression remains largely uncharacterized. Analysis by immunohistochemistry of the expression of hnRNP A1, hnRNPH, RBM9/FOX2, SRSF1/ASF/SF2, SRSF2/SC35, SRSF3/SRp20, SRSF7/9G8 in breast tumors shows that the expression of hnRNP A1, but not the other tested RBPs, is associated with metastatic relapse. Strikingly, hnRNP A1, a nuclear splicing regulator, is also present in the cytoplasm of tumor cells of a subset of patients displaying exceedingly worse prognosis. Expression of a cytoplasmic mutant of hnRNP A1 leads to increased translation of the mRNA encoding the tyrosine kinase receptor RON/MTS1R, known for its function in tumor dissemination, and increases cell migration in vitro. hnRNP A1 directly binds to the 5′ untranslated region of the RON mRNA and activates its translation through G-quadruplex RNA secondary structures. The correlation between hnRNP A1 and RON tumoral expression suggests that these findings hold clinical relevance. PMID:26930004

  16. Autoradiographic localization of supraspinal kappa-opioid receptors with (/sup 125/I-Tyr1, D-Pro10)dynorphin A-(1-11)

    SciTech Connect

    Jomary, C.; Gairin, J.E.; Cros, J.; Meunier, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    (/sup 125/I-Tyr1, D-Pro10)dynorphin A-(1-11) (/sup 125/I-DP-DYN), an opioid peptide analogue that has previously been shown to be kappa selective, displays specific, saturable, and high-affinity (Kd = 0.3 nM) binding in slide-mounted sections from nerve tissue. We have used /sup 125/I-DPDYN to autoradiographically visualize supraspinal kappa-opioid receptor sites in rats, guinea pigs, and rabbits. The autoradiographic dispositions of /sup 125/I-DPDYN in sections from cerebellum are clearly different in guinea pig and rabbit, suggesting that kappa receptors have different functions in this organ of the two species. Autoradiograms from /sup 125/I-DPDYN-labeled brain sections also reveal major species differences, in particular in thalamus, which is densely labeled in rabbit and considerably less so in rat and guinea pig. The data show that /sup 125/I-DPDYN is a useful probe to visualize kappa-opioid receptor sites in nerve tissue sections directly and rapidly.

  17. The glycosylation and structure of human serum IgA1, Fab, and Fc regions and the role of N-glycosylation on Fcα receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Mattu, T S; Pleass, R J; Willis, A C; Kilian, M; Wormald, M R; Lellouch, A C; Rudd, P M; Woof, J M; Dwek, R A

    1998-01-23

    The human serum immunoglobulins IgG and IgA1 are produced in bone marrow and both interact with specific cellular receptors that mediate biological events. In contrast to IgA1, the glycosylation of IgG has been well characterized, and its interaction with various Fc receptors (Fc Rs) has been well studied. In this paper, we have analyzed the glycosylation of IgA1 and IgA1 Fab and Fc as well as three recombinant IgA1 molecules, including two N-glycosylation mutants. Amino acid sequencing data of the IgA1 Fc O-glycosylated hinge region indicated that O-glycans are located at Thr228, Ser230, and Ser232, while O-glycan sites at Thr225 and Thr236 are partially occupied. Over 90% of the N-glycans in IgA1 were sialylated, in contrast to IgG, where < 10% contain sialic acid. This paper contains the first report of Fab glycosylation in IgA1, and (in contrast to IgG Fab, which contains only N-linked glycans) both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were identified. Analysis of the N-glycans attached to recombinant IgA1 indicated that the Cα 2 N-glycosylation site contained mostly biantennary glycans, while the tailpiece site, absent in IgG, contained mostly triantennary structures. Further analysis of these data suggested that processing at one Fc N-glycosylation site affects the other. Neutrophil Fcα R binding studies, using recombinant IgA1, indicated that neither the tailpiece region nor the N-glycans in the C alpha 2 domain contribute to IgA1-neutrophil Fcα R binding. This contrasts with IgG, where removal of the Fc N-glycans reduces binding to the Fcγ R. The primary sequence and disulfide bond pattern of IgA1, together with the crystal structures of IgG1 Fc and mouse IgA Fab and the glycan sequencing data, were used to generate a molecular model of IgA1. As a consequence of both the primary sequence and S-S bond pattern, the N-glycans in IgA1 Fc are not confined within the inter-α-chain space. The accessibility of the Cα 2 N-glycans provides an explanation for the

  18. Annexin-A1 and caldesmon are associated with resistance to tamoxifen in estrogen receptor positive recurrent breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Marchi, Tommaso; Timmermans, Anne M.; Smid, Marcel; Look, Maxime P.; Stingl, Christoph; Opdam, Mark; Linn, Sabine C.; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Span, Paul N.; Kliffen, Mike; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Luider, Theo M.; Foekens, John A.; Martens, John W.; Umar, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen therapy resistance constitutes a major cause of death in patients with recurrent estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer. Through high resolution mass spectrometry (MS), we previously generated a 4-protein predictive signature for tamoxifen therapy outcome in recurrent breast cancer. ANXA1 and CALD1, which were not included in the classifier, were however the most differentially expressed proteins. We first evaluated the clinical relevance of these markers in our MS cohort, followed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining on an independent set of tumors incorporated in a tissue microarray (TMA) and regression analysis in relation to time to progression (TTP), clinical benefit and objective response. In order to assess which mechanisms ANXA1 and CALD1 might been involved in, we performed Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) on ANXA1 and CALD1 correlated proteins in our MS cohort. ANXA1 (Hazard ratio [HR] = 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22–2.75; P = 0.003) and CALD1 (HR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.04–2.36; P = 0.039) based patient stratification showed significant association to TTP, while IHC staining on TMA showed that both ANXA1 (HR = 1.82; 95% CI: 1.12–3.00; P = 0.016) and CALD1 (HR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.40–3.75; P = 0.001) expression was associated with shorter TTP independently of traditional predictive factors. Pearson correlation analysis showed that the majority of proteins correlated to ANXA1 also correlated with CALD1. IPA indicated that ANXA1 and CALD1 were associated with ER-downregulation and NFκB signaling. We hereby report that ANXA1 and CALD1 proteins are independent markers for tamoxifen therapy outcome and are associated to fast tumor progression. PMID:26657294

  19. Lack of association between TaqI A1 Allele of dopamine D2 receptor gene and alcohol-use disorders in Atayal natives of Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chia-Hsiang Chen; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Hai-Gwo Hwu

    1996-09-20

    Association studies between the A1 allele of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene TaqI A polymorphism and alcoholism remain controversial. A recent study from Japan demonstrated that the A1 allele is associated with severe alcoholism in the Japanese population. We were interested in knowing if this association also exists in the Atayals of Taiwan, who were found to have a higher prevalence of alcohol-use disorders than the Han Chinese in Taiwan. Genotype and allele frequencies were determined in alcohol-abusing, alcohol-dependent, and nonalcoholic control Atayal natives in Taiwan. A1 allele frequencies in alcohol-dependent, alcohol-abusing, and normal control Atayals were 0.39, 0.42, and 0.39, respectively. No difference in A1 allele frequency was found among these three groups. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the A1 allele of the TaqI A polymorphism of the DRD2 gene increases susceptibility to alcohol-use disorders in the Atayals of Taiwan. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Pregnane X receptor-mediated transcriptional activation of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 by natural constituents from foods and herbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junyan; Huang, Minmin; Hu, Haihong; Yu, Lushan; Zeng, Su

    2014-12-01

    The induction of drug-metabolising enzymes is being increasingly recognised for its clinical importance in drug research and development. In the present study, we used a pregnane X receptor (PXR)-mediated reporter gene assay to evaluate the activating effects of various food, herb, and horticultural plant constituents on the PXR and a UGT1A1 reporter gene DNA construct. The results showed that of 102 naturally occurring constituents tested, 50 activated the PXR signaling pathway and induced expression of the UGT1A1-reporter gene DNA construct. Eleven constituents strongly induced gene expression (a response of >70% compared to that associated with rifampicin), and were further evaluated in in vitro experiments to confirm the induction of UGT1A1 mRNA and protein expression. The results suggest that foods and herbs containing these constituents should be consumed with caution to avoid undesirable drug-drug interactions with co-administered drugs that are substrates for UGT1A1. PMID:24996308

  1. Remifentanil-induced preconditioning has cross-talk with A1 and A2B adenosine receptors in ischemic-reperfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Cheol; Jung, Jiyoon; Park, Sang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a cross-talk between opioid receptors (OPRs) and adenosine receptors (ADRs) in remifentanil preconditioning (R-Pre) and, if so, to investigate the types of ADRs involved in the cross-talk. Isolated rat hearts received 30 min of regional ischemia followed by 2 hr of reperfusion. OPR and ADR antagonists were perfused from 10 min before R-Pre until the end of R-Pre. The heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), velocity of contraction (+dP/dtmax), and coronary flow (CF) were recorded. The area at risk and area of necrosis were measured. After reperfusion, the LVDP, +dP/dtmax, and CF showed a significant increase in the R-Pre group compared with the control group (no intervention before or after regional ischemia). These increases in the R-Pre group were blocked by naloxone, a nonspecific ADR antagonist, an A1 ADR antagonist, and an A2B ADR antagonist. The infarct size was reduced significantly in the R-Pre group compared with the control group. The infarct-reducing effect in the R-Pre group was blocked by naloxone, the nonspecific ADR antagonist, the A1 ADR antagonist, and the A2B ADR antagonist. The results of this study demonstrate that there is cross-talk between ADRs and OPRs in R-Pre and that A1 ADR and A2B ADR appear to be involved in the cross-talk. PMID:26773185

  2. Remifentanil-induced preconditioning has cross-talk with A1 and A2B adenosine receptors in ischemic-reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Cheol; Jung, Jiyoon; Park, Sang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a cross-talk between opioid receptors (OPRs) and adenosine receptors (ADRs) in remifentanil preconditioning (R-Pre) and, if so, to investigate the types of ADRs involved in the cross-talk. Isolated rat hearts received 30 min of regional ischemia followed by 2 hr of reperfusion. OPR and ADR antagonists were perfused from 10 min before R-Pre until the end of R-Pre. The heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP),velocity of contraction (+dP/dtmax), and coronary flow (CF) were recorded. The area at risk and area of necrosis were measured. After reperfusion, the LVDP, +dP/dtmax,and CF showed a significant increase in the R-Pre group compared with the control group (no intervention before or after regional ischemia). These increases in the R-Pre group were blocked by naloxone, a nonspecific ADR antagonist, an A1 ADR antagonist, and an A2B ADR antagonist. The infarct size was reduced significantly in the R-Pre group compared with the control group. The infarct-reducing effect in the R-Pre group was blocked by naloxone, the nonspecific ADR antagonist, the A1 ADR antagonist, and the A2B ADR antagonist. The results of this study demonstrate that there is cross-talk between ADRs and OPRs in R-Pre and that A1 ADR and A2B ADR appear to be involved in the cross-talk. PMID:26773185

  3. Odor Preference Learning and Memory Modify GluA1 Phosphorylation and GluA1 Distribution in the Neonate Rat Olfactory Bulb: Testing the AMPA Receptor Hypothesis in an Appetitive Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cui, Wen; Darby-King, Andrea; Grimes, Matthew T.; Howland, John G.; Wang, Yu Tian; McLean, John H.; Harley, Carolyn W.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in synaptic AMPA receptors is hypothesized to mediate learning and memory. AMPA receptor increases have been reported in aversive learning models, although it is not clear if they are seen with memory maintenance. Here we examine AMPA receptor changes in a cAMP/PKA/CREB-dependent appetitive learning model: odor preference learning in…

  4. No association between the TaqI A1 RFLP of the D2 receptor gene and alcoholism in a Mexican population

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Fuentes, C.; Carmarena, B.; Eroza, V.

    1994-09-01

    The suggested association of the A1 allele of the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) human gene with alcoholism was studied by comparing the DRD2/TaqI genotypes of 36 healthy controls and 38 individuals who met the DSM-III-R diagnostic criteria for alcohol dependence. All subjects were unrelated, with parents and grandparents of Mexican origin. The alcoholics in our sample suffered one of the following conditions: delirium tremens (16.6%), alcohol hallucinosis (56.6%) or uncomplicated alcohol withdrawal (26.4%). Eight-eight percent of the controls carried the A1 allele. The frequency of the DRD2 A1 allele in the Mexican urban sample (pA1 = 0.61) was 2 to 3-fold higher than reported in Caucasian populations from the USA and Europe, but similar to the allele frequencies found in defined Amerindian populations. There were not significant differences in the prevalence or allele frequency between alcoholics (pA1 = 0.64) and controls, regardless if the alcoholics were subtyped accordingly to severity, age of onset or positive family history. Alcoholics had higher scores than controls in the neuroticism (N) and psychoticism (P) subscales on the Eysenck personality test: alcoholics P = 6.2 {+-} 2.9, N = 16.0 {+-} 4.2 vs. controls P = 2.5 {+-} 2.3, N = 5.7 {+-} 5.1; p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. However, no relationship between personality traits and genotypes was found. Our results do not support a consistent association between the TaqI A1 RFLP for the DRD2 gene and alcoholism.

  5. Adenosine A1-receptor blockade impairs the ability of rat pups to autoresuscitate from primary apnea during repeated exposure to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Fewell, James E; Lun, Rongzhi

    2015-01-01

    Failure of gasping to bring about autoresuscitation from hypoxia-induced apnea has been suggested to play a role in sudden unexpected infant death. Little is known, however, about factors that influence the ability of gasping to restore life during severe hypoxia in newborns. Given that adenosine modulates cardiac function during hypoxia-induced apnea and that cardiac dysfunction plays a role in mediating autoresuscitation failure, the present experiments were carried out on 34, 5- to 6-, and 10- to 11-day-old rat pups to investigate their ability to autoresuscitate from hypoxia-induced apnea during repeated exposure to hypoxia after adenosine A1-receptor blockade. Each pup was placed into a temperature-controlled chamber regulated to 37 ± 1°C and repeatedly exposed to an anoxic gas mixture (97% N2 and 3% CO2) until the occurrence of autoresuscitation failure. One group was studied following administration of the selective adenosine A1-receptor antagonist 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3,-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) and one group was studied following vehicle. DPCPX significantly attenuated bradycardia during hypoxia-induced apnea and impaired the ability of both age groups of pups to autoresuscitate during repeated exposure to hypoxia (5–6 days tolerated – vehicle 17 ± 4 vs. DPCPX 10 ± 2 hypoxia exposures [P < 0.05]; 10–11 days tolerated – vehicle 10 ± 2 vs. DPCPX 7 ± 2 hypoxia exposures [P < 0.05]). Death in all pups resulted from the inability of gasping to restore cardiovascular function during hypoxia-induced apnea although the mechanism of cardiovascular dysfunction/failure was influenced and the occurrence hastened by DPCPX. Thus, our data provide evidence that adenosine acting via adenosine A1-receptors enhances the ability of rat pups to tolerate repeated exposure to severe hypoxia during early postnatal maturation. PMID:26272732

  6. Increased prevalence of the Taq I A1 allele of the dopamine receptor gene (DRD2) in obesity with comorbid substance use disorder: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Blum, K; Braverman, E R; Wood, R C; Gill, J; Li, C; Chen, T J; Taub, M; Montgomery, A R; Sheridan, P J; Cull, J G

    1996-08-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of the Taq I A1 allele of the dopamine receptor gene (DRD2) in obesity with and without comorbid substance use disorder, a total of 40 patients, from an outpatient neuropsychiatric clinic in Princeton, New Jersey, were genotyped for presence or absence of the Taq I DRD2 A1 allele. The primary inclusion criterion for 40 obese subjects was a body mass index (BMI) equal to or over 25 (uncharacterized); 11 obese subjects had severe substance use disorder; 20 controls had a BMI below 25; and, 33 substance use disorder (less severe) patients had a BMI below 25. The data were statistically compared with three different sets of controls divided into three separate groups (Group I, n = 20; Group II, n = 286; Group III, n = 714). They differed according to screening criteria (drug, alcohol, nicotine abuse/dependence, BMI below 25 and other related behaviours including parental history of alcoholism or drug abuse and DSM IV, Axis I and Axis II diagnoses). Groups II and III were population controls derived from the literature. The prevalence of the Taq I A1D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) alleles was determined in 40 Caucasian obese females and males. In this sample with a mean BMI of 32.35 +/- 1.02, the A1 allele of the DRD2 gene was present in 52.5% of these obese subjects. Furthermore, we found that in the 23 obese subjects possessing comorbid substance use disorder, the prevalence of the DRD2 A1 allele significantly increased compared to the 17 obese subjects without comorbid substance use disorder. The DRD2 A1 allele was present in 73.9% of the obese subjects with comorbid substance use disorder compared to 23.5% in obese subjects without comorbid substance use disorder. Moreover, when we assessed severity of substance usage (alcoholism, cocaine dependence, etc.) increasing severity of drug use increased the prevalence of the Taq I DRD2 A1 allele; where 66.67% (8/12) of less severe probands possessed the A1 allele compared to 82% (9

  7. What causes aberrant salience in schizophrenia? A role for impaired short-term habituation and the GRIA1 (GluA1) AMPA receptor subunit

    PubMed Central

    Barkus, C; Sanderson, DJ; Rawlins, JNP; Walton, ME; Harrison, PJ; Bannerman, DM

    2014-01-01

    The GRIA1 locus, encoding the GluA1 (also known as GluRA or GluR1) AMPA glutamate receptor subunit, shows genome-wide association to schizophrenia. As well as extending the evidence that glutamatergic abnormalities play a key role in the disorder, this finding draws attention to the behavioural phenotype of Gria1 knockout mice. These mice show deficits in short-term habituation. Importantly, under some conditions the attention being paid to a recently presented neutral stimulus can actually increase rather than decrease (sensitization). We propose that this mouse phenotype represents a cause of aberrant salience and, in turn, that aberrant salience (and the resulting positive symptoms) in schizophrenia may arise, at least in part, from a glutamatergic genetic predisposition and a deficit in short-term habituation. This proposal links an established risk gene with a psychological process central to psychosis, and is supported by findings of comparable deficits in short-term habituation in mice lacking the NMDAR receptor subunit Grin2a (which also shows association to schizophrenia). Since aberrant salience is primarily a dopaminergic phenomenon, the model supports the view that the dopaminergic abnormalities can be downstream of a glutamatergic aetiology. Finally, we suggest that, as illustrated here, the real value of genetically modified mice is not as ‘models of schizophrenia’, but as experimental tools which can link genomic discoveries with psychological processes, and help elucidate the underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:25224260

  8. Swertisin, a C-glucosylflavone, ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice with its adenosine A1 receptor antagonistic property.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Eun; Jeon, Se Jin; Ryu, Byeol; Park, Se Jin; Ko, Sang Yoon; Lee, Younghwan; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Sunhee; Kim, Haneul; Jang, Dae Sik; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Swertisin, a C-glucosylflavone isolated from Swertia japonica, has been known to have anti-inflammatory or antidiabetic activities. Until yet, however, its cognitive function is not investigated. In the present study, we endeavored to elucidate the effects of swertisin on cholinergic blockade-induced memory impairment. Swertisin (5 or 10mg/kg, p.o.) significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in the several behavioral tasks. Also, single administration of swertisin (10mg/kg, p.o.) in normal naïve mice enhanced the latency time in the passive avoidance task. In addition, the ameliorating effect of swertisin on scopolamine-induced memory impairment was significantly antagonized by a sub-effective dose of N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 0.1mg/kg, i.p). The adenosine A1 receptor antagonistic property of swertisin was confirmed by receptor binding assay. Furthermore, the administration of swertisin significantly increased the phosphorylation levels of hippocampal or cortical protein kinase A (PKA, 5 or 10mg/kg) and CREB (10mg/kg), and co-administration of CPA (0.1mg/kg, i.p) blocked the increased phosphorylated levels of PKA and CREB in the both cortex and hippocampus. Taken together, these results indicate that the memory-ameliorating effects of swertisin may be, in part, mediated through the adenosinergic neurotransmitter system, and that swertisin may be useful for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction observed in several diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26996316

  9. Skatole (3-Methylindole) Is a Partial Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist and Induces CYP1A1/2 and CYP1B1 Expression in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer, Patrick; Ekstrand, Bo; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Skatole (3-methylindole) is a product of bacterial fermentation of tryptophan in the intestine. A significant amount of skatole can also be inhaled during cigarette smoking. Skatole is a pulmonary toxin that induces the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulated genes, such as cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), in human bronchial cells. The liver has a high metabolic capacity for skatole and is the first organ encountered by the absorbed skatole; however, the effect of skatole in the liver is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the impact of skatole on hepatic AhR activity and AhR-regulated gene expression. Using reporter gene assays, we showed that skatole activates AhR and that this is accompanied by an increase of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 expression in HepG2-C3 and primary human hepatocytes. Specific AhR antagonists and siRNA-mediated AhR silencing demonstrated that skatole-induced CYP1A1 expression is dependent on AhR activation. The effect of skatole was reduced by blocking intrinsic cytochrome P450 activity and indole-3-carbinole, a known skatole metabolite, was a more potent inducer than skatole. Finally, skatole could reduce TCDD-induced CYP1A1 expression, suggesting that skatole is a partial AhR agonist. In conclusion, our findings suggest that skatole and its metabolites affect liver homeostasis by modulating the AhR pathway. PMID:27138278

  10. Transgenic Overexpression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AhRR) and AhR-Mediated Induction of CYP1A1, Cytokines, and Acute Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Christoph F.A.; Chang, W.L. William; Kado, Sarah; McCulloh, Kelly; Vogel, Helena; Wu, Dalei; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Yang, GuoXiang; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Matsumura, Fumio; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) is known to repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling, but very little is known regarding the role of the AhRR in vivo. Objective: This study tested the role of AhRR in vivo in AhRR overexpressing mice on molecular and toxic end points mediated through a prototypical AhR ligand. Methods: We generated AhRR-transgenic mice (AhRR Tg) based on the genetic background of C57BL/6J wild type (wt) mice. We tested the effect of the prototypical AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and cytokines in various tissues of mice. We next analyzed the infiltration of immune cells in adipose tissue of mice after treatment with TCDD using flow cytometry. Results: AhRR Tg mice express significantly higher levels of AhRR compared to wt mice. Activation of AhR by TCDD caused a significant increase of the inflammatory cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, and CXCL chemokines in white epididymal adipose tissue from both wt and AhRR Tg mice. However, the expression of IL-1β, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were significantly lower in AhRR Tg versus wt mice following TCDD treatment. Exposure to TCDD caused a rapid accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages in white adipose tissue of wt and AhRR Tg mice. Furthermore we found that male AhRR Tg mice were protected from high-dose TCDD-induced lethality associated with a reduced inflammatory response and liver damage as indicated by lower levels of TCDD-induced alanine aminotransferase and hepatic triglycerides. Females from both wt and AhRR Tg mice were less sensitive than male mice to acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current study identifies AhRR as a previously uncharacterized regulator of specific inflammatory cytokines, which may protect from acute toxicity induced by TCDD. Citation: Vogel CF, Chang WL, Kado S, McCulloh K, Vogel H, Wu D, Haarmann-Stemmann T, Yang GX, Leung PS, Matsumura F

  11. Adenosine A1 receptor activation modulates human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) activity via PKC-mediated phosphorylation of serine-281.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Scott J; Cravetchi, Xenia; Vilas, Gonzalo; Hammond, James R

    2015-05-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype 1 (ENT1) is critical for the regulation of the biological activities of endogenous nucleosides such as adenosine, and for the cellular uptake of chemotherapeutic nucleoside analogs. Previous studies have implicated protein kinase C (PKC) in the regulation of ENT1 expression/function. It was hypothesized that hENT1 activity at the plasma membrane is regulated by PKC-mediated phosphorylation of Ser281. WT (wild-type)-hENT1 or S281A-hENT1 was stably transfected into a PK15 cell variant that is deficient in nucleoside transport. Using [(3)H]nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) binding and [(3)H]2-chloroadenosine uptake analyses, it was determined that S281A-hENT1 exhibited functional characteristics similar to WT-hENT1. Direct activation of PKC with PMA or indirect activation with the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) led to significant increases in [(3)H]NBMPR binding and [(3)H]2-chloroadenosine uptake in WT-hENT1 transfected cells. The PKC inhibitor Gö6983 blocked these effects of both PMA and CCPA, and the CCPA-mediated increase was also blocked by the A1 adenosine receptor antagonist DPCPX. In contrast, neither PMA nor CCPA affected [(3)H]NBMPR binding or [(3)H]2-chloroadenosine uptake in cells transfected with S281A-hENT1. shRNAi silencing studies implicated PKCδ in this regulation of hENT1 activity. Immunocytochemical analysis and cell surface biotinylation assays showed that activation of PKC with PMA, but not CCPA, led to a significant increase in the plasma membrane localization of hENT1. These data suggest that phosphorylation of hENT1 by PKC has effects on both the function and subcellular trafficking of hENT1. This signaling pathway represents a feedback loop whereby adenosine receptor signaling can lead to increased adenosine reuptake into cells via hENT1. PMID:25725289

  12. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Vorrink, Sabine U.; Severson, Paul L.; Kulak, Mikhail V.; Futscher, Bernard W.; Domann, Frederick E.

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O{sub 2} prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity. - Highlights: • Significant crosstalk exists between AhR and HIF-1α signaling. • Hypoxia perturbs PCB 126 induced AhR function and

  13. Protein Kinase C Is Involved in the Induction of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Expression by Liver X Receptor/Retinoid X Receptor Agonist in Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huwait, Etimad A; Singh, Nishi N; Michael, Daryn R; Davies, Thomas S; Moss, Joe W E; Ramji, Dipak P

    2015-09-01

    The transcription of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) gene, which plays a key anti-atherogenic role, is known to be induced by agonists of liver X receptors (LXRs). LXRs form obligate heterodimers with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) and interact with their recognition sequences in the regulatory regions of key genes implicated in the control of cholesterol, fatty acid and glucose homeostasis. We have previously shown a novel role for c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in the LXRs-mediated induction of macrophage gene expression. Protein kinase C (PKC) is often found to regulate the action of nuclear receptors and cross talk between this kinase family and JNK and/or PI3K has been shown in several settings. We have, therefore, investigated a potential role for PKC in the action of LXR/RXR agonist 22-(R)-hydroxycholesterol (22-(R)-HC)/9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA) in THP-1 macrophages, including the induction of ABCA1 expression. The pan PKC inhibitor bisindoylmaleimide was found to attenuate the induction of ABCA1 protein expression, the activation of the JNK signaling pathway and the stimulation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding activity in macrophages treated with 22-(R)-HC and 9cRA. The role of PKC in the action of these ligands was confirmed further by the use of more isotype-specific inhibitors. These studies, therefore, reveal a potentially important role for PKC in the action of 22-(R)-HC and 9cRA in human macrophages. PMID:25752819

  14. Ion Fluxes through KCa2 (SK) and Cav1 (L-type) Channels Contribute to Chronoselectivity of Adenosine A1 Receptor-Mediated Actions in Spontaneously Beating Rat Atria

    PubMed Central

    Bragança, Bruno; Oliveira-Monteiro, Nádia; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Lima, Pedro A.; Faria, Miguel; Fontes-Sousa, Ana P.; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Impulse generation in supraventricular tissue is inhibited by adenosine and acetylcholine via the activation of A1 and M2 receptors coupled to inwardly rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels, respectively. Unlike M2 receptors, bradycardia produced by A1 receptors activation predominates over negative inotropy. Such difference suggests that other ion currents may contribute to adenosine chronoselectivity. In isolated spontaneously beating rat atria, blockade of KCa2/SK channels with apamin and Cav1 (L-type) channels with nifedipine or verapamil, sensitized atria to the negative inotropic action of the A1 agonist, R-PIA, without affecting the nucleoside negative chronotropy. Patch-clamp experiments in the whole-cell configuration mode demonstrate that adenosine, via A1 receptors, activates the inwardly-rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/KIR3.4 current resulting in hyperpolarization of atrial cardiomyocytes, which may slow down heart rate. Conversely, the nucleoside inactivates a small conductance Ca2+-activated KCa2/SK outward current, which eventually reduces the repolarizing force and thereby prolong action potentials duration and Ca2+ influx into cardiomyocytes. Immunolocalization studies showed that differences in A1 receptors distribution between the sinoatrial node and surrounding cardiomyocytes do not afford a rationale for adenosine chronoselectivity. Immunolabelling of KIR3.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3, and Cav1 was also observed throughout the right atrium. Functional data indicate that while both A1 and M2 receptors favor the opening of GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels modulating atrial chronotropy, A1 receptors may additionally restrain KCa2/SK activation thereby compensating atrial inotropic depression by increasing the time available for Ca2+ influx through Cav1 (L-type) channels. PMID:27014060

  15. Ion Fluxes through KCa2 (SK) and Cav1 (L-type) Channels Contribute to Chronoselectivity of Adenosine A1 Receptor-Mediated Actions in Spontaneously Beating Rat Atria.

    PubMed

    Bragança, Bruno; Oliveira-Monteiro, Nádia; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Lima, Pedro A; Faria, Miguel; Fontes-Sousa, Ana P; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Impulse generation in supraventricular tissue is inhibited by adenosine and acetylcholine via the activation of A1 and M2 receptors coupled to inwardly rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels, respectively. Unlike M2 receptors, bradycardia produced by A1 receptors activation predominates over negative inotropy. Such difference suggests that other ion currents may contribute to adenosine chronoselectivity. In isolated spontaneously beating rat atria, blockade of KCa2/SK channels with apamin and Cav1 (L-type) channels with nifedipine or verapamil, sensitized atria to the negative inotropic action of the A1 agonist, R-PIA, without affecting the nucleoside negative chronotropy. Patch-clamp experiments in the whole-cell configuration mode demonstrate that adenosine, via A1 receptors, activates the inwardly-rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/KIR3.4 current resulting in hyperpolarization of atrial cardiomyocytes, which may slow down heart rate. Conversely, the nucleoside inactivates a small conductance Ca(2+)-activated KCa2/SK outward current, which eventually reduces the repolarizing force and thereby prolong action potentials duration and Ca(2+) influx into cardiomyocytes. Immunolocalization studies showed that differences in A1 receptors distribution between the sinoatrial node and surrounding cardiomyocytes do not afford a rationale for adenosine chronoselectivity. Immunolabelling of KIR3.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3, and Cav1 was also observed throughout the right atrium. Functional data indicate that while both A1 and M2 receptors favor the opening of GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels modulating atrial chronotropy, A1 receptors may additionally restrain KCa2/SK activation thereby compensating atrial inotropic depression by increasing the time available for Ca(2+) influx through Cav1 (L-type) channels. PMID:27014060

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling on the human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; van Duijl, Tirsa; Heezen, Maxime; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-04-01

    Classical evaluation of target selectivity is usually undertaken by measuring the binding affinity of lead compounds against a number of potential targets under equilibrium conditions, without considering the kinetics of the ligand-receptor interaction. In the present study we propose a combined strategy including both equilibrium- and kinetics-based selectivity profiling. The adenosine receptor (AR) was chosen as a prototypical drug target. Six in-house AR antagonists were evaluated in a radioligand displacement assay for their affinity and in a competition association assay for their binding kinetics on three AR subtypes. One of the compounds with a promising kinetic selectivity profile was also examined in a [(35)S]-GTPγS binding assay for functional activity. We found that XAC and LUF5964 were kinetically more selective for the A1R and A3R, respectively, although they are non-selective in terms of their affinity. In comparison, LUF5967 displayed a strong equilibrium-based selectivity for the A1R over the A2AR, yet its kinetic selectivity thereon was less pronounced. In a GTPγS assay, LUF5964 exhibited insurmountable antagonism on the A3R while having a surmountable effect on the A1R, consistent with its kinetic selectivity profile. This study provides evidence that equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling can both be important in the early phases of the drug discovery process. Our proposed combinational strategy could be considered for future medicinal chemistry efforts and aid the design and discovery of different or even better leads for clinical applications. PMID:26930564

  17. P2X-mediated AMPA receptor internalization and synaptic depression is controlled by two CaMKII phosphorylation sites on GluA1 in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pougnet, Johan-Till; Compans, Benjamin; Martinez, Audrey; Choquet, Daniel; Hosy, Eric; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity at excitatory synapses can be induced either by synaptic release of glutamate or the release of gliotransmitters such as ATP. Recently, we showed that postsynaptic P2X2 receptors activated by ATP released from astrocytes downregulate synaptic AMPAR, providing a novel mechanism by which glial cells modulate synaptic activity. ATP- and lNMDA-induced depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus are additive, suggesting distinct molecular pathways. AMPARs are homo-or hetero-tetramers composed of GluA1-A4. Here, we first show that P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition is dependent on the subunit composition of AMPAR. GluA3 homomers are insensitive and their presence in heteromers alters P2X-mediated inhibition. Using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that the two CaMKII phosphorylation sites S567 and S831 located in the cytoplasmic Loop1 and C-terminal tail of GluA1 subunits, respectively, are critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition recorded from co-expressing Xenopus oocytes and removal of surface AMPAR at synapses of hippocampal neurons imaged by the super-resolution dSTORM technique. Finally, using phosphorylation site-specific antibodies, we show that P2X-induced depression in hippocampal slices produces a dephosphorylation of the GluA1 subunit at S567, contrary to NMDAR-mediated LTD. These findings indicate that GluA1 phosphorylation of S567 and S831 is critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR internalization and ATP-driven synaptic depression. PMID:27624155

  18. Enhanced Long-Term and Impaired Short-Term Spatial Memory in GluA1 AMPA Receptor Subunit Knockout Mice: Evidence for a Dual-Process Memory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, David J.; Good, Mark A.; Skelton, Kathryn; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas P.; Bannerman, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit is a key mediator of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and is especially important for a rapidly-induced, short-lasting form of potentiation. GluA1 gene deletion impairs hippocampus-dependent, spatial working memory, but spares hippocampus-dependent spatial reference memory. These findings may reflect the necessity of…

  19. Vitamin-D receptor agonist calcitriol reduces calcification in vitro through selective upregulation of SLC20A2 but not SLC20A1 or XPR1

    PubMed Central

    Keasey, M. P.; Lemos, R. R.; Hagg, T.; Oliveira, J. R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (hypovitaminosis D) causes osteomalacia and poor long bone mineralization. In apparent contrast, hypovitaminosis D has been reported in patients with primary brain calcifications (“Fahr’s disease”). We evaluated the expression of two phosphate transporters which we have found to be associated with primary brain calcification (SLC20A2, whose promoter has a predicted vitamin D receptor binding site, and XPR1), and one unassociated (SLC20A1), in an in vitro model of calcification. Expression of all three genes was significantly decreased in calcifying human bone osteosarcoma (SaOs-2) cells. Further, we confirmed that vitamin D (calcitriol) reduced calcification as measured by Alizarin Red staining. Cells incubated with calcitriol under calcifying conditions specifically maintained expression of the phosphate transporter SLC20A2 at higher levels relative to controls, by RT-qPCR. Neither SLC20A1 nor XPR1 were affected by calcitriol treatment and remained suppressed. Critically, knockdown of SLC20A2 gene and protein with CRISPR technology in SaOs2 cells significantly ablated vitamin D mediated inhibition of calcification. This study elucidates the mechanistic importance of SLC20A2 in suppressing the calcification process. It also suggests that vitamin D might be used to regulate SLC20A2 gene expression, as well as reduce brain calcification which occurs in Fahr’s disease and normal aging. PMID:27184385

  20. Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, but not eslicarbazepine, enhance excitatory synaptic transmission onto hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells through an antagonist action at adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Booker, Sam A; Pires, Nuno; Cobb, Stuart; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Vida, Imre

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed the anticonvulsant and seizure generation effects of carbamazepine (CBZ), oxcarbazepine (OXC) and eslicarbazepine (S-Lic) in wild-type mice. Electrophysiological recordings were made to discriminate potential cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying anti- and pro-epileptic actions. The anticonvulsant and pro-convulsant effects were evaluated in the MES, the 6-Hz and the Irwin tests. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were used to investigate the effects on fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal area CA1. The safety window for CBZ, OXC and eslicarbazepine (ED50 value against the MES test and the dose that produces grade 5 convulsions in all mice), was 6.3, 6.0 and 12.5, respectively. At high concentrations the three drugs reduced synaptic transmission. CBZ and OXC enhanced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at low, therapeutically-relevant concentrations. These effects were associated with no change in inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) resulting in altered balance between excitation and inhibition. S-Lic had no effect on EPSC or IPSC amplitudes over the same concentration range. The CBZ mediated enhancement of EPSCs was blocked by DPCPX, a selective antagonist, and occluded by CCPA, a selective agonist of the adenosine A1 receptor. Furthermore, reduction of endogenous adenosine by application of the enzyme adenosine deaminase also abolished the CBZ- and OXC-induced increase of EPSCs, indicating that the two drugs act as antagonists at native adenosine receptors. In conclusion, CBZ and OXC possess pro-epileptic actions at clinically-relevant concentrations through the enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission. S-Lic by comparison has no such effect on synaptic transmission, explaining its lack of seizure exacerbation. PMID:25656478

  1. Adenosine A1 receptor, a target and regulator of estrogen receptoralpha action, mediates the proliferative effects of estradiol in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Yin, P; Reierstad, S; O'Halloran, M; Coon, V J S; Pearson, E K; Mutlu, G M; Bulun, S E

    2010-02-25

    Estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and its ligand estradiol (E2) has critical roles in breast cancer growth and are key therapeutic targets. In this study, we report a novel dual role of the adenosine A1 receptor (Adora1) as an E2/ERalpha target and a regulator of ERalpha transcriptional activity. In ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells, E2 upregulated Adora1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels, an effect that was reversed by the E2 antagonist ICI 182 780. Small interference RNA ablation of Adora1 in ERalpha-positive cells reduced basal and E2-dependent proliferation, whereas Adora1 over-expression in an ERalpha-negative cell line induced proliferation. The selective Adora1 antagonist, DPCPX, reduced proliferation, establishing Adora1 as a mediator of E2/ERalpha-dependent breast cancer growth. Intriguingly, Adora1 ablation decreased both mRNA and protein levels of ERalpha and, consequently, estrogen-responsive element-dependent ERalpha transcriptional activity. Moreover, Adora1 ablation decreased binding activity of ERalpha to the promoter of its target gene TFF1 and led to reduced TFF1 promoter activity and mRNA levels, suggesting that Adora1 is required for full transcriptional activity of ERalpha on E2 stimulation. Taken together, we showed a short feed-forward loop involving E2, ERalpha and Adora1 that favors breast cancer growth. These data suggest that Adora1 may represent an important target for therapeutic intervention in hormone-dependent breast cancer. PMID:19935720

  2. Prophylactic effects of asiaticoside-based standardized extract of Centella asiatica (L.) Urban leaves on experimental migraine: Involvement of 5HT1A/1B receptors.

    PubMed

    Bobade, Vijeta; Bodhankar, Subhash L; Aswar, Urmila; Vishwaraman, Mohan; Thakurdesai, Prasad

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed at evaluation of prophylactic efficacy and possible mechanisms of asiaticoside (AS) based standardized extract of Centella asiatica (L.) Urban leaves (INDCA) in animal models of migraine. The effects of oral and intranasal (i.n.) pretreatment of INDCA (acute and 7-days subacute) were evaluated against nitroglycerine (NTG, 10 mg·kg(-1), i.p.) and bradykinin (BK, 10 μg, intra-arterial) induced hyperalgesia in rats. Tail flick latencies (from 0 to 240 min) post-NTG treatment and the number of vocalizations post-BK treatment were recorded as a measure of hyperalgesia. Separate groups of rats for negative (Normal) and positive (sumatriptan, 42 mg·kg(-1), s.c.) controls were included. The interaction of INDCA with selective 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT1D receptor antagonists (NAN-190, Isamoltane hemifumarate, and BRL-15572 respectively) against NTG-induced hyperalgesia was also evaluated. Acute and sub-acute pre-treatment of INDCA [10 and 30 mg·kg(-1) (oral) and 100 μg/rat (i.n.) showed significant anti-nociception activity, and reversal of the NTG-induced hyperalgesia and brain 5-HT concentration decline. Oral pre-treatment with INDCA (30 mg·kg(-1), 7 d) showed significant reduction in the number of vocalization. The anti-nociceptive effects of INDCA were blocked by 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B but not 5-HT1D receptor antagonists. In conclusion, INDCA demonstrated promising anti-nociceptive effects in animal models of migraine, probably through 5-HT1A/1B medicated action. PMID:25908624

  3. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated changes in basal and histamine-stimulated levels of intracellular calcium in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine A1 receptor stimulation on basal and histamine-stimulated levels of intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) have been investigated in primary astrocyte cultures derived from neonatal rat forebrains. 2. Histamine (0.1 microM-1 mM) caused rapid, concentration-dependent increases in [Ca2+]i over basal levels in single type-2 astrocytes in the presence of extracellular calcium. A maximum mean increase of 1,468 +/- 94 nM over basal levels was recorded in 90% of type-2 cells treated with 1 mM histamine (n = 49). The percentage of type-2 cells exhibiting calcium increases in response to histamine appeared to vary in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the application of 1 mM histamine to type-1 astrocytes had less effect, eliciting a mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 805 +/- 197 nM over basal levels in only 30% of the cells observed (n = 24). 3. In the presence of extracellular calcium, the A1 receptor-selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10 microM), caused a maximum mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 1,110 +/- 181 nM over basal levels in 30% of type-2 astrocytes observed (n = 53). The size of this response was concentration-dependent; however, the percentage of type-2 cells exhibiting calcium increases in response to CPA did not appear to vary in a concentration-dependent manner. A mean calcium increase of 605 +/- 89 nM over basal levels was also recorded in 23% of type-1 astrocytes treated with 10 microM CPA (n = 30). 4. In the absence of extracellular calcium, in medium containing 0.1 mM EGTA, a mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 504 +/- 67 nM over basal levels was recorded in 41% of type-2 astrocytes observed (n = 41) after stimulation with 1 microM CPA. However, in the presence of extracellular calcium, pretreatment with the A1 receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, for 5-10 min before stimulation with 1 microM CPA, completely antagonized the response in 100% of the cells observed. 5. In type-2

  4. /sup 125/I-BW-A844U, an antagonist radioligand with high affinity and selectivity for adenosine A1 receptors, and /sup 125/I-azido-BW-A844U, a photoaffinity label

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Craig, R.H.; Daluge, S.M.; Linden, J.

    1988-06-01

    3-(4-Amino)phenethyl-1-propyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (BW-A844U) has been synthesized and shown to bind with high affinity to adenosine A1 receptors of bovine brain membranes (KD = 0.23 nM). This compound is highly selective for A1 receptors; the KI for binding to A2 receptors of human platelet membranes is 2.0 microM (A2/A1 ratio = 8700). Radioiodination of the 3-aminophenethyl group resulted in 125I-BW-A844U, a radioligand that retains high affinity for A1 receptors in bovine brain membranes (KD = 0.14 nM) and to 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate-solubilized receptors (KD = 0.34 nM). Specific binding of 125I-BW-A844U represented greater than 90% of the total binding at the KD. From the association constant (K1 = 5.0 X 10(8) M-1min-1) and the dissociation constant (K-1 = 0.064 min-1), the kinetic KD (K-1/K1) in membranes was calculated to be 0.13 nM. NaCl (1 M) had little effect on the binding affinity of 125I-BW-A844U, in contrast to the large effect of salt on the binding affinity of acidic antagonist radioligands. 8-Sulfophenyltheophylline inhibited radioligand binding with a Hill coefficient of 1.0, indicative of a single affinity binding state for the antagonist. By comparison, two distinct agonist affinity states of A1 receptors for the agonist (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine could be resolved, a high affinity state (62%, KH = 74 pM) and a low affinity state (KL = 3.83 nM). The addition of 0.1 mM guanylylimidodiphosphate converted all receptors to the low affinity state. Addition of NaCl (0.5 M) decreased the fraction of receptors in the high affinity state and increased both KH and KL, suggesting that NaCl alters coupling of receptors to G proteins and influences the conformation of the receptor polypeptide, whether or not the receptor is coupled to a G protein.

  5. CYP19A1 polymorphisms and clinical outcomes in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the BIG 1–98 trial

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Kathryn P.; Abramovitz, Mark; Bouzyk, Mark; Young, Brandon; Long, Bradley; Kammler, Roswitha; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Biasi, Maria Olivia; Thürlimann, Beat; Lyng, Maria B.; Ditzel, Henrik J.; Harvey, Vernon J.; Neven, Patrick; Treilleux, Isabelle; Rasmussen, Birgitte Bruun; Maibach, Rudolf; Price, Karen N.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Pagani, Olivia; Viale, Giuseppe; Rae, James M.; Regan, Meredith M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether CYP19A1 polymorphisms are associated with abnormal activity of aromatase and with musculoskeletal and bone side effects of aromatase inhibitors. DNA was isolated from tumor specimens of 4861 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer enrolled in the BIG 1–98 trial to receive tamoxifen and/or letrozole for 5 years. Tumors were genotyped for six CYP19A1 polymorphisms using PCR-based methods. Associations with breast cancer-free interval (BCFI), distant recurrence-free interval (DRFI), musculoskeletal and bone adverse events (AEs) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. All statistical tests were two-sided. No association between the CYP19A1 genotypes and BCFI or DRFI was observed overall. A reduced risk of a breast cancer event for tamoxifen-treated patients with rs700518 variants was observed (BCFI CC/TC vs. TT: HR 0.53, 95 % CI 0.34–0.82, interaction P = 0.08), but not observed for letrozole-treated patients. There was an increased risk of musculoskeletal AEs for patients with rs700518 variants CC/TC versus TT (HR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.03–1.45, P = 0.02), regardless of treatment. Tamoxifen-treated patients with rs4646 variants had a reduced risk of bone AEs (AA/CA vs. CC: HR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.59–0.98), whereas an increase of minor allele (C) of rs10046 was associated with an increased risk of bone AEs (HR 1.28, 95 % CI 1.07–1.52). rs936308 variants were associated with a reduced risk of bone AEs in letrozole-treated patients (GG/GC vs. CC: HR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.54–0.99), different from in tamoxifen-treated patients (GG/GC vs. CC: HR 1.32, 95 % CI 0.92–1.90, interaction P = 0.01). CYP19A1 rs700518 variants showed associations with BCFI, DRFI, in tamoxifen treated patients and musculoskeletal AEs regardless of treatment. SNPs rs4646, rs10046, and rs936308 were associated with bone AEs. PMID:25935582

  6. CYP19A1 polymorphisms and clinical outcomes in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the BIG 1-98 trial.

    PubMed

    Leyland-Jones, Brian; Gray, Kathryn P; Abramovitz, Mark; Bouzyk, Mark; Young, Brandon; Long, Bradley; Kammler, Roswitha; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Biasi, Maria Olivia; Thürlimann, Beat; Lyng, Maria B; Ditzel, Henrik J; Harvey, Vernon J; Neven, Patrick; Treilleux, Isabelle; Rasmussen, Birgitte Bruun; Maibach, Rudolf; Price, Karen N; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron; Pagani, Olivia; Viale, Giuseppe; Rae, James M; Regan, Meredith M

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether CYP19A1 polymorphisms are associated with abnormal activity of aromatase and with musculoskeletal and bone side effects of aromatase inhibitors. DNA was isolated from tumor specimens of 4861 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer enrolled in the BIG 1-98 trial to receive tamoxifen and/or letrozole for 5 years. Tumors were genotyped for six CYP19A1 polymorphisms using PCR-based methods. Associations with breast cancer-free interval (BCFI), distant recurrence-free interval (DRFI), musculoskeletal and bone adverse events (AEs) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards models. All statistical tests were two-sided. No association between the CYP19A1 genotypes and BCFI or DRFI was observed overall. A reduced risk of a breast cancer event for tamoxifen-treated patients with rs700518 variants was observed (BCFI CC/TC vs. TT: HR 0.53, 95 % CI 0.34-0.82, interaction P = 0.08), but not observed for letrozole-treated patients. There was an increased risk of musculoskeletal AEs for patients with rs700518 variants CC/TC versus TT (HR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.03-1.45, P = 0.02), regardless of treatment. Tamoxifen-treated patients with rs4646 variants had a reduced risk of bone AEs (AA/CA vs. CC: HR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.59-0.98), whereas an increase of minor allele (C) of rs10046 was associated with an increased risk of bone AEs (HR 1.28, 95 % CI 1.07-1.52). rs936308 variants were associated with a reduced risk of bone AEs in letrozole-treated patients (GG/GC vs. CC: HR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.54-0.99), different from in tamoxifen-treated patients (GG/GC vs. CC: HR 1.32, 95 % CI 0.92-1.90, interaction P = 0.01). CYP19A1 rs700518 variants showed associations with BCFI, DRFI, in tamoxifen treated patients and musculoskeletal AEs regardless of treatment. SNPs rs4646, rs10046, and rs936308 were associated with bone AEs. PMID:25935582

  7. The Hypocholesterolemic Effect of Germinated Brown Rice Involves the Upregulation of the Apolipoprotein A1 and Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Maznah; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Ithnin, Hairuszah

    2013-01-01

    Germinated brown rice (GBR) is rich in bioactive compounds, which confer GBR with many functional properties. Evidence of its hypocholesterolemic effects is emerging, but the exact mechanisms of action and bioactive compounds involved have not been fully documented. Using type 2 diabetic rats, we studied the effects of white rice, GBR, and brown rice (BR) on lipid profile and on the regulation of selected genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Our results showed that the upregulation of apolipoprotein A1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor genes was involved in the hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR. Additionally, in vitro studies using HEPG2 cells showed that acylated steryl glycoside, gamma amino butyric acid, and oryzanol and phenolic extracts of GBR contribute to the nutrigenomic regulation of these genes. Transcriptional and nontranscriptional mechanisms are likely involved in the overall hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR suggesting that it may have an impact on the prevention and/or management of hypercholesterolemia due to a wide variety of metabolic perturbations. However, there is need to conduct long-term clinical trials to determine the clinical relevance of the hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR determined through animal studies. PMID:23671850

  8. Serum amyloid A1 secreted from UV-irradiated keratinocytes induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 in fibroblasts through toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Han, Sangbum; Jin, Seon-Pil; Oh, Jang-Hee; Seo, Eun-Young; Park, Chi-Hyun; Yoon, Hyun-Sun; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on skin triggers photoageing-related phenotypes such as formation of wrinkles. UV ray upregulates matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), which in turn degrades extracellular matrix proteins, mostly collagens. Serum amyloid A1 (SAA1) is an acute-phase protein of which plasma concentration increases in response to inflammation. Although the expression of SAA1 in the skin was reported, its function in the skin is yet to be studied. In this research, we found that the expression of SAA1 was increased in acute UV-irradiated buttock skin and photoaged forearm skin in vivo. UV irradiation also increased SAA1 in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), and treatment of recombinant human SAA1 (rhSAA1) induced MMP-1 in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) but not in NHEK. Next, we demonstrated that NHDF treated with UV-irradiated keratinocyte-conditioned media showed the increased MMP-1 expression; however, this increase of MMP-1 in NHDF was inhibited by knockdown of SAA1 in NHEK. In addition, knockdown of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inhibited rhSAA1-induced MMP-1 expression in NHDF. Taken together, our data showed that UV-induced SAA1 production in NHEK, and this secreted SAA1 induced MMP-1 expression in NHDF in a paracrine manner through TLR4 signalling pathway. Therefore, our results suggest that SAA1 can be a potential mediator for UV-induced MMP-1 expression in human skin. PMID:26900010

  9. 5'-Chloro-5'-deoxy-(±)-ENBA, a potent and selective adenosine A(1) receptor agonist, alleviates neuropathic pain in mice through functional glial and microglial changes without affecting motor or cardiovascular functions.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Livio; Petrelli, Riccardo; Gatta, Luisa; Giordano, Catia; Guida, Francesca; Vita, Patrizia; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Grifantini, Mario; de Novellis, Vito; Cappellacci, Loredana; Maione, Sabatino

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to investigate the effect of chronic treatment with 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA, a potent and highly selective agonist of human adenosine A(1) receptor, on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain, the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) of the sciatic nerve. Chronic systemic administration of 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia 3 and 7 days post-SNI, in a way prevented by DPCPX (3 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective A(1) adenosine receptor antagonist, without exerting any significant change on the motor coordination or arterial blood pressure. In addition, a single intraperitoneal injection of 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 7 days post-SNI also reduced both symptoms for at least two hours. SNI was associated with spinal changes in microglial activation ipsilaterally to the nerve injury. Activated, hypertrophic microglia were significantly reduced by 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA chronic treatment. Our results demonstrated an involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor in the amplified nociceptive thresholds and in spinal glial and microglial changes occurred in neuropathic pain, without affecting motor coordination or blood pressure. Our data suggest a possible use of adenosine A(1) receptor agonist in neuropathic pain symptoms. PMID:23174891

  10. Molecular Characterization and Sex-Specific Tissue Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha (esr1), Estrogen Receptor Beta-a (esr2a) and Ovarian Aromatase (cyp19a1a) in Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) exhibit an estrogen-stimulated sexual size dimorphism (SSD) wherein females grow faster and larger than males. To aid in the examination of this phenomenon, the cDNA sequences encoding estrogen receptor-alpha (esr1), estrogen receptor-beta-a (esr2a) and ovarian aroma...

  11. NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase, cytochrome P-450 2C11 and P-450 1A1, and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in livers of rats fed methyl-folate-deficient diets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Henning, S M; Heber, D; Choi, J; Wang, Y; Swendseid, M E; Go, V L

    1997-01-01

    We investigated three hepatic cytochrome P-450 isozymes and the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in rats fed one of the following three diets for 15 months: a diet containing the AIN vitamin mixture (control), the control diet devoid of choline and folate (CFD), or the CFD diet devoid of niacin (CFND). Hepatic tumors developed in all CFD- and CFND-fed rats. Western blot analyses of nontumor hepatic tissue showed that NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase (P-450 reductase) increased significantly in the CFD and CFND groups compared with the control group. Hepatic cytochrome P-450 2C11 (CYP2C11) was not detectable in the CFD and CFND groups compared with the control group. Ah receptor and cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1) were detected in higher amounts in livers of both deficient groups. CYP1A1 is an enzyme associated with bioactivation of exogenous genotoxins. To our knowledge, this is the first time it has been shown that CYP1A1 and the Ah receptor are induced by dietary deficiencies. PMID:9290122

  12. A novel highly selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist VCP28 reduces ischemia injury in a cardiac cell line and ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated rat hearts at concentrations that do not affect heart rate.

    PubMed

    Urmaliya, Vijay B; Pouton, Colin W; Devine, Shane M; Haynes, John M; Warfe, Lyndon; Scammells, Peter J; White, Paul J

    2010-09-01

    The cardioprotective effects of a novel adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-(2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-yloxyl-3-ylmethyl) adenosine (VCP28) were compared with the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) in a H9c2(2-1) cardiac cell line-simulated ischemia (SI) model (12 hours) and a global ischemia (30 minutes) and reperfusion (60 minutes) model in isolated rat heart model. H9c2(2-1) cells were treated with CPA and VCP28 at the start of ischemia for entire ischemic duration, whereas isolated rat hearts were treated at the onset of reperfusion for 15 minutes. In the H9c2(2-1) cells SI model, CPA and VCP28 (100 nM) significantly (P < 0.05, n = 5-6) reduced the proportion of nonviable cells (30.88% +/- 2.49% and 16.17% +/- 3.77% of SI group, respectively) and lactate dehydrogenase efflux. In isolated rat hearts, CPA and VCP28 significantly (n = 6-8, P < 0.05) improved post-ischemic contractility (dP/dt(max), 81.69% +/- 10.96%, 91.07% +/- 19.87% of baseline, respectively), left ventricular developed pressure, and end diastolic pressure and reduced infarct size. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist abolished the cardioprotective effects of CPA and VCP28 in SI model and isolated rat hearts. In conclusion, the adenosine A1 receptor agonist VCP28 has equal cardioprotective effects to the prototype A1 agonist CPA at concentrations that have no effect on heart rate. PMID:20571427

  13. Cerebral adenosine A₁ receptors are upregulated in rodent encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Soumen; Khanapur, Shivashankar; Boersma, Wytske; Sijbesma, Jurgen W; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Elsinga, Philip H; Meerlo, Peter; Doorduin, Janine; Dierckx, Rudi A; van Waarde, Aren

    2014-05-15

    Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) are implied in the modulation of neuroinflammation. Activation of cerebral A1Rs acts as a brake on the microglial response after traumatic brain injury and has neuroprotective properties in animal models of Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. Neuroinflammatory processes in turn may affect the expression of A1Rs, but the available data is limited and inconsistent. Here, we applied an animal model of encephalitis to assess how neuroinflammation affects the expression of A1Rs. Two groups of animals were studied: Infected rats (n=7) were intranasally inoculated with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1, 1 × 10(7) plaque forming units), sham-infected rats (n=6) received only phosphate-buffered saline. Six or seven days later, microPET scans (60 min with arterial blood sampling) were made using the tracer 8-dicyclopropyl-1-(11)C-methyl-3-propyl-xanthine ((11)C-MPDX). Tracer clearance from plasma and partition coefficient (K₁/k₂ estimated from a 2-tissue compartment model fit) were not significantly altered after virus infection. PET tracer distribution volume calculated from a Logan plot was significantly increased in the hippocampus (+37%) and medulla (+27%) of virus infected rats. Tracer binding potential (k₃/k₄ estimated from the model fit) was significantly increased in the cerebellum (+87%) and the medulla (+148%) which may indicate increased A1R expression. This was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis showing a strong increase of A1R immunoreactivity in the cerebellum of HSV-1-infected rats. Both the quantitative PET data and immunohistochemical analysis indicate that A1Rs are upregulated in brain areas where active virus is present. PMID:24513151

  14. [Role of GABA-A receptors in mechanism of psychotropic action of pyrrol[1,2-a][1,4]diazepines studied using drug discrimination technique in Wistar rats].

    PubMed

    Korolev, A O; Kalinina, T S; Volkova, A V; Mokrov, G V; Kudriashov, N V; Voronina, T A

    2014-01-01

    The role of GABA-A receptors in psychotropic effects of pyrrolo[1,2-a][1,4]diazepine derivatives GMAL-24 and GMAL-27 has been studied on an operant method with liquid reinforcement of drug discrimination in male Wistar rats. It is established that, in substitution tests, GMAL-24 (2, 5, 10 mg/kg) and GMAL-27 (2, 5, 10 mg/kg) do not produce interoceptive effects of phenazepam (1 mg/kg) and fail to inhibit interoceptive effects of corasol (20 mg/kg). The obtained results indicate that pyrrolo[1,2-a][1,4]diazepine derivatives do not exhibit GABA-A receptor-positive modulator properties in vivo. PMID:25102727

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of 2-amino-3-aroyl thiophene derivatives as agonist allosteric modulators of the A1 adenosine receptor. A position-dependent effect study.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Lopez-Cara, Carlota; Cruz-Lopez, Olga; Moorman, Allan R; Massink, Arnault; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2015-08-28

    The 2-amino-3-(p-chlorobenzoyl)thiophene scaffold has been widely employed as a pharmacophore for the identification of small molecules acting as allosteric modulators at the adenosine A1 receptor. A new series of 2-amino-3-(p-chlorobenzoyl)-4-benzyl-5-arylthiophene derivatives, characterized by the absence as well as the presence of electron-releasing or electron-withdrawing groups on the phenyl ring at the 4- and 5-positions of the thiophene ring, were identified as positive allosteric enhancers at the adenosine A1 receptor in binding (saturation, competition and dissociation kinetics) and functional assays. To better understand the positional requirements of substituents on the 2-amino-3-(p-chlorobenzoyl)thiophene core, the corresponding regioisomeric 4-aryl-5-benzylthiophene analogues were synthesized and found to possess reduced allosteric enhancer activity. PMID:26141910

  16. Interaction of ApoA-IV with NR4A1 and NR1D1 Represses G6Pase and PEPCK Transcription: Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Downregulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in Mice and a Human Hepatocyte Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Fei; Ji, Yong; DavidsoN, W. Sean; Li, Zongfang; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the nuclear receptor, NR1D1, is a cofactor in ApoA-IV-mediated downregulation of gluconeogenesis. Nuclear receptor, NR4A1, is involved in the transcriptional regulation of various genes involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. We investigated whether NR4A1 influences the effect of ApoA-IV on hepatic glucose metabolism. Our in situ proximity ligation assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that ApoA-IV colocalized with NR4A1 in human liver (HepG2) and kidney (HEK-293) cell lines. The chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase reporter assays indicated that the ApoA-IV and NR4A1 colocalized at the RORα response element of the human G6Pase promoter, reducing its transcriptional activity. Our RNA interference experiments showed that knocking down the expression of NR4A1 in primary mouse hepatocytes treated with ApoA-IV increased the expression of NR1D1, G6Pase, and PEPCK, and that knocking down NR1D1 expression increased the level of NR4A1. We also found that ApoA-IV induced the expression of endogenous NR4A1 in both cultured primary mouse hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and decreased glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Our findings showed that ApoA-IV colocalizes with NR4A1, which suppresses G6Pase and PEPCK gene expression at the transcriptional level, reducing hepatic glucose output and lowering blood glucose. The ApoA-IV-induced increase in NR4A1 expression in hepatocytes mediates further repression of gluconeogenesis. Our findings suggest that NR1D1 and NR4A1 serve similar or complementary functions in the ApoA-IV-mediated regulation of gluconeogenesis. PMID:26556724

  17. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In "driver" thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  18. Activation of A1-Adenosine Receptors Promotes Leukocyte Recruitment to the Lung and Attenuates Acute Lung Injury in Mice Infected with Influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) Virus

    PubMed Central

    Aeffner, Famke; Woods, Parker S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have shown that bronchoalveolar epithelial A1-adenosine receptors (A1-AdoR) are activated in influenza A virus-infected mice. Alveolar macrophages and neutrophils also express A1-AdoRs, and we hypothesized that activation of A1-AdoRs on these cells will promote macrophage and neutrophil chemotaxis and activation and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of influenza virus-induced acute lung injury. Wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, congenic A1-AdoR knockout (A1-KO) mice, and mice that had undergone reciprocal bone marrow transfer were inoculated intranasally with 10,000 PFU/mouse influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus. Alternatively, WT mice underwent daily treatment with the A1-AdoR antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) from 1 day prior to inoculation. Infection increased bronchoalveolar lining fluid (BALF) adenosine comparably in WT and A1-KO mice. Infection of WT mice resulted in reduced carotid arterial O2 saturation (hypoxemia), lung pathology, pulmonary edema, reduced lung compliance, increased basal airway resistance, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. These effects were absent or significantly attenuated in A1-KO mice. Levels of BALF leukocytes, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and interleukin 10 (IL-10) were significantly reduced in infected A1-KO mice, but levels of KC, IP-10, and MCP-1 were increased. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer resulted in WT-like lung injury severity, but BALF leukocyte levels increased only in WT and A1-KO mice with WT bone barrow. Hypoxemia, pulmonary edema, and levels of BALF alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, IFN-γ, and IL-10 were reduced in DPCPX-treated WT mice. Levels of viral replication did not differ between mouse strains or treatment groups. These findings indicate that adenosine activation of leukocyte A1-AdoRs plays a significant role in their recruitment to the infected lung and contributes to influenza pathogenesis. A1-AdoR inhibitor therapy may therefore be beneficial in patients with influenza

  19. Adenosine A1( )receptors are selectively coupled to Gα(i-3) in postmortem human brain cortex: Guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding/immunoprecipitation study.

    PubMed

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Ota, Toshio; Meana, J Javier; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-10-01

    By means of guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) binding assay combined with immunoprecipitation using anti-Gα subunit antibody, we recently reported 5-HT2A receptor- and M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated Gαq activation in rat cerebral cortical membranes (Odagaki et al., 2014). In the present study, this method has been applied to postmortem human brains, with focusing on adenosine receptor-mediated G-protein activation. In the exploratory experiments using a series of agonists and the antibodies specific to each Gα subtypes in the presence of low (10 nM) or high (50 μM) concentration of GDP, the most prominent increases in specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the membranes prepared from human prefrontal cortex were obtained for the combinations of adenosine (1mM)/anti-Gαi-3 in the presence of 50 μM GDP as well as 5-HT (100 μM)/anti-Gαq and carbachol (1mM)/anti-Gαq in the presence of 10nM GDP. Adenosine-induced activation of Gαi-3 emerged only when GDP concentrations were increased higher than 10 μM, and the following experiments were performed in the presence of 300 μM GDP. Adenosine increased specific [(35)S]GTPγS binding to Gαi-3 in a concentration-dependent manner to 251.4% of the basal unstimulated binding, with an EC50 of 1.77 μM. The involvement of adenosine A1 receptor was verified by the experiments using selective agonists and antagonists at adenosine A1 or A3 receptor. Among the α subunits of Gi/o class (Gαi-1, Gαi-2, Gαi-3, and Gαo.), only Gαi-3 was activated by 1mM adenosine, indicating that human brain adenosine A1 receptor is coupled preferentially, if not exclusively, to Gαi-3. PMID:26213104

  20. Specific Activation of A3, A2A and A1 Adenosine Receptors in CD73-Knockout Mice Affects B16F10 Melanoma Growth, Neovascularization, Angiogenesis and Macrophage Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Koszałka, Patrycja; Gołuńska, Monika; Urban, Aleksandra; Stasiłojć, Grzegorz; Stanisławowski, Marcin; Majewski, Marceli; Składanowski, Andrzej C.; Bigda, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase), a cell surface enzyme hydrolyzing AMP to adenosine, was lately demonstrated to play a direct role in tumor progression including regulation of tumor vascularization. It was also shown to stimulate tumor macrophage infiltration. Interstitial adenosine, accumulating in solid tumors due to CD73 enzymatic activity, is recognized as a main mediator regulating the production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, but the engagement of specific adenosine receptors in tumor progression in vivo is still poorly researched. We have analyzed the role of high affinity adenosine receptors A1, A2A, and A3 in B16F10 melanoma progression using specific agonists (CCPA, CGS-21680 and IB-MECA, respectively). We limited endogenous extracellular adenosine background using CD73 knockout mice treated with CD73 chemical inhibitor, AOPCP (adenosine α,β-methylene 5’-diphosphate). Activation of any adenosine receptor significantly inhibited B16F10 melanoma growth but only at its early stage. At 14th day of growth, the decrease in tumor neovascularization and MAPK pathway activation induced by CD73 depletion was reversed by all agonists. Activation of A1AR primarily increased angiogenic activation measured by expression of VEGF-R2 on tumor blood vessels. However, mainly A3AR activation increased both the microvessel density and expression of pro-angiogenic factors. All agonists induced significant increase in macrophage tumor infiltration, with IB-MECA being most effective. This effect was accompanied by substantial changes in cytokines regulating macrophage polarization between pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic phenotype. Our results demonstrate an evidence that each of the analyzed receptors has a specific role in the stimulation of tumor angiogenesis and confirm significantly more multifaceted role of adenosine in its regulation than was already observed. They also reveal previously unexplored consequences to extracellular adenosine signaling depletion in

  1. The orphan nuclear receptor Nr4a1 couples sympathetic and inflammatory cues in CNS-recruited macrophages to limit neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Iftach; Hanna, Richard N.; Shaked, Helena; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Nowyhed, Heba N.; Tweet, George; Tacke, Robert; Basat, Alp Bugra; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Togher, Susan; Miller, Jacqueline; Blatchley, Amy; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Darvas, Martin; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Thomas, Graham; Lai-Wing-Sun, Sonia; Rezk, Ayman; Bar-Or, Amit; Glass, Christopher K.; Bandukwala, Hozefa; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms linking the sympathetic stress response and inflammation remain enigmatic. Here we demonstrate that the transcription factor Nr4a1 regulates production of norepinephrine (NE) in macrophages, thereby limiting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Lack of Nr4a1 in myeloid cells led to enhanced NE production, accelerated leukocyte infiltration to the central nervous system (CNS) and disease exacerbation in vivo. In contrast, myeloid-specific deletion of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, protected against EAE. Further, we found that Nr4a1 repressed autocrine NE production in macrophages by recruiting the corepressor CoREST to the Th promoter. Our data reveal a new role for macrophages in neuroinflammation and identify Nr4a1 as a key regulator of macrophage catecholamine production. PMID:26523867

  2. ABA renewal involves enhancements in both GluA2-lacking AMPA receptor activity and GluA1 phosphorylation in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungjoon; Song, Beomjong; Kim, Jeongyeon; Hong, Ingie; Song, Sangho; Lee, Junuk; Park, Sungmo; Kim, Jihye; An, Bobae; Lee, Hyun Woo; Lee, Seungbok; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Justin C; Lee, Sukwon; Choi, Sukwoo

    2014-01-01

    Fear renewal, the context-specific relapse of fear following fear extinction, is a leading animal model of post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and fear-related disorders. Although fear extinction can diminish fear responses, this effect is restricted to the context where the extinction is carried out, and the extinguished fear strongly relapses when assessed in the original acquisition context (ABA renewal) or in a context distinct from the conditioning and extinction contexts (ABC renewal). We have previously identified Ser831 phosphorylation of GluA1 subunit in the lateral amygdala (LA) as a key molecular mechanism for ABC renewal. However, molecular mechanisms underlying ABA renewal remain to be elucidated. Here, we found that both the excitatory synaptic efficacy and GluA2-lacking AMPAR activity at thalamic input synapses onto the LA (T-LA synapses) were enhanced upon ABA renewal. GluA2-lacking AMPAR activity was also increased during low-threshold potentiation, a potential cellular substrate of renewal, at T-LA synapses. The microinjection of 1-naphtylacetyl-spermine (NASPM), a selective blocker of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, into the LA attenuated ABA renewal, suggesting a critical role of GluA2-lacking AMPARs in ABA renewal. We also found that Ser831 phosphorylation of GluA1 in the LA was increased upon ABA renewal. We developed a short peptide mimicking the Ser831-containing C-tail region of GluA1, which can be phosphorylated upon renewal (GluA1S); thus, the phosphorylated GluA1S may compete with Ser831-phosphorylated GluA1. This GluA1S peptide blocked the low-threshold potentiation when dialyzed into a recorded neuron. The microinjection of a cell-permeable form of GluA1S peptide into the LA attenuated ABA renewal. In support of the GluA1S experiments, a GluA1D peptide (in which the serine at 831 is replaced with a phosphomimetic amino acid, aspartate) attenuated ABA renewal when microinjected into the LA. These findings suggest that enhancements in both the

  3. Exploring the 2- and 5-positions of the pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidin-7-amino scaffold to target human A1 and A2A adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Squarcialupi, Lucia; Falsini, Matteo; Catarzi, Daniela; Varano, Flavia; Betti, Marco; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Dal Ben, Diego; Lambertucci, Catia; Volpini, Rosaria; Colotta, Vittoria

    2016-06-15

    A new series of 7-aminopyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives (1-31) were synthesized to evaluate some structural modifications at the 2- and 5-positions aimed at shifting affinity towards the human (h) A2A adenosine receptor (AR) or both hA2A and hA1 ARs. The most active compounds were those featured by a 2-furyl or 5-methylfuran-2-yl moiety at position 5, combined with a benzyl or a substituted-benzyl group at position 2. Several of these derivatives (22-31) displayed nanomolar affinity for the hA2A AR (Ki=3.62-57nM) and slightly lower for the hA1 ARs, thus showing different degrees (3-22 fold) of hA2A versus hA1 selectivity. In particular, the 2-(2-methoxybenzyl)-5-(5-methylfuran-2-yl) derivative 25 possessed the highest hA2A and hA1 AR affinities (Ki=3.62nM and 18nM, respectively) and behaved as potent antagonist at both these receptors (cAMP assays). Its 2-(2-hydroxybenzyl) analog 26 also showed a high affinity for the hA2A AR (Ki=5.26nM) and was 22-fold selective versus the hA1 subtype. Molecular docking investigations performed at the hA2A AR crystal structure and at a homology model of the hA1 AR allowed us to represent the hypothetical binding mode of our derivatives and to rationalize the observed SARs. PMID:27161878

  4. Characterization of the binding of a novel nonxanthine adenosine antagonist radioligand, ( sup 3 H)CGS 15943, to multiple affinity states of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.F.; Williams, M.; Do, U.H.; Sills, M.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The triazoloquinazoline CGS 15943 is the first reported nonxanthine adenosine antagonist that has high affinity for brain adenosine receptors. In the present study, the binding of (3H) CGS 15943 to recognition sites in rat cortical membranes was characterized. Saturation experiments revealed that (3H)CGS 15943 labeled a single class of recognition sites with high affinity and limited capacity. Competition studies revealed that the binding of (3H)CGS 15943 was consistent with the labeling of brain adenosine A1 receptors. Adenosine agonists inhibited 1 nM (3H)CGS 15943 binding with the following order of activity N6-cyclopentyladenosine (IC50 = 15 nM) greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than (R)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than 5'-N6-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine greater than (S)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than CGS 21680 greater than CV 1808 (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). The potency order for adenosine antagonists was CGS 15943 (IC50 = 5 nM) greater than 8-phenyltheophylline greater than 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-amino-2-chloro)phenylxanthine greater than 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine greater than theophylline = caffeine (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM). Antagonist inhibition curves were steep and best described by a one-site binding model. In contrast, adenosine A1 agonist competition curves were shallow, as indicated by Hill coefficients less than unity. Computer analysis revealed that these inhibition curves were best described by a two-site binding model. Agonist competition curves generated in the presence of 1 mM GTP resulted in a rightward shift and steepening of the inhibition-concentration curves, whereas antagonist binding was not altered in the presence of GTP. The complex binding interactions found with adenosine agonists indicate that (3H)CGS 15943 labels both high and low affinity components of the adenosine A1 receptor in the rat cortex.

  5. Postnatal changes in the expressions of serotonin 1A, 1B, and 2A receptors in ten brain stem nuclei of the rat: implication for a sensitive period

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiuli; Wong-Riley, Margaret T.T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical period in respiratory network development occurs in the rat around postnatal days (P)12–13, when abrupt neurochemical, metabolic, and physiological changes were evident. As serotonin (5-HT) and its receptors are involved in respiratory modulation, and serotonergic abnormality is implicated in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, we hypothesized that 5-HT receptors are significantly down-regulated during the critical period. This was documented recently for 5-HT2AR in several respiratory nuclei. The present study represents a comprehensive analysis of postnatal development of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in ten brain stem nuclei and 5-HT2AR in six nuclei not previously examined. Optical densitometric analysis of immunohistochemically-reacted neurons from P2 to P21 indicated four developmental patterns of expression: 1) Pattern I: a high level of expression at P2–P11, an abrupt and significant reduction at P12, followed by a plateau until P21 (5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in raphé magnus [RM], raphé obscurus [ROb], raphé pallidus [RP], pre-Bötzinger complex [PBC], nucleus ambiguus [Amb], and hypoglossal nucleus [XII; 5-HT1AR only]). 2) Pattern II: a high level at P2–P9, a gradual decline from P9 to P12, followed by a plateau until P21 (5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in the retrotrapezoid nucleus [RTN]/parafacial respiratory group [pFRG]). 3) Pattern III: a high level at P2–P11, followed by a gradual decline until P21 (5-HT1AR in the ventrolateral subnucleus of solitary tract nucleus [NTSVL] and the non-respiratory cuneate nucleus [CN]). 4) Pattern IV: a relatively constant level maintained from P2 to P21 (5-HT1AR in the commissural subnucleus of solitary tract nucleus [NTSCOM]; 5-HT1BR in XII, NTSVL, NTSCOM, and CN; and 5-HT2AR in RM, ROb, RP, RTN/pFRG, NTSVL, and NTSCOM). Thus, a significant reduction in the expression of 5-HT1AR, 5-HT1BR, and 5-HT2AR in multiple respiratory-related nuclei at P12 is consistent with reduced serotonergic transmission during the critical period

  6. Rats fed soy protein isolate (SPI) have impaired hepatic CYP1A1 induction by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a result of interference with aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of soy diet has been found to reduce cancer incidence in animals and is associated with reduced cancer risk in humans. Previously, we have demonstrated that female Sprague-Dawley rats fed purified AIN-93G diets with soy protein isolate (SPI) as the sole protein source had reduced CYP1A1 ...

  7. SF-1 (Nuclear Receptor 5A1) Activity Is Activated by Cyclic AMP via p300-Mediated Recruitment to Active Foci, Acetylation, and Increased DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Yi; Juan, Li-Jung; Chung, Bon-chu

    2005-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a nuclear receptor essential for steroidogenic gene expression, but how its activity is regulated is unclear. Here we demonstrate that p300 plays an important role in regulating SF-1 function. SF-1 was acetylated in vitro and in vivo by p300 at the KQQKK motif in the Ftz-F1 (Fushi-tarazu factor 1) box adjacent to its DNA-binding domain. Mutation of the KQQKK motif reduced the DNA-binding activity and p300-dependent activation of SF-1. When stimulated with cyclic AMP (cAMP), adrenocortical Y1 cells expressed more p300, leading to additional SF-1 association with p300 and increased SF-1 acetylation and DNA binding. It also increased SF-1 colocalization with p300 in nuclear foci. Collectively, these results indicate that SF-1 transcriptional activity is regulated by p300 in response to the cAMP signaling pathway by way of increased acetylation, DNA binding, and recruitment to nuclear foci. PMID:16287857

  8. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

    PubMed

    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins. PMID:27129202

  9. Lack of antagonism of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin's (TCDDs) induction of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) by the putative selective aryl hydrocarbon receptor modulator 6-alkyl-1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (6-MCDF) in the mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa-1c1c7.

    PubMed

    Fretland, Adrian J; Safe, Stephen; Hankinson, Oliver

    2004-11-20

    Regulation of gene expression by the aryl hydrocarbon (AHR) receptor is a much-studied pathway of molecular toxicology. Activation of AHR by the xenobiotic ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is hypothesized as the mechanism by which TCDD exerts its toxic and carcinogenic effects. Paradoxically, some studies have shown that TCDD acts as an antiestrogen. This has led to the hypothesis that so-called selective aryl hydrocarbon receptor modulators (SAhRMs), AHR ligands that retain the antiestrogenic effects but lack the transcriptional effects of TCDD associated with toxicity, may be utilized as cancer chemotherapeutics in conjunction with other antiestrogenic compounds such as tamoxifen. The present study attempts to further define the molecular mechanism of action of the putative SAhRMs, 6-alkyl-1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (6-MCDF), and diindolylmethane (DIM), focusing particularly on the former. We tested 6-MCDF and DIM for the recruitment of AHR and RNA polymerase II (pol II) to the regulatory region of the AHR responsive gene, cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), using the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay in the mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa-1c1c7 (Hepa-1). We also tested the level of CYP1A1 induction in Hepa-1 cells using quantitative real-time PCR. We show no difference in the recruitment of AHR or pol II to the regulatory region of CYP1A1 in response to TCDD, 6-MCDF, or co-treatment with both TCDD and 6-MCDF. Our results also show no antagonism of CYP1A1 induction with co-treatment of Hepa-1 cells with TCDD and 6-MCDF. These data suggest that 6-MCDF exhibits agonist activity with respect to induction of CYP1A1 in the Hepa-1 cell line. PMID:15535986

  10. Striatal Pre- and Postsynaptic Profile of Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Beaumont, Vahri; Goldberg, Steven R.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Striatal adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). A2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261) showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A2AR-D2R and A1R-A2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A2AR when co-expressed with D2R than with A1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A2AR co-expressed with D2R than co-expressed with A1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile. On the basis of their preferential

  11. Molecular signalling mediating the protective effect of A1 adenosine and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptor activation against apoptosis by oxygen/glucose deprivation in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Renata; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Ballerini, Patrizia; D'Auro, Mariagrazia; Nargi, Eleonora; Buccella, Silvana; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Bruno, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Caciagli, Francesco

    2007-05-01

    Astrocyte death may occur in neurodegenerative disorders and complicates the outcome of brain ischemia, a condition associated with high extracellular levels of adenosine and glutamate. We show that pharmacological activation of A(1) adenosine and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors with N(6)-chlorocyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) and (-)2-oxa-4-aminocyclo-[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268), respectively, protects cultured astrocytes against apoptosis induced by a 3-h exposure to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). Protection by CCPA and LY379268 was less than additive and was abrogated by receptor blockade with selective competitive antagonists or pertussis toxin. Both in control astrocytes and in astrocytes exposed to OGD, CCPA and LY379268 induced a rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which are known to support cell survival. In cultures exposed to OGD, CCPA and LY379268 reduced the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38/MAPK, reduced the levels of the proapoptotic protein Bad, increased the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-X(L), and were highly protective against apoptotic death, as shown by nuclear 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and measurements of caspase-3 activity. All of these effects were attenuated by treatment with 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(methylthio)butadiene (U0126) and 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride (LY294002), which inhibit the MAPK and the PI3K pathways, respectively. These data suggest that pharmacological activation of A(1) and mGlu3 receptors protects astrocytes against hypoxic/ischemic damage by stimulating the PI3K and ERK1/2 MAPK pathways. PMID:17293559

  12. Bile Acid-regulated Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-α (PPARα) Activity Underlies Circadian Expression of Intestinal Peptide Absorption Transporter PepT1/Slc15a1*

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter. PMID:25016014

  13. Bile acid-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) activity underlies circadian expression of intestinal peptide absorption transporter PepT1/Slc15a1.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-09-01

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter. PMID:25016014

  14. Reduced striatal adenosine A2A receptor levels define a molecular subgroup in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Villar-Menéndez, Izaskun; Díaz-Sánchez, Sara; Blanch, Marta; Albasanz, José Luis; Pereira-Veiga, Thais; Monje, Alfonso; Planchat, Luis Maria; Ferrer, Isidre; Martín, Mairena; Barrachina, Marta

    2014-04-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a mental disorder of unknown origin. Some scientific evidence seems to indicate that SZ is not a single disease entity, since there are patient groups with clear symptomatic, course and biomarker differences. SZ is characterized by a hyperdopaminergic state related to high dopamine D2 receptor activity. It has also been proposed that there is a hypoadenosynergic state. Adenosine is a nucleoside widely distributed in the organism with neuromodulative and neuroprotective activity in the central nervous system. In the brain, the most abundant adenosine receptors are A1R and A2AR. In the present report, we characterize the presence of both receptors in human postmortem putamens of patients suffering SZ with real time TaqMan PCR, western blotting and radioligand binding assay. We show that A1R levels remain unchanged with respect to age-matched controls, whereas nearly fifty percent of patients have reduced A2AR, at the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, we describe how DNA methylation plays a role in the pathological A2AR levels with the bisulfite-sequencing technique. In fact, an increase in 5-methylcytosine percentage in the 5' UTR region of ADORA2A was found in those SZ patients with reduced A2AR levels. Interestingly, there was a relationship between the A2A/β-actin ratio and motor disturbances as assessed with some items of the PANSS, AIMS and SAS scales. Therefore, there may be a subgroup of SZ patients with reduced striatal A2AR levels accompanied by an altered motor phenotype. PMID:24433848

  15. Novel Regulation of the Synthesis of α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Subunit GluA1 by Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C) in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fadó, Rut; Soto, David; Miñano-Molina, Alfredo J; Pozo, Macarena; Carrasco, Patricia; Yefimenko, Natalia; Rodríguez-Álvarez, José; Casals, Núria

    2015-10-16

    The regulation of AMPA-type receptor (AMPAR) abundance in the postsynaptic membrane is an important mechanism involved in learning and memory formation. Recent data suggest that one of the constituents of the AMPAR complex is carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific isoform located in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurons. Previous results had demonstrated that CPT1C deficiency disrupted spine maturation in hippocampal neurons and impaired spatial learning, but the role of CPT1C in AMPAR physiology had remained mostly unknown. In the present study, we show that CPT1C binds GluA1 and GluA2 and that the three proteins have the same expression profile during neuronal maturation. Moreover, in hippocampal neurons of CPT1C KO mice, AMPAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and synaptic levels of AMPAR subunits GluA1 and GluA2 are significantly reduced. We show that AMPAR expression is dependent on CPT1C levels because total protein levels of GluA1 and GluA2 are decreased in CPT1C KO neurons and are increased in CPT1C-overexpressing neurons, whereas other synaptic proteins remain unaltered. Notably, mRNA levels of AMPARs remained unchanged in those cultures, indicating that CPT1C is post-transcriptionally involved. We demonstrate that CPT1C is directly involved in the de novo synthesis of GluA1 and not in protein degradation. Moreover, in CPT1C KO cultured neurons, GluA1 synthesis after chemical long term depression was clearly diminished, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor treatment was unable to phosphorylate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and stimulate GluA1 protein synthesis. These data newly identify CPT1C as a regulator of AMPAR translation efficiency and therefore also synaptic function in the hippocampus. PMID:26338711

  16. The Frog Skin-Derived Antimicrobial Peptide Esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 Promotes the Migration of Human HaCaT Keratinocytes in an EGF Receptor-Dependent Manner: A Novel Promoter of Human Skin Wound Healing?

    PubMed Central

    Di Grazia, Antonio; Cappiello, Floriana; Imanishi, Akiko; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Picardo, Mauro; Paus, Ralf; Mangoni, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    One of the many functions of skin is to protect the organism against a wide range of pathogens. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the skin epithelium provide an effective chemical shield against microbial pathogens. However, whereas antibacterial/antifungal activities of AMPs have been extensively characterized, much less is known regarding their wound healing-modulatory properties. By using an in vitro re-epithelialisation assay employing special cell-culture inserts, we detected that a derivative of the frog-skin AMP esculentin-1a, named esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2, significantly stimulates migration of immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) over a wide range of peptide concentrations (0.025–4 μM), and this notably more efficiently than human cathelicidin (LL-37). This activity is preserved in primary human epidermal keratinocytes. By using appropriate inhibitors and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we found that the peptide-induced cell migration involves activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and STAT3 protein. These results suggest that esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 now deserves to be tested in standard wound healing assays as a novel candidate promoter of skin re-epithelialisation. The established ability of esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 to kill microbes without harming mammalian cells, namely its high anti-Pseudomonal activity, makes this AMP a particularly attractive candidate wound healing promoter, especially in the management of chronic, often Pseudomonas-infected, skin ulcers. PMID:26068861

  17. Metformin inhibits 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced breast carcinogenesis and adduct formation in human breast cells by inhibiting the cytochrome P4501A1/aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Maayah, Zaid H.; Ghebeh, Hazem; Alhaider, Abdulqader A.; El-Kadi, Ayman O.S.; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.; Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad; Korashy, Hesham M.

    2015-04-15

    Recent studies have established that metformin (MET), an oral anti-diabetic drug, possesses antioxidant activity and is effective against different types of cancer in several carcinogen-induced animal models and cell lines. However, whether MET can protect against breast cancer has not been reported before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential chemopreventive effect of MET in non-cancerous human breast MCF10A cells and explore the underlying mechanism involved, specifically the role of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1)/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. Transformation of the MCF10A cells into initiated breast cancer cells with DNA adduct formation was conducted using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), an AhR ligand. The chemopreventive effect of MET against DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was evidenced by the capability of MET to restore the induction of the mRNA levels of basic excision repair genes, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1), and the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Interestingly, the inhibition of DMBA-induced DNA adduct formation was associated with proportional decrease in CYP1A1 and in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene expression. Mechanistically, the involvements of AhR and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the MET-mediated inhibition of DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and NQO1 gene expression were evidenced by the ability of MET to inhibit DMBA-induced xenobiotic responsive element and antioxidant responsive element luciferase reporter gene expression which suggests an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent transcriptional control. However, the inability of MET to bind to AhR suggests that MET is not an AhR ligand. In conclusion, the present work shows a strong evidence that MET inhibits the DMBA-mediated carcinogenicity and adduct formation by inhibiting the expression of CYP1A1 through an AhR ligand-independent mechanism

  18. The Vγ9Vδ2 T Cell Antigen Receptor and Butyrophilin-3 A1: Models of Interaction, the Possibility of Co-Evolution, and the Case of Dendritic Epidermal T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Mohindar M.; Herrmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Most circulating human gamma delta T cells are Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Their hallmark is the expression of T cell antigen receptors (TCR) whose γ-chains show a Vγ9-JP (Vγ2-Jγ1.2) rearrangement and are paired with Vδ2-containing δ-chains, a dominant TCR configuration, which until recently seemed to occur in primates only. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells respond to phosphoantigens (PAg) such as (E)-4-Hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), which is produced by many pathogens and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), which accumulates in certain tumors or cells treated with aminobisphosphonates such as zoledronate. A prerequisite for PAg-induced activation is the contact of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells with cells expressing butyrophilin-3 A1 (BTN3A1). We will first critically review models of how BTN3 might act in PAg-mediated Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation and then address putative co-evolution of Vγ9, Vδ2, and BTN3 genes. In those rodent and lagomorphs used as animal models, all three genes are lost but a data-base analysis showed that they emerged together with placental mammals. A strong concomitant conservation of functional Vγ9, Vδ2, and BTN3 genes in other species suggests co-evolution of these three genes. A detailed analysis was performed for the new world camelid alpaca (Vicugna pacos). It provides an excellent candidate for a non-primate species with presumably functional Vγ9Vδ2 T cells since TCR rearrangements share features characteristic for PAg-reactive primate Vγ9Vδ2 TCR and proposed PAg-binding sites of BTN3A1 have been conserved. Finally, we analyze the possible functional relationship between the butyrophilin-family member Skint1 and the γδ TCR-V genes used by murine dendritic epithelial T cells (DETC). Among placental mammals, we identify five rodents, the cow, a bat, and the cape golden mole as the only species concomitantly possessing potentially functional homologs of murine Vγ3, Vδ4 genes, and Skint1 gene and suggest to search for DETC like cells in these

  19. Reduction in 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced hepatic cytochrome-P450 1A1 expression following soy consumption in female rats is mediated by degradation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a soy diet has been found to reduce cancer incidence in animals and is associated with reduced cancer risk in humans. In this study, the effect of consuming soy protein isolate (SPI) on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated signaling pathway was investigated. Female Sprague-Daw...

  20. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J.; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In “driver” thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  1. Pharmacological evidence that 5-HT1A/1B/1D, α2-adrenoceptors and D2-like receptors mediate ergotamine-induced inhibition of the vasopressor sympathetic outflow in pithed rats.

    PubMed

    Villamil-Hernández, Ma Trinidad; Alcántara-Vázquez, Oscar; Sánchez-López, Araceli; Gutiérrez-Lara, Erika J; Centurión, David

    2014-10-01

    The sympathetic nervous system that innervates the peripheral circulation is regulated by several mechanisms/receptors. It has been reported that prejunctional 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, D2-like receptors and α2-adrenoceptors mediate the inhibition of the vasopressor sympathetic outflow in pithed rats. In addition, ergotamine, an antimigraine drug, displays affinity at the above receptors and may explain some of its adverse/therapeutic effects. Thus, the aims of this study were to investigate in pithed rats: (i) whether ergotamine produces inhibition of the vasopressor sympathetic outflow; and (ii) the major receptors involved in this effect. For this purpose, male Wistar pithed rats were pre-treated with gallamine (25 mg/kg; i.v.) and desipramine (50 µg/kg) and prepared to stimulate the vasopressor sympathetic outflow (T7-T9; 0.03-3 Hz) or to receive i.v. bolus of exogenous noradrenaline (0.03-3 µg/kg). I.v. continuous infusions of ergotamine (1 and 1.8 μg/kgmin) dose-dependently inhibited the vasopressor responses to sympathetic stimulation but not those to exogenous noradrenaline. The sympatho-inhibition elicited by 1.8 μg/kg min ergotamine was (i) unaffected by saline (1 ml/kg); (ii) partially antagonised by WAY 100635 (5-HT1A; 30 μg/kg) and rauwolscine (α2-adrenoceptor; 300 μg/kg), and (iii) dose-dependently blocked by GR 127935 (5-HT1B/1D; 100 and 300 μg/kg) or raclopride (D2-like; 300 and 1000 μg/kg), The above doses of antagonists did not modify per se the sympathetically-induced vasopressor responses. The above results suggest that ergotamine induces inhibition of the vasopressor sympathetic outflow by activation of prejunctional 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B/1D, α2-adrenoceptors and D2-like receptors in pithed rats. PMID:24975101

  2. Microarray analysis of E9.5 reduced folate carrier (RFC1; Slc19a1) knockout embryos reveals altered expression of genes in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Gelineau-van Waes, Janee; Maddox, Joyce R; Smith, Lynette M; van Waes, Michael; Wilberding, Justin; Eudy, James D; Bauer, Linda K; Finnell, Richard H

    2008-01-01

    Background The reduced folate carrier (RFC1) is an integral membrane protein and facilitative anion exchanger that mediates delivery of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate into mammalian cells. Adequate maternal-fetal transport of folate is necessary for normal embryogenesis. Targeted inactivation of the murine RFC1 gene results in post-implantation embryolethality, but daily folic acid supplementation of pregnant dams prolongs survival of homozygous embryos until mid-gestation. At E10.5 RFC1-/- embryos are developmentally delayed relative to wildtype littermates, have multiple malformations, including neural tube defects, and die due to failure of chorioallantoic fusion. The mesoderm is sparse and disorganized, and there is a marked absence of erythrocytes in yolk sac blood islands. The identification of alterations in gene expression and signaling pathways involved in the observed dysmorphology following inactivation of RFC1-mediated folate transport are the focus of this investigation. Results Affymetrix microarray analysis of the relative gene expression profiles in whole E9.5 RFC1-/- vs. RFC1+/+ embryos identified 200 known genes that were differentially expressed. Major ontology groups included transcription factors (13.04%), and genes involved in transport functions (ion, lipid, carbohydrate) (11.37%). Genes that code for receptors, ligands and interacting proteins in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex accounted for 9.36% of the total, followed closely by several genes involved in hematopoiesis (8.03%). The most highly significant gene network identified by Ingenuity™ Pathway analysis included 12 genes in the cubilin-megalin multiligand endocytic receptor complex. Altered expression of these genes was validated by quantitative RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that megalin protein expression disappeared from the visceral yolk sac of RFC1-/- embryos, while cubilin protein was widely misexpressed. Conclusion Inactivation of

  3. Effects of a Proprietary Standardized Orthosiphon stamineus Ethanolic Leaf Extract on Enhancing Memory in Sprague Dawley Rats Possibly via Blockade of Adenosine A 2A Receptors.

    PubMed

    George, Annie; Chinnappan, Sasikala; Choudhary, Yogendra; Choudhary, Vandana Kotak; Bommu, Praveen; Wong, Hoi Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore a propriety standardized ethanolic extract from leaves of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth in improving impairments in short-term social memory in vivo, possibly via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). The ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves showed significant in vitro binding activity of A2AR with 74% inhibition at 150 μg/ml and significant A2AR antagonist activity with 98% inhibition at 300 μg/mL. A significant adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist activity with 100% inhibition was observed at 300 μg/mL. Its effect on learning and memory was assessed via social recognition task using Sprague Dawley rats whereby the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus showed significant (p < 0.001) change in recognition index (RI) at 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg p.o and 120 mg/kg i.p., respectively, compared to the vehicle control. In comparison, the ethanolic extract of Polygonum minus aerial parts showed small change in inflexion; however, it remained insignificant in RI at 200 mg/kg p.o. Our findings suggest that the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves improves memory by reversing age-related deficits in short-term social memory and the possible involvement of adenosine A1 and adenosine A2A as a target bioactivity site in the restoration of memory. PMID:26649059

  4. Effects of a Proprietary Standardized Orthosiphon stamineus Ethanolic Leaf Extract on Enhancing Memory in Sprague Dawley Rats Possibly via Blockade of Adenosine A2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Yogendra; Choudhary, Vandana Kotak; Bommu, Praveen; Wong, Hoi Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore a propriety standardized ethanolic extract from leaves of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth in improving impairments in short-term social memory in vivo, possibly via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). The ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves showed significant in vitro binding activity of A2AR with 74% inhibition at 150 μg/ml and significant A2AR antagonist activity with 98% inhibition at 300 μg/mL. A significant adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist activity with 100% inhibition was observed at 300 μg/mL. Its effect on learning and memory was assessed via social recognition task using Sprague Dawley rats whereby the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus showed significant (p < 0.001) change in recognition index (RI) at 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg p.o and 120 mg/kg i.p., respectively, compared to the vehicle control. In comparison, the ethanolic extract of Polygonum minus aerial parts showed small change in inflexion; however, it remained insignificant in RI at 200 mg/kg p.o. Our findings suggest that the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves improves memory by reversing age-related deficits in short-term social memory and the possible involvement of adenosine A1 and adenosine A2A as a target bioactivity site in the restoration of memory. PMID:26649059

  5. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A) in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Sorber, Rebecca; Teper, Yaroslav; Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Waterfall, Joshua J; Davis, Sean; Killian, J Keith; Pineda, Marbin; Ray, Satyajit; McCord, Matt R; Pflicke, Holger; Burkett, Sandra Sczerba; Meltzer, Paul S; Rudloff, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A) in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor's natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26962861

  6. Camel milk modulates the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Korashy, Hesham M; El Gendy, Mohamed A M; Alhaider, Abdulqader A; El-Kadi, Ayman O

    2012-01-01

    There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that camel milk may aid in prevention and treatment of numerous cases of cancer yet, the exact mechanism was not investigated. Therefore, we examined the ability of camel milk to modulate the expression of a well-known cancer-activating gene, Cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), and cancer-protective genes, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1), in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. Our results showed that camel milk significantly inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most potent Cyp1a1 inducer and known carcinogenic chemical, at mRNA, protein, and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, camel milk significantly decreased the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE)-dependent luciferase activity, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism is involved. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of camel milk was associated with a proportional increase in heme oxygenase 1. On the other hand, camel milk significantly induced Nqo1 and Gsta1 mRNA expression level in a concentration-dependent fashion. The RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely blocked the induction of Nqo1 mRNA by camel milk suggesting the requirement of de novo RNA synthesis through a transcriptional mechanism. In conclusion, camel milk modulates the expression of Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1 at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. PMID:22570534

  7. Camel Milk Modulates the Expression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Regulated Genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in Murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korashy, Hesham M.; El Gendy, Mohamed A. M.; Alhaider, Abdulqader A.; El-Kadi, Ayman O.

    2012-01-01

    There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that camel milk may aid in prevention and treatment of numerous cases of cancer yet, the exact mechanism was not investigated. Therefore, we examined the ability of camel milk to modulate the expression of a well-known cancer-activating gene, Cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), and cancer-protective genes, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1), in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. Our results showed that camel milk significantly inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most potent Cyp1a1 inducer and known carcinogenic chemical, at mRNA, protein, and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, camel milk significantly decreased the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE)-dependent luciferase activity, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism is involved. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of camel milk was associated with a proportional increase in heme oxygenase 1. On the other hand, camel milk significantly induced Nqo1 and Gsta1 mRNA expression level in a concentration-dependent fashion. The RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely blocked the induction of Nqo1 mRNA by camel milk suggesting the requirement of de novo RNA synthesis through a transcriptional mechanism. In conclusion, camel milk modulates the expression of Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1 at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. PMID:22570534

  8. Vector-averaged gravity-induced changes in cell signaling and vitamin D receptor activity in MG-63 cells are reversed by a 1,25-(OH)2D3 analog, EB1089

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.; Smith, C. L.; Weigel, N. L.

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading in an animal hindlimb suspension model and microgravity experienced by astronauts or as a result of prolonged bed rest causes site-specific losses in bone mineral density of 1%-2% per month. This is accompanied by reductions in circulating levels of 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3), the active metabolite of vitamin D. 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3), the ligand for the vitamin D receptor (VDR), is important for calcium absorption and plays a role in differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. To examine the responses of cells to activators of the VDR in a simulated microgravity environment, we used slow-turning lateral vessels (STLVs) in a rotating cell culture system. We found that, similar to cells grown in microgravity, MG-63 cells grown in the STLVs produce less osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and collagen Ialpha1 mRNA and are less responsive to 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3). In addition, expression of VDR was reduced. Moreover, growth in the STLV caused activation of the stress-activated protein kinase pathway (SAPK), a kinase that inhibits VDR activity. In contrast, the 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) analog, EB1089, was able to compensate for some of the STLV-associated responses by reducing SAPK activity, elevating VDR levels, and increasing expression of osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase. These studies suggest that, not only does simulated microgravity reduce differentiation of MG-63 cells, but the activity of the VDR, an important regulator of bone metabolism, is reduced. Use of potent, less calcemic analogs of 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) may aid in overcoming this defect. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A) in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Davis, Sean; Killian, J. Keith; Pineda, Marbin; Ray, Satyajit; McCord, Matt R.; Pflicke, Holger; Burkett, Sandra Sczerba; Meltzer, Paul S.; Rudloff, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A) in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor’s natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26962861

  10. Wheel running alters patterns of uncontrollable stress-induced cfos mRNA expression in rat dorsal striatum direct and indirect pathways: a possible role for plasticity in adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Ghasem, Parsa R.; Mika, Agnieszka; Day, Heidi E.; Herrera, Jonathan J.; Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Fleshner, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that adenosine is a major regulator of striatum activity, in part, through the antagonistic modulation of dopaminergic function. Exercise can influence adenosine and dopamine activity, which may subsequently promote plasticity in striatum adenosine and dopamine systems. Such changes could alter activity of medium spiny neurons and impact striatum function. The purpose of this study was two-fold. The first was to characterize the effect of long-term wheel running on adenosine 1 (A1R), adenosine 2A (A2AR), dopamine 1 (D1R), and dopamine 2 (D2R) receptor mRNA expression in adult rat dorsal and ventral striatum structures using in situ hybridization. The second was to determine if changes to adenosine and dopamine receptor mRNA from running are associated with altered cfos mRNA induction in dynorphin- (direct pathway) and enkephalin- (indirect pathway) expressing neurons of the dorsal striatum following stress exposure. We report that chronic running, as well as acute uncontrollable stress, reduced A1R and A2AR mRNA levels in the dorsal and ventral striatum. Running also modestly elevated D2R mRNA levels in striatum regions. Finally, stress-induced cfos was potentiated in dynorphin and attenuated in enkephalin expressing neurons of running rats. These data suggest striatum adenosine and dopamine systems are targets for neuroplasticity from exercise, which may contribute to changes in direct and indirect pathway activity. These findings may have implications for striatum mediated motor and cognitive processes, as well as exercise facilitated stress-resistance. PMID:25017571

  11. Identification of a novel selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha agonist, 2-methyl-2-(4-{3-[1-(4-methylbenzyl)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]propyl}phenoxy)propanoic acid (LY518674), that produces marked changes in serum lipids and apolipoprotein A-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jai Pal; Kauffman, Raymond; Bensch, William; Wang, Guoming; McClelland, Pam; Bean, James; Montrose, Chahrzad; Mantlo, Nathan; Wagle, Asavari

    2005-09-01

    Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) is an important risk factor of coronary artery disease (CAD). Optimum therapy for raising HDL-c is still not available. Identification of novel HDL-raising agents would produce a major impact on CAD. In this study, we have identified a potent (IC50 approximately 24 nM) and selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) agonist, 2-methyl-2-(4-{3-[1-(4-methylbenzyl)-5-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]propyl}phenoxy)propanoic acid (LY518674). In human apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1) transgenic mice, LY518674 produced a dose-dependent increase in serum HDL-c, resulting in 208 +/- 15% elevation at optimum dose. A new synthesis of apoA-1 contributed to the increase in HDL-c. LY518674 increased apoA-1 mRNA levels in liver. Moreover, liver slices from animals treated with LY518674 secreted 3- to 6-fold more apoA-1 than control liver slices. In cultured hepatocytes, LY518674 produced 50% higher apoA-1 secretion, which was associated with increase in radiolabeled methionine incorporation in apoA-1. Thus, LY518674 is a potent and selective PPARalpha agonist that produced a much greater increase in serum HDL-c than the known fibrate drugs. The increase in HDL-c was associated with de novo synthesis of apoA-1. PMID:15933217

  12. Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate accumulation in macrophages induces intracellular cholesterol redistribution, attenuates liver-X receptor/ATP-Binding cassette transporter A1/ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 pathway, and impairs cholesterol efflux

    PubMed Central

    Luquain-Costaz, Céline; Lefai, Etienne; Arnal-Levron, Maud; Markina, Daria; Sakaï, Shota; Euthine, Vanessa; Makino, Asami; Guichardant, Michel; Yamashita, Shizuya; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Lagarde, Michel; Moulin, Philippe; Delton-Vandenbroucke, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endosomal signature phospholipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) has been involved in the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. Accumulation of BMP is a hallmark of lipid storage disorders and was recently reported as a noticeable feature of oxidized LDL-laden macrophages. This study was designed to delineate the consequences of macrophage BMP accumulation on intracellular cholesterol distribution, metabolism and efflux and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods and results We have developed an experimental design to specifically increase BMP content in RAW macrophages. Following BMP accumulation, cell cholesterol distribution was markedly altered despite no change in LDL uptake and hydrolysis, cholesterol esterification, or total cell cholesterol content. The expression of cholesterol regulated genes SREBP2 and HMGCoAR was decreased by 40%, indicative of an increase of endoplasmic reticulum associated-cholesterol. Cholesterol delivery to plasma membrane was reduced as evidenced by the 20% decrease of efflux by cyclodextrin. Functionally, BMP accumulation reduced cholesterol efflux to both apoA1 and HDL by 40%, correlated with a 40% decrease in mRNA contents of ABCA1 and ABCG1 transporters and LXR α and β. Foam cell formation induced by oxidized LDL exposure was exacerbated in BMP enriched cells. Conclusion The present work shows for the first time a strong functional link between BMP and cholesterol regulating genes involved in both intracellular metabolism and efflux. We propose that accumulation of cellular BMP might contribute to the deregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in atheromatous macrophages. PMID:23788762

  13. [N-methyl-Tyr1,N-methyl-Arg7-D-Leu8]-dynorphin-A-(1-8)ethylamide, a stable dynorphin analog, produces diuresis by kappa-opiate receptor activation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Salas, S P; Roblero, J S; López, L F; Tachibana, S; Huidobro-Toro, J P

    1992-09-01

    The i.v. administration of E-2078 ([N-methyl-Tyr1-N-methyl-Arg7-D-Leu8]-dynorphin-A-(1-8) ethylamide) to conscious animals in doses of 15, 50 or 200 micrograms/rat caused a dose-related diuretic response associated with a significant in crease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and in blood pressure. The overall excretion of Na+ was not modified by the opioid, whereas it reduced K+ output and its fractional excretion. Time course studies demonstrated that the increase in GFR and in blood pressure were transient and did not parallel the changes in urine outflow. Pretreatment of the animal with 1 mg/kg of naltrexone or of naloxone reduced the pressor response but did not reduce the renal action of E-2078. Doses of naltrexone 10 times larger (10 mg/kg) were required to attenuate the diuretic effect and abolish completely the changes in K+ excretion; however, the increase in GFR was not antagonized by 10 mg/kg of naltrexone. Consonant with the studies in conscious rats, perfusion of isolated rat kidneys with 0.2 to 1.8 microM E-2078 increased urine flow in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was prevented by the simultaneous perfusion of 2 microM naltrexone with the peptide. In pentobarbital-anesthetized animals, E-2078 elicited a diuretic response that was not parallelled by changes in GFR or electrolyte excretion. In addition, E-2078 caused a long lasting decrease in blood pressure which was blocked completely by pretreatment of the animal with 1 mg/kg of naltrexone. The diuretic effect of E-2078 was not modified by pretreatment of the animals with beta-funaltrexamine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1356155

  14. Lipoxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Recchia, Irene; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO) and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL). In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1). This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed. PMID:17767357

  15. Suppression of adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR)-mediated adenosine signaling improves disease phenotypes in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Seng Kah; Higashimori, Haruki; Tolman, Michaela; Yang, Yongjie

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease in which the majority of upper and lower motor neurons are degenerated. Despite intensive efforts to identify drug targets and develop neuroprotective strategies, effective therapeutics for ALS remains unavailable. The identification and characterization of novel targets and pathways remain crucial in the development of ALS therapeutics. Adenosine is a major neuromodulator that actively regulates synaptic transmission. Interestingly, adenosine levels are significantly elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of progressing human ALS patients. In the current study, we showed that adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR), but not adenosine 1 receptor (A1R), is highly enriched in spinal (motor) neurons. A2aR expression is also selectively increased at the symptomatic onset in the spinal cords of SOD1G93A mice and end-stage human ALS spinal cords. Interestingly, we found that direct adenosine treatment is sufficient to induce embryonic stem cell-derived motor neuron (ESMN) cell death in cultures. Subsequent pharmacological inhibition and partial genetic ablation of A2aR (A2aR(+/-)) significantly protect ESMN from SOD1G93A(+) astrocyte-induced cell death and delay disease progression of SOD1G93A mice. Taken together, our results provide compelling novel evidence that A2aR-mediated adenosine signaling contributes to the selective spinal motor neuron degeneration observed in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. PMID:25779930

  16. Molecular Cloning, Functional Characterization, and Evolutionary Analysis of Vitamin D Receptors Isolated from Basal Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kollitz, Erin M.; Zhang, Guozhu; Hawkins, Mary Beth; Whitfield, G. Kerr; Reif, David M.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate genome is a result of two rapid and successive rounds of whole genome duplication, referred to as 1R and 2R. Furthermore, teleost fish have undergone a third whole genome duplication (3R) specific to their lineage, resulting in the retention of multiple gene paralogs. The more recent 3R event in teleosts provides a unique opportunity to gain insight into how genes evolve through specific evolutionary processes. In this study we compare molecular activities of vitamin D receptors (VDR) from basal species that diverged at key points in vertebrate evolution in order to infer derived and ancestral VDR functions of teleost paralogs. Species include the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a 1R jawless fish; the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), a cartilaginous fish that diverged after the 2R event; and the Senegal bichir (Polypterus senegalus), a primitive 2R ray-finned fish. Saturation binding assays and gel mobility shift assays demonstrate high affinity ligand binding and classic DNA binding characteristics of VDR has been conserved across vertebrate evolution. Concentration response curves in transient transfection assays reveal EC50 values in the low nanomolar range, however maximum transactivational efficacy varies significantly between receptor orthologs. Protein-protein interactions were investigated using co-transfection, mammalian 2-hybrid assays, and mutations of coregulator activation domains. We then combined these results with our previous study of VDR paralogs from 3R teleosts into a bioinformatics analysis. Our results suggest that 1, 25D3 acts as a partial agonist in basal species. Furthermore, our bioinformatics analysis suggests that functional differences between VDR orthologs and paralogs are influenced by differential protein interactions with essential coregulator proteins. We speculate that we may be observing a change in the pharmacodynamics relationship between VDR and 1, 25D3 throughout vertebrate evolution that may have been

  17. Molecular cloning, functional characterization, and evolutionary analysis of vitamin D receptors isolated from basal vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kollitz, Erin M; Zhang, Guozhu; Hawkins, Mary Beth; Whitfield, G Kerr; Reif, David M; Kullman, Seth W

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate genome is a result of two rapid and successive rounds of whole genome duplication, referred to as 1R and 2R. Furthermore, teleost fish have undergone a third whole genome duplication (3R) specific to their lineage, resulting in the retention of multiple gene paralogs. The more recent 3R event in teleosts provides a unique opportunity to gain insight into how genes evolve through specific evolutionary processes. In this study we compare molecular activities of vitamin D receptors (VDR) from basal species that diverged at key points in vertebrate evolution in order to infer derived and ancestral VDR functions of teleost paralogs. Species include the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a 1R jawless fish; the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), a cartilaginous fish that diverged after the 2R event; and the Senegal bichir (Polypterus senegalus), a primitive 2R ray-finned fish. Saturation binding assays and gel mobility shift assays demonstrate high affinity ligand binding and classic DNA binding characteristics of VDR has been conserved across vertebrate evolution. Concentration response curves in transient transfection assays reveal EC50 values in the low nanomolar range, however maximum transactivational efficacy varies significantly between receptor orthologs. Protein-protein interactions were investigated using co-transfection, mammalian 2-hybrid assays, and mutations of coregulator activation domains. We then combined these results with our previous study of VDR paralogs from 3R teleosts into a bioinformatics analysis. Our results suggest that 1, 25D3 acts as a partial agonist in basal species. Furthermore, our bioinformatics analysis suggests that functional differences between VDR orthologs and paralogs are influenced by differential protein interactions with essential coregulator proteins. We speculate that we may be observing a change in the pharmacodynamics relationship between VDR and 1, 25D3 throughout vertebrate evolution that may have been

  18. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    HbA1C test; Glycated hemoglobin test; Glycosylated hemoglobin test; Hemoglobin glycosylated test; Glycohemoglobin test ... have recently eaten does not affect the A1C test, so you do not need to fast to ...

  19. Purinergic receptors in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Krügel, Ute

    2016-05-01

    Psychiatric disorders describe different mental or behavioral patterns, causing suffering or poor coping of ordinary life with manifold presentations. Multifactorial processes can contribute to their development and progression. Purinergic neurotransmission and neuromodulation in the brain have attracted increasing therapeutic interest in the field of psychiatry. Purine nucleotides and nucleosides are well recognized as signaling molecules mediating cell to cell communication. The actions of ATP are mediated by ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptor subfamilies, whilst the actions of adenosine are mediated by P1 (A1 or A2) adenosine receptors. Purinergic mechanisms and specific receptor subtypes have been shown to be linked to the regulation of many aspects of behavior and mood and to dysregulation in pathological processes of brain function. In this review the recent knowledge on the role of purinergic receptors in the two most frequent psychiatric diseases, major depression and schizophrenia, as well as on related animal models is summarized. At present the most promising data for therapeutic strategies derive from investigations of the adenosine system emphasizing a unique function of A2A receptors at neurons and astrocytes in these disorders. Among the P2 receptor family, in particular P2X7 and P2Y1 receptors were related to disturbances in major depression and schizophrenia, respectively. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26518371

  20. A1C

    MedlinePlus

    A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 ... A1C alone or in combination with other diabetes tests to make a diagnosis. They also use the ...

  1. A1C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to minimize the complications caused by chronically elevated glucose levels, such as progressive damage to body organs like the kidneys, eyes, cardiovascular system, and nerves. The A1c test result ...

  2. Adenosine Receptors and Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Lasley, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptors are a member of the large family of seven transmembrane spanning G protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The four adenosine receptor subtypes – A1, A2a, A2b, A3 – exert their effects via the activation of one or more heterotrimeric G proteins resulting in the modulation of intracellular signaling. Numerous studies over the past decade have documented the complexity of GPCR signaling at the level of protein-protein interactions as well as through signaling crosstalk. With respect to adenosine receptors the activation of one receptor subtype can have profound direct effects in one cell type, but little or no effect in other cells. There is significant evidence that the compartmentation of subcellular signaling plays a physiological role in the fidelity of GPCR signaling. This compartmentation is evident at the level of the plasma membrane in the form of membrane microdomains such as caveolae and lipid rafts. This review will summarize and critically assess our current understanding of the role of membrane microdomains in regulating adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:20888790

  3. Sulfotransferase 4A1.

    PubMed

    Minchin, Rodney F; Lewis, Aaron; Mitchell, Deanne; Kadlubar, Fred F; McManus, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    In this review, we highlight the physical and enzymatic properties of the novel human sulfotransferase, SULT4A1. The gene is most highly expressed in selective regions of the brain, although work to date has failed to identify any specific endogenous substrate for the enzyme. SULT4A1 shares low homology with other human sulfotransferases. Nevertheless, it is highly conserved between species. Despite the low homology, it is structurally very similar to other cytosolic sulfotransferases with a conserved substrate binding domain, dimerization site and partial cofactor binding sites. However, the catalytic cavity is much smaller, and it has been suggested that the cofactor may not be accommodated within it. A recent link between variability in the 5'UTR of the SULT4A1 gene and schizophrenia has heightened interest in the endogenous function of the enzyme and its possible role in human disease. PMID:18248844

  4. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  5. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.

  6. Identification and function of adenosine A3 receptor in afferent arterioles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Rui; Ge, Ying; Carlstrom, Mattias; Wang, Shaohui; Fu, Yiling; Cheng, Liang; Wei, Jin; Roman, Richard J; Wang, Lei; Gao, Xichun; Liu, Ruisheng

    2015-05-01

    Adenosine plays an important role in regulation of renal microcirculation. All receptors of adenosine, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, have been found in the kidney. However, little is known about the location and function of the A3 receptor in the kidney. The present study determined the expression and role of A3 receptors in mediating the afferent arteriole (Af-Art) response and studied the interaction of A3 receptors with angiotensin II (ANG II), A1 and A2 receptors on the Af-Art. We found that the A3 receptor expressed in microdissected isolated Af-Art and the mRNA levels of A3 receptor were 59% of A1. In the isolated microperfused Af-Art, A3 receptor agonist IB-MECA did not have a constrictive effect. Activation of A3 receptor dilated the preconstricted Af-Art by norepinephrine and blunted the vasoconstrictive effect of both adenosine A1 receptor activation and ANG II on the Af-Art, respectively. Selective A2 receptor antagonist (both A2A and A2B) had no effect on A3 receptor agonist-induced vasodilation, indicating that the dilatory effect of A3 receptor activation is not mediated by activation of A2 receptor. We conclude that the A3 receptor is expressed in the Af-Art, and activation of the A3 receptor dilates the Af-Art. PMID:25608966

  7. Adenosine receptor interactions and anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Bruns, R F; Katims, J J; Annau, Z; Snyder, S H; Daly, J W

    1983-12-01

    [3H]-N6-cyclohexyladenosine and [3H]-1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine label the A1 subtype of adenosine receptor in brain membranes. The affinities of methylxanthines in competing for A1 adenosine receptors parallel their potencies as locomotor stimulants. The adenosine agonist N6-(phenylisopropyl) adenosine is a potent locomotor depressant. Both diazepam and N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)adenosine cause locomotor stimulation in a narrow range of subdepressant doses. Combined stimulant doses of the two agents depress motor activity, as do larger doses of either one, given separately. Evidence supporting and against the hypothesis that some of the actions of benzodiazepines are mediated via the adenosine system is reviewed. A number of compounds interact with both systems, probably because of physico-chemical similarities between adenosine and diazepam. It is concluded that of the four classic actions of benzodiazepines, the sedative and muscle relaxant (but not anxiolytic or anticonvulsant) actions could possibly be mediated by adenosine. PMID:6199685

  8. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Klaasse, Elisabeth C.; de Grip, Willem J.; Beukers, Margot W.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein class. Since adenosine receptors are widespread throughout the body and involved in a variety of physiological processes and diseases, there is great interest in understanding how the different subtypes are regulated, as a basis for designing therapeutic drugs that either avoid or make use of this regulation. The major GPCR regulatory pathway involves phosphorylation of activated receptors by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), a process that is followed by binding of arrestin proteins. This prevents receptors from activating downstream heterotrimeric G protein pathways, but at the same time allows activation of arrestin-dependent signalling pathways. Upon agonist treatment, adenosine receptor subtypes are differently regulated. For instance, the A1Rs are not (readily) phosphorylated and internalize slowly, showing a typical half-life of several hours, whereas the A2AR and A2BR undergo much faster downregulation, usually shorter than 1 h. The A3R is subject to even faster downregulation, often a matter of minutes. The fast desensitization of the A3R after agonist exposure may be therapeutically equivalent to antagonist occupancy of the receptor. This review describes the process of desensitization and internalization of the different adenosine subtypes in cell systems, tissues and in vivo studies. In addition, molecular mechanisms involved in adenosine receptor desensitization are discussed. PMID:18368531

  9. ApoA1 and ApoA1-specific self-antibodies in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-07-01

    Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) is a main protein moiety in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Generally, ApoA1 and HDL are considered as atheroprotective. In prooxidant and inflammatory microenvironment in the vicinity to the atherosclerotic lesion, ApoA1/HDL are subjected to modification. The chemical modifications such as oxidation, nitration, etc result in altering native architecture of ApoA1 toward dysfunctionality and abnormality. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase has a prominent role in this mechanism. Neo-epitopes could be formed and then exposed that makes them immunogenic. Indeed, these epitopes may be recognized by immune cells and induce production of proatherogenic ApoA1-specific IgG antibodies. These antibodies are biologically relevant because they are able to react with Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR4 in target cells and induce a variety of pro-inflammatory responses. Epidemiological and functional studies underline a prognostic value of ApoA1 self-antibodies for several cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, and severe carotid stenosis. PMID:27183204

  10. Historical overview of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2016-03-01

    This review summarizes the birth of the field of nuclear receptors, from Jensen's discovery of estrogen receptor alpha, Gustafsson's discovery of the three-domain structure of the glucocorticoid receptor, the discovery of the glucocorticoid response element and the first partial cloning of the glucocorticoid receptor. Furthermore the discovery of the novel receptors called orphan receptors is described. PMID:25797032

  11. Standardizing Scavenger Receptor Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    PrabhuDas, Mercy; Bowdish, Dawn; Drickamer, Kurt; Febbraio, Maria; Herz, Joachim; Kobzik, Lester; Krieger, Monty; Loike, John; Means, Terry K.; Moestrup, Soren K.; Post, Steven; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Silverstein, Samuel; Wang, Xiang-Yang; El Khoury, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of proteins that are structurally diverse and participate in a wide range of biological functions. These receptors are expressed predominantly by myeloid cells and recognize a variety of ligands, including endogenous and modified host-derived molecules and microbial pathogens. There are currently eight classes of scavenger receptors, many of which have multiple names, leading to inconsistencies and confusion in the literature. To address this problem, a workshop was organized by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health to help develop a clear definition of scavenger receptors and a standardized nomenclature based on that definition. Fifteen experts in the scavenger receptor field attended the workshop and, after extensive discussion, reached a consensus regarding the definition of scavenger receptors and a proposed scavenger receptor nomenclature. Scavenger receptors were defined as cell surface receptors that typically bind multiple ligands and promote the removal of non-self or altered-self targets. They often function by mechanisms that include endocytosis, phagocytosis, adhesion, and signaling that ultimately lead to the elimination of degraded or harmful substances. Based on this definition, nomenclature and classification of these receptors into 10 classes were proposed. The discussion and nomenclature recommendations described in this report only refer to mammalian scavenger receptors. The purpose of this article is to describe the proposed mammalian nomenclature and classification developed at the workshop and to solicit additional feedback from the broader research community. PMID:24563502

  12. Regulation of the ERK pathway in the dentate gyrus by in vivo dopamine D1 receptor stimulation requires glutamatergic transmission.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2012-11-01

    Acute systemic administration of the dopamine D1/D5 receptors (D1Rs) agonist, SKF81297, activates the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) pathway selectively in the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. In this study, we examined the mechanisms involved in this regulation and investigated the molecular components that could promote ERK-dependent transcription and translation. SKF81297 induced phosphorylation of ERK and histone H3 required intact glutamatergic transmission. Blockade of glutamate release achieved by the mGluR2/3 agonist, LY354740 or the selective adenosine A1R agonist, CCPA as well as neurotoxic lesions of lateral entorhinal cortex reduced the ability of SKF81297 to induce ERK activation in the dentate gyrus. This activation required the combined stimulation of NR2B-containing NMDARs, mGluR1 and mGluR5. SKF81297 evoked phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) selectively at the Ser235/236 site while the Ser240/244 site remains unchanged. The SKF81297 induced increased phosphorylation of rpS6 was dependent on PKC and ERK/p90RSK activation. Surprisingly, administration of D1Rs agonist suppressed mTORC1/p70S6K pathway suggesting an mTOR-independent regulation of rpS6 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results show that intact glutamatergic transmission plays a major role in the regulation of ERK-dependent phosphorylation of histone H3 and rpS6 observed in the mouse dentate gyrus after systemic administration of SKF81297. PMID:22796106

  13. A(3) adenosine receptor ligands: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, P G; Cacciari, B; Romagnoli, R; Merighi, S; Varani, K; Borea, P A; Spalluto, G

    2000-03-01

    Adenosine regulates many physiological functions through specific cell membrane receptors. On the basis of pharmacological studies and molecular cloning, four different adenosine receptors have been identified and classified as A(1), A(2A), A(2B), and A(3). These adenosine receptors are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. While adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor subtypes have been pharmacologically characterized through the use of selective ligands, the A(3) adenosine receptor subtype is presently under study in order to better understand its physio-pathological functions. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors has been shown to stimulate phospholipase C and D and to inhibit adenylate cyclase. Activation of A(3) adenosine receptors also causes the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine from mast cells. These mediators are responsible for processes such as inflammation and hypotension. It has also been suggested that the A(3) receptor plays an important role in brain ischemia, immunosuppression, and bronchospasm in several animal models. Based on these results, highly selective A(3) adenosine receptor agonists and/or antagonists have been indicated as potential drugs for the treatment of asthma and inflammation, while highly selective agonists have been shown to possess cardioprotective effects. The updated material related to this field of research has been rationalized and arranged in order to offer an overview of the topic. PMID:10723024

  14. 5-HT3 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A. J.; Lummis, S. C. R.

    2009-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor is a member of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels. These receptors are located in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, where functional receptors are constructed from five subunits. These subunits may be the same (homopentameric 5-HT3A receptors) or different (heteropentameric receptors, usually comprising of 5-HT3A and 5-HT3B receptor subunits), with the latter having a number of distinct properties. The 5-HT3 receptor binding site is comprised of six loops from two adjacent subunits, and critical ligand binding amino acids in these loops have been largely identified. There are a range of selective agonists and antagonists for these receptors and the pharmacophore is reasonably well understood. There are also a wide range of compounds that can modulate receptor activity. Studies have suggested many diverse potential disease targets that might be amenable to alleviation by 5-HT3 receptor selective compounds but to date only two applications have been fully realised in the clinic: the treatment of emesis and irritable-bowel syndrome. PMID:17073663

  15. P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    North, R Alan

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2X receptors have a widespread tissue distribution. On some smooth muscle cells, P2X receptors mediate the fast excitatory junction potential that leads to depolarization and contraction. In the central nervous system, activation of P2X receptors allows calcium to enter neurons and this can evoke slower neuromodulatory responses such as the trafficking of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. In primary afferent nerves, P2X receptors are critical for the initiation of action potentials when they respond to ATP released from sensory cells such as taste buds, chemoreceptors or urothelium. In immune cells, activation of P2X receptors triggers the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β. The development of selective blockers of different P2X receptors has led to clinical trials of their effectiveness in the management of cough, pain, inflammation and certain neurodegenerative diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377721

  16. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  17. Novel hormone "receptors".

    PubMed

    Nemere, Ilka; Hintze, Korry

    2008-02-01

    Our concepts of hormone receptors have, until recently, been narrowly defined. In the last few years, an increasing number of reports identify novel proteins, such as enzymes, acting as receptors. In this review we cover the novel receptors for the hormones atrial naturetic hormone, enterostatin, hepcidin, thyroid hormones, estradiol, progesterone, and the vitamin D metabolites 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and 24,25(OH)(2)D(3). PMID:17546587

  18. [Nuclear receptors PPARalpha].

    PubMed

    Soska, V

    2006-06-01

    Mechanism of the fibrates action is mediated by nuclear PPARalpha receptors (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor). These receptors regulate a number of genes that are involved both in lipids and lipoproteins metabolism and other mediators (e.g. inflammatory mediatores). Due to PPARalpha activation by fibrates, triglycerides and small dense LDL concentration is decreased, HDL cholesterol is increased and both inflammation and prothrombotic status are reduced. These effects are very important in patients with metabolic syndrom. PMID:16871768

  19. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Gargi; Hurst, Christopher H.; Waxman, David J.

    2009-07-15

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC{sub 50} for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by {approx} 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  20. The growth hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Waters, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Once thought to be present only in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, the GH receptor is now known to be ubiquitously distributed, in accord with the many pleiotropic actions of GH. These include the regulation of metabolism, postnatal growth, cognition, immune, cardiac and renal systems and gut function. GH exerts these actions primarily through alterations in gene expression, initiated by activation of its membrane receptor and the resultant activation of the associated JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) and Src family kinases. Receptor activation involves hormone initiated movements within a receptor homodimer, rather than simple receptor dimerization. We have shown that binding of the hormone realigns the orientation of the two receptors both by relative rotation and by closer apposition just above the cell membrane. This is a consequence of the asymmetric placement of the binding sites on the hormone. Binding results in a conversion of parallel receptor transmembrane domains into a rotated crossover orientation, which produces separation of the lower part of the transmembrane helices. Because the JAK2 is bound to the Box1 motif proximal to the inner membrane, receptor activation results in separation of the two associated JAK2s, and in particular the removal of the inhibitory pseudokinase domain from the kinase domain of the other JAK2 (and vice versa). This brings the two kinase domains into position for trans-activation and initiates tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor cytoplasmic domain and other substrates such as STAT5, the key transcription factor mediating most genomic actions of GH. There are a limited number of genomic actions initiated by the Src kinase family member which also associates with the upper cytoplasmic domain of the receptor, including important immune regulatory actions to dampen exuberant innate immune activation of cells involved in transplant rejection. These findings offer insights for developing specific receptor antagonists which may be

  1. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Batten, Margaret R; Senior, Bernard W; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-03-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement for either proline or threonine at residues 227 to 228. By contrast, the IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis had an absolute requirement for proline at 227 but not for threonine at 228, which could be replaced by valine. There was evidence in S. mitis that proteases from different strains may have different amino acid requirements for cleavage. Remarkably, some streptococcal proteases appeared able to cleave the hinge at a distant alternative site if substitution prevented efficient cleavage of the original site. Hence, this study has identified key residues required for the recognition of the IgA1 hinge as a substrate by streptococcal IgA1 proteases, and it marks a preliminary step towards development of specific enzyme inhibitors. PMID:12595464

  2. The human D2 dopamine receptor synergizes with the A2A adenosine receptor to stimulate adenylyl cyclase in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kudlacek, Oliver; Just, Herwig; Korkhov, Vladimir M; Vartian, Nina; Klinger, Markus; Pankevych, Halyna; Yang, Qiong; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor and the dopamine D(2) receptor are prototypically coupled to G(s) and G(i)/G(o), respectively. In striatal intermediate spiny neurons, these receptors are colocalized in dendritic spines and act as mutual antagonists. This antagonism has been proposed to occur at the level of the receptors or of receptor-G protein coupling. We tested this model in PC12 cells which endogenously express A(2A) receptors. The human D(2) receptor was introduced into PC12 cells by stable transfection. A(2A)-agonist-mediated inhibition of D(2) agonist binding was absent in PC12 cell membranes but present in HEK293 cells transfected as a control. However, in the resulting PC12 cell lines, the action of the D(2) agonist quinpirole depended on the expression level of the D(2) receptor: at low and high receptor levels, the A(2A)-agonist-induced elevation of cAMP was enhanced and inhibited, respectively. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation was invariably inhibited by quinpirole. The effects of quinpirole were abolished by pretreatment with pertussis toxin. A(2A)-receptor-mediated cAMP formation was inhibited by other G(i)/G(o)-coupled receptors that were either endogenously present (P(2y12)-like receptor for ADP) or stably expressed after transfection (A(1) adenosine, metabotropic glutamate receptor-7A). Similarly, voltage activated Ca(2+) channels were inhibited by the endogenous P(2Y) receptor and by the heterologously expressed A(1) receptor but not by the D(2) receptor. These data indicate functional segregation of signaling components. Our observations are thus compatible with the proposed model that D(2) and A(2A) receptors are closely associated, but they highlight the fact that this interaction can also support synergism. PMID:12784121

  3. RECEPTOR MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment (receptor) models are mathematical procedures for identifying and quantifying the sources of ambient air pollutants and their effects at a site (the receptor), primarily on the basis of species concentration measurements at the receptor, and generally without...

  4. HYBRID RECEPTOR MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid receptor model is a specified mathematical procedure which uses not only the ambient species concentration measurements that form the input data for a pure receptor model, but in addition source emission rates or atmospheric dispersion or transformation information chara...

  5. Identification of a Novel Signaling Pathway and Its Relevance for GluA1 Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Seebohm, Guiscard; Neumann, Sebastian; Theiss, Carsten; Novkovic, Tanja; Hill, Elaine V.; Tavaré, Jeremy M.; Lang, Florian; Hollmann, Michael; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 3 (SGK3) increases the AMPA-type glutamate receptor GluA1 protein in the plasma membrane. The activation of AMPA receptors by NMDA-type glutamate receptors eventually leads to postsynaptic neuronal plasticity. Here, we show that SGK3 mRNA is upregulated in the hippocampus of new-born wild type Wistar rats after NMDA receptor activation. We further demonstrate in the Xenopus oocyte expression system that delivery of GluA1 protein to the plasma membrane depends on the small GTPase RAB11. This RAB-dependent GluA1 trafficking requires phosphorylation and activation of phosphoinositol-3-phosphate-5-kinase (PIKfyve) and the generation of PI(3,5)P2. In line with this mechanism we could show PIKfyve mRNA expression in the hippocampus of wild type C57/BL6 mice and phosphorylation of PIKfyve by SGK3. Incubation of hippocampal slices with the PIKfyve inhibitor YM201636 revealed reduced CA1 basal synaptic activity. Furthermore, treatment of primary hippocampal neurons with YM201636 altered the GluA1 expression pattern towards reduced synaptic expression of GluA1. Our findings demonstrate for the first time an involvement of PIKfyve and PI(3,5)P2 in NMDA receptor-triggered synaptic GluA1 trafficking. This new regulatory pathway of GluA1 may contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory. PMID:22470488

  6. Signals and Receptors.

    PubMed

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lu, Benson; Evans, Ron; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Communication between cells in a multicellular organism occurs by the production of ligands (proteins, peptides, fatty acids, steroids, gases, and other low-molecular-weight compounds) that are either secreted by cells or presented on their surface, and act on receptors on, or in, other target cells. Such signals control cell growth, migration, survival, and differentiation. Signaling receptors can be single-span plasma membrane receptors associated with tyrosine or serine/threonine kinase activities, proteins with seven transmembrane domains, or intracellular receptors. Ligand-activated receptors convey signals into the cell by activating signaling pathways that ultimately affect cytosolic machineries or nuclear transcriptional programs or by directly translocating to the nucleus to regulate transcription. PMID:27037414

  7. Cloning and expression of Che a 1, the major allergen of Chenopodium album in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vahedi, Fatemeh; Sankian, Mojtaba; Moghadam, Malihe; Mohaddesfar, Maryam; Ghobadi, Sirous; Varasteh, Abdol Reza

    2011-04-01

    Chenopodium album is a weedy annual plant in the genus Chenopodium. C. album pollen represents a predominant allergen source in Iran. The main C. album pollen allergens have been described as Che a 1, Che a 2, and Che a 3. The aim of this work was to clone the Che a 1 in Escherichia coli to establish a system for overproduction of the recombinant Che a 1 (rChe a 1). In order to clone this allergen, the pollens were subjected to RNA extraction. A full-length fragment encoding Che a 1 was prepared by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the first-strand cDNA synthesized from extracted RNA. Cloning was carried out by inserting the cDNA into the pET21b+ vector, thereafter the construct was transformed into E. coli Top10 cells and expression of the protein was induced by IPTG. The rChe a 1 was purified using histidine tag in recombinant protein by means of Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. IgE immunoblotting, ELISA, and inhibition ELISA were done to evaluate IgE binding of the purified protein. In conclusion, the cDNA for the major allergen of the C. album pollen, Che a 1, was successfully cloned and rChe a 1 was purified. Inhibition assays demonstrated allergic subjects sera reacted with rChe a 1 similar to natural Che a 1 in crude extract of C. album pollen. This study is the first report of using the E. coli as a prokaryotic system for Che a 1 cloning and production of rChe a 1. PMID:20872185

  8. Hibernation, Hypothermia and a Possible Therapeutic "Shifted Homeostasis" Induced by Central Activation of A1 Adenosine Receptor (A1AR).

    PubMed

    Tupone, Domenico; Cetas, Justin S; Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-04-01

    The positive outcome that hypothermia contributes to brain and cardiac protection following ischemia has stimulated research in the development of pharmacological approaches to induce a hypothermic/hypometabolic state. Pharmacological manipulation of central autonomic thermoregulatory circuits could represent a potential target for the induction of a hypothermic state. Here we present a brief description of the CNS thermoregulatory centers and how the manipulation of these circuits can be useful in the treatment of pathological conditions such as stroke or brain hemorrhage. PMID:27333659

  9. Laryngeal pressure receptors.

    PubMed

    Mathew, O P; Sant'Ambrogio, G; Fisher, J T; Sant'Ambrogio, F B

    1984-07-01

    We studied the response characteristics of laryngeal pressure receptors in anesthetized dogs, breathing through a tracheal cannula, by recording single unit action potentials from the peripheral cut end of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. The larynx, with the rest of the upper airway, was isolated and cannulated separately for the application of distending and collapsing pressures. We identified receptors responding to either negative or positive pressure and a few responding to both. All these receptors showed a marked dynamic sensitivity and had the characteristics of slowly adapting mechanoreceptors. The majority of pressure receptors were active at zero transmural pressure and the gain of their response to pressure was higher at lower values, suggesting a role for these receptors in eupnea. Reflex alterations in breathing pattern and upper airway muscle activity during upper airway pressure changes, previously reported, are presumably mediated by the receptors described here. Moreover, these receptors may play a role in certain pathological states, such as obstructive sleep apnea, in which the upper airway is transiently subjected to large collapsing pressure. PMID:6484319

  10. Signaling by Sensory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Julius, David; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Sensory systems detect small molecules, mechanical perturbations, or radiation via the activation of receptor proteins and downstream signaling cascades in specialized sensory cells. In vertebrates, the two principal categories of sensory receptors are ion channels, which mediate mechanosensation, thermosensation, and acid and salt taste; and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which mediate vision, olfaction, and sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. GPCR-based signaling in rods and cones illustrates the fundamental principles of rapid activation and inactivation, signal amplification, and gain control. Channel-based sensory systems illustrate the integration of diverse modulatory signals at the receptor, as seen in the thermosensory/pain system, and the rapid response kinetics that are possible with direct mechanical gating of a channel. Comparisons of sensory receptor gene sequences reveal numerous examples in which gene duplication and sequence divergence have created novel sensory specificities. This is the evolutionary basis for the observed diversity in temperature- and ligand-dependent gating among thermosensory channels, spectral tuning among visual pigments, and odorant binding among olfactory receptors. The coding of complex external stimuli by a limited number of sensory receptor types has led to the evolution of modality-specific and species-specific patterns of retention or loss of sensory information, a filtering operation that selectively emphasizes features in the stimulus that enhance survival in a particular ecological niche. The many specialized anatomic structures, such as the eye and ear, that house primary sensory neurons further enhance the detection of relevant stimuli. PMID:22110046

  11. Inhibition of receptor/G protein coupling by suramin analogues.

    PubMed

    Beindl, W; Mitterauer, T; Hohenegger, M; Ijzerman, A P; Nanoff, C; Freissmuth, M

    1996-08-01

    Suramin analogues act as direct antagonists of heterotrimeric G proteins because they block the rate-limiting step of G protein activation (i.e., the dissociation of GDP prebound to the G protein alpha subunit). We have used the human brain A1 adenosine receptor and the rat striatal D2 dopamine receptor, two prototypical Gi/G(o)-coupled receptors, as a model system to test whether the following analogues suppress the receptor-dependent activation of G proteins: 8-(3-nitrobenzamido)-1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid (NF007), 8-(3-(3-nitrobenzamido)-benzamido)-1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid (NF018); 8,8'-(carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylene))bis-(1,3,5-naphthalenetr isulfonic acid) (NF023); 8,8'-(carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylene)carbonylimino-(3,1- phenylene)) bis(1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid) (NF037); and suramin. Suramin and its analogues inhibit the formation of the agonist-specific ternary complex (agonist/receptor/G protein). This inhibition is (i) quasicompetitive with respect to agonist binding in that it can be overcome by increasing receptor occupancy but (ii) does not result from an interaction of the analogues with the ligand binding pocket of the receptors because the binding of antagonists or of agonists in the absence of functional receptor/G protein interaction is not affected. In addition to suppressing the spontaneous release of GDP from defined G protein alpha subunits, suramin and its analogues reduce receptor-catalyzed guanine nucleotide exchange. The site, to which suramin analogues bind, overlaps with the docking site for the receptor on the G protein alpha subunit. The structure-activity relationships for inhibition of agonist binding to the A1 adenosine receptor (suramin > NF037 > NF023) and of agonist binding to the inhibition D2 dopamine receptor (suramin = NF037 > NF023 > NF018) differ. Thus, NF037 discriminates between the ternary complexes formed by the agonist-liganded D2 dopamine receptors and those formed by the A1 adenosine

  12. Identification and analysis of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Hosaka, Shinya; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450) are important for not only drug metabolism and toxicity, but also biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and bile acids, and steroid synthesis. In cynomolgus macaques, widely used in biomedical research, we have characterized P450 cDNAs, which were isolated as expressed sequence tags of cynomolgus macaque liver. In this study, cynomolgus CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 cDNAs were characterized by sequence analysis, phylogenetic analysis and tissue expression pattern. By sequence analysis, these five cynomolgus P450s had high sequence identities (94-99%) to the human orthologs in amino acids. By phylogenetic analysis, each cynomolgus P450 was more closely related to the human ortholog as compared with the dog or rat ortholog. By quantitative polymerase chain reaction, among the 10 tissue types, CYP7A1 and CYP17A1 mRNAs were preferentially expressed in liver and adrenal gland, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 mRNAs were most abundantly expressed in liver and testis, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP20A1 mRNA was expressed in all the tissues, including brain and liver. Tissue expression patterns of each cynomolgus P450 were generally similar to that of the human ortholog. These results suggest the molecular similarities of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 between cynomolgus macaques and humans. PMID:25649950

  13. Mammalian sweet taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G; Hoon, M A; Chandrashekar, J; Zhang, Y; Ryba, N J; Zuker, C S

    2001-08-10

    The sense of taste provides animals with valuable information about the quality and nutritional value of food. Previously, we identified a large family of mammalian taste receptors involved in bitter taste perception (the T2Rs). We now report the characterization of mammalian sweet taste receptors. First, transgenic rescue experiments prove that the Sac locus encodes T1R3, a member of the T1R family of candidate taste receptors. Second, using a heterologous expression system, we demonstrate that T1R2 and T1R3 combine to function as a sweet receptor, recognizing sweet-tasting molecules as diverse as sucrose, saccharin, dulcin, and acesulfame-K. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the patterns of expression of T1Rs and T2Rs, thus providing a view of the representation of sweet and bitter taste at the periphery. PMID:11509186

  14. Galanin Receptors and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Webling, Kristin E. B.; Runesson, Johan; Bartfai, Tamas; Langel, Ülo

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin was first discovered 30 years ago. Today, the galanin family consists of galanin, galanin-like peptide (GALP), galanin-message associated peptide (GMAP), and alarin and this family has been shown to be involved in a wide variety of biological and pathological functions. The effect is mediated through three GPCR subtypes, GalR1-3. The limited number of specific ligands to the galanin receptor subtypes has hindered the understanding of the individual effects of each receptor subtype. This review aims to summarize the current data of the importance of the galanin receptor subtypes and receptor subtype specific agonists and antagonists and their involvement in different biological and pathological functions. PMID:23233848

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE AH RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rat liver cytosolic receptor protein containing the Ah-receptor protein was purified and studied using a photochemical assembly of 2,3,7,8-TCDD. The unbound receptor protein rapidly lost its capacity to bind 2,3,7,8-TCDD; however, the 2,3,7,8-TCDD bound Ah receptor did not re...

  16. Chemokine Receptor Oligomerization and Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Bryan; Handel, Tracy M.

    2014-01-01

    Oligomerization of chemokine receptors has been reported to influence many aspects of receptor function through allosteric communication between receptor protomers. Allosteric interactions within chemokine receptor hetero-oligomers have been shown to cause negative cooperativity in the binding of chemokines and to inhibit receptor activation in the case of some receptor pairs. Other receptor pairs can cause enhanced signaling and even activate entirely new, hetero-oligomer-specific signaling complexes and responses downstream of receptor activation. Many mechanisms contribute to these effects including direct allosteric coupling between the receptors, G protein mediated allostery, G protein stealing, ligand sequestration and recruitment of new intracellular proteins by exposing unique binding interfaces on the oligomerized receptors. These effects present both challenges as well as exciting opportunities for drug discovery. One of the most difficult challenges will involve determining if and when hetero-oligomers versus homo-oligomers are involved in specific disease states. PMID:23415099

  17. Genetics of taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R; Nelson, Theodore M

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical "tastes" as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  18. Genetics of Taste Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Bosak, Natalia P.; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R.; Nelson, Theodore M.

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical “tastes” as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  19. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  20. A Binding Site Model and Structure-Activity Relationships for the Rat A3 Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    VAN GALEN, PHILIP J. M.; VAN BERGEN, ANDREW H.; GALLO-RODRIGUEZ, CAROLA; MELMAN, NELI; OLAH, MARK E.; IJZERMAN, AD P.; STILES, GARY L.; JACOBSON, KENNETH A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A novel adenosine receptor, the A3 receptor, has recently been cloned. We have systematically investigated the hitherto largely unexplored structure-activity relationships (SARs) for binding at A3 receptors, using 125I-N6-2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyladenosine as a radioligand and membranes from Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the rat A3-cDNA. As is the case for A1 and A2a, receptors, substitutions at the N6 and 5′ positions of adenosine, the prototypic agonist ligand, may yield fairly potent compounds. However, the highest affinity and A3 selectivity is found for N6,5′-disubstituted compounds, in contrast to A1 and A2a receptors. Thus, N6-benzyladenosine-5′-N-ethylcarboxamide is highly potent (Ki, 6.8 nM) and moderately selective (13- and 14-fold versus A1 and A2a). The N6 region of the A3 receptor also appears to tolerate hydrophilic substitutions, in sharp contrast to the other subtypes. Potencies of N6,5′-disubstituted compounds in inhibition of adenylate cyclase via A3 receptors parallel their high affinity in the binding assay. None of the typical xanthine or nonxanthine (A1/A2) antagonists tested show any appreciable affinity for rat A3 receptors. 1,3-Dialkylxanthines did not antagonize the A3 agonist-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase. A His residue in helix 6 that is absent in A3 receptors but present in A1/A2 receptors may be causal in this respect. In a molecular model for the rat A3 receptor, this mutation, together with an increased bulkiness of residues surrounding the ligand, make antagonist binding unfavorable when compared with a previously developed A1 receptor model. Second, this A3 receptor model predicted similarities with A1 and A2 receptors in the binding requirements for the ribose moiety and that xanthine-7-ribosides would bind to rat A3 receptors. This hypothesis was supported experimentally by the moderate affinity (Ki 6 μM) of 7-riboside of 1,3-dibutylxanthine, which appears to be a partial agonist at

  1. Selective modulation of wild type receptor functions by mutants of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Gouill, C; Parent, J L; Caron, C A; Gaudreau, R; Volkov, L; Rola-Pleszczynski, M; Stanková, J

    1999-04-30

    Members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family are involved in most aspects of higher eukaryote biology, and mutations in their coding sequence have been linked to several diseases. In the present study, we report that mutant GPCR can affect the functional properties of the co-expressed wild type (WT) receptor. Mutants of the human platelet-activating factor receptor that fail to show any detectable ligand binding (N285I and K298stop) or coupling to a G-protein (D63N, D289A, and Y293A) were co-expressed with the WT receptor in Chinese hamster ovary and COS-7 cells. In this context, N285I and K298stop mutant receptors inhibited 3H-WEB2086 binding and surface expression. Co-transfection with D63N resulted in a constitutively active receptor phenotype. Platelet-activating factor-induced inositol phosphate production in cells transfected with a 1:1 ratio of WT:D63N was higher than with the WT cDNA alone but was abolished with a 1:3 ratio. We confirmed that these findings could be extended to other GPCRs by showing that co-expression of the WT C-C chemokine receptor 2b with a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (K311stop), resulted in a decreased affinity and responsiveness to MCP-1. A better understanding of this phenomenon could lead to important tools for the prevention or treatment of certain diseases. PMID:10212233

  2. Cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Agraval, J; Gleeson, D; Heasman, K; Glass, M

    2006-03-01

    Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, are expressed in mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The presence of cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates has been controversial, due to conflicting evidence. We conducted a systematic review of the literature, using expanded search parameters. Evidence presented in the literature varied in validity, ranging from crude in vivo behavioural assays to robust in silico ortholog discovery. No research existed for several clades of invertebrates; we therefore tested for cannabinoid receptors in seven representative species, using tritiated ligand binding assays with [3H]CP55,940 displaced by the CB1-selective antagonist SR141716A. Specific binding of [3H]CP55,940 was found in neural membranes of Ciona intestinalis (Deuterstoma, a positive control), Lumbricusterrestris (Lophotrochozoa), and three ecdysozoans: Peripatoides novae-zealandiae (Onychophora), Jasus edwardi (Crustacea) and Panagrellus redivivus (Nematoda); the potency of displacement by SR141716A was comparable to measurements on rat cerebellum. No specific binding was observed in Actinothoe albocincta (Cnidaria) or Tethya aurantium (Porifera). The phylogenetic distribution of cannabinoid receptors may address taxonomic questions; previous studies suggested that the loss of CB1 was a synapomorphy shared by ecdysozoans. Our discovery of cannabinoid receptors in some nematodes, onychophorans, and crustaceans does not contradict the Ecdysozoa hypothesis, but gives it no support. We hypothesize that cannabinoid receptors evolved in the last common ancestor of bilaterians, with secondary loss occurring in insects and other clades. Conflicting data regarding Cnidarians precludes hypotheses regarding the last common ancestor of eumetazoans. No cannabinoid receptors are expressed in sponges, which probably diverged before the origin of the eumetazoan ancestor. PMID:16599912

  3. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by GABAB receptors in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Robin A; Manuel, Nick A; Bulters, Diederick O; Cobb, Stuart R; Davies, Ceri H

    2001-01-01

    Both GABAB and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) influence hippocampal-dependent mnemonic processing. Here the possibility of a direct interaction between GABAB receptors and mAChR-mediated synaptic responses has been studied using intracellular recording in rat hippocampal slices. The GABAB receptor agonist(−)-baclofen (5–10 μm) depressed an atropine-sensitive slow EPSP (EPSPM) and occluded the GABAB-receptor-mediated IPSP (IPSPB) which preceded it. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by postsynaptic hyperpolarization (9 ± 2 mV) and a reduction in cell input resistance (12 ± 3 %). The selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 55845A (1 μm) fully reversed the depressant effects of (−)-baclofen (5–10 μm) such that in the combined presence of (−)-baclofen and CGP 55845A the EPSPM was 134 ± 21 % of control. (−)-Baclofen (5–10 μm) caused a small (28 ± 11 %) inhibition of carbachol-induced (3.0 μm) postsynaptic depolarizations and increases in input resistance. CGP 55845A (1 μm) alone caused an increase in the amplitude of the EPSPM (253 ± 74 % of control) and blocked the IPSPB that preceded it. In contrast, the selective GABA uptake inhibitor NNC 05–0711 (10 μm) increased the amplitude of the IPSPB by 141 ± 38 % and depressed the amplitude of the EPSPM by 58 ± 10 %. This inhibition was abolished by CGP 55845A (1 μm). Taken together these data provide good evidence that synaptically released GABA activates GABAB receptors that inhibit mAChR-mediated EPSPs in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones. The mechanism of inhibition may involve both pre- and postsynaptic elements. PMID:11559773

  4. Architecture of Eph receptor clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Himanen, Juha P.; Yermekbayeva, Laila; Janes, Peter W.; Walker, John R.; Xu, Kai; Atapattu, Lakmali; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Mensinga, Anneloes; Lackmann, Martin; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2010-10-04

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ephrin ligands regulate cell navigation during normal and oncogenic development. Signaling of Ephs is initiated in a multistep process leading to the assembly of higher-order signaling clusters that set off bidirectional signaling in interacting cells. However, the structural and mechanistic details of this assembly remained undefined. Here we present high-resolution structures of the complete EphA2 ectodomain and complexes with ephrin-A1 and A5 as the base unit of an Eph cluster. The structures reveal an elongated architecture with novel Eph/Eph interactions, both within and outside of the Eph ligand-binding domain, that suggest the molecular mechanism underlying Eph/ephrin clustering. Structure-function analysis, by using site-directed mutagenesis and cell-based signaling assays, confirms the importance of the identified oligomerization interfaces for Eph clustering.

  5. Regulation of plasminogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Herren, Thomas; Swaisgood, Carmen; Plow, Edward F

    2003-01-01

    Many eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells bind plasminogen in a specific and saturable manner. When plasminogen is bound to cell-surface proteins with C-terminal lysines via its lysine binding sites, its activation to plasmin is accelerated, and cell-bound plasmin is protected from inactivation by natural inhibitors. Plasmin mediates direct or indirect degradation of the extracellular matrix, and bound plasmin is used by cells to facilitate migration through extracellular matrices. Since cell migration and tissue remodelling are the underpinnings of many physiological and pathological responses, the modulation of plasminogen receptors may serve as a primary regulatory mechanism for control of many cellular responses. Specific examples of cell types on which plasminogen receptors undergo modulation include: fibroblasts, where modulation may contribute to cartilage and bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis; leukemic cells, where enhanced plasminogen binding may contribute to the heightened fibrinolytic state in the patients; other tumor cells, where up-regulation may support invasion and metastasis; bacteria, where enhanced plasminogen binding may facilitate tissue destruction and invasion; platelets, where up-regulation of plasminogen binding may play a role in regulating clot lysis; and adipocytes, where the modulation of plasminogen receptor expression may regulate cell differentiation and fat accumulation. Two pathways for modulation of plasminogen receptors have been characterized: A protease-dependent pathway can either up-regulate or down-regulate plasminogen binding to cells by changing the availability of plasminogen-binding proteins with C-terminal lysines. New receptors may be generated by trypsin-like proteases, including plasmin, which create new C-terminal lysines; other enzymes may expose existing membrane proteins by altering the cell surface; or receptor function may be lost by removal of C-terminal lysines. The basic carboxypeptidases of blood

  6. Taste Receptors in Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors were first identified on the tongue, where they initiate a signaling pathway that communicates information to the brain about the nutrient content or potential toxicity of ingested foods. However, recent research has shown that taste receptors are also expressed in a myriad of other tissues, from the airway and gastrointestinal epithelia to the pancreas and brain. The functions of many of these extraoral taste receptors remain unknown, but emerging evidence suggests that bitter and sweet taste receptors in the airway are important sentinels of innate immunity. This review discusses taste receptor signaling, focusing on the G-protein coupled–receptors that detect bitter, sweet, and savory tastes, followed by an overview of extraoral taste receptors and in-depth discussion of studies demonstrating the roles of taste receptors in airway innate immunity. Future research on extraoral taste receptors has significant potential for identification of novel immune mechanisms and insights into host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25323130

  7. Ionotropic Crustacean Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  8. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Corey, Elizabeth A; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  9. Challenges for and current status of research into positive modulators of AMPA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Simon E; Bax, Benjamin D; Harries, Mark

    2010-01-01

    AMPA receptors consist of a family of hetero-oligomeric (tetrameric) receptors arising from four genes, each of which encodes a distinct receptor subunit (GluA1-4). Recombinant homo-tetrameric AMPA receptors, comprising four identical subunits, are functionally active and have been used in in vitro assays. However, the many different subunit permutations make possible the functional and anatomical diversity of AMPA receptors throughout the CNS. Furthermore, AMPA receptor subunit stoichiometry influences the biophysical and functional properties of the receptor. A number of chemically diverse positive modulators of AMPA receptor have been identified which potentiate AMPA receptor-mediated activity in vitro as well as improving cognitive performance in rodents and non-human primates with several being taken further in the clinic. This review article summarizes the current status in the research on positive allosteric modulation of AMPA receptors and outlines the challenges involved in identifying a chemically distinct series of AMPA receptor positive modulators, addressing the challenges created by the heterogeneity of the AMPA receptor populations and the development of structure-activity relationships driven by homomeric, recombinant systems on high-throughput platforms. We also review the role of X-ray crystallography in the selection and prioritization of targets for lead optimization for AMPA receptor positive modulators. PMID:20423333

  10. Purinergic receptors in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The pancreas is a complex gland performing both endocrine and exocrine functions. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that both endocrine and exocrine cells possess purinergic receptors, which influence processes such as insulin secretion and epithelial ion transport. Most commonly, these processes have been viewed separately. In β cells, stimulation of P2Y1 receptors amplifies secretion of insulin in the presence of glucose. Nucleotides released from secretory granules could also contribute to autocrine/paracrine regulation in pancreatic islets. In addition to P2Y1 receptors, there is also evidence for other P2 and adenosine receptors in β cells (P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2X subtypes and A1 receptors) and in glucagon-secreting α cells (P2X7, A2 receptors). In the exocrine pancreas, acini release ATP and ATP-hydrolysing and ATP-generating enzymes. P2 receptors are prominent in pancreatic ducts, and several studies indicate that P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y11, P2X4 and P2X7 receptors could regulate secretion, primarily by affecting Cl− and K+ channels and intracellular Ca2+ signalling. In order to understand the physiology of the whole organ, it is necessary to consider the full complement of purinergic receptors on different cells as well as the structural and functional relation between various cells within the whole organ. In addition to the possible physiological function of purinergic receptors, this review analyses whether the receptors could be potential therapeutic targets for drug design aimed at treatment of pancreatic diseases. PMID:18368520

  11. Trafficking of Kainate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Steffen; Tapken, Daniel; Haering, Simon C.; Hollmann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate the vast majority of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. In the protein family of iGluRs, kainate receptors (KARs) comprise the probably least well understood receptor class. Although KARs act as key players in the regulation of synaptic network activity, many properties and functions of these proteins remain elusive until now. Especially the precise pre-, extra-, and postsynaptic localization of KARs plays a critical role for neuronal function, as an unbalanced localization of KARs would ultimately lead to dysregulated neuronal excitability. Recently, important advances in the understanding of the regulation of surface expression, function, and agonist-dependent endocytosis of KARs have been achieved. Post-translational modifications like PKC-mediated phosphorylation and SUMOylation have been reported to critically influence surface expression and endocytosis, while newly discovered auxiliary proteins were shown to shape the functional properties of KARs. PMID:25141211

  12. Selective orexin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lebold, Terry P; Bonaventure, Pascal; Shireman, Brock T

    2013-09-01

    The orexin, or hypocretin, neuropeptides (orexin-A and orexin-B) are produced on neurons in the hypothalamus which project to key areas of the brain that control sleep-wake states, modulation of food intake, panic, anxiety, emotion, reward and addictive behaviors. These neuropeptides exert their effects on a pair of G-protein coupled receptors termed the orexin-1 (OX1) and orexin-2 (OX2) receptors. Emerging biology suggests the involvement of these receptors in psychiatric disorders as they are thought to play a key role in the regulation of multiple systems. This review is intended to highlight key selective OX1 or OX2 small-molecule antagonists. PMID:23891187

  13. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  14. Cutaneous temperature receptors.

    PubMed

    Spray, D C

    1986-01-01

    Specific thermoreceptors comprise an electrophysiologically distinct class of cutaneous receptors with a morphological substrate (free nerve endings) and plausible transduction mechanism (electrogenic Na pump with or without auxiliary temperature-dependent processes). Because responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli converge along the neural pathway, we have difficulty explaining the purity of cold and warm sensations; participation of dual-modality receptors in sensory discrimination cannot be ruled out. The field is now at a point where a leap in understanding would be achieved by intracellular recordings from the sensory receptor (for which patch clamp studies on isolated neuronal elements may provide the necessary technology) and from continued analysis of what information is lost and what retained in passage from one synapse to the next along the thermal pathway. PMID:3085583

  15. Neuropharmacology of dopamine receptors:

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, Frank I.

    2001-01-01

    There has been an extraordinary recent accumulation of information concerning the neurobiology and neuropharmacology of dopamine (DA) receptors in the mammalian central nervous system. Many new DA molecular entities have been cloned, their gene, peptide sequences and structures have been identified, their anatomical distributions in the mammalian brain described, and their pharmacology characterized. Progress has been made toward developing selective ligands and drug-candidates for different DA receptors. The new discoveries have greatly stimulated preclinical and clinical studies to explore the neuropharmacology of DA receptors and their implications in the neuropathophysiology of different neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Accordingly, it seems timely to review the salient aspects of this specialized area of preclinical neuropharmacology and its relevance to clinical neuropsychiatry. PMID:24019715

  16. A-1 Test Stand work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A structural steel beam to support the new thrust measurement system on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center is lifted to waiting employees for installation. The beam is part of the thrust takeout structure needed to support the new measurement system. Four such beams have been installed at the stand in preparation for installation of the system in upcoming weeks. Operators are preparing the stand for testing the next generation of rocket engines for the U.S. space program.

  17. Estrogen receptor scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Scheidhauer, K; Scharl, A; Schicha, H

    1998-03-01

    Radio-labeled estrogen receptor ligands are tracers that can be used for functional receptor diagnosis. Their specificity towards receptors, together with the fact that only 50-70% of mammary carcinomas are receptor positive, renders them unsuitable for detection of primary tumors or metastases, and this means that estrogen receptor scintigraphy can be used neither for tumor screening nor for staging. However, both 18F-labeled and 123I-labeled estradiol derivatives are suitable for in vivo imaging of estrogen receptors. Their high specificity, established in animal experiments and in vitro studies has been reproduced in in vivo applications in humans. Tracers with positron radiation emitters are, however, hardly suitable for broad application owing to the short half-life of 18F, which would mean that users would need to be situated close to a cyclotron and a correspondingly equipped radiochemical laboratory. The number of available PET scanners, on the other hand, has increased over the last few years, especially in Germany, so that this, at least, does not present a limiting factor. All the same, 123I-labeled estradiol derivatives will find more widespread application, since the number of gamma-cameras incorporating modern multi-head systems is several times greater. The results of studies with 123I-E2-scintigraphy published to date are very promising, even given the initial technical problems mentioned above. As a method of examination, it could be optimised by using improved tracers with a higher tumor contrast and less disturbance from overlapping in diagnostically relevant locations, for instance, by selecting tracers with higher activities whose excretion is more renal than hepatobiliary. The use of modern multi-head camera systems can also be expected to improve the photon yield. PMID:9646642

  18. CONTAMINANT INTERACTIONS WITH STEROID RECEPTORS: EVIDENCE FOR RECEPTOR BINDING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid receptors are important determinants of endocrine disrupter consequences. As the most frequently proposed mechanism of endocrine-disrupting contaminant (EDC) action, steroid receptors are not only targets of natural steroids but are also commonly sites of nonsteroidal com...

  19. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for. PMID:25604388

  20. Biomimetic Receptors and Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dickert, Franz L.

    2014-01-01

    In biomimetics, living systems are imitated to develop receptors for ions, molecules and bioparticles. The most pertinent idea is self-organization in analogy to evolution in nature, which created the key-lock principle. Today, modern science has been developing host-guest chemistry, a strategy of supramolecular chemistry for designing interactions of analytes with synthetic receptors. This can be realized, e.g., by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) or molecular imprinting. The strategies are used for solid phase extraction (SPE), but preferably in developing recognition layers of chemical sensors. PMID:25436653

  1. Basis for receptor specificity of nonecotropic murine leukemia virus surface glycoprotein gp70SU.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, D; Rein, A

    1992-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) initiate infection of NIH 3T3 cells by binding of the viral envelope (Env) protein to a cell surface receptor. Interference assays have shown that MuLVs can be divided into four groups, each using a distinct receptor: ecotropic, polytropic, amphotropic, and 10A1. In this study, we have attempted to map the determinants within viral Env proteins by constructing chimeric env genes. Chimeras were made in all six pairwise combinations between Moloney MCF (a polytropic MuLV), amphotropic MuLV, and 10A1, using a conserved EcoRI site in the middle of the Env coding region. The receptor specificity of each chimera was determined by using an interference assay. We found that amphotropic receptor specificity of each chimera was determined by using an interference assay. We found that amphotropic receptor specificity seems to map to the N-terminal portion of surface glycoprotein gp70SU. The difference between amphotropic and 10A1 receptor specificity can be attributed to one or more of only six amino acid differences in this region. Nearly all other cases showed evidence of interaction between Env domains in the generation of receptor specificity. Thus, a chimera composed exclusively of MCF and amphotropic sequences was found to exhibit 10A1 receptor specificity. None of the chimeras were able to infect cells by using the MCF receptor; however, two chimeras containing the C-terminal portion of MCF gp70SU could bind to this receptor, while they were able to infect cells via the amphotropic receptor. This result raises the possibility that receptor binding maps to the C-terminal portion of MCF gp70SU but requires MCF N-terminal sequences for a functional interaction with the MCF receptor. Images PMID:1321266

  2. G protein-independent neuromodulatory action of adenosine on metabotropic glutamate signalling in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Toshihide; Kawakami, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Hashimotodani, Yuki; Fredholm, Bertil B; Sekino, Yuko; Aiba, Atsu; Kano, Masanobu

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediating the neuromodulatory actions of adenosine that influence emotional, cognitive, motor, and other functions in the central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies show complex formation between ARs and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in heterologous systems and close colocalization of ARs and mGluRs in several central neurons. Here we explored the possibility of intimate functional interplay between Gi/o protein-coupled A1-subtype AR (A1R) and type-1 mGluR (mGluR1) naturally occurring in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Using a perforated-patch voltage-clamp technique, we found that both synthetic and endogenous agonists for A1R induced continuous depression of a mGluR1-coupled inward current. A1R agonists also depressed mGluR1-coupled intracellular Ca2+ mobilization monitored by fluorometry. A1R indeed mediated this depression because genetic depletion of A1R abolished it. Surprisingly, A1R agonist-induced depression persisted after blockade of Gi/o protein. The depression appeared to involve neither the cAMP-protein kinase A cascade downstream of the alpha subunits of Gi/o and Gs proteins, nor cytoplasmic Ca2+ that is suggested to be regulated by the beta-gamma subunit complex of Gi/o protein. Moreover, A1R did not appear to affect Gq protein which mediates the mGluR1-coupled responses. These findings suggest that A1R modulates mGluR1 signalling without the aid of the major G proteins. In this respect, the A1R-mediated depression of mGluR1 signalling shown here is clearly distinguished from the A1R-mediated neuronal responses described so far. These findings demonstrate a novel neuromodulatory action of adenosine in central neurons. PMID:17379632

  3. Annexin A1 localization and its relevance to cancer.

    PubMed

    Boudhraa, Zied; Bouchon, Bernadette; Viallard, Claire; D'Incan, Michel; Degoul, Françoise

    2016-02-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a Ca(2+)-regulated phospholipid-binding protein involved in various cell processes. ANXA1 was initially widely studied in inflammation resolution, but its overexpression was later reported in a large number of cancers. Further in-depth investigations have revealed that this protein could have many roles in cancer progression and act at different levels (from cancer initiation to metastasis). This is partly due to the location of ANXA1 in different cell compartments. ANXA1 can be nuclear, cytoplasmic and/or membrane associated. This last location allows ANXA1 to be proteolytically cleaved and/or to become accessible to its cognate partners, the formyl-peptide receptors. Indeed, in some cancers, ANXA1 is found at the cell surface, where it stimulates formyl-peptide receptors to trigger oncogenic pathways. In the present review, we look at the different locations of ANXA1 and their association with the deregulated pathways often observed in cancers. We have specifically detailed the non-classic pathways of ANXA1 externalization, the significance of its cleavage and the role of the ANXA1-formyl-peptide receptor complex in cancer progression. PMID:26769657

  4. Nuclear Receptors and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the steroid hormone glucocorticoid and its nuclear receptor regulate the inflammatory process, a crucial component in the pathophysiological process related to human diseases that include atherosclerosis, obesity and type II diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and liver tumors. Growing evidence demonstrates that orphan and adopted orphan nuclear receptors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, liver × receptors, the farnesoid × receptor, NR4As, retinoid × receptors, and the pregnane × receptor, regulate the inflammatory and metabolic profiles in a ligand-dependent or -independent manner in human and animal models. This review summarizes the regulatory roles of these nuclear receptors in the inflammatory process and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:18375823

  5. AT1 receptors as mechanosensors.

    PubMed

    Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael; Storch, Ursula; Gudermann, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are appreciated as central components of neurohormonal signaling. Recently, it turned out that they may also play a role in mechanotransduction. The angiotensin II AT(1) receptor was the first G-protein-coupled receptor claimed to be a mechanosensor. In the meantime, several other G(q/11)-coupled receptors were found to be sensitive to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, there is first evidence to support the concept that G(i/o)-coupled receptors are susceptible to mechanical stimulation as well. Mechanical receptor activation appears to be agonist-independent and is initiated by a conformational change of the receptor protein discernible from agonist-bound conformations. Mechanically induced receptor activation plays a physiological role for myogenic vasoconstriction and is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:21147033

  6. Cardioprotection of Controlled and Cardiac-Specific Over-Expression of A2A-Adenosine Receptor in the Pressure Overload

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Eman A.; Zhu, Weizhong; Chan, Tung O.; Myers, Valerie; Gao, Erhe; Li, Xue; Zhang, Jin; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Koch, Walter; Feldman, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine binds to three G protein-coupled receptors (R) located on the cardiomyocyte (A1-R, A2A-R and A3-R) and provides cardiac protection during both ischemic and load-induced stress. While the role of adenosine receptor-subtypes has been well defined in the setting of ischemia-reperfusion, far less is known regarding their roles in protecting the heart during other forms of cardiac stress. Because of its ability to increase cardiac contractility and heart rate, we hypothesized that enhanced signaling through A2A-R would protect the heart during the stress of transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Using a cardiac-specific and inducible promoter, we selectively over-expressed A2A-R in FVB mice. Echocardiograms were obtained at baseline, 2, 4, 8, 12, 14 weeks and hearts were harvested at 14 weeks, when WT mice developed a significant decrease in cardiac function, an increase in end systolic and diastolic dimensions, a higher heart weight to body weight ratio (HW/BW), and marked fibrosis when compared with sham-operated WT. More importantly, these changes were significantly attenuated by over expression of the A2A-R. Furthermore, WT mice also demonstrated marked increases in the hypertrophic genes β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC), and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) – changes that are mediated by activation of the transcription factor GATA-4. Levels of the mRNAs encoding β-MHC, ANP, and GATA-4 were significantly lower in myocardium from A2A-R TG mice after TAC when compared with WT and sham-operated controls. In addition, three inflammatory factors genes encoding cysteine dioxygenase, complement component 3, and serine peptidase inhibitor, member 3N, were enhanced in WT TAC mice, but their expression was suppressed in A2A-R TG mice. A2A-R over-expression is protective against pressure-induced heart failure secondary to TAC. These cardioprotective effects are associated with attenuation of GATA-4 expression and inflammatory factors. The A2A-R may provide a novel new

  7. Semisynthetic Neoclerodanes as Kappa Opioid Receptor Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Kimberly M.; Vasiljevik, Tamara; Araya, Juan J.; Lozama, Anthony; Prevatt-Smith, Katherine M.; Day, Victor W.; Dersch, Christina M.; Rothman, Richard B.; Butelman, Eduardo R.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Prisinzano, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Modification of the furan ring of salvinorin A (1), the main active component of Salvia divinorum, has resulted in novel neoclerodane diterpenes with opioid receptor affinity and activity. Conversion of the furan ring to an aldehyde at the C-12 position (5) has allowed for the synthesis of analogues with new carbon-carbon bonds at that position. Previous methods for forming these bonds, such as Grignard and Stille conditions, have met with limited success. We report a palladium catalyzed Liebeskind-Srogl cross-coupling reaction of a thioester and a boronic acid that occurs at neutral pH and ambient temperature to produce ketone analogs at C-12. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported usage of the Liebeskind-Srogl reaction to diversify a natural product scaffold. We also describe a one-step protocol for the conversion of 1 to 12-epi-1 (3) through microwave irradiation. Previously, this synthetically challenging process has required multiple steps. Additionally, we report in this study that alkene 9 and aromatic analogues 12, 19, 23, 25, and 26 were discovered to retain affinity and selectivity at kappa opioid receptors (KOP). Finally, we report that the furan-2-yl analog of 1 (31) has similar affinity to 1. Collectively, these findings suggest that different aromatic groups appended directly to the decalin core may be well tolerated by KOP receptors, and may generate further ligands with affinity and activity at KOP receptors. PMID:22464684

  8. Nicotinic Receptors in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; López-Hernández, Beatriz; Ceña, Valentín

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have focused on expanding our knowledge of the structure and diversity of peripheral and central nicotinic receptors. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the Cys-loop superfamily of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which include GABA (A and C), serotonin, and glycine receptors. Currently, 9 alpha (α2-α10) and 3 beta (β2-β4) subunits have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS), and these subunits assemble to form a variety of functional nAChRs. The pentameric combination of several alpha and beta subunits leads to a great number of nicotinic receptors that vary in their properties, including their sensitivity to nicotine, permeability to calcium and propensity to desensitize. In the CNS, nAChRs play crucial roles in modulating presynaptic, postsynaptic, and extrasynaptic signaling, and have been found to be involved in a complex range of CNS disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), schizophrenia, Tourette´s syndrome, anxiety, depression and epilepsy. Therefore, there is growing interest in the development of drugs that modulate nAChR functions with optimal benefits and minimal adverse effects. The present review describes the main characteristics of nAChRs in the CNS and focuses on the various compounds that have been tested and are currently in phase I and phase II trials for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including PD, AD and age-associated memory and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:24179465

  9. GPCR heteromers and their allosteric receptor-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, K; Borroto-Escuela, D O; Marcellino, D; Romero-Fernandez, W; Frankowska, M; Guidolin, D; Filip, M; Ferraro, L; Woods, A S; Tarakanov, A; Ciruela, F; Agnati, L F; Tanganelli, S

    2012-01-01

    The concept of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions and evidence for their existences were introduced in the beginning of the 1980's, suggesting the existence of receptor heterodimerization. The discovery of GPCR heteromers and the receptor mosaic (higher order oligomers, more than two) has been related to the parallel development and application of a variety of resonance energy transfer techniques such as bioluminescence (BRET), fluorescence (FRET) and sequential energy transfer (SRET). The assembly of interacting GPCRs, heterodimers and receptor mosaic leads to changes in the agonist recognition, signaling, and trafficking of participating receptors via allosteric mechanisms, sometimes involving the appearance of cooperativity. The receptor interface in the GPCR heteromers is beginning to be characterized and the key role of electrostatic epitope-epitope interactions for the formation of the receptor heteromers will be discussed. Furthermore, a "guide-and-clasp" manner of receptor-receptor interactions has been proposed where the "adhesive guides" may be the triplet homologies. These interactions probably represent a general molecular mechanism for receptor-receptor interactions. It is proposed that changes in GPCR function (moonlighting) may develop through the intracellular loops and C-terminii of the GPCR heteromers as a result of dynamic allosteric interactions between different types of G proteins and other receptor interacting proteins in these domains of the receptors. The evidence for the existence of receptor heteromers opens up a new field for a better understanding of neurophysiology and neuropathology. Furthermore, novel therapeutic approaches could be possible based on the use of heteromers as targets for drug development based on their unique pharmacology. PMID:22335512

  10. GABA and benzodiazepine receptors in the gerbil brain after transient ischemia: demonstration by quantitative receptor autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, H.; Sato, G.; Kogure, K.

    1987-02-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to measure the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and benzodiazepine receptors after ischemia by means of transient occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries in the gerbil. (/sup 3/H)Muscimol was used to label the GABAA receptors and (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam to label central type benzodiazepine receptors. In the superolateral convexities of the frontal cortices, (/sup 3/H)muscimol binding was increased in 60% of the animals killed 3 days after ischemia, and decreased in 67% of the animals killed 27 days after ischemia. Twenty-seven days after ischemia, (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding in the substantia nigra pars reticulata increased to 252% of the control, though the increase in (/sup 3/H)muscimol binding was not significant. In the dorsolateral region of the caudate putamen, marked neuronal necrosis and depletion of both (/sup 3/H)muscimol and (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding sites were observed 27 days after ischemia, the ventromedial region being left intact. In spite of the depletion of pyramidal cells in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, both (/sup 3/H)muscimol and (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding sites were preserved 27 days after ischemia. Since our previous study revealed that adenosine A1 binding sites were depleted in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus after ischemia correlating with neuronal damage, GABAA and benzodiazepine receptors may not be distributed predominantly on the pyramidal cells in the CA1 region.

  11. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, N; Kemp, N; Adeyemo, O; Buchanan, P; Stone, T W

    1995-10-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. The hydrophilic xanthine, 8-(p-sulphophenyl) theophylline did not prevent anxiolysis by CPA. 4. Caffeine had anxiogenic-like activity at 30 mg kg(-1) which was prevented by CPA at 50 micro kg(-1). 5. The A2 receptor agonist, N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2(2-methylphenyl)-ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) had no effect on anxiety behaviour but depressed locomotor activity at the highest dose tested of 1 mg kg(-1). The A2 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dimethyl-l-propargylxanthine (DMPX) had no effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotion and did not modify the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. 6. Administration of DPMA in combination with anxiolytic doses of CPA prevented the anxiolytic-like activity of the latter. 7. The results suggest that the selective activation of central A1 adenosine receptors induces anxiolytic-like behaviour, while the activation of A2 sites causes locomotor depression and reduces the effects of A1 receptor activation. The absence of any effect of CPX alone suggests that the receptors involved in modulating behaviour in the elevated plus-maze in mice are not activated tonically by endogenous adenosine. PMID:8640355

  12. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, N.; Kemp, N.; Adeyemo, O.; Buchanan, P.; Stone, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. The hydrophilic xanthine, 8-(p-sulphophenyl) theophylline did not prevent anxiolysis by CPA. 4. Caffeine had anxiogenic-like activity at 30 mg kg(-1) which was prevented by CPA at 50 micro kg(-1). 5. The A2 receptor agonist, N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2(2-methylphenyl)-ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) had no effect on anxiety behaviour but depressed locomotor activity at the highest dose tested of 1 mg kg(-1). The A2 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dimethyl-l-propargylxanthine (DMPX) had no effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotion and did not modify the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. 6. Administration of DPMA in combination with anxiolytic doses of CPA prevented the anxiolytic-like activity of the latter. 7. The results suggest that the selective activation of central A1 adenosine receptors induces anxiolytic-like behaviour, while the activation of A2 sites causes locomotor depression and reduces the effects of A1 receptor activation. The absence of any effect of CPX alone suggests that the receptors involved in modulating behaviour in the elevated plus-maze in mice are not activated tonically by endogenous adenosine. PMID:8640355

  13. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a novel human P2 nucleotide receptor.

    PubMed

    Southey, M C; Hammet, F; Hutchins, A M; Paidhungat, M; Somers, G R; Venter, D J

    1996-11-11

    A novel human P2 nucleotide receptor has been cloned from a T-cell cDNA library. The predicted amino acid sequence shows characteristics of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and shares 88% homology with a recently characterised rat P2 nucleotide receptor sequence. Distinctive features include an extremely short cytoplasmic tail with only one putative protein kinase C phosphorylation site. Northern blot analysis revealed a 1.9 kb transcript expressed in the placenta. PMID:8950181

  14. Apolipoprotein a1 increases mitochondrial biogenesis through AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Song, Parkyong; Kwon, Yonghoon; Yea, Kyungmoo; Moon, Hyo-Youl; Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Ghim, Jaewang; Hyun, Hyunjung; Kim, Dayea; Koh, Ara; Berggren, Per-Olof; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-09-01

    Apolipoprotein a1, which is a major lipoprotein component of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), was reported to decrease plasma glucose in type 2 diabetes. Although recent studies also have shown that apolipoprotein a1 is involved in triglyceride (TG) metabolism, the mechanisms by which apolipoprotein a1 modulates TG levels remain largely unexplored. Here we demonstrated that apolipoprotein a1 increased mitochondrial DNA and mitochondria contents through sustained AMPK activation in myotubes. This resulted in enhanced fatty acid oxidation and attenuation of free fatty acid-induced insulin resistance features in skeletal muscle. The increment of mitochondria was mediated through induction of transcription factors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear transcription factor 1 (NRF-1). The inhibition of AMPK by a pharmacological agent inhibited the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Increase of AMPK phosphorylation by apolipoprotein a1 occurs through activation of upstream kinase LKB1. Finally, we confirmed that scavenger receptor Class B, type 1 (SR-B1) is an important receptor for apolipoprotein a1 in stimulating AMPK pathway and mitochondrial biogenesis. Our study suggests that apolipoprotein a1 can alleviate obesity related metabolic disease by inducing AMPK dependent mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25982508

  15. Glycated Serum Albumin and AGE Receptors.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Stefan W

    2015-01-01

    In vivo modification of proteins by molecules with reactive carbonyl groups leads to intermediate and advanced glycation end products (AGE). Glucose is a significant glycation reagent due to its high physiological concentration and poorly controlled diabetics show increased albumin glycation. Increased levels of glycated and AGE-modified albumin have been linked to diabetic complications, neurodegeneration, and vascular disease. This review discusses glycated albumin formation, structural consequences of albumin glycation on drug binding, removal of circulating AGE by several scavenger receptors, as well as AGE-induced proinflammatory signaling through activation of the receptor for AGE. Analytical methods for quantitative detection of protein glycation and AGE formation are compared. Finally, the use of glycated albumin as a novel clinical marker to monitor glycemic control is discussed and compared to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as long-term indicator of glycemic status. PMID:26471084

  16. Structural basis of receptor sharing by interleukin 17 cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Lauren K.; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher; Stanford-MED

    2010-02-19

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing helper T cells (T{sub H}-17 cells), together with their effector cytokines, including members of the IL-17 family, are emerging as key mediators of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Here we present the crystal structure of a complex of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) bound to IL-17F in a 1:2 stoichiometry. The mechanism of complex formation was unique for cytokines and involved the engagement of IL-17 by two fibronectin-type domains of IL-17RA in a groove between the IL-17 homodimer interface. Binding of the first receptor to the IL-17 cytokines modulated the affinity and specificity of the second receptor-binding event, thereby promoting heterodimeric versus homodimeric complex formation. IL-17RA used a common recognition strategy to bind to several members of the IL-17 family, which allows it to potentially act as a shared receptor in multiple different signaling complexes.

  17. Involvement of adenosinergic receptors in anxiety related behaviours.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas K; Singh, Kulwinder; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2007-05-01

    In the present study, the effect of adenosine (A1 and A2 receptor agonist), caffeine (A2A receptor antagonist), theophylline (A2A receptor antagonist) and their combination was studied in anxiety related behaviours using elevated zero maze and elevated plus maze paradigms and compared their various behavioural profiles. Adenosine (10, 25, 50,100 mg/kg) significantly showed anxiolytic effect at all the doses, whereas caffeine (8, 15, 30, 60 mg/kg) and theophylline (30, 60 mg/kg) showed psychostimulatory action at lower doses and anxiogenic effect at higher doses. Pretreatment with caffeine (8, 15, 30 mg/kg) and theophylline (30 mg/kg) reversed the anxiolytic effect of adenosine. The study suggested the involvement of adenosinergic receptor system in anxiety related behaviours. PMID:17569285

  18. Novel adenosine receptors in rat hippocampus identification and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.; Mashman, W.E.; DeLorenzo, R.J.

    1985-05-06

    2-chloro(/sup 3/H)adenosine, a stable analog of adenosine, was used to investigate the presence of adenosine receptors in rat hippocampal membranes that may mediate the depressant effects of adenosine on synaptic transmission in this tissue. Equilibrium binding studies reveal the presence of a previously undescribed class of receptors with a K/sub D/ of 4.7 ..mu..M and a Bmax of 130 pmol/mg of protein. Binding is sensitive to alkylxanthines and to a number of adenosine-related compounds. The pharmacological properties of this binding site are distinct from those of the A1 and A2 adenosine receptors associated with adenylate cyclase. The results suggest that this adenosine binding site is a novel central purinergic receptor through which adenosine may regulate hippocampal excitability. 50 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  19. Taste Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2009-01-01

    In the past several years, tremendous progress has been achieved with the discovery and characterization of vertebrate taste receptors from the T1R and T2R families, which are involved in recognition of bitter, sweet, and umami taste stimuli. Individual differences in taste, at least in some cases, can be attributed to allelic variants of the T1R and T2R genes. Progress with understanding how T1R and T2R receptors interact with taste stimuli and with identifying their patterns of expression in taste cells sheds light on coding of taste information by the nervous system. Candidate mechanisms for detection of salts, acids, fat, complex carbohydrates, and water have also been proposed, but further studies are needed to prove their identity. PMID:17444812

  20. Dynorphin A (1-13) Neurotoxicity In Vitro: Opioid and Non-Opioid Mechanisms in Mouse Spinal Cord Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Kurt F.; Foldes, Jane K.; Turbek, Carol S.

    2016-01-01

    Dynorphin A is an endogenous opioid peptide that preferentially activates κ opioid receptors and is antinociceptive at physiological concentrations. Levels of dynorphin A and a major metabolite, dynorphin A (1-13), increase significantly following spinal cord trauma and reportedly contribute to neurodegeneration associated with secondary injury. Interestingly, both κ opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists can modulate dynorphin toxicity, suggesting that dynorphin is acting (directly or indirectly) through κ opioid and/or NMDA receptor (NMDAR) types. Despite these findings, few studies have systematically explored dynorphin toxicity at the cellular level in defined populations of neurons co-expressing κ opioid and NMDA receptors. To address this question, we isolated populations of neurons enriched in both κ opioid and NMDA receptors from embryonic mouse spinal cord and examined the effects of dynorphin A (1-13) on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and neuronal survival in vitro. Time-lapse photography was used to repeatedly follow the same neurons before and during experimental treatments. At micromolar concentrations, dynorphin A (1-13) elevated [Ca2+]i and caused a significant loss of neurons. The excitotoxic effects were prevented by MK-801 (Dizocilpine) (10 μM), 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP-5) (100 μM), or 7-chlorokynurenic acid (100 μM)— suggesting that dynorphin A (1-13) was acting (directly or indirectly) through NMDA receptors. In contrast, co-treatment with (−)-naloxone (3 μM), or the more selective κ opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (3 μM), exacerbated dynorphin A (1-13)-induced neuronal loss; however, cell losses were not enhanced by the inactive stereoisomer (+)-naloxone (3 μM). Neuronal losses were not seen with exposure to the opioid antagonists alone (10 μM). Thus, opioid receptor blockade significantly increased toxicity, but only in the presence of excitotoxic levels of

  1. Identification of A3 adenosine receptor agonists as novel non-narcotic analgesics.

    PubMed

    Janes, K; Symons-Liguori, A M; Jacobson, K A; Salvemini, D

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain negatively impacts the quality of life in a variety of patient populations. The current therapeutic repertoire is inadequate in managing patient pain and warrants the development of new therapeutics. Adenosine and its four cognate receptors (A1 , A2A , A2B and A3 ) have important roles in physiological and pathophysiological states, including chronic pain. Preclinical and clinical studies have revealed that while adenosine and agonists of the A1 and A2A receptors have antinociceptive properties, their therapeutic utility is limited by adverse cardiovascular side effects. In contrast, our understanding of the A3 receptor is only in its infancy, but exciting preclinical observations of A3 receptor antinociception, which have been bolstered by clinical trials of A3 receptor agonists in other disease states, suggest pain relief without cardiovascular side effects and with sufficient tolerability. Our goal herein is to briefly discuss adenosine and its receptors in the context of pathological pain and to consider the current data regarding A3 receptor-mediated antinociception. We will highlight recent findings regarding the impact of the A3 receptor on pain pathways and examine the current state of selective A3 receptor agonists used for these studies. The adenosine-to-A3 receptor pathway represents an important endogenous system that can be targeted to provide safe, effective pain relief from chronic pain. PMID:26804983

  2. Quantitative receptor autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Boast, C.A.; Snowhill, E.W.; Altar, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography addresses the topic of technical and scientific advances in the sphere of quantitative autoradiography. The volume opens with a overview of the field from a historical and critical perspective. Following is a detailed discussion of in vitro data obtained from a variety of neurotransmitter systems. The next section explores applications of autoradiography, and the final two chapters consider experimental models. Methodological considerations are emphasized, including the use of computers for image analysis.

  3. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, James; Franks, Christopher J.; Murray, Caitriona; Edwards, Richard J.; Calahorro, Fernando; Ishihara, Takeshi; Katsura, Isao; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission is evolutionarily conserved across animal phyla. A major class of glutamate receptors consists of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). In C. elegans, three mGluR genes, mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3, are organized into three subgroups, similar to their mammalian counterparts. Cellular reporters identified expression of the mgls in the nervous system of C. elegans and overlapping expression in the pharyngeal microcircuit that controls pharyngeal muscle activity and feeding behavior. The overlapping expression of mgls within this circuit allowed the investigation of receptor signaling per se and in the context of receptor interactions within a neural network that regulates feeding. We utilized the pharmacological manipulation of neuronally regulated pumping of the pharyngeal muscle in the wild-type and mutants to investigate MGL function. This defined a net mgl-1-dependent inhibition of pharyngeal pumping that is modulated by mgl-3 excitation. Optogenetic activation of the pharyngeal glutamatergic inputs combined with electrophysiological recordings from the isolated pharyngeal preparations provided further evidence for a presynaptic mgl-1-dependent regulation of pharyngeal activity. Analysis of mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3 mutant feeding behavior in the intact organism after acute food removal identified a significant role for mgl-1 in the regulation of an adaptive feeding response. Our data describe the molecular and cellular organization of mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3. Pharmacological analysis identified that, in these paradigms, mgl-1 and mgl-3, but not mgl-2, can modulate the pharyngeal microcircuit. Behavioral analysis identified mgl-1 as a significant determinant of the glutamate-dependent modulation of feeding, further highlighting the significance of mGluRs in complex C. elegans behavior. PMID:25869139

  4. Pgc-1α and Nr4a1 Are Target Genes of Circadian Melatonin and Dopamine Release in Murine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Kunst, Stefanie; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Kelleher, Debra K.; Wolfrum, Uwe; Sargsyan, S. Anna; Iuvone, P. Michael; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Spessert, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The neurohormones melatonin and dopamine mediate clock-dependent/circadian regulation of inner retinal neurons and photoreceptor cells and in this way promote their functional adaptation to time of day and their survival. To fulfill this function they act on melatonin receptor type 1 (MT1 receptors) and dopamine D4 receptors (D4 receptors), respectively. The aim of the present study was to screen transcriptional regulators important for retinal physiology and/or pathology (Dbp, Egr-1, Fos, Nr1d1, Nr2e3, Nr4a1, Pgc-1α, Rorβ) for circadian regulation and dependence on melatonin signaling/MT1 receptors or dopamine signaling/D4 receptors. Methods This was done by gene profiling using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in mice deficient in MT1 or D4 receptors. Results The data obtained determined Pgc-1α and Nr4a1 as transcriptional targets of circadian melatonin and dopamine signaling, respectively. Conclusions The results suggest that Pgc-1α and Nr4a1 represent candidate genes for linking circadian neurohormone release with functional adaptation and healthiness of retina and photoreceptor cells. PMID:26393668

  5. Alcohol Worsens Acute Lung Injury by Inhibiting Alveolar Sodium Transport through the Adenosine A1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Urich, Daniela; Soberanes, Saul; Manghi, Tomas S.; Chiarella, Sergio E.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Budinger, G. R. Scott; Mutlu, Gökhan M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Alcohol intake increases the risk of acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is associated with poor outcomes in patients who develop these syndromes. No specific therapies are currently available to treat or decrease the risk of ARDS in patients with alcoholism. We have recently shown increased levels of lung adenosine inhibit alveolar fluid clearance, an important predictor of outcome in patients with ARDS. We hypothesized that alcohol might worsen lung injury by increasing lung adenosine levels, resulting in impaired active Na+ transport in the lung. Methods We treated wild-type mice with alcohol administered i.p. to achieve blood alcohol levels associated with moderate to severe intoxication and measured the rate of alveolar fluid clearance and Na,K-ATPase expression in peripheral lung tissue and assessed the effect of alcohol on survival during exposure to hyperoxia. We used primary rat alveolar type II cells to investigate the mechanisms by which alcohol regulates alveolar Na+ transport. Results Exposure to alcohol reduced alveolar fluid clearance, downregulated Na,K-ATPase in the lung tissue and worsened hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Alcohol caused an increase in BAL fluid adenosine levels. A similar increase in lung adenosine levels was observed after exposure to hyperoxia. In primary rat alveolar type II cells alcohol and adenosine decreased the abundance of the Na,K-ATPase at the basolateral membrane via a mechanism that required activation of the AMPK. Conclusions Alcohol decreases alveolar fluid clearance and impairs survival from acute lung injury. Alcohol induced increases in lung adenosine levels may be responsible for reduction in alveolar fluid clearance and associated worsening of lung injury. PMID:22272351

  6. Characterization of DNA complexes formed by the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Frank, Christian; Gonzalez, Manuel Macias; Oinonen, Carita; Dunlop, Thomas W; Carlberg, Carsten

    2003-10-31

    The nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) acts as a xenobiotic sensor and regulates the expression of enzymes, such as several cytochromes P450s and the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) type 1A1. CAR binds as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to specific DNA sites, called response elements (REs). Clusters of CAR REs, referred to as phenobarbital response enhancer modules (PBREMs), have been identified in several CAR target genes. In this study we confirm that REs formed by direct repeats of two AGTTCA hexamers with 4 spacing nucleotides are optimal for the binding of CAR-RXR heterodimers. In addition, we found that the heterodimers also form complexes on everted repeat-type arrangements with 8 spacing nucleotides. We also observed that CAR is able to bind DNA as a monomer and to interact in this form with different coregulators even in the presence of RXR. Systematic variation of the nucleotides 5'-flanking to both AGTTCA hexamers showed that the dinucleotide sequence modulates the DNA complex formation of CAR monomers and CAR-RXR heterodimer by a factor of up to 20. The highest preference was found for the sequence AG and lowest for CC. The increased DNA affinity of CAR is mediated by the positively charged arginines 90 and 91 located in the carboxyl-terminal extension of the DNA-binding domain of the receptor. Furthermore, we show that one of the three CAR REs of the human UGT1A1 PBREM is exclusively bound by CAR monomers and this is regulated by ligands that bind to this nuclear receptor. This points to a physiological role for CAR monomers. Therefore, both CAR-RXR heterodimers and CAR monomers can contribute to the gene activating function of PBREMs in CAR target genes. PMID:12896978

  7. Adenosine receptor agonists attenuate and adenosine receptor antagonists exacerbate opiate withdrawal signs.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Sears, M T

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. Adenosine receptors and their functions have been shown to be regulated by chronic opiate treatment. This study examines the role of adenosine receptors in the expression of opiate withdrawal behaviors. The effects of single doses of parenterally administered adenosine receptor subtype-selective agonists and antagonists on opiate withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice were measured. Mice received subcutaneous morphine pellet treatment for 72 h and then underwent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal after pretreatment with adenosinergic agents. Adenosine agonists attenuated different opiate withdrawal signs. The A1 agonist R-N6(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (0, 0.01, 0.02 mg/kg, IP) significantly reduced wet dog shakes and withdrawal diarrhea, while the A2a-selective agonist 2-p-(2-carboxethyl)phenylethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine or CGS 21680 (0, 0.01, 0.05 mg/kg, IP) significantly inhibited teeth chattering and forepaw treads. Adenosine receptor antagonists enhanced different opiate withdrawal signs. The adenosine A1 antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (0, 1, 10 mg/kg, IP) significantly increased weight loss and the A2 antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (0, 1 and 10 mg/kg, IP) enhanced wet dog shakes and withdrawal diarrhea. Treatment effects of adenosinergic agents were not due to nonspecific motor effects, as demonstrated by activity monitoring studies. These results support a role for adenosine receptors in the expression of opiate withdrawal and suggest the potential utility of adenosine agonists in its treatment. PMID:8741956

  8. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  9. Nucleus tractus solitarii A(2a) adenosine receptors inhibit cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of sympathetic outputs.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-02-01

    Previously we have shown that stimulation of inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors located in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) evoked inhibition of renal, adrenal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Activation of facilitatory A2a adenosine receptors, which dominate over A1 receptors in the NTS, contrastingly alters baseline activity of regional sympathetic outputs: it decreases renal, increases adrenal and does not change lumbar nerve activity. Considering that NTS A2a receptors may facilitate release of inhibitory transmitters we hypothesized that A2a receptors will act in concert with A1 receptors differentially inhibiting regional sympathetic CCR responses (adrenal>lumbar>renal). In urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats (n=38) we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT3 receptor agonist, phenylbiguanide, (1-8μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation, blockade or combined blockade and stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors (microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 0.2-20pmol/50nl, ZM-241385 40pmol/100nl or ZM-241385+CGS-21680, respectively). We found that stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors uniformly inhibited the regional sympathetic and hemodynamic reflex responses and this effect was abolished by the selective blockade of NTS A2a receptors. This indicates that A2a receptor triggered inhibition of CCR responses and the contrasting shifts in baseline sympathetic activity are mediated via different mechanisms. These data implicate that stimulation of NTS A2a receptors triggers unknown inhibitory mechanism(s) which in turn inhibit transmission in the CCR pathway when adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hypotension. PMID:24216055

  10. Transcriptional regulation of human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase SULT2A1 by LXRα.

    PubMed

    Ou, Zhimin; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Huang, Yixian; Xu, Meishu; Ren, Songrong; Li, Song; Liu, Suhuan; Xie, Wen; Huang, Min

    2014-10-01

    The nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR) plays an important role in the metabolism and homeostasis of cholesterol, lipids, bile acids, and steroid hormones. In this study, we uncovered a function of LXRα (NR1H3) in regulating the human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase SULT2A1, a phase II conjugating enzyme known to sulfonate bile acids, hydroxysteroid dehydroepiandrosterone, and related androgens. We showed that activation of LXR induced the expression of SULT2A1 at mRNA, protein, and enzymatic levels. A combination of promoter reporter gene and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that LXRα transactivated the SULT2A1 gene promoter through its specific binding to the -500- to -258-base pair region of the SULT2A1 gene promoter. LXR small interfering RNA knockdown experiments suggested that LXRα, but not LXRβ, played a dominant role in regulating SULT2A1. In primary human hepatocytes, we found a positive correlation between the expression of SULT2A1 and LXRα, which further supported the regulation of SULT2A1 by LXRα. In summary, our results established human SULT2A1 as a novel LXRα target gene. The expression of LXRα is a potential predictor for the expression of SULT2A1 in human liver. PMID:25028566

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of Human Hydroxysteroid Sulfotransferase SULT2A1 by LXRα

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Zhimin; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Huang, Yixian; Xu, Meishu; Ren, Songrong; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR) plays an important role in the metabolism and homeostasis of cholesterol, lipids, bile acids, and steroid hormones. In this study, we uncovered a function of LXRα (NR1H3) in regulating the human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase SULT2A1, a phase II conjugating enzyme known to sulfonate bile acids, hydroxysteroid dehydroepiandrosterone, and related androgens. We showed that activation of LXR induced the expression of SULT2A1 at mRNA, protein, and enzymatic levels. A combination of promoter reporter gene and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that LXRα transactivated the SULT2A1 gene promoter through its specific binding to the −500- to −258-base pair region of the SULT2A1 gene promoter. LXR small interfering RNA knockdown experiments suggested that LXRα, but not LXRβ, played a dominant role in regulating SULT2A1. In primary human hepatocytes, we found a positive correlation between the expression of SULT2A1 and LXRα, which further supported the regulation of SULT2A1 by LXRα. In summary, our results established human SULT2A1 as a novel LXRα target gene. The expression of LXRα is a potential predictor for the expression of SULT2A1 in human liver. PMID:25028566

  12. Mechanism of androgen receptor action.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Al-Azzawi, Farook

    2009-06-20

    Recent research provides a much more detailed understanding of the role of the androgen receptor in normal human development and physiology, its structure, and its functioning. This review discusses genomic and non-genomic actions of the androgen receptor, as well as their co-regulators. We also explore several clinically relevant aspects of the molecular biology of the androgen receptor and its co-regulators. PMID:19372015

  13. [The beta-adrenergic receptor].

    PubMed

    Bicho, M P; Manso, C F

    1992-12-01

    The Authors review the constitution and mechanism of action of the beta adrenergic receptor. It is part of a large family which includes visual pigments, muscarinic, serotonergic, olfactive and substance K receptors. Catecholamines given an electron to the receptor. It goes then successively to the alpha submit of Gs protein ant to adenylyl cyclase. The process of activation consists in a successive transfer of one electron. PMID:1337834

  14. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  15. A1C Test and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... laboratory tests. How does the A1C relate to estimated average glucose? Estimated average glucose (eAG) is calculated from the A1C. ... levels have the A1C test twice a year. Estimated average glucose (eAG) is calculated from the A1C ...

  16. The human olfactory receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Sergey; Echeverri, Fernando; Nguyen, Trieu

    2001-01-01

    Background The mammalian olfactory apparatus is able to recognize and distinguish thousands of structurally diverse volatile chemicals. This chemosensory function is mediated by a very large family of seven-transmembrane olfactory (odorant) receptors encoded by approximately 1,000 genes, the majority of which are believed to be pseudogenes in humans. Results The strategy of our sequence database mining for full-length, functional candidate odorant receptor genes was based on the high overall sequence similarity and presence of a number of conserved sequence motifs in all known mammalian odorant receptors as well as the absence of introns in their coding sequences. We report here the identification and physical cloning of 347 putative human full-length odorant receptor genes. Comparative sequence analysis of the predicted gene products allowed us to identify and define a number of consensus sequence motifs and structural features of this vast family of receptors. A new nomenclature for human odorant receptors based on their chromosomal localization and phylogenetic analysis is proposed. We believe that these sequences represent the essentially complete repertoire of functional human odorant receptors. Conclusions The identification and cloning of all functional human odorant receptor genes is an important initial step in understanding receptor-ligand specificity and combinatorial encoding of odorant stimuli in human olfaction. PMID:11423007

  17. Adenosine receptor desensitization and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart; Kelly, Eamonn

    2011-05-01

    As with the majority of G-protein-coupled receptors, all four of the adenosine receptor subtypes are known to undergo agonist-induced regulation in the form of desensitization and trafficking. These processes can limit the ability of adenosine receptors to couple to intracellular signalling pathways and thus reduce the ability of adenosine receptor agonists as well as endogenous adenosine to produce cellular responses. In addition, since adenosine receptors couple to multiple signalling pathways, these pathways may desensitize differentially, while the desensitization of one pathway could even trigger signalling via another. Thus, the overall picture of adenosine receptor regulation can be complex. For all adenosine receptor subtypes, there is evidence to implicate arrestins in agonist-induced desensitization and trafficking, but there is also evidence for other possible forms of regulation, including second messenger-dependent kinase regulation, heterologous effects involving G proteins, and the involvement of non-clathrin trafficking pathways such as caveolae. In this review, the evidence implicating these mechanisms is summarized for each adenosine receptor subtype, and we also discuss those issues of adenosine receptor regulation that remain to be resolved as well as likely directions for future research in this field. PMID:20550943

  18. Extensive phosphorylation of AMPA receptors in neurons.

    PubMed

    Diering, Graham H; Heo, Seok; Hussain, Natasha K; Liu, Bian; Huganir, Richard L

    2016-08-16

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) function is a fundamental mechanism controlling synaptic strength during long-term potentiation/depression and homeostatic scaling. AMPAR function and membrane trafficking is controlled by protein-protein interactions, as well as by posttranslational modifications. Phosphorylation of the GluA1 AMPAR subunit at S845 and S831 play especially important roles during synaptic plasticity. Recent controversy has emerged regarding the extent to which GluA1 phosphorylation may contribute to synaptic plasticity. Here we used a variety of methods to measure the population of phosphorylated GluA1-containing AMPARs in cultured primary neurons and mouse forebrain. Phosphorylated GluA1 represents large fractions from 12% to 50% of the total population under basal and stimulated conditions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a large fraction of synapses are positive for phospho-GluA1-containing AMPARs. Our results support the large body of research indicating a prominent role of GluA1 phosphorylation in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27482106

  19. Alcohol- and alcohol antagonist-sensitive human GABAA receptors: tracking δ subunit incorporation into functional receptors.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Wallner, Martin

    2010-11-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) have long been a focus as targets for alcohol actions. Recent work suggests that tonic GABAergic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs is uniquely sensitive to ethanol and enhanced at concentrations relevant for human alcohol consumption. Ethanol enhancement of recombinant α4β3δ receptors is blocked by the behavioral alcohol antagonist 8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (Ro15-4513), suggesting that EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive receptors mediate important behavioral alcohol actions. Here we confirm alcohol/alcohol antagonist sensitivity of α4β3δ receptors using human clones expressed in a human cell line and test the hypothesis that discrepant findings concerning the high alcohol sensitivity of these receptors are due to difficulties incorporating δ subunits into functional receptors. To track δ subunit incorporation, we used a functional tag, a single amino acid change (H68A) in a benzodiazepine binding residue in which a histidine in the δ subunit is replaced by an alanine residue found at the homologous position in γ subunits. We demonstrate that the δH68A substitution confers diazepam sensitivity to otherwise diazepam-insensitive α4β3δ receptors. The extent of enhancement of α4β3δH68A receptors by 1 μM diazepam, 30 mM EtOH, and 1 μM β-carboline-3-carboxy ethyl ester (but not 1 μM Zn(2+) block) is correlated in individual recordings, suggesting that δ subunit incorporation into recombinant GABA(A)Rs varies from cell to cell and that this variation accounts for the variable pharmacological profile. These data are consistent with the notion that δ subunit-incorporation is often incomplete in recombinant systems yet is necessary for high ethanol sensitivity, one of the features of native δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs. PMID:20699325

  20. Alcohol- and Alcohol Antagonist-Sensitive Human GABAA Receptors: Tracking δ Subunit Incorporation into Functional Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W.; Otis, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) have long been a focus as targets for alcohol actions. Recent work suggests that tonic GABAergic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABAARs is uniquely sensitive to ethanol and enhanced at concentrations relevant for human alcohol consumption. Ethanol enhancement of recombinant α4β3δ receptors is blocked by the behavioral alcohol antagonist 8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (Ro15-4513), suggesting that EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive receptors mediate important behavioral alcohol actions. Here we confirm alcohol/alcohol antagonist sensitivity of α4β3δ receptors using human clones expressed in a human cell line and test the hypothesis that discrepant findings concerning the high alcohol sensitivity of these receptors are due to difficulties incorporating δ subunits into functional receptors. To track δ subunit incorporation, we used a functional tag, a single amino acid change (H68A) in a benzodiazepine binding residue in which a histidine in the δ subunit is replaced by an alanine residue found at the homologous position in γ subunits. We demonstrate that the δH68A substitution confers diazepam sensitivity to otherwise diazepam-insensitive α4β3δ receptors. The extent of enhancement of α4β3δH68A receptors by 1 μM diazepam, 30 mM EtOH, and 1 μM β-carboline-3-carboxy ethyl ester (but not 1 μM Zn2+ block) is correlated in individual recordings, suggesting that δ subunit incorporation into recombinant GABAARs varies from cell to cell and that this variation accounts for the variable pharmacological profile. These data are consistent with the notion that δ subunit-incorporation is often incomplete in recombinant systems yet is necessary for high ethanol sensitivity, one of the features of native δ subunit-containing GABAARs. PMID:20699325

  1. Glucocorticoid Regulation of the Vitamin D Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies indicate calcitriol has potent anti-tumor activity in different types of cancers. However, high levels of vitamin D can produce hypercalcemia in some patients. Glucocorticoids are used to ameliorate hypercalcemia and to enhance calcitriol anti-tumor activity. Calcitriol in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) protein levels and ligand binding in squamous cell carcinoma VII (SCC). In this study we found that both calcitriol and Dex induce VDR- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcription respectively, indicating both hormone receptors are active in SCC. Pre-treatment with Dex increases VDR-mediated transcription at the human CYP24A1 promoter. Whereas, pre-treatment with other steroid hormones, including dihydrotestosterone and R1881, has no effect on VDR-mediated transcription. Real-time PCR indicates treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time-dependent manner, suggesting Dex may directly regulate expression of Vdr. Numerous putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) were found in the Vdr gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated GR binding at several putative GREs located within the mouse Vdr gene. However, none of the putative GREs studied increase GR-mediated transcription in luciferase reporter assays. In an attempt to identify the response element responsible for Vdr transcript regulation, future studies will continue to analyze newly identified GREs more distal from the Vdr gene promoter. PMID:20398752

  2. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  3. The receptor subunits generating NMDA receptor mediated currents in oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Burzomato, Valeria; Frugier, Guillaume; Pérez-Otaño, Isabel; Kittler, Josef T; Attwell, David

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptors have been shown to contribute to glutamate-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes. Activation of these receptors damages myelin in ischaemia, in part because they are more weakly blocked by Mg2+ than are most neuronal NMDA receptors. This weak Mg2+ block was suggested to reflect an unusual subunit composition including the NR2C and NR3A subunits. Here we expressed NR1/NR2C and triplet NR1/NR2C/NR3A recombinant receptors in HEK cells and compared their currents with those of NMDA-evoked currents in rat cerebellar oligodendrocytes. NR1/NR2C/3A receptors were less blocked by 2 mm Mg2+ than were NR1/NR2C receptors (the remaining current was 30% and 18%, respectively, of that seen without added Mg2+) and showed less channel noise, suggesting a smaller single channel conductance. NMDA-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes showed a Mg2+ block (to 32%) similar to that observed for NR1/NR2C/NR3A and significantly different from that for NR1/NR2C receptors. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed interactions between NR1, NR2C and NR3A subunits in a purified myelin preparation from rat brain. These data are consistent with NMDA-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes reflecting the activation of receptors containing NR1, NR2C and NR3A subunits. PMID:20660562

  4. Cleavage of a Recombinant Human Immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 Hybrid Antibody by Certain Bacterial IgA1 Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Bernard W.; Dunlop, James I.; Batten, Margaret R.; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M.

    2000-01-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcα receptors and trigger respiratory bursts in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. sanguis, Neisseria meningitidis types 1 and 2, N. gonorrhoeae types 1 and 2, and Haemophilus influenzae type 2. Thus, for these enzymes the recognition site for IgA1 cleavage is contained within half of the IgA1 hinge region; additional distal elements, if required, are provided by either an IgA1 or an IgA2 framework. In contrast, the IgA2/A1 hybrid appeared to be resistant to cleavage with S. oralis and some H. influenzae type 1 IgA1 proteases, suggesting these enzymes require additional determinants for efficient substrate recognition. PMID:10639405

  5. Cleavage of a recombinant human immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 hybrid antibody by certain bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Dunlop, J I; Batten, M R; Kilian, M; Woof, J M

    2000-02-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcalpha receptors and trigger respiratory bursts in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. sanguis, Neisseria meningitidis types 1 and 2, N. gonorrhoeae types 1 and 2, and Haemophilus influenzae type 2. Thus, for these enzymes the recognition site for IgA1 cleavage is contained within half of the IgA1 hinge region; additional distal elements, if required, are provided by either an IgA1 or an IgA2 framework. In contrast, the IgA2/A1 hybrid appeared to be resistant to cleavage with S. oralis and some H. influenzae type 1 IgA1 proteases, suggesting these enzymes require additional determinants for efficient substrate recognition. PMID:10639405

  6. Reduced phosphorylation of GluA1 subunits relates to anxiety-like behaviours in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kiselycznyk, Carly; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Huganir, Richard L.; Holmes, Andrew; Svenningsson, Per

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are highly prevalent and frequently co-morbid conditions. The ionotropic glutamate receptors N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) mediate actions of monoaminergic antidepressants and have been directly targeted by novel fast-acting antidepressants. Less is known about the role of these receptors in anxiety-like states. Here we investigate how two distinct anxiolytic agents, buspirone, a partial 5-HT1A agonist, and diazepam, a benzodiazepine, influence phosphorylation of GluA1 subunits of AMPA receptors at the potentiating residue Ser845 and Ser831 in corticolimbic regions. To test the functional relevance of these changes, phosphomutant GluA1 mice lacking phosphorylatable Ser845 and Ser831 were examined in relevant behavioural paradigms. These mutant mice exhibited a reduced anxiety-like phenotype in the light/dark exploration task and elevated plus maze, but not in the novelty induced hypophagia paradigm. These data indicate that reduced potentiation of the AMPA receptor signalling, via decreased GluA1 phoshorylation, is specifically involved in approach–avoidance based paradigms relevant for anxiety-like behaviours. PMID:23360771

  7. Kinins and peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Regoli, Domenico; Gobeil, Fernand

    2016-04-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first contains the essential elements of the opening lecture presented by Pr. Regoli to the 2015 International Kinin Symposium in S. Paulo, Brazil on June 28th and the second is the celebration of Dr. Regoli's 60 years of research on vasoactive peptides. The cardiovascular homeostasis derives from a balance of two systems, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). The biologically active effector entity of RAS is angiotensin receptor-1 (AT-1R), and that of KKS is bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). The first mediates vasoconstriction, the second is the most potent and efficient vasodilator. Thanks to its complex and multi-functional mechanism of action, involving nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelial hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). B2R is instrumental for the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrition to tissues. KKS is present on the vascular endothelium and functions as an autacoid playing major roles in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and diabetes. KKS exerts a paramount role in the prevention of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Such knowledge emphasizes the already prominent value of the ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) for the treatment of CVDs and diabetes. Indeed, the ACEIs, thanks to their double action (block of the RAS and potentiation of the KKS) are the ideal agents for a rational treatment of these diseases. PMID:26408609

  8. Leptin and its receptors.

    PubMed

    Wada, Nobuhiro; Hirako, Satoshi; Takenoya, Fumiko; Kageyama, Haruaki; Okabe, Mai; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is mainly produced in the white adipose tissue before being secreted into the blood and transported across the blood-brain barrier. Leptin binds to a specific receptor (LepR) that has numerous subtypes (LepRa, LepRb, LepRc, LepRd, LepRe, and LepRf). LepRb, in particular, is expressed in several brain nuclei, including the arcuate nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus, and the dorsomedial, lateral and ventromedial regions of the hypothalamus. LepRb is also co-expressed with several neuropeptides, including proopiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, galanin, galanin-like peptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, tyrosine hydroxylase and neuropeptide W. Functionally, LepRb induces activation of the JAK2/ERK, /STAT3, /STAT5 and IRS/PI3 kinase signaling cascades, which are important for the regulation of energy homeostasis and appetite in mammals. In this review, we discuss the structure, genetics and distribution of the leptin receptors, and their role in cell signaling mechanisms. PMID:25218975

  9. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  10. The Multifaceted Mineralocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.

    2015-01-01

    The primary adrenal cortical steroid hormones, aldosterone, and the glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone, act through the structurally similar mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Aldosterone is crucial for fluid, electrolyte, and hemodynamic homeostasis and tissue repair; the significantly more abundant glucocorticoids are indispensable for energy homeostasis, appropriate responses to stress, and limiting inflammation. Steroid receptors initiate gene transcription for proteins that effect their actions as well as rapid non-genomic effects through classical cell signaling pathways. GR and MR are expressed in many tissues types, often in the same cells, where they interact at molecular and functional levels, at times in synergy, others in opposition. Thus the appropriate balance of MR and GR activation is crucial for homeostasis. MR has the same binding affinity for aldosterone, cortisol, and corticosterone. Glucocorticoids activate MR in most tissues at basal levels and GR at stress levels. Inactivation of cortisol and corticosterone by 11β-HSD2 allows aldosterone to activate MR within aldosterone target cells and limits activation of the GR. Under most conditions, 11β-HSD1 acts as a reductase and activates cortisol/corticosterone, amplifying circulating levels. 11β-HSD1 and MR antagonists mitigate inappropriate activation of MR under conditions of oxidative stress that contributes to the pathophysiology of the cardiometabolic syndrome; however, MR antagonists decrease normal MR/GR functional interactions, a particular concern for neurons mediating cognition, memory, and affect. PMID:24944027

  11. NMDA receptor structures reveal subunit arrangement and pore architecture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Lü, Wei; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Goehring, April; Du, Juan; Song, Xianqiang; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are Hebbian-like coincidence detectors, requiring binding of glycine and glutamate in combination with the relief of voltage-dependent magnesium block to open an ion conductive pore across the membrane bilayer. Despite the importance of the NMDA receptor in the development and function of the brain, a molecular structure of an intact receptor has remained elusive. Here we present x-ray crystal structures of the GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptor with the allosteric inhibitor, Ro25-6981, partial agonists and the ion channel blocker, MK-801. Receptor subunits are arranged in a 1-2-1-2 fashion, demonstrating extensive interactions between the amino terminal and ligand binding domains. The transmembrane domains harbor a closed-blocked ion channel, a pyramidal central vestibule lined by residues implicated in binding ion channel blockers and magnesium, and a ~2-fold symmetric arrangement of ion channel pore loops. These structures provide new insights into the architecture, allosteric coupling and ion channel function of NMDA receptors. PMID:25008524

  12. Role of iso-receptors in receptor-receptor interactions with a focus on dopamine iso-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Agnati, Luigi F; Guidolin, Diego; Cervetto, Chiara; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular and intracellular communication processes consist of signals and recognition/decoding apparatuses of these signals. In humans, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest family of cell surface receptors. More than 30 years ago, it has been proposed that GPCR could form dimers or higher-order oligomers (receptor mosaics [RMs] at the plasma membrane level and receptor-receptor interactions [RRIs] have been proposed as a new integrative mechanism for chemical signals impinging on cell plasma membranes). The basic phenomena involved in RRIs are allostery and cooperativity of membrane receptors, and the present paper provides basic information concerning their relevance for the integrative functions of RMs. In this context, the possible role of iso-receptor RM is discussed (with a special focus on dopamine receptor subtypes and on some of the RMs they form with other dopamine iso-receptors), and it is proposed that two types of cooperativity, namely, homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity, could allow distinguishing two types of functionally different RMs. From a general point of view, the presence of iso-receptors and their topological organization within RMs allow the use of a reduced number of signals for the intercellular communication processes, since the target cells can recognize and decode the same signal in different ways. This theoretical aspect is further analyzed here by means of an analogy with artificial information systems. Thus, it is suggested that the 'multiplexer' and 'demultiplexer' concepts could, at least in part, model the role of RMs formed by iso-receptors in the information handling by the cell. PMID:26418645

  13. NEK2 mediates ALDH1A1-dependent drug resistance in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jiliang; Gu, Zhimin; Wendlandt, Erik; Zhan, Xin; Janz, Siegfried; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously that increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) in multiple myeloma (MM) is a marker of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that is further associated with chromosomal instability (CIN). Here we demonstrate that member A1 of the ALDH1 family of proteins, ALDH1A1, is most abundantly expressed in myeloma. Enforced expression of ALDH1A1 in myeloma cells led to increased clonogenicity, tumor formation in mice, and resistance to myeloma drugs in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism underlying these phenotypes included the ALDH1A1-dependent activation of drug-efflux pump, ABCB1, and survival proteins, AKT and BCL2. Over expression of ALDH1A1 in myeloma cells led to increased mRNA and protein levels of NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK2), whereas shRNA-mediated knock down of NEK2 decreased drug efflux pump activity and drug resistance. The activation of NEK2 in myeloma cells relied on the ALDH1A1-dependent generation of the retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) ligand, 9-cis retinoic acid (9CRA) – not the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) ligand, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). These findings implicate the ALDH1A1-RXRα-NEK2 pathway in drug resistance and disease relapse in myeloma and suggest that specific inhibitors of ALDH1A1 are worthy of consideration for clinical development of new approaches to overcome drug resistance in myeloma. PMID:25230277

  14. Adenosine A2A receptor dynamics studied with the novel fluorescent agonist Alexa488-APEC

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Frank; Klutz, Athena; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Schulte, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors, such as the adenosine A2A receptor, are dynamic proteins, which undergo agonist-dependent redistribution from the cell surface to intracellular membranous compartments, such as endosomes. In order to study the kinetics of adenosine A2A receptor redistribution in living cells, we synthesized a novel fluorescent agonist, Alexa488-APEC. Alexa488-APEC binds to adenosine A2A (Ki = 149 ± 27 nM) as well as A3 receptors (Ki= 240 ± 160 nM) but not to adenosine A1 receptors. Further, we characterized the dose-dependent increase in Alexa488-APEC-induced cAMP production as well as cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation, verifying the ligand’s functionality at adenosine A2A but not A2B receptors. In live cell imaging studies, Alexa488-APEC induced adenosine A2A receptor internalization, which was blocked by the competitive reversible antagonist ZM 241385 and hyperosmolaric sucrose. Further, internalized adenosine A2A receptors co-localized with clathrin and Rab5, indicating that agonist stimulation promotes adenosine A2A receptor uptake through a clathrin-dependent mechanism to Rab5-positive endosomes. The basic characterization of Alexa488-APEC provided here showed that it provides a usefultool for tracing adenosine A2A receptors in vitro. PMID:18603240

  15. PM SOURCE APPORTIONMENT/RECEPTOR MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment (receptor) models are mathematical procedures for identifying and quantifying the sources of ambient air pollutants and their effects at a site (the receptor), primarily on the basis of species concentration measurements at the receptor, and generally without...

  16. The olfactory receptor family album

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito; Singer, Michael S; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the human genome draft sequences has revealed a more complete portrait of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in humans than was available previously. The new information provides a basis for deeper analysis of the functions of the receptors, and promises new insights into the evolutionary history of the family. PMID:11597337

  17. Zinc Modulation of Glycine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Trombley, Paul Q.; Blakemore, Laura J.; Hill, Brook J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycine receptors are widely expressed in the mammalian central nervous system, and previous studies have demonstrated that glycine receptors are modulated by endogenous zinc. Zinc is concentrated in synaptic vesicles in several brain regions but is particularly abundant in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. In the present study, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology of rat hippocampal and olfactory bulb neurons in primary culture to examine the effects of zinc on glycine receptors. Although glycine has been reported to reach millimolar concentrations during synaptic transmission, most previous studies on the effects of zinc on glycine receptors have used relatively low concentrations of glycine. High concentrations of glycine cause receptor desensitization. Our current results extend our previous demonstration that the modulatory actions of zinc are largely prevented when co-applied with desensitizing concentrations of glycine (300 μM), suggesting that the effects of zinc are dependent on the state of the receptor. In contrast, pre-application of 300 μM zinc, prior to glycine (300 μM) application, causes a slowly developing inhibition with a slow rate of recovery, suggesting that the timing of zinc and glycine release also influences the effects of zinc. Furthermore, previous evidence suggests that synaptically released zinc can gain intracellular access, and we provide the first demonstration that low concentrations of intracellular zinc can potentiate glycine receptors. These results support the notion that zinc has complex effects on glycine receptors and multiple factors may interact to influence the efficacy of glycinergic transmission. PMID:21530619

  18. Allosteric Modulation of Chemoattractant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Marcello; Cesta, Maria Candida; Locati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Chemoattractants control selective leukocyte homing via interactions with a dedicated family of related G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Emerging evidence indicates that the signaling activity of these receptors, as for other GPCR, is influenced by allosteric modulators, which interact with the receptor in a binding site distinct from the binding site of the agonist and modulate the receptor signaling activity in response to the orthosteric ligand. Allosteric modulators have a number of potential advantages over orthosteric agonists/antagonists as therapeutic agents and offer unprecedented opportunities to identify extremely selective drug leads. Here, we resume evidence of allosterism in the context of chemoattractant receptors, discussing in particular its functional impact on functional selectivity and probe/concentration dependence of orthosteric ligands activities. PMID:27199992

  19. [Interceptors:--"silent" chemokine receptors].

    PubMed

    Grodecka, Magdalena; Waśniowska, Kazimiera

    2007-01-01

    The physiological effect caused by chemokines is regulated by interactions with a group of rodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors share a number of common features: the polypeptide chain is a 7-transmembrane ?-helix (7 TMD motif) and the region involved in G-protein interaction (the DRYLAIV sequence) is located in the second transmembrane loop. So far, 19 chemokine receptors have been identified. Three of them (Duffy glycoprotein, D6, and CCX-CKR proteins), although structurally related to other GPCRs, lack the ability of G-protein signal transduction. Instead, they efficiently internalize their cognate ligands, regulating chemokine levels in various body compartments. These three proteins are suggested to form a distinct chemokine receptor family, designated "interceptors" or "silent" chemokine receptors. PMID:17507871

  20. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  1. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor turnover in adipose tissue and kidney: irreversible blockade of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by benextramine

    SciTech Connect

    Taouis, M.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The recovery of post- and extrasynaptic alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-binding sites was studied in vivo in male golden hamsters after treatment with an irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist benextramine, a tetramine disulfide that possesses a high affinity for alpha 2-binding sites. The kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptor number was measured with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine, whereas (/sup 3/H)clonidine was used for fat cell and brain membrane alpha 2-binding site identification. Benextramine treatment of fat cell, kidney, and brain membranes reduced or completely suppressed, in an irreversible manner, (/sup 3/H) clonidine and (/sup 3/H)yohimbine binding without modifying adenosine (A1-receptor) and beta-adrenergic receptor sites. This irreversible binding was also found 1 and 2 hr after intraperitoneal administration of benextramine to the hamsters. Although it bound irreversibly to peripheral and central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors on isolated membranes, benextramine was unable to cross the blood-brain barrier of the hamster at the concentrations used (10-20 mg/kg). After the irreversible blockade, alpha 2-binding sites reappeared in kidney and adipose tissue following a monoexponential time course. Recovery of binding sites was more rapid in kidney than in adipose tissue; the half-lives of the receptor were 31 and 46 hr, respectively in the tissues. The rates of receptor production were 1.5 and 1.8 fmol/mg of protein/hr in kidney and adipose tissue. Reappearance of alpha 2-binding sites was associated with a rapid recovery of function (antilipolytic potencies of alpha 2-agonists) in fat cells inasmuch as occupancy of 15% of (/sup 3/H)clonidine-binding sites was sufficient to promote 40% inhibition of lipolysis. Benextramine is a useful tool to estimate turnover of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors under normal and pathological situations.

  2. Selective CGRP and adrenomedullin peptide binding by tethered RAMP-calcitonin receptor-like receptor extracellular domain fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Moad, Heather E; Pioszak, Augen A

    2013-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) are related peptides that are potent vasodilators. The CGRP and AM receptors are heteromeric protein complexes comprised of a shared calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) subunit and a variable receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) subunit. RAMP1 enables CGRP binding whereas RAMP2 confers AM specificity. How RAMPs determine peptide selectivity is unclear and the receptor stoichiometries are a topic of debate with evidence for 1:1, 2:2, and 2:1 CLR:RAMP stoichiometries. Here, we describe bacterial production of recombinant tethered RAMP-CLR extracellular domain (ECD) fusion proteins and biochemical characterization of their peptide binding properties. Tethering the two ECDs ensures complex stability and enforces defined stoichiometry. The RAMP1-CLR ECD fusion purified as a monomer, whereas the RAMP2-CLR ECD fusion purified as a dimer. Both proteins selectively bound their respective peptides with affinities in the low micromolar range. Truncated CGRP(27-37) and AM(37-52) fragments were identified as the minimal ECD complex binding regions. The CGRP C-terminal amide group contributed to, but was not required for, ECD binding, whereas the AM C-terminal amide group was essential for ECD binding. Alanine-scan experiments identified CGRP residues T30, V32, and F37 and AM residues P43, K46, I47, and Y52 as critical for ECD binding. Our results identify CGRP and AM determinants for receptor ECD complex binding and suggest that the CGRP receptor functions as a 1:1 heterodimer. In contrast, the AM receptor may function as a 2:2 dimer of heterodimers, although our results cannot rule out 2:1 or 1:1 stoichiometries. PMID:24115156

  3. Catalytically Relevant Electrostatic Interactions of Cytochrome P450c17 (CYP17A1) and Cytochrome b5*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hwei-Ming; Liu, Jiayan; Forsberg, Sarah E.; Tran, Hong T.; Anderson, Sean M.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Two acidic residues, Glu-48 and Glu-49, of cytochrome b5 (b5) are essential for stimulating the 17,20-lyase activity of cytochrome P450c17 (CYP17A1). Substitution of Ala, Gly, Cys, or Gln for these two glutamic acid residues abrogated all capacity to stimulate 17,20-lyase activity. Mutations E49D and E48D/E49D retained 23 and 38% of wild-type activity, respectively. Using the zero-length cross-linker ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide, we obtained cross-linked heterodimers of b5 and CYP17A1, wild-type, or mutations R347K and R358K. In sharp contrast, the b5 double mutation E48G/E49G did not form cross-linked complexes with wild-type CYP17A1. Mass spectrometric analysis of the CYP17A1-b5 complexes identified two cross-linked peptide pairs as follows: CYP17A1-WT: 84EVLIKK89-b5: 53EQAGGDATENFEDVGHSTDAR73 and CYP17A1-R347K: 341TPTISDKNR349-b5: 40FLEEHPGGEEVLR52. Using these two sites of interaction and Glu-48/Glu-49 in b5 as constraints, protein docking calculations based on the crystal structures of the two proteins yielded a structural model of the CYP17A1-b5 complex. The appositional surfaces include Lys-88, Arg-347, and Arg-358/Arg-449 of CYP17A1, which interact with Glu-61, Glu-42, and Glu-48/Glu-49 of b5, respectively. Our data reveal the structural basis of the electrostatic interactions between these two proteins, which is critical for 17,20-lyase activity and androgen biosynthesis. PMID:25315771

  4. Clinicopathological significance of forkhead box protein A1 in breast cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    HE, KELI; ZENG, HUI; XU, XIANQUN; LI, ANLING; CAI, QING; LONG, XINGHUA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between the expression of forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) and differential clinicopathological characteristics in breast cancer using a meta-analysis method. Eligible studies that investigated the correlation between FOXA1 expression and the clinical characteristics of breast cancer were collected through searching numerous databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and the VIP database. In total, eight studies were included in the meta-analysis. Following a systematic analysis, the expression of FOXA1 was found to be significantly associated with the estrogen receptor α status, the progesterone receptor status, lymph node metastasis and the histological grade in breast cancer. However, no statistically significant association was observed between FOXA1 expression and the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 status in breast cancer patients. PMID:27284343

  5. Variant ionotropic glutamate receptors as chemosensory receptors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Richard; Vannice, Kirsten S.; Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate neuronal communication at synapses throughout vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. We have characterized a novel family of iGluR-related genes in Drosophila, which we name Ionotropic Receptors (IRs). These receptors do not belong to the well-described Kainate, AMPA, or NMDA classes of iGluRs, and have divergent ligand-binding domains that lack their characteristic glutamate-interacting residues. IRs are expressed in a combinatorial fashion in sensory neurons that respond to many distinct odors but do not express either insect odorant receptors (ORs) or gustatory receptors (GRs). IR proteins accumulate in sensory dendrites and not at synapses. Mis-expression of IRs induces novel odor responses in ectopic neurons. Together, these results lead us to propose that the IRs comprise a novel family of chemosensory receptors. Conservation of IR/iGluR-related proteins in bacteria, plants, and animals suggests that this receptor family represents an evolutionarily ancient mechanism for sensing both internal and external chemical cues. PMID:19135896

  6. Androgen receptor genomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong-Jian; Kim, Jung

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is not only critical for the normal development and function of the prostate but also pivotal to the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The studies of AR transcriptional regulation were previously limited to a handful of AR-target genes. Owing to the development of various high-throughput genomic technologies, significant advances have been made in recent years. Here we discuss the discoveries of genome-wide androgen-regulated genes in PCa cell lines, animal models and tissues using expression microarray and sequencing, the mapping of genomic landscapes of AR using Combining Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and ChIP-seq assays, the interplay of transcriptional cofactors in defining AR binding profiles, and the genomic regulation and AR reprogramming in advanced PCa. PMID:25237629

  7. Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Lien, Egil; Ingalls, Robin R

    2002-01-01

    The ability of a host to sense invasion by pathogenic organisms and to respond appropriately to control infection is paramount to survival. In the case of sepsis and septic shock, however, an exaggerated systemic response may, in fact, contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated with overwhelming infections. The innate immune system has evolved as the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. The Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a part of this innate immune defense, recognizing conserved patterns on microorganisms. These TLRs and their signaling pathways are represented in such diverse creatures as mammals, fruit flies, and plants. Ten members of the TLR family have been identified in humans, and several of them appear to recognize specific microbial products, including lipopolysaccharide, bacterial lipoproteins, peptidoglycan, and bacterial DNA. Signals initiated by the interaction of TLRs with specific microbial patterns direct the subsequent inflammatory response. Thus, TLR signaling represents a key component of the innate immune response to microbial infection. PMID:11782555

  8. 18 CFR 3a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 3a.1 Section 3a.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION General § 3a.1 Purpose. This part 3a describes...

  9. 22 CFR 3a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 3a.1 Section 3a.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL ACCEPTANCE OF EMPLOYMENT FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS BY MEMBERS OF THE UNIFORMED SERVICES § 3a.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a) Applicant means any person...

  10. 32 CFR 352a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 352a.1 Section 352a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTERS DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE (DFAS) § 352a.1 Purpose. Pursuant to the authority vested in the Secretary of Defense under provisions...

  11. 14 CFR 374a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 374a.1 Section 374a.1 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS EXTENSION OF CREDIT BY AIRLINES TO FEDERAL POLITICAL CANDIDATES § 374a.1 Purpose. Section 401...

  12. 32 CFR 242a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability. 242a.1 Section 242a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PUBLIC MEETING PROCEDURES OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES § 242a.1 Applicability. These...

  13. 12 CFR 708a.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions. 708a.1 Section 708a.1 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS BANK CONVERSIONS AND MERGERS Conversion of Insured Credit Unions to Mutual Savings Banks § 708a.1 Definitions. As used in this part: Clear and conspicuous means text...

  14. Lung Fibrosis-associated Surfactant Protein A1 and C Variants Induce Latent Transforming Growth Factor β1 Secretion in Lung Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Dey, Moushumi; Yuan, Wen-Cheng; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2013-01-01

    Missense mutations of surfactant proteins are recognized as important causes of inherited lung fibrosis. Here, we study rare and common surfactant protein (SP)-A1 and SP-C variants, either discovered in our familial pulmonary fibrosis cohort or described by others. We show that expression of two SP-A1 (R219W and R242*) and three SP-C (I73T, M71V, and L188Q) variant proteins lead to the secretion of the profibrotic latent transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in lung epithelial cell lines. The secreted TGF-β1 is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling and is dependent upon expression of the latent TGF-β1 binding proteins. The dependence upon unfolded protein response (UPR) mediators for TGF-β1 induction differs for each variant. TGF-β1 secretion induced by the expression of the common SP-A1 R219W variant is nearly completely blocked by silencing the UPR transducers IRE-1α and ATF6. In contrast, the secretion of TGF-β1 induced by two rare SP-C mutant proteins (I73T and M71V), is largely unaffected by UPR silencing or by the addition of the small molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid, implicating a UPR-independent mechanism for these variants. Blocking TGF-β1 secretion reverses cell death of RLE-6TN cells expressing these SP-A1 and SP-C variants suggesting that anti-TGF-β therapeutics may be beneficial to this molecularly defined subgroup of pulmonary fibrosis patients. PMID:23926107

  15. Lung fibrosis-associated surfactant protein A1 and C variants induce latent transforming growth factor β1 secretion in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Dey, Moushumi; Yuan, Wen-Cheng; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2013-09-20

    Missense mutations of surfactant proteins are recognized as important causes of inherited lung fibrosis. Here, we study rare and common surfactant protein (SP)-A1 and SP-C variants, either discovered in our familial pulmonary fibrosis cohort or described by others. We show that expression of two SP-A1 (R219W and R242*) and three SP-C (I73T, M71V, and L188Q) variant proteins lead to the secretion of the profibrotic latent transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in lung epithelial cell lines. The secreted TGF-β1 is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling and is dependent upon expression of the latent TGF-β1 binding proteins. The dependence upon unfolded protein response (UPR) mediators for TGF-β1 induction differs for each variant. TGF-β1 secretion induced by the expression of the common SP-A1 R219W variant is nearly completely blocked by silencing the UPR transducers IRE-1α and ATF6. In contrast, the secretion of TGF-β1 induced by two rare SP-C mutant proteins (I73T and M71V), is largely unaffected by UPR silencing or by the addition of the small molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid, implicating a UPR-independent mechanism for these variants. Blocking TGF-β1 secretion reverses cell death of RLE-6TN cells expressing these SP-A1 and SP-C variants suggesting that anti-TGF-β therapeutics may be beneficial to this molecularly defined subgroup of pulmonary fibrosis patients. PMID:23926107

  16. Early Stages of Melody Processing: Stimulus-Sequence and Task-Dependent Neuronal Activity in Monkey Auditory Cortical Fields A1 and R

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Pingbo; Mishkin, Mortimer; Sutter, Mitchell; Fritz, Jonathan B.

    2008-01-01

    To explore the effects of acoustic and behavioral context on neuronal responses in the core of auditory cortex (fields A1 and R), two monkeys were trained on a go/no-go discrimination task in which they learned to respond selectively to a four-note target (S+) melody and withhold response to a variety of other nontarget (S−) sounds. We analyzed evoked activity from 683 units in A1/R of the trained monkeys during task performance and from 125 units in A1/R of two naive monkeys. We characterized two broad classes of neural activity that were modulated by task performance. Class I consisted of tone-sequence–sensitive enhancement and suppression responses. Enhanced or suppressed responses to specific tonal components of the S+ melody were frequently observed in trained monkeys, but enhanced responses were rarely seen in naive monkeys. Both facilitatory and suppressive responses in the trained monkeys showed a temporal pattern different from that observed in naive monkeys. Class II consisted of nonacoustic activity, characterized by a task-related component that correlated with bar release, the behavioral response leading to reward. We observed a significantly higher percentage of both Class I and Class II neurons in field R than in A1. Class I responses may help encode a long-term representation of the behaviorally salient target melody. Class II activity may reflect a variety of nonacoustic influences, such as attention, reward expectancy, somatosensory inputs, and/or motor set and may help link auditory perception and behavioral response. Both types of neuronal activity are likely to contribute to the performance of the auditory task. PMID:18842950

  17. Early stages of melody processing: stimulus-sequence and task-dependent neuronal activity in monkey auditory cortical fields A1 and R.

    PubMed

    Yin, Pingbo; Mishkin, Mortimer; Sutter, Mitchell; Fritz, Jonathan B

    2008-12-01

    To explore the effects of acoustic and behavioral context on neuronal responses in the core of auditory cortex (fields A1 and R), two monkeys were trained on a go/no-go discrimination task in which they learned to respond selectively to a four-note target (S+) melody and withhold response to a variety of other nontarget (S-) sounds. We analyzed evoked activity from 683 units in A1/R of the trained monkeys during task performance and from 125 units in A1/R of two naive monkeys. We characterized two broad classes of neural activity that were modulated by task performance. Class I consisted of tone-sequence-sensitive enhancement and suppression responses. Enhanced or suppressed responses to specific tonal components of the S+ melody were frequently observed in trained monkeys, but enhanced responses were rarely seen in naive monkeys. Both facilitatory and suppressive responses in the trained monkeys showed a temporal pattern different from that observed in naive monkeys. Class II consisted of nonacoustic activity, characterized by a task-related component that correlated with bar release, the behavioral response leading to reward. We observed a significantly higher percentage of both Class I and Class II neurons in field R than in A1. Class I responses may help encode a long-term representation of the behaviorally salient target melody. Class II activity may reflect a variety of nonacoustic influences, such as attention, reward expectancy, somatosensory inputs, and/or motor set and may help link auditory perception and behavioral response. Both types of neuronal activity are likely to contribute to the performance of the auditory task. PMID:18842950

  18. Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Agonist LY379268 Regulates AMPA Receptor Trafficking in Prefrontal Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min-Juan; Li, Yan-Chun; Snyder, Melissa A.; Wang, Huaixing; Li, Feng; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists have emerged as potential treatment drugs for schizophrenia and other neurological disorders, whereas the mechanisms involved remain elusive. Here we examined the effects of LY379268 (LY37) on the expression and trafficking of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2 in prefrontal neurons. We show that LY37 significantly increased the surface and total expression of both GluA1 and GluA2 subunits in cultured prefrontal neurons and in vivo. This effect was mimicked by the selective mGluR2 agonist LY395756 and was blocked by mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495. Moreover, we found that both GluA1 and GluA2 subunits were colocalized with PSD95 but not synapsin I, suggesting a postsynaptic localization. Consistently, treatment with LY37 significantly increased the amplitude, but not frequency, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. Further, actinomycin-D blocked LY37's effects, suggesting a transcriptional regulation. In addition, application of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3β) inhibitor completely blocked LY37's effect on GluA2 surface expression, whereas GSK-3β inhibitor itself induced decreases in the surface and total protein levels of GluA1, but not GluA2 subunits. This suggests that GSK-3β differentially mediates GluA1 and GluA2 trafficking. Further, LY37 significantly increased the phosphorylation, but not total protein, of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Neither ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 alone nor PD98059 combined with LY37 treatment induced changes in GluA1 or GluA2 surface expression or total protein levels. Our data thus suggest that mGluR2/3 agonist regulates postsynaptic AMPA receptors by affecting the synaptic trafficking of both GluA1 and GluA2 subunits and that the regulation is likely through ERK1/2 signaling in GluA1 and/or both ERK1/2 and GSK-3β signaling pathways in the GluA2 subunit. PMID:23593498

  19. Antibodies to cardiac receptors.

    PubMed

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Schlipp, A; Hartmann, S; Panjwani, P; Klingel, K; Lohse, M J; Ertl, G; Jahns, R

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation of cardiac tissue is generally associated with an activation of the host's immune system. On the one hand, this activation is mandatory to protect the heart by fighting the invading microbial agents or toxins and by engaging myocardial reparation and healing processes. On the other hand, uncontrolled activation of the immune defense has the risk of an arousal of auto- or cross-reactive immune cells, which in some cases bring more harm than good. Dependent on the individual genetic predisposition, such heart-directed autoimmune reactions most likely occur as a result of myocyte apoptosis or necrosis and subsequent liberation of self-antigens previously hidden to the immune system. During the past two decades, evidence for a pathogenic relevance of autoimmunity in human heart disease has substantially increased. Conformational cardiac (auto)antibodies affecting cardiac function and, in particular, (auto)antibodies that target G protein-coupled cardiac membrane receptors are thought to play a key role in the development of heart failure. Clinical pilot studies even suggest that such antibodies negatively affect survival in heart failure patients. However, the true prevalence and clinical impact of many cardiac (auto)antibodies in human heart diseases are still unclear, as are the events triggering their formation, their titer course, and their patterns of clearance and/or persistence. The present article summarizes current knowledge in the field of cardiac receptor (auto)antibodies including recent efforts to address some of the aforementioned gaps of knowledge, thereby attempting to pave the way for novel, more specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23183584

  20. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 null mice are sensitive to cholestatic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L; Cheng, Xingguo; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2012-06-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1) is predominantly expressed in livers of mice and is thought to transport bile acids (BAs) from blood into liver. Because Oatp1a1 expression is markedly decreased in mice after bile duct ligation (BDL). We hypothesized that Oatp1a1-null mice would be protected against liver injury during BDL-induced cholestasis due largely to reduced hepatic uptake of BAs. To evaluate this hypothesis, BDL surgeries were performed in both male wild-type (WT) and Oatp1a1-null mice. At 24 h after BDL, Oatp1a1-null mice showed higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels and more severe liver injury than WT mice, and all Oatp1a1-null mice died within 4 days after BDL, whereas all WT mice survived. At 24 h after BDL, surprisingly Oatp1a1-null mice had higher total BA concentrations in livers than WT mice, suggesting that loss of Oatp1a1 did not prevent BA accumulation in the liver. In addition, secondary BAs dramatically increased in serum of Oatp1a1-null BDL mice but not in WT BDL mice. Oatp1a1-null BDL mice had similar basolateral BA uptake (Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and Oatp1b2) and BA-efflux (multidrug resistance-associated protein [Mrp]-3, Mrp4, and organic solute transporter α/β) transporters, as well as BA-synthetic enzyme (Cyp7a1) in livers as WT BDL mice. Hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner Cyp3a11, Cyp4a14, and Nqo1, which are target genes of farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, and NF-E2-related factor 2, respectively, were increased in WT BDL mice but not in Oatp1a1-null BDL mice. These results demonstrate that loss of Oatp1a1 function exacerbates cholestatic liver injury in mice and suggest that Oatp1a1 plays a unique role in liver adaptive responses to obstructive cholestasis. PMID:22461449

  1. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) – renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    PubMed Central

    Divekar, Shailaja D.; Tiek, Deanna M.; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor. PMID:27507929

  2. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    PubMed

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor. PMID:27507929

  3. Dopamine receptors - IUPHAR Review 13.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  4. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1–6, S1P1–5, LPI1, and LysoPS1–3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as is a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. PMID:25499971

  5. Discoidin domain receptors in disease.

    PubMed

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2014-02-01

    Discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, lie at the intersection of two large receptor families, namely the extracellular matrix and tyrosine kinase receptors. As such, DDRs are uniquely positioned to function as sensors for extracellular matrix and to regulate a wide range of cell functions from migration and proliferation to cytokine secretion and extracellular matrix homeostasis/remodeling. While activation of DDRs by extracellular matrix collagens is required for normal development and tissue homeostasis, aberrant activation of these receptors following injury or in disease is detrimental. The availability of mice lacking DDRs has enabled us to identify key roles played by these receptors in disease initiation and progression. DDR1 promotes inflammation in atherosclerosis, lung fibrosis and kidney injury, while DDR2 contributes to osteoarthritis. Furthermore, both DDRs have been implicated in cancer progression. Yet the mechanisms whereby DDRs contribute to disease progression are poorly understood. In this review we highlight the mechanisms whereby DDRs regulate two important processes, namely inflammation and tissue fibrosis. In addition, we discuss the challenges of targeting DDRs in disease. Selective targeting of these receptors requires understanding of how they interact with and are activated by extracellular matrix, and whether their cellular function is dependent on or independent of receptor kinase activity. PMID:24361528

  6. Discoidin Domain Receptors in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2014-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, lie at the intersection of two large receptor families, namely the extracellular matrix and tyrosine kinase receptors. As such, DDRs are uniquely positioned to function as sensors for extracellular matrix and to regulate a wide range of cell functions from migration and proliferation to cytokine secretion and extracellular matrix homeostasis/remodeling. While activation of DDRs by extracellular matrix collagens is required for normal development and tissue homeostasis, aberrant activation of these receptors following injury or in disease is detrimental. The availability of mice lacking DDRs has enabled us to identify key roles played by these receptors in disease initiation and progression. DDR1 promotes inflammation in atherosclerosis, lung fibrosis and kidney injury, while DDR2 contributes to osteoarthritis. Furthermore, both DDRs have been implicated in cancer progression. Yet the mechanisms whereby DDRs contribute to diseases progression are poorly understood. In this review we highlight the mechanisms whereby DDRs regulate two important processes, namely inflammation and tissue fibrosis. In addition, we discuss the challenges of targeting DDRs in disease. Selective targeting of these receptors requires understanding of how they interact with and are activated by extracellular matrix, and whether their cellular function is dependent on or independent of receptor kinase activity. PMID:24361528

  7. Sigma receptors and cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors have been well documented as a protein target for cocaine and have been shown to be involved in the toxic and stimulant actions of cocaine. Strategies to reduce the access of cocaine to sigma receptors have included antisense oligonucleotides to the sigma-1 receptor protein as well as small molecule ligand with affinity for sigma receptor sites. These results have been encouraging as novel protein targets that can attenuate the actions of cocaine are desperately needed as there are currently no medications approved for treatment of cocaine toxicity or addiction. Many years of research in this area have yet to produce an effective treatment and much focus was on dopamine systems. A flurry of research has been carried out to elucidate the role of sigma receptors in the blockade of cocaine effects but this research has yet to yield a clinical agent. This review summarizes the work to date on the linkage of sigma receptors and the actions of cocaine and the progress that has been made with regard to small molecules. Although there is still a lack of an agent in clinical trials with a sigma receptor mechanism of action, work is progressing and the ligands are becoming more selective for sigma systems and the potential remains high. PMID:21050176

  8. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2015-05-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1-6, S1P1-5, LPI1, and LysoPS1-3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. PMID:25499971

  9. Glutamate receptor ligands as anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka-Wójcik, E; Kłodzinska, A; Pilc, A

    2001-08-01

    The glutamatergic system has received considerable attention over recent years as a potential target for anxiolytic drugs. In spite of the pronounced anxiolytic-like effects of competitive and non-competitive antagonists of NMDA receptors in animal models of anxiety, these substances can not be regarded as potential anxiolytic drugs, mainly due to their side-effect profiles (eg, ataxia, myorelaxation, impairment of learning and memory processes and psychotomimetic effects). Antagonists and partial agonists of the glycine, receptor inhibit function of the NMDA receptor complex and evoke in animals an anxiolytic-like response. Although data concerning anti-anxiety-like effects of glycine, receptor antagonists are not very promising, studies are underway to develop new, brain-penetrating agents devoid of side effects. Further developments are necessary to more fully elucidate the possible involvement of AMPA/kainate receptors in anxiety. The recent discovery of metabotropic glutamate receptors, which modulate the function of the glutamatergic system, offers new hope for discovery of a new generation of anxiolytics. MPEP, a highly selective, brain penetrable, noncompetitive mGlu5 receptor antagonist, evokes anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models of anxiety, remaining remarkably free of side effects. LY-354740, a selective brain-penetrable group II mGlu receptor agonist, evokes marked anxiolytic-like effects in animal models of anxiety. LY-354740 causes mild sedation in mice, does not disturb motor coordination and has no potential to cause dependence. Therefore mGlu receptor ligands may become the anxiolytics of the future, free from the side effects characteristic of benzodiazepines. PMID:11892923

  10. Immunisation with Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Elfman, L

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine mediates the transfer of information between neurons in the electric organ of, for example, Torpedo as well as in vertebrate skeletal muscle. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex translates the binding of acetylcholine into ion permeability changes. This leads to an action potential in the muscle fibre. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein has been purified from Torpedo by use of affinity chromatography. The receptor is an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein composed of five polypeptide chains. When various animals are immunised with the receptor they demonstrate clinical signs of severe muscle weakness coincident with high antibody titres in their sera. The symptoms resemble those found in the autoimmune neuromuscular disease myasthenia gravis in humans. This animal model has constituted a unique model for studying autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews some of the work using Torpedo acetylcholine receptor in order to increase the understanding of the motor nervous system function and myasthenia gravis. It is now known that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein is the antigen involved in myasthenia gravis. The mechanism of immune damage involves a direct block of the receptor function. This depends on the presence of antibodies which crosslink the postsynaptic receptors leading to their degradation. The questions to be answered in the future are; (a) what initiates or triggers the autoimmune response, (b) how do the antibodies cause the symptoms--is there a steric hindrance of the interaction of acetylcholine and the receptor, (c) why is there not a strict relationship between antibody titre and severity of symptoms, and (d) why are some muscles affected and other spared? With help of the experimental model, answers to these questions may result in improved strategies for the treatment of the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. PMID:6097937

  11. Binding capacity of in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 to human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-jun; Xu, Li-xia; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2006-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common glomerular disease and it is characterized by deposition of IgA1 molecules in mesangium. Recent studies had demonstrated that serum and mesangial IgA1 in IgAN were deglycosylated and IgA1 could bind to human mesangial cells (HMC) through a novel receptor. The aim of the current study is to investigate and compare the binding capacities of different in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 on human mesangial cells. Serum IgA1 was purified by jacalin affinity chromatography and then was desialylated (DesIgA1) and/or degalactosylated (Des/DeGalIgA1) with neuraminidase and/or beta-galactosidase. The efficacy of deglycosylations was assessed by Peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Vicia villosa (VV) lectin. The sizes of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 were determined by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography and binding capacities to primary HMC were evaluated by radioligand binding assays. Normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 could bind to HMC in a dose-dependent, saturable manner. The maximal binding capacities and binding sites/cell of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1. However, more aggregated IgA1 was found in DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1. Scatchard analysis revealed a similar Kd of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1. The current study suggested that the binding capacities of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 to HMC were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1, which at least in part was due to more macromolecular IgA1 in deglycoslated IgA1. However, there were no significant differences in the affinities of normal IgA1, DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 with HMC. Deglycosylated IgA1 might play an important role in pathogenesis of IgAN. PMID:16442846

  12. Contractile effects and receptor analysis of adenosine-receptors in human detrusor muscle from stable and neuropathic bladders.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, Mahreen; Ikeda, Youko; McCarthy, Carly; Kitney, Darryl G; Jabr, Rita I; Fry, Christopher H

    2016-08-01

    To measure the relative transcription of adenosine receptor subtypes and the contractile effects of adenosine and selective receptor-subtype ligands on detrusor smooth muscle from patients with neuropathic overactive (NDO) and stable bladders and also from guinea-pigs. Contractile function was measured at 37°C in vitro from detrusor smooth muscle strips. Contractions were elicited by superfusate agonists or by electrical field stimulation. Adenosine-receptor (A1, A2A, A2B, A3) transcription was measured by RT-PCR. Adenosine attenuated nerve-mediated responses with equivalent efficacy in human and guinea-pig tissue (pIC50 3.65-3.86); the action was more effective at low (1-8 Hz) compared to high (20-40 Hz) stimulation frequencies in human NDO and guinea-pig tissue. With guinea-pig detrusor the action of adenosine was mirrored by the A1/A2-agonist N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), partly abolished in turn by the A2B-selectve antagonist alloxazine, as well as the A1-selective agonist N6- cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). With detrusor from stable human bladders the effects of NECA and CPA were much smaller than that of adenosine. Adenosine also attenuated carbachol contractures, but mirrored by NECA (in turn blocked by alloxazine) only in guinea-pig tissue. Adenosine receptor subtype transcription was measured in human detrusor and was similar in both groups, except reduced A2A levels in overactive bladder. Suppression of the carbachol contracture in human detrusor is independent of A-receptor activation, in contrast to an A2B-dependent action with guinea-pig tissue. Adenosine also reduced nerve-mediated contractions, by an A1- dependent action suppressing ATP neurotransmitter action. PMID:27185496

  13. Teaching old receptors new tricks: biasing seven-transmembrane receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Rajagopal, Keshava; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also known as G protein-coupled receptors) are the largest class of receptors in the human genome and are common targets for therapeutics. Originally identified as mediators of 7TMR desensitization, β-arrestins (arrestin 2 and arrestin 3) are now recognized as true adaptor proteins that transduce signals to multiple effector pathways. Signalling that is mediated by β-arrestins has distinct biochemical and functional consequences from those mediated by G proteins, and several biased ligands and receptors have been identified that preferentially signal through either G protein- or β-arrestin-mediated pathways. These ligands are not only useful tools for investigating the biochemistry of 7TMR signalling, they also have the potential to be developed into new classes of therapeutics. PMID:20431569

  14. RIBOSE MODIFIED NUCLEOSIDES AND NUCLEOTIDES AS LIGANDS FOR PURINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, R. G.; Nandanan, E.; Kim, H. S.; Moro, S.; Kim, Y. C.; Lee, K.; Barak, D.; Marquez, V. E.; Ji, X. D.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling of receptors for adenosine and nucleotide (P2) receptors with docked ligand, based on mutagenesis, was carried out. Adenosine 3′,5′-bisphosphate derivatives act as selective P2Y1 antagonists/partial agonists. The ribose moiety was replaced with carbocyclics, smaller and larger rings, conformationally constrained rings, and acyclics, producing compounds that retained receptor affinity. Conformational constraints were built into the ribose rings of nucleoside and nucleotide ligands using the methanocarba approach, i.e. fused cyclopropane and cyclopentane rings in place of ribose, suggesting a preference for the Northern (N) conformation among ligands for P2Y1 and A1 and A3ARs. PMID:11563046

  15. Chemosensory receptor specificity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Ryan P; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2015-07-01

    The senses provide a means by which data on the physical and chemical properties of the environment may be collected and meaningfully interpreted. Sensation begins at the periphery, where a multitude of different sensory cell types are activated by environmental stimuli as different as photons and odorant molecules. Stimulus sensitivity is due to expression of different cell surface sensory receptors, and therefore the receptive field of each sense is defined by the aggregate of expressed receptors in each sensory tissue. Here, we review current understanding on patterns of expression and modes of regulation of sensory receptors. PMID:25938729

  16. 2-Aminopyrimidines as dual adenosine A1/A2A antagonists.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarel J; Petzer, Jacobus P; Terre'Blanche, Gisella; Petzer, Anél; van der Walt, Mietha M; Bergh, Jacobus J; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-01

    In this study thirteen 2-aminopyrimidine derivatives were synthesised and screened as potential antagonists of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in order to further investigate the structure activity relationships of this class of compounds. 4-(5-Methylfuran-2-yl)-6-[3-(piperidine-1-carbonyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-2-amine (8m) was identified as a compound with high affinities for both receptors, with an A2AKi value of 6.34 nM and an A1Ki value of 9.54 nM. The effect of selected compounds on the viability of cultured cells was assessed and preliminary results indicate low cytotoxicity. In vivo efficacy at A2A receptors was illustrated for compounds 8k and 8m since these compounds attenuated haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats. A molecular docking study revealed that the interactions between the synthesised compounds and the adenosine A2A binding site most likely involve Phe168 and Asn253, interactions which are similar for structurally related adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. PMID:26462195

  17. Led Astray by Hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jean; Diesburg-Stanwood, Amy; Bodor, Geza; Rasouli, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (A1c) is used frequently to diagnose and treat diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is important be aware of factors that may interfere with the accuracy of A1c measurements. This is a case of a rare hemoglobin variant that falsely elevated a nondiabetic patient’s A1c level and led to a misdiagnosis of diabetes. A 67-year-old male presented to endocrine clinic for further management after he was diagnosed with diabetes based on an elevated A1c of 10.7%, which is approximately equivalent to an average blood glucose of 260 mg/dL. Multiple repeat A1c levels remained >10%, but his home fasting and random glucose monitoring ranged from 92 to 130 mg/dL. Hemoglobin electrophoresis and subsequent genetic analysis diagnosed the patient with hemoglobin Wayne, a rare hemoglobin variant. This variant falsely elevates A1c levels when A1c is measured using cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. When the boronate affinity method was applied instead, the patient’s A1c level was actually 4.7%. Though hemoglobin Wayne is clinically silent, this patient was erroneously diagnosed with diabetes and started on an antiglycemic medication. Due to this misdiagnosis, the patient was at risk of escalation in his “diabetes management” and hypoglycemia. Therefore, it is important that providers are aware of factors that may result in hemoglobin A1c inaccuracy including hemoglobin variants. PMID:26848480

  18. The A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 2 Has Higher Affinity for Ribosomes and Higher Catalytic Activity than the A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 1.

    PubMed

    Basu, Debaleena; Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Jennifer N; May, Kerrie L; Kahn, Peter C; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections can lead to life-threatening complications, including hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in the United States. Stx1 and Stx2 are AB5 toxins consisting of an enzymatically active A subunit associated with a pentamer of receptor binding B subunits. Epidemiological evidence suggests that Stx2-producing E. coli strains are more frequently associated with HUS than Stx1-producing strains. Several studies suggest that the B subunit plays a role in mediating toxicity. However, the role of the A subunits in the increased potency of Stx2 has not been fully investigated. Here, using purified A1 subunits, we show that Stx2A1 has a higher affinity for yeast and mammalian ribosomes than Stx1A1. Biacore analysis indicated that Stx2A1 has faster association and dissociation with ribosomes than Stx1A1. Analysis of ribosome depurination kinetics demonstrated that Stx2A1 depurinates yeast and mammalian ribosomes and an RNA stem-loop mimic of the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) at a higher catalytic rate and is a more efficient enzyme than Stx1A1. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes at a higher level in vivo and was more cytotoxic than Stx1A1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes and inhibited translation at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1 in human cells. These results provide the first direct evidence that the higher affinity for ribosomes in combination with higher catalytic activity toward the SRL allows Stx2A1 to depurinate ribosomes, inhibit translation, and exhibit cytotoxicity at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1. PMID:26483409

  19. Kainate Receptor Post-translational Modifications Differentially Regulate Association with 4.1N to Control Activity-dependent Receptor Endocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Copits, Bryan A.; Swanson, Geoffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Kainate receptors exhibit a highly compartmentalized distribution within the brain; however, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that coordinate their expression at neuronal sites of action are poorly characterized. Here we report that the GluK1 and GluK2 kainate receptor subunits interact with the spectrin-actin binding scaffolding protein 4.1N through a membrane-proximal domain in the C-terminal tail. We found that this interaction is important for the forward trafficking of GluK2a receptors, their distribution in the neuronal plasma membrane, and regulation of receptor endocytosis. The association between GluK2a receptors and 4.1N was regulated by both palmitoylation and protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of the receptor subunit. Palmitoylation of the GluK2a subunit promoted 4.1N association, and palmitoylation-deficient receptors exhibited reduced neuronal surface expression and compromised endocytosis. Conversely, PKC activation decreased 4.1N interaction with GluK2/3-containing kainate receptors in acute brain slices, an effect that was reversed after inhibition of PKC. Our data and previous studies therefore demonstrate that these two post-translational modifications have opposing effects on 4.1N association with GluK2 kainate and GluA1 AMPA receptors. The convergence of the signaling pathways regulating 4.1N protein association could thus result in the selective removal of AMPA receptors from the plasma membrane while simultaneously promoting the insertion and stabilization of kainate receptors, which may be important for tuning neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity. PMID:23400781

  20. Kainate receptor post-translational modifications differentially regulate association with 4.1N to control activity-dependent receptor endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Copits, Bryan A; Swanson, Geoffrey T

    2013-03-29

    Kainate receptors exhibit a highly compartmentalized distribution within the brain; however, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that coordinate their expression at neuronal sites of action are poorly characterized. Here we report that the GluK1 and GluK2 kainate receptor subunits interact with the spectrin-actin binding scaffolding protein 4.1N through a membrane-proximal domain in the C-terminal tail. We found that this interaction is important for the forward trafficking of GluK2a receptors, their distribution in the neuronal plasma membrane, and regulation of receptor endocytosis. The association between GluK2a receptors and 4.1N was regulated by both palmitoylation and protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of the receptor subunit. Palmitoylation of the GluK2a subunit promoted 4.1N association, and palmitoylation-deficient receptors exhibited reduced neuronal surface expression and compromised endocytosis. Conversely, PKC activation decreased 4.1N interaction with GluK2/3-containing kainate receptors in acute brain slices, an effect that was reversed after inhibition of PKC. Our data and previous studies therefore demonstrate that these two post-translational modifications have opposing effects on 4.1N association with GluK2 kainate and GluA1 AMPA receptors. The convergence of the signaling pathways regulating 4.1N protein association could thus result in the selective removal of AMPA receptors from the plasma membrane while simultaneously promoting the insertion and stabilization of kainate receptors, which may be important for tuning neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity. PMID:23400781

  1. Reversibility of Intersystem Crossing in the {a}1A1(000) and {a}1A1(010) States of Methylene, CH_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh T.; Sears, Trevor; Hall, Gregory

    2015-06-01

    The lowest energy singlet ( {a}1A1) and triplet ( {X}3B1) electronic states of methylene, CH_2, are only separated by 3150 wn, but differ greatly in chemical reactivity. Overall methylene reaction rates and chemical behavior are therefore strongly dependent on collisionally-mediated singlet-triplet interconversion. Collisions with inert partners tend to depopulate the excited singlet state and populate vibrationally excited triplet levels in CH_2. This process is generally considered as irreversible for large molecules, however, this is not the case for small molecules such as CH_2. An investigation of the decay kinetics of CH_2 in the presence of argon and various amounts of oxygen has been carried out using transient frequency modulation (FM) absorption spectroscopy, to monitor ortho and para rotational levels in both the {a}1A1(000) and {a}1A1(010) states. In the {a}1A1(000) state, all observed rotational levels follow double exponential decay kinetics, a direct consequence of reversible intersystem crossing. The relative amplitude of the slower decay component is an indicator of how quickly the reverse crossing from excited triplet levels becomes significant during the reaction and relaxation of singlet methylene. The para rotational levels show more obvious signs of reversibility than ortho rotational levels. Adding oxygen enhances the visibility of reversibility for both ortho and para levels. However, in the {a}1A1(010) state where the FM signal is 5-10 times smaller than the {a}1A1(000) state, there is no evidence of double exponential decay kinetics. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 and DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  2. Selective suppression of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor function can be mediated through binding interference at the C-terminal half of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lina; Thompson, John D; Cheung, Michael; Ngo, Katherine; Sung, Sarah; Leong, Scott; Chan, William K

    2016-05-01

    The human aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a cytosolic signaling molecule which affects immune response and aberrant cell growth. Canonical signaling of the receptor requires the recruitment of coactivators to the promoter region to remodel local chromatin structure. We predicted that interference of this recruitment would block the aryl hydrocarbon receptor function. To prove that, we employed phage display to identify nine peptides of twelve-amino-acid in length which target the C-terminal half of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor, including the region where coactivators bind. Eight 12mer peptides, in the form of GFP fusion, suppressed the ligand-dependent transcription of six AHR target genes (cyp1a1, cyp1a2, cyp1b1, ugt1a1, nqo1, and ahrr) in different patterns in Hep3B cells, whereas the AHR antagonist CH-223191 suppressed all these target genes similarly. Three of the 12mer peptides (namely 11-3, 1-7, and 7-3) suppressed the 3MC-induced, CYP1A1-dependent EROD activity and the ROS production caused by benzo[a]pyrene. These 12mer peptides suppressed the AHR function synergistically with CH-223191. In conclusion, we provide evidence that targeting the C-terminal half of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a viable, new approach to selectively block the receptor function. PMID:26970402

  3. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27319979

  4. Purification and Mass Spectrometric Analysis of the κ Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wannemacher, Kenneth M.; Terskiy, Alexandra; Bian, Shengjie; Yadav, Prem N.; Li, Hong; Howells, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    A clonal human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell line was established that stably expressed the rat κ-opioid receptor (rKOR) with a FLAG epitope at the amino terminus. The Kd for [3H]diprenorphine was 1.1 ± 0.2 nM, and the Bmax was 2.6 ± 0.4 pmoles/mg. Dynorphin A (1–13), U69,593 and naloxone competitively inhibited [3H]diprenorphine binding with Ki values of 2.0, 18 and 18 nM, respectively, in good agreement with previously reported affinities for the unmodified receptor. U69,593 stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in a concentration-dependent manner and caused phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, indicating that the activated epitope-tagged receptor triggered appropriate signaling pathways. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that two immunoreactive receptor species with apparent molecular masses of 42 and 52 kDa were expressed. Previous studies indicated that the 42 kDa protein was localized intracellularly and was a precursor of the 52 kDa receptor, which was present at the cell surface. rKOR was extracted from transfected HEK 293 cell membranes with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside. Sequential use of wheat germ agglutinin chromatography, Sephacryl S300 gel filtration chromatography, anti-FLAG immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS/PAGE permitted purification of the 52 kDa receptor. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides derived from rKOR following sequential in-gel digestion with trypsin and cyanogen bromide. Eighteen rKOR peptides were detected, corresponding to 27.1% coverage of the receptor. Precursor-selective MS/MS confirmed the identity of most of these peptides. In addition, we have identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) as a rKOR-interacting protein. PMID:18656460

  5. Purification and mass spectrometric analysis of the kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Wannemacher, Kenneth M; Terskiy, Alexandra; Bian, Shengjie; Yadav, Prem N; Li, Hong; Howells, Richard D

    2008-09-16

    A clonal human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell line was established that stably expressed the rat kappa-opioid receptor (rKOR) with a FLAG epitope at the amino terminus. The Kd for [3H]diprenorphine was 1.1+/-0.2 nM, and the Bmax was 2.6+/-0.4 pmol/mg. Dynorphin A (1-13), U69,593 and naloxone competitively inhibited [3H]diprenorphine binding with Ki values of 2.0, 18 and 18 nM, respectively, in good agreement with previously reported affinities for the unmodified receptor. U69,593 stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in a concentration-dependent manner and caused phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, indicating that the activated epitope-tagged receptor triggered appropriate signaling pathways. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that two immunoreactive receptor species with apparent molecular masses of 42 and 52 kDa were expressed. Previous studies indicated that the 42 kDa protein was localized intracellularly and was a precursor of the 52 kDa receptor, which was present at the cell surface. rKOR was extracted from transfected HEK 293 cell membranes with n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltopyranoside. Sequential use of wheat germ agglutinin chromatography, Sephacryl S300 gel filtration chromatography, anti-FLAG immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS/PAGE permitted purification of the 52 kDa receptor. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides derived from rKOR following sequential in-gel digestion with trypsin and cyanogen bromide. Eighteen rKOR peptides were detected, corresponding to 27.1% coverage of the receptor. Precursor-selective MS/MS confirmed the identity of most of these peptides. In addition, we have identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) as a rKOR-interacting protein. PMID:18656460

  6. Adenosine, type 1 receptors: role in proximal tubule Na+ reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Welch, W J

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine type 1 receptor (A1 -AR) antagonists induce diuresis and natriuresis in experimental animals and humans. Much of this effect is due to inhibition of A1 -ARs in the proximal tubule, which is responsible for 60-70% of the reabsorption of filtered Na(+) and fluid. Intratubular application of receptor antagonists indicates that A1 -AR mediates a portion of Na(+) uptake in PT and PT cells, via multiple transport systems, including Na(+) /H(+) exchanger-3 (NHE3), Na(+) /PO4(-) co-transporter and Na(+) -dependent glucose transporter, SGLT. Renal microperfusion and recollection studies have shown that fluid reabsorption is reduced by A1 -AR antagonists and is lower in A1 -AR KO mice, compared to WT mice. Absolute proximal reabsorption (APR) measured by free-flow micropuncture is equivocal, with studies that show either lower APR or similar APR in A1 -AR KO mice, compared to WT mice. Inhibition of A1 -ARs lowers elevated blood pressure in models of salt-sensitive hypertension, partially due to their effects in the proximal tubule. PMID:25345761

  7. Functionalized Congener Approach to the Design of Ligands for G Protein–Coupled Receptors (GPCRs)

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Functionalized congeners, in which a chemically functionalized chain is incorporated at an insensitive site on a pharmacophore, have been designed from the agonist and antagonist ligands of various G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). These chain extensions enable a conjugation strategy for detecting and characterizing GPCR structure and function and pharmacological modulation. The focus in many studies of functionalized congeners has been on two families of GPCRs: those responding to extracellular purines and pyrimidines—i.e., adenosine receptors (ARs) and P2Y nucleotide receptors. Functionalized congeners of small-molecule as ligands for other GPCRs and non-G protein coupled receptors have also been designed. For example, among biogenic amine neurotransmitter receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists and adrenergic receptor ligands have been studied with a functionalized congener approach. Adenosine A1, A2A, and A3 receptor functionalized congeners have yielded macromolecular conjugates, irreversibly binding AR ligands for receptor inactivation and crosslinking, radioactive probes that use prosthetic groups, immobilized ligands for affinity chromatography, and dual-acting ligands that function as binary drugs. Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers have served as nanocarriers for covalently conjugated AR functionalized congeners. Rational methods of ligand design derived from molecular modeling and templates have been included in these studies. Thus, the design of novel ligands, both small molecules and macromolecular conjugates, for studying the chemical and biological properties of GPCRs have been developed with this approach, has provided researchers with a strategy that is more versatile than the classical medicinal chemical approaches. PMID:19405524

  8. Identification of Putative Chemosensory Receptor Genes from the Athetis dissimilis Antennal Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Junfeng; Song, Yueqin; Li, Wenliang; Shi, Jie; Wang, Zhenying

    2016-01-01

    Olfaction plays a crucial role in insect population survival and reproduction. Identification of the genes associated with the olfactory system, without the doubt will promote studying the insect chemical communication system. In this study, RNA-seq technol