Science.gov

Sample records for a1 receptor agonist

  1. AMP is an adenosine A1 receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Rittiner, Joseph E; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Frye, Stephen V; Zylka, Mark J

    2012-02-17

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5'-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A(2B) receptor (A(2B)R) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A(1)R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A(1)R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A(1)R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A(1)R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine.

  2. AMP Is an Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist*

    PubMed Central

    Rittiner, Joseph E.; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5′-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A1R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A1R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A1R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A1R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine. PMID:22215671

  3. Adenosine-A1 Receptor Agonist Induced Hyperalgesic Priming Type II

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of the transition to chronic pain that we have termed Type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to Type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, Type II hyperalgesic priming differs from Type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced Type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced Type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the Type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. PMID:26588695

  4. Potentiation of adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA-induced antinociception by paeoniflorin in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Da-Zhi; Zhao, Fei-Li; Liu, Jing; Ji, Xin-Quan; Ye, Yang; Zhu, Xing-Zu

    2006-08-01

    The effect of paeoniflorin (PF), a major constituent isolated from Paeony radix, on N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a selective adenosine A1 receptor (A1 receptor) agonist, induced antinociception was examined in mice. In the tail-pressure test, CPA (0.05, 0.1, 0.2 mg/kg, s.c.) could induce antinociception in a dose-dependent manner. PF (5, 10, 20 mg/kg, s.c.) alone failed to exhibit any antinociceptive effect in mice; however, pretreatment of PF (20 mg/kg, s.c.) could significantly enhance CPA-induced antinociception. Additionally, pretreatment of 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.25 mg/kg, s.c.), a selective A1 receptor antagonist, could antagonize the antinociceptive effect of combining CPA with PF. Furthermore, in the competitive binding experiments, PF did not displace the binding of [3H]-8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine ([3H]-DPCPX) but displaced that of [3H]-2-Chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine ([3H]-CCPA, a selective A1 receptor agonist) to the membrane preparation of rat cerebral cortex. These results suggested that PF might selectively increase the binding and antinociceptive effect of CPA by binding with A1 receptor.

  5. Interaction of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and opioid receptors in spinal cord nociceptive reflexes.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Zepeda, Guillermo; Herrero, Juan F

    2013-08-14

    We previously observed that the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) is a very effective antinociceptive agent on intact but not on spinalized adult rats with inflammation. Since a close connection between opioid and adenosine A1 receptors has been described, we studied a possible relationship between these systems in the spinal cord. CPA-mediated antinociception was challenged by the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dimethylxanthine (CPT) and by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone on male adult Wistar rats with carrageenan-induced inflammation. Withdrawal reflexes activated by noxious mechanical and electrical stimulation were recorded using the single motor technique in intact and sham-spinalized animals. CPA was very effective in intact and sham spinalized rats but not in spinalized animals. Full reversal of CPA antinociception was observed with i.v. 1mg/kg of naloxone but not with 20mg/kg of CPT i.v. in responses to noxious mechanical and electrical stimulation. CPT fully prevented CPA from any antinociceptive action whereas naloxone did not modify CPA activity. These results suggest a centrally-mediated action, since CPA depressed the wind-up phenomenon which is derived of the activity of spinal cord neurons. The present study provides strong in vivo evidence of an antinociceptive activity mediated by the adenosine A1 receptor system in the spinal cord, linked to an activation of opioid receptors in adult animals with inflammation. © 2013.

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) against organophosphate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Bueters, Tjerk J H; Groen, Bas; Danhof, Meindert; IJzerman, Ad P; Van Helden, Herman P M

    2002-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether reduction of central acetylcholine (ACh) accumulation by adenosine receptor agonists could serve as a generic treatment against organophosphate (OP) poisoning. The OPs studied were tabun ( O-ethyl- N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), sarin (isopropylmethylphosphonofluoridate), VX ( O-ethyl- S-2-diisopropylaminoethylmethylphosphonothiolate) and parathion ( O, O-diethyl- O-(4-nitrophenyl)phosphorothioate). The efficacy of the adenosine A(1) receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) against an OP intoxication was examined on the basis of the occurrence of clinical symptoms that are directly associated with such intoxication. CPA (1-2 mg/kg) effectively attenuated the cholinergic symptoms and prevented mortality in lethally tabun- or sarin-intoxicated rats. In contrast, CPA (2 mg/kg) proved to be ineffective against VX or parathion intoxication. Intracerebral microdialysis studies revealed that survival of sarin-poisoned and CPA-treated animals coincided with a minor elevation of extracellular ACh concentrations in the brain relative to the baseline value, whereas an 11-fold increase in transmitter levels was observed in animals not treated with CPA. In VX-intoxicated rats, however, the ACh amounts increased 18-fold, irrespective of treatment with CPA. The striatal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity following a lethal sarin intoxication was completely abolished in the vehicle-treated animals, whereas 10% and 60% AChE activity remained in animals treated with 2 mg/kg CPA 1 min after or 2 min prior to the poisoning, respectively. In VX-intoxicated animals the AChE activity in the brain was strongly reduced (striatum 10%, hippocampus 1%) regardless of the CPA treatment. These results demonstrate that CPA is highly effective against tabun or sarin poisoning, but fails to protect against VX or parathion. Survival and attenuation of clinical signs in tabun- or sarin-poisoned animals are associated with a

  7. Interaction of valerian extracts of different polarity with adenosine receptors: identification of isovaltrate as an inverse agonist at A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lacher, Svenja K; Mayer, Ralf; Sichardt, Kathrin; Nieber, Karen; Müller, Christa E

    2007-01-15

    A series of extracts of valerian roots (Valeriana officinalis L.) was prepared with solvents of different polarity. Polar as well as nonpolar extracts were found to interact with adenosine A(1) receptors. While polar extracts activated A(1) receptors (partial agonistic activity), nonpolar extracts showed antagonistic or inverse agonistic activity at A(1) receptors, as demonstrated by GTPgammaS binding assays at human recombinant A(1) receptors stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Guided by radioligand binding assays, fractionation of a lipophilic petroleum ether:diethyl ether (1:1) extract led to the isolation of isovaltrate, which was characterized as a potent, highly efficacious inverse agonist at adenosine A(1) receptors (K(i) rat A(1): 2.05 microM). In experiments at rat brain slices measuring post-synaptic potentials (PSPs) in cortical neurons, isovaltrate at least partly reversed the reduction in the PSPs induced by the adenosine A(1) receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). Isovaltrate may serve as a new lead structure for the development of inverse agonists at adenosine A(1) receptors. The common use of hydrophilic, but not lipophilic valerian extracts as mild sleep-inducing agents is consistent with the opposite actions of hydrophilic and lipophilic extracts on adenosine receptors.

  8. Hypothermia in mouse is caused by adenosine A1 and A3 receptor agonists and AMP via three distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Jain, Shalini; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Wan, Tina C; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Auchampach, John A; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gavrilova, Oksana; Reitman, Marc L

    2017-03-01

    Small mammals have the ability to enter torpor, a hypothermic, hypometabolic state, allowing impressive energy conservation. Administration of adenosine or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) can trigger a hypothermic, torpor-like state. We investigated the mechanisms for hypothermia using telemetric monitoring of body temperature in wild type and receptor knock out (Adora1 -/- , Adora3 -/- ) mice. Confirming prior data, stimulation of the A 3 adenosine receptor (AR) induced hypothermia via peripheral mast cell degranulation, histamine release, and activation of central histamine H 1 receptors. In contrast, A 1 AR agonists and AMP both acted centrally to cause hypothermia. Commonly used, selective A 1 AR agonists, including N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), N 6 -cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), and MRS5474, caused hypothermia via both A 1 AR and A 3 AR when given intraperitoneally. Intracerebroventricular dosing, low peripheral doses of Cl-ENBA [(±)-5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N 6 -endo-norbornyladenosine], or using Adora3 -/- mice allowed selective stimulation of A 1 AR. AMP-stimulated hypothermia can occur independently of A 1 AR, A 3 AR, and mast cells. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP cause regulated hypothermia that was characterized by a drop in total energy expenditure, physical inactivity, and preference for cooler environmental temperatures, indicating a reduced body temperature set point. Neither A 1 AR nor A 3 AR was required for fasting-induced torpor. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP trigger regulated hypothermia via three distinct mechanisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Role of A1 and A2A adenosine receptor agonists in adipose tissue inflammation induced by obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    DeOliveira, Caroline Candida; Paiva Caria, Cintia Rabelo E; Ferreira Gotardo, Erica Martins; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Gambero, Alessandra

    2017-03-15

    Adenosine receptors are expressed in adipose tissue and control physiological and pathological events such as lipolysis and inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a potent and selective A 1 adenosine receptor agonist; 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS-21680), an A 2A adenosine receptor agonist; and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a potent non-selective adenosine receptor agonist on adipose tissue inflammatory alterations induced by obesity in mice. Swiss mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and agonists were administered in the last two weeks. Body weight, adiposity and glucose homeostasis were evaluated. Inflammation in adipose tissue was assessed by evaluation of adipokine production and macrophage infiltration. Adenosine receptor signaling in adipose tissue was also evaluated. Mice that received CGS21680 presented an improvement in glucose homeostasis in association with systemically reduced inflammatory markers (TNF-α, PAI-1) and in the visceral adipose tissue (TNF-α, MCP-1, macrophage infiltration). Activation of p38 signaling was found in adipose tissue of this group of mice. NECA-treated mice presented some improvements in glucose homeostasis associated with an observed weight loss. Mice that received CPA presented only a reduction in the ex vivo basal lipolysis rate measured within visceral adipose tissue. In conclusion, administration of the A 2A receptor agonist to obese mice resulted in improvements in glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue inflammation, corroborating the idea that new therapeutics to treat obesity could emerge from these compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Homeostatic action of adenosine A3 and A1 receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Streitová, Denisa; Vacek, Antonín

    2008-07-01

    Two adenosine receptor agonists, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), which selectively activate adenosine A3 and A1 receptors, respectively, were tested for their ability to influence proliferation of granulocytic and erythroid cells in femoral bone marrow of mice using morphological criteria. Agonists were given intraperitoneally to mice in repeated isomolar doses of 200 nmol/kg. Three variants of experiments were performed to investigate the action of the agonists under normal resting state of mice and in phases of cell depletion and subsequent regeneration after treatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. In the case of granulopoiesis, IB-MECA 1) increased by a moderate but significant level proliferation of cells under normal resting state; 2) strongly increased proliferation of cells in the cell depletion phase; but 3) did not influence cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. CPA did not influence cell proliferation under normal resting state and in the cell depletion phase, but strongly suppressed the overshooting cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. The stimulatory effect of IB-MECA on cell proliferation of erythroid cells was observed only when this agonist was administered during the cell depletion phase. CPA did not modulate erythroid proliferation in any of the functional states investigated, probably due to the lower demand for cell production as compared with granulopoiesis. The results indicate opposite effects of the two adenosine receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic cells and suggest the plasticity and homeostatic role of the adenosine receptor expression.

  11. Role of central and peripheral adenosine receptors in the cardiovascular responses to intraperitoneal injections of adenosine A1 and A2A subtype receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Charles W; Karcz-Kubicha, Marzena; Thorndike, Eric B; Müller, Christa E; Tella, Srihari R; Ferré, Sergi; Goldberg, Steven R

    2005-03-01

    1. The cardiovascular effects of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and the adenosine A2A receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680) were investigated in rats implanted with telemetry transmitters for the measurement of blood pressure and heart rate. 2. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA led to dose-dependent decreases in both blood pressure and heart rate. These effects of 0.3 mg kg(-1) CPA were antagonized by i.p. injections of the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethyl-xanthine (CPT), but not by i.p. injections of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 3-(3-hydroxypropyl)-8-(m-methoxystyryl)-7-methyl-1-propargylxanthine phosphate disodium salt (MSX-3). Injections (i.p.) of the peripherally acting nonselective adenosine antagonist 8-sulfophenyltheophylline (8-SPT) and the purported nonselective adenosine antagonist caffeine also antagonized the cardiovascular effects of CPA. 3. The adenosine A2A agonist CGS 21680 given i.p. produced a dose-dependent decrease in blood pressure and an increase in heart rate. These effects of 0.5 mg kg(-1) CGS 21680 were antagonized by i.p. injections of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3, but not by i.p. injections of the antagonists CPT, 8-SPT or caffeine. 4. Central administration (intracerebral ventricular) of CGS 21680 produced an increase in heart rate, but no change in blood pressure. MSX-3 given i.p. antagonized the effects of the central injection of CGS 21680. 5. These results suggest that adenosine A1 receptor agonists produce decreases in blood pressure and heart rate that are mediated by A1 receptors in the periphery, with little or no contribution of central adenosine A1 receptors to those effects. 6. The heart rate increasing effect of adenosine A2A agonists appears to be mediated by adenosine A2A receptors in the central nervous system. The blood pressure decreasing

  12. The amphiphilic peptide adenoregulin enhances agonist binding to A1-adenosine receptors and [35S]GTP gamma S to brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Moni, R W; Romero, F S; Daly, J W

    1995-08-01

    1. Adenoregulin is an amphilic peptide isolated from skin mucus of the tree frog, Phyllomedusa bicolor. Synthetic adenoregulin enhanced the binding of agonists to several G-protein-coupled receptors in rat brain membranes. 2. The maximal enhancement of agonist binding, and in parentheses, the concentration of adenoregulin affording maximal enhancement were as follows: 60% (20 microM) for A1-adenosine receptors, 30% (100 microM) for A2a-adenosine receptors, 20% (2 microM) for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, and 30% (10 microM) for 5HT1A receptors. High affinity agonist binding for A1-, alpha 2-, and 5HT1A-receptors was virtually abolished by GTP gamma S in the presence of adenoregulin, but was only partially abolished in its absence. Magnesium ions increased the binding of agonists to receptors and reduced the enhancement elicited by adenoregulin. 3. The effect of adenoregulin on binding of N6-cyclohexyladenosine ([3H]CHA) to A1-receptors was relatively slow and was irreversible. Adenoregulin increased the Bmax value for [3H]CHA binding sites, and the proportion of high affinity states, and slowed the rate of [3H]CHA dissociation. Binding of the A1-selective antagonist, [3H]DPCPX, was maximally enhanced by only 13% at 2 microM adenoregulin. Basal and A1-adenosine receptor-stimulated binding of [35S]GTP gamma S were maximally enhanced 45% and 23%, respectively, by 50 microM adenoregulin. In CHAPS-solubilized membranes from rat cortex, the binding of both [3H]CHA and [3H]DPCPX were enhanced by adenoregulin. Binding of [3H]CHA to membranes from DDT1 MF-2 cells was maximally enhanced 17% at 20 microM adenoregulin. In intact DDT1 MF-2 cells, 20 microM adenoregulin did not potentiate the inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation mediated via the adenosine A1 receptor. 4. It is proposed that adenoregulin enhances agonist binding through a mechanism involving enhancement of guanyl nucleotide exchange at G-proteins, resulting in a conversion of receptors into a high affinity state

  13. Identification of novel thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives as human A1 and A2A adenosine receptor antagonists/inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Varano, Flavia; Catarzi, Daniela; Falsini, Matteo; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Pasquini, Silvia; Varani, Katia; Colotta, Vittoria

    2018-07-23

    In this study a new set of thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives was synthesized. These derivatives bear different substituents at positions 2 and 5 of the thiazolopyrimidine core while maintaining a free amino group at position-7. The new compounds were tested for their affinity and potency at human (h) A 1 , A 2A , A 2B and A 3 adenosine receptors expressed in CHO cells. The results reveal that the higher affinity of these new set of thiazolopyrimidines is toward the hA 1 and hA 2A adenosine receptors subtypes and is tuned by the substitution pattern at both the 2 and 5 positions of the thiazolopyrimidine nucleus. Functional studies evidenced that the compounds behaved as dual A 1 /A 2A antagonists/inverse agonists. Compound 3, bearing a 5-((2-methoxyphenyl) methylamino) group and a phenyl moiety at position 2, displayed the highest affinity (hA 1 K i  = 10.2 nM; hA 2A K i  = 4.72 nM) and behaved as a potent A 1 /A 2A antagonist/inverse agonist (hA 1 IC 50  = 13.4 nM; hA 2A IC 50  = 5.34 nM). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A comparison of an A1 adenosine receptor agonist (CVT-510) with diltiazem for slowing of AV nodal conduction in guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Snowdy, Stephen; Liang, Hui Xiu; Blackburn, Brent; Lum, Robert; Nelson, Marek; Wang, Lisa; Pfister, Jürg; Sharma, Bhavender P; Wolff, Andrew; Belardinelli, Luiz

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacological properties (i.e. the AV nodal depressant, vasodilator, and inotropic effects) of two AV nodal blocking agents belonging to different drug classes; a novel A1 adenosine receptor (A1 receptor) agonist, N-(3(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl)-6-aminopurine riboside (CVT-510), and the prototypical calcium channel blocker diltiazem.In the atrial-paced isolated heart, CVT-510 was approximately 5 fold more potent to prolong the stimulus-to-His bundle (S–H interval), a measure of slowing AV nodal conduction (EC50=41 nM) than to increase coronary conductance (EC50=200 nM). At concentrations of CVT-510 (40 nM) and diltiazem (1 μM) that caused equal prolongation of S–H interval (∼10 ms), diltiazem, but not CVT-510, significantly reduced left ventricular developed pressure (LVP) and markedly increased coronary conductance. CVT-510 shortened atrial (EC50=73 nM) but not the ventricular monophasic action potentials (MAP).In atrial-paced anaesthetized guinea-pigs, intravenous infusions of CVT-510 and diltiazem caused nearly equal prolongations of P–R interval. However, diltiazem, but not CVT-510, significantly reduced mean arterial blood pressure.Both CVT-510 and diltiazem prolonged S–H interval, i.e., slowed AV nodal conduction. However, the A1 receptor-selective agonist CVT-510 did so without causing the negative inotropic, vasodilator, and hypotensive effects associated with diltiazem. Because CVT-510 did not affect the ventricular action potential, it is unlikely that this agonist will have a proarrythmic action in ventricular myocardium. PMID:10051130

  15. The antinociceptive effects of the systemic adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA in the absence and in the presence of spinal cord sensitization.

    PubMed

    Curros-Criado, M Mar; Herrero, Juan F

    2005-12-01

    Adenosine A1 receptor agonists are effective antinociceptive agents in neuropathic and inflammatory pain, though they appear to be weak analgesics in acute nociception. Important discrepancies are observed on the effectiveness and potency of adenosine analogues when comparing different studies, probably due to the use of different ligands, models of antinociception, routes of administration and types of sensitization. We studied the systemic antinociceptive effects of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) in spinal cord neuronal responses from adult male rats in acute nociception and in sensitization due to arthritis and neuropathy. The experiments showed that CPA was effective in the three experimental conditions, with a similar potency in reducing responses to noxious mechanical stimulation (ID50s: 20 +/- 1.2 microg/kg in acute nociception, 18 +/- 1.1 microg/kg in arthritis, 17.4 +/- 2 microg/kg in neuropathy). The phenomenon of wind-up was also dose-dependently reduced by CPA in the three experimental situations although the main action was seen in arthritis. Depression of blood pressure by CPA was not dose-dependent. We conclude that systemic CPA is a potent and effective analgesic in sensitization due to arthritis and neuropathy but also in acute nociception. The effect is independent of the cardiovascular activity and is centrally mediated since wind-up was inhibited.

  16. Central or Peripheral Delivery of an Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist Improves Mechanical Allodynia in a Mouse Model of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Katz, N. K.; Ryals, J. M.; Wright, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8-weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of painful

  17. Thermal nociception is decreased by hypocretin-1 and an adenosine A1 receptor agonist microinjected into the pontine reticular formation of Sprague Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sarah L; Watson, Christopher J; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2010-06-01

    Clinical and preclinical data concur that sleep disruption causes hyperalgesia, but the brain mechanisms through which sleep and pain interact remain poorly understood. Evidence that pontine components of the ascending reticular activating system modulate sleep and nociception encouraged the present study testing the hypothesis that hypocretin-1 (orexin-A) and an adenosine receptor agonist administered into the pontine reticular nucleus, oral part (PnO) each alter thermal nociception. Adult male rats (n = 23) were implanted with microinjection guide tubes aimed for the PnO. The PnO was microinjected with saline (control), hypocretin-1, the adenosine A(1) receptor agonist N(6)-p-sulfophenyladenosine (SPA), the hypocretin receptor-1 antagonist N-(2-Methyl-6-benzoxazolyl)-N''-1,5-naphthyridin-4-yl-urea (SB-334867), and hypocretin-1 plus SB-334867. As an index of antinociceptive behavior, the latency (in seconds) to paw withdrawal away from a thermal stimulus was measured following each microinjection. Compared to control, antinociception was significantly increased by hypocretin-1 and by SPA. SB-334867 increased nociceptive responsiveness, and administration of hypocretin-1 plus SB-334867 blocked the antinociception caused by hypocretin-1. These results suggest for the first time that hypocretin receptors in rat PnO modulate nociception. Widely distributed and overlapping neural networks regulate states of sleep and pain. Specifying the brain regions and neurotransmitters through which pain and sleep interact is an essential step for developing adjunctive therapies that diminish pain without disrupting states of sleep and wakefulness. Copyright (c) 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY354740 and the D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol reduce locomotor hyperactivity but fail to rescue spatial working memory in GluA1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Thomas; Bygrave, Alexei M; Chen, Jingkai; Fernando, Anushka; Jackson, Stephanie; Barkus, Chris; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H; Harrison, Paul J; Gilmour, Gary; Bannerman, David M; Sanderson, David J

    2017-04-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists have been suggested as potential anti-psychotics, at least in part, based on the observation that the agonist LY354740 appeared to rescue the cognitive deficits caused by non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists, including spatial working memory deficits in rodents. Here, we tested the ability of LY354740 to rescue spatial working memory performance in mice that lack the GluA1 subunit of the AMPA glutamate receptor, encoded by Gria1, a gene recently implicated in schizophrenia by genome-wide association studies. We found that LY354740 failed to rescue the spatial working memory deficit in Gria1 -/- mice during rewarded alternation performance in the T-maze. In contrast, LY354740 did reduce the locomotor hyperactivity in these animals to a level that was similar to controls. A similar pattern was found with the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol, with no amelioration of the spatial working memory deficit in Gria1 -/- mice, even though the same dose of haloperidol reduced their locomotor hyperactivity. These results with LY354740 contrast with the rescue of spatial working memory in models of glutamatergic hypofunction using non-competitive NMDAR antagonists. Future studies should determine whether group II mGluR agonists can rescue spatial working memory deficits with other NMDAR manipulations, including genetic models and other pharmacological manipulations of NMDAR function. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cardiovascular effects of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) decisive for its therapeutic efficacy in sarin poisoning.

    PubMed

    Joosen, Marloes J A; Bueters, Tjerk J H; van Helden, Herman P M

    2004-01-01

    Mortality and occurrence of cholinergic symptoms upon sarin intoxication (144 micro g/kg s.c., approximately 2 x LD50) in rats is completely prevented by treatment with the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 2 mg/kg i.m.). Previously, we have shown that CPA treatment altered the distribution of sarin into the brain, presumably through its cardiovascular side effects. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of the cardiodepressant effects of CPA to its therapeutic efficacy against sarin intoxication. Intramuscular treatment of rats with 0.5 and 2.0 mg/kg CPA 1 min after sarin poisoning attenuated most cholinergic symptoms and prevented mortality, which seemed to be directly associated with an immediate strong and long-lasting bradycardia and hypotension caused by CPA. Treatment with lower doses of CPA (0.1 and 0.05 mg/kg i.m.) caused similar levels of bradycardia and hypotension, albeit a few minutes later than at the higher doses of CPA. Upon sarin intoxication, this was correlated with increased incidence of cholinergic symptoms and decreased survival rates. Pretreatment with the peripheral adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8- p-sulphophenyltheophylline (8-PST, 20 mg/kg i.p.) counteracted the cardiodepressant effects of 0.05 mg/kg CPA almost completely, thereby nearly abolishing its therapeutic efficacy against sarin poisoning. In conclusion, the present results strongly indicate that bradycardia and hypotension induced by the peripheral adenosine A1 receptor play a prominent role in the therapeutic efficacy of CPA in cases of sarin poisoning.

  20. Discrimination between olfactory receptor agonists and non-agonists.

    PubMed

    Topin, Jérémie; de March, Claire A; Charlier, Landry; Ronin, Catherine; Antonczak, Serge; Golebiowski, Jérôme

    2014-08-11

    A joint approach combining free-energy calculations and calcium-imaging assays on the broadly tuned human 1G1 olfactory receptor is reported. The free energy of binding of ten odorants was computed by means of molecular-dynamics simulations. This state function allows separating the experimentally determined eight agonists from the two non-agonists. This study constitutes a proof-of-principle for the computational deorphanization of olfactory receptors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  2. Adverse Effects of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Filippatos, Theodosios D.; Panagiotopoulou, Thalia V.; Elisaf, Moses S.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a class of injective anti-diabetic drugs that improve glycemic control and many other atherosclerosis-related parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the use of this relatively new class of drugs may be associated with certain adverse effects. Concerns have been expressed regarding the effects of these drugs on pancreatic and thyroid tissue, since animal studies and analyses of drug databases indicate an association of GLP-1 receptor agonists with pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, and thyroid cancer. However, several meta-analyses failed to confirm a cause-effect relation between GLP-1 receptor agonists and the development of these adverse effects. One benefit of GLP-1 receptor agonists is that they do not cause hypoglycemia when combined with metformin or thiazolidinediones, but the dose of concomitant sulphonylurea or insulin may have to be decreased to reduce the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. On the other hand, several case reports have linked the use of these drugs, mainly exenatide, with the occurrence of acute kidney injury, primarily through hemodynamic derangement due to nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The most common symptoms associated with the use of GLP-1 receptor agonists are gastrointestinal symptoms, mainly nausea. Other common adverse effects include injection site reactions, headache, and nasopharyngitis, but these effects do not usually result in discontinuation of the drug. Current evidence shows that GLP-1 receptor agonists have no negative effects on the cardiovascular risk of patients with T2D. Thus, GLP-1 receptor agonists appear to have a favorable safety profile, but ongoing trials will further assess their cardiovascular effects. The aim of this review is to analyze critically the available data regarding adverse events of GLP-1 receptor agonists in different anatomic systems published in Pubmed and Scopus. Whenever possible, certain differences between GLP-1

  3. 5-Functionalized indazoles as glucocorticoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mei; Carr, Grant; Deorazio, Russell J; Friedrich, Thomas D; Dobritsa, Svetlana; Fitzpatrick, Kevin; Guzzo, Peter R; Kitchen, Douglas B; Lynch, Michael A; Peace, Denise; Sajad, Mohammed; Usyatinsky, Alexander; Wolf, Mark A

    2010-05-15

    An indazole based series of glucocorticoid receptor agonists is reported. The SAR exploration of this scaffold yielded compounds with nanomolar affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor with indications of selectivity for the preferred transrepression mechanism; in vivo efficacy was observed in the mouse LPS induced TNFalpha model for compound 28. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. New thrombopoietin receptor agonists for platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Homeida, S; Ebdon, C; Batty, P; Jackson, B; Kolade, S; Bateman, C; Peng, Y Y; Stasi, R

    2012-04-01

    Since thrombopoietin (TPO) was cloned in 1994, TPO receptor (TPO-R) agonists have been developed which have shown significant clinical activity in various conditions characterized by thrombocytopenia. First-generation TPO-R agonists were recombinant forms of human TPO. The clinical development of these molecules was discontinued after one of them, pegylated recombinant human megakaryocyte growth and development factor, was associated with the development of neutralizing autoantibodies cross-reacting with endogenous TPO. Second-generation TPO-R agonists are now available, which present no sequence homology to endogenous TPO. Two of these new agents, romiplostim and eltrombopag, have been granted marketing authorization for use in patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia unresponsive to conventional treatments. Clinical trials with TPO-R agonists are also ongoing in other thrombocytopenias, such as hepatitis C virus-related thrombocytopenia and the myelodysplastic syndromes. Copyright 2012 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  5. Update in TSH Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of the TSH receptor (TSHR) as a major regulator of thyroid function is well understood, but TSHRs are also expressed in multiple normal extrathyroidal tissues, and the physiological roles of TSHRs in these tissues are unclear. Moreover, TSHRs play a major role in several pathological conditions including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and thyroid tumors. Small molecule, “drug-like” TSHR agonists, neutral antagonists, and inverse agonists may be useful as probes of TSHR function in extrathyroidal tissues and as leads to develop drugs for several diseases of the thyroid. In this Update, we review the most recent findings regarding the development and use of these small molecule TSHR ligands. PMID:23019348

  6. Agonist-induced modulation of inverse agonist efficacy at the beta 2-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Chidiac, P; Nouet, S; Bouvier, M

    1996-09-01

    Sustained stimulation of several G protein-coupled receptors is known to lead to a reduction in the signaling efficacy. This phenomenon, named agonist-induced desensitization, has been best studied for the beta 2-adrenergic receptor (AR) and is characterized by a decreased efficacy of beta-adrenergic agonists to stimulate the adenylyl cyclase activity. Recently, several beta-adrenergic ligands were found to inhibit the spontaneous agonist-independent activity of the beta 2AR. These compounds, termed inverse agonists, have different inhibitory efficacies, ranging from almost neutral antagonists to full inverse agonists. The current study was undertaken to determine whether, as is the case for agonists, desensitization can affect the efficacies of inverse agonists. Agonist-promoted desensitization of the human beta 2AR expressed in Sf9 cells potentiated the inhibitory actions of the inverse agonists, with the extent of the potentiation being inversely proportional to their intrinsic activity. For example, desensitization increased the inhibitory action of the weak inverse agonist labetalol by 29%, whereas inhibition of the spontaneous activity by the strong inverse agonist timolol was not enhanced by the desensitizing stimuli. Interestingly, dichloroisoproterenol acted stochastically as either a weak partial agonist or a weak inverse agonist in control conditions but always behaved as an inverse agonist after desensitization. These data demonstrate that like for agonists, the efficacies of inverse agonists can be modulated by a desensitizing treatment. Also, the data show that the initial state of the receptor can determine whether a ligand behaves as a partial agonist or an inverse agonist.

  7. Agonists and antagonists for P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Costanzi, Stefano; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Besada, Pedro; Shin, Dae Hong; Ko, Hyojin; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Mamedova, Liaman

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has identified nucleotide agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 receptors. Selective non-nucleotide antagonists have been reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2X2/3/P2X3 and P2X7 receptors. For example, the dinucleotide INS 37217 (Up4dC) potently activates the P2Y2 receptor, and the non-nucleotide antagonist A-317491 is selective for P2X2/3/P2X3 receptors. Nucleotide analogues in which the ribose moiety is substituted by a variety of novel ring systems, including conformation-ally locked moieties, have been synthesized as ligands for P2Y receptors. The focus on conformational factors of the ribose-like moiety allows the inclusion of general modifications that lead to enhanced potency and selectivity. At P2Y1,2,4,11 receptors, there is a preference for the North conformation as indicated with (N)-methanocarba analogues. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2500 inhibited ADP-induced human platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.95 nM. MRS2365, an (N)-methanocarba analogue of 2-MeSADP, displayed potency (EC50) of 0.4 nM at the P2Y1 receptor, with >10 000-fold selectivity in comparison to P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. At P2Y6 receptors there is a dramatic preference for the South conformation. Three-dimensional structures of P2Y receptors have been deduced from structure activity relationships (SAR), mutagenesis and modelling studies. Detailed three-dimensional structures of P2X receptors have not yet been proposed. PMID:16805423

  8. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, EE; Doležal, V

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5′-γ−thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Filtration and scintillation proximity assays measured equilibrium binding as well as binding kinetics of [35S]GTPγS and [3H]GDP to a mixture of G-proteins as well as individual classes of G-proteins upon binding of structurally different agonists to the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. KEY RESULTS Agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. GTPγS (1 µM) changed the competition curves to monophasic with low affinity and 50 µM GDP produced a similar effect. Depletion of membrane-bound GDP increased the proportion of agonist high-affinity sites. Carbachol accelerated the dissociation of [3H]GDP from membranes. The inverse agonist N-methylscopolamine slowed GDP dissociation and GTPγS binding without changing affinity for GDP. Carbachol affected both GDP association with and dissociation from Gi/o G-proteins but only its dissociation from Gs/olf G-proteins. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings suggest the existence of a low-affinity agonist-receptor conformation complexed with GDP-liganded G-protein. Also the negative cooperativity between GDP and agonist binding at the receptor/G-protein complex determines agonist efficacy. GDP binding reveals differences in action of agonists versus inverse agonists as well as differences in activation of Gi/o versus Gs/olf G-proteins that are not identified by conventional GTPγS binding. PMID:20958290

  9. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, E E; Doležal, V

    2011-03-01

    Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5'-γ-thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. Filtration and scintillation proximity assays measured equilibrium binding as well as binding kinetics of [³⁵S]GTPγS and [³H]GDP to a mixture of G-proteins as well as individual classes of G-proteins upon binding of structurally different agonists to the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [³H]-N-methylscopolamine. GTPγS (1 µM) changed the competition curves to monophasic with low affinity and 50 µM GDP produced a similar effect. Depletion of membrane-bound GDP increased the proportion of agonist high-affinity sites. Carbachol accelerated the dissociation of [³H]GDP from membranes. The inverse agonist N-methylscopolamine slowed GDP dissociation and GTPγS binding without changing affinity for GDP. Carbachol affected both GDP association with and dissociation from G(i/o) G-proteins but only its dissociation from G(s/olf) G-proteins. These findings suggest the existence of a low-affinity agonist-receptor conformation complexed with GDP-liganded G-protein. Also the negative cooperativity between GDP and agonist binding at the receptor/G-protein complex determines agonist efficacy. GDP binding reveals differences in action of agonists versus inverse agonists as well as differences in activation of G(i/o) versus G(s/olf) G-proteins that are not identified by conventional GTPγS binding. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Agonist-Directed Desensitization of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy; Jin, Yan; Sun, Haiyan; Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Fang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists with reduced tachyphylaxis may offer new therapeutic agents with improved tolerance profile. However, receptor desensitization assays are often inferred at the single signaling molecule level, thus ligand-directed desensitization is poorly understood. Here we report a label-free biosensor whole cell assay with microfluidics to determine ligand-directed desensitization of the β2AR. Together with mechanistic deconvolution using small molecule inhibitors, the receptor desensitization and resensitization patterns under the short-term agonist exposure manifested the long-acting agonism of salmeterol, and differentiated the mechanisms of agonist-directed desensitization between a full agonist epinephrine and a partial agonist pindolol. This study reveals the cellular mechanisms of agonist-selective β2AR desensitization at the whole cell level. PMID:21541288

  11. Nicotine receptor partial agonists for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kate; Stead, Lindsay F; Lancaster, Tim

    2008-07-16

    Nicotine receptor partial agonists may help people to stop smoking by a combination of maintaining moderate levels of dopamine to counteract withdrawal symptoms (acting as an agonist) and reducing smoking satisfaction (acting as an antagonist). Varenicline was developed as a nicotine receptor partial agonist from cytisine, a drug widely used in central and eastern Europe for smoking cessation. The first trial reports of varenicline were released in 2006, and further trials have now been published or are currently are underway. The primary objective of this review is to assess the efficacy and tolerability of nicotine receptor partial agonists, including varenicline and cytisine, for smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's specialised register for trials, using the terms ('varenicline' or 'cytisine' or 'Tabex' or 'nicotine receptor partial agonist') and 'smoking' in the title or abstract, or as keywords. We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL using MeSH terms and free text, and we contacted authors of trial reports for additional information where necessary. The latest search was in March 2008. We included randomized controlled trials which compared the treatment drug with placebo. We also included comparisons with bupropion and nicotine patches where available. We excluded trials which did not report a minimum follow-up period of six months from start of treatment. We extracted data in duplicate on the type of participants, the dose and duration of treatment, the outcome measures, the randomization procedure, concealment of allocation, and completeness of follow up. The main outcome measured was abstinence from smoking after at least six months from the beginning of treatment. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence, and preferred biochemically validated rates where they were reported. Where appropriate we performed meta-analysis to produce a risk ratio, using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model. We found

  12. Nicotine receptor partial agonists for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kate; Stead, Lindsay F; Lancaster, Tim

    2011-02-16

    Nicotine receptor partial agonists may help people to stop smoking by a combination of maintaining moderate levels of dopamine to counteract withdrawal symptoms (acting as an agonist) and reducing smoking satisfaction (acting as an antagonist). Varenicline was developed as a nicotine receptor partial agonist from cytisine, a drug widely used in central and eastern Europe for smoking cessation. The first trial reports of varenicline were released in 2006, and further trials have now been published or are currently underway. The primary objective of this review is to assess the efficacy and tolerability of nicotine receptor partial agonists, including varenicline and cytisine, for smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's specialised register for trials, using the terms ('varenicline' or 'cytisine' or 'Tabex' or 'nicotine receptor partial agonist') and 'smoking' in the title or abstract, or as keywords. We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL using MeSH terms and free text, and we contacted authors of trial reports for additional information where necessary. The latest search was in September 2010. We included randomized controlled trials which compared the treatment drug with placebo. We also included comparisons with bupropion and nicotine patches where available. We excluded trials which did not report a minimum follow-up period of six months from start of treatment. We extracted data on the type of participants, the dose and duration of treatment, the outcome measures, the randomization procedure, concealment of allocation, and completeness of follow up.The main outcome measured was abstinence from smoking after at least six months from the beginning of treatment. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence, and preferred biochemically validated rates where they were reported. Where appropriate we performed meta-analysis to produce a risk ratio, using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model. We found 11 trials of

  13. Nicotine receptor partial agonists for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kate; Stead, Lindsay F; Lancaster, Tim

    2010-12-08

    Nicotine receptor partial agonists may help people to stop smoking by a combination of maintaining moderate levels of dopamine to counteract withdrawal symptoms (acting as an agonist) and reducing smoking satisfaction (acting as an antagonist). Varenicline was developed as a nicotine receptor partial agonist from cytisine, a drug widely used in central and eastern Europe for smoking cessation. The first trial reports of varenicline were released in 2006, and further trials have now been published or are currently underway. The primary objective of this review is to assess the efficacy and tolerability of nicotine receptor partial agonists, including varenicline and cytisine, for smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's specialised register for trials, using the terms ('varenicline' or 'cytisine' or 'Tabex' or 'nicotine receptor partial agonist') and 'smoking' in the title or abstract, or as keywords. We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL using MeSH terms and free text, and we contacted authors of trial reports for additional information where necessary. The latest search was in September 2010. We included randomized controlled trials which compared the treatment drug with placebo. We also included comparisons with bupropion and nicotine patches where available. We excluded trials which did not report a minimum follow-up period of six months from start of treatment. We extracted data on the type of participants, the dose and duration of treatment, the outcome measures, the randomization procedure, concealment of allocation, and completeness of follow up.The main outcome measured was abstinence from smoking after at least six months from the beginning of treatment. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence, and preferred biochemically validated rates where they were reported. Where appropriate we performed meta-analysis to produce a risk ratio, using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model. We found 11 trials of

  14. The 5-HT1A/1B-receptor agonist eltoprazine increases both catecholamine release in the prefrontal cortex and dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and decreases motivation for reward and "waiting" impulsivity, but increases "stopping" impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Korte, S Mechiel; Prins, Jolanda; Van den Bergh, Filip S; Oosting, Ronald S; Dupree, Rudy; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Westphal, Koen G C; Olivier, Berend; Denys, Damiaan A; Garland, Alexis; Güntürkün, Onur

    2017-01-05

    The 5-HT 1A/1B -receptor agonist eltoprazine has a behavioral drug signature that resembles that of a variety of psychostimulant drugs, despite the differences in receptor binding profile. These psychostimulants are effective in treating impulsivity disorders, most likely because they increase norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) levels in the prefrontal cortex. Both amphetamine and methylphenidate, however, also increase dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which has a significant role in motivation, pleasure, and reward. How eltoprazine affects monoamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and the NAc is unknown. It is also unknown whether eltoprazine affects different forms of impulsivity and brain reward mechanisms. Therefore, in the present study, we investigate the effects of eltoprazine in rats in the following sequence: 1) the activity of the monoaminergic systems using in vivo microdialysis, 2) motivation for reward measured using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure, and finally, 3) "waiting" impulsivity in the delay-aversion task, and the "stopping" impulsivity in the stop-signal task. The microdialysis studies clearly showed that eltoprazine increased DA and NE release in both the mPFC and OFC, but only increased DA concentration in the NAc. In contrast, eltoprazine decreased 5-HT release in the mPFC and NAc (undetectable in the OFC). Remarkably, eltoprazine decreased impulsive choice, but increased impulsive action. Furthermore, brain stimulation was less rewarding following eltoprazine treatment. These results further support the long-standing hypothesis that "waiting" and "stopping" impulsivity are regulated by distinct neural circuits, because 5-HT 1A/1B -receptor activation decreases impulsive choice, but increases impulsive action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  16. Mechanisms of inverse agonist action at D2 dopamine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, David J; Strange, Philip G

    2005-01-01

    Mechanisms of inverse agonist action at the D2(short) dopamine receptor have been examined. Discrimination of G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled forms of the receptor by inverse agonists was examined in competition ligand-binding studies versus the agonist [3H]NPA at a concentration labelling both G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled receptors. Competition of inverse agonists versus [3H]NPA gave data that were fitted best by a two-binding site model in the absence of GTP but by a one-binding site model in the presence of GTP. Ki values were derived from the competition data for binding of the inverse agonists to G-protein-uncoupled and -coupled receptors. Kcoupled and Kuncoupled were statistically different for the set of compounds tested (ANOVA) but the individual values were different in a post hoc test only for (+)-butaclamol. These observations were supported by simulations of these competition experiments according to the extended ternary complex model. Inverse agonist efficacy of the ligands was assessed from their ability to reduce agonist-independent [35S]GTPγS binding to varying degrees in concentration–response curves. Inverse agonism by (+)-butaclamol and spiperone occurred at higher potency when GDP was added to assays, whereas the potency of (−)-sulpiride was unaffected. These data show that some inverse agonists ((+)-butaclamol, spiperone) achieve inverse agonism by stabilising the uncoupled form of the receptor at the expense of the coupled form. For other compounds tested, we were unable to define the mechanism. PMID:15735658

  17. Opioid-receptor subtype agonist-induced enhancements of sucrose intake are dependent upon sucrose concentration.

    PubMed

    Ruegg, H; Yu, W Z; Bodnar, R J

    1997-07-01

    Selective mu ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO)), delta1 ([D-Pen2, D-Pen5]-enkephalin (DPDPE)), delta2 ([D-Ala2, Glu4]-Deltorphin (Delt II)), kappa1 (U50488H) and kappa3 (naloxone benzoylhydrazone (NalBzOH)) opioid agonists each stimulate food intake in rats. Whereas studies with selective opioid antagonists implicate mu and kappa1 receptors in the mediation of sucrose intake, studies with selective opioid agonists implicate mu and delta receptors in the mediation of saccharin intake. The present study determined if specific delta1, delta2, kappa1, kappa3 and mu opioid-receptor subtype agonists produced similar alterations in sucrose intake as a function of sucrose concentration (0.5%, 2.5%, 10%) across a 1-h time-course. Each of these agonists significantly increased sucrose intake with variations in pattern, magnitude, and consistency as a function of sucrose concentration. Whereas the mu opioid agonist, DAMGO, and the delta1 opioid agonist, DPDPE, each enhanced sucrose intake at higher (2.5%, 10%), but not lower (0.5%), concentrations, the delta2 opioid agonist, Delt II, increased sucrose intake at lower (0.5%, 2.5%), but not higher (10%), concentrations. Kappa opioid agonists produced less consistent effects. The kappa1 opioid agonist, U50488H, increased sucrose intake at high (10%) concentrations and decreased sucrose intake at low (0.5%) concentrations, and the kappa3 opioid agonist, NalBzOH, inconsistently increased sucrose intake at the 0.5% (20 microg) and 10% (1 microg) concentrations. Thus, these data further implicate mu, delta1, and delta2 opioid mediation of palatable intake, particularly of its orosensory characteristics.

  18. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Trial Watch: Toll-like receptor agonists for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have long been known for their ability to initiate innate immune responses upon exposure to conserved microbial components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA. More recently, this family of pattern recognition receptors has been attributed a critical role in the elicitation of anticancer immune responses, raising interest in the development of immunochemotherapeutic regimens based on natural or synthetic TLR agonists. In spite of such an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation, only three TLR agonists are currently licensed by FDA for use in cancer patients: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that operates as a mixed TLR2/TLR4 agonist; monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a derivative of Salmonella minnesota that functions as a potent agonist of TLR4; and imiquimod, a synthetic imidazoquinoline that activates TLR7. One year ago, in the August and September issues of OncoImmunology , we described the main biological features of TLRs and discussed the progress of clinical studies evaluating the safety and therapeutic potential of TLR agonists in cancer patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this exciting area of research, focusing on preclinical studies that have been published during the last 13 mo and clinical trials launched in the same period to investigate the antineoplastic activity of TLR agonists.

  20. Gingerols: a novel class of vanilloid receptor (VR1) agonists

    PubMed Central

    Dedov, Vadim N; Tran, Van H; Duke, Colin C; Connor, Mark; Christie, MacDonald J; Mandadi, Sravan; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2002-01-01

    Gingerols, the pungent constituents of ginger, were synthesized and assessed as agonists of the capsaicin-activated VR1 (vanilloid) receptor. [6]-Gingerol and [8]-gingerol evoked capsaicin-like intracellular Ca2+ transients and ion currents in cultured DRG neurones. These effects of gingerols were blocked by capsazepine, the VR1 receptor antagonist. The potency of gingerols increased with increasing size of the side chain and with the overall hydrophobicity in the series. We conclude that gingerols represent a novel class of naturally occurring VR1 receptor agonists that may contribute to the medicinal properties of ginger, which have been known for centuries. The gingerol structure may be used as a template for the development of drugs acting as moderately potent activators of the VR1 receptor. PMID:12411409

  1. Bitter taste receptor agonists alter mitochondrial function and induce autophagy in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shi; Sharma, Pawan; Shah, Sushrut D; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2017-07-01

    Airway remodeling, including increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, is a hallmark feature of asthma and COPD. We previously identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) on human ASM cells and demonstrated that known TAS2R agonists could promote ASM relaxation and bronchodilation and inhibit mitogen-induced ASM growth. In this study, we explored cellular mechanisms mediating the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists on human ASM cells. Pretreatment of ASM cells with TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine resulted in inhibition of cell survival, which was largely reversed by bafilomycin A1, an autophagy inhibitor. Transmission electron microscope studies demonstrated the presence of double-membrane autophagosomes and deformed mitochondria. In ASM cells, TAS2R agonists decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation. Inhibiting dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1) reversed TAS2R agonist-induced mitochondrial membrane potential change and attenuated mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Furthermore, the expression of mitochondrial protein BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) and mitochondrial localization of DLP1 were significantly upregulated by TAS2R agonists. More importantly, inhibiting Bnip3 mitochondrial localization by dominant-negative Bnip3 significantly attenuated cell death induced by TAS2R agonist. Collectively the TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine modulate mitochondrial structure and function, resulting in ASM cell death. Furthermore, Bnip3 plays a central role in TAS2R agonist-induced ASM functional changes via a mitochondrial pathway. These findings further establish the cellular mechanisms of antimitogenic effects of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and pathways that can be targeted to mitigate airway remodeling as well as bronchoconstriction in obstructive airway diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological

  2. Pharmacological Studies of NOP Receptor Agonists as Novel Analgesics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    found in hot-chili peppers that evokes pain sensation by activating at the TRPV1 . TRPV1 and the up-regulation of its expression have been strongly...via nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptors. Br J Pharmacol 137:1355-1361. Knotkova H, Pappagallo M, Szallasi A (2008) Capsaicin ( TRPV1 Agonist) therapy...Szallasi A, Cortright DN, Blum CA, Eid SR (2007). The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 : 10 years from channel cloning to antagonist proof of concept. Nat Rev Drug

  3. Adenosine A2A receptor agonists with potent antiplatelet activity.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Fuentes, Manuel; Caballero, Julio; Palomo, Iván; Hinz, Sonja; El-Tayeb, Ali; Müller, Christa E

    2018-05-01

    Selected adenosine A 2A receptor agonists (PSB-15826, PSB-12404, and PSB-16301) have been evaluated as new antiplatelet agents. In addition, radioligand-binding studies and receptor-docking experiments were performed in order to explain their differential biological effects on a molecular level. Among the tested adenosine derivatives, PSB-15826 was the most potent compound to inhibit platelet aggregation (EC 50 0.32 ± 0.05 µmol/L) and platelet P-selectin cell-surface localization (EC 50 0.062 ± 0.2 µmol/L), and to increase intraplatelets cAMP levels (EC 50 0.24 ± 0.01 µmol/L). The compound was more active than CGS21680 (EC 50 0.97±0.07 µmol/L) and equipotent to NECA (EC 50 0.31 ± 0.05 µmol/L) in platelet aggregation induced by ADP. In contrast to the results from cAMP assays, K i values determined in radioligand-binding studies were not predictive of the A 2A agonists' antiplatelet activity. Docking studies revealed the key molecular determinants of this new family of adenosine A 2A receptor agonists: differences in activities are related to π-stacking interactions between the ligands and the residue His264 in the extracellular loop of the adenosine A 2A receptor which may result in increased residence times. In conclusion, these results provide an improved understanding of the requirements of antiplatelet adenosine A 2A receptor agonists.

  4. Differential agonist and inverse agonist profile of antipsychotics at D2L receptors coupled to GIRK potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Castro-Fernandez, Annabelle; Cussac, Didier

    2007-03-01

    The D(2) dopaminergic receptor represents a major target of antipsychotic drugs. Using the coupling of the human D(2long) (hD(2L)) receptor to G protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium (GIRK) channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we examined the activity of antipsychotic agents of different classes - typical, atypical, and a "new generation" of compounds, exhibiting a preferential D(2) and 5-HT(1A) receptor profile. When the hD(2L) receptor was coexpressed with GIRK channels, a series of reference compounds exhibited full agonist (dopamine, and quinpirole), partial agonist (apomorphine, (-)3-PPP, and (+)-UH232) or inverse agonist (raclopride, and L741626) properties. Sarizotan exhibited only very weak partial agonist action. At higher levels of receptor cRNA injected per oocyte, both partial agonist activity and inverse agonist properties were generally more pronounced. The inverse agonist action of L741626 was reversed by interaction with sarizotan, thus confirming the constitutive activity of wild-type hD(2L) receptors in the oocyte expression system. When antipsychotic agents were tested for their actions at the hD(2L) receptor, typical (haloperidol) as well as atypical (nemonapride, ziprasidone, and clozapine) compounds acted as inverse agonists. In contrast, among D(2)/5-HT(1A) antipsychotics, only SLV313 and F15063 behaved as inverse agonists, whilst the other members of this group (bifeprunox, SSR181507 and the recently marketed antipsychotic, aripiprazole) exhibited partial agonist properties. Thus, the X. laevis oocyte expression system highlights markedly different activity of antipsychotics at the hD(2L) receptor. These differential properties may translate to distinct therapeutic potential of these compounds.

  5. Progesterone receptor isoforms, agonists and antagonists differentially reprogram estrogen signaling

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E.; Zarnke, Allison L.; Laine, Muriel; Al Abosy, Rose; Chang, Ya-Fang; Dembo, Anna G.; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Vadhi, Raga; Qiu, Xintao; Rao, Prakash; Santhamma, Bindu; Nair, Hareesh B.; Nickisch, Klaus J.; Long, Henry W.; Becker, Lev; Brown, Myles; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2018-01-01

    Major roadblocks to developing effective progesterone receptor (PR)-targeted therapies in breast cancer include the lack of highly-specific PR modulators, a poor understanding of the pro- or anti-tumorigenic networks for PR isoforms and ligands, and an incomplete understanding of the cross talk between PR and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Through genomic analyses of xenografts treated with various clinically-relevant ER and PR-targeting drugs, we describe how the activation or inhibition of PR differentially reprograms estrogen signaling, resulting in the segregation of transcriptomes into separate PR agonist and antagonist-mediated groups. These findings address an ongoing controversy regarding the clinical utility of PR agonists and antagonists, alone or in combination with tamoxifen, for breast cancer management. Additionally, the two PR isoforms PRA and PRB, bind distinct but overlapping genomic sites and interact with different sets of co-regulators to differentially modulate estrogen signaling to be either pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Of the two isoforms, PRA inhibited gene expression and ER chromatin binding significantly more than PRB. Differential gene expression was observed in PRA and PRB-rich patient tumors and PRA-rich gene signatures had poorer survival outcomes. In support of antiprogestin responsiveness of PRA-rich tumors, gene signatures associated with PR antagonists, but not PR agonists, predicted better survival outcomes. The better patient survival associated with PR antagonists versus PR agonists treatments was further reflected in the higher in vivo anti-tumor activity of therapies that combine tamoxifen with PR antagonists and modulators. This study suggests that distinguishing common effects observed due to concomitant interaction of another receptor with its ligand (agonist or antagonist), from unique isoform and ligand-specific effects will inform the development of biomarkers for patient selection and translation of PR

  6. A Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 selective allosteric agonist

    PubMed Central

    Satsu, Hideo; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Guerrero, Miguel; Saldana, Adrian; Eberhart, Christina; Hodder, Peter; Cayanan, Charmagne; Schürer, Stephan; Bhhatarai, Barun; Roberts, Ed; Rosen, Hugh; Brown, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular probe tool compounds for the Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) are important for investigating the multiple biological processes in which the S1PR2 receptor has been implicated. Amongst these are NF-κB-mediated tumor cell survival and fibroblast chemotaxis to fibronectin. Here we report our efforts to identify selective chemical probes for S1PR2 and their characterization. We employed high throughput screening to identify two compounds which activate the S1PR2 receptor. SAR optimization led to compounds with high nanomolar potency. These compounds, XAX-162 and CYM-5520, are highly selective and do not activate other S1P receptors. Binding of CYM-5520 is not competitive with the antagonist JTE-013. Mutation of receptor residues responsible for binding to the zwitterionic headgroup of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) abolishes S1P activation of the receptor, but not activation by CYM-5520. Competitive binding experiments with radiolabeled S1P demonstrate that CYM-5520 is an allosteric agonist and does not displace the native ligand. Computational modeling suggests that CYM-5520 binds lower in the orthosteric binding pocket, and that co-binding with S1P is energetically well tolerated. In summary, we have identified an allosteric S1PR2 selective agonist compound. PMID:23849205

  7. Structure of an agonist-bound ionotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Yelshanskaya, Maria V; Li, Minfen; Sobolevsky, Alexander I

    2014-08-29

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate most excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and function by opening their ion channel in response to binding of agonist glutamate. Here, we report a structure of a homotetrameric rat GluA2 receptor in complex with partial agonist (S)-5-nitrowillardiine. Comparison of this structure with the closed-state structure in complex with competitive antagonist ZK 200775 suggests conformational changes that occur during iGluR gating. Guided by the structures, we engineered disulfide cross-links to probe domain interactions that are important for iGluR gating events. The combination of structural information, kinetic modeling, and biochemical and electrophysiological experiments provides insight into the mechanism of iGluR gating. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Improving the developability profile of pyrrolidine progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Kallander, Lara S.; Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.

    2010-09-17

    The previously reported pyrrolidine class of progesterone receptor partial agonists demonstrated excellent potency but suffered from serious liabilities including hERG blockade and high volume of distribution in the rat. The basic pyrrolidine amine was intentionally converted to a sulfonamide, carbamate, or amide to address these liabilities. The evaluation of the degree of partial agonism for these non-basic pyrrolidine derivatives and demonstration of their efficacy in an in vivo model of endometriosis is disclosed herein.

  9. Agonist Binding to Chemosensory Receptors: A Systematic Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fierro, Fabrizio; Suku, Eda; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Cichon, Sven; Carloni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Human G-protein coupled receptors (hGPCRs) constitute a large and highly pharmaceutically relevant membrane receptor superfamily. About half of the hGPCRs' family members are chemosensory receptors, involved in bitter taste and olfaction, along with a variety of other physiological processes. Hence these receptors constitute promising targets for pharmaceutical intervention. Molecular modeling has been so far the most important tool to get insights on agonist binding and receptor activation. Here we investigate both aspects by bioinformatics-based predictions across all bitter taste and odorant receptors for which site-directed mutagenesis data are available. First, we observe that state-of-the-art homology modeling combined with previously used docking procedures turned out to reproduce only a limited fraction of ligand/receptor interactions inferred by experiments. This is most probably caused by the low sequence identity with available structural templates, which limits the accuracy of the protein model and in particular of the side-chains' orientations. Methods which transcend the limited sampling of the conformational space of docking may improve the predictions. As an example corroborating this, we review here multi-scale simulations from our lab and show that, for the three complexes studied so far, they significantly enhance the predictive power of the computational approach. Second, our bioinformatics analysis provides support to previous claims that several residues, including those at positions 1.50, 2.50, and 7.52, are involved in receptor activation. PMID:28932739

  10. Targeting GLP-1 receptor trafficking to improve agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ben; Buenaventura, Teresa; Kanda, Nisha; Chabosseau, Pauline; Owen, Bryn M; Scott, Rebecca; Goldin, Robert; Angkathunyakul, Napat; Corrêa, Ivan R; Bosco, Domenico; Johnson, Paul R; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Marchetti, Piero; Shapiro, A M James; Cochran, Blake J; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C; Inoue, Asuka; Tan, Tricia; Rutter, Guy A; Tomas, Alejandra; Bloom, Stephen R

    2018-04-23

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation promotes insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells, causes weight loss, and is an important pharmacological target in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Like other G protein-coupled receptors, the GLP-1R undergoes agonist-mediated endocytosis, but the functional and therapeutic consequences of modulating GLP-1R endocytic trafficking have not been clearly defined. Here, we investigate a series of biased GLP-1R agonists with variable propensities for GLP-1R internalization and recycling. Compared to a panel of FDA-approved GLP-1 mimetics, compounds that retain GLP-1R at the plasma membrane produce greater long-term insulin release, which is dependent on a reduction in β-arrestin recruitment and faster agonist dissociation rates. Such molecules elicit glycemic benefits in mice without concomitant increases in signs of nausea, a common side effect of GLP-1 therapies. Our study identifies a set of agents with specific GLP-1R trafficking profiles and the potential for greater efficacy and tolerability as T2D treatments.

  11. A Rationally Designed Agonist Defines Subfamily IIIA Abscisic Acid Receptors As Critical Targets for Manipulating Transpiration.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Aditya S; Peterson, Francis C; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Merilo, Ebe; Verstraeten, Inge; Park, Sang-Youl; Elzinga, Dezi; Kaundal, Amita; Helander, Jonathan; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Otani, Masato; Wu, Kevin; Jensen, Davin R; Kollist, Hannes; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R

    2017-11-17

    Increasing drought and diminishing freshwater supplies have stimulated interest in developing small molecules that can be used to control transpiration. Receptors for the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) have emerged as key targets for this application, because ABA controls the apertures of stomata, which in turn regulate transpiration. Here, we describe the rational design of cyanabactin, an ABA receptor agonist that preferentially activates Pyrabactin Resistance 1 (PYR1) with low nanomolar potency. A 1.63 Å X-ray crystallographic structure of cyanabactin in complex with PYR1 illustrates that cyanabactin's arylnitrile mimics ABA's cyclohexenone oxygen and engages the tryptophan lock, a key component required to stabilize activated receptors. Further, its sulfonamide and 4-methylbenzyl substructures mimic ABA's carboxylate and C6 methyl groups, respectively. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements show that cyanabactin's compact structure provides ready access to high ligand efficiency on a relatively simple scaffold. Cyanabactin treatments reduce Arabidopsis whole-plant stomatal conductance and activate multiple ABA responses, demonstrating that its in vitro potency translates to ABA-like activity in vivo. Genetic analyses show that the effects of cyanabactin, and the previously identified agonist quinabactin, can be abolished by the genetic removal of PYR1 and PYL1, which form subclade A within the dimeric subfamily III receptors. Thus, cyanabactin is a potent and selective agonist with a wide spectrum of ABA-like activities that defines subfamily IIIA receptors as key target sites for manipulating transpiration.

  12. Choline as an agonist: determination of its agonistic potency on cholinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Ulus, I H; Millington, W R; Buyukuysal, R L; Kiran, B K

    1988-07-15

    These experiments examined the potency of choline as a cholinergic agonist at both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in rat brain and peripheral tissues. Choline stimulated the contraction of isolated smooth muscle preparations of the stomach fundus, urinary bladder and trachea and reduced the frequency of spontaneous contractions of the right atrium at high micromolar and low millimolar concentrations. The potency of choline to elicit a biological response varied markedly among these tissues; EC50 values ranged between 0.41 mM in the fundus to 14.45 mM in the atrium. Choline also displaced [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding in a concentration-dependent manner although, again, its potency varied among different brain regions (Ki = 1.2 to 3.5 mM) and peripheral tissues (Ki = 0.28 to 3.00 mM). Choline exhibited a comparable affinity for nicotinic receptors. It stimulated catecholamine release from the vascularly perfused adrenal gland (EC50 = 1.3 mM) and displaced L-[3H]nicotine binding to membrane preparations of brain and peripheral tissues (Ki = 0.38 to 1.17 mM). However, the concentration of choline required to bind to cholinergic receptors in most tissues was considerably higher than serum levels either in controls (8-13 microM) or following the administration of choline chloride (200 microM). These results clearly demonstrate that choline is a weak cholinergic agonist. Its potency is too low to account for the central nervous system effects produced by choline administration, although the direct activation of cholinergic receptors in several peripheral tissues may explain some of its side effects.

  13. Characterization of the hypothermic effects of imidazoline I2 receptor agonists in rats

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, David A; An, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Yanan; Pigini, Maria; Li, Jun-Xu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Imidazoline I2 receptors have been implicated in several CNS disorders. Although several I2 receptor agonists have been described, no simple and sensitive in vivo bioassay is available for studying I2 receptor ligands. This study examined I2 receptor agonist-induced hypothermia as a functional in vivo assay of I2 receptor agonism. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Different groups of rats were used to examine the effects of I2 receptor agonists on the rectal temperature and locomotion. The pharmacological mechanisms were investigated by combining I2 receptor ligands and different antagonists. KEY RESULTS All the selective I2 receptor agonists examined (2-BFI, diphenyzoline, phenyzoline, CR4056, tracizoline, BU224 and S22687, 3.2–56 mg·kg–1, i.p.) dose-dependently and markedly decreased the rectal temperature (hypothermia) in rats, with varied duration of action. Pharmacological mechanism of the observed hypothermia was studied by combining the I2 receptor agonists (2-BFI, BU224, tracizoline and diphenyzoline) with imidazoline I2 receptor/ α2 adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan, selective I1 receptor antagonist efaroxan, α2 adrenoceptor antagonist/5-HT1A receptor agonist yohimbine. Idazoxan but not yohimbine or efaroxan attenuated the hypothermic effects of 2-BFI, BU224, tracizoline and diphenyzoline, supporting the I2 receptor mechanism. In contrast, both idazoxan and yohimbine attenuated hypothermia induced by the α2 adrenoceptor agonist clonidine. Among all the I2 receptor agonists studied, only S22687 markedly increased the locomotor activity in rats. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Imidazoline I2 receptor agonists can produce hypothermic effects, which are primarily mediated by I2 receptors. These data suggest that I2 receptor agonist-induced hypothermia is a simple and sensitive in vivo assay for studying I2 receptor ligands. PMID:22324428

  14. Co-administration of delta- and mu-opioid receptor agonists promotes peripheral opioid receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Cicely L.; Honda, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of peripheral opioid analgesia following tissue injury or inflammation in animal models is well-documented, but clinical results of peripheral opioid therapy remain inconsistent. Previous studies in the central nervous system have shown that co-administration of μ- and δ-opioid receptor agonists can enhance analgesic outcomes; however, less is known about the functional consequences of opioid receptor interactions in the periphery. The present study examines the effects of intraplantar injection of the μ- and δ-opioid receptor agonists, morphine and deltorphin, alone and in combination on behavioral tests of nociception in naïve rats and on potassium-evoked release of CGRP from sciatic nerves of naïve rats. Neither drug alone affected nociceptive behaviors or CGRP release. Two separate measures of mechanical nociceptive sensitivity remained unchanged after co-administration of the two drugs. In contrast, when deltorphin was co-injected with morphine, dose-dependent and peripherally-restricted increases in paw withdrawal latencies to radiant heat were observed. Similarly, concentration-dependent inhibition of CGRP release was observed when deltorphin and morphine were administered in sequence prior to potassium stimulation. However, no inhibition was observed when morphine was administered prior to deltorphin. All combined opioid effects were blocked by co-application of antagonists. Deltorphin exposure also enhanced the in vivo and in vitro effects of another μ-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO. Together, these results suggest that under normal conditions, δ-opioid receptor agonists enhance the effect of μ-opioid receptor agonists in the periphery, and local co-administration of δ- and μ-opioid receptor agonists may improve results of peripheral opioid therapy for the treatment of pain. PMID:20970925

  15. Exploring the binding energy profiles of full agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Nargis; Ma, Qianyun; Wu, Guanzhao; Jiang, Tao; Yu, Rilei

    2017-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) belong to the Cys-loop receptor family and are important drug targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the precise determinants of the binding efficacies of ligands for these receptors are unclear. Therefore, in this study, the binding energy profiles of various ligands (full agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists) were quantified by docking those ligands with structural ensembles of the α7 nAChR exhibiting different degrees of C-loop closure. This approximate treatment of interactions suggested that full agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists of the α7 nAChR possess distinctive binding energy profiles. Results from docking revealed that ligand binding efficacy may be related to the capacity of the ligand to stabilize conformational states with a closed C loop.

  16. Hypotensive effects of ghrelin receptor agonists mediated through a novel receptor.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Brid; Kosari, Samin; Pustovit, Ruslan V; Sartor, Daniela M; Ferens, Dorota; Ban, Kung; Baell, Jonathan; Nguyen, Trung V; Rivera, Leni R; Brock, James A; Furness, John B

    2014-03-01

    Some agonists of ghrelin receptors cause rapid decreases in BP. The mechanisms by which they cause hypotension and the pharmacology of the receptors are unknown. The effects of ligands of ghrelin receptors were investigated in rats in vivo, on isolated blood vessels and on cells transfected with the only molecularly defined ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a). Three agonists of GHSR1a receptors, ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709, caused a rapid decrease in BP in the anaesthetized rat. The effect was not reduced by either of two GHSR1a antagonists, JMV2959 or YIL781, at doses that blocked effects on colorectal motility, in vivo. The rapid hypotension was not mimicked by ghrelin, unacylated ghrelin or the unacylated ghrelin receptor agonist, AZP531. The early hypotension preceded a decrease in sympathetic nerve activity. Early hypotension was not reduced by hexamethonium or by baroreceptor (sino-aortic) denervation. Ulimorelin also relaxed isolated segments of rat mesenteric artery, and, less potently, relaxed aorta segments. The vascular relaxation was not reduced by JMV2959 or YIL781. Ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709 activated GHSR1a in transfected HEK293 cells at nanomolar concentrations. JMV2959 and YIL781 both antagonized effects in these cells, with their pA2 values at the GHSR1a receptor being 6.55 and 7.84. Our results indicate a novel vascular receptor or receptors whose activation by ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709 lowered BP. This receptor is activated by low MW GHSR1a agonists, but is not activated by ghrelin. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Hypotensive effects of ghrelin receptor agonists mediated through a novel receptor

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brid; Kosari, Samin; Pustovit, Ruslan V; Sartor, Daniela M; Ferens, Dorota; Ban, Kung; Baell, Jonathan; Nguyen, Trung V; Rivera, Leni R; Brock, James A; Furness, John B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Some agonists of ghrelin receptors cause rapid decreases in BP. The mechanisms by which they cause hypotension and the pharmacology of the receptors are unknown. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of ligands of ghrelin receptors were investigated in rats in vivo, on isolated blood vessels and on cells transfected with the only molecularly defined ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a). KEY RESULTS Three agonists of GHSR1a receptors, ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709, caused a rapid decrease in BP in the anaesthetized rat. The effect was not reduced by either of two GHSR1a antagonists, JMV2959 or YIL781, at doses that blocked effects on colorectal motility, in vivo. The rapid hypotension was not mimicked by ghrelin, unacylated ghrelin or the unacylated ghrelin receptor agonist, AZP531. The early hypotension preceded a decrease in sympathetic nerve activity. Early hypotension was not reduced by hexamethonium or by baroreceptor (sino-aortic) denervation. Ulimorelin also relaxed isolated segments of rat mesenteric artery, and, less potently, relaxed aorta segments. The vascular relaxation was not reduced by JMV2959 or YIL781. Ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709 activated GHSR1a in transfected HEK293 cells at nanomolar concentrations. JMV2959 and YIL781 both antagonized effects in these cells, with their pA2 values at the GHSR1a receptor being 6.55 and 7.84. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results indicate a novel vascular receptor or receptors whose activation by ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709 lowered BP. This receptor is activated by low MW GHSR1a agonists, but is not activated by ghrelin. PMID:24670149

  18. Newspapers and Newspaper Ink Contain Agonists for the Ah Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E. S.; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  19. Helminthosporic acid functions as an agonist for gibberellin receptor.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Sho; Jiang, Kai; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Asami, Tadao; Nakajima, Masatoshi

    2017-11-01

    Helminthosporol was isolated from a fungus, Helminthosporium sativum, as a natural plant growth regulator in 1963. It showed gibberellin-like bioactivity that stimulated the growth of the second leaf sheath of rice. After studying the structure-activity relationship between the compound and some synthesized analogs, it was found that helminthosporic acid (H-acid) has higher gibberellin-like activity and chemical stability than helminthosporol. In this study, we showed that (1) H-acid displays gibberellin-like activities not only in rice but also in Arabidopsis, (2) it regulates the expression of gibberellin-related genes, (3) it induces DELLA degradation through binding with a gibberellin receptor (GID1), and (4) it forms the GID1-(H-acid)-DELLA complex to transduce the gibberellin signal in the same manner as gibberellin. This work shows that the H-acid mode of action acts as an agonist for gibberellin receptor.

  20. New Small Molecule Agonists to the Thyrotropin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M. Rejwan; Ma, Risheng; David, Martine; Morshed, Syed A.; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Lau, Zerlina; Mezei, Mihaly; Davies, Terry F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Novel small molecular ligands (SMLs) to the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) have potential as improved molecular probes and as therapeutic agents for the treatment of thyroid dysfunction and thyroid cancer. Methods To identify novel SMLs to the TSHR, we developed a transcription-based luciferase-cAMP high-throughput screening system and we screened 48,224 compounds from a 100K library in duplicate. Results We obtained 62 hits using the cut-off criteria of the mean±three standard deviations above the baseline. Twenty molecules with the greatest activity were rescreened against the parent CHO-luciferase cell for nonspecific activation, and we selected two molecules (MS437 and MS438) with the highest potency for further study. These lead molecules demonstrated no detectible cross-reactivity with homologous receptors when tested against luteinizing hormone (LH)/human chorionic gonadotropin receptor and follicle stimulating hormone receptor–expressing cells. Molecule MS437 had a TSHR-stimulating potency with an EC50 of 13×10−8 M, and molecule MS438 had an EC50 of 5.3×10−8 M. The ability of these small molecule agonists to bind to the transmembrane domain of the receptor and initiate signal transduction was suggested by their activation of a chimeric receptor consisting of an LHR ectodomain and a TSHR transmembrane. Molecular modeling demonstrated that these molecules bound to residues S505 and E506 for MS438 and T501 for MS437 in the intrahelical region of transmembrane helix 3. We also examined the G protein activating ability of these molecules using CHO cells co-expressing TSHRs transfected with luciferase reporter vectors in order to measure Gsα, Gβγ, Gαq, and Gα12 activation quantitatively. The MS437 and MS438 molecules showed potent activation of Gsα, Gαq, and Gα12 similar to TSH, but neither the small molecule agonists nor TSH showed activation of the Gβγ pathway. The small molecules MS437 and MS438 also showed upregulation of

  1. Potent and selective oxytocin receptor agonists without disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yusuke; Sakimura, Katsuya; Shimizu, Yuji; Nakayama, Masaharu; Terao, Yasuko; Yano, Takahiko; Asami, Taiji

    2017-06-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide involved in a wide variety of physiological actions, both peripherally and centrally. Many human studies have revealed the potential of OT to treat autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. OT interacts with the OT receptor (OTR) as well as vasopressin 1a and 1b receptors (V 1a R, V 1b R) as an agonist, and agonistic activity for V 1a R and V 1b R may have a negative impact on the therapeutic effects of OTR agonism in the CNS. An OTR-selective agonistic peptide, FE 202767, in which the structural differences from OT are a sulfide bond instead of a disulfide bond, and N-alkylglycine replacement for Pro at position 7, was reported. However, the effects of amino acid substitutions in OT have not been comprehensively investigated to compare OTR, V 1a R, and V 1b R activities. This led us to obtain a new OTR-selective analog by comprehensive amino acid substitutions of OT and replacement of the disulfide bond. A systematic amino acid scanning (Ala, Leu, Phe, Ser, Glu, or Arg) of desamino OT (dOT) at positions 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 8 revealed the tolerability for the substitution at positions 7 and 8. Further detailed study showed that trans-4-hydroxyproline (trans-Hyp) at position 7 and γ-methylleucine [Leu(Me)] at position 8 were markedly effective for improving receptor selectivity without decreasing the potency at the OTR. Subsequently, a combination of these amino acid substitutions with the replacement of the disulfide bond of dOT analogs with a sulfide bond (carba analog) or an amide bond (lactam analog) yielded several promising analogs, including carba-1-[trans-Hyp 7 ,Leu(Me) 8 ]dOT (14) with a higher potency (7.2pM) at OTR than that of OT and marked selectivity (>10,000-fold) over V 1a R and V 1b R. Hence, we investigated comprehensive modification of OT and obtained new OT analogs that exhibited high potency at OTR with marked selectivity. These OTR-selective agonists could be useful to investigate OTR-mediated effects on

  2. Pharmacological characterization of the new histamine H4 receptor agonist VUF 8430

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Herman D; Adami, Maristella; Guaita, Elena; Werfel, Thomas; Smits, Rogier A; de Esch, Iwan JP; Bakker, Remko A; Gutzmer, Ralf; Coruzzi, Gabriella; Leurs, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We compare the pharmacological profiles of a new histamine H4 receptor agonist 2-(2-guanidinoethyl)isothiourea (VUF 8430) with that of a previously described H4 receptor agonist, 4-methylhistamine. Experimental approach: Radioligand binding and functional assays were performed using histamine H4 receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines. Compounds were also evaluated ex vivo in monocyte-derived dendritic cells endogenously expressing H4 receptors and in vivo in anaesthetized rats for gastric acid secretion activity. Key results: Both VUF 8430 and 4-methylhistamine were full agonists at human H4 receptors with lower affinity at rat and mouse H4 receptors. Both compounds induced chemotaxis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. VUF 8430 also showed reasonable affinity and was a full agonist at the H3 receptor. Agmatine is a metabolite of arginine, structurally related to VUF 8430, and was a H4 receptor agonist with micromolar affinity. At histamine H3 receptors, agmatine was a full agonist, whereas 4-methylhistamine was an agonist only at high concentrations. Both VUF 8430 and agmatine were inactive at H1 and H2 receptors, whereas 4-methylhistamine is as active as histamine at H2 receptors. In vivo, VUF 8430 only caused a weak secretion of gastric acid mediated by H2 receptors, whereas 4-methylhistamine, dimaprit, histamine and amthamine, at equimolar doses, induced 2.5- to 6-fold higher output than VUF 8430. Conclusions and implications: Our results suggest complementary use of 4-methylhistamine and VUF 8430 as H4 receptor agonists. Along with H4 receptor antagonists, both agonists can serve as useful pharmacological tools in studies of histamine H4 receptors. PMID:19413569

  3. Interaction of a radiolabeled agonist with cardiac muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Harden, T.K.; Meeker, R.B.; Martin, M.W.

    The interaction of a radiolabeled muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist, (methyl-/sup 3/H)oxotremorine acetate ((/sup 3/H)OXO), with a washed membrane preparation derived from rat heart, has been studied. In binding assays at 4 degrees C, the rate constants for association and dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO were 2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 and 5 X 10(-3) min-1, respectively, Saturation binding isotherms indicated that binding was to a single population of sites with a Kd of approximately 300 pM. The density of (/sup 3/H)OXO binding sites (90-100 fmol/mg of protein) was approximately 75% of that determined for the radiolabeled receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate.more » Both muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO with high affinity and Hill slopes of approximately one. Guanine nucleotides completely inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO. This effect was on the maximum binding (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)OXO with no change occurring in the Kd; the order of potency for five nucleotides was guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio-triphosphate) greater than 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate greater than GTP greater than or equal to guanosine/diphosphate greater than GMP. The (/sup 3/H)OXO-induced interaction of muscarinic receptors with a guanine nucleotide binding protein was stable to solubilization. That is, membrane receptors that were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)OXO could be solubilized with digitonin, and the addition of guanine nucleotides to the soluble, (/sup 3/H)OXO-labeled complex resulted in dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO from the receptor. Pretreatment of membranes with relatively low concentrations of N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)OXO binding by 85% with no change in the Kd of (/sup 3/H)OXO, and with no effect on (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding.« less

  4. Fast Modulation of μ-Opioid Receptor (MOR) Recycling Is Mediated by Receptor Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Roman-Vendrell, Cristina; Yu, Y. Joy; Yudowski, Guillermo Ariel

    2012-01-01

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the main target of endogenous opioid neuropeptides and morphine. Upon activation by ligands, MORs are rapidly internalized via clathrin-coated pits in heterologous cells and dissociated striatal neurons. After initial endocytosis, resensitized receptors recycle back to the cell surface by vesicular delivery for subsequent cycles of activation. MOR trafficking has been linked to opioid tolerance after acute exposure to agonist, but it is also involved in the resensitization process. Several studies describe the regulation and mechanism of MOR endocytosis, but little is known about the recycling of resensitized receptors to the cell surface. To study this process, we induced internalization of MOR with [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and morphine and imaged in real time single vesicles recycling receptors to the cell surface. We determined single vesicle recycling kinetics and the number of receptors contained in them. Then we demonstrated that rapid vesicular delivery of recycling MORs to the cell surface was mediated by the actin-microtubule cytoskeleton. Recycling was also dependent on Rab4, Rab11, and the Ca2+-sensitive motor protein myosin Vb. Finally, we showed that recycling is acutely modulated by the presence of agonists and the levels of cAMP. Our work identifies a novel trafficking mechanism that increases the number of cell surface MORs during acute agonist exposure, effectively reducing the development of opioid tolerance. PMID:22378794

  5. Novel kinin B1 receptor agonists with improved pharmacological profiles.

    PubMed

    Côté, Jérôme; Savard, Martin; Bovenzi, Veronica; Bélanger, Simon; Morin, Josée; Neugebauer, Witold; Larouche, Annie; Dubuc, Céléna; Gobeil, Fernand

    2009-04-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that inducible kinin B1 receptors (B1R) may play beneficial and protecting roles in cardiovascular-related pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, and ischemic organ diseases. Peptide B1R agonists bearing optimized pharmacological features (high potency, selectivity and stability toward proteolysis) hold promise as valuable therapeutic agents in the treatment of these diseases. In the present study, we used solid-phase methodology to synthesize a series of novel peptide analogues based on the sequence of Sar[dPhe(8)]desArg(9)-bradykinin, a relatively stable peptide agonist with moderate affinity for the human B1R. We evaluated the pharmacological properties of these peptides using (1) in vitro competitive binding experiments on recombinant human B1R and B2R (for index of selectivity determination) in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK-293T cells), (2) ex vivo vasomotor assays on isolated human umbilical veins expressing endogenous human B1R, and (3) in vivo blood pressure tests using anesthetized lipopolysaccharide-immunostimulated rabbits. Key chemical modifications at the N-terminus, the positions 3 and 5 on Sar[dPhe(8)]desArg(9)-bradykinin led to potent analogues. For example, peptides 18 (SarLys[Hyp(3),Cha(5), dPhe(8)]desArg(9)-bradykinin) and 20 (SarLys[Hyp(3),Igl(5), dPhe(8)]desArg(9)-bradykinin) outperformed the parental molecule in terms of affinity, functional potency and duration of action in vitro and in vivo. These selective agonists should be valuable in future animal and human studies to investigate the potential benefits of B1R activation.

  6. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  7. Trial Watch: Toll-like receptor agonists in oncological indications.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Fernando; Vacchelli, Erika; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle; Henrik Ter Meulen, Jan; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of enzymatically inactive, single membrane-spanning proteins that recognize a wide panel of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Besides constituting a crucial component of the innate immune response to bacterial and viral pathogens, TLRs appear to play a major role in anticancer immunosurveillance. In line with this notion, several natural and synthetic TLR ligands have been intensively investigated for their ability to boost tumor-targeting immune responses elicited by a variety of immunotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic interventions. Three of these agents are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or equivalent regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients: the so-called bacillus Calmette-Guérin, monophosphoryl lipid A, and imiquimod. However, the number of clinical trials testing the therapeutic potential of both FDA-approved and experimental TLR agonists in cancer patients is stably decreasing, suggesting that drug developers and oncologists are refocusing their interest on alternative immunostimulatory agents. Here, we summarize recent findings on the use of TLR agonists in cancer patients and discuss how the clinical evaluation of FDA-approved and experimental TLR ligands has evolved since the publication of our first Trial Watch dealing with this topic.

  8. Triiodothyronine, beta-adrenergic receptors, agonist responses, and exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Martin, W H

    1993-07-01

    Although thyroid hormone excess results in increased beta-adrenergic receptor density or agonist responses in some cells of experimental animals, the role of these effects in contributing to clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism in human subjects is unclear. To shed further light on this issue, we characterized the effect of 2 weeks of excess triiodothyronine administration on cardiac and metabolic responses to graded-dose isoproterenol infusion, skeletal muscle beta-adrenergic receptor density, and physiologic determinants of exercise capacity in young healthy subjects. The slope of the heart rate response to isoproterenol was 36% greater (p < 0.05) after triiodothyronine administration. In addition, beta-adrenergic receptor density was increased (p < 0.01) in all types of skeletal muscle fibers. Maximal oxygen uptake during treadmill exercise declined 5% (p < 0.001) after triiodothyronine administration because of a decrease in the arteriovenous oxygen difference (p < 0.05). The plasma lactate response to submaximal exercise was 25% greater (p < 0.01) in the hyperthyroid state. These effects were paralleled by a decrement in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and a decrease in cross-sectional area of type 2A skeletal myocytes. Thus, thyroid hormone excess enhances cardiac beta-adrenergic sensitivity under in vivo conditions in human subjects. Nevertheless, exercise capacity is diminished in the hyperthyroid state, an effect that may be related to reduced skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and type 2A fiber atrophy.

  9. Sarizotan, a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor agonist and dopamine receptor ligand. 1. Neurochemical profile.

    PubMed

    Bartoszyk, G D; Van Amsterdam, C; Greiner, H E; Rautenberg, W; Russ, H; Seyfried, C A

    2004-02-01

    Sarizotan exhibited high affinities only to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors and dopamine DA D4>D3>D2 receptors with the profile of a 5-HT1A agonist and DA antagonist demonstrated by the inhibition of cAMP-stimulation and guinea pig ileum contraction, decreased accumulation of the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan and increased levels of 5-HT metabolites, increased accumulation of DA precursor dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and the reduced levels of DA metabolites in intact rats. However, sarizotan at higher doses decreased DA precursor accumulation in reserpinized rats and induced contralateral rotational behavior in unilaterally substantia nigra lesioned rats, indicating some intrinsic dopaminergic activity; at D2 receptors sarizotan may act as a partial agonist, depending on the dopaminergic impulse flow. Sarizotan represents a new approach for the treatment of extrapyramidal motor complications such as l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

  10. Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonists: The 6β-Naltrexamines

    PubMed Central

    Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Neal, Adrian P.; Bradbury, Faye A.; Purington, Lauren C.; Aceto, Mario D.; Harris, Louis S.; Lewis, John W.; Traynor, John R.; Husbands, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Ligands from the naltrexamine series have consistently demonstrated agonist activity at kappa opioid receptors (KOR), with varying activity at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Various 6β-cinnamoylamino derivatives were made with the aim of generating ligands with a KOR agonist/MOR partial agonist profile, as ligands with this activity may be of interest as treatment agents for cocaine abuse. The ligands all displayed the desired high affinity, non-selective binding in vitro and in the functional assays were high efficacy KOR agonists with some partial agonist activity at MOR. Two of the new ligands (12a, 12b) have been evaluated in vivo, with 12a acting as a KOR agonist, and therefore somewhat similar to the previously evaluated analogues 3–6, while 12b displayed predominant MOR agonist activity. PMID:19253970

  11. Functional efficacy of adenosine A2A receptor agonists is positively correlated to their receptor residence time

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Mulder-Krieger, Thea; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The adenosine A2A receptor belongs to the superfamily of GPCRs and is a promising therapeutic target. Traditionally, the discovery of novel agents for the A2A receptor has been guided by their affinity for the receptor. This parameter is determined under equilibrium conditions, largely ignoring the kinetic aspects of the ligand-receptor interaction. The aim of this study was to assess the binding kinetics of A2A receptor agonists and explore a possible relationship with their functional efficacy. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We set up, validated and optimized a kinetic radioligand binding assay (a so-called competition association assay) at the A2A receptor from which the binding kinetics of unlabelled ligands were determined. Subsequently, functional efficacies of A2A receptor agonists were determined in two different assays: a novel label-free impedance-based assay and a more traditional cAMP determination. KEY RESULTS A simplified competition association assay yielded an accurate determination of the association and dissociation rates of unlabelled A2A receptor ligands at their receptor. A correlation was observed between the receptor residence time of A2A receptor agonists and their intrinsic efficacies in both functional assays. The affinity of A2A receptor agonists was not correlated to their functional efficacy. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study indicates that the molecular basis of different agonist efficacies at the A2A receptor lies within their different residence times at this receptor. PMID:22324512

  12. Activation of single heteromeric GABAA receptor ion channels by full and partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Martin; Kristiansen, Uffe; Ebert, Bjarke; Frølund, Bente; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl; Smart, Trevor G

    2004-01-01

    The linkage between agonist binding and the activation of a GABAA receptor ion channel is yet to be resolved. This aspect was examined on human recombinant α1β2γ2S GABAA receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney cells using the following series of receptor agonists: GABA, isoguvacine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), isonipecotic acid, piperidine-4-sulphonic acid (P4S), imidazole-4-acetic acid (IAA), 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isothiazolol (thio-4-PIOL) and 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol (4-PIOL). Whole-cell concentration–response curves enabled the agonists to be categorized into four classes based upon their maximum responses. Single channel analyses revealed that the channel conductance of 25–27 pS was unaffected by the agonists. However, two open states were resolved from the open period distributions with mean open times reduced 5-fold by the weakest partial agonists. Using saturating agonist concentrations, estimates of the channel shutting rate, α, ranged from 200 to 600 s−1. The shut period distributions were described by three or four components and for the weakest partial agonists, the interburst shut periods increased whilst the mean burst durations and longest burst lengths were reduced relative to the full agonists. From the burst analyses, the opening rates for channel activation, β, and the total dissociation rates, k−1, for the agonists leaving the receptor were estimated. The agonist efficacies were larger for the full agonists (E ∼7−9) compared to the weak partial agonists (∼0.4–0.6). Overall, changes in agonist efficacy largely determined the different agonist profiles with contributions from the agonist affinities and the degree of receptor desensitization. From this we conclude that GABAA receptor activation does not occur in a switch-like manner since the agonist recognition sites are flexible, accommodating diverse agonist structures which differentially influence the opening and shutting rates of the ion

  13. Metformin sensitizes triple-negative breast cancer to proapoptotic TRAIL receptor agonists by suppressing XIAP expression.

    PubMed

    Strekalova, Elena; Malin, Dmitry; Rajanala, Harisha; Cryns, Vincent L

    2017-06-01

    Despite robust antitumor activity in diverse preclinical models, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor agonists have not demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials, underscoring the need to identify agents that enhance their activity. We postulated that the metabolic stress induced by the diabetes drug metformin would sensitize breast cancer cells to TRAIL receptor agonists. Human triple (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2)-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines were treated with TRAIL receptor agonists (monoclonal antibodies or TRAIL peptide), metformin, or the combination. The effects on cell survival, caspase activation, and expression of TRAIL receptors and the antiapoptotic protein XIAP were determined. In addition, XIAP was silenced by RNAi in TNBC cells and the effects on sensitivity to TRAIL were determined. The antitumor effects of metformin, TRAIL, or the combination were evaluated in an orthotopic model of metastatic TNBC. Metformin sensitized diverse TNBC cells to TRAIL receptor agonists. Metformin selectively enhanced the sensitivity of transformed breast epithelial cells to TRAIL receptor agonist-induced caspase activation and apoptosis with little effect on untransformed breast epithelial cells. These effects of metformin were accompanied by robust reductions in the protein levels of XIAP, a negative regulator of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Silencing XIAP in TNBC cells mimicked the TRAIL-sensitizing effects of metformin. Metformin also enhanced the antitumor effects of TRAIL in a metastatic murine TNBC model. Our findings indicate that metformin enhances the activity of TRAIL receptor agonists, thereby supporting the rationale for additional translational studies combining these agents.

  14. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, Esam E; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-07-01

    We mutated key amino acids of the human variant of the M1 muscarinic receptor that target ligand binding, receptor activation, and receptor-G protein interaction. We compared the effects of these mutations on the action of two atypical M1 functionally preferring agonists (N-desmethylclozapine and xanomeline) and two classical non-selective orthosteric agonists (carbachol and oxotremorine). Mutations of D105 in the orthosteric binding site and mutation of D99 located out of the orthosteric binding site decreased affinity of all tested agonists that was translated as a decrease in potency in accumulation of inositol phosphates and intracellular calcium mobilization. Mutation of D105 decreased the potency of the atypical agonist xanomeline more than that of the classical agonists carbachol and oxotremorine. Mutation of the residues involved in receptor activation (D71) and coupling to G-proteins (R123) completely abolished the functional responses to both classical and atypical agonists. Our data show that both classical and atypical agonists activate hM1 receptors by the same molecular switch that involves D71 in the second transmembrane helix. The principal difference among the studied agonists is rather in the way they interact with D105 in the orthosteric binding site. Furthermore, our data demonstrate a key role of D105 in xanomeline wash-resistant binding and persistent activation of hM1 by wash-resistant xanomeline. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of adenosine receptor agonist on the rocuroniuminduced neuromuscular block and sugammadex-induced recovery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Beom; Lee, Sangseok; Choi, Hey Ran; In, Junyong; Chang, Young Jin; Kim, Ha Jung; Ro, Young Jin; Yang, Hong-Seuk

    2018-04-25

    Several types of receptors are found at neuromuscular presynaptic membranes. Presynaptic inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2A receptors mediate different modulatory functions on acetylcholine release. This study investigated whether adenosine A1 receptor agonist contributes to the first twitch tension (T1) of train-of-four (TOF) stimulation depression and TOF fade during rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade, and sugammadex-induced recovery. Phrenic nerve-diaphragm tissues were obtained from 30 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Each tissue specimen was randomly allocated to either control group or 2-chloroadenosine (CADO, 10 μM) group. One hour of reaction time was allowed before initiating main experimental data collection. Loading and boost doses of rocuronium were sequentially administered until > 95% depression of the T1 was achieved. After confirming that there was no T1 twitch tension response, 15 min of resting time was allowed, after which sugammadex was administered. Recovery profiles (T1, TOF ratio [TOFR], and recovery index) were collected for 1 h and compared between groups. There were statistically significant differences on amount of rocuronium (actually used during experiment), TOFR changes during concentration-response of rocuronium (P = 0.04), and recovery profiles (P < 0.01) of CADO group comparing with the control group. However, at the initial phase of this experiment, dose-response of rocuronium in each group demonstrated no statistically significant differences (P = 0.12). The adenosine A1 receptor agonist (CADO) influenced the TOFR and the recovery profile. After activating adenosine receptor, sugammadex-induced recovery from rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block was delayed.

  16. Deprescribing benzodiazepine receptor agonists: Evidence-based clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Pottie, Kevin; Thompson, Wade; Davies, Simon; Grenier, Jean; Sadowski, Cheryl A; Welch, Vivian; Holbrook, Anne; Boyd, Cynthia; Swenson, Robert; Ma, Andy; Farrell, Barbara

    2018-05-01

    To develop an evidence-based guideline to help clinicians make decisions about when and how to safely taper and stop benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BZRAs); to focus on the highest level of evidence available and seek input from primary care professionals in the guideline development, review, and endorsement processes. The overall team comprised 8 clinicians (1 family physician, 2 psychiatrists, 1 clinical psychologist, 1 clinical pharmacologist, 2 clinical pharmacists, and 1 geriatrician) and a methodologist; members disclosed conflicts of interest. For guideline development, a systematic process was used, including the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. Evidence was generated by conducting a systematic review of BZRA deprescribing trials for insomnia, as well as performing a review of reviews of the harms of continued BZRA use and narrative syntheses of patient preferences and resource implications. This evidence and GRADE quality of evidence ratings were used to generate recommendations. The team refined guideline content and recommendations through consensus and synthesized clinical considerations to address front-line clinician questions. The draft guideline was reviewed by clinicians and stakeholders. We recommend that deprescribing (tapering slowly) of BZRAs be offered to elderly adults (≥ 65 years) who take BZRAs, regardless of duration of use, and suggest that deprescribing (tapering slowly) be offered to adults aged 18 to 64 who have used BZRAs for more than 4 weeks. These recommendations apply to patients who use BZRAs to treat insomnia on its own (primary insomnia) or comorbid insomnia where potential underlying comorbidities are effectively managed. This guideline does not apply to those with other sleep disorders or untreated anxiety, depression, or other physical or mental health conditions that might be causing or aggravating insomnia. Benzodiazepine receptor agonists are associated with harms

  17. Structure/function relationships of calcitonin analogues as agonists, antagonists, or inverse agonists in a constitutively activated receptor cell system.

    PubMed

    Pozvek, G; Hilton, J M; Quiza, M; Houssami, S; Sexton, P M

    1997-04-01

    The structure/function relationship of salmon calcitonin (sCT) analogues was investigated in heterologous calcitonin receptor (CTR) expression systems. sCT analogues with progressive amino-terminal truncations intermediate of sCT-(1-32) to sCT-(8-32) were examined for their ability to act as agonists, antagonists, or inverse agonists. Two CTR cell clones, B8-H10 and G12-E12, which express approximately 5 million and 25,000 C1b receptors/cell, respectively, were used for this study. The B8-H10 clone has an approximately 80-fold increase in basal levels of intracellular cAMP due to constitutive activation of the overexpressed receptor. In whole-cell competition binding studies, sCT-(1-32) was more potent than any of its amino-terminally truncated analogues in competition for 125I-sCT binding. In cAMP accumulation studies, sCT-(1-32) and modified analogues sCT-(2-32) and sCT-(3-32) had agonist activities. SDZ-216-710, with an amino-terminal truncation of four amino acids, behaved as a partial agonist/antagonist, whereas amino-terminal truncations of six or seven amino acid residues produced a 16-fold reduction in basal cAMP levels and attenuated the response to the agonist sCT-(1-32) in the constitutively active CTR system. This inverse agonist effect was insensitive to pertussis toxin inhibition. In contrast, the inverse agonist activity of these peptides was not observed in the nonconstitutively active CTR system, in which sCT analogues with amino-terminal truncations of four or more amino acids behaved as neutral competitive antagonists. These results suggest that the inverse agonist activity is mediated by stabilization of the inactive state of the receptor, which does not couple to G protein, and attenuates basal signaling initiated by ligand-independent activation of the effector adenylyl cyclase.

  18. Development of novel neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) selective agonists with resistance to proteolytic degradation.

    PubMed

    Misu, Ryosuke; Oishi, Shinya; Yamada, Ai; Yamamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Fuko; Yamamoto, Koki; Noguchi, Taro; Ohno, Hiroaki; Okamura, Hiroaki; Ohkura, Satoshi; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2014-10-23

    Neurokinin B (NKB) regulates the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) via activation of the neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R). We evaluated the biological stability of NK3R selective agonists to develop novel NK3R agonists to regulate reproductive functions. On the basis of degradation profiles, several peptidomimetic derivatives were designed. The modification of senktide with (E)-alkene dipeptide isostere generated a novel potent NK3R agonist with high stability and prolonged bioactivity.

  19. Identification of novel selective V2 receptor non-peptide agonists.

    PubMed

    Del Tredici, Andria L; Vanover, Kim E; Knapp, Anne E; Bertozzi, Sine M; Nash, Norman R; Burstein, Ethan S; Lameh, Jelveh; Currier, Erika A; Davis, Robert E; Brann, Mark R; Mohell, Nina; Olsson, Roger; Piu, Fabrice

    2008-10-30

    Peptides with agonist activity at the vasopressin V(2) receptor are used clinically to treat fluid homeostasis disorders such as polyuria and central diabetes insipidus. Of these peptides, the most commonly used is desmopressin, which displays poor bioavailability as well as potent activity at the V(1b) receptor, with possible stress-related adverse effects. Thus, there is a strong need for the development of small molecule chemistries with selective V(2) receptor agonist activity. Using the functional cell-based assay Receptor Selection and Amplification Technology (R-SAT((R))), a screening effort identified three small molecule chemotypes (AC-94544, AC-88324, and AC-110484) with selective agonist activity at the V(2) receptor. One of these compounds, AC-94544, displayed over 180-fold selectivity at the V(2) receptor compared to related vasopressin and oxytocin receptors and no activity at 28 other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). All three compounds also showed partial agonist activity at the V(2) receptor in a cAMP accumulation assay. In addition, in a rat model of central diabetes insipidus, AC-94544 was able to significantly reduce urine output in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AC-94544, AC-88324, and AC-110484 represent novel opportunities for the treatment of disorders associated with V(2) receptor agonist deficiency.

  20. Mechanical stress activates NMDA receptors in the absence of agonists.

    PubMed

    Maneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Maki, Bruce; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Belin, Sophie; Popescu, Gabriela K; Sachs, Frederick; Hua, Susan Z

    2017-01-03

    While studying the physiological response of primary rat astrocytes to fluid shear stress in a model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), we found that shear stress induced Ca 2+ entry. The influx was inhibited by MK-801, a specific pore blocker of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) channels, and this occurred in the absence of agonists. Other NMDA open channel blockers ketamine and memantine showed a similar effect. The competitive glutamate antagonists AP5 and GluN2B-selective inhibitor ifenprodil reduced NMDA-activated currents, but had no effect on the mechanically induced Ca 2+ influx. Extracellular Mg 2+ at 2 mM did not significantly affect the shear induced Ca 2+ influx, but at 10 mM it produced significant inhibition. Patch clamp experiments showed mechanical activation of NMDAR and inhibition by MK-801. The mechanical sensitivity of NMDARs may play a role in the normal physiology of fluid flow in the glymphatic system and it has obvious relevance to TBI.

  1. Mechanical stress activates NMDA receptors in the absence of agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Maki, Bruce; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Belin, Sophie; Popescu, Gabriela K.; Sachs, Frederick; Hua, Susan Z.

    2017-01-01

    While studying the physiological response of primary rat astrocytes to fluid shear stress in a model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), we found that shear stress induced Ca2+ entry. The influx was inhibited by MK-801, a specific pore blocker of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) channels, and this occurred in the absence of agonists. Other NMDA open channel blockers ketamine and memantine showed a similar effect. The competitive glutamate antagonists AP5 and GluN2B-selective inhibitor ifenprodil reduced NMDA-activated currents, but had no effect on the mechanically induced Ca2+ influx. Extracellular Mg2+ at 2 mM did not significantly affect the shear induced Ca2+ influx, but at 10 mM it produced significant inhibition. Patch clamp experiments showed mechanical activation of NMDAR and inhibition by MK-801. The mechanical sensitivity of NMDARs may play a role in the normal physiology of fluid flow in the glymphatic system and it has obvious relevance to TBI. PMID:28045032

  2. Pulmonary delivery of a GLP-1 receptor agonist, BMS-686117.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Mathias, Neil; Moench, Paul; Chi, Cecilia; Desikan, Sridhar; Hussain, Munir; Smith, Ronald L

    2009-01-21

    Alternate delivery route of therapeutic peptides is an attractive non-invasive option to patients who must chronically self-administer their medication through injections. In recent years, much attention has centered on pulmonary peptide delivery of peptide drugs such as insulin and GLP-1 mimetic peptides in the treatment of type II diabetes. In this study, we assessed the feasibility of delivering BMS-686117, an 11-mer GLP-1 receptor peptide agonist, to the lung in rats via intratracheal administration. The pharmacokinetic profiles of three spray-dried, prototype inhaled powder formulations, 80/20 BMS-686117/trehalose (I), 100% BMS-686117 (II), and 20/80 BMS-686117/mannitol (III), as well as a lyophilized BMS-686117 powder, were compared with intravenously and subcutaneously administered peptide. The spray-dried formulations were mostly spherical particles with narrow particle size distribution between 2 to 10 microm, which are better suited for inhalation delivery than the lyophilized, irregular shape powder with a wide particle size distribution between 2 to 100 microm. Prototype III exhibited the best physical characteristics and in vivo performance, with bioavailability of 45% relative to subcutaneous administration. The T(max) for lung delivered peptide formulations were almost twice as fast as subcutaneous injection, suggesting potential for rapid absorption and onset of action. This study demonstrated that pulmonary delivery is a promising, non-invasive route for the administration of BMS-686117.

  3. Novel glucocorticoid receptor agonists in the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Coppola, Angelo; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids are the only drugs that effectively suppress the airway inflammation, but they can induce considerable systemic and adverse effects when they are administered chronically at high doses. Consequently, the pharmaceutical industry is still searching for newer entities with an improved therapeutic index. Herein, the authors review the research in the glucocorticoid field to identify ligands of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These ligands preferentially induce transrepression with little or no transactivating activity, in order to have a potent anti-inflammatory action and a low side-effects profile. Several agents have been synthesized, but few have been tested in experimental models of asthma. Furthermore, only three (BI-54903, GW870086X and AZD5423) have entered clinical development, although the development of at least one of them (BI-54903) was discontinued. The reason for the limited success so far obtained is that the model of transactivation versus transrepression is a too simplistic representation of GR activity. It is difficult to uncouple the therapeutic and harmful effects mediated by GR, but some useful information that might change the current perspective is appearing in the literature. The generation of gene expression 'fingerprints' produced by different GR agonists in target and off-target human tissues could be useful in identifying drug candidates with an improved therapeutic ratio.

  4. Fixed ratio combinations of glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists with basal insulin: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liakopoulou, Paraskevi; Liakos, Aris; Vasilakou, Despoina; Athanasiadou, Eleni; Bekiari, Eleni; Kazakos, Kyriakos; Tsapas, Apostolos

    2017-06-01

    Basal insulin controls primarily fasting plasma glucose but causes hypoglycaemia and weight gain, whilst glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists induce weight loss without increasing risk for hypoglycaemia. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials to investigate the efficacy and safety of fixed ratio combinations of basal insulin with glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists. We searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library as well as conference abstracts up to December 2016. We assessed change in haemoglobin A 1c , body weight, and incidence of hypoglycaemia and gastrointestinal adverse events. We included eight studies with 5732 participants in the systematic review. Switch from basal insulin to fixed ratio combinations with a glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonist was associated with 0.72% reduction in haemoglobin A 1c [95% confidence interval -1.03 to -0.41; I 2  = 93%] and 2.35 kg reduction in body weight (95% confidence interval -3.52 to -1.19; I 2  = 93%), reducing also risk for hypoglycaemia [odds ratio 0.70; 95% confidence interval 0.57 to 0.86; I 2  = 85%] but increasing incidence of nausea (odds ratio 6.89; 95% confidence interval 3.73-12.74; I 2  = 79%). Similarly, switching patients from treatment with a glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonist to a fixed ratio combination with basal insulin was associated with 0.94% reduction in haemoglobin A 1c (95% confidence interval -1.11 to -0.77) and an increase in body weight by 2.89 kg (95% confidence interval 2.17-3.61). Fixed ratio combinations of basal insulin with glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists improve glycaemic control whilst balancing out risk for hypoglycaemia and gastrointestinal side effects.

  5. Agonist-Antagonist Interaction at the Cholinergic Receptor of Denervated Diaphragm,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A study has been made of the cholinergic receptor induced by chronic denervation in the rat diaphragm. The agonists acetylcholine, carbachol and...muscle cells. Supramaximally effective doses of agonists caused desensitization of the preparation; however, there was no cross tachyphylaxis between acetylcholine and carbachol . (Author)

  6. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a bivalent micro opiate and adenosine A1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Smitha C; Ghosh, Nandita; By, Youlet; Berthault, Aurélie; Virolleaud, Marie-Alice; Carrega, Louis; Chouraqui, Gaëlle; Commeiras, Laurent; Condo, Jocelyne; Attolini, Mireille; Gaudel-Siri, Anouk; Ruf, Jean; Parrain, Jean-Luc; Rodriguez, Jean; Guieu, Régis

    2009-12-01

    The cross talk between different membrane receptors is the source of increasing research. We designed and synthesized a new hetero-bivalent ligand that has antagonist properties on both A(1) adenosine and mu opiate receptors with a K(i) of 0.8+/-0.05 and 0.7+/-0.03 microM, respectively. This hybrid molecule increases cAMP production in cells that over express the mu receptor as well as those over expressing the A(1) adenosine receptor and reverses the antalgic effects of mu and A(1) adenosine receptor agonists in animals.

  7. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-05-03

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations.

  8. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  9. Agemone mexicana flavanones; apposite inverse agonists of the β2-adrenergic receptor in asthma treatment.

    PubMed

    Eniafe, Gabriel O; Metibemu, Damilohun S; Omotuyi, Olaposi I; Ogunleye, Adewale J; Inyang, Olumide K; Adelakun, Niyi S; Adeniran, Yakubu O; Adewumi, Bamidele; Enejoh, Ojochenemi A; Osunmuyiwa, Joseph O; Shodehinde, Sidiqat A; Oyeneyin, Oluwatoba E

    2018-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease of the airway that poses a major threat to human health. With increase industrialization in the developed and developing countries, the incidence of asthma is on the rise. The β2-adrenergic receptor is an important target in designing anti-asthmatic drugs. The synthetic agonists of the β2-adrenergic receptor used over the years proved effective, but with indispensable side effects, thereby limiting their therapeutic use on a long-term scale. Inverse agonists of this receptor, although initially contraindicated, had been reported to have long-term beneficial effects. Phytochemicals from Agemone mexicana were screened against the human β2-adrenergic receptor in the agonist, inverse agonist, covalent agonist, and the antagonist conformations. Molecular docking of the phyto-constituents showed that the plant constituents bind better to the inverse agonist bound conformation of the protein, and revealed two flavanones; eriodictyol and hesperitin, with lower free energy (ΔG) values and higher affinities to the inverse agonist bound receptor than the co-crystallized ligand. Eriodictyol and hesperitin bind with the glide score of -10.684 and - 9.958 kcal/mol respectively, while the standard compound ICI-118551, binds with glide score of -9.503 kcal/mol. Further interaction profiling at the protein orthosteric site and ADME/Tox screening confirmed the drug-like properties of these compounds.

  10. Electrophysiological Perspectives on the Therapeutic Use of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Partial AgonistsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Trocmé-Thibierge, Caryn; Guendisch, Daniela; Al Rubaiy, Shehd Abdullah Abbas; Bloom, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Partial agonist therapies rely variously on two hypotheses: the partial agonists have their effects through chronic low-level receptor activation or the partial agonists work by decreasing the effects of endogenous or exogenous full agonists. The relative significance of these activities probably depends on whether acute or chronic effects are considered. We studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes to test a model for the acute interactions between acetylcholine (ACh) and weak partial agonists. Data were best-fit to a basic competition model that included an additional factor for noncompetitive inhibition. Partial agonist effects were compared with the nAChR antagonist bupropion in prolonged bath application experiments that were designed to mimic prolonged drug exposure typical of therapeutic drug delivery. A primary effect of prolonged application of nicotine was to decrease the response of all nAChR subtypes to acute applications of ACh. In addition, nicotine, cytisine, and varenicline produced detectable steady-state activation of α4β2* [(α4)2(β2)3, (α4)3(β2)2, and (α4)2(β2)2α5)] receptor subtypes that was not seen with other test compounds. Partial agonists produced no detectable steady-state activation of α7 nAChR, but seemed to show small potentiation of ACh-evoked responses; however, “run-up” of α7 ACh responses was also sometimes observed under control conditions. Potential off-target effects of the partial agonists therefore included the modulation of α7 responses by α4β2 partial agonists and decreases in α4β2* responses by α7-selective agonists. These data indicate the dual effects expected for α4β2* partial agonists and provide models and insights for utility of partial agonists in therapeutic development. PMID:21285282

  11. Ghrelin and motilin receptor agonists: time to introduce bias into drug design.

    PubMed

    Sanger, G J

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin and motilin receptor agonists increase gastric motility and are attractive drug targets. However, 14 years after the receptors were described (18-24 years since ligands became available) the inactivity of the ghrelin agonist TZP-102 in patients with gastroparesis joins the list of unsuccessful motilin agonists. Fundamental questions must be asked. Pustovit et al., have now shown that the ghrelin agonist ulimorelin evokes prolonged increases in rat colorectal propulsion yet responses to other ghrelin agonists fade. Similarly, different motilin agonists induce short- or long-lasting effects in a cell-dependent manner. Together, these and other data create the hypothesis that the receptors can be induced to preferentially signal ('biased agonism') via particular pathways to evoke different responses with therapeutic advantages/disadvantages. Biased agonism has been demonstrated for ghrelin. Are motilin agonists which cause long-lasting facilitation of human stomach cholinergic function (compared with motilin) biased agonists (e.g., camicinal, under development for patients with gastric hypo-motility)? For ghrelin, additional complications exist because the therapeutic aims/mechanisms of action are uncertain, making it difficult to select the best (biased) agonist. Will ghrelin agonists be useful treatments of nausea and/or as suggested by Pustovit et al., chronic constipation? How does ghrelin increase gastric motility? As gastroparesis symptoms poorly correlate with delayed gastric emptying (yet gastro-prokinetic drugs can provide relief: e.g., low-dose erythromycin), would low doses of ghrelin and motilin agonists relieve symptoms simply by restoring neuromuscular rhythm? These questions on design and functions need addressing if ghrelin and motilin agonists are to reach patients as drugs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Differential Modulation of Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling by Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Nürnberg, Daniela; Grüters, Annette; Führer-Sakel, Dagmar; Krude, Heiko; Köhrle, Josef; Schöneberg, Torsten; Biebermann, Heike

    2011-01-01

    Trace amine-associated receptors (TAAR) are rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). TAAR are involved in modulation of neuronal, cardiac and vascular functions and they are potentially linked with neurological disorders like schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Subtype TAAR1, the best characterized TAAR so far, is promiscuous for a wide set of ligands and is activated by trace amines tyramine (TYR), phenylethylamine (PEA), octopamine (OA), but also by thyronamines, dopamine, and psycho-active drugs. Unfortunately, effects of trace amines on signaling of the two homologous β-adrenergic receptors 1 (ADRB1) and 2 (ADRB2) have not been clarified yet in detail. We, therefore, tested TAAR1 agonists TYR, PEA and OA regarding their effects on ADRB1/2 signaling by co-stimulation studies. Surprisingly, trace amines TYR and PEA are partial allosteric antagonists at ADRB1/2, whereas OA is a partial orthosteric ADRB2-antagonist and ADRB1-agonist. To specify molecular reasons for TAAR1 ligand promiscuity and for observed differences in signaling effects on particular aminergic receptors we compared TAAR, tyramine (TAR) octopamine (OAR), ADRB1/2 and dopamine receptors at the structural level. We found especially for TAAR1 that the remarkable ligand promiscuity is likely based on high amino acid similarity in the ligand-binding region compared with further aminergic receptors. On the other hand few TAAR specific properties in the ligand-binding site might determine differences in ligand-induced effects compared to ADRB1/2. Taken together, this study points to molecular details of TAAR1-ligand promiscuity and identified specific trace amines as allosteric or orthosteric ligands of particular β-adrenergic receptor subtypes. PMID:22073124

  13. Subchronic intermittent caffeine administration to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats sensitizes turning behaviour in response to dopamine D(1) but not D(2) receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; Pinna, Annalisa; Morelli, Micaela

    2005-12-01

    The effects of caffeine, an antagonist of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors, are significantly influenced by modifications in dopamine transmission. Administration of caffeine to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats induces ipsilateral turning behaviour in rats never exposed to a dopamine receptor agonist, whereas contralateral turning is elicited if rats are repeatedly primed with a dopamine receptor agonist. In this study, rats unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine and subchronically treated with an intermittent administration of caffeine (15 mg/kg) or vehicle, were administered, 3 days after discontinuations of the treatment, with the dopamine D(1) receptor agonist 1-phenyl 1,2,3,4,5-tetrahydro(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,8-diolhydrochloride (SKF 38393), the D(2)/D(3) receptor agonist quinpirole, the D(2) receptor agonist R(-)-propylnorapomorphine or the dopamine precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine. Administration of SKF 38393 (1.5 mg/kg) or L-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (6 mg/kg), but not quinpirole (0.15 mg/kg) or R(-)-propylnorapomorphine (0.01 mg/kg), induced a significantly higher contralateral turning behaviour in rats subchronically treated with caffeine than in vehicle-pretreated rats. The results show that repeated intermittent caffeine exposure enhances the motor stimulant effects elicited by dopamine agonists by a preferential sensitization of dopamine D(1) receptors.

  14. Agonist-Specific Recruitment of Arrestin Isoforms Differentially Modify Delta Opioid Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Perroy, Julie; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Smith, Monique L.; Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Bana, Alia; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-specific recruitment of arrestins facilitates functional selectivity of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Here, we describe agonist-selective recruitment of different arrestin isoforms to the delta opioid receptor in mice. A high-internalizing delta opioid receptor agonist (SNC80) preferentially recruited arrestin 2 and, in arrestin 2 knock-outs (KOs), we observed a significant increase in the potency of SNC80 to inhibit mechanical hyperalgesia and decreased acute tolerance. In contrast, the low-internalizing delta agonists (ARM390, JNJ20788560) preferentially recruited arrestin 3 with unaltered behavioral effects in arrestin 2 KOs. Surprisingly, arrestin 3 KO revealed an acute tolerance to these low-internalizing agonists, an effect never observed in wild-type animals. Furthermore, we examined delta opioid receptor–Ca2+ channel coupling in dorsal root ganglia desensitized by ARM390 and the rate of resensitization was correspondingly decreased in arrestin 3 KOs. Live-cell imaging in HEK293 cells revealed that delta opioid receptors are in pre-engaged complexes with arrestin 3 at the cell membrane and that ARM390 strengthens this membrane interaction. The disruption of these complexes in arrestin 3 KOs likely accounts for the altered responses to low-internalizing agonists. Together, our results show agonist-selective recruitment of arrestin isoforms and reveal a novel endogenous role of arrestin 3 as a facilitator of resensitization and an inhibitor of tolerance mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Agonists that bind to the same receptor can produce highly distinct signaling events and arrestins are a major mediator of this ligand bias. Here, we demonstrate that delta opioid receptor agonists differentially recruit arrestin isoforms. We found that the high-internalizing agonist SNC80 preferentially recruits arrestin 2 and knock-out (KO) of this protein results in increased efficacy of SNC80. In contrast, low-internalizing agonists (ARM390 and JNJ20788560

  15. Rational design of orally-active, pyrrolidine-based progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Scott K.; Washburn, David G.; Frazee, James S.

    2010-09-03

    Using the X-ray crystal structure of an amide-based progesterone receptor (PR) partial agonist bound to the PR ligand binding domain, a novel PR partial agonist class containing a pyrrolidine ring was designed. Members of this class of N-alkylpyrrolidines demonstrate potent and highly selective partial agonism of the progesterone receptor, and one of these analogs was shown to be efficacious upon oral dosing in the OVX rat model of estrogen opposition.

  16. Extrinsic factors regulate partial agonist efficacy of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Farroni, Jeffrey S; McCool, Brian A

    2004-08-09

    Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in many adult forebrain regions consist of alpha2 + beta heteromeric channels. This subunit composition is distinct from the alpha1 + beta channels found throughout the adult spinal cord. Unfortunately, the pharmacology of forebrain alpha2beta receptors are poorly defined compared to 'neonatal' alpha2 homomeric channels or 'spinal' alpha1beta heteromers. In addition, the pharmacologic properties of native alpha2beta glycine receptors have been generally distinct from receptors produced by heterologous expression. To identify subtype-specific pharmacologic tools for the forebrain alpha2beta receptors, it is important to identify a heterologous expression system that closely resembles these native glycine-gated chloride channels. While exploring pharmacological properties of alpha2beta glycine receptors compared to alpha2-homomers, we found that distinct heterologous expression systems appeared to differentially influence partial agonist pharmacology. The beta-amino acid taurine possessed 30-50% efficacy for alpha2-containing receptor isoforms when expressed in HEK 293 cells. However, taurine efficacy was dramatically reduced in L-cell fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained for beta-alanine. The efficacy of these partial agonists was also strongly reduced by the beta subunit. There were no significant differences in apparent strychnine affinity values calculated from concentration-response data between expression systems or subunit combinations. Nor did relative levels of expression correlate with partial agonist efficacy when compared within or between several different expression systems. Finally, disruption of the tubulin cytoskeleton reduced the efficacy of partial agonists in a subunit-dependent, but system-independent, fashion. Our results suggest that different heterologous expression systems can dramatically influence the agonist pharmacology of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. In the systems examine here

  17. Differential effects of subtype-specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists on early and late hippocampal LTP.

    PubMed

    Kroker, Katja S; Rast, Georg; Rosenbrock, Holger

    2011-12-05

    Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in several neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, Tourette's syndrome, schizophrenia, depression, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and anxiety. Currently, approaches selectively targeting the activation of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are in clinical development for treatment of memory impairment of Alzheimer's disease patients. These are α4β2 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists which are believed to enhance cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, respectively. In order to gain a better insight into the mechanistic role of these two nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in learning and memory, we investigated the effects of the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist TC-1827 and the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist SSR180711 on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a widely accepted cellular experimental model of memory formation. Generally, LTP is distinguished in an early and a late form, the former being protein-synthesis independent and the latter being protein-synthesis dependent. TC-1827 was found to increase early LTP in a bell-shaped dose dependent manner, but did not affect late LTP. In contrast, the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist SSR180711 showed enhancing effects on both early and late LTP in a bell-shaped manner. Furthermore, SSR180711 not only increased early LTP, but also transformed it into late LTP, which was not observed with the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist. Therefore, based on these findings α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (partial) agonists appear to exhibit stronger efficacy on memory improvement than α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Therapeutic Potential of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Agonists as Analgesics without Abuse Liability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although mu opioid (MOP) receptor agonists are the most commonly used analgesics for the treatment of moderate to severe pain in the clinic, the side effects of MOP agonists such as abuse liability limit their value as a medication. Research to identify novel analgesics without adverse effects is pivotal to advance the health care of humans. The nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor, the fourth opioid receptor subtype, mediates distinctive actions in nonhuman primates which suggests the possibility that activity at this receptor may result in strong analgesia in the absence of virtually all of the side effects associated with MOP agonists. The present review highlights the recent progress of pharmacological studies of NOP-related ligands in primates. Selective NOP agonists, either peptidic or nonpeptidic, produce full analgesia in various assays in primates, when delivered systemically or intrathecally. Yet small molecule NOP agonists do not serve as reinforcers, indicating a lack of abuse liability. Given that NOP agonists have low abuse liability and that coactivation of NOP and MOP receptors produces synergistic antinociception, it is worth developing bifunctional NOP/MOP ligands. The outcomes of these studies and recent developments provide new perspectives to establish a translational bridge for understanding the biobehavioral functions of NOP receptors in primates and for facilitating the development of NOP-related ligands as a new generation of analgesics without abuse liability in humans. PMID:23421672

  19. Discovery of Peripheral κ-Opioid Receptor Agonists as Novel Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinya; Sugawara, Yuji; Inada, Hideaki; Tsuji, Riichiro; Inoue, Atsushi; Tanimura, Ryuji; Shimozono, Rieko; Konno, Mitsuhiro; Ohyama, Tomofumi; Higashi, Eriko; Sakai, Chizuka; Kawai, Koji

    2017-01-01

    κ-Opioid receptor agonists with high selectivity over the μ-opioid receptor and peripheral selectivity are attractive targets in the development of drugs for pain. We have previously attempted to create novel analgesics with peripheral selective κ-opioid receptor agonist on the basis of TRK-820. In this study, we elucidated the biological properties of 17-hydroxy-cyclopropylmethyl and 10α-hydroxy derivatives. These compounds were found to have better κ-opioid receptor selectivity and peripheral selectivity than TRK-820.

  20. A RETINOIC ACID β2-RECEPTOR AGONIST EXERTS CARDIOPROTECTIVE EFFECTS.

    PubMed

    Marino, Alice; Sakamoto, Takuya; Tang, Xiao-Han; Gudas, Lorraine J; Levi, Roberto

    2018-06-15

    We previously discovered that oral treatment with AC261066, a synthetic selective agonist for the retinoic acid β2-receptor (RARβ2), decreases oxidative stress in the liver, pancreas, and kidney of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Since hyperlipidemic states are causally associated with myocardial ischemia and oxidative stress, we have now investigated the effects of AC261066 in an ex-vivo ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury model in hearts of two prototypic dysmetabolic mice. We found that a 6-week oral treatment with AC261066 in both genetically hypercholesterolemic (ApoE-/-) and obese (HFD-fed) wild-type mice exerts protective effects when their hearts are subsequently subjected to I/R ex vivo in the absence of added drug. In ApoE-/- mice this cardioprotection ensued without hyperlipidemic changes. Cardioprotection consisted of an attenuation of infarct size, diminution of norepinephrine (NE) spillover, and alleviation of reperfusion arrhythmias. This cardioprotection was associated with a reduction in oxidative stress and mast cell (MC) degranulation. We suggest that the reduction in myocardial injury and adrenergic activation, and the antiarrhythmic effects result from decreased formation of oxygen radicals and toxic aldehydes known to elicit the release of MC-derived renin, promoting the activation of local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) leading to enhanced NE release and reperfusion arrhythmias. Because these beneficial effects of AC261066 occurred at the ex-vivo level following oral drug treatment, our data suggest that AC261066 could be viewed as a therapeutic means to reduce I/R injury of the heart, and potentially also considered in the treatment of other cardiovascular ailments such as chronic arrhythmias, and cardiac failure. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. A molecular characterization of the agonist binding site of a nematode cys-loop GABA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Mark D; Kwaka, Ariel; Callanan, Micah K; Nusrat, Humza; Desaulniers, Jean-Paul; Forrester, Sean G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cys-loop GABA receptors represent important targets for human chemotherapeutics and insecticides and are potential targets for novel anthelmintics (nematicides). However, compared with insect and mammalian receptors, little is known regarding the pharmacological characteristics of nematode Cys-loop GABA receptors. Here we have investigated the agonist binding site of the Cys-loop GABA receptor UNC-49 (Hco-UNC-49) from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Experimental Approach We used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology to measure channel activation by classical GABA receptor agonists on Hco-UNC-49 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, along with site-directed mutagenesis and in silico homology modelling. Key Results The sulphonated molecules P4S and taurine had no effect on Hco-UNC-49. Other classical Cys-loop GABAA receptor agonists tested on the Hco-UNC-49B/C heteromeric channel had a rank order efficacy of GABA > trans-4-aminocrotonic acid > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid (IMA) > (R)-(−)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [R(−)-GABOB] > (S)-(+)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [S(+)-GABOB] > guanidinoacetic acid > isonipecotic acid > 5-aminovaleric acid (DAVA) (partial agonist) > β-alanine (partial agonist). In silico ligand docking revealed some variation in binding between agonists. Mutagenesis of a key serine residue in binding loop C to threonine had minimal effects on GABA and IMA but significantly increased the maximal response to DAVA and decreased twofold the EC50 for R(−)- and S(+)-GABOB. Conclusions and Implications The pharmacological profile of Hco-UNC-49 differed from that of vertebrate Cys-loop GABA receptors and insect resistance to dieldrin receptors, suggesting differences in the agonist binding pocket. These findings could be exploited to develop new drugs that specifically target GABA receptors of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25850584

  2. Functional plasticity of the N/OFQ-NOP receptor system determines analgesic properties of NOP receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, W; Lambert, D G; Ko, M C; Koch, T

    2014-01-01

    Despite high sequence similarity between NOP (nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid peptide) and opioid receptors, marked differences in endogenous ligand selectivity, signal transduction, phosphorylation, desensitization, internalization and trafficking have been identified; underscoring the evolutionary difference between NOP and opioid receptors. Activation of NOP receptors affects nociceptive transmission in a site-specific manner, with antinociceptive effects prevailing after peripheral and spinal activation, and pronociceptive effects after supraspinal activation in rodents. The net effect of systemically administered NOP receptor agonists on nociception is proposed to depend on the relative contribution of peripheral, spinal and supraspinal activation, and this may depend on experimental conditions. Functional expression and regulation of NOP receptors at peripheral and central sites of the nociceptive pathway exhibits a high degree of plasticity under conditions of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. In rodents, systemically administered NOP receptor agonists exerted antihypersensitive effects in models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, they were largely ineffective in acute pain while concomitantly evoking severe motor side effects. In contrast, systemic administration of NOP receptor agonists to non-human primates (NHPs) exerted potent and efficacious antinociception in the absence of motor and sedative side effects. The reason for this species difference with respect to antinociceptive efficacy and tolerability is not clear. Moreover, co-activation of NOP and μ-opioid peptide (MOP) receptors synergistically produced antinociception in NHPs. Hence, both selective NOP receptor as well as NOP/MOP receptor agonists may hold potential for clinical use as analgesics effective in conditions of acute and chronic pain. PMID:24762001

  3. D1 receptor agonist improves sleep-wake parameters in experimental parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Hyacinthe, Carole; Barraud, Quentin; Tison, François; Bezard, Erwan; Ghorayeb, Imad

    2014-03-01

    Both excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deregulation are part of Parkinson's disease (PD) non-motor symptoms and may complicate dopamine replacement therapy. We report here that dopamine agonists act differentially on sleep architecture in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine macaque monkey. Continuous sleep and wake electroencephalographic monitoring revealed no effect of the selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist quinpirole on EDS, whereas the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF38393 efficiently alleviated EDS and restored REM sleep to baseline values. The present results question the relevance of abandoning D1 receptor agonist treatment in PD as it might actually improve sleep-related disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. New-generation 5-HT4 receptor agonists: potential for treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Noriaki; Wong, Banny S; Camilleri, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility is an important mechanism in functional GI disorders (FGIDs) including constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and gastroparesis. 5-hydroxytryptamine(4) (5-HT(4)) receptors are targets for the treatment of GI motility disorders. However, older 5-HT(4) receptor agonists had limited clinical success because they were associated with changes in the function of the cardiac HERG potassium channel. We conducted a PubMed search using the following key words alone or in combination: 5-HT(4), safety, toxicity, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical trial, cardiac, hERG, arrhythmia, potassium current, elderly, prucalopride, ATI-7505, and velusetrag (TD-5108), to review mechanisms of action, clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability of three new-generation 5-HT(4) receptor agonists. Prucalopride, ATI-7505, and velusetrag (TD-5108) are highly selective, high-affinity 5-HT(4) receptor agonists that are devoid of action on other receptors within their therapeutic range. Their efficacy has been demonstrated in pharmacodynamic studies which demonstrate acceleration of colonic transit and, to a variable degree, in clinical trials that significantly relieve chronic constipation. Currently available evidence shows that the new 5-HT(4) receptor agonists have safe cardiac profiles. New-generation 5-HT(4) receptor agonists and future drugs targeting organ-specific splice variants are promising approaches to treat GI dysmotility, particularly colonic diseases.

  5. Microbiome-Derived Tryptophan Metabolites and Their Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Agonist and Antagonist Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Un-Ho; Lee, Syng-Ook; Sridharan, Gautham; Lee, Kyongbum; Davidson, Laurie A.; Jayaraman, Arul; Chapkin, Robert S.; Alaniz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The tryptophan metabolites indole, indole-3-acetate, and tryptamine were identified in mouse cecal extracts and fecal pellets by mass spectrometry. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonist and antagonist activities of these microbiota-derived compounds were investigated in CaCo-2 intestinal cells as a model for understanding their interactions with colonic tissue, which is highly aryl hydrocarbon (Ah)–responsive. Activation of Ah-responsive genes demonstrated that tryptamine and indole 3-acetate were AHR agonists, whereas indole was an AHR antagonist that inhibited TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin)–induced CYP1A1 expression. In contrast, the tryptophan metabolites exhibited minimal anti-inflammatory activities, whereas TCDD decreased phorbol ester-induced CXCR4 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4] gene expression, and this response was AHR dependent. These results demonstrate that the tryptophan metabolites indole, tryptamine, and indole-3-acetate modulate AHR-mediated responses in CaCo-2 cells, and concentrations of indole that exhibit AHR antagonist activity (100–250 μM) are detected in the intestinal microbiome. PMID:24563545

  6. Endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists inhibit neurogenic inflammations in guinea pig airways.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Shigemi; Morimoto, Hiroshi; Ohori, Makoto; Yamada, Yumi; Abe, Toshio; Arisaka, Osamu

    2005-09-01

    Although neurogenic inflammation via the activation of C fibers in the airway must have an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma, their regulatory mechanism remains uncertain. The pharmacological profiles of endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists on the activation of C fibers in airway tissues were investigated and the mechanisms how cannabinoids regulate airway inflammatory reactions were clarified. The effects of endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists on electrical field stimulation-induced bronchial smooth muscle contraction, capsaicin-induced bronchoconstriction and capsaicin-induced substance P release in guinea pig airway tissues were investigated. The influences of cannabinoid receptor antagonists and K+ channel blockers to the effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on these respiratory reactions were examined. Both endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists, anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide, inhibited electrical field stimulation-induced guinea pig bronchial smooth muscle contraction, but not neurokinin A-induced contraction. A cannabinoid CB2 antagonist, SR 144528, reduced the inhibitory effect of endogenous agonists, but not a cannabinoid CB1 antagonist, SR 141716A. Inhibitory effects of agonists were also reduced by the pretreatment of large conductance Ca2+ -activated K+ channel (maxi-K+ channel) blockers, iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin, but not by other K+ channel blockers, dendrotoxin or glibenclamide. Anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide blocked the capsaicin-induced release of substance P-like immunoreactivity from guinea pig airway tissues. Additionally, intravenous injection of palmitoylethanolamide dose-dependently inhibited capsaicin-induced guinea pig bronchoconstriction, but not neurokinin A-induced reaction. However, anandamide did not reduce capsaicin-induced guinea pig bronchoconstriction. These findings suggest that endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists inhibit the activation of C fibers via cannabinoid CB2 receptors and

  7. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jonathan L; Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A; Rice, Kenner C; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2016-07-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. U.S. Government work not protected by U

  8. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A.; Rice, Kenner C.; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H.; McCurdy, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. PMID:27189970

  9. Lack of cocaine-like discriminative-stimulus effects of σ-receptor agonists in rats.

    PubMed

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L; Tanda, Gianluigi; Katz, Jonathan L

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the effectiveness of selective σ-receptor (σR) agonists [1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), PRE-084] as reinforcers in rats trained to self-administer cocaine. Similar to cocaine, these drugs increased nucleus accumbens shell dopamine levels, and effects of DTG, but not PRE-084, on dopamine seemed to be mediated by σRs. In addition, σR antagonists blocked self-administration of σR agonists, but were inactive against reinforcing and neurochemical effects of cocaine. Thus, pharmacologically distinct mechanisms likely underlie the reinforcing and neurochemical effects of σR agonists and cocaine. This study further examined the cocaine-like effects of σR agonists in rats trained to discriminate injections of cocaine from saline to assess the similarity of their subjective effects. Standard dopamine-uptake inhibitors (WIN 35,428, methylphenidate), but neither σR agonist (PRE-084, DTG), produced full cocaine-like discriminative-stimulus effects. The lack of effects of σR agonists was obtained regardless of route of administration (intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, or intravenous) or pretreatment time (5 or 30 min before sessions). The present results demonstrate differences in the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine and selective σR agonists, indicating that an overlap of subjective effects is not necessary for σR agonist self-administration. The previously found differences in neurochemical effects of cocaine and σR agonists may contribute to their different subjective effects.

  10. Lack of Cocaine-Like Discriminative-Stimulus Effects of σ Receptor Agonists in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L.; Tanda, Gianluigi; Katz, Jonathan L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated effectiveness of selective sigma-receptor (σR) agonists (DTG, PRE-084) as reinforcers in rats trained to self-administer cocaine. Like cocaine, these drugs increased nucleus accumbens shell dopamine levels, and effects of DTG, but not PRE-084, on dopamine appeared to be mediated by σRs. Additionally, σR antagonists blocked self-administration of σR agonists, but were inactive against reinforcing and neurochemical effects of cocaine. Thus pharmacologically distinct mechanisms likely underlie the reinforcing and neurochemical effects of σR agonists and cocaine. The present study further examined the cocaine-like effects of σR agonists in rats trained to discriminate injections of cocaine from saline to assess the similarity of their subjective effects. Standard dopamine-uptake inhibitors (WIN 35,428, methylphenidate), but neither σR agonist (PRE-084, DTG) produced full cocaine-like discriminative-stimulus effects. The lack of effects of σR agonists was obtained regardless of route of administration (i.p., s.c. or i.v.) or pretreatment time (5- or 30-min before sessions). The present results demonstrate differences in the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine and selective σR agonists, indicating that an overlap of subjective effects is not necessary for σR agonist self-administration. The previously found differences in neurochemical effects of cocaine and σR agonists may contribute to their different subjective effects. PMID:21808192

  11. Characterizing novel metabolic pathways of melatonin receptor agonist agomelatine using metabolomic approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agomelatine (AGM), an analog of melatonin, is a potential agonist at melatonin receptors 1/2 and a selective antagonist at 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C receptors. AGM is widely used for the treatment of major depressive episodes in adults. However, multiple adverse effects associated with AGM have been re...

  12. Identification of potent, nonabsorbable agonists of the calcium-sensing receptor for GI-specific administration.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Steven M; Spearing, Paul K; Diaz, Caroline J; Cowan, David J; Jayawickreme, Channa; Chen, Grace; Rimele, Thomas J; Generaux, Claudia; Harston, Lindsey T; Roller, Shane G

    2017-10-15

    Modulation of gastrointestinal nutrient sensing pathways provides a promising a new approach for the treatment of metabolic diseases including diabetes and obesity. The calcium-sensing receptor has been identified as a key receptor involved in mineral and amino acid nutrient sensing and thus is an attractive target for modulation in the intestine. Herein we describe the optimization of gastrointestinally restricted calcium-sensing receptor agonists starting from a 3-aminopyrrolidine-containing template leading to the identification of GI-restricted agonist 19 (GSK3004774). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure-guided development of dual β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Dietmar; Stanek, Markus; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Aiming to discover dual-acting β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor ligands, a structure-guided approach for the evolution of GPCR agonists that address multiple targets was elaborated. Starting from GPCR crystal structures, we describe the design, synthesis and biological investigation of a defined set of compounds leading to the identification of the benzoxazinone (R)-3, which shows agonist properties at the adrenergic β2 receptor and substantial G protein-promoted activation at the D2 receptor. This directed approach yielded molecular probes with tuned dual activity. The congener desOH-3 devoid of the benzylic hydroxyl function was shown to be a β2 adrenergic antagonist/D2 receptor agonist with Ki values in the low nanomolar range. The compounds may serve as a promising starting point for the investigation and treatment of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ agonist promotes reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, William R.; Shenk, Jennifer L.; Snaith, Mike R.; Russell, Caroline S.; Plunket, Kelli D.; Bodkin, Noni L.; Lewis, Michael C.; Winegar, Deborah A.; Sznaidman, Marcos L.; Lambert, Millard H.; Xu, H. Eric; Sternbach, Daniel D.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Hansen, Barbara C.; Willson, Timothy M.

    2001-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are dietary lipid sensors that regulate fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. The hypolipidemic effects of the fibrate drugs and the antidiabetic effects of the glitazone drugs in humans are due to activation of the α (NR1C1) and γ (NR1C3) subtypes, respectively. By contrast, the therapeutic potential of the δ (NR1C2) subtype is unknown, due in part to the lack of selective ligands. We have used combinatorial chemistry and structure-based drug design to develop a potent and subtype-selective PPARδ agonist, GW501516. In macrophages, fibroblasts, and intestinal cells, GW501516 increases expression of the reverse cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 and induces apolipoprotein A1-specific cholesterol efflux. When dosed to insulin-resistant middle-aged obese rhesus monkeys, GW501516 causes a dramatic dose-dependent rise in serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol while lowering the levels of small-dense low density lipoprotein, fasting triglycerides, and fasting insulin. Our results suggest that PPARδ agonists may be effective drugs to increase reverse cholesterol transport and decrease cardiovascular disease associated with the metabolic syndrome X. PMID:11309497

  15. Rate constants of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors in rat brain medulla. Evaluation by competition kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, G.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    The method of competition kinetics, which measures the binding kinetics of an unlabeled ligand through its effect on the binding kinetics of a labeled ligand, was employed to investigate the kinetics of muscarinic agonist binding to rat brain medulla pons homogenates. The agonists studied were acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and oxotremorine, with N-methyl-4-(TH)piperidyl benzilate employed as the radiolabeled ligand. Our results suggested that the binding of muscarinic agonists to the high affinity sites is characterized by dissociation rate constants higher by 2 orders of magnitude than those of antagonists, with rather similar association rate constants. Our findings also suggest that isomerization ofmore » the muscarinic receptors following ligand binding is significant in the case of antagonists, but not of agonists. Moreover, it is demonstrated that in the medulla pons preparation, agonist-induced interconversion between high and low affinity bindings sites does not occur to an appreciable extent.« less

  16. PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR (PPAR) AGONISTS AS PROMISING NEW MEDICATIONS FOR DRUG ADDICTION: PRECLINICAL EVIDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Foll, Bernard Le; Ciano, Patricia Di; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Goldberg, Steven R.; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This review examines the growing literature on the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in addiction. There are two subtypes of PPAR receptors that have been studied in addiction: PPAR-α and PPAR-γ. The role of each PPAR subtype in common models of addictive behavior, mainly pre-clinical models, is summarized. In particular, studies are reviewed that investigated the effects of PPAR-α agonists on relapse, sensitization, conditioned place preference, withdrawal and drug intake, and effects of PPAR-γ agonists on relapse, withdrawal and drug intake. Finally, studies that investigated the effects of PPAR agonists on neural pathways of addiction are reviewed. Taken together this preclinical data indicates that PPAR agonists are promising new medications for drug addiction treatment. PMID:23614675

  17. Antinociceptive effects of imidazoline I2 receptor agonists in the formalin test in rats

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, David A; Qiu, Yanyan; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2015-01-01

    The imidazoline I2 receptor is an emerging drug target for analgesics. This study extended previous studies by examining the antinociceptive effects of three I2 receptor agonists (2-BFI, BU224 and CR4056) in the formalin test. The receptor mechanisms and anatomical mediation of I2 receptor agonist-induced antinociception were also examined. Formalin-induced flinching responses (2%, 50µl) were quantified after treatment with I2 receptor agonists alone or in combination with the I2 receptor antagonist idazoxan. Anatomical mediation was studied by locally administering 2-BFI into the plantar surface or into the right lateral ventricle via cannulae (i.c.v). The locomotor activity was also examined after central (i.c.v.) administration of 2-BFI. 2-BFI (1–10 mg/kg, i.p.) and BU224 (1–10 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the spontaneous flinching response observed during 10 min (phase 1) and 20–60 min (phase 2) following formalin treatment, while CR4056 (1–32 mg/kg, i.p.) only decreased phase 2 flinching response. The I2 receptor antagonist idazoxan attenuated the antinociceptive effects of 2-BFI and BU224 during phase 1, but not phase 2. Peripheral administration of 2-BFI (1–10 mg/kg, i.pl) to the hindpaw of rats had no antinociceptive effects. In contrast, centrally delivered 2-BFI (10–100 µg, i.c.v.) dose-dependently attenuated phase 1 and phase 2 flinching at doses that did not reduce the locomotor activity. Together, these data revealed the differential antinociceptive effects of I2 receptor agonists and the differential antagonism profiles by idazoxan, suggesting the involvement of different I2 receptor subtypes in reducing different phases of formalin-induced pain-like behaviors. In addition, the results also suggest the central mediation of I2 receptor agonist-induced antinociceptive actions. PMID:26599907

  18. NOP Receptor Mediates Anti-analgesia Induced by Agonist-Antagonist Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Gear, Robert W.; Bogen, Oliver; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ~90 minutes after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69,593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  19. Small-molecule agonists for the thyrotropin receptor stimulate thyroid function in human thyrocytes and mice

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Susanne; Huang, Wenwei; Titus, Steve; Krause, Gerd; Kleinau, Gunnar; Alberobello, Anna Teresa; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel T.; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Celi, Francesco S.; Gavrilova, Oksana; Thomas, Craig J.; Raaka, Bruce M.; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2009-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors (7TMRs) are prominent drug targets. However, small-molecule ligands for 7-transmembrane-spanning receptors for which the natural ligands are large, heterodimeric glycoprotein hormones, like thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; thyrotropin), have only recently been reported, and none are approved for human use. We have used quantitative high-throughput screening to identify a small-molecule TSH receptor (TSHR) agonist that was modified to produce a second agonist with increased potency. We show that these agonists are highly selective for human TSHR versus other glycoprotein hormone receptors and interact with the receptor's serpentine domain. A binding pocket within the transmembrane domain was defined by docking into a TSHR homology model and was supported by site-directed mutagenesis. In primary cultures of human thyrocytes, both TSH and the agonists increase mRNA levels for thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase, sodium iodide symporter, and deiodinase type 2, and deiodinase type 2 enzyme activity. Moreover, oral administration of the agonist stimulated thyroid function in mice, resulting in increased serum thyroxine and thyroidal radioiodide uptake. Thus, we discovered a small molecule that activates human TSHR in vitro, is orally active in mice, and could be a lead for development of drugs to use in place of recombinant human TSH in patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:19592511

  20. Small-molecule agonists for the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Kiel, Dan; Teng, Min; Behrens, Carsten; Bhumralkar, Dilip; Kodra, János T.; Holst, Jens J.; Jeppesen, Claus B.; Johnson, Michael D.; de Jong, Johannes Cornelis; Jorgensen, Anker Steen; Kercher, Tim; Kostrowicki, Jarek; Madsen, Peter; Olesen, Preben H.; Petersen, Jacob S.; Poulsen, Fritz; Sidelmann, Ulla G.; Sturis, Jeppe; Truesdale, Larry; May, John; Lau, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 has important actions resulting in glucose lowering along with weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes. As a peptide hormone, GLP-1 has to be administered by injection. Only a few small-molecule agonists to peptide hormone receptors have been described and none in the B family of the G protein coupled receptors to which the GLP-1 receptor belongs. We have discovered a series of small molecules known as ago-allosteric modulators selective for the human GLP-1 receptor. These compounds act as both allosteric activators of the receptor and independent agonists. Potency of GLP-1 was not changed by the allosteric agonists, but affinity of GLP-1 for the receptor was increased. The most potent compound identified stimulates glucose-dependent insulin release from normal mouse islets but, importantly, not from GLP-1 receptor knockout mice. Also, the compound stimulates insulin release from perfused rat pancreas in a manner additive with GLP-1 itself. These compounds may lead to the identification or design of orally active GLP-1 agonists. PMID:17213325

  1. Ligand-based receptor tyrosine kinase partial agonists: New paradigm for cancer drug discovery?

    PubMed

    Riese, David J

    2011-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are validated targets for oncology drug discovery and several RTK antagonists have been approved for the treatment of human malignancies. Nonetheless, the discovery and development of RTK antagonists has lagged behind the discovery and development of agents that target G-protein coupled receptors. In part, this is because it has been difficult to discover analogs of naturally-occurring RTK agonists that function as antagonists. AREAS COVERED: Here we describe ligands of ErbB receptors that function as partial agonists for these receptors, thereby enabling these ligands to antagonize the activity of full agonists for these receptors. We provide insights into the mechanisms by which these ligands function as antagonists. We discuss how information concerning these mechanisms can be translated into screens for novel small molecule- and antibody-based antagonists of ErbB receptors and how such antagonists hold great potential as targeted cancer chemotherapeutics. EXPERT OPINION: While there have been a number of important key findings into this field, the identification of the structural basis of ligand functional specificity is still of the greatest importance. While it is true that, with some notable exceptions, peptide hormones and growth factors have not proven to be good platforms for oncology drug discovery; addressing the fundamental issues of antagonistic partial agonists for receptor tyrosine kinases has the potential to steer oncology drug discovery in new directions. Mechanism based approaches are now emerging to enable the discovery of RTK partial agonists that may antagonize both agonist-dependent and -independent RTK signaling and may hold tremendous promise as targeted cancer chemotherapeutics.

  2. Sensitization of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 by the prokineticin receptor agonist Bv8.

    PubMed

    Vellani, Vittorio; Colucci, Mariantonella; Lattanzi, Roberta; Giannini, Elisa; Negri, Lucia; Melchiorri, Pietro; McNaughton, Peter A

    2006-05-10

    Small mammalian proteins called the prokineticins [prokineticin 1 (PK1) and PK2] and two corresponding G-protein-coupled receptors [prokineticin receptor 1 (PKR1) and PKR2] have been identified recently, but the physiological role of the PK/PKR system remains mostly unexplored. Bv8, a protein extracted from frog skin, is a convenient and potent agonist for both PKR1 and PKR2, and injection of Bv8 in vivo causes a potent and long-lasting hyperalgesia. Here, we investigate the cellular basis of hyperalgesia caused by activation of PKRs. Bv8 caused increases in [Ca]i in a population of isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which we identified as nociceptors, or sensors for painful stimuli, from their responses to capsaicin, bradykinin, mustard oil, or proteases. Bv8 enhanced the inward current carried by the heat and capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) via a pathway involving activation of protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon), because Bv8 caused translocation of PKCepsilon to the neuronal membrane and because PKC antagonists reduced both the enhancement of current carried by TRPV1 and behavioral hyperalgesia in rodents. The neuronal population expressing PKRs consisted partly of small peptidergic neurons and partly of neurons expressing the N52 marker for myelinated fibers. Using single-cell reverse transcriptase-PCR, we found that mRNA for PKR1 was mainly expressed in small DRG neurons. Exposure to GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor) induced de novo expression of functional receptors for Bv8 in a nonpeptidergic population of neurons. These results show that prokineticin receptors are expressed in nociceptors and cause heat hyperalgesia by sensitizing TRPV1 through activation of PKCepsilon. The results suggest a role for prokineticins in physiological inflammation and hyperalgesia.

  3. [The receptorial responsiveness method (RRM): a new possibility to estimate the concentration of pharmacologic agonists at their receptors].

    PubMed

    Pák, Krisztián; Kiss, Zsuzsanna; Erdei, Tamás; Képes, Zita; Gesztelyi, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the biggest challenge in terms of life expectancy in developed countries. Adenosine contributes to the adaptation of the heart to ischemia and hypoxia, because adenosine, in addition to its metabolite role in the nucleic acid metabolism, is the endogenous agonist of the ubiquitous adenosine receptor family. Adenosine receptor activation is beneficial in most cases, it improves the balance between energy supply and consumption, reduces injury caused by stressors and inhibits the unfavorable tissue remodeling. Pharmacological manipulation of cardioprotective effects evoked by adenosine is an important, although to date not sufficiently utilized endeavor that may have therapeutic and preventive implications in cardiovascular diseases. As the ligand binding site of adenosine receptors is accessible from the extracellular space, it is especially important to know the adenosine concentration of the interstitial fluid ([Ado](ISF)). However, in the functioning heart, [Ado](ISF) values range in an extremely wide interval, spanning from nano- to micromolar concentrations, as estimated by the commonly used methods. Our recently developed procedure, the receptorial responsiveness method (RRM), may resolve this problem in certain cases. RRM enables quantification of an acute increase in the concentration of a pharmacological agonist, uniquely in the microenvironment of the receptors of the given agonist. As a limitation, concentration of agonists with short half-life (just like adenosine) at their receptors can only be quantified with the equieffective concentration of a stable agonist exerting the same action. In a previous study using RRM, inhibition of the transmembrane nucleoside transport in the euthyroid guinea pig atrium produced an increase in [Ado](ISF) that was equieffective with 18.8 +/- 3 nM CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine, a stable, selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist). This finding is consistent with observations of others, i.e., in the

  4. Assembly of high-affinity insulin receptor agonists and antagonists from peptide building blocks

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Lauge; Brissette, Renee E.; Spetzler, Jane C.; Pillutla, Renuka C.; Østergaard, Søren; Lennick, Michael; Brandt, Jakob; Fletcher, Paul W.; Danielsen, Gillian M.; Hsiao, Ku-Chuan; Andersen, Asser S.; Dedova, Olga; Ribel, Ulla; Hoeg-Jensen, Thomas; Hansen, Per Hertz; Blume, Arthur J.; Markussen, Jan; Goldstein, Neil I.

    2003-01-01

    Insulin is thought to elicit its effects by crosslinking the two extracellular α-subunits of its receptor, thereby inducing a conformational change in the receptor, which activates the intracellular tyrosine kinase signaling cascade. Previously we identified a series of peptides binding to two discrete hotspots on the insulin receptor. Here we show that covalent linkage of such peptides into homodimers or heterodimers results in insulin agonists or antagonists, depending on how the peptides are linked. An optimized agonist has been shown, both in vitro and in vivo, to have a potency close to that of insulin itself. The ability to construct such peptide derivatives may offer a path for developing agonists or antagonists for treatment of a wide variety of diseases. PMID:12684539

  5. Pharmacologic Treatment with GABAB Receptor Agonist of Methamphetamine-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive drug, and addiction to METH has increased to epidemic proportions worldwide. Chronic use of METH causes psychiatric symptoms, such as hallucinations and delusions, and long-term cognitive deficits, which are indistinguishable from paranoid schizophrenia. The GABA receptor system is known to play a significant role in modulating the dopaminergic neuronal system, which is related to behavioral changes induced by drug abuse. However, few studies have investigated the effects of GABA receptor agonists on cognitive deficits induced by METH. In the present review, we show that baclofen, a GABA receptor agonist, is effective in treating METH-induced impairment of object recognition memory and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex, a measure of sensorimotor gating in mice. Acute and repeated treatment with METH induced a significant impairment of PPI. Furthermore, repeated but not acute treatment of METH resulted in a long-lasting deficit of object recognition memory. Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, dose-dependently ameliorated the METH-induced PPI deficits and object recognition memory impairment in mice. On the other hand, THIP, a GABAA receptor agonist, had no effect on METH-induced cognitive deficits. These results suggest that GABAB receptors may constitute a putative new target in treating cognitive deficits in chronic METH users. PMID:21886573

  6. Different skeletal effects of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α agonist fenofibrate and the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Syversen, Unni; Stunes, Astrid K; Gustafsson, Björn I; Obrant, Karl J; Nordsletten, Lars; Berge, Rolf; Thommesen, Liv; Reseland, Janne E

    2009-01-01

    Background All the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are found to be expressed in bone cells. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone has been shown to decrease bone mass in mice and thiazolidinediones (TZDs) have recently been found to increase bone loss and fracture risk in humans treated for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of the PPARα agonist fenofibrate (FENO) and the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone (PIO) on bone in intact female rats. Methods Rats were given methylcellulose (vehicle), fenofibrate or pioglitazone (35 mg/kg body weight/day) by gavage for 4 months. BMC, BMD, and body composition were measured by DXA. Histomorphometry and biomechanical testing of excised femurs were performed. Effects of the compounds on bone cells were studied. Results The FENO group had higher femoral BMD and smaller medullary area at the distal femur; while trabecular bone volume was similar to controls. Whole body BMD, BMC, and trabecular bone volume were lower, while medullary area was increased in PIO rats compared to controls. Ultimate bending moment and energy absorption of the femoral shafts were reduced in the PIO group, while similar to controls in the FENO group. Plasma osteocalcin was higher in the FENO group than in the other groups. FENO stimulated proliferation and differentiation of, and OPG release from, the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. Conclusion We show opposite skeletal effects of PPARα and γ agonists in intact female rats. FENO resulted in significantly higher femoral BMD and lower medullary area, while PIO induced bone loss and impairment of the mechanical strength. This represents a novel effect of PPARα activation. PMID:19331671

  7. β1-adrenergic receptor stimulation by agonist Compound 49b restores insulin receptor signal transduction in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youde; Zhang, Qiuhua; Ye, Eun-Ah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Determine whether Compound 49b treatment ameliorates retinal changes due to the lack of β2-adrenergic receptor signaling. Methods Using retinas from 3-month-old β2-adrenergic receptor-deficient mice, we treated mice with our novel β1-/β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, Compound 49b, to assess the effects of adrenergic agonists acting only on β1-adrenergic receptors due to the absence of β2-adrenergic receptors. Western blotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses were performed for β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors, as well as key insulin resistance proteins, including TNF-α, SOCS3, IRS-1Ser307, and IRTyr960. Analyses were also performed on key anti- and proapoptotic proteins: Akt, Bcl-xL, Bax, and caspase 3. Electroretinogram analyses were conducted to assess functional changes, while histological assessment was conducted for changes in retinal thickness. Results A 2-month treatment of β2-adrenergic receptor-deficient mice with daily eye drops of 1 mM Compound 49b, a novel β1- and β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, reversed the changes in insulin resistance markers (TNF-α and SOCS3) observed in untreated β2-adrenergic receptor-deficient mice, and concomitantly increased morphological integrity (retinal thickness) and functional responses (electroretinogram amplitude). These results suggest that stimulating β1-adrenergic receptors on retinal endothelial cells or Müller cells can compensate for the loss of β2-adrenergic receptor signaling on Müller cells, restore insulin signal transduction, reduce retinal apoptosis, and enhance retinal function. Conclusions Since our previous studies with β1-adrenergic receptor knockout mice confirmed that the reverse also occurs (β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation can compensate for the loss of β1-adrenergic receptor activity), it appears that increased activity in either of these pathways alone is sufficient to block insulin resistance–based retinal cell apoptosis. PMID:24966659

  8. Reports of pathological gambling, hypersexuality, and compulsive shopping associated with dopamine receptor agonist drugs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas J; Glenmullen, Joseph; Mattison, Donald R

    2014-12-01

    Severe impulse control disorders involving pathological gambling, hypersexuality, and compulsive shopping have been reported in association with the use of dopamine receptor agonist drugs in case series and retrospective patient surveys. These agents are used to treat Parkinson disease, restless leg syndrome, and hyperprolactinemia. To analyze serious adverse drug event reports about these impulse control disorders received by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and to assess the relationship of these case reports with the 6 FDA-approved dopamine receptor agonist drugs. We conducted a retrospective disproportionality analysis based on the 2.7 million serious domestic and foreign adverse drug event reports from 2003 to 2012 extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System. Cases were selected if they contained any of 10 preferred terms in the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) that described the abnormal behaviors. We used the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) to compare the proportion of target events to all serious events for the study drugs with a similar proportion for all other drugs. We identified 1580 events indicating impulse control disorders from the United States and 21 other countries:710 fordopamine receptor agonist drugs and 870 for other drugs. The dopamine receptor agonist drugs had a strong signal associated with these impulse control disorders (n = 710; PRR = 277.6, P < .001). The association was strongest for the dopamine agonists pramipexole (n = 410; PRR = 455.9, P < .001) and ropinirole (n = 188; PRR = 152.5, P < .001), with preferential affinity for the dopamine D3 receptor. A signal was also seen for aripiprazole, an antipsychotic classified as a partial agonist of the D3 receptor (n = 37; PRR = 8.6, P < .001). Our findings confirm and extend the evidence that dopamine receptor agonist drugs are associated with these specific impulse control disorders. At present

  9. A2A adenosine receptor agonists and their potential therapeutic applications. An update.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Angel

    2018-03-12

    In the last 20 years, an increasing interest of medicinal chemists on the development of potent and selective agonists and antagonists of adenosine receptors has been noticed due to the large impact they have shown in a variety of important biological processes and diseases. Among these, it should be mentioned vasodilation, inflammation, cancer, wound healing, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson disease, infectious diseases, and other CNS disorders. In this review, I will provide an update of the structures of the A2A agonists known, their selectivity versus other adenosine receptors, and their latest therapeutic applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Effect of Light and Melatonin and other Melatonin Receptor Agonists on Human Circadian Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Emens, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Circadian (body clock) timing has a profound influence on mental health, physical health, and health behaviors. This review focuses on how light, melatonin and other melatonin receptor agonist drugs can be used to shift circadian timing in patients with misaligned circadian rhythms. A brief overview of the human circadian system is provided, followed by a discussion of patient characteristics and safety considerations that can influence the treatment of choice. The important features of light treatment, light avoidance, exogenous melatonin and other melatonin receptor agonists are reviewed, along with some of the practical aspects of light and melatonin treatment. PMID:26568121

  11. Discovery of 3-aryl-4-isoxazolecarboxamides as TGR5 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Evans, Karen A; Budzik, Brian W; Ross, Sean A; Wisnoski, David D; Jin, Jian; Rivero, Ralph A; Vimal, Mythily; Szewczyk, George R; Jayawickreme, Channa; Moncol, David L; Rimele, Thomas J; Armour, Susan L; Weaver, Susan P; Griffin, Robert J; Tadepalli, Sarva M; Jeune, Michael R; Shearer, Todd W; Chen, Zibin B; Chen, Lihong; Anderson, Donald L; Becherer, J David; De Los Frailes, Maite; Colilla, Francisco Javier

    2009-12-24

    A series of 3-aryl-4-isoxazolecarboxamides identified from a high-throughput screening campaign as novel, potent small molecule agonists of the human TGR5 G-protein coupled receptor is described. Subsequent optimization resulted in the rapid identification of potent exemplars 6 and 7 which demonstrated improved GLP-1 secretion in vivo via an intracolonic dose coadministered with glucose challenge in a canine model. These novel TGR5 receptor agonists are potentially useful therapeutics for metabolic disorders such as type II diabetes and its associated complications.

  12. Extrinsic factors regulate partial agonist efficacy of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Farroni, Jeffrey S; McCool, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    Background Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in many adult forebrain regions consist of alpha2 + beta heteromeric channels. This subunit composition is distinct from the alpha1 + beta channels found throughout the adult spinal cord. Unfortunately, the pharmacology of forebrain alpha2beta receptors are poorly defined compared to 'neonatal' alpha2 homomeric channels or 'spinal' alpha1beta heteromers. In addition, the pharmacologic properties of native alpha2beta glycine receptors have been generally distinct from receptors produced by heterologous expression. To identify subtype-specific pharmacologic tools for the forebrain alpha2beta receptors, it is important to identify a heterologous expression system that closely resembles these native glycine-gated chloride channels. Results While exploring pharmacological properties of alpha2beta glycine receptors compared to alpha2-homomers, we found that distinct heterologous expression systems appeared to differentially influence partial agonist pharmacology. The β-amino acid taurine possessed 30–50% efficacy for alpha2-containing receptor isoforms when expressed in HEK 293 cells. However, taurine efficacy was dramatically reduced in L-cell fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained for β-alanine. The efficacy of these partial agonists was also strongly reduced by the beta subunit. There were no significant differences in apparent strychnine affinity values calculated from concentration-response data between expression systems or subunit combinations. Nor did relative levels of expression correlate with partial agonist efficacy when compared within or between several different expression systems. Finally, disruption of the tubulin cytoskeleton reduced the efficacy of partial agonists in a subunit-dependent, but system-independent, fashion. Conclusions Our results suggest that different heterologous expression systems can dramatically influence the agonist pharmacology of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. In

  13. Agonist activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site

    PubMed Central

    Gill, JasKiran K.; Savolainen, Mari; Young, Gareth T.; Zwart, Ruud; Sher, Emanuele; Millar, Neil S.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, such as acetylcholine, act at an extracellular “orthosteric” binding site located at the interface between two adjacent subunits. Here, we present evidence of potent activation of α7 nAChRs via an allosteric transmembrane site. Previous studies have identified a series of nAChR-positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that lack agonist activity but are able to potentiate responses to orthosteric agonists, such as acetylcholine. It has been shown, for example, that TQS acts as a conventional α7 nAChR PAM. In contrast, we have found that a compound with close chemical similarity to TQS (4BP-TQS) is a potent allosteric agonist of α7 nAChRs. Whereas the α7 nAChR antagonist metyllycaconitine acts competitively with conventional nicotinic agonists, metyllycaconitine is a noncompetitive antagonist of 4BP-TQS. Mutation of an amino acid (M253L), located in a transmembrane cavity that has been proposed as being the binding site for PAMs, completely blocks agonist activation by 4BP-TQS. In contrast, this mutation had no significant effect on agonist activation by acetylcholine. Conversely, mutation of an amino acid located within the known orthosteric binding site (W148F) has a profound effect on agonist potency of acetylcholine (resulting in a shift of ∼200-fold in the acetylcholine dose-response curve), but had little effect on the agonist dose-response curve for 4BP-TQS. Computer docking studies with an α7 homology model provides evidence that both TQS and 4BP-TQS bind within an intrasubunit transmembrane cavity. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that agonist activation of nAChRs can occur via an allosteric transmembrane site. PMID:21436053

  14. The non-biphenyl-tetrazole angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist eprosartan is a unique and robust inverse agonist of the active state of the AT1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Takezako, Takanobu; Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Node, Koichi

    2018-03-23

    Conditions such as hypertension and renal allograft rejection are accompanied by chronic, agonist-independent, signalling by angiotensin II AT 1 receptors. The current treatment paradigm for these diseases entails the preferred use of inverse agonist AT 1 receptor blockers (ARBs). However, variability in the inverse agonist activities of common biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs for the active state of AT 1 receptors often leads to treatment failure. Therefore, characterization of robust inverse agonist ARBs for the active state of AT 1 receptors is necessary. To identify the robust inverse agonist for active state of AT 1 receptors and its molecular mechanism, we performed site-directed mutagenesis, competition binding assay, inositol phosphate production assay and molecular modelling for both ground-state wild-type AT 1 receptors and active-state N111G mutant AT 1 receptors. Although candesartan and telmisartan exhibited weaker inverse agonist activity for N111G- compared with WT-AT 1 receptors, only eprosartan exhibited robust inverse agonist activity for both N111G- and WT- AT 1 receptors. Specific ligand-receptor contacts for candesartan and telmisartan are altered in the active-state N111G- AT 1 receptors compared with the ground-state WT-AT 1 receptors, suggesting an explanation of their attenuated inverse agonist activity for the active state of AT 1 receptors. In contrast, interactions between eprosartan and N111G-AT 1 receptors were not significantly altered, and the inverse agonist activity of eprosartan was robust. Eprosartan may be a better therapeutic option than other ARBs. Comparative studies investigating eprosartan and other ARBs for the treatment of diseases caused by chronic, agonist-independent, AT 1 receptor activation are warranted. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Agonistic autoantibodies against the angiotensin AT1 receptor increase in unstable angina patients after stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miao; Sheng, Li; Huang, Peng; Li, Jun; Zhang, Chuan-Huan; Yang, Jun; Liao, Yu-Hua; Li, Liu-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Agonistic AT1 receptor autoantibodies have been described in patients with hypertension and preeclampsia. These autoantibodies could stimulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are involved in angiotensin II-induced vascular injury in cardiovascular disease. Hence, in this study, we explored the existence of agonistic AT1 receptor autoantibodies in unstable angina (UA) patients and the possible effects of them on the in-stent restenosis of these patients. A total of 95 UA patients and 98 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The serum of each patient was analyzed for the presence of AT1 receptor autoantibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Their effects on VSMC proliferation and c-fos and c-jun expression were studied in vitro. AT1 receptor autoantibodies were detected in 34/95 patients with UA. The incidence was 10.2% in the control group and rose to 47.37% after stent implantation. In vitro, this autoantibody had agonist-like activity, shown as stimulation of VSMC proliferation and upregulation of c-fos and c-jun expression. These effects were similar to that of angiotensin II and could be weakened partly by the AT1-receptor blocker valsartan. Our findings show that the autoantibody from UA patients has similar agonistic activity to angiotensin II and might play a role in the pathogenesis of in-stent restenosis in these patients.

  16. Facilitatory effects of selective agonists for tachykinin receptors on cholinergic neurotransmission: evidence for species differences.

    PubMed Central

    Belvisi, M. G.; Patacchini, R.; Barnes, P. J.; Maggi, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    1. Exogenous tachykinins modulate cholinergic neurotransmission in rabbit and guinea-pig airways. We have investigated the effect of selective tachykinin receptor agonists and antagonists on cholinergic neurotransmission evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) of bronchial rings in rabbit, guinea-pig and human airways in vitro to assess which type of tachykinin receptor is mediating this facilitatory effect. 2. Bronchial rings were set up for isometric tension recording. Contractile responses to EFS (60 V, 0.4 ms, 2 Hz for 10 s every min) and exogenous acetylcholine (ACh) were obtained and the effects of selective tachykinin agonists and antagonists were investigated. 3. In rabbit bronchi the endogenous tachykinins, substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) (10 nM) potentiated cholinergic responses to EFS (by 287.6 +/- 121%, P < 0.01 and 181.4 +/- 56.5%, P < 0.001 respectively). 4. The NK1 receptor selective agonist, [Sar9]SP sulphone (10 nM) evoked a maximal facilitatory action on cholinergic responses of 334.9 +/- 63% (P < 0.01) (pD2 = 8.5 +/- 0.06) an effect which was blocked by the selective NK1-receptor antagonist, CP 96,345 (100 nM) (P < 0.05) but not by the NK2 receptor antagonist, MEN 10,376 (100 nM). The NK2 receptor selective agonist, [beta Ala8]NKA(4-10) (10 nM), produced a maximum enhancement of 278 +/- 83.5% (P < 0.01) (pD2 = 8.7 +/- 0.1) an effect which was blocked by MEN 10,376 (100 nM) (P < 0.05) and not by CP 96,345. [MePhe7]NKB, an NK3 receptor selective agonist was without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7516799

  17. Inverse agonist and neutral antagonist actions of synthetic compounds at an insect 5-HT1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Troppmann, B; Balfanz, S; Baumann, A; Blenau, W

    2010-04-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been shown to control and modulate many physiological and behavioural functions in insects. In this study, we report the cloning and pharmacological properties of a 5-HT(1) receptor of an insect model for neurobiology, physiology and pharmacology. A cDNA encoding for the Periplaneta americana 5-HT(1) receptor was amplified from brain cDNA. The receptor was stably expressed in HEK 293 cells, and the functional and pharmacological properties were determined in cAMP assays. Receptor distribution was investigated by RT-PCR and by immunocytochemistry using an affinity-purified polyclonal antiserum. The P. americana 5-HT(1) receptor (Pea5-HT(1)) shares pronounced sequence and functional similarity with mammalian 5-HT(1) receptors. Activation with 5-HT reduced adenylyl cyclase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Pea5-HT(1) was expressed as a constitutively active receptor with methiothepin acting as a neutral antagonist, and WAY 100635 as an inverse agonist. Receptor mRNA was present in various tissues including brain, salivary glands and midgut. Receptor-specific antibodies showed that the native protein was expressed in a glycosylated form in membrane samples of brain and salivary glands. This study marks the first pharmacological identification of an inverse agonist and a neutral antagonist at an insect 5-HT(1) receptor. The results presented here should facilitate further analyses of 5-HT(1) receptors in mediating central and peripheral effects of 5-HT in insects.

  18. Bile Acid Receptor Agonist GW4064 Regulates PPARγ Coactivator-1α Expression Through Estrogen Receptor-Related Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Singh, Nidhi; Kumari, Rashmi; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Tripathi, Sarita; Banerjee, Priyam; Shah, Priyanka; Kukshal, Vandana; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Mishra, Durga Prasad; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Sanyal, Somali; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Ramachandran, Ravishankar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Bandyopadhyay, Arun; Arora, Ashish; Lundåsen, Thomas; Anakk, Sayee Priyadarshini; Moore, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is induced in energy-starved conditions and is a key regulator of energy homeostasis. This makes PGC-1α an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome and diabetes. In our effort to identify new regulators of PGC-1α expression, we found that GW4064, a widely used synthetic agonist for the nuclear bile acid receptor [farnesoid X receptor (FXR)] strongly enhances PGC-1α promoter reporter activity, mRNA, and protein expression. This induction in PGC-1α concomitantly enhances mitochondrial mass and expression of several PGC-1α target genes involved in mitochondrial function. Using FXR-rich or FXR-nonexpressing cell lines and tissues, we found that this effect of GW4064 is not mediated directly by FXR but occurs via activation of estrogen receptor-related receptor α (ERRα). Cell-based, biochemical and biophysical assays indicate GW4064 as an agonist of ERR proteins. Interestingly, FXR disruption alters GW4064 induction of PGC-1α mRNA in a tissue-dependent manner. Using FXR-null [FXR knockout (FXRKO)] mice, we determined that GW4064 induction of PGC-1α expression is not affected in oxidative soleus muscles of FXRKO mice but is compromised in the FXRKO liver. Mechanistic studies to explain these differences revealed that FXR physically interacts with ERR and protects them from repression by the atypical corepressor, small heterodimer partner in liver. Together, this interplay between ERRα-FXR-PGC-1α and small heterodimer partner offers new insights into the biological functions of ERRα and FXR, thus providing a knowledge base for therapeutics in energy balance-related pathophysiology. PMID:21493670

  19. The estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 can act both as an agonist and an inverse agonist when estrogen receptor α AF-2 is modified

    PubMed Central

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Börjesson, Anna E.; Farman, Helen H.; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H.; Lagerquist, Marie K.; Andersson, Annica; Stubelius, Alexandra; Carlsten, Hans; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-01-01

    The bone-sparing effect of estrogen is primarily mediated via estrogen receptor (ER) α, which stimulates target gene transcription through two activation functions (AFs), AF-1 in the N-terminal and AF-2 in the ligand-binding domain. It was recently demonstrated that the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI) acts as an ER agonist in uterus of mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2. To evaluate the estrogen-like effects of ICI in different tissues, ovariectomized wild-type mice and mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2 (ERαAF-20) were treated with ICI, estradiol, or vehicle for 3 wk. Estradiol increased the trabecular and cortical bone mass as well as the uterine weight, whereas it reduced fat mass, thymus weight, and the growth plate height in wild-type but not in ERαAF-20 mice. Although ICI had no effect in wild-type mice, it exerted tissue-specific effects in ERαAF-20 mice. It acted as an ERα agonist on trabecular bone mass and uterine weight, whereas no effect was seen on cortical bone mass, fat mass, or thymus weight. Surprisingly, a pronounced inverse agonistic activity was seen on the growth plate height, resulting in enhanced longitudinal bone growth. In conclusion, ICI uses ERα AF-1 in a tissue-dependent manner in mice lacking ERαAF-2, resulting in no effect, agonistic activity, or inverse agonistic activity. We propose that ERα lacking AF-2 is constitutively active in the absence of ligand in the growth plate, enabling ICI to act as an inverse agonist. PMID:24395795

  20. The estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 can act both as an agonist and an inverse agonist when estrogen receptor α AF-2 is modified.

    PubMed

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Börjesson, Anna E; Farman, Helen H; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H; Lagerquist, Marie K; Andersson, Annica; Stubelius, Alexandra; Carlsten, Hans; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-01-21

    The bone-sparing effect of estrogen is primarily mediated via estrogen receptor (ER) α, which stimulates target gene transcription through two activation functions (AFs), AF-1 in the N-terminal and AF-2 in the ligand-binding domain. It was recently demonstrated that the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI) acts as an ER agonist in uterus of mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2. To evaluate the estrogen-like effects of ICI in different tissues, ovariectomized wild-type mice and mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2 (ERαAF-2(0)) were treated with ICI, estradiol, or vehicle for 3 wk. Estradiol increased the trabecular and cortical bone mass as well as the uterine weight, whereas it reduced fat mass, thymus weight, and the growth plate height in wild-type but not in ERαAF-2(0) mice. Although ICI had no effect in wild-type mice, it exerted tissue-specific effects in ERαAF-2(0) mice. It acted as an ERα agonist on trabecular bone mass and uterine weight, whereas no effect was seen on cortical bone mass, fat mass, or thymus weight. Surprisingly, a pronounced inverse agonistic activity was seen on the growth plate height, resulting in enhanced longitudinal bone growth. In conclusion, ICI uses ERα AF-1 in a tissue-dependent manner in mice lacking ERαAF-2, resulting in no effect, agonistic activity, or inverse agonistic activity. We propose that ERα lacking AF-2 is constitutively active in the absence of ligand in the growth plate, enabling ICI to act as an inverse agonist.

  1. Discovery of novel acetanilide derivatives as potent and selective beta3-adrenergic receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuya; Onda, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Masahiko; Matsui, Tetsuo; Takasu, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2009-06-01

    In the search for potent and selective human beta3-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists as potential drugs for the treatment of obesity and noninsulin-dependent (type II) diabetes, a novel series of acetanilide-based analogues were prepared and their biological activities were evaluated at the human beta3-, beta2-, and beta1-ARs. Among these compounds, 2-pyridylacetanilide (2f), pyrimidin-2-ylacetanilide (2u), and pyrazin-2-ylacetanilide (2v) derivatives exhibited potent agonistic activity at the beta3-AR with functional selectivity over the beta1- and beta2-ARs. In particular, compound 2u was found to be the most potent and selective beta3-AR agonist with an EC(50) value of 0.11 microM and no agonistic activity for either the beta1- or beta2-AR. In addition, 2f, 2u, and 2v showed significant hypoglycemic activity in a rodent diabetic model.

  2. Antinociceptive action of NOP and opioid receptor agonists in the mouse orofacial formalin test.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, A; Ruzza, C; Bianco, S; Trapella, C; Calo', G

    2017-08-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) modulates several biological functions, including pain transmission via selective activation of a specific receptor named NOP. The aim of this study was the investigation of the antinociceptive properties of NOP agonists and their interaction with opioids in the trigeminal territory. The orofacial formalin (OFF) test in mice was used to investigate the antinociceptive potential associated to the activation of NOP and opioid receptors. Mice subjected to OFF test displayed the typical biphasic nociceptive response and sensitivity to opioid and NSAID drugs. Mice knockout for the NOP gene displayed a robust pronociceptive phenotype. The NOP selective agonist Ro 65-6570 (0.1-1mgkg -1 ) and morphine (0.1-10mgkg -1 ) elicited dose dependent antinociceptive effects in the OFF with the alkaloid showing larger effects; the isobologram analysis of their actions demonstrated an additive type of interaction. The mixed NOP/opioid receptor agonist cebranopadol elicited potent (0.01-0.1mgkg -1 ) and robust antinociceptive effects. In the investigated dose range, all drugs did not modify the motor performance of the mice in the rotarod test. Collectively the results of this study demonstrated that selective NOP agonists and particularly mixed NOP/opioid agonists are worthy of development as innovative drugs to treat painful conditions of the trigeminal territory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Behavioural and biochemical responses following activation of midbrain dopamine pathways by receptor selective neurokinin agonists.

    PubMed

    Elliott, P J; Mason, G S; Stephens-Smith, M; Hagan, R M

    1991-06-01

    Preferential activation of mesolimbic and nigro-striatal dopamine (DA) pathways by receptor-selective and peptidase-resistant neurokinin (NK) agonists is reported. The DA cell body region of the mesolimbic pathway appears to be activated by NK agonists selective for NK-1 and NK-3 receptors whereas the DA cell bodies in the substantia nigra are under an excitatory NK-2 receptor-mediated influence. Stimulation of the mesolimbic DA pathway by NK-1 (Ava[L-Pro9,N-Me-Leu10]SP (7-11) [GR73632]) or NK-3 (Senktide) agonists increase locomotor activity. Additional studies showed that this elevated motor response observed after intra-VTA infusion of GR73632 was accompanied by a corresponding increase in DA turnover in the terminal fields of this pathway. Similarly, unilateral activation of the nigro-striatal DA pathway by NK-2 selective agonists (Ava (D-Pro9) SP (7-11) [GR51667] or [Lys3,Gly8,R-Lac-Leu9]NKA (3-10) [GR64349]) elicit contralateral rotational activity and an increase in DA turnover in the ipsilateral striatum. The rotational response was attenuated by prior administration of an NK-2 antagonist (cyclo (Gln, Trp, Phe, Gly, Leu, Met)] L-659877]) into the nigra. Peripheral injection of haloperidol, a DA antagonist, also blocked the NK-2 agonist induced rotations.

  4. Lupinalbin A as the most potent estrogen receptor α- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist in Eriosema laurentii de Wild. (Leguminosae).

    PubMed

    Ateba, Sylvin Benjamin; Njamen, Dieudonné; Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Zehl, Martin; Kaehlig, Hanspeter; Jungbauer, Alois; Krenn, Liselotte

    2014-08-09

    Eriosema laurentii De Wild. (Leguminosae) is a plant used in Cameroon against infertility and gynecological or menopausal complaints. In our previous report, a methanol extract of its aerial parts was shown to exhibit estrogenic and aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonistic activities in vitro and to prevent menopausal symptoms in ovariectomized Wistar rats. In order to determine the major estrogen receptor α (ERα) agonists in the extract, an activity-guided fractionation was performed using the ERα yeast screen. To check whether the ERα active fractions/compounds also accounted for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonistic activity of the crude methanol extract, they were further tested on the AhR yeast screen. This study led to the identification of 2'-hydroxygenistein, lupinalbin A and genistein as major estrogenic principles of the extract. 2'-hydroxygenistein and lupinalbin A were, for the first time, also shown to possess an AhR agonistic activity, whereas genistein was not active in this assay. In addition, it was possible to deduce structure-activity relationships. These results suggest that the identified compounds are the major active principles responsible for the estrogenic and AhR agonistic activities of the crude methanol extract of the aerial parts of Eriosema laurentii.

  5. Design and synthesis of small molecule agonists of EphA2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Petty, Aaron; Idippily, Nethrie; Bobba, Viharika; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Zhong, Bo; Su, Bin; Wang, Bingcheng

    2018-01-01

    Ligand-independent activation of EphA2 receptor kinase promotes cancer metastasis and invasion. Activating EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase with small molecule agonist is a novel strategy to treat EphA2 overexpressing cancer. In this study, we performed a lead optimization of a small molecule Doxazosin that was identified as an EphA2 receptor agonist. 33 new analogs were developed and evaluated; a structure-activity relationship was summarized based on the EphA2 activation of these derivatives. Two new derivative compounds 24 and 27 showed much improved activity compared to Doxazosin. Compound 24 possesses a bulky amide moiety, and compound 27 has a dimeric structure that is very different to the parental compound. Compound 27 with a twelve-carbon linker of the dimer activated the kinase and induced receptor internalization and cell death with the best potency. Another dimer with a six-carbon linker has significantly reduced potency compared to the dimer with a longer linker, suggesting that the length of the linker is critical for the activity of the dimeric agonist. To explore the receptor binding characteristics of the new molecules, we applied a docking study to examine how the small molecule binds to the EphA2 receptor. The results reveal that compounds 24 and 27 form more hydrogen bonds to EphA2 than Doxazosin, suggesting that they may have higher binding affinity to the receptor. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Characterization of methadone as a β-arrestin-biased μ-opioid receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Seira; Mori, Tomohisa; Uzawa, Naoki; Arima, Takamichi; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Uchida, Masashi; Yawata, Ayaka; Narita, Michiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone is a unique µ-opioid receptor agonist. Although several researchers have insisted that the pharmacological effects of methadone are mediated through the blockade of NMDA receptor, the underlying mechanism by which methadone exerts its distinct pharmacological effects compared to those of other µ-opioid receptor agonists is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the pharmacological profile of methadone compared to those of fentanyl and morphine as measured mainly by the discriminative stimulus effect and in vitro assays for NMDA receptor binding, µ-opioid receptor-internalization, and µ-opioid receptor-mediated β-arrestin recruitment. Results We found that fentanyl substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone, whereas a relatively high dose of morphine was required to substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone in rats. Under these conditions, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 did not substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone. In association with its discriminative stimulus effect, methadone failed to displace the receptor binding of MK801 using mouse brain membrane. Methadone and fentanyl, but not morphine, induced potent µ-opioid receptor internalization accompanied by the strong recruitment of β-arrestin-2 in µ-opioid receptor-overexpressing cells. Conclusions These results suggest that methadone may, at least partly, produce its pharmacological effect as a β-arrestin-biased µ-opioid receptor agonist, similar to fentanyl, and NMDA receptor blockade is not the main contributor to the pharmacological profile of methadone. PMID:27317580

  7. Differential agonist sensitivity of glycine receptor α2 subunit splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul S; Harvey, Robert J; Smart, Trevor G

    2004-01-01

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) α2A and α2B splice variants differ by a dual, adjacent amino acid substitution from α2AV58,T59 to α2BI58,A59 in the N-terminal extracellular domain. Comparing the effects of the GlyR agonists, glycine, β-alanine and taurine, on the GlyR α2 isoforms, revealed a significant increase in potency for all three agonists at the α2B variant. The sensitivities of the splice variants to the competitive antagonist, strychnine, and to the biphasic modulator Zn2+, were comparable. In contrast, the allosteric inhibitor picrotoxin was more potent on GlyR α2A compared to GlyR α2B receptors. Coexpression of α2A or α2B subunits with the GlyR β subunit revealed that the higher agonist potencies observed with the α2B homomer were retained for the α2Bβ heteromer. The identical sensitivity to strychnine combined with a reduction in the maximum current induced by the partial agonist taurine at the GlyR α2A homomer, suggested that the changed sensitivity to agonists is in accordance with a modulation of agonist efficacy rather than agonist affinity. An effect on agonist efficacy was also supported by using a structural model of the GlyR, localising the region of splice variation to the proposed docking region between GlyR loop 2 and the TM2-3 loop, an area associated with channel activation. The existence of a spasmodic mouse phenotype linked to a GlyR α1A52S mutation, the equivalent position to the source of the α2 splice variation, raises the possibility that the GlyR α2 splice variants may be responsible for distinct roles in neuronal function. PMID:15302677

  8. Investigation of pyrazolo-sulfonamides as putative small molecule oxytocin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Katte, Timothy A; Reekie, Tristan A; Werry, Eryn L; Jorgensen, William T; Boyd, Rochelle; Wong, Erick C N; Gulliver, Damien W; Connor, Mark; Kassiou, Michael

    2017-08-18

    The neuropeptide oxytocin has been implicated in multiple central nervous system functions in mammalian species. Increased levels have been reported to improve trust, alleviate symptoms related to autism and social phobias, and reduce social anxiety. Hoffman-La Roche published a patent claiming to have found potent small molecule oxytocin receptor agonists, smaller than the first non-peptide oxytocin agonist reported, WAY 267,464. We selected two of the more potent compounds from the patent and, in addition, created WAY 267,464 hybrid structures and determined their oxytocin and vasopressin receptor activity. Human embryonic kidney and Chinese hamster ovary cells were used for the expression of oxytocin or vasopressin 1a receptors and activity assessed via IP1 accumulation assays and calcium FLIPR assays. The results concluded that the reported compounds in the patent and the hybrid structures have no activity at the oxytocin or vasopressin 1a receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulations of Biased Agonists in the β2 Adrenergic Receptor with Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The biased agonism of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), where in addition to a traditional G protein-signaling pathway a GPCR promotes intracellular signals though β-arrestin, is a novel paradigm in pharmacology. Biochemical and biophysical studies have suggested that a GPCR forms a distinct ensemble of conformations signaling through the G protein and β-arrestin. Here we report on the dynamics of the β2 adrenergic receptor bound to the β-arrestin and G protein-biased agonists and the empty receptor to further characterize the receptor conformational changes caused by biased agonists. We use conventional and accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations to explore the conformational transitions of the GPCR from the active state to the inactive state. We found that aMD simulations enable monitoring of the transition within the nanosecond time scale while capturing the known microscopic characteristics of the inactive states, such as the ionic lock, the inward position of F6.44, and water clusters. Distinct conformational states are shown to be stabilized by each biased agonist. In particular, in simulations of the receptor with the β-arrestin-biased agonist N-cyclopentylbutanepherine, we observe a different pattern of motions in helix 7 when compared to simulations with the G protein-biased agonist salbutamol that involves perturbations of the network of interactions within the NPxxY motif. Understanding the network of interactions induced by biased ligands and the subsequent receptor conformational shifts will lead to development of more efficient drugs. PMID:23879802

  10. Allosteric activation of the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor by selective, nonpeptide agonists.

    PubMed

    Yanofsky, Stephen D; Shen, Emily S; Holden, Frank; Whitehorn, Erik; Aguilar, Barbara; Tate, Emily; Holmes, Christopher P; Scheuerman, Randall; MacLean, Derek; Wu, May M; Frail, Donald E; López, Francisco J; Winneker, Richard; Arey, Brian J; Barrett, Ronald W

    2006-05-12

    The pituitary glycoprotein hormones, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), act through their cognate receptors to initiate a series of coordinated physiological events that results in germ cell maturation. Given the importance of FSH in regulating folliculogenesis and fertility, the development of FSH mimetics has been sought to treat infertility. Currently, purified and recombinant human FSH are the only FSH receptor (FSH-R) agonists available for infertility treatment. By screening unbiased combinatorial chemistry libraries, using a cAMP-responsive luciferase reporter assay, we discovered thiazolidinone agonists (EC50's = 20 microm) of the human FSH-R. Subsequent analog library screening and parallel synthesis optimization resulted in the identification of a potent agonist (EC50 = 2 nm) with full efficacy compared with FSH that was FSH-R-selective and -dependent. The compound mediated progesterone production in Y1 cells transfected with the human FSH-R (EC50 = 980 nm) and estradiol production from primary rat ovarian granulosa cells (EC50 = 10.5 nm). This and related compounds did not compete with FSH for binding to the FSH-R. Use of human FSH/thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor chimeras suggested a novel mechanism for receptor activation through a binding site independent of the natural hormone binding site. This study is the first report of a high affinity small molecule agonist that activates a glycoprotein hormone receptor through an allosteric mechanism. The small molecule FSH receptor agonists described here could lead to an oral alternative to the current parenteral FSH treatments used clinically to induce ovarian stimulation for both in vivo and in vitro fertilization therapy.

  11. Selective melanocortin MC4 receptor agonists reverse haemorrhagic shock and prevent multiple organ damage

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, D; Mioni, C; Bazzani, C; Zaffe, D; Botticelli, A R; Capolongo, S; Sabba, A; Galantucci, M; Iannone, A; Grieco, P; Novellino, E; Colombo, G; Tomasi, A; Catania, A; Guarini, S

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: In circulatory shock, melanocortins have life-saving effects likely to be mediated by MC4 receptors. To gain direct insight into the role of melanocortin MC4 receptors in haemorrhagic shock, we investigated the effects of two novel selective MC4 receptor agonists. Experimental approach: Severe haemorrhagic shock was produced in rats under general anaesthesia. Rats were then treated with either the non-selective agonist [Nle4, D-Phe7]α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (NDP-α-MSH) or with the selective MC4 agonists RO27-3225 and PG-931. Cardiovascular and respiratory functions were continuously monitored for 2 h; survival rate was recorded up to 24 h. Free radicals in blood were measured using electron spin resonance spectrometry; tissue damage was evaluated histologically 25 min or 24 h after treatment. Key results: All shocked rats treated with saline died within 30-35 min. Treatment with NDP-α-MSH, RO27-3225 and PG-931 produced a dose-dependent (13-108 nmol kg-1 i.v.) restoration of cardiovascular and respiratory functions, and improved survival. The three melanocortin agonists also markedly reduced circulating free radicals relative to saline-treated shocked rats. All these effects were prevented by i.p. pretreatment with the selective MC4 receptor antagonist HS024. Moreover, treatment with RO27-3225 prevented morphological and immunocytochemical changes in heart, lung, liver, and kidney, at both early (25 min) and late (24 h) intervals. Conclusions and Implications: Stimulation of MC4 receptors reversed haemorrhagic shock, reduced multiple organ damage and improved survival. Our findings suggest that selective MC4 receptor agonists could have a protective role against multiple organ failure following circulatory shock. PMID:17245369

  12. In vivo dopamine agonist properties of rotigotine: Role of D1 and D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Fenu, Sandro; Espa, Elena; Pisanu, Augusta; Di Chiara, Gaetano

    2016-10-05

    Rotigotine acts in vitro as a full agonist of dopamine D1 receptors at concentrations almost superimposable to those at which it acts on D2 receptors. However in vivo evidence of the differences between the agonist activity of rotigotine at D1 receptors from that on the D2 receptors has not been provided yet. In order to test the ability of rotigotine to stimulate dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in vivo, we studied the effect of SCH39166 and eticlopride, selective dopamine D1 and D2/D3 receptor antagonists respectively, on rotigotine-induced contralateral turning behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Furthermore, the expression of the immediate-early gene c-fos in the caudate-putamen, was evaluated. As a comparison, we tested the D2/D3 agonist pramipexole. In primed rats, rotigotine (0.035, 0.1 and 0.35mg/kg) induced dose-dependent contralateral turning. Turning induced by 0.1mg/kg of rotigotine was reduced by pretreatment with the D1 antagonist SCH39166 and the D2 antagonist eticlopride. In drug-naive rats, rotigotine was less effective in eliciting turning but SCH39166 still reduced turning induced by rotigotine (0.35mg/kg). Pramipexole induced contralateral turning only in primed rats. SCH39166 potentiated and eticlopride abolished pramipexole-induced turning. Rotigotine induced Fos expression in the caudate-putamen and SCH39166 completely blocked it. Pramipexole failed to induce Fos. These results indicate that rotigotine acts in vivo as an agonist of D1 and D2 receptors while pramipexole is devoid of D1 activity in vivo. Given their differing DA receptor profiles, rotigotine and pramipexole might differ in their spectrum of application to the therapy of Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Profound and rapid reduction in body temperature induced by the melanocortin receptor agonists

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) plays a major role in body weight regulation and its agonist MTII has been widely used to study the role of MC4Rs in energy expenditure promotion and feeding reduction. Unexpectedly, we observed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of MTII induced a rapid red...

  14. Differences in acute anorectic effects of long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have both glucose- and weight-lowering effects. The brain is poised to mediate both of these actions since GLP-1Rs are present in key areas known to control weight and glucose. Although some research has been performed on the effects of ...

  15. Design and Discovery of Functionally Selective Serotonin 2C (5-HT2C) Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianjun; McCorvy, John D; Giguere, Patrick M; Zhu, Hu; Kenakin, Terry; Roth, Bryan L; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-11-10

    On the basis of the structural similarity of our previous 5-HT 2C agonists with the melatonin receptor agonist tasimelteon and the putative biological cross-talk between serotonergic and melatonergic systems, a series of new (2,3-dihydro)benzofuran-based compounds were designed and synthesized. The compounds were evaluated for their selectivity toward 5-HT 2A , 5-HT 2B , and 5-HT 2C receptors in the calcium flux assay with the ultimate goal to generate selective 5-HT 2C agonists. Selected compounds were studied for their functional selectivity by comparing their transduction efficiency at the G protein signaling pathway versus β-arrestin recruitment. The most functionally selective compound (+)-7e produced weak β-arrestin recruitment and also demonstrated less receptor desensitization compared to serotonin in both calcium flux and phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis assays. We report for the first time that selective 5-HT 2C agonists possessing weak β-arrestin recruitment can produce distinct receptor desensitization properties.

  16. Differential Effects of Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist on Social Discrimination and Contextual Fear in Amygdala and Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 5 [mu]g/side) microinjected into the hippocampus or the amygdala would differentially affect memory processes in a neutral vs. an aversive task. In the aversive contextual fear task, WIN into the basolateral amygdala impaired fear acquisition/consolidation, but not retrieval.…

  17. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na/sup +/ channel interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-12

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na/sup +/ channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) (G-protein(s)). These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxin to Na/sup +/ channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinicallymore » induced /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na/sup +/ channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na/sup +/channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na/sup +/ channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na/sup +/ channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues.« less

  18. The 5-HT2A/1A agonist psilocybin disrupts modal object completion associated with visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Kometer, Michael; Cahn, B Rael; Andel, David; Carter, Olivia L; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2011-03-01

    Recent findings suggest that the serotonergic system and particularly the 5-HT2A/1A receptors are implicated in visual processing and possibly the pathophysiology of visual disturbances including hallucinations in schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. To investigate the role of 5-HT2A/1A receptors in visual processing the effect of the hallucinogenic 5-HT2A/1A agonist psilocybin (125 and 250 μg/kg vs. placebo) on the spatiotemporal dynamics of modal object completion was assessed in normal volunteers (n = 17) using visual evoked potential recordings in conjunction with topographic-mapping and source analysis. These effects were then considered in relation to the subjective intensity of psilocybin-induced visual hallucinations quantified by psychometric measurement. Psilocybin dose-dependently decreased the N170 and, in contrast, slightly enhanced the P1 component selectively over occipital electrode sites. The decrease of the N170 was most apparent during the processing of incomplete object figures. Moreover, during the time period of the N170, the overall reduction of the activation in the right extrastriate and posterior parietal areas correlated positively with the intensity of visual hallucinations. These results suggest a central role of the 5-HT2A/1A-receptors in the modulation of visual processing. Specifically, a reduced N170 component was identified as potentially reflecting a key process of 5-HT2A/1A receptor-mediated visual hallucinations and aberrant modal object completion potential. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of the potential 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS 19 in an autoshaping learning task.

    PubMed

    Perez-García, Georgina S; Meneses, A

    2005-08-30

    This work aimed to evaluate further the role of 5-HT7 receptors during memory formation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning task. Post-training administration of the potential 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS 19 or antagonist SB-269970 enhanced memory formation or had no effect, respectively. The AS 19 facilitatory effect was reversed by SB-269970, but not by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635. Amnesia induced by scopolamine (cholinergic antagonist) or dizocilpine (NMDA antagonist) was also reversed by AS 19. Certainly, reservations regarding the selectivity of AS 19 for 5-HT7 and other 5-HT receptors in vivo are noteworthy and, therefore, its validity for use in animal models as a pharmacological tool. Having mentioned that, it should be noticed that together these data are providing further support to the notion of the 5-HT7 receptors role in memory formation. Importantly, this 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS 19 appears to represent a step forward respect to the notion that potent and selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists can be useful in the treatment of dysfunctional memory in aged-related decline and Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Triazine dyes are agonists of the NAADP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Richard A; Bak, Judit; Martinez-Coscolla, Ana; Debidda, Marcella; Genazzani, Armando A

    2004-01-01

    NAADP has been shown to be a potent calcium-releasing second messenger in a wide variety of cell types to date. However, research has been hampered by a lack of pharmacological agents, with which to investigate NAADP-induced calcium release, and by the molecular identity of its cellular target protein being unknown.In the present paper, the sea urchin egg model was used to investigate whether triazine dyes, which can act as nucleotide mimetics, can bind to the NAADP receptor, induce Ca2+ release and be used for affinity chromatography of the receptor.Indeed, all the triazine dyes tested (Reactive Red 120 (RR120), Reactive Green 19 (RG19), Reactive Green 5 (RG5), Cibacron Blue 3GA and Reactive Yellow 86) displayed micromolar affinities, except for Reactive Orange 14. Furthermore, unlike NAADP, RR120, RG19 and RG5 did not bind in an irreversible manner.The compound that displayed the highest affinity, RR120, was tested in a 45Ca2+ efflux assay. This compound released Ca2+ via the NAADP receptor, as shown by the ability of subthreshold NAADP concentrations to inhibit this release. Furthermore, heparin and ruthenium red were unable to block RR120-induced Ca2+ release.We have also shown that RG5 and RG19, immobilised on resins, retain the ability to bind to the receptor, and that this interaction can be disrupted by high salt concentrations. As a proof of principle, we have shown that this can be used to partially purify the NAADP receptor by at least 75-fold.In conclusion, triazine dyes interact with the NAADP receptor, and this could be exploited in future to create a new generation of pharmacological tools to investigate this messenger and, in combination with other techniques, to purify the receptor. PMID:15265807

  1. Identification of benzothiazole derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists present in tire extracts.

    PubMed

    He, Guochun; Zhao, Bin; Denison, Michael S

    2011-08-01

    Leachate from rubber tire material contains a complex mixture of chemicals previously shown to produce toxic and biological effects in aquatic organisms. The ability of these leachates to induce Ah receptor (AhR)-dependent cytochrome P4501A1 expression in fish indicated the presence of AhR active chemicals, but the responsible chemicals and their direct interaction with the AhR signaling pathway were not examined. Using a combination of AhR-based bioassays, we have demonstrated the ability of tire extract to stimulate both AhR DNA binding and AhR-dependent gene expression and confirmed that the responsible chemicals were metabolically labile. The application of CALUX (chemical-activated luciferase gene expression) cell bioassay-driven toxicant identification evaluation not only revealed that tire extract contained a variety of known AhR-active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons but also identified 2-methylthiobenzothiazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole as AhR agonists. Analysis of a structurally diverse series of benzothiazoles identified many that could directly stimulate AhR DNA binding and transiently activate the AhR signaling pathway and identified benzothiazoles as a new class of AhR agonists. In addition to these compounds, the relatively high AhR agonist activity of a large number of fractions strongly suggests that tire extract contains a large number of physiochemically diverse AhR agonists whose identities and toxicological/biological significances are unknown. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  2. Identification of Benzothiazole Derivatives and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists Present in Tire Extracts

    PubMed Central

    He, Guochun; Zhao, Bin; Denison, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Leachate from rubber tire material contains a complex mixture of chemicals previously shown to produce toxic and biological effects in aquatic organisms. While the ability of these leachates to induce Ah receptor (AhR)-dependent cytochrome P4501A1 expression in fish indicated the presence of AhR active chemicals, the responsible chemical(s) and their direct interaction with the AhR signaling pathway were not examined. Using a combination of AhR-based bioassays, we have demonstrated the ability of tire extract to stimulate both AhR DNA binding and AhR-dependent gene expression and confirmed that the responsible chemical(s) was metabolically labile. The application of CALUX (Chemical-Activated LUciferase gene eXpression) cell bioassay-driven toxicant identification evaluation not only revealed that tire extract contained a variety of known AhR-active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, but also identified 2-methylthiobenzothiazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole as AhR agonists. Analysis of a structurally diverse series of benzothiazoles identified many that could directly stimulate AhR DNA binding and transiently activate the AhR signaling pathway and identified benzothiazoles as a new class of AhR agonists. In addition to these compounds, the relatively high AhR agonist activity of a large number of fractions strongly suggests that tire extract contains a large number of physiochemically diverse AhR agonists whose identities and toxicological/biological significances are unknown. PMID:21590714

  3. SB265610 is an allosteric, inverse agonist at the human CXCR2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, ME; Bond, ME; Manini, J; Brown, Z; Charlton, SJ

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: In several previous studies, the C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonist 1-(2-bromo-phenyl)-3-(7-cyano-3H-benzotriazol-4-yl)-urea (SB265610) has been described as binding competitively with the endogenous agonist. This is in contrast to many other chemokine receptor antagonists, where the mechanism of antagonism has been described as allosteric. Experimental approach: To determine whether it displays a unique mechanism among the chemokine receptor antagonists, the mode of action of SB265610 was investigated at the CXCR2 receptor using radioligand and [35S]-GTPγS binding approaches in addition to chemotaxis of human neutrophils. Key results: In equilibrium saturation binding studies, SB265610 depressed the maximal binding of [125I]-interleukin-8 ([125I]-IL-8) without affecting the Kd. In contrast, IL-8 was unable to prevent binding of [3H]-SB265610. Kinetic binding experiments demonstrated that this was not an artefact of irreversible or slowly reversible binding. In functional experiments, SB265610 caused a rightward shift of the concentration-response curves to IL-8 and growth-related oncogene α, but also a reduction in maximal response elicited by each agonist. Fitting these data to an operational allosteric ternary complex model suggested that, once bound, SB265610 completely blocks receptor activation. SB265610 also inhibited basal [35S]-GTPγS binding in this preparation. Conclusions and implications: Taken together, these data suggest that SB265610 behaves as an allosteric inverse agonist at the CXCR2 receptor, binding at a region distinct from the agonist binding site to prevent receptor activation, possibly by interfering with G protein coupling. PMID:19422399

  4. Muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists: current scenario in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Stuti; Kumar, Ashwini; Tripathi, Timir; Kumar, Awanish

    2018-04-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become the primary cause of dementia. It shows a progressive cognitive dysfunction with degenerating neurons. Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) propagate the cognitive ability and it consists of two primary members namely muscarinic (mAChRs) and nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). Where mAChRs is G-protein coupled receptor, (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels. The conventional therapeutic regimen for AD consists of three acetylcholinestearse inhibitors while a single NMDA receptor antagonist. Researchers around the globe are developing new and modifying the existing AChRs agonists to develop lead candidates with lower risk to benefit ratio where benefits clearly outweigh the adverse events. We have searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Google scholar, Science Direct and, Web of Science with keywords "Muscarinic/Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, agonists and, AD". The literature search included articles written in English. Scientific relevance for clinical studies, basic science studies is eligibility criteria for articles referred in this paper. M1 is the primary muscarinic subtype while α7 is the primary nAChR subtype that is responsible for cognition and memory and these two have been the major recent experimental targets for mAChR agonist strategy. The last cholinergic receptor agonist to enter phase 3 trial was EVP-6124 (Enceniclin) but was withdrawn due to severe gastrointestinal adverse effects. We aim to present an overview of the efforts and achievements in targeting Muscarinic and Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the current review for development of better AD therapeutics. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. The therapeutic potential of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists for pain control.

    PubMed

    Decker, M W; Meyer, M D; Sullivan, J P

    2001-10-01

    Due to the limitations of currently available analgesics, a number of novel alternatives are currently under investigation, including neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists. During the 1990s, the discovery of the antinociceptive properties of the potent nAChR agonist epibatidine in rodents sparked interest in the analgesic potential of this class of compounds. Although epibatidine also has several mechanism-related toxicities, the identification of considerable nAChR diversity suggested that the toxicities and therapeutic actions of the compound might be mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. Consistent with this view, a number of novel nAChR agonists with antinociceptive activity and improved safety profiles in preclinical models have now been identified, including A-85380, ABT-594, DBO-83, SIB-1663 and RJR-2403. Of these, ABT-594 is the most advanced and is currently in Phase II clinical evaluation. Nicotinically-mediated antinociception has been demonstrated in a variety of rodent pain models and is likely mediated by the activation of descending inhibitory pathways originating in the brainstem with the predominant high-affinity nicotine site in brain, the alpha4beta2 subtype, playing a critical role. Thus, preclinical findings suggest that nAChR agonists have the potential to be highly efficacious treatments in a variety of pain states. However, clinical proof-of-principle studies will be required to determine if nAChR agonists are active in pathological pain.

  6. Antimitogenic effect of bitter taste receptor agonists on airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Panebra, Alfredo; Pera, Tonio; Tiegs, Brian C; Hershfeld, Alena; Kenyon, Lawrence C; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2016-02-15

    Airway remodeling is a hallmark feature of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical studies and animal models have demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and ASM thickness is correlated with severity of the disease. Current medications control inflammation and reverse airway obstruction effectively but have limited effect on remodeling. Recently we identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2R) on ASM cells, and activation with known TAS2R agonists resulted in ASM relaxation and bronchodilation. These studies suggest that TAS2R can be used as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. To further establish their effectiveness, in this study we aimed to determine the effects of TAS2R agonists on ASM growth and promitogenic signaling. Pretreatment of healthy and asthmatic human ASM cells with TAS2R agonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of ASM proliferation. The antimitogenic effect of TAS2R ligands was not dependent on activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or high/intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels. Immunoblot analyses revealed that TAS2R agonists inhibit growth factor-activated protein kinase B phosphorylation without affecting the availability of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, suggesting TAS2R agonists block signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists involved inhibition of induced transcription factors (activator protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, E2 factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells) and inhibition of expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes, suggesting a direct inhibition of cell cycle progression. Collectively, these findings establish the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and signaling pathways that can be targeted to reduce or prevent airway remodeling as well as

  7. Antimitogenic effect of bitter taste receptor agonists on airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Panebra, Alfredo; Pera, Tonio; Tiegs, Brian C.; Hershfeld, Alena; Kenyon, Lawrence C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a hallmark feature of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical studies and animal models have demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and ASM thickness is correlated with severity of the disease. Current medications control inflammation and reverse airway obstruction effectively but have limited effect on remodeling. Recently we identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2R) on ASM cells, and activation with known TAS2R agonists resulted in ASM relaxation and bronchodilation. These studies suggest that TAS2R can be used as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. To further establish their effectiveness, in this study we aimed to determine the effects of TAS2R agonists on ASM growth and promitogenic signaling. Pretreatment of healthy and asthmatic human ASM cells with TAS2R agonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of ASM proliferation. The antimitogenic effect of TAS2R ligands was not dependent on activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or high/intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K+ channels. Immunoblot analyses revealed that TAS2R agonists inhibit growth factor-activated protein kinase B phosphorylation without affecting the availability of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, suggesting TAS2R agonists block signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists involved inhibition of induced transcription factors (activator protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, E2 factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells) and inhibition of expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes, suggesting a direct inhibition of cell cycle progression. Collectively, these findings establish the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and signaling pathways that can be targeted to reduce or prevent airway remodeling as well as

  8. Differential profile of typical, atypical and third generation antipsychotics at human 5-HT7a receptors coupled to adenylyl cyclase: detection of agonist and inverse agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Ailhaud, Marie-Christine; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Cussac, Didier

    2007-10-01

    5-HT(7) receptors are present in thalamus and limbic structures, and a possible role of these receptors in the pathology of schizophrenia has been evoked. In this study, we examined binding affinity and agonist/antagonist/inverse agonist properties at these receptors of a large series of antipsychotics, i.e., typical, atypical, and third generation compounds preferentially targeting D(2) and 5-HT(1A) sites. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity was measured in HEK293 cells stably expressing the human (h) 5-HT(7a) receptor isoform. 5-HT and 5-CT increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate level by about 20-fold whereas (+)-8-OH-DPAT, the antidyskinetic agent sarizotan, and the novel antipsychotic compound bifeprunox exhibited partial agonist properties at h5-HT(7a) receptors stimulating AC. Other compounds antagonized 5-HT-induced AC activity with pK (B) values which correlated with their pK (i) as determined by competition binding vs [(3)H]5-CT. The selective 5-HT(7) receptor ligand, SB269970, was the most potent antagonist. For antipsychotic compounds, the following rank order of antagonism potency (pK (B)) was ziprasidone > tiospirone > SSR181507 > or = clozapine > or = olanzapine > SLV-314 > SLV-313 > or = aripiprazole > or = chlorpromazine > nemonapride > haloperidol. Interestingly, pretreatment of HEK293-h5-HT(7a) cells with forskolin enhanced basal AC activity and revealed inverse agonist properties for both typical and atypical antipsychotics as well as for aripiprazole. In contrast, other novel antipsychotics exhibited diverse 5-HT(7a) properties; SLV-313 and SLV-314 behaved as quasi-neutral antagonists, SSR181507 acted as an inverse agonist, and bifeprunox as a partial agonist, as mentioned above. In conclusion, the differential properties of third generation antipsychotics at 5-HT(7) receptors may influence their antipsychotic profile.

  9. Evaluation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists on interleukin-5-induced eosinophil differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven G; Hill, Mike; Oliveria, John-Paul; Watson, Brittany M; Baatjes, Adrian J; Dua, Benny; Howie, Karen; Campbell, Heather; Watson, Rick M; Sehmi, Roma; Gauvreau, Gail M

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists have been suggested as novel therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory lung disease, such as allergic asthma. Treatment with PPAR agonists has been shown to inhibit airway eosinophilia in murine models of allergic asthma, which can occur through several mechanisms including attenuated generation of chemoattractants (e.g. eotaxin) and decreased eosinophil migrational responses. In addition, studies report that PPAR agonists can inhibit the differentiation of several cell types. To date, no studies have examined the effects of PPAR agonists on interleukin-5 (IL-5) -induced eosinophil differentiation from haemopoietic progenitor cells. Non-adherent mononuclear cells or CD34+ cells isolated from the peripheral blood of allergic subjects were grown for 2 weeks in Methocult® cultures with IL-5 (10 ng/ml) and IL-3 (25 ng/ml) in the presence of 1–1000 nm PPARα agonist (GW9578), PPARβ/δ agonist (GW501516), PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) or diluent. The number of eosinophil/basophil colony-forming units (Eo/B CFU) was quantified by light microscopy. The signalling mechanism involved was assessed by phosphoflow. Blood-extracted CD34+ cells cultured with IL-5 or IL-5 + IL-3 formed Eo/B CFU, which were significantly inhibited by rosiglitazone (100 nm, P < 0·01) but not GW9578 or GW501516. In addition, rosglitazone significantly inhibited IL-5-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. We observed an inhibitory effect of rosiglitazone on eosinophil differentiation in vitro, mediated by attenuation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signalling pathway. These findings indicate that the PPARγ agonist can attenuate tissue eosinophilia by interfering with local differentiative responses. PMID:24628018

  10. Evaluation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists on interleukin-5-induced eosinophil differentiation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven G; Hill, Mike; Oliveria, John-Paul; Watson, Brittany M; Baatjes, Adrian J; Dua, Benny; Howie, Karen; Campbell, Heather; Watson, Rick M; Sehmi, Roma; Gauvreau, Gail M

    2014-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists have been suggested as novel therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory lung disease, such as allergic asthma. Treatment with PPAR agonists has been shown to inhibit airway eosinophilia in murine models of allergic asthma, which can occur through several mechanisms including attenuated generation of chemoattractants (e.g. eotaxin) and decreased eosinophil migrational responses. In addition, studies report that PPAR agonists can inhibit the differentiation of several cell types. To date, no studies have examined the effects of PPAR agonists on interleukin-5 (IL-5) -induced eosinophil differentiation from haemopoietic progenitor cells. Non-adherent mononuclear cells or CD34(+) cells isolated from the peripheral blood of allergic subjects were grown for 2 weeks in Methocult(®) cultures with IL-5 (10 ng/ml) and IL-3 (25 ng/ml) in the presence of 1-1000 nm PPARα agonist (GW9578), PPARβ/δ agonist (GW501516), PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) or diluent. The number of eosinophil/basophil colony-forming units (Eo/B CFU) was quantified by light microscopy. The signalling mechanism involved was assessed by phosphoflow. Blood-extracted CD34(+) cells cultured with IL-5 or IL-5 + IL-3 formed Eo/B CFU, which were significantly inhibited by rosiglitazone (100 nm, P < 0·01) but not GW9578 or GW501516. In addition, rosglitazone significantly inhibited IL-5-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. We observed an inhibitory effect of rosiglitazone on eosinophil differentiation in vitro, mediated by attenuation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signalling pathway. These findings indicate that the PPARγ agonist can attenuate tissue eosinophilia by interfering with local differentiative responses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A Novel Non-Peptidic Agonist of the Ghrelin Receptor with Orexigenic Activity In vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Cavada, Elena; Pardo, Leticia M.; Kandil, Dalia; Torres-Fuentes, Cristina; Clarke, Sarah L.; Shaban, Hamdy; McGlacken, Gerard P.; Schellekens, Harriet

    2016-11-01

    Loss of appetite in the medically ill and ageing populations is a major health problem and a significant symptom in cachexia syndromes, which is the loss of muscle and fat mass. Ghrelin is a gut-derived hormone which can stimulate appetite. Herein we describe a novel, simple, non-peptidic, 2-pyridone which acts as a selective agonist for the ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a). The small 2-pyridone demonstrated clear agonistic activity in both transfected human cells and mouse hypothalamic cells with endogenous GHS-R1a receptor expression. In vivo tests with the hit compound showed significant increased food intake following peripheral administration, which highlights the potent orexigenic effect of this novel GHS-R1a receptor ligand.

  12. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  13. Activation of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels by nicotinic and muscarinic agonists

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Gustav; Auerbach, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    The dose-response parameters of recombinant mouse adult neuromuscular acetylcholine receptor channels (nAChR) activated by carbamylcholine, nicotine, muscarine and oxotremorine were measured. Rate constants for agonist association and dissociation, and channel opening and closing, were estimated from single-channel kinetic analysis.The dissociation equilibrium constants were (mM): ACh (0.16)carbamylcholine (5.1)>oxotremorine M (0.6)>nicotine (0.5)>muscarine (0.15).Rat neuronal α4β2 nAChR can be activated by all of the agonists. However, detailed kinetic analysis was impossible because the recordings lacked clusters representing the activity of a single receptor complex. Thus, the number of channels in the patch was unknown and the activation rate constants could not be determined.Considering both receptor affinity and agonist efficacy, muscarine and oxotremorine are significant agonists of muscle-type nAChR. The results are discussed in terms of structure-function relationships at the nAChR transmitter binding site. PMID:10602325

  14. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    PubMed Central

    Ettrup, Anders; da Cunha-Bang, Sophie; McMahon, Brenda; Lehel, Szabolcs; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Skibsted, Anine W; Jørgensen, Louise M; Hansen, Martin; Baandrup, Anders O; Bache, Søren; Svarer, Claus; Kristensen, Jesper L; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2014-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [11C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT2A receptors with [11C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input measurements provided the most optimal quantification of cerebral [11C]Cimbi-36 binding. Reference tissue modeling was feasible as it induced a negative but predictable bias in [11C]Cimbi-36 PET outcome measures. In five subjects, pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin before a second PET scan significantly decreased [11C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [11C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT2A receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. Thus, we here describe [11C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. PMID:24780897

  15. Identification of potent, selective, CNS-targeted inverse agonists of the ghrelin receptor.

    PubMed

    McClure, Kim F; Jackson, Margaret; Cameron, Kimberly O; Kung, Daniel W; Perry, David A; Orr, Suvi T M; Zhang, Yingxin; Kohrt, Jeffrey; Tu, Meihua; Gao, Hua; Fernando, Dilinie; Jones, Ryan; Erasga, Noe; Wang, Guoqiang; Polivkova, Jana; Jiao, Wenhua; Swartz, Roger; Ueno, Hirokazu; Bhattacharya, Samit K; Stock, Ingrid A; Varma, Sam; Bagdasarian, Victoria; Perez, Sylvie; Kelly-Sullivan, Dawn; Wang, Ruduan; Kong, Jimmy; Cornelius, Peter; Michael, Laura; Lee, Eunsun; Janssen, Ann; Steyn, Stefanus J; Lapham, Kimberly; Goosen, Theunis

    2013-10-01

    The optimization for selectivity and central receptor occupancy for a series of spirocyclic azetidine-piperidine inverse agonists of the ghrelin receptor is described. Decreased mAChR muscarinic M2 binding was achieved by use of a chiral indane in place of a substituted benzylic group. Compounds with desirable balance of human in vitro clearance and ex vivo central receptor occupancy were discovered by incorporation of heterocycles. Specifically, heteroaryl rings with nitrogen(s) vicinal to the indane linkage provided the most attractive overall properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Partial agonists for α4β2 nicotinic receptors stimulate dopaminergic neuron firing with relatively enhanced maximal effects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Broad, Lisa M; Phillips, Keith G; Zwart, Ruud

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Partial agonists selective for α4β2 nicotinic ACh receptors have been developed for smoking cessation as they induce weak activation of native α4β2* receptors and inhibit effect of nicotine. However, it is unclear whether at brain functions there is an existence of receptor reserve that allows weak receptor activation to induce maximum physiological effects. We assessed the extent of α4β2 partial agonist-induced increase of firing rate in dopaminergic neurons and evaluated the influence of receptor reserve. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The relative maximal effects and potencies of six nicotinic agonists were assessed on recombinant human α4β2 and α7 receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines by measuring calcium influx. Agonist-induced increase of the spontaneous firing rate of dopaminergic neurons was recorded using microelectrodes in the ventral tegmental area of rat brain slices. KEY RESULTS All α4β2 partial and full agonists increased the firing rate concentration-dependently. Their sensitivity to subtype-selective antagonists showed predominant activation of native α4β2* receptors. However, partial agonists with relative maximal effects as low as 33% on α4β2 receptors maximally increased the firing rate and induced additional depolarization block of firing, demonstrating that partial activation of receptors caused the maximum increase in firing rate in the presence of a receptor reserve. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Partial α4β2 agonists induced relatively enhanced effects on the firing rate of dopaminergic neurons, and the effect was mainly attributed to the existence of native α4β2* receptor reserve. The results have implications in the understanding of physiological effects and therapeutic efficacies of α4β2 partial agonists. PMID:21838750

  17. Metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists potentiate a slow afterdepolarization in CNS neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that, in the rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN), metabotropic glutamate receptor (met-GluR) agonists evoked a slow depolarization accompanied by an increase in membrane conductance and burst firing. We have speculated that the burst firing elicited by met-GluR agonists may be due to activation or enhancement of a non-specific cation current, which exists in some DLSN neurons. Now we report that a slow afterdepolarization (sADP) mediated by a non-specific cation current was potentiated by both 1S,3R-ACPD and quisqualate. In addition, met-GluR agonists unmask a sADP in DLSN neurons which did not show a sADP under control conditions. Our data suggest that a non-specific cation current can be potentiated by activation of the met-GluR.

  18. Agonist-induced Endocytosis of CC Chemokine Receptor 5 Is Clathrin Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Signoret, Nathalie; Hewlett, Lindsay; Wavre, Silène; Pelchen-Matthews, Annegret; Oppermann, Martin; Marsh, Mark

    2005-01-01

    The signaling activity of several chemokine receptors, including CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), is in part controlled by their internalization, recycling, and/or degradation. For CCR5, agonists such as the chemokine CCL5 induce internalization into early endosomes containing the transferrin receptor, a marker for clathrin-dependent endocytosis, but it has been suggested that CCR5 may also follow clathrin-independent routes of internalization. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the role of clathrin in chemokine-induced CCR5 internalization. Using CCR5-transfected cell lines, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that CCL5 causes the rapid redistribution of scattered cell surface CCR5 into large clusters that are associated with flat clathrin lattices. Invaginated clathrin-coated pits could be seen at the edge of these lattices and, in CCL5-treated cells, these pits contain CCR5. Receptors internalized via clathrin-coated vesicles follow the clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway, and depletion of clathrin with small interfering RNAs inhibits CCL5-induced CCR5 internalization. We found no evidence for CCR5 association with caveolae during agonist-induced internalization. However, sequestration of cholesterol with filipin interferes with agonist binding to CCR5, suggesting that cholesterol and/or lipid raft domains play some role in the events required for CCR5 activation before internalization. PMID:15591129

  19. Conformational changes in the M2 muscarinic receptor induced by membrane voltage and agonist binding

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Polanco, Ricardo A; Galindo, Eloy G Moreno; Ferrer-Villada, Tania; Arias, Marcelo; Rigby, J Ryan; Sánchez-Chapula, José A; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The ability to sense transmembrane voltage is a central feature of many membrane proteins, most notably voltage-gated ion channels. Gating current measurements provide valuable information on protein conformational changes induced by voltage. The recent observation that muscarinic G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) generate gating currents confirms their intrinsic capacity to sense the membrane electrical field. Here, we studied the effect of voltage on agonist activation of M2 muscarinic receptors (M2R) in atrial myocytes and how agonist binding alters M2R gating currents. Membrane depolarization decreased the potency of acetylcholine (ACh), but increased the potency and efficacy of pilocarpine (Pilo), as measured by ACh-activated K+ current, IKACh. Voltage-induced conformational changes in M2R were modified in a ligand-selective manner: ACh reduced gating charge displacement while Pilo increased the amount of charge displaced. Thus, these ligands manifest opposite voltage-dependent IKACh modulation and exert opposite effects on M2R gating charge displacement. Finally, mutations in the putative ligand binding site perturbed the movement of the M2R voltage sensor. Our data suggest that changes in voltage induce conformational changes in the ligand binding site that alter the agonist–receptor interaction in a ligand-dependent manner. Voltage-dependent GPCR modulation has important implications for cellular signalling in excitable tissues. Gating current measurement allows for the tracking of subtle conformational changes in the receptor that accompany agonist binding and changes in membrane voltage. PMID:21282291

  20. Differential epileptogenic potentials of selective mu and delta opiate receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Haffmans, J; Dzoljic, M R

    1983-01-01

    By using electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic recordings in anaesthetized and free-moving rats, two opioid peptides, known as selective agonists for mu and delta opiate receptors, respectively, were examined for their epileptogenic properties. The delta receptor peptide (DSTLE, 4.6-18.6 nmol, intraventricularly, ivt), a putative delta opiate agonist, produced a dose-related increase of myoclonic contractions (MC) with epileptic discharges in anaesthetized rats and severe wet dog shakes, with occasionally falling down, in free-moving animals. Morphiceptin, a specific mu opiate agonist, used in equimolar doses and under the same experimental conditions, had a significantly less pronounced effect on the number of MC and epileptiform EEG phenomena. Similarly, DSTLE (18.6 nmol) injected in the CA2 area of the hippocampus, a region with a nearly equal distribution of mu and delta opiate receptors, induced epileptic discharges in anaesthetized and free-moving rats, while an equimolar dose of morphiceptin had no significant effect. It is suggested that the epileptiform activity of opioid peptides is mainly due to an activation of delta opiate receptors in the central nervous system.

  1. Melanocortin Receptor Agonists Facilitate Oxytocin-Dependent Partner Preference Formation in the Prairie Vole.

    PubMed

    Modi, Meera E; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Barrett, Catherine E; Kittelberger, Kara A; Smith, Daniel G; Landgraf, Rainer; Young, Larry J

    2015-07-01

    The central melanocortin (MC) system has been widely studied for its effects on food intake and sexual behavior. However, the MC system, and more specifically the MC4 receptor (MC4R), also interacts with neurochemical systems that regulate socioemotional behaviors, including oxytocin (OT) and dopamine. In monogamous prairie voles, OT and dopamine interact to promote partner preference formation, a laboratory measure of an enduring social bond between mates. Here we investigated the effects of MC receptor activation on partner preference formation in prairie voles, as well as the interaction between the MC and OT systems during this process. Peripheral administration of the brain penetrant MC3/4R receptor peptide agonist, Melanotan II (MTII), and the highly selective, small-molecule MC4R agonist, Pf-446687, enhanced partner preference formation in the prairie vole, but not in the non-monogamous meadow vole. MTII-induced partner preferences were enduring, as they were present 1 week after drug manipulation. The prosocial effects of MCR agonists may be mediated, in part, through modulation of OT, as coadministration of an OT receptor antagonist prevented MTII-induced partner preferences. MTII also selectively activated hypothalamic OT neurons and potentiated central OT release. As OT has been shown to enhance some aspects of social cognition in humans, our data suggest that the MC4R may be a viable therapeutic target for enhancing social function in psychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia, potentially through activation of the OT system.

  2. Melanocortin Receptor Agonists Facilitate Oxytocin-Dependent Partner Preference Formation in the Prairie Vole

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Meera E; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Barrett, Catherine E; Kittelberger, Kara A; Smith, Daniel G; Landgraf, Rainer; Young, Larry J

    2015-01-01

    The central melanocortin (MC) system has been widely studied for its effects on food intake and sexual behavior. However, the MC system, and more specifically the MC4 receptor (MC4R), also interacts with neurochemical systems that regulate socioemotional behaviors, including oxytocin (OT) and dopamine. In monogamous prairie voles, OT and dopamine interact to promote partner preference formation, a laboratory measure of an enduring social bond between mates. Here we investigated the effects of MC receptor activation on partner preference formation in prairie voles, as well as the interaction between the MC and OT systems during this process. Peripheral administration of the brain penetrant MC3/4R receptor peptide agonist, Melanotan II (MTII), and the highly selective, small-molecule MC4R agonist, Pf-446687, enhanced partner preference formation in the prairie vole, but not in the non-monogamous meadow vole. MTII-induced partner preferences were enduring, as they were present 1 week after drug manipulation. The prosocial effects of MCR agonists may be mediated, in part, through modulation of OT, as coadministration of an OT receptor antagonist prevented MTII-induced partner preferences. MTII also selectively activated hypothalamic OT neurons and potentiated central OT release. As OT has been shown to enhance some aspects of social cognition in humans, our data suggest that the MC4R may be a viable therapeutic target for enhancing social function in psychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia, potentially through activation of the OT system. PMID:25652247

  3. Site and mechanism of the colokinetic action of the ghrelin receptor agonist, HM01.

    PubMed

    Naitou, K; Mamerto, T P; Pustovit, R V; Callaghan, B; Rivera, L R; Chan, A J; Ringuet, M T; Pietra, C; Furness, J B

    2015-12-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the ghrelin receptor agonist, HM01, caused defecation in rats that were treated to provide a model for the constipation of Parkinson's disease. HM01 significantly increased fecal output and increased Fos activity in neurons of the hypothalamus and hindbrain, but not in the spinal defecation center. Other ghrelin agonists act on the defecation center. Receptor pharmacology was examined in ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a) transfected cells. Anesthetized rats were used to investigate sites and mechanisms of action. HM01 activated rat GHSR1a at nanomolar concentrations and was antagonized by the GHSR1a antagonist, YIL781. HM01, intravenous, was potent to activate propulsive colorectal contractions. This was prevented by pelvic nerve section and by intravenous YIL781, but not by spinal cord section rostral to the defecation centers. Direct intrathecal application of HM01 to the defecation center at spinal level L6-S1 initiated propulsive contractions of the colorectum. HM01 stimulates GHSR1a receptors on neurons in the lumbosacral defecation centers to cause propulsive contractions and emptying of the colorectum. It has greater potency when given systemically, compared with other GHSR1a agonists. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Structural insights into selective agonist actions of tamoxifen on human estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Biswas, Pradip Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Tamoxifen-an anti-estrogenic ligand in breast tissues used as a first-line treatment in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers-is associated with the development of resistance followed by resumption of tumor growth in about 30 % of cases. Whether tamoxifen assists in proliferation in such cases or whether any ligand-independent pathway to transcription exists is not fully understood; also, no ERα mutants have been detected so far that could lead to tamoxifen resistance. Using in silico conformational analysis of the ERα ligand binding domain (LBD), in the absence and presence of selective agonist (diethylstilbestrol; DES), antagonist (Faslodex; ICI), and selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM; 4-hydroxy tamoxifen; 4-OHT) ligands, we have elucidated ligand-responsive structural modulations of the ERα-LBD dimer in its agonist and antagonist complexes to address the issue of "tamoxifen resistance". DES and ICI were found to stabilize the dimer in their agonist and antagonist conformations, respectively. The ERα-LBD dimer without the presence of any bound ligand also led to a stable structure in agonist conformation. However, binding of 4-OHT to the antagonist structure led to a flexible conformation allowing the protein to visit conformations populated by agonists as was evident from principal component analysis and radius of gyration plots. Further, the relaxed conformations of the 4-OHT bound protein exhibited a diminished size of the co-repressor binding pocket in the LBD, thus signaling a partial blockage of the co-repressor binding motif. Thus, the ability of 4-OHT-bound ERα-LBD to assume flexible conformations visited by agonists and reduced co-repressor binding surface at the LBD provide crucial structural insights into tamoxifen-resistance that complement our existing understanding.

  5. Toll-like receptor 7 agonists are potent and rapid bronchodilators in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Elad H.; Fryer, Allison D.; Jacoby, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Respiratory tract viral infections result in asthma exacerbations. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 is a receptor for viral single-stranded RNA and is expressed at high levels in the lungs. Objective Because TLR7 polymorphisms are associated with asthma, we examined the effects of TLR7 agonists in guinea pig airways. Methods We induced bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs in vivo by means of electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve or intravenous administration of acetylcholine and measured the effect of a TLR7 agonist administered intravenously. We induced contraction of airway smooth muscle in segments of isolated guinea pig tracheas in vitro and measured the effect of TLR7 agonists, antagonists, and pharmacologic inhibitors of associated signaling pathways administered directly to the bath. Results TLR7 agonists acutely inhibited bronchoconstriction in vivo and relaxed contraction of airway smooth muscle in vitro within minutes of administration. Airway relaxation induced by the TLR7 agonist R837 (imiquimod) was partially blocked with a TLR7 antagonist and was also blocked by inhibitors of large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels; prostaglandin synthesis; and nitric oxide generation. Another TLR7 agonist, 21-mer single-stranded phosphorothioated polyuridylic acid (PolyUs), mediated relaxation that was completely blocked by a TLR7 antagonist. Conclusions These data demonstrate a novel protective mechanism to limit bronchoconstriction and maintain airflow during respiratory tract viral infections. The fast time frame is inconsistent with canonical TLR7 signaling. R837 mediates bronchodilation by means of TLR7-dependent and TLR7-independent mechanisms, whereas PolyUs does so through only the TLR7-dependent mechanism. TLR7-independent mechanisms involve prostaglandins and large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels, whereas TLR7-dependent mechanisms involve nitric oxide. TLR7 is an attractive therapeutic target for its ability to

  6. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT2C Receptor Agonists for Addictive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2015-07-15

    The neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) has long been associated with the control of a variety of motivated behaviors, including feeding. Much of the evidence linking 5-HT and feeding behavior was obtained from studies of the effects of the 5-HT releaser (dex)fenfluramine in laboratory animals and humans. Recently, the selective 5-HT2C receptor agonist lorcaserin received FDA approval for the treatment of obesity. This review examines evidence to support the use of selective 5-HT2C receptor agonists as treatments for conditions beyond obesity, including substance abuse (particularly nicotine, psychostimulant, and alcohol dependence), obsessive compulsive, and excessive gambling disorder. Following a brief survey of the early literature supporting a role for 5-HT in modulating food and drug reinforcement, we propose that intrinsic differences between SSRI and serotonin releasers may have underestimated the value of serotonin-based pharmacotherapeutics to treat clinical forms of addictive behavior beyond obesity. We then highlight the critical involvement of the 5-HT2C receptor in mediating the effect of (dex)fenfluramine on feeding and body weight gain and the evidence that 5-HT2C receptor agonists reduce measures of drug reward and impulsivity. A recent report of lorcaserin efficacy in a smoking cessation trial further strengthens the idea that 5-HT2C receptor agonists may have potential as a treatment for addiction. This review was prepared as a contribution to the proceedings of the 11th International Society for Serotonin Research Meeting held in Hermanus, South Africa, July 9-12, 2014.

  7. Inverse agonist and neutral antagonist actions of synthetic compounds at an insect 5-HT1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Troppmann, B; Balfanz, S; Baumann, A; Blenau, W

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been shown to control and modulate many physiological and behavioural functions in insects. In this study, we report the cloning and pharmacological properties of a 5-HT1 receptor of an insect model for neurobiology, physiology and pharmacology. Experimental approach: A cDNA encoding for the Periplaneta americana 5-HT1 receptor was amplified from brain cDNA. The receptor was stably expressed in HEK 293 cells, and the functional and pharmacological properties were determined in cAMP assays. Receptor distribution was investigated by RT-PCR and by immunocytochemistry using an affinity-purified polyclonal antiserum. Key results: The P. americana 5-HT1 receptor (Pea5-HT1) shares pronounced sequence and functional similarity with mammalian 5-HT1 receptors. Activation with 5-HT reduced adenylyl cyclase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Pea5-HT1 was expressed as a constitutively active receptor with methiothepin acting as a neutral antagonist, and WAY 100635 as an inverse agonist. Receptor mRNA was present in various tissues including brain, salivary glands and midgut. Receptor-specific antibodies showed that the native protein was expressed in a glycosylated form in membrane samples of brain and salivary glands. Conclusions and implications: This study marks the first pharmacological identification of an inverse agonist and a neutral antagonist at an insect 5-HT1 receptor. The results presented here should facilitate further analyses of 5-HT1 receptors in mediating central and peripheral effects of 5-HT in insects. PMID:20233210

  8. Differentiation of δ, μ, and κ opioid receptor agonists based on pharmacophore development and computed physicochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filizola, Marta; Villar, Hugo O.; Loew, Gilda H.

    2001-04-01

    Compounds that bind with significant affinity to the opioid receptor types, δ, μ, and κ, with different combinations of activation and inhibition at these three receptors could be promising behaviorally selective agents. Working on this hypothesis, the chemical moieties common to three different sets of opioid receptor agonists with significant affinity for each of the three receptor types δ, μ, or κ were identified. Using a distance analysis approach, common geometric arrangements of these chemical moieties were found for selected δ, μ, or κ opioid agonists. The chemical and geometric commonalities among agonists at each opioid receptor type were then compared with a non-specific opioid recognition pharmacophore recently developed. The comparison provided identification of the additional requirements for activation of δ, μ, and κ opioid receptors. The distance analysis approach was able to clearly discriminate κ-agonists, while global molecular properties for all compounds were calculated to identify additional requirements for activation of δ and μ receptors. Comparisons of the combined geometric and physicochemical properties calculated for each of the three sets of agonists allowed the determination of unique requirements for activation of each of the three opioid receptors. These results can be used to improve the activation selectivity of known opioid agonists and as a guide for the identification of novel selective opioid ligands with potential therapeutic usefulness.

  9. The hybrid molecule, VCP746, is a potent adenosine A2B receptor agonist that stimulates anti-fibrotic signalling.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Elizabeth A; Chuo, Chung Hui; Baltos, Jo-Anne; Ford, Leigh; Scammells, Peter J; Wang, Bing H; Christopoulos, Arthur; White, Paul J; May, Lauren T

    2016-10-01

    We have recently described the rationally-designed adenosine receptor agonist, 4-(5-amino-4-benzoyl-3-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)-N-(6-(9-((2R,3R,4S,5R)-3,4-dihydroxy-5-(hydroxylmethyl)tetrahydro-furan-2-yl)-9H-purin-6-ylamino)hexyl)benzamide (VCP746), a hybrid molecule consisting of an adenosine moiety linked to an adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) allosteric modulator moiety. At the A1AR, VCP746 mediated cardioprotection in the absence of haemodynamic side effects such as bradycardia. The current study has now identified VCP746 as an important pharmacological tool for the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR). The binding and function of VCP746 at the A2BAR was rigorously characterised in a heterologous expression system, in addition to examination of its anti-fibrotic signalling in cardiac- and renal-derived cells. In FlpInCHO cells stably expressing the human A2BAR, VCP746 was a high affinity, high potency A2BAR agonist that stimulated Gs- and Gq-mediated signal transduction, with an apparent lack of system bias relative to prototypical A2BAR agonists. The distinct agonist profile may result from an atypical binding mode of VCP746 at the A2BAR, which was consistent with a bivalent mechanism of receptor interaction. In isolated neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NCF), VCP746 stimulated potent inhibition of both TGF-β1- and angiotensin II-mediated collagen synthesis. Similar attenuation of TGF-β1-mediated collagen synthesis was observed in renal mesangial cells (RMC). The anti-fibrotic signalling mediated by VCP746 in NCF and RMC was selectively reversed in the presence of an A2BAR antagonist. Thus, we believe, VCP746 represents an important tool to further investigate the role of the A2BAR in cardiac (patho)physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation Effect of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonists on Lipid Droplet Proteins in Liver.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Ming-Liang; Zhong, Yuan; Wang, Chen; Jia, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are used for treating hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism of action of these agonists is still under investigation. The lipid droplet-associated proteins FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5, regulated directly by PPARγ and PPARα, are associated with hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the expression levels of FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5 and the regulation of these proteins by consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) or administration of PPAR agonists. Mice with diet-induced obesity were treated with the PPARγ or PPARα agonist, pioglitazone or fenofibrate, respectively. Liver tissues from db/db diabetic mice and human were also collected. Interestingly, FSP27/CIEDC was expressed in mouse and human livers and was upregulated in obese C57BL/6J mice. Fenofibrate treatment decreased hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD diet. In mice, LSDP5 was not detected, even in the context of insulin resistance or treatment with PPAR agonists. However, LSDP5 was highly expressed in humans, with elevated expression observed in the fatty liver. We concluded that fenofibrate greatly decreased hepatic TG content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD, suggesting a potential regulatory role for fenofibrate in the amelioration of hepatic steatosis.

  11. β2-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists Inhibit the Proliferation of 1321N1 Astrocytoma CellsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Toll, L.; Jimenez, L.; Waleh, N.; Jozwiak, K.; Woo, A.Y.-H.; Xiao, R.-P.; Bernier, M.

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytomas and glioblastomas have been particularly difficult to treat and refractory to chemotherapy. However, significant evidence has been presented that demonstrates a decrease in astrocytoma cell proliferation subsequent to an increase in cAMP levels. The 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line, as well as other astrocytomas and glioblastomas, expresses β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) that are coupled to Gs activation and consequent cAMP production. Experiments were conducted to determine whether the β2-AR agonist (R,R′)-fenoterol and other β2-AR agonists could attenuate mitogenesis and, if so, by what mechanism. Receptor binding studies were conducted to characterize β2-AR found in 1321N1 and U118 cell membranes. In addition, cells were incubated with (R,R′)-fenoterol and analogs to determine their ability to stimulate intracellular cAMP accumulation and inhibit [3H]thymidine incorporation into the cells. 1321N1 cells contain significant levels of β2-AR as determined by receptor binding. (R,R′)-fenoterol and other β2-AR agonists, as well as forskolin, stimulated cAMP accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. Accumulation of cAMP induced a decrease in [3H]thymidine incorporation. There was a correlation between concentration required to stimulate cAMP accumulation and inhibit [3H]thymidine incorporation. U118 cells have a reduced number of β2-ARs and a concomitant reduction in the ability of β2-AR agonists to inhibit cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate the efficacy of β2-AR agonists for inhibition of growth of the astrocytoma cell lines. Because a significant portion of brain tumors contain β2-ARs to a greater extent than whole brain, (R,R′)-fenoterol, or some analog, may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors after biopsy to determine β2-AR expression. PMID:21071556

  12. Molecular modelling studies on the ORL1-receptor and ORL1-agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröer, Britta M.; Gurrath, Marion; Höltje, Hans-Dieter

    2003-11-01

    The ORL1 ( opioid receptor like 1)- receptor is a member of the family of rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and represents an interesting new therapeutical target since it is involved in a variety of biomedical important processes, such as anxiety, nociception, feeding, and memory. In order to shed light on the molecular basis of the interactions of the GPCR with its ligands, the receptor protein and a dataset of specific agonists were examined using molecular modelling methods. For that purpose, the conformational space of a very potent non-peptide ORL1-receptor agonist (Ro 64-6198) with a small number of rotatable bonds was analysed in order to derive a pharmacophoric arrangement. The conformational analyses yielded a conformation that served as template for the superposition of a set of related analogues. Structural superposition was achieved by employing the program FlexS. Using the experimental binding data and the superposition of the ligands, a 3D-QSAR analysis applying the GRID/GOLPE method was carried out. After the ligand-based modelling approach, a 3D model of the ORL1-receptor has been constructed using homology modelling methods based on the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin. A representative structure of the model taken from molecular dynamics simulations was used for a manual docking procedure. Asp-130 and Thr-305 within the ORL1-receptor model served as important hydrophilic interaction partners. Furthermore, a hydrophobic cavity was identified stabilizing the agonists within their binding site. The manual docking results were supported using FlexX, which identified the same protein-ligand interaction points.

  13. Recent Updates on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor δ Agonists for the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Ajmer S; Beniwal, Meenu; Pandita, Deepti; Sekhon, Bhupinder S; Lather, Viney

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a disorder described by reduced insulin sensitivity, overweight, hyperlipidaemia, high blood pressure and myocardial disorders, mainly due to high fat diet and lack of physical activity. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are type II nuclear hormone receptors that regulate a number of processes in living systems, such as metabolism of carbohydrates and fatty acids, growth and differentiation of cell, and inflammatory reactions. Alpha, gamma and delta are the three distinct isoforms of PPAR. The stimulation of PPARδ alters body's energy fuel preference from glucose to fat. The PPARδ isoform is expressed ubiquitously in all tissues, especially in those tissues which involved in metabolism of lipids like adipose tissue, liver, kidney, and muscle. Currently, PPARδ is an emerging therapeutic target for the pharmacological therapy of disorders associated with metabolic syndrome. Several PPARδ selective agonists had been reported in last ten years, many of them had been advanced into the late phase of clinical trials such as Endurobol (GW501516). However, no PPARδ agonists are yet approved for human use. The present work had been planned to cover wide variety of PPARδ agonists reported till now along with their potential role to tackle various metabolic disorders. The present review has been planned to focus mainly the most popular PPARδ agonists.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta agonist ameliorated inflammasome activation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Yeon, Jong Eun; Ko, Eun Jung; Yoon, Eileen L; Suh, Sang Jun; Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Hae Rim; Kang, Seoung Hee; Yoo, Yang Jae; Je, Jihye; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inflammasome activation and the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-δ agonist treatment in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice were classified according to control or high fat diet (HFD) with or without PPAR-δ agonist (GW) over period of 12 wk [control, HFD, HFD + lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HFD + LPS + GW group]. HepG2 cells were exposed to palmitic acid (PA) and/or LPS in the absence or presence of GW. RESULTS: HFD caused glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. In mice fed an HFD with LPS, caspase-1 and interleukin (IL)-1β in the liver were significantly increased. Treatment with GW ameliorated the steatosis and inhibited overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In HepG2 cells, PA and LPS treatment markedly increased mRNA of several nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family members (NLRP3, NLRP6, and NLRP10), caspase-1 and IL-1β. PA and LPS also exaggerated reactive oxygen species production. All of the above effects of PA and LPS were reduced by GW. GW also enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK-α. CONCLUSION: PPAR-δ agonist reduces fatty acid-induced inflammation and steatosis by suppressing inflammasome activation. Targeting the inflammasome by the PPAR-δ agonist may have therapeutic implication for NAFLD. PMID:26668503

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists modulate neuropathic pain: a link to chemokines?

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Caroline M.; Miller, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain presents a widespread and intractable medical problem. While numerous pharmaceuticals are used to treat chronic pain, drugs that are safe for extended use and highly effective at treating the most severe pain do not yet exist. Chronic pain resulting from nervous system injury (neuropathic pain) is common in conditions ranging from multiple sclerosis to HIV-1 infection to type II diabetes. Inflammation caused by neuropathy is believed to contribute to the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines are key inflammatory mediators, several of which (MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, fractalkine, SDF-1 among others) have been linked to chronic, neuropathic pain in both human conditions and animal models. The important roles chemokines play in inflammation and pain make them an attractive therapeutic target. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a family of nuclear receptors known for their roles in metabolism. Recent research has revealed that PPARs also play a role in inflammatory gene repression. PPAR agonists have wide-ranging effects including inhibition of chemokine expression and pain behavior reduction in animal models. Experimental evidence suggests a connection between the pain ameliorating effects of PPAR agonists and suppression of inflammatory gene expression, including chemokines. In early clinical research, one PPARα agonist, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), shows promise in relieving chronic pain. If this link can be better established, PPAR agonists may represent a new drug therapy for neuropathic pain. PMID:25191225

  16. The Glycine Transport Inhibitor Sarcosine Is an Inhibitory Glycine Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai Xia; Lyons-Warren, Ariel; Thio, Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sarcosine is an endogenous amino acid that is a competitive inhibitor of the type I glycine transporter (GlyT1), an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) co-agonist, and an important intermediate in one-carbon metabolism. Its therapeutic potential for schizophrenia further underscores its clinical importance. The structural similarity between sarcosine and glycine and sarcosine's ability to serve as an NMDAR co-agonist led us to examine whether sarcosine is also an agonist at the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR). We examined this possibility using whole-cell recordings from cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons and found that sarcosine evoked a dose-dependent, strychnine sensitive, Cl- current that cross-inhibited glycine currents. Sarcosine evoked this current with Li+ in the extracellular solution to block GlyT1, in neurons treated with the essentially irreversible GlyT1 inhibitor N[3-(4′-fluorophenyl)-3-(4′-phenylphenoxy)propyl]sarcosine (NFPS), and in neurons plated in the absence of glia. These results indicate that the sarcosine currents did not result from GlyT1 inhibition or heteroexchange. We conclude that sarcosine is a GlyR agonist. PMID:19619564

  17. The glycine transport inhibitor sarcosine is an inhibitory glycine receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai Xia; Lyons-Warren, Ariel; Thio, Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Sarcosine is an endogenous amino acid that is a competitive inhibitor of the type I glycine transporter (GlyT1), an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) co-agonist, and an important intermediate in one-carbon metabolism. Its therapeutic potential for schizophrenia further underscores its clinical importance. The structural similarity between sarcosine and glycine and sarcosine's ability to serve as an NMDAR co-agonist led us to examine whether sarcosine is also an agonist at the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR). We examined this possibility using whole-cell recordings from cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons and found that sarcosine evoked a dose-dependent, strychnine sensitive, Cl(-) current that cross-inhibited glycine currents. Sarcosine evoked this current with Li(+) in the extracellular solution to block GlyT1, in neurons treated with the essentially irreversible GlyT1 inhibitor N[3-(4'-fluorophenyl)-3-(4'-phenylphenoxy)propyl]sarcosine (NFPS), and in neurons plated in the absence of glia. These results indicate that the sarcosine currents did not result from GlyT1 inhibition or heteroexchange. We conclude that sarcosine is a GlyR agonist.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of SMM-189, a cannabinoid receptor 2-specific inverse agonist

    PubMed Central

    Presley, Chaela; Abidi, Ammaar; Suryawanshi, Satyendra; Mustafa, Suni; Meibohm, Bernd; Moore, Bob M

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists and inverse agonists are emerging as new therapeutic options for a spectrum of autoimmune-related disease. Of particular interest, is the ability of CB2 ligands to regulate microglia function in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injury. We have previously reported the receptor affinity of 3′,5′-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-biphenyl-4-yl)-phenyl-methanone (SMM-189) and the characterization of the beneficial effects of SMM-189 in the mouse model of mild traumatic brain injury. Herein, we report the further characterization of SMM-189 as a potent and selective CB2 inverse agonist, which acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of CP 55,940. The ability of SMM-189 to regulate microglial activation, in terms of chemokine expression and cell morphology, has been determined. Finally, we have determined that SMM-189 possesses acceptable biopharmaceutical properties indicating that the triaryl class of CB2 inverse agonists are viable compounds for continued preclinical development for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic brain injury. PMID:26196013

  19. Preclinical evaluation of SMM-189, a cannabinoid receptor 2-specific inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Presley, Chaela; Abidi, Ammaar; Suryawanshi, Satyendra; Mustafa, Suni; Meibohm, Bernd; Moore, Bob M

    2015-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists and inverse agonists are emerging as new therapeutic options for a spectrum of autoimmune-related disease. Of particular interest, is the ability of CB2 ligands to regulate microglia function in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injury. We have previously reported the receptor affinity of 3',5'-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-biphenyl-4-yl)-phenyl-methanone (SMM-189) and the characterization of the beneficial effects of SMM-189 in the mouse model of mild traumatic brain injury. Herein, we report the further characterization of SMM-189 as a potent and selective CB2 inverse agonist, which acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of CP 55,940. The ability of SMM-189 to regulate microglial activation, in terms of chemokine expression and cell morphology, has been determined. Finally, we have determined that SMM-189 possesses acceptable biopharmaceutical properties indicating that the triaryl class of CB2 inverse agonists are viable compounds for continued preclinical development for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic brain injury.

  20. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D.; Schiffmann, Serge N.; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain. PMID:26100888

  1. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D; Schiffmann, Serge N; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-07-07

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain.

  2. Group III mGlu receptor agonists potentiate the anticonvulsant effect of AMPA and NMDA receptor block.

    PubMed

    De Sarro, Giovambattista; Chimirri, Alba; Meldrum, Brian S

    2002-09-06

    We report the anticonvulsant action in DBA/2 mice of two mGlu Group III receptor agonists: (R,S)-4-phosphonophenylglycine, (R,S)-PPG, a compound with moderate mGlu8 selectivity, and of (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid, ACPT-1, a selective agonist for mGlu4alpha receptors. Both compounds, given intracerebroventricularly at doses which did not show marked anticonvulsant activity, produced a consistent shift to the left of the dose-response curves (i.e. enhanced the anticonvulsant properties) of 1-(4'-aminophenyl)-3,5-dihydro-7,8-dimethoxy-4H-2,3-benzodiazepin-4-one hydrochloride, CFM-2, a noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist, and 3-((+/-)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-1-phosphonic acid, CPPene, a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, in DBA/2 mice. In addition, (R,S)-PPG and ACPT-1 administered intracerebroventricularly prolonged the time course of the anticonvulsant properties of CFM-2 (33 micromol/kg, i.p.) and CPPene (3.3 micromol/kg, i.p.) administered intraperitoneally. We conclude that modest reduction of synaptic glutamate release by activation of Group III metabotropic receptors potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of AMPA and NMDA receptor blockade. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Future Treatment of Constipation-associated Disorders: Role of Relamorelin and Other Ghrelin Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Mosińska, Paula; Zatorski, Hubert; Storr, Martin; Fichna, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    There is an unmet need for effective pharmacological therapies for constipation, a symptom that significantly deteriorates patients’ quality of life and impacts health care. Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor and has been shown to exert prokinetic effects on gastrointestinal (GI) motility via the vagus and pelvic nerves. The pharmacological potential of ghrelin is hampered by its short half-life. Ghrelin receptor (GRLN-R) agonists with enhanced pharmacokinetics were thus developed. Centrally penetrant GRLN-R agonists stimulate defecation and improve impaired lower GI transit in animals and humans. This review summarizes the current knowledge on relamorelin, a potent ghrelin mimetic, and other GRLN-R analogs which are in preclinical or clinical stages of development for the management of disorders with underlying GI hypomotility, like constipation. PMID:28238253

  4. 6'-Guanidinonaltrindole (6'-GNTI) is a G protein-biased κ-opioid receptor agonist that inhibits arrestin recruitment.

    PubMed

    Rives, Marie-Laure; Rossillo, Mary; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2012-08-03

    κ-Opioid receptor (KOR) agonists do not activate the reward pathway stimulated by morphine-like μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists and thus have been considered to be promising nonaddictive analgesics. However, KOR agonists produce other adverse effects, including dysphoria, diuresis, and constipation. The therapeutic promise of KOR agonists has nonetheless recently been revived by studies showing that their dysphoric effects require arrestin recruitment, whereas their analgesic effects do not. Moreover, KOR agonist-induced antinociceptive tolerance observed in vivo has also been proposed to be correlated to the ability to induce arrestin-dependent phosphorylation, desensitization, and internalization of the receptor. The discovery of functionally selective drugs that are therapeutically effective without the adverse effects triggered by the arrestin pathway is thus an important goal. We have identified such an extreme G protein-biased KOR compound, 6'-guanidinonaltrindole (6'-GNTI), a potent partial agonist at the KOR receptor for the G protein activation pathway that does not recruit arrestin. Indeed, 6'-GNTI functions as an antagonist to block the arrestin recruitment and KOR internalization induced by other nonbiased agonists. As an extremely G protein-biased KOR agonist, 6'-GNTI represents a promising lead compound in the search for nonaddictive opioid analgesic as its signaling profile suggests that it will be without the dysphoria and other adverse effects promoted by arrestin recruitment and its downstream signaling.

  5. A comparative safety review between GLP-1 receptor agonists and SGLT2 inhibitors for diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Consoli, Agostino; Formoso, Gloria; Baldassarre, Maria Pompea Antonia; Febo, Fabrizio

    2018-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA) and sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) are of particular interest in type 2 diabetes treatment strategies, due to their efficacy in reducing HbA1c with a low risk of hypoglycaemia, to their positive effects on body weight and blood pressure and in light of their effects on cardiovascular risk and on nephroprotection emerged from the most recent cardiovascular outcome trials. Since it is therefore very likely that GLP-1RA and SGLT2i use will become more and more common, it is more and more important to gather and discuss information about their safety profile. Area Covered: adverse events and the safety concerns most often emerged in trials with GLP-1RA namely, exenatide long acting release (LAR), dulaglutide, liraglutide, semaglutide, lixisenatide or SGLT2i, namely empagliflozin, dapagliflozin, canagliflozin and SGLT2i with an attempt at comparing the safety profiles of molecules of these two classes. Expert opinion: GLP-1RA and SGLT2i, although each associated with different specific side effects, share a 'similar' safety profile and are both drugs relatively easy to handle. The potentially complementary mechanisms of action, the cardio and nephroprotective effects demonstrated by molecules of both classes, make these drugs potentially useful even in add on to each other.

  6. An Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Megan D; Chan, Trevor; Swigart, Philip M; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Dash, Rajesh; Simpson, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors mediate adaptive effects in the heart and cardiac myocytes, and a myocyte survival pathway involving the alpha-1A receptor subtype and ERK activation exists in vitro. However, data in vivo are limited. Here we tested A61603 (N-[5-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-2-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl]methanesulfonamide), a selective imidazoline agonist for the alpha-1A. A61603 was the most potent alpha-1-agonist in activating ERK in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. A61603 activated ERK in adult mouse ventricular myocytes and protected the cells from death caused by the anthracycline doxorubicin. A low dose of A61603 (10 ng/kg/d) activated ERK in the mouse heart in vivo, but did not change blood pressure. In male mice, concurrent subcutaneous A61603 infusion at 10 ng/kg/d for 7 days after a single intraperitoneal dose of doxorubicin (25 mg/kg) increased survival, improved cardiac function, heart rate, and cardiac output by echocardiography, and reduced cardiac cell necrosis and apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis. All protective effects were lost in alpha-1A-knockout mice. In female mice, doxorubicin at doses higher than in males (35-40 mg/kg) caused less cardiac toxicity than in males. We conclude that the alpha-1A-selective agonist A61603, via the alpha-1A adrenergic receptor, prevents doxorubicin cardiomyopathy in male mice, supporting the theory that alpha-1A adrenergic receptor agonists have potential as novel heart failure therapies.

  7. Neurokinin receptors in the rabbit iris sphincter characterised by novel agonist ligands.

    PubMed

    Hall, J M; Mitchell, D; Morton, I K

    1991-06-18

    We have used novel selective agonist ligands to examine neurokinin receptors mediating the contractile response to tachykinins in the rabbit iris sphincter preparation in vitro. The selective NK-1 receptor agonist delta-amino valeryl-[L-Pro9,N-Me Leu10]SP-(7-11) (GR73632) and the NK-3 receptor-selective agonist succ-[Asp6,N-Me-Phe8] SP-(6-11) (senktide) were both very active (concentration range 0.032 pM-10 nM and 0.1 pM-32 nM respectively), and were 933 and 16.6 times more potent than substance P, respectively, in contracting the iris. In contrast, the NK-2 selective agonist [Lys3,Gly8-R-gamma-lactam,Leu9]NKA-(3-10) (GR64349) was active only at the highest concentrations tested (3.2 nM-32 microM), and had 0.054 the activity of substance P. The presence of several peptidase inhibitors was without effect on the concentration-response relationship to substance P, GR73632, GR64349 or senktide. Tachykinins differed in their offset kinetics. Responses to GR73632, GR64349 and senktide were rapid in offset (times to reach half maximal responses were 1.5, 1.1 and 5.1 min, respectively), whereas responses to substance P were very much more prolonged in duration (time to reach half maximal response was 35.3 min). These results suggest the presence of both NK-1 and NK-3 receptors mediating contraction of the rabbit iris sphincter preparation. In addition, differences in response offset kinetics seem not to be due to differences in peptide metabolism, and suggest a property of substance P not shared by the other tachykinins used in this study.

  8. Cholecystokinin type B receptor antagonist PD-136,450 is a partial secretory agonist in the stomach and a full agonist in the pancreas of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schmassmann, A; Garner, A; Flogerzi, B; Hasan, M Y; Sanner, M; Varga, L; Halter, F

    1994-01-01

    Gastrin (cholecystokinin type B (CCK-B)) receptor antagonists may help to elucidate the physiological role of gastrin, have therapeutic potential as acid antisecretory drugs, and may be of use as adjuvant therapy for gastrin sensitive tumours. In binding studies, the gastrin receptor antagonist PD-136,450 had at least 1000 fold greater affinity for gastrin (CCK-B) than CCK-A receptors. In this study the biological activity of PD-136,450 was evaluated in conscious and anaesthetised rats. PD-136,450 antagonised gastrin stimulated acid secretion after subcutaneous (IC50: 0.28 mumol/kg; conscious rats) and intravenous (IC50: 0.17 mumol/kg; anaesthetised rats) administration. In basal secreting fistula animals, the compound stimulated acid output to 30 (5)% of the maximal response to gastrin. Stimulant activity was not caused by gastrin release. As an agonist PD-136,450 was about 350 times less potent than gastrin-17 on a molar basis. In addition, PD-136,450 was a powerful agonist of pancreatic secretion in anaesthetised rats. The specific gastrin antagonist L-365,260 inhibited the (partial) agonist activity of PD-136,450 in the stomach and the specific CCK-A receptor antagonist L-364,718 inhibited the agonist activity of PD-136,450 in the pancreas. It is concluded that the agonist effect of PD-136,450 is mediated via interaction with the gastrin (CCK-B) receptor in the stomach and the CCK-A receptor in the pancreas. PMID:8307482

  9. PAR-2 agonists induce contraction of murine small intestine through neurokinin receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Aiping; Shea-Donohue, Terez

    2003-10-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is a G protein-coupled receptor and is expressed throughout the gut. It is well known that PAR-2 participates in the regulation of gastrointestinal motility; however, the results are inconsistent. The present study investigated the effect and mechanism of PAR-2 activation on murine small intestinal smooth muscle function in vitro. Both trypsin and PAR-2-activating peptide SLIGRL induced a small relaxation followed by a concentration-dependent contraction. The sensitivity to trypsin was greater than that to SLIGRL (EC50 = 0.03 vs. 40 microM), but maximal responses were similar (12.3 +/- 1.6 vs. 13.7 +/- 1.3 N/cm2). Trypsin-evoked contraction (1 microM) exhibited a rapid desensitization, whereas the desensitization of response to SLIGRL was less even at high concentration (50 microM). Atropine had no effect on PAR-2 agonist-induced contractions. In contrast, TTX and capsaicin significantly attenuated those contractions, implicating a neurogenic mechanism that may involve capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves. Furthermore, contractions induced by trypsin and SLIGRL were reduced by neurokinin receptor NK1 antagonist SR-140333 or NK2 antagonist SR-48968 alone or were further reduced by combined application of SR-140333 and SR-48968, indicating the involvement of neurokinin receptors. In addition, desensitizing neurokinin receptors with substance P and/or neurokinin A decreased the PAR-2 agonist-evoked contraction. We concluded that PAR-2 agonists induced a contraction of murine intestinal smooth muscle that was mediated by nerves. The excitatory effect is also dependent on sensory neural pathways and requires both NK1 and NK2 receptors.

  10. Agonist trapped in ATP-binding sites of the P2X2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ruotian; Lemoine, Damien; Martz, Adeline; Taly, Antoine; Gonin, Sophie; Prado de Carvalho, Lia; Specht, Alexandre; Grutter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    ATP-gated P2X receptors are trimeric ion channels, as recently confirmed by X-ray crystallography. However, the structure was solved without ATP and even though extracellular intersubunit cavities surrounded by conserved amino acid residues previously shown to be important for ATP function were proposed to house ATP, the localization of the ATP sites remains elusive. Here we localize the ATP-binding sites by creating, through a proximity-dependent “tethering” reaction, covalent bonds between a synthesized ATP-derived thiol-reactive P2X2 agonist (NCS-ATP) and single cysteine mutants engineered in the putative binding cavities of the P2X2 receptor. By combining whole-cell and single-channel recordings, we report that NCS-ATP covalently and specifically labels two previously unidentified positions N140 and L186 from two adjacent subunits separated by about 18 Å in a P2X2 closed state homology model, suggesting the existence of at least two binding modes. Tethering reaction at both positions primes subsequent agonist binding, yet with distinct functional consequences. Labeling of one position impedes subsequent ATP function, which results in inefficient gating, whereas tethering of the other position, although failing to produce gating by itself, enhances subsequent ATP function. Our results thus define a large and dynamic intersubunit ATP-binding pocket and suggest that receptors trapped in covalently agonist-bound states differ in their ability to gate the ion channel. PMID:21576497

  11. N-terminal galanin-(1-16) fragment is an agonist at the hippocampal galanin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisone, G.; Berthold, M.; Bedecs, K.

    1989-12-01

    The galanin N-terminal fragment (galanin-(1-16)) has been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and by enzymic cleavage of galanin by endoproteinase Asp-N. This peptide fragment displaced {sup 125}I-labeled galanin in receptor autoradiography experiments on rat forebrain and spinal cord and in equilibrium binding experiments from high-affinity binding sites in the ventral hippocampus with an IC50 of approximately 3 nM. In tissue slices of the same brain area, galanin-(1-16), similarly to galanin, inhibited the muscarinic agonist-stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Upon intracerebroventricular administration, galanin-(1-16) (10 micrograms/15 microliters) also inhibited the scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.)-evoked release of acetylcholine, as studied in vivo by microdialysis.more » Substitution of (L-Trp2) for (D-Trp2) resulted in a 500-fold loss in affinity as compared with galanin-(1-16). It is concluded that, in the ventral hippocampus, the N-terminal galanin fragment (galanin-(1-16)) is recognized by the galanin receptors controlling acetylcholine release and muscarinic agonist-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown as a high-affinity agonist and that amino acid residue (Trp2) plays an important role in the receptor-ligand interactions.« less

  12. Agonist trapped in ATP-binding sites of the P2X2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruotian; Lemoine, Damien; Martz, Adeline; Taly, Antoine; Gonin, Sophie; Prado de Carvalho, Lia; Specht, Alexandre; Grutter, Thomas

    2011-05-31

    ATP-gated P2X receptors are trimeric ion channels, as recently confirmed by X-ray crystallography. However, the structure was solved without ATP and even though extracellular intersubunit cavities surrounded by conserved amino acid residues previously shown to be important for ATP function were proposed to house ATP, the localization of the ATP sites remains elusive. Here we localize the ATP-binding sites by creating, through a proximity-dependent "tethering" reaction, covalent bonds between a synthesized ATP-derived thiol-reactive P2X2 agonist (NCS-ATP) and single cysteine mutants engineered in the putative binding cavities of the P2X2 receptor. By combining whole-cell and single-channel recordings, we report that NCS-ATP covalently and specifically labels two previously unidentified positions N140 and L186 from two adjacent subunits separated by about 18 Å in a P2X2 closed state homology model, suggesting the existence of at least two binding modes. Tethering reaction at both positions primes subsequent agonist binding, yet with distinct functional consequences. Labeling of one position impedes subsequent ATP function, which results in inefficient gating, whereas tethering of the other position, although failing to produce gating by itself, enhances subsequent ATP function. Our results thus define a large and dynamic intersubunit ATP-binding pocket and suggest that receptors trapped in covalently agonist-bound states differ in their ability to gate the ion channel.

  13. The putative imidazoline receptor agonist, harmane, promotes intracellular calcium mobilisation in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Squires, Paul E; Hills, Claire E; Rogers, Gareth J; Garland, Patrick; Farley, Sophia R; Morgan, Noel G

    2004-10-06

    beta-Carbolines (including harmane and pinoline) stimulate insulin secretion by a mechanism that may involve interaction with imidazoline I(3)-receptors but which also appears to be mediated by actions that are additional to imidazoline receptor agonism. Using the MIN6 beta-cell line, we now show that both the imidazoline I(3)-receptor agonist, efaroxan, and the beta-carboline, harmane, directly elevate cytosolic Ca(2+) and increase insulin secretion but that these responses display different characteristics. In the case of efaroxan, the increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) was readily reversible, whereas, with harmane, the effect persisted beyond removal of the agonist and resulted in the development of a repetitive train of Ca(2+)-oscillations whose frequency, but not amplitude, was concentration-dependent. Initiation of the Ca(2+)-oscillations by harmane was independent of extracellular calcium but was sensitive to both dantrolene and high levels (20 mM) of caffeine, suggesting the involvement of ryanodine receptor-gated Ca(2+)-release. The expression of ryanodine receptor-1 and ryanodine receptor-2 mRNA in MIN6 cells was confirmed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and, since low concentrations of caffeine (1 mM) or thimerosal (10 microM) stimulated increases in [Ca(2+)](i), we conclude that ryanodine receptors are functional in these cells. Furthermore, the increase in insulin secretion induced by harmane was attenuated by dantrolene, consistent with the involvement of ryanodine receptors in mediating this response. By contrast, the smaller insulin secretory response to efaroxan was unaffected by dantrolene. Harmane-evoked changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) were maintained by nifedipine-sensitive Ca(2+)-influx, suggesting the involvement of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channels. Taken together, these data imply that harmane may interact with ryanodine receptors to generate sustained Ca(2+)-oscillations in pancreatic beta-cells and that this effect

  14. Agonists and antagonists acting at P2X receptors: selectivity profiles and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, G

    2000-11-01

    P2X receptors are nucleotide-gated cation channels composed of homomeric or heteromeric assemblies of three subunits. In the past 7 years, an extended series (P2X1-7) of P2X subunits has been cloned from vertebrate tissues. In this rapidly expanding field, one of the main current challenges is to relate the cloned P2X receptor subtypes to the diverse physiological responses mediated by the native P2X receptors. However, the paucity of useful ligands, especially subtype-selective agonists and antagonists as well as radioligands, acts as a considerable impediment to progress. Most of the ligands available are highly limited in terms of their kinetics of action, receptor-affinity, subtype-selectivity and P2X receptor-specificity. Their suspected ability to be a substrate for ecto-nucleotidases or to inhibit these enzymes also complicates their use. A number of new antagonists at P2X receptors have recently been described which to some degree are more potent and more selective than earlier antagonists like suramin or pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-6-azophenyl 2',4'-disulfonate (PPADS). This work moves us closer to the ideal goal of classifying the recombinant and native P2X receptor subtypes on the basis of antagonist profiles. This review begins with a brief account of the current status of P2X receptors. It then focuses on the pharmacological properties of a series of key P2 receptor agonists and antagonists and will finish with the discussion of some related therapeutic possibilities.

  15. Rotigotine is a potent agonist at dopamine D1 receptors as well as at dopamine D2 and D3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wood, Martyn; Dubois, Vanessa; Scheller, Dieter; Gillard, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Rotigotine acts as a dopamine receptor agonist with high affinity for the dopamine D2, D3, D4 and D5 receptors but with a low affinity for the dopamine D1 receptor. We have investigated this further in radioligand binding and functional studies and compared the profile of rotigotine with that of other drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). The binding of rotigotine to human dopamine D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 receptors was determined in radioligand binding studies using [(3)H]rotigotine and compared with that of standard antagonist radioligands. Functional interactions of rotigotine with human dopamine receptors was also determined. [(3)H]rotigotine can be used as an agonist radioligand to label all dopamine receptor subtypes and this can be important to derive agonist affinity estimates. Rotigotine maintains this high affinity in functional studies at all dopamine receptors especially D1, D2 and D3 receptors and, to a lesser extent, D4 and D5 receptors. Rotigotine, like apomorphine but unlike ropinirole and pramipexole, was a potent agonist at all dopamine receptors. Rotigotine is a high-potency agonist at human dopamine D1, D2 and D3 receptors with a lower potency at D4 and D5 receptors. These studies differentiate rotigotine from conventional dopamine D2 agonists, used in the treatment of PD, such as ropinirole and pramipexole which lack activity at the D1 and D5 receptors, but resembles that of apomorphine which has greater efficacy in PD than other dopamine agonists but has suboptimal pharmacokinetic properties. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Rotigotine is a potent agonist at dopamine D1 receptors as well as at dopamine D2 and D3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Martyn; Dubois, Vanessa; Scheller, Dieter; Gillard, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Rotigotine acts as a dopamine receptor agonist with high affinity for the dopamine D2, D3, D4 and D5 receptors but with a low affinity for the dopamine D1 receptor. We have investigated this further in radioligand binding and functional studies and compared the profile of rotigotine with that of other drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Experimental Approach The binding of rotigotine to human dopamine D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 receptors was determined in radioligand binding studies using [3H]rotigotine and compared with that of standard antagonist radioligands. Functional interactions of rotigotine with human dopamine receptors was also determined. Key Results [3H]rotigotine can be used as an agonist radioligand to label all dopamine receptor subtypes and this can be important to derive agonist affinity estimates. Rotigotine maintains this high affinity in functional studies at all dopamine receptors especially D1, D2 and D3 receptors and, to a lesser extent, D4 and D5 receptors. Rotigotine, like apomorphine but unlike ropinirole and pramipexole, was a potent agonist at all dopamine receptors. Conclusions and Implications Rotigotine is a high-potency agonist at human dopamine D1, D2 and D3 receptors with a lower potency at D4 and D5 receptors. These studies differentiate rotigotine from conventional dopamine D2 agonists, used in the treatment of PD, such as ropinirole and pramipexole which lack activity at the D1 and D5 receptors, but resembles that of apomorphine which has greater efficacy in PD than other dopamine agonists but has suboptimal pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:25339241

  17. Novel selective agonists and antagonists confirm neurokinin NK1 receptors in guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J. M.; Morton, I. K.

    1991-01-01

    1. This study investigated the recognition characteristics of neurokinin receptors mediating potentiation of the contractile response to field stimulation in the guinea-pig vas deferens. 2. A predominant NK1 receptor population is strongly suggested by the relative activities of the common naturally-occurring tachykinin agonists, which fall within less than one order of magnitude. This conclusion is supported by the relative activities of the synthetic NK1 selective agonists substance P methyl ester, [Glp6,L-Pro9]-SP(6-11) and delta-aminovaleryl-[L-Pro9,N-MeLeu10]- SP(7-11) (GR73632) which were 0.78, 9.3 and 120 as active as substance P, respectively. Furthermore, the NK2 selective agonist [Lys3, Gly8,-R-gamma-lactam-Leu9]-NKA(3-10) (GR64349) was active only at the highest concentrations tested (greater than 10 microM), and the NK3 selective agonist, succ-[Asp6,N-MePhe8]-SP(6-11) (senktide) was essentially inactive (10 nM-32 microM). 3. [D-Arg1,D-Pro2,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]-SP(1-11) antagonized responses to neurokinin A, neurokinin B, physalaemin, eledoisin, [Glp6,D-Pro9]-SP(6-11), GR73632 and GR64349 (apparent pKB s 5.6-6.2), but was less potent in antagonizing responses to substance P, substance P methyl ester and [Glp6,L-Pro9]-SP(6-11) (apparent pKB s less than or equal to 5.0-5.0). 4. In contrast, the recently developed NK1-selective receptor antagonist [D-Pro9[Spiro-gamma-lactam]Leu10,Trp11]-SP(1-11) (GR71251) did not produce agonist-dependent pKB estimates. Schild plot analysis indicated a competitive interaction with a single receptor population where the antagonist had an estimated overall pKB of 7.58 +/- 0.13 for the four agonists of differing subtype selectivity tested (GR73632, GR64349, substance P methyl ester and neurokinin B).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1707714

  18. Melanocortin Antagonist Tetrapeptides with Minimal Agonist Activity at the Mouse Melanocortin-3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The melanocortin system regulates many important functions in the body. There are five melanocortin G protein-coupled receptor subtypes known to date. Herein, we report a structure–activity relationship (SAR) study of a tetrapeptide lead discovered through a double substitution strategy at the melanocortin core His-Phe-Arg-Trp sequence. Several compounds were identified with micromolar agonist activity at the mouse melanocortin-1 (mMC1R) and mouse melanocortin-5 receptor (mMC5R) subtypes, weak antagonist activity at the mouse melanocortin-3 receptor (mMC3R), and potent antagonist activity at the mouse melanocortin-4 receptor (mMC4R). Two compounds (2 and 3) were nanomolar mMC4R antagonists with no mMC3R antagonist activity observed. Additionally, we identified three tetrapeptide MC3R antagonists (1, 6, and 7) that possess minimal mMC3R agonist activity only at 100 μM, not commonly observed for mMC3R/mMC4R antagonists. These novel molecular templates have the potential as molecular probes to better differentiate the roles of the centrally expressed MC3 and MC4 receptors. PMID:25699138

  19. Identification of SR1078, a synthetic agonist for the orphan nuclear receptors RORα and RORγ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjun; Kumar, Naresh; Nuhant, Philippe; Cameron, Michael D; Istrate, Monica A; Roush, William R; Griffin, Patrick R; Burris, Thomas P

    2010-11-19

    The retinoic acid receptor-related receptors (RORs) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. Several NRs are still characterized as orphan receptors because ligands have not yet been identified for these proteins. Here, we describe the identification of a synthetic RORα/RORγ ligand, SR1078. SR1078 modulates the conformation of RORγ in a biochemical assay and activates RORα and RORγ driven transcription. Furthermore, SR1078 stimulates expression of endogenous ROR target genes in HepG2 cells that express both RORα and RORγ. Pharmacokinetic studies indicate that SR1078 displays reasonable exposure following injection into mice, and consistent with SR1078 functioning as a RORα/RORγ agonist, expression of two ROR target genes, glucose-6-phosphatase and fibroblast growth factor 21, were stimulated in the liver. Thus, we have identified the first synthetic RORα/γ agonist, and this compound can be utilized as a chemical tool to probe the function of these receptors both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Identification of a Synthetic Agonist for the Orphan Nuclear Receptors RORα and RORγ, SR1078

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjun; Kumar, Naresh; Nuhant, Philippe; Cameron, Michael D.; Istrate, Monica A.; Roush, William R.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related receptors (RORs) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors. Several NRs are still characterized as orphan receptors since ligands have not yet been identified for these proteins. Here, we describe the identification of a synthetic RORα/RORγ ligand, SR1078. SR1078 modulates the conformation of RORγ in a biochemical assay and activates RORα and RORγ driven transcription. Furthermore, SR1078 stimulates expression of endogenous ROR target genes in HepG2 cells that express both RORα and RORγ. Pharmacokinetic studies indicate that SR1078 displays reasonable exposure following injection into mice and consistent with SR1078 functioning as a RORα/RORγ agonist, expression of two ROR target genes, glucose-6-phosphatase and fibroblast growth factor 21, were stimulated in the liver. Thus, we have identified the first synthetic RORα/γ agonist and this compound can be utilized as a chemical tool to probe the function of these receptors both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20735016

  1. When Intensive Insulin Therapy (MDI) Fails in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Switching to GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Versus Insulin Pump.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ohad; Filetti, Sebastiano; Castañeda, Javier; Maranghi, Marianna; Glandt, Mariela

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with insulin, alone or with oral or injectable hypoglycemic agents, is becoming increasingly common in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, approximately 40% of patients fail to reach their glycemic targets with the initially prescribed regimen and require intensification of insulin therapy, which increases the risks of weight gain and hypoglycemia. Many of these patients eventually reach a state in which further increases in the insulin dosage fail to improve glycemic control while increasing the risks of weight gain and hypoglycemia. The recently completed OpT2mise clinical trial showed that continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is more effective in reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) than intensification of multiple daily injection (MDI) insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes who do not respond to intensive insulin therapy. CSII therapy may also be useful in patients who do not reach glycemic targets despite multidrug therapy with basal-bolus insulin and other agents, including glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists; current guidelines offer no recommendations for the treatment of such patients. Importantly, insulin and GLP-1 receptor agonists have complementary effects on glycemia and, hence, can be used either sequentially or in combination in the initial management of diabetes. Patients who have not previously failed GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy may show reduction in weight and insulin dose, in addition to moderate improvement in HbA1c, when GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy is added to MDI regimens. In subjects with long-standing type 2 diabetes who do not respond to intensive insulin therapies, switching from MDI to CSII and/or the addition of GLP-1 receptor agonists to MDI have the potential to improve glycemic control without increasing the risk of adverse events. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for

  2. The A2 Adenosine Receptor: Guanine Nucleotide Modulation of Agonist Binding Is Enhanced by Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    NANOFF, CHRISTIAN; JACOBSON, KENNETH A.; STILES, GARY L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Agonist binding to the A2 adenosine receptor (A2AR) and its regulation by guanine nucleotides was studied using the newly developed radioligand 125l-2-[4-(2-{2-[(4-ammnophenyl)methylcarbonylamino]ethylaminnocarbonyl}ethyl)phenyl]ethylamino-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (1251-PAPA-APEC) and its photoaffinity analog 125l-azido-PAPA-APEC. A single protein of Mr 45,000, displaying the appropriate A2AR pharmacology, is Iabeled in membranes from bovine striatum, PC12 cells, and frog erythrocytes. In DDT1 MF2 cells the labeled protein has a slightly lower molecular weight. Incorporation of 125l-azido-PAPA-APEC into membranes from rabbit striatum, however, reveals two specifically labeled peptides (Mr ~47,O00 and 38,000), both of which display A2AR pharmacology. Inhibition of protease activity leads to a decrease in the amount of the Mr 38,000 protein, with only the Mr 47,000 protein remaining. This suggests that the Mr 38,000 peptide is a proteolytic product of the Mr 47,000 A2AR protein. In membranes containing the intact undigested A2AR protein, guanine nucleotides induce a small to insignificant decrease in agonist binding, which is atypical of stimulatory Gs-coupled receptors. This minimal effect is observed in rabbit striatal membranes prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors, as well as in the other tissues studied. Binding to rabbit stnatal membranes that possess the partially digested receptor protein, however, reveals a 50% reduction in maximal specific agonist binding upon addition of guanine nucleotides. Inhibition of proteolysis in rabbit striatum, on the other hand, results in a diminished ability of guanine nucleotides to regulate agonist binding. Thus, the enhanced effectiveness of guanine nucleotides in rabbit striatal membranes is associated with the generation of the Mr 38,000 peptide fragment. Guanosine 5′-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate reduces photoaffinity labeling by 55% in the Mr 38,000 protein, whereas the labeling is decreased by

  3. Identification of a Novel Non-retinoid Pan Inverse Agonist of the Retinoic Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Scott A.; Kumar, Naresh; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Istrate, Monica A.; Conkright, Juliana J.; Wang, Yongjun; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Cameron, Michael D.; Roush, William R.; Burris, Thomas P.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2011-01-01

    Retinoids are potent forms of vitamin A and are involved in a broad range of physiological processes and the pharmacological effects of retinoids are primarily mediated by the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Several natural and synthetic RAR modulators have proven to be clinically useful for a number of therapeutic indications including cancer, psoriasis, and diabetes. Unfortunately, these agents lead to a number of significant side effects. Most synthetic retinoid ligands are based on the retinoid scaffold and thus have similarities to the natural ligand with all previously disclosed RAR ligands having a carboxylic acid that makes a critical ionic bridge within the ligand binding domain of the receptors. The potential therapeutic value offered from RAR modulation provides the impetus to identify novel ligands based on unique scaffolds that may offer improved toxicity and pharmacokinetic profiles. Here we describe the identification of an atypical RAR inverse agonist that represents the first non-acid, non-retinoid direct modulator of RAR receptor subfamily. SR-0065 functions as a pan-RAR inverse agonist suppressing the basal activity of RARα, RARβ, and RARγ as well as inhibiting agonist induced RAR activity. SR-0065 treatment enhanced receptor interaction with a peptide representative of the corepressor SMRT and in cells SR-0065 enhances recruitment of SMRT to RARγ. The acid form of SR-0065, SR-1758, was inactive in all assays. Thus, SR-0065 represents a new class of non-acid, non-retinoid RAR modulator that may be used as a point to initiate development of improved RAR-targeted drugs. PMID:21381756

  4. The novel μ-opioid receptor agonist PZM21 depresses respiration and induces tolerance to antinociception.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rob; Disney, Alex; Conibear, Alex; Sutcliffe, Katy; Dewey, William; Husbands, Stephen; Bailey, Chris; Kelly, Eamonn; Henderson, Graeme

    2018-07-01

    PZM21 is a novel μ-opioid receptor ligand that has been reported to induce minimal arrestin recruitment and be devoid of the respiratory depressant effects characteristic of classical μ receptor ligands such as morphine. We have re-examined the signalling profile of PZM21 and its ability to depress respiration. G protein (G i ) activation and arrestin-3 translocation were measured in vitro, using BRET assays, in HEK 293 cells expressing μ receptors. Respiration (rate and tidal volume) was measured in awake, freely moving mice by whole-body plethysmography, and antinociception was measured by the hot plate test. PZM21 (10 -9 - 3 × 10 -5  M) produced concentration-dependent G i activation and arrestin-3 translocation. Comparison with responses evoked by morphine and DAMGO revealed that PZM21 was a low efficacy agonist in both signalling assays. PZM21 (10-80 mg·kg -1 ) depressed respiration in a dose-dependent manner. The respiratory depression was due to a decrease in the rate of breathing not a decrease in tidal volume. On repeated daily administration of PZM21 (twice daily doses of 40 mg·kg -1 ), complete tolerance developed to the antinociceptive effect of PZM21 over 3 days but no tolerance developed to its respiratory depressant effect. These data demonstrate that PZM21 is a low efficacy μ receptor agonist for both G protein and arrestin signalling. Contrary to a previous report, PZM21 depresses respiration in a manner similar to morphine, the classical opioid receptor agonist. © 2018 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Identification of Novel Synthetic Toll-like Receptor 2 Agonists by High Throughput Screening*

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yue; Omueti-Ayoade, Katherine; Mutha, Sarita K.; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Tapping, Richard I.

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a central role in host defense by inducing inflammatory and adaptive immune responses following infection. Drugs that target TLRs are of considerable interest as potential inflammatory regulators, vaccine adjuvants, and novel immunotherapeutics. TLR2, in cooperation with either TLR1 or TLR6, mediates responses to a wide variety of microbial products as well as products of host tissue damage. In an effort to understand the structural basis of TLR2 recognition and uncover novel TLR2 agonists, a synthetic chemical library of 24,000 compounds was screened using an IL-8-driven luciferase reporter in cells expressing these human receptors. The screening yielded several novel TLR2-dependent activators that utilize TLR1, TLR6, or both as co-receptors. These novel small molecule compounds are aromatic in nature and structurally unrelated to any known TLR2 agonists. The three most potent compounds do not exhibit synergistic activity, nor do they act as pseudoantagonists toward natural TLR2 activators. Interestingly, two of the compounds exhibit species specificity and are inactive toward murine peritoneal macrophages. Mutational analysis reveals that although the central extracellular region of TLR1 is required for stimulation, there are subtle differences in the mechanism of stimulation mediated by the synthetic compounds in comparison with natural lipoprotein agonists. The three most potent compounds activate cells in the nanomolar range and stimulate cytokine production from human peripheral blood monocytes. Our results confirm the utility of high throughput screens to uncover novel synthetic TLR2 agonists that may be of therapeutic benefit. PMID:20504771

  6. Activation of Adhesion G Protein-coupled Receptors: AGONIST SPECIFICITY OF STACHEL SEQUENCE-DERIVED PEPTIDES.

    PubMed

    Demberg, Lilian M; Winkler, Jana; Wilde, Caroline; Simon, Kay-Uwe; Schön, Julia; Rothemund, Sven; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone; Liebscher, Ines

    2017-03-17

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) family carry an agonistic sequence within their large ectodomains. Peptides derived from this region, called the Stachel sequence, can activate the respective receptor. As the conserved core region of the Stachel sequence is highly similar between aGPCRs, the agonist specificity of Stachel sequence-derived peptides was tested between family members using cell culture-based second messenger assays. Stachel peptides derived from aGPCRs of subfamily VI (GPR110/ADGRF1, GPR116/ADGRF5) and subfamily VIII (GPR64/ADGRG2, GPR126/ADGRG6) are able to activate more than one member of the respective subfamily supporting their evolutionary relationship and defining them as pharmacological receptor subtypes. Extended functional analyses of the Stachel sequences and derived peptides revealed agonist promiscuity, not only within, but also between aGPCR subfamilies. For example, the Stachel -derived peptide of GPR110 (subfamily VI) can activate GPR64 and GPR126 (both subfamily VIII). Our results indicate that key residues in the Stachel sequence are very similar between aGPCRs allowing for agonist promiscuity of several Stachel -derived peptides. Therefore, aGPCRs appear to be pharmacologically more closely related than previously thought. Our findings have direct implications for many aGPCR studies, as potential functional overlap has to be considered for in vitro and in vivo studies. However, it also offers the possibility of a broader use of more potent peptides when the original Stachel sequence is less effective. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Working memory span capacity improved by a D2 but not D1 receptor family agonist.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Isadore S; Sharp, Richard F; Geyer, Mark A; Meves, Jessica M; Young, Jared W

    2011-06-01

    Patients with schizophrenia exhibit poor working memory (WM). Although several subcomponents of WM can be measured, evidence suggests the primary subcomponent affected in schizophrenia is span capacity (WMC). Indeed, the NIMH-funded MATRICS initiative recommended assaying the WMC when assessing the efficacy of a putative therapeutic for FDA approval. Although dopamine D1 receptor agonists improve delay-dependent memory in animals, evidence for improvements in WMC due to dopamine D1 receptor activation is limited. In contrast, the dopamine D2-family agonist bromocriptine improves WMC in humans. The radial arm maze (RAM) can be used to assess WMC, although complications due to ceiling effects or strategy confounds have limited its use. We describe a 12-arm RAM protocol designed to assess whether the dopamine D1-family agonist SKF 38393 (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) or bromocriptine (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) could improve WMC in C57BL/6N mice (n=12) in cross-over designs. WMC increased and strategy usage decreased with training. The dopamine D1 agonist SKF 38393 had no effect on WMC or long-term memory. Bromocriptine decreased WMC errors, without affecting long-term memory, consistent with human studies. These data confirm that WMC can be measured in mice and reveal drug effects that are consistent with reported effects in humans. Future research is warranted to identify the subtype of the D2-family of receptors responsible for the observed improvement in WMC. Finally, this RAM procedure may prove useful in developing animal models of deficient WMC to further assess putative treatments for the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The opioid receptor triple agonist DPI-125 produces analgesia with less respiratory depression and reduced abuse liability.

    PubMed

    Yi, Shou-Pu; Kong, Qing-Hong; Li, Yu-Lei; Pan, Chen-Ling; Yu, Jie; Cui, Ben-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Fei; Wang, Guan-Lin; Zhou, Pei-Lan; Wang, Li-Li; Gong, Ze-Hui; Su, Rui-Bin; Shen, Yue-Hai; Yu, Gang; Chang, Kwen-Jen

    2017-07-01

    Opioid analgesics remain the first choice for the treatment of moderate to severe pain, but they are also notorious for their respiratory depression and addictive effects. This study focused on the pharmacology of a novel opioid receptor mixed agonist DPI-125 and attempted to elucidate the relationship between the δ-, μ- and κ-receptor potency ratio and respiratory depression and abuse liability. Five diarylmethylpiperazine compounds (DPI-125, DPI-3290, DPI-130, KUST202 and KUST13T02) were selected for this study. PKA fluorescence redistribution assays in CHO cells individually expressing δ-, μ- or κ-receptors were used to measure the agonist potency. The respiratory safety profiles were estimated in rats by the ratio of ED 50 (pCO 2 increase)/ED 50 (antinociception). The abuse liability of DPI-125 was evaluated with a self-administration model in rhesus monkeys. The observed agonist potencies of DPI-125 for δ-, μ- and κ-opioid receptors were 4.29±0.36, 11.10±3.04, and 16.57±4.14 nmol/L, respectively. The other four compounds were also mixed agonists with varying potencies. DPI-125 exhibited a high respiratory safety profile, clearly related to its high δ-receptor potency. The ratio of the EC 50 potencies for the μ- and δ-receptors was found to be positively correlated with the respiratory safety ratio. DPI-125 has similar potencies for μ- and κ-receptors, which is likely the reason for its reduced abuse potential. Our results demonstrate that the opioid receptor mixed agonist DPI-125 is safer and less addictive than traditional μ-agonist analgesics. These findings suggest that the development of δ>μ∼κ opioid receptor mixed agonists is feasible, and such compounds could represent a promising class of potent analgesics with wider therapeutic windows.

  9. A Small Molecule Inverse Agonist for the Human Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Susanne; Huang, Wenwei; Eliseeva, Elena; Titus, Steve; Thomas, Craig J.; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Small molecule inverse agonists for the TSH receptor (TSHR) may be used as probes of the role of basal (or agonist-independent or constitutive) signaling and may have therapeutic potential as orally active drugs to inhibit basal signaling in patients with thyroid cancer and in some patients with hyperthyroidism. We describe the first small-molecule ligand [1;2-(3-((2,6-dimethylphenoxy)methyl)-4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(furan-2-ylmethyl)-2,3-dihydroquinazolin-4(1H)-one] that exhibits inverse agonist properties at TSHR. 1 inhibits basal and TSH-stimulated signaling, measured as cAMP production, by TSHRs in HEK-EM 293 cells stably expressing wild-type TSHRs; the antagonism of TSH-mediated signaling is competitive. 1 also inhibits basal signaling by wild-type TSHRs, and four constitutively active mutants of TSHR expressed transiently in HEK-EM 293 cells. 1 was active under more physiologically relevant conditions in primary cultures of human thyrocytes expressing endogenous TSHRs where it inhibited basal levels of mRNA transcripts for thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase, sodium iodide symporter, and TSHR. These data serve as proof of principle that small, drug-like molecules can inhibit basal signaling by TSHR. We suggest that this small molecule is a lead compound for the development of higher-potency inverse agonists that can be used as probes of TSHR biology with therapeutic potential. PMID:20427476

  10. Platelet-activating factor receptor agonists mediate xeroderma pigmentosum A photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongxue; Harrison, Kathleen A; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Murphy, Robert C; Rezania, Samin; Konger, Raymond L; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2012-03-16

    To date, oxidized glycerophosphocholines (Ox-GPCs) with platelet-activating factor (PAF) activity produced non-enzymatically have not been definitively demonstrated to mediate any known disease processes. Here we provide evidence that these Ox-GPCs play a pivotal role in the photosensitivity associated with the deficiency of the DNA repair protein xeroderma pigmentosum type A (XPA). It should be noted that XPA-deficient cells are known to have decreased antioxidant defenses. These studies demonstrate that treatment of human XPA-deficient fibroblasts with the pro-oxidative stressor ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation resulted in increased reactive oxygen species and PAF receptor (PAF-R) agonistic activity in comparison with gene-corrected cells. The UVB irradiation-generated PAF-R agonists were inhibited by antioxidants. UVB irradiation of XPA-deficient (Xpa-/-) mice also resulted in increased PAF-R agonistic activity and skin inflammation in comparison with control mice. The increased UVB irradiation-mediated skin inflammation and TNF-α production in Xpa-/- mice were blocked by systemic antioxidants and by PAF-R antagonists. Structural characterization of PAF-R-stimulating activity in UVB-irradiated XPA-deficient fibroblasts using mass spectrometry revealed increased levels of sn-2 short-chain Ox-GPCs along with native PAF. These studies support a critical role for PAF-R agonistic Ox-GPCs in the pathophysiology of XPA photosensitivity.

  11. Roles of threonine 192 and asparagine 382 in agonist and antagonist interactions with M1 muscarinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xi-Ping; Nagy, Peter I; Williams, Frederick E; Peseckis, Steven M; Messer, William S

    1999-01-01

    Conserved amino acids, such as Thr in transmembrane domains (TM) V and Asn in TM VI of muscarinic receptors, may be important in agonist binding and/or receptor activation. In order to determine the functional roles of Thr192 and Asn382 in human M1 receptors in ligand binding and receptor activation processes, we created and characterized mutant receptors with Thr192 or Asn382 substituted by Ala.HM1 wild-type (WT) and mutant receptors [HM1(Thr192Ala) and HM1(Asn382Ala)] were stably expressed in A9 L cells. The Kd values for 3H-(R)-QNB and Ki values for other classical muscarinic antagonists were similar at HM1(WT) and HM1(Thr192Ala) mutant receptors, yet higher at HM1(Asn382Ala) mutant receptors. Carbachol exhibited lower potency and efficacy in stimulating PI hydrolysis via HM1(Thr192Ala) mutant receptors, and intermediate agonist activity at the HM1(Asn382Ala) mutant receptors.The Asn382 residue in TM VI but not the Thr192 residue in TM V of the human M1 receptor appears to participate directly in antagonist binding. Both Thr192 and Asn382 residues are involved differentially in agonist binding and/or receptor activation processes, yet the Asn382 residue is less important than Thr192 in agonist activation of M1 receptors.Molecular modelling studies indicate that substitution of Thr192 or Asn382 results in the loss of hydrogen-bond interactions and changes in the agonist binding mode associated with an increase in hydrophobic interactions between ligand and receptor. PMID:10188986

  12. CJ-1639: A Potent and Highly Selective Dopamine D3 Receptor Full Agonist.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyong; Collins, Gregory T; Levant, Beth; Woods, James; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Wang, Shaomeng

    2011-08-11

    We have identified several ligands with high binding affinities to the dopamine D3 receptor and excellent selectivity over the D2 and D1 receptors. CJ-1639 (17) binds to the D3 receptor with a K(i) value of 0.50 nM and displays a selectivity of >5,000 times over D2 and D1 receptors in binding assays using dopamine receptors expressed in the native rat brain tissues. CJ-1639 binds to human D3 receptor with a K(i) value of 3.61 nM and displays over >1000-fold selectivity over human D1 and D2 receptors. CJ-1639 is active at 0.01 mg/kg at the dopamine D3 receptor in the rat and only starts to show a modest D2 activity at doses as high as 10 mg/kg. CJ-1639 is the most potent and selective D3 full agonist reported to date.

  13. Anti-nociceptive interactions between opioids and a cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist in inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Hale, David E; Guindon, Josée; Morgan, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor and cannabinoid 2 receptor can both be targeted in the treatment of pain; yet, they have some important differences. Cannabinoid 1 receptor is expressed at high levels in the central nervous system, whereas cannabinoid 2 receptor is found predominantly, although not exclusively, outside the central nervous system. The objective of this study was to investigate potential interactions between cannabinoid 2 receptor and the mu-opioid receptor in pathological pain. The low level of adverse side effects and lack of tolerance for cannabinoid 2 receptor agonists are attractive pharmacotherapeutic traits. This study assessed the anti-nociceptive effects of a selective cannabinoid 2 receptor agonist (JWH-133) in pathological pain using mice subjected to inflammatory pain using the formalin test. Furthermore, we examined several ways in which JWH-133 may interact with morphine. JWH-133 produces dose-dependent anti-nociception during both the acute and inflammatory phases of the formalin test. This was observed in both male and female mice. However, a maximally efficacious dose of JWH-133 (1 mg/kg) was not associated with somatic withdrawal symptoms, motor impairment, or hypothermia. After eleven once-daily injections of 1 mg/JWH-133, no tolerance was observed in the formalin test. Cross-tolerance for the anti-nociceptive effects of JWH-133 and morphine were assessed to gain insight into physiologically relevant cannabinoid 2 receptor and mu-opioid receptor interaction. Mice made tolerant to the effects of morphine exhibited a lower JWH-133 response in both phases of the formalin test compared to vehicle-treated morphine-naïve animals. However, repeated daily JWH-133 administration did not cause cross-tolerance for morphine, suggesting opioid and cannabinoid 2 receptor cross-tolerance is unidirectional. However, preliminary data suggest co-administration of JWH-133 with morphine modestly attenuates morphine tolerance. Isobolographic analysis

  14. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Unravels Biased Phosphorylation of Serotonin 2A Receptor at Ser280 by Hallucinogenic versus Nonhallucinogenic Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J.; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT2A receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT2A receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT2A agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser280) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser280 by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT2A receptors at Ser280 in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser280 to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of

  15. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasionmore » of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked

  16. Long-term management of type 2 diabetes with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Hamish; Nayar, Rahul; Rajeswaran, Chinnadorai; Jandhyala, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Continuously reducing excess blood glucose is a primary goal for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Most patients with T2D require glucose-lowering medications to achieve and maintain adequate glycemic control; however, treatment failure may occur, limiting treatment options. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are an emerging therapeutic class that can be prescribed for patients instead of basal insulin after the failure of oral therapies. Recent studies have focused on the durability and tolerability of long-term GLP-1RA therapy. This review summarizes the key efficacy and safety findings from prospective phase 3 clinical studies of at least 76 weeks' duration for the GLP-1RAs currently approved in the United States and the European Union (albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide twice daily [BID], exenatide once weekly [QW], liraglutide, and lixisenatide). Currently, most of the long-term data are from uncontrolled extension studies, and continuous patient benefit has been observed for up to 3 years with multiple GLP-1RAs. Four-year comparative data demonstrated a longer time to treatment failure for exenatide BID than for sulfonylurea, and 3-year comparative extension data demonstrated greater glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reductions and weight loss with exenatide QW than with insulin glargine. Currently, the longest extension study for a GLP-1RA is the DURATION-1 study of exenatide QW, with >7 years of clinical data available. Data from DURATION-1 demonstrated that continuous HbA1c reductions and weight loss were observed for the patients continuing on the treatment, with no unexpected adverse events. Taken together, these data support GLP-1RAs as a long-term noninsulin treatment option after the failure of oral therapies.

  17. Effect of a muscarinic M3 receptor agonist on gastric motility.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Toshimi; Kudara, Norihiko; Sato, Masaki; Inomata, Masaaki; Orii, Seishi; Suzuki, Kazuyuki

    2007-11-01

    Muscarinic M3 receptors exist in the gastrointestinal wall in humans and the muscarinic M3 agonist cevimeline hydrochloride (Evoxac) is a candidate therapeutic agent for the treatment of xerostomia in Sjögren's syndrome. However, M3 receptor agonists are not known to show efficacy for diseases associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motility. Herein the effects are reported of cevimeline on gastric motility in two patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. The patients both received long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy for 6 months, but their symptoms persisted. Then cevimeline was administered orally for 8 weeks at 30 mg three times daily (90 mg/day) and their dyspepsia symptoms improved. Electrogastrography was performed to examine gastric motility before and after administration of the M3 agonist. The fasting or nocturnal wave rate was significantly increased after administration compared with before administration, but no significant postprandial changes were seen. No adverse effects of cevimeline were observed. This drug might be a candidate therapeutic agent for non-ulcer dyspepsia. Because its postprandial effects on gastrointestinal motility are unclear, a dose-finding clinical study should be performed in the future.

  18. Profound and rapid reduction in body temperature induced by the melanocortin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Kim, Eun Ran; Fan, Shengjie; Xia, Yan; Xu, Yong; Huang, Cheng; Tong, Qingchun

    2014-08-22

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) plays a major role in body weight regulation and its agonist MTII has been widely used to study the role of MC4Rs in energy expenditure promotion and feeding reduction. Unexpectedly, we observed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of MTII induced a rapid reduction in both body temperature and energy expenditure, which was independent of its effect on feeding and followed by a prolonged increase in energy expenditure. The rapid reduction was at least partly mediated by brain neurons since intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone, an endogenous melanocortin receptor agonist, produced a similar response. In addition, the body temperature-lowering effect of MTII was independent of the presence of MC4Rs, but in a similar fashion to the previously shown effect on body temperature by 5'AMP. Moreover, β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) were required for the recovery from low body temperature induced by MTII and further pharmacological studies showed that the MTII's effect on body temperature may be partially mediated by the vasopressin V1a receptors. Collectively, our results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the melanocortin pathway in rapidly lowering body temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The electrophysiological effects of the serotonin 1A receptor agonist buspirone in emotional face processing.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Kometer, Michael; Pokorny, Thomas; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2015-04-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system, and serotonin (5-HT) receptor agonists impair emotional face processing. However, the specific contribution of the 5-HT1A receptor remains poorly understood. Here we investigated the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underpinning the modulation of emotional face processing induced by buspirone, a partial 5-HT1A receptor agonist. In a psychophysical discrimination of emotional faces task, we observed that the discrimination fearful versus neutral faces were reduced, but not happy versus neutral faces. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials elicited by emotional face images, after placebo and buspirone administration. Buspirone modulated response strength (i.e., global field power) in the interval 230-248ms after stimulus onset. Distributed source estimation over this time interval revealed that buspirone decreased the neural activity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex that was evoked by fearful faces. These results indicate temporal and valence-specific effects of buspirone on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing. Furthermore, the reduced neural activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in response to fearful faces suggests a reduced attention to fearful faces. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into the role of 5-HT1A receptors in emotional face processing and have implications for affective disorders that are characterized by an increased attention to negative stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  20. Renoprotective Effects of AVE0991, a Nonpeptide Mas Receptor Agonist, in Experimental Acute Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Lívia Corrêa; Silveira, Kátia Daniela; Lima, Cristiano Xavier; Borges, Valdinéria; Bader, Michael; Rachid, Milene; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Souza, Danielle Gloria; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2012-01-01

    Renal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) is the major cause of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients. Mechanisms underlying reperfusion-associated injury include recruitment and activation of leukocytes and release of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we investigated the renal effects of acute administration of AVE0991, an agonist of Mas, the angiotensin-(1–7) receptor, the angiotensin-(1–7) receptor, in a murine model of renal I/R. Male C57BL/6 wild-type or Mas−/− mice were subjected to 30 min of bilateral ischemia and 24 h of reperfusion. Administration of AVE0991 promoted renoprotective effects, as seen by improvement of function, decreased tissue injury, prevention of local and remote leucocyte infiltration, and release of the chemokine, CXCL1. I/R injury was similar in WT and Mas−/− mice, suggesting that endogenous activation of this receptor does not control renal damage under baseline conditions. In conclusion, pharmacological interventions using Mas receptor agonists may represent a therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of renal I/R injury. PMID:22319645

  1. Profound and Rapid Reduction in Body Temperature Induced by the Melanocortin Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Kim, Eun Ran; Fan, Shengjie; Xia, Yan; Xu, Yong; Huang, Cheng; Tong, Qingchun

    2014-01-01

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) plays a major role in body weight regulation and its agonist MTII has been widely used to study the role of MC4Rs in energy expenditure promotion and feeding reduction. Unexpectedly, we observed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of MTII induced a rapid reduction in both body temperature and energy expenditure, which was independent of its effect on feeding and followed by a prolonged increase in energy expenditure. The rapid reduction was at least partly mediated by brain neurons since intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of alpha melanocyte-stimulating hormone, an endogenous melanocortin receptor agonist, produced a similar response. In addition, the body temperature-lowering effect of MTII was independent of the presence of MC4Rs, but in a similar fashion to the previously shown effect on body temperature by 5′AMP. Moreover, β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) were required for the recovery from low body temperature induced by MTII and further pharmacological studies showed that the MTII’s effect on body temperature may be partially mediated by the vasopressin V1a receptors. Collectively, our results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the melanocortin pathway in rapidly lowering body temperature. PMID:25065745

  2. Effect of GABA receptor agonists or antagonists injected spinally on the blood glucose level in mice.

    PubMed

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kang, Yu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Su; Kim, Chea-Ha; Kim, Su-Jin; Jung, Jun-Sub; Ryu, Ohk-Hyun; Choi, Moon-Gi; Suh, Hong-Won

    2013-05-01

    The possible roles of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) receptors located in the spinal cord for the regulation of the blood glucose level were studied in ICR mice. We found in the present study that intrathecal (i.t.) injection with baclofen (a GABAB receptor agonist; 1-10 μg/5 μl) or bicuculline (a GABAA receptor antagonist; 1-10 μg/5 μl) caused an elevation of the blood glucose level in a dose-dependent manner. The hyperglycemic effect induced by baclofen was more pronounced than that induced by bicuculline. However, muscimol (a GABAA receptor agonist; 1-5 μg/5 μl) or phaclofen (a GABAB receptor antagonist; 5-10 μg/5 μl) administered i.t. did not affect the blood glucose level. Baclofen-induced elevation of the blood glucose was dose-dependently attenuated by phaclofen. Furthermore, i.t. pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX; 0.05 or 0.1 μg/5 μl) for 6 days dose-dependently reduced the hyperglycemic effect induced by baclofen. Our results suggest that GABAB receptors located in the spinal cord play important roles for the elevation of the blood glucose level. Spinally located PTX-sensitive G-proteins appear to be involved in hyperglycemic effect induced by baclofen. Furthermore, inactivation of GABAA receptors located in the spinal cord appears to be responsible for tonic up-regulation of the blood glucose level.

  3. Design and Synthesis of Selective Estrogen Receptor beta Agonists and Their Pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, K. L. Iresha Sampathi

    Estrogens (17beta-estradiol, E2) have garnered considerable attention in influencing cognitive process in relation to phases of the menstrual cycle, aging and menopausal symptoms. However, hormone replacement therapy can have deleterious effects leading to breast and endometrial cancer, predominantly mediated by estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) the major isoform present in the mammary gland and uterus. Further evidence supports a dominant role of estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) for improved cognitive effects such as enhanced hippocampal signaling and memory consolidation via estrogen activated signaling cascades. Creation of the ERbeta selective ligands is challenging due to high structural similarity of both receptors. Thus far, several ERbeta selective agonists have been developed, however, none of these have made it to clinical use due to their lower selectivity or considerable side effects. The research in this dissertation involved the design of non-steroidal ERbeta selective agonists for hippocampal memory consolidation. The step-wise process to achieve the ultimate goal of this research includes: (1) design and synthesis of (4-hydroxyphenyl)cyclohexyl or cycloheptyl derivatives, (2) in vitro biological evaluation of synthesized compounds to identify highly potent and selective candidates, and (3) in vivo biological evaluation of selected candidates for hippocampal memory consolidation. Several (4-hydroxyphenyl)cyclohexyl or cycloheptyl derivatives were synthesized having structural alterations on both aromatic and cyclohexyl/heptyl ring scaffolds. ERbeta agonist potency was initially evaluated in TR-FRET ERbeta ligand binding assay and compounds having high potency were re-evaluated in functional cell based assays for potency and ERbeta vs. ERalpha selectivity. Two compounds from each series, ISP 163-PK4 and ISP 358-2 were identified as most selective ERbeta agonists. Both compounds revealed high metabolic stability, solubility and no cross reactivity

  4. Significant Correlation between TLR2 Agonist Activity and TNF-α Induction in J774.A1 Macrophage Cells by Different Medicinal Mushroom Products.

    PubMed

    Coy, Catherine; Standish, Leanna J; Bender, Geoff; Lu, Hailing

    2015-01-01

    In the US market, there is a variety of mushroom preparations available, even within the same species of mushroom. Nonetheless, little is known about whether species or the various extraction methods affect biological activity and potency of the immune modulatory activity of mushroom extracts. After discovering that protein-bound polysaccharide-K, a hot water extract from Trametes versicolor, was a potent Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 agonist that stimulates both innate and adaptive immunity, this study was initiated to evaluate whether other medicinal mushroom products also have TLR2 agonist activity and immune-enhancing potential as measured by the induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in J774.A1 murine macrophage cells. Furthermore, the products were divided by extraction method and species to determine whether these factors affect their immunomodulatory activity. The results showed that the majority (75%) of mushroom products tested had TLR2 agonist activity and that there was a significant correlation between TLR2 agonist activity and TNF-α induction potential in the mushroom products analyzed. In addition, the data demonstrated that hot water mushroom extracts are more potent than ground mushroom products in activating TLR2 and inducing TNF-α. These data provide evidence that extraction methods may affect the biological activity of mushroom products; thus, further studies are warranted to investigate the structural differences between various mushroom products.

  5. Synthetic non-peptide low molecular weight agonists of the relaxin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Agoulnik, Alexander I; Agoulnik, Irina U; Hu, Xin; Marugan, Juan

    2017-05-01

    Relaxin is a small heterodimeric peptide hormone of the insulin/relaxin superfamily produced mainly in female and male reproductive organs. It has potent antifibrotic, vasodilatory and angiogenic effects and regulates the normal function of various physiological systems. Preclinical studies and recent clinical trials have shown the promise of recombinant relaxin as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of cardiovascular and fibrotic diseases. However, there are the universal drawbacks of peptide-based pharmacology that apply to relaxin: a short half-life in vivo requires its continuous delivery, and there are high costs of production, storage and treatment, as well as the possibility of immune responses. All these issues can be resolved by the development of low non-peptide MW agonists of the relaxin receptors which are stable, bioavailable, easily synthesized and specific. In this review, we describe the discovery and characterization of the first series of such compounds. The lead compound, ML290, binds to an allosteric site of the relaxin GPCR, RXFP1. ML290 shows high activity and efficacy, measured by cAMP response, in cells expressing endogenous or transfected RXFP1. Relaxin-like effects of ML290 were shown in various functional cellular assays in vitro. ML290 has excellent absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties and in vivo stability. The identified series of low MW agonists does not activate rodent RXFP1 receptors and thus, the production of a RXFP1 humanized mouse model is needed for preclinical studies. The future analysis and clinical perspectives of relaxin receptor agonists are discussed. This article is part of a themed section on Recent Progress in the Understanding of Relaxin Family Peptides and their Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.10/issuetoc. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Endomorphin-2: A Biased Agonist at the μ-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Guadalupe; Llorente, Javier; McPherson, Jamie; Cooke, Alex; Mundell, Stuart J.; McArdle, Craig A.; Rosethorne, Elizabeth M.; Charlton, Steven J.; Krasel, Cornelius; Bailey, Christopher P.; Henderson, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Previously we correlated the efficacy for G protein activation with that for arrestin recruitment for a number of agonists at the μ-opioid receptor (MOPr) stably expressed in HEK293 cells. We suggested that the endomorphins (endomorphin-1 and -2) might be biased toward arrestin recruitment. In the present study, we investigated this phenomenon in more detail for endomorphin-2, using endogenous MOPr in rat brain as well as MOPr stably expressed in HEK293 cells. For MOPr in neurons in brainstem locus ceruleus slices, the peptide agonists [d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and endomorphin-2 activated inwardly rectifying K+ current in a concentration-dependent manner. Analysis of these responses with the operational model of pharmacological agonism confirmed that endomorphin-2 had a much lower operational efficacy for G protein-mediated responses than did DAMGO at native MOPr in mature neurons. However, endomorphin-2 induced faster desensitization of the K+ current than did DAMGO. In addition, in HEK293 cells stably expressing MOPr, the ability of endomorphin-2 to induce phosphorylation of Ser375 in the COOH terminus of the receptor, to induce association of arrestin with the receptor, and to induce cell surface loss of receptors was much more efficient than would be predicted from its efficacy for G protein-mediated signaling. Together, these results indicate that endomorphin-2 is an arrestin-biased agonist at MOPr and the reason for this is likely to be the ability of endomorphin-2 to induce greater phosphorylation of MOPr than would be expected from its ability to activate MOPr and to induce activation of G proteins. PMID:22553358

  7. Endomorphin-2: a biased agonist at the μ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Guadalupe; Llorente, Javier; McPherson, Jamie; Cooke, Alex; Mundell, Stuart J; McArdle, Craig A; Rosethorne, Elizabeth M; Charlton, Steven J; Krasel, Cornelius; Bailey, Christopher P; Henderson, Graeme; Kelly, Eamonn

    2012-08-01

    Previously we correlated the efficacy for G protein activation with that for arrestin recruitment for a number of agonists at the μ-opioid receptor (MOPr) stably expressed in HEK293 cells. We suggested that the endomorphins (endomorphin-1 and -2) might be biased toward arrestin recruitment. In the present study, we investigated this phenomenon in more detail for endomorphin-2, using endogenous MOPr in rat brain as well as MOPr stably expressed in HEK293 cells. For MOPr in neurons in brainstem locus ceruleus slices, the peptide agonists [d-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and endomorphin-2 activated inwardly rectifying K(+) current in a concentration-dependent manner. Analysis of these responses with the operational model of pharmacological agonism confirmed that endomorphin-2 had a much lower operational efficacy for G protein-mediated responses than did DAMGO at native MOPr in mature neurons. However, endomorphin-2 induced faster desensitization of the K(+) current than did DAMGO. In addition, in HEK293 cells stably expressing MOPr, the ability of endomorphin-2 to induce phosphorylation of Ser375 in the COOH terminus of the receptor, to induce association of arrestin with the receptor, and to induce cell surface loss of receptors was much more efficient than would be predicted from its efficacy for G protein-mediated signaling. Together, these results indicate that endomorphin-2 is an arrestin-biased agonist at MOPr and the reason for this is likely to be the ability of endomorphin-2 to induce greater phosphorylation of MOPr than would be expected from its ability to activate MOPr and to induce activation of G proteins.

  8. Prospects for Creation of Cardioprotective and Antiarrhythmic Drugs Based on Opioid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Leonid N; Oeltgen, Peter R.; Naryzhnaya, Natalia V.; Pei, Jian‐Ming; Brown, Stephen A.; Lishmanov, Yury B.; Downey, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has now been demonstrated that the μ, δ1, δ2, and κ1 opioid receptor (OR) agonists represent the most promising group of opioids for the creation of drugs enhancing cardiac tolerance to the detrimental effects of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Opioids are able to prevent necrosis and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes during I/R and improve cardiac contractility in the reperfusion period. The OR agonists exert an infarct‐reducing effect with prophylactic administration and prevent reperfusion‐induced cardiomyocyte death when ischemic injury of heart has already occurred; that is, opioids can mimic preconditioning and postconditioning phenomena. Furthermore, opioids are also effective in preventing ischemia‐induced arrhythmias. PMID:27197922

  9. Transcriptomic and phenotypic profiling in developing zebrafish exposed to thyroid hormone receptor agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, Derik E.; Noyes, Pamela D.; Waters, Katrina M.

    There is a need to develop novel, high-throughput screening and prioritization methods to identify chemicals with adverse estrogen, androgen, and thyroid activity to protect human health and the environment and is of interest to the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. The current aim is to explore the utility of zebrafish as a testing paradigm to classify endocrine activity using phenotypically anchored transcriptome profiling. Transcriptome analysis was conducted on embryos exposed to 25 estrogen-, androgen-, or thyroid-active chemicals at a concentration that elicited adverse malformations or mortality at 120 hours post-fertilization in 80% of the animals exposed. Analysis of the top 1000more » significant differentially expressed transcripts across all treatments identified a unique transcriptional and phenotypic profile for thyroid hormone receptor agonists, which can be used as a biomarker screen for potential thyroid hormone agonists.« less

  10. Misoprostol, an anti-ulcer agent and PGE2 receptor agonist, protects against cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Liang, Xibin; Wang, Qian; Breyer, Richard M; McCullough, Louise; Andreasson, Katrin

    2008-06-20

    Induction of COX-2 activity in cerebral ischemia results in increased neuronal injury and infarct size. Recent studies investigating neurotoxic mechanisms of COX-2 demonstrate both toxic and paradoxically protective effects of downstream prostaglandin receptor signaling pathways. We tested whether misoprostol, a PGE(2) receptor agonist that is utilized clinically as an anti-ulcer agent and signals through the protective PGE(2) EP2, EP3, and EP4 receptors, would reduce brain injury in the murine middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO-RP) model. Administration of misoprostol, at the time of MCAO or 2h after MCAO, resulted in significant rescue of infarct volume at 24 and 72h. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated dynamic regulation of the EP2 and EP4 receptors during reperfusion in neurons and endothelial cells of cerebral cortex and striatum, with limited expression of EP3 receptor. EP3-/- mice had no significant changes in infarct volume compared to control littermates. Moreover, administration of misoprostol to EP3+/+ and EP3-/- mice showed similar levels of infarct rescue, indicating that misoprostol protection was not mediated through the EP3 receptor. Taken together, these findings suggest a novel function for misoprostol as a protective agent in cerebral ischemia acting via the PGE(2) EP2 and/or EP4 receptors.

  11. Effects of topical sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 receptor agonist on corneal allograft in mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liang; Liu, Yong; Wang, Liqiang; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Yifei

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the antirejection effects of topical selective sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 receptor (S1P1) agonist and cyclosporine A (CsA) on the acceptance of a transplanted, allogeneic cornea graft in a murine animal model. Fifty-six BALB/c mice were randomly divided into 4 groups. All the mice received corneal grafts from 28 C57BL/6 donors. Experimental recipients were treated with 0.25%, 0.5% S1P1 agonist suspension eye drops or 1% CsA eye drops 4 times a day after the corneal graft was performed. Controls received no treatment. The corneal grafts were imaged and evaluated with clinical scoring. The excised corneal sections 14 days after transplantation were stained using hematoxylin-eosin for histopathological evaluation. CD86+ and MHC-II+ dendritic cells in corneal samples were identified by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of mRNA in the cornea was evaluated using real-time quantitative PCR for interleukin-2, interferon-gamma, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. Corneal graft survival was prolonged by treatment with 0.5% S1P1 agonist and 1% CsA (P < 0.01, respectively) when compared with that in the control in clinical scoring. In addition, topical application of 0.5% S1P1 increased the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 mRNA expression of the corneal grafts. There were significant differences observed with 0.5% S1P1 and agonist 1% CsA (P < 0.01, respectively) when compared with the values of the control group in histology scoring. Topical 0.5% S1P1 agonist is as effective as 1% CsA, and both can effectively prolong the survival of corneal allografts in mice.

  12. 2-Arachidonyl glyceryl ether, an endogenous agonist of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hanuš, Lumír; Abu-Lafi, Saleh; Fride, Ester; Breuer, Aviva; Vogel, Zvi; Shalev, Deborah E.; Kustanovich, Irina; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2001-01-01

    Two types of endogenous cannabinoid-receptor agonists have been identified thus far. They are the ethanolamides of polyunsaturated fatty acids—arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide) is the best known compound in the amide series—and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol, the only known endocannabinoid in the ester series. We report now an example of a third, ether-type endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonyl glyceryl ether (noladin ether), isolated from porcine brain. The structure of noladin ether was determined by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and was confirmed by comparison with a synthetic sample. It binds to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (Ki = 21.2 ± 0.5 nM) and causes sedation, hypothermia, intestinal immobility, and mild antinociception in mice. It binds weakly to the CB2 receptor (Ki > 3 μM). PMID:11259648

  13. Revealing a steroid receptor ligand as a unique PPAR[gamma] agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shengchen; Han, Ying; Shi, Yuzhe

    2012-06-28

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and is a molecular target for anti-diabetic drugs. We report here the identification of a steroid receptor ligand, RU-486, as an unexpected PPAR{gamma} agonist, thereby uncovering a novel signaling route for this steroid drug. Similar to rosiglitazone, RU-486 modulates the expression of key PPAR{gamma} target genes and promotes adipocyte differentiation, but with a lower adipogenic activity. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis for a unique binding mode for RU-486 in the PPAR{gamma} ligand-binding pocket with distinctive properties and epitopes, providing the molecular mechanisms for the discrimination ofmore » RU-486 from thiazolidinediones (TZDs) drugs. Our findings together indicate that steroid compounds may represent an alternative approach for designing non-TZD PPAR{gamma} ligands in the treatment of insulin resistance.« less

  14. Differential activation of G-proteins by μ-opioid receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Saidak, Zuzana; Blake-Palmer, Katherine; Hay, Debbie L; Northup, John K; Glass, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the ability of the activated μ-opioid receptor (MOR) to differentiate between myristoylated Gαi1 and GαoA type Gα proteins, and the maximal activity of a range of synthetic and endogenous agonists to activate each Gα protein. Membranes from HEK293 cells stably expressing transfected MOR were chaotrope extracted to denature endogenous G-proteins and reconstituted with specific purified G-proteins. The Gα subunits were generated in bacteria and were demonstrated to be recognised equivalently to bovine brain purified Gα protein by CB1 cannabinoid receptors. The ability of agonists to catalyse the MOR-dependent GDP/[35S]GTPγS exchange was then compared for Gαi1 and GαoA. Activation of MOR by DAMGO produced a high-affinity saturable interaction for GαoA (Km=20±1 nM) but a low-affinity interaction with Gαi1 (Km=116±12 nM). DAMGO, met-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalin displayed maximal Gα activation among the agonists evaluated. Endomorphins 1 and 2, methadone and β-endorphin activated both Gα to more than 75% of the maximal response, whereas fentanyl partially activated both G-proteins. Buprenorphine and morphine demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the maximal activities between Gαi1 and GαoA. Interestingly, DAMGO, morphine, endomorphins 1 and 2, displayed significant differences in the potencies for the activation of the two Gα. Differences in maximal activity and potency, for Gαi1 versus GαoA, are both indicative of agonist selective activation of G-proteins in response to MOR activation. These findings may provide a starting point for the design of drugs that demonstrate greater selectivity between these two G-proteins and therefore produce a more limited range of effects. PMID:16415903

  15. Ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) agonists show potential as interventive agents during aging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roy G; Sun, Yuxiang; Jiang, Hong; Albarran-Zeckler, Rosie; Timchenko, Nikolai

    2007-11-01

    Administration of an orally active agonist (MK-0677) of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a) to elderly subjects restored the amplitude of endogenous episodic growth hormone (GH) release to that of young adults. Functional benefits include increased lean mass and bone density and modest improvements in strength. In old mice, a similar agonist partially restored function to the thymus and reduced tumor cell growth and metastasis. Treatment of old mice with the endogenous GHS-R1a agonist ghrelin restored a young liver phenotype. The mechanism involves inhibition of cyclin D3:cdk4/cdk6 activity and increased protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) activity in liver nuclei, which stabilizes the dephosphorylated form of the transcription factor C/EBPalpha preventing the age-dependent formation of the C/EBPalpha-Rb-E2F4-Brm nuclear complex. By inhibiting formation of this complex, repression of E2F target genes is de-repressed and C/EBPalpha regulated expression of Pepck, a regulator of gluconeogenesis, is normalized, thereby restoring a young liver phenotype. In the brain, aging is associated with decline in dopamine function. We investigated the potential neuromodulatory role of GHS-R1a on dopamine action. Neurons were identified in the hippocampus, cortex, substantia nigra, and ventral tegmental areas that coexpressed GHS-R1a and dopamine receptor subtype-1 (D1R). Cell culture studies showed that, in the presence of ghrelin and dopamine, GHS-R and D1R form heterodimers, which modified G-protein signal transduction resulting in amplification of dopamine signaling. We speculate that aging is associated with deficient endogenous ghrelin signaling that can be rescued by intervention with GHS-R1a agonists to improve quality of life and maintain independence.

  16. Receptor-selective, peptidase-resistant agonists at neurokinin NK-1 and NK-2 receptors: new tools for investigating neurokinin function.

    PubMed

    Hagan, R M; Ireland, S J; Jordan, C C; Beresford, I J; Deal, M J; Ward, P

    1991-06-01

    The pharmacological profiles of two novel neurokinin agonists have been investigated. delta Ava[L-Pro9,N-MeLeu10]SP(7-11) (GR73632) and [Lys3,Gly8-R-gamma-lactam-Leu9] NKA(3-10) (GR64349) are potent and selective agonists at NK-1 and NK-2 receptors respectively. In the guinea-pig isolated trachea preparation, contractions induced by these agonists were largely unaffected by inclusion of peptidase inhibitors in the bathing medium, indicating that these agonists are resistant to metabolism by peptidases. In the anaesthetised guinea-pig, both agonists were more potent bronchoconstrictor agents than either NKA or the SP analogue, SP methylester. In the anaesthetised rat, the NK-1 agonist, GR73632 was more potent than SP, NKA or NKB at causing the histamine-independent extravasation of plasma proteins into the skin after intradermal administration. The NK-2 agonist, GR64349 and the NK-3 agonist, senktide were without significant effect in this model. These agonists are useful tools for characterizing neurokinin receptor-mediated actions both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Identification of Buctopamine and Mebuctopamine, a β2 Receptor Agonist and Its Metabolite, in Swine Hair and Feed Additives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Heng; Yang, Chia-Ying; Cheng, Chih Wen; Lin, Yi-Ying; Kuo, Su Lien; Hsin, Ling-Wei

    2017-05-17

    4-[2-(t-Butylamino)-1-hydroxyethyl]phenol (buctopamine, 4), a new β 2 receptor agonist (β 2 -agonist), was found to be an adulterant in feed additives for swine in Taiwan, where using β 2 -agonists in food-production animals is prohibited. Buctopamine and its metabolite, 4-[2-(t-butylamino)-1-hydroxyethyl]-2-methoxyphenol (mebuctopamine, 2), were detected in swine hair specimens. Authentic compounds 2 and 4 were synthesized with 98.6% and 97.7% purity, respectively, as reference standards for analysis, and both compounds were more hydrophilic than ractopamine and clenbuterol. In a preliminary pharmacological evaluation, compounds 2 and 4 exhibited moderate human β 2 receptor binding affinity and did not show significant affinities for the human α 1 , α 2 , β 1 , and β 3 receptors. After addition of compounds 2-4 into the β 2 -agonist library, a multiresidue analysis of 26 β 2 -agonists by using triple quadrupole LC/MS/MS for routine screening conducted by regulatory authorities was established, in which the common limits of quantification for the 26 β 2 -agonists in swine feed and hair are 10 and 25 ng/g, respectively. In addition, the illegal use of buctopamine (4) has been effectively prevented. The results of this study are also useful for controlling the illegal use of new β 2 -agonists in food-production animals.

  18. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Dissection of Seven-transmembrane Receptor Signaling Using Full and Biased Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Gitte L.; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Lyngsø, Christina; Sarwar, Uzma; Bøgebo, Rikke; Sheikh, Søren P.; Gammeltoft, Steen; Olsen, Jesper V.; Hansen, Jakob L.

    2010-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) signal through the well described heterotrimeric G proteins but can also activate G protein-independent signaling pathways of which the impact and complexity are less understood. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a prototypical 7TMR and an important drug target in cardiovascular diseases. “Biased agonists” with intrinsic “functional selectivity” that simultaneously blocks Gαq protein activity and activates G protein-independent pathways of the AT1R confer important perspectives in treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we performed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis of the AT1R signaling network. We analyzed ligand-stimulated SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) cells by high resolution (LTQ-Orbitrap) MS and compared the phosphoproteomes of the AT1R agonist angiotensin II and the biased agonist [Sar1,Ile4,Ile8]angiotensin II (SII angiotensin II), which only activates the Gαq protein-independent signaling. We quantified more than 10,000 phosphorylation sites of which 1183 were regulated by angiotensin II or its analogue SII angiotensin II. 36% of the AT1R-regulated phosphorylations were regulated by SII angiotensin II. Analysis of phosphorylation site patterns showed a striking distinction between protein kinases activated by Gαq protein-dependent and -independent mechanisms, and we now place protein kinase D as a key protein involved in both Gαq-dependent and -independent AT1R signaling. This study provides substantial novel insight into angiotensin II signal transduction and is the first study dissecting the differences between a full agonist and a biased agonist from a 7TMR on a systems-wide scale. Importantly, it reveals a previously unappreciated diversity and quantity of Gαq protein-independent signaling and uncovers novel signaling pathways. We foresee that the amount and diversity of G protein-independent signaling may be more pronounced than

  19. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-IL; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y.L.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ -binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism. PMID:26348907

  20. Unsaturated free fatty acids increase benzodiazepine receptor agonist binding depending on the subunit composition of the GABAA receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Witt, M R; Westh-Hansen, S E; Rasmussen, P B; Hastrup, S; Nielsen, M

    1996-11-01

    It has been shown previously that unsaturated free fatty acids (FFAs) strongly enhance the binding of agonist benzodiazepine receptor ligands and GABAA receptor ligands in the CNS in vitro. To investigate the selectivity of this effect, recombinant human GABAA/benzodiazepine receptor complexes formed by different subunit compositions (alpha x beta y gamma 2, x = 1, 2, 3, and 5; y = 1, 2, and 3) were expressed using the baculovirus-transfected Sf9 insect cell system. At 10(-4) M, unsaturated FFAs, particularly arachidonic (20:4) and docosahexaenoic (22:6) acids, strongly stimulated (> 200% of control values) the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam ([3H]FNM) to the alpha 3 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination in whole cell preparations. No effect or small increases in levels of unsaturated FFAs on [3H]FNM binding to alpha 1 beta x gamma 2 and alpha 2 beta x gamma 2 receptor combinations were observed, and weak effects (130% of control values) were detected using the alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination. The saturated FFAs, stearic and palmitic acids, were without effect on [3H]FNM binding to any combination of receptor complexes. The hydroxylated unsaturated FFAs, ricinoleic and ricinelaidic acids, were shown to decrease the binding of [3H]FNM only if an alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination was used. Given the heterogeneity of the GABAA/ benzodiazepine receptor subunit distribution in the CNS, the effects of FFAs on the benzodiazepine receptor can be assumed to vary at both cellular and regional levels.

  1. The effect of various opiate receptor agonists on the seizure threshold in the rat. Is dynorphin an endogenous anticonvulsant?

    PubMed

    Przewłocka, B; Stala, L; Lasoń, W; Przewłocki, R

    1983-01-01

    The effects of various opiate receptor agonists on the seizure threshold after an intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazol were investigated in rats. The mu- and epsilon-receptor agonists, morphine (20-40 micrograms) and beta-endorphin (5-10 micrograms) show proconvulsant properties towards clonic and tonic seizures. The delta-receptor agonist (D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin, DADL 5-40 micrograms) and alpha-neoendorphin (20-40 micrograms) show pro- and anticonvulsant properties towards clonic and tonic seizures, respectively. Anticonvulsant properties of DADL are possibly due to its action on the spinal cord, since after the intrathecal injection this effect is still observed. Similarities between DADL and alpha-neoendorphin suggest that they may act through the same receptor. The kappa-receptor agonist dynorphin A (5-20 micrograms) and its degradation-resistant analogue D-Arg-dynorphin1-13 (10 micrograms) show significant anticonvulsant properties. Our present results suggest that the kappa-receptor agonist dynorphin may act physiologically as an endogenous anticonvulsant, in contrast to other opioid peptides.

  2. Design of glucagon-like Peptide-1 receptor agonist for diabetes mellitus from traditional chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hsin-Chieh; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a promising target for diabetes mellitus (DM) therapy and reduces the occurrence of diabetes due to obesity. However, GLP-1 will be hydrolyzed soon by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). We tried to design small molecular drugs for GLP-1 receptor agonist from the world's largest traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) Database@Taiwan. According to docking results of virtual screening, we selected 2 TCM compounds, wenyujinoside and 28-deglucosylchikusetsusaponin IV, for further molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. GLP-1 was assigned as the control compound. Based on the results of root mean square deviation (RMSD), solvent accessible surface (SAS), mean square deviation (MSD), Gyrate, total energy, root mean square fluctuation (RMSF), matrices of smallest distance of residues, database of secondary structure assignment (DSSP), cluster analysis, and distance of H-bond, we concluded that all the 3 compounds could bind and activate GLP-1 receptor by computational simulation. Wenyujinoside and 28-deglucosylchikusetsusaponin IV were the TCM compounds that could be GLP-1 receptor agonists.

  3. Design of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist for Diabetes Mellitus from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Chieh; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a promising target for diabetes mellitus (DM) therapy and reduces the occurrence of diabetes due to obesity. However, GLP-1 will be hydrolyzed soon by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). We tried to design small molecular drugs for GLP-1 receptor agonist from the world's largest traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) Database@Taiwan. According to docking results of virtual screening, we selected 2 TCM compounds, wenyujinoside and 28-deglucosylchikusetsusaponin IV, for further molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. GLP-1 was assigned as the control compound. Based on the results of root mean square deviation (RMSD), solvent accessible surface (SAS), mean square deviation (MSD), Gyrate, total energy, root mean square fluctuation (RMSF), matrices of smallest distance of residues, database of secondary structure assignment (DSSP), cluster analysis, and distance of H-bond, we concluded that all the 3 compounds could bind and activate GLP-1 receptor by computational simulation. Wenyujinoside and 28-deglucosylchikusetsusaponin IV were the TCM compounds that could be GLP-1 receptor agonists. PMID:24891870

  4. Unbinding Pathways of an Agonist and an Antagonist from the 5-HT3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A. J.; Chau, P.-L.; Chan, S. L.; Lummis, S. C. R.

    2006-01-01

    The binding sites of 5-HT3 and other Cys-loop receptors have been extensively studied, but there are no data on the entry and exit routes of ligands for these sites. Here we have used molecular dynamics simulations to predict the pathway for agonists and antagonists exiting from the 5-HT3 receptor binding site. The data suggest that the unbinding pathway follows a tunnel at the interface of two subunits, which is ∼8 Å long and terminates ∼20 Å above the membrane. The exit routes for an agonist (5-HT) and an antagonist (granisetron) were similar, with trajectories toward the membrane and outward from the ligand binding site. 5-HT appears to form many hydrogen bonds with residues in the unbinding pathway, and experiments show that mutating these residues significantly affects function. The location of the pathway is also supported by docking studies of granisetron, which show a potential binding site for granisetron on the unbinding route. We propose that leaving the binding pocket along this tunnel places the ligands close to the membrane and prevents their immediate reentry into the binding pocket. We anticipate similar exit pathways for other members of the Cys-loop receptor family. PMID:16387779

  5. Diindolylmethane Derivatives: Potent Agonists of the Immunostimulatory Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR84.

    PubMed

    Pillaiyar, Thanigaimalai; Köse, Meryem; Sylvester, Katharina; Weighardt, Heike; Thimm, Dominik; Borges, Gleice; Förster, Irmgard; von Kügelgen, Ivar; Müller, Christa E

    2017-05-11

    The G i protein-coupled receptor GPR84, which is activated by (hydroxy)fatty acids, is highly expressed on immune cells. Recently, 3,3'-diindolylmethane was identified as a heterocyclic, nonlipid-like GPR84 agonist. We synthesized a broad range of diindolylmethane derivatives by condensation of indoles with formaldehyde in water under microwave irradiation. The products were evaluated at the human GPR84 in cAMP and β-arrestin assays. Structure-activity relationships (SARs) were steep. 3,3'-Diindolylmethanes bearing small lipophilic residues at the 5- and/or 7-position of the indole rings displayed the highest activity in cAMP assays, the most potent agonists being di(5-fluoro-1H-indole-3-yl)methane (38, PSB-15160, EC 50 80.0 nM) and di(5,7-difluoro-1H-indole-3-yl)methane (57, PSB-16671, EC 50 41.3 nM). In β-arrestin assays, SARs were different, indicating biased agonism. The new compounds were selective versus related fatty acid receptors and the arylhydrocarbon receptor. Selected compounds were further investigated and found to display an ago-allosteric mechanism of action and increased stability in comparison to the lead structure.

  6. The rabbit iris sphincter contains NK1 and NK3 but not NK2 receptors: a study with selective agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z Y; Håkanson, R

    1993-04-08

    Tachykinin analogues, claimed to be selective NK1, NK2 and NK3 receptor agonists, contracted the isolated rabbit iris sphincter muscle in a concentration-dependent manner. The contractions were not modified by the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (10(-5) M of each). The pD2 values for (Sar9,Met(O2)11)SP (NK1 receptor agonist), (Nle10)NKA(4-10) (NK2 receptor agonist) and (MePhe7)NKB (NK3 receptor agonist) were 8.3, 6.1 and 8.2, respectively. (Sar9,Met(O2)11)SP was the most efficacious of the three agonists. The results are compatible with the presence of NK1 and NK3 receptors. The low pD2 value for the NK2 agonist may reflect a lack of NK2 receptors and interaction of the NK2 agonist with NK1 receptors. The contraction caused by the NK1 receptor agonist was inhibited competitively by the highly selective NK1 receptor antagonist (+/-) CP-96,345; the pA2 value was 5.5. Also the contraction caused by the NK2 receptor agonist was inhibited competitively by (+/-) CP-96,345 with a pA2 value of 5.7, supporting the view that the two agonists (Sar9,Met(O2)11)SP and (Nle10)NKA(4-10) interact with the same receptor. The selective NK2 receptor antagonist actinomycin D did not affect the contraction caused by the NK2 receptor agonist. We conclude that the rabbit iris sphincter muscle contains NK1 and probably NK3 receptors. We obtained no evidence for the presence of NK2 receptors.

  7. Hyodeoxycholic acid derivatives as liver X receptor α and G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Marino, Simona; Carino, Adriana; Masullo, Dario; Finamore, Claudia; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Catalanotti, Bruno; Novellino, Ettore; Limongelli, Vittorio; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Bile acids are extensively investigated for their potential in the treatment of human disorders. The liver X receptors (LXRs), activated by oxysterols and by a secondary bile acid named hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA), have been found essential in the regulation of lipid homeostasis in mammals. Unfortunately, LXRα activates lipogenic enzymes causing accumulation of lipid in the liver. In addition to LXRs, HDCA has been also shown to function as ligand for GPBAR1, a G protein coupled receptor for secondary bile acids whose activation represents a promising approach to liver steatosis. In the present study, we report a library of HDCA derivatives endowed with modulatory activity on the two receptors. The lead optimization of HDCA moiety was rationally driven by the structural information on the binding site of the two targets and results from pharmacological characterization allowed the identification of hyodeoxycholane derivatives with selective agonistic activity toward LXRα and GPBAR1 and notably to the identification of the first example of potent dual LXRα/GPBAR1 agonists. The new chemical entities might hold utility in the treatment of dyslipidemic disorders.

  8. The pharmacology of Ro 64-6198, a systemically active, nonpeptide NOP receptor (opiate receptor-like 1, ORL-1) agonist with diverse preclinical therapeutic activity.

    PubMed

    Shoblock, James R

    2007-01-01

    The NOP receptor (formerly referred to as opiate receptor-like 1, ORL-1, LC132, OP(4), or NOP(1)) is a G protein-coupled receptor that shares high homology to the classic opioid MOP, DOP, and KOP (mu, delta, and kappa, respectively) receptors and was first cloned in 1994 by several groups. The NOP receptor remained an orphan receptor until 1995, when the endogenous neuropeptide agonist, known as nociceptin or orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) was isolated. Five years later, a group at Hoffmann-La Roche reported on the selective, nonpeptide NOP agonist Ro 64-6198, which became the most extensively published nonpeptide NOP agonist and a valuable pharmacological tool in determining the potential of the NOP receptor as a therapeutic target. Ro 64-6198 is systemically active and achieves high brain penetration. It has subnanomolar affinity for the NOP receptor and is at least 100 times more selective for the NOP receptor over the classic opioid receptors. Ro 64-6198 ranges from partial to full agonist, depending on the assay. Preclinical data indicate that Ro 64-6198 may have broad clinical uses, such as in treating stress and anxiety, addiction, neuropathic pain, cough, and anorexia. This review summarizes the pharmacology and preclinical data of Ro 64-6198.

  9. 5-HT4 receptor agonists enhance both cholinergic and nitrergic activities in human isolated colon circular muscle.

    PubMed

    Cellek, S; John, A K; Thangiah, R; Dass, N B; Bassil, A K; Jarvie, E M; Lalude, O; Vivekanandan, S; Sanger, G J

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated mixed inhibitory and facilitatory effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine-4 (5-HT(4)) receptor agonists on electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced responses in human isolated colon. Here we report three types of responses to EFS in human isolated colon circular muscle: monophasic cholinergic contraction during EFS, biphasic response (nitrergic relaxation during EFS followed by cholinergic contraction after termination of EFS) and triphasic response (cholinergic contraction followed by nitrergic relaxation during EFS and a tachykininergic contraction after EFS). The effects of two 5-HT(4) receptor agonists, prucalopride and tegaserod were then investigated on monophasic responses only. Each compound inhibited contractions during EFS in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) however, prucalopride and tegaserod enhanced the contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. In strips where the tone was elevated with substance-P and treated with scopolamine, EFS-induced relaxations were enhanced by the two agonists. The above observed effects by the two agonists were abolished by 5-HT(4) receptor antagonist SB-204070. The two agonists did not alter the tone raised by substance-P in the presence of scopolamine and l-NAME and did not affect carbachol-induced contractions in the presence of tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that in the circular muscle of human colon, 5-HT(4) receptor agonists simultaneously facilitate the activity of neurones which release the inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters, nitric oxide and acetylcholine respectively.

  10. Variable Dependence of Signaling Output on Agonist Occupancy of Ste2p, a G Protein-coupled Receptor in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Rajashri; Connelly, Sara M; Naider, Fred; Dumont, Mark E

    2016-11-11

    We report here on the relationship between ligand binding and signaling responses in the yeast pheromone response pathway, a well characterized G protein-coupled receptor system. Responses to agonist (α-factor) by cells expressing widely varying numbers of receptors depend primarily on fractional occupancy, not the absolute number of agonist-bound receptors. Furthermore, the concentration of competitive antagonist required to inhibit α-factor-dependent signaling is more than 10-fold higher than predicted based on the known ligand affinities. Thus, responses to a particular number of agonist-bound receptors can vary greatly, depending on whether there are unoccupied or antagonist-bound receptors present on the same cell surface. This behavior does not appear to be due to pre-coupling of receptors to G protein or to the Sst2p regulator of G protein signaling. The results are consistent with a signaling response that is determined by the integration of positive signals from agonist-occupied receptors and inhibitory signals from unoccupied receptors, where the inhibitory signals can be diminished by antagonist binding. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Relaxant Effects of the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator, Bazedoxifene, and Estrogen Receptor Agonists in Isolated Rabbit Basilar Artery.

    PubMed

    Castelló-Ruiz, María; Salom, Juan B; Fernández-Musoles, Ricardo; Burguete, María C; López-Morales, Mikahela A; Arduini, Alessandro; Jover-Mengual, Teresa; Hervás, David; Torregrosa, Germán; Alborch, Enrique

    2016-10-01

    We have previously shown that the selective estrogen receptor modulator, bazedoxifene, improves the consequences of ischemic stroke. Now we aimed to characterize the effects and mechanisms of action of bazedoxifene in cerebral arteries. Male rabbit isolated basilar arteries were used for isometric tension recording and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Bazedoxifene relaxed cerebral arteries, as 17-β-estradiol, 4,4',4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol [estrogen receptor (ER) α agonist], and G1 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER) agonist] did it (4,4',4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol > bazedoxifene = G1 > 17-β-estradiol). 2,3-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (ERβ agonist) had no effect. Expression profile of genes encoding for ERα (ESR1), ERβ (ESR2), and GPER was GPER > ESR1 > ESR2. As to the endothelial mechanisms, endothelium removal, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, and indomethacin, did not modify the relaxant responses to bazedoxifene. As to the K channels, both a high-K medium and the Kv blocker, 4-aminopyridine, inhibited the bazedoxifene-induced relaxations, whereas tetraethylammonium (nonselective K channel blocker), glibenclamide (selective KATP blocker) or iberiotoxin (selective KCa blocker) were without effect. Bazedoxifene also inhibited both Ca- and Bay K8644-elicited contractions. Therefore, bazedoxifene induces endothelium-independent relaxations of cerebral arteries through (1) activation of GPER and ERα receptors; (2) increase of K conductance through Kv channels; and (3) inhibition of Ca entry through L-type Ca channels. Such a profile is compatible with the beneficial effects of estrogenic compounds (eg, SERMs) on vascular function and, specifically, that concerning the brain. Therefore, bazedoxifene could be useful in the treatment of cerebral disorders in which the cerebrovascular function is compromised (eg, stroke).

  12. The Thrombopoietin Receptor: Structural Basis of Traffic and Activation by Ligand, Mutations, Agonists, and Mutated Calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Leila N; Defour, Jean-Philippe; Pecquet, Christian; Constantinescu, Stefan N

    2017-01-01

    A well-functioning hematopoietic system requires a certain robustness and flexibility to maintain appropriate quantities of functional mature blood cells, such as red blood cells and platelets. This review focuses on the cytokine receptor that plays a significant role in thrombopoiesis: the receptor for thrombopoietin (TPO-R; also known as MPL). Here, we survey the work to date to understand how this receptor functions at a molecular level throughout its lifecycle, from traffic to the cell surface, dimerization and binding cognate cytokine via its extracellular domain, through to its subsequent activation of associated Janus kinases and initiation of downstream signaling pathways, as well as the regulation of these processes. Atomic level resolution structures of TPO-R have remained elusive. The identification of disease-causing mutations in the receptor has, however, offered some insight into structure and function relationships, as has artificial means of receptor activation, through TPO mimetics, transmembrane-targeting receptor agonists, and engineering in dimerization domains. More recently, a novel activation mechanism was identified whereby mutated forms of calreticulin form complexes with TPO-R via its extracellular N-glycosylated domain. Such complexes traffic pathologically in the cell and persistently activate JAK2, downstream signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs), and other pathways. This pathologic TPO-R activation is associated with a large fraction of human myeloproliferative neoplasms.

  13. Electrophysiologic effects of a novel selective adenosine A1 agonist (CVT-510) on atrioventricular nodal conduction in humans.

    PubMed

    Lerman, B B; Ellenbogen, K A; Kadish, A; Platia, E; Stein, K M; Markowitz, S M; Mittal, S; Slotwiner, D J; Scheiner, M; Iwai, S; Belardinelli, L; Jerling, M; Shreeniwas, R; Wolff, A A

    2001-07-01

    CVT-510, N-(3(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl)-6-aminopurine riboside, is a selective A(1)-adenosine receptor agonist with potential potent antiarrhythmic effects in tachycardias involving the atrioventricular (AV) node. This study, the first in humans, was designed to determine the effects of CVT-510 on AV nodal conduction and hemodynamics. Patients in sinus rhythm with normal AV nodal function at electrophysiologic study (n = 32) received a single intravenous bolus of CVT-510. AH and HV intervals were measured during sinus rhythm and during atrial pacing at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the bolus. Increasing doses of CVT-510 (0.3 to 10 microg/kg) caused a dose-dependent increase in the AH interval. At 1 minute, a dose of 10 microg/kg increased the AH interval during sinus rhythm from 93 +/- 23 msec to 114 +/- 37 msec, p = 0.01 and from 114 +/- 31 msec to 146 +/- 44 msec during atrial pacing at 600 msec, p = 0.003). The AH interval returned to baseline by 20 minutes. CVT-510 at doses of 0.3 to 10 microg/kg had no effect on sinus rate, HV interval, or systemic blood pressure, and was not associated with serious adverse effects. At doses of 15 and 30 microg/kg, CVT-510 produced transient second/third degree AV heart block in all four patients treated. One of these patients also had a prolonged sedative effect that was reversed with aminophylline. CVT-510 promptly prolongs AV nodal conduction and does not affect sinus rate or blood pressure. Selective stimulation of the A(1)-adenosine receptor by CVT-510 may be useful for immediate control of heart rate in atrial fibrillation/flutter and to convert paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia to sinus rhythm, while avoiding vasodilatation mediated by the A(2)-adenosine receptor, as well as the vasodepressor and negative inotropic effects associated with beta-adrenergic receptor blockade and/or calcium channel blockers.

  14. The Melatonin Receptor Agonist Ramelteon Effectively Treats Insomnia and Behavioral Symptoms in Autistic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including autistic disorder, frequently suffer from comorbid sleep problems. An altered melatonin rhythm is considered to underlie the impairment in sleep onset and maintenance in ASD. We report three cases with autistic disorder in whom nocturnal symptoms improved with ramelteon, a selective melatonin receptor agonist. Insomnia and behavior, assessed using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, improved in two cases with 2 mg ramelteon and in the third case with 8 mg ramelteon. Our findings demonstrate that ramelteon is effective not only for insomnia, but for behavioral problems as well, in patients with autistic disorder. PMID:24955274

  15. The melatonin receptor agonist ramelteon effectively treats insomnia and behavioral symptoms in autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Kentaro; Horiuchi, Fumie; Oka, Yasunori; Ueno, Shu-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including autistic disorder, frequently suffer from comorbid sleep problems. An altered melatonin rhythm is considered to underlie the impairment in sleep onset and maintenance in ASD. We report three cases with autistic disorder in whom nocturnal symptoms improved with ramelteon, a selective melatonin receptor agonist. Insomnia and behavior, assessed using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, improved in two cases with 2 mg ramelteon and in the third case with 8 mg ramelteon. Our findings demonstrate that ramelteon is effective not only for insomnia, but for behavioral problems as well, in patients with autistic disorder.

  16. SAR of α7 nicotinic receptor agonists derived from tilorone: exploration of a novel nicotinic pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Schrimpf, Michael R; Sippy, Kevin B; Briggs, Clark A; Anderson, David J; Li, Tao; Ji, Jianguo; Frost, Jennifer M; Surowy, Carol S; Bunnelle, William H; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Meyer, Michael D

    2012-02-15

    The well-known interferon-inducer tilorone was found to possess potent affinity for the agonist site of the α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor (K(i)=56 nM). SAR investigations determined that both basic sidechains are essential for potent activity, however active monosubstituted derivatives can also be prepared if the flexible sidechains are replaced with conformationally rigidified cyclic amines. Analogs in which the fluorenone core is replaced with either dibenzothiophene-5,5-dioxide or xanthenone also retain potent activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist on social discrimination and contextual fear in amygdala and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2011-04-01

    We examined whether the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 5 µg/side) microinjected into the hippocampus or the amygdala would differentially affect memory processes in a neutral vs. an aversive task. In the aversive contextual fear task, WIN into the basolateral amygdala impaired fear acquisition/consolidation, but not retrieval. In the ventral subiculum (vSub), WIN impaired fear retrieval. In the neutral social discrimination task, WIN into the vSub impaired both acquisition/consolidation and retrieval, whereas in the medial amygdala WIN impaired acquisition. The results suggest that cannabinoid signaling differentially affects memory in a task-, region-, and memory stage-dependent manner.

  18. Neuritogenic and neuroprotective properties of peptide agonists of the fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Shizhong; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2010-05-26

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) interact with their cognate ligands, FGFs, and with a number of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), such as the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), mediating a wide range of events during the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Determination of protein structure, in silico modeling and biological studies have recently resulted in the identification of FGFR binding peptides derived from various FGFs and NCAM mimicking the effects of these molecules with regard to their neuritogenic and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on recently developed functional peptide agonists of FGFR with possible therapeutic potential.

  19. Antidiuretic effects of a nonpeptide vasopressin V(2)-receptor agonist, OPC-51803, administered orally to rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Hirano, T; Tsujimae, K; Aoyama, M; Kondo, K; Yamamura, Y; Mori, T; Tominaga, M

    2000-12-01

    OPC-51803 is the first nonpeptide vasopressin (AVP) V(2)-receptor-selective agonist. Its pharmacological profile, including antidiuretic action and receptor binding, was characterized using conscious Brattleboro rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus and Sprague-Dawley rats. In membrane preparations from the liver and kidney, OPC-51803 displaced the [(3)H]AVP binding to V(2)-receptors (K(i) = 49.8 +/- 8.1 nM) more greatly than that to V(1a)-receptors (K(i) = 1061 +/- 60 nM), showing a 21 times higher affinity for V(2)-receptors. At single oral doses of 0.003 to 0.3 mg/kg in female Brattleboro rats, OPC-51803 decreased urine volume (from 10.8 +/- 1.1 to 0.5 +/- 0.2 ml during 0-2 h postdosing) and increased urinary osmolality (from 114 +/- 9 to 432 +/- 114 mOsm/kg) in a dose-dependent manner. During the period of 4-week treatment with OPC-51803, significant and constant antidiuresis was observed. In male Sprague-Dawley rats with normal plasma AVP levels, OPC-51803 at 0.03 to 0.3 mg/kg also produced a dose-dependent antidiuretic action (urine volume: from 2.6 +/- 0.6 to 1.1 +/- 0.2 ml at 0-4 h postdosing). Few changes in urinary parameters, serum parameters, or plasma hormone levels were observed. OPC-51803 did not change blood pressure or heart rate, or inhibit AVP-induced pressor response even at 30 mg/kg p.o. These results demonstrate that OPC-51803 is a V(2)-selective agonist that produces a significant antidiuretic action after single and multiple oral dosing in AVP-deficient and normal AVP states. The data suggest that OPC-51803 is a useful therapeutic drug in the treatment of hypothalamic diabetes insipidus, nocturnal enuresis, and some kinds of urinary incontinence.

  20. Evidence for Noncanonical Neurotransmitter Activation: Norepinephrine as a Dopamine D2-Like Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Soto, Marta; Bonifazi, Alessandro; Cai, Ning Sheng; Ellenberger, Michael P.; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2016-01-01

    The Gαi/o-coupled dopamine D2-like receptor family comprises three subtypes: the D2 receptor (D2R), with short and long isoform variants (D2SR and D2LR), D3 receptor (D3R), and D4 receptor (D4R), with several polymorphic variants. The common overlap of norepinephrine innervation and D2-like receptor expression patterns prompts the question of a possible noncanonical action by norepinephrine. In fact, previous studies have suggested that norepinephrine can functionally interact with D4R. To our knowledge, significant interactions between norepinephrine and D2R or D3R receptors have not been demonstrated. By using radioligand binding and bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays in transfected cells, the present study attempted a careful comparison between dopamine and norepinephrine in their possible activation of all D2-like receptors, including the two D2R isoforms and the most common D4R polymorphic variants. Functional BRET assays included activation of G proteins with all Gαi/o subunits, adenylyl cyclase inhibition, and β arrestin recruitment. Norepinephrine acted as a potent agonist for all D2-like receptor subtypes, with the general rank order of potency of D3R > D4R ≥ D2SR ≥ D2L. However, for both dopamine and norepinephrine, differences depended on the Gαi/o protein subunit involved. The most striking differences were observed with Gαi2, where the rank order of potencies for both dopamine and norepinephrine were D4R > D2SR = D2LR >> D3R. Furthermore the results do not support the existence of differences in the ability of dopamine and norepinephrine to activate different human D4R variants. The potency of norepinephrine for adrenergic α2A receptor was only about 20-fold higher compared with D3R and D4R across the three functional assays. PMID:26843180

  1. Effects of tachykinin receptor agonists and antagonists on the guinea-pig isolated oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Kerr, K P

    2000-11-01

    1. Vagal nerve stimulation of the guinea-pig isolated oesophagus produced a triphasic tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive contractile response. The third phase, which was resistant to ganglion blocking drugs, was selectively abolished by capsaicin, suggesting the involvement of one or more neuropeptides released from afferent neurons. Receptors on cholinergic neurons were subsequently activated because the response was atropine sensitive. Contractile responses resulting from exogenous substance P were abolished by atropine and TTX and enhanced by physostigmine. These findings suggest that the third phase may be mediated by the action of a substance P-like neuropeptide released from sensory nerve endings that subsequently activated cholinergic neurons. 2. The tachykinin receptors in the body of the guinea-pig oesophagus were characterized by determining the relative agonist potencies of natural tachykinins as well as tachykinin receptor-selective analogues. Antagonist affinities were also determined. The results indicated the presence of both NK2 and NK3 receptors. In addition, the effects of a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors (captopril, thiorphan and amastatin) on responses to various tachykinins and synthetic analogues were determined. The results indicate that one or more peptidases are present in this preparation. 3. Experiments using various tachykinin receptor antagonists were performed to determine whether the activation of tachykinin receptors played a role in the mediation of the third phase of the response to vagal nerve stimulation. While this response was unaffected by NK1 and NK2 receptor-selective antagonists, it was only partially inhibited (23%) by the NK3 receptor antagonist SR 142801. Thus, in the guinea-pig oesophagus, it appears that NK3 receptors play only a minor role in mediating a contractile response when afferent neurons are excited by vagal nerve stimulation.

  2. Molecular and Therapeutic Characterization of Anti-ectodysplasin A Receptor (EDAR) Agonist Monoclonal Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczyk, Christine; Dunkel, Nathalie; Willen, Laure; Casal, Margret L.; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Gaide, Olivier; Tardivel, Aubry; Badic, Giovanna; Etter, Anne-Lise; Favre, Manuel; Jefferson, Douglas M.; Headon, Denis J.; Demotz, Stéphane; Schneider, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    The TNF family ligand ectodysplasin A (EDA) and its receptor EDAR are required for proper development of skin appendages such as hair, teeth, and eccrine sweat glands. Loss of function mutations in the Eda gene cause X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), a condition that can be ameliorated in mice and dogs by timely administration of recombinant EDA. In this study, several agonist anti-EDAR monoclonal antibodies were generated that cross-react with the extracellular domains of human, dog, rat, mouse, and chicken EDAR. Their half-life in adult mice was about 11 days. They induced tail hair and sweat gland formation when administered to newborn EDA-deficient Tabby mice, with an EC50 of 0.1 to 0.7 mg/kg. Divalency was necessary and sufficient for this therapeutic activity. Only some antibodies were also agonists in an in vitro surrogate activity assay based on the activation of the apoptotic Fas pathway. Activity in this assay correlated with small dissociation constants. When administered in utero in mice or at birth in dogs, agonist antibodies reverted several ectodermal dysplasia features, including tooth morphology. These antibodies are therefore predicted to efficiently trigger EDAR signaling in many vertebrate species and will be particularly suited for long term treatments. PMID:21730053

  3. Interactions of agonists with an allosteric antagonist at muscarinic acetylcholine M2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lanzafame, A; Christopoulos, A; Mitchelson, F

    1996-11-28

    The interaction of heptane-1,7-bis(dimethyl-3'-phthalimidopropylammonium bromide) (C7/3'-phth), with several agonists, was investigated at the muscarinic M2 receptor in guinea-pig left atria. C7/3'-phth shifted concentration-response curves for the agonists, carbachol, oxotremorine-M and (+)-cis-dioxolane, to the right in a parallel fashion. Arunlakshana-Schild regressions of the data yielded slopes significantly different to unity, suggesting non-competitive antagonism. Non-linear regression analysis, using an equation based on allosteric modulation, gave quantitative estimates of co-operativity (alpha values) and the dissociation constant of C7/3'-phth (KB). In all cases, the KB estimates for C7/3'-phth were not significantly different. Increasing the carbachol contact time 10-fold did not significantly influence the KB or the alpha value obtained with C7/3'-phth. Changing from Krebs to Tyrode solution did not significantly alter the KB for C7/3'-phth, although alpha values obtained were consistently lower in Tyrode solution, suggesting that the allosteric action may be sensitive to buffer composition. A 4-fold higher degree of negative, heterotropic co-operativity between C7/3'-phth and agonists than between C7/3'-phth and competitive antagonists was also found.

  4. Selective Estrogen Receptor β Agonist LY500307 as a Novel Therapeutic Agent for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sareddy, Gangadhara R.; Li, Xiaonan; Liu, Jinyou; Viswanadhapalli, Suryavathi; Garcia, Lauren; Gruslova, Aleksandra; Cavazos, David; Garcia, Mike; Strom, Anders M.; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Tekmal, Rajeshwar Rao; Brenner, Andrew; Vadlamudi, Ratna K.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM), deadly brain tumors, have greater incidence in males than females. Epidemiological evidence supports a tumor suppressive role of estrogen; however, estrogen as a potential therapy for GBM is limited due to safety concerns. Since GBM express ERβ, a second receptor for estrogen, targeting ERβ with a selective agonist may be a potential novel GBM therapy. In the present study, we examined the therapeutic effect of the selective synthetic ERβ agonist LY500307 using in vitro and in vivo GBM models. Treatment with LY500307 significantly reduced the proliferation of GBM cells with no activity on normal astrocytes in vitro. ERβ agonists promoted apoptosis of GBM cells, and mechanistic studies using RNA sequencing revealed that LY500307 modulated several pathways related to apoptosis, cell cycle, and DNA damage response. Further, LY500307 sensitized GBM cells to several FDA-approved chemotherapeutic drugs including cisplatin, lomustine and temozolomide. LY500307 treatment significantly reduced the in vivo tumor growth and promoted apoptosis of GBM tumors in an orthotopic model and improved the overall survival of tumor-bearing mice in the GL26 syngeneic glioma model. Our results demonstrate that LY500307 has potential as a therapeutic agent for GBM. PMID:27126081

  5. Agonist properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, R L; Canton, H; Barrett, R J; Sanders-Bush, E

    1998-11-01

    Extensive behavioral and biochemical evidence suggests an agonist role at the 5-HT2A receptor, and perhaps the 5-HT2C receptor, in the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs. However the published in vitro pharmacological properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an hallucinogenic tryptamine analog, are not consistent with this hypothesis. We, therefore, undertook an extensive investigation into the properties of DMT at 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors. In fibroblasts transfected with the 5-HT2A receptor or the 5-HT2C receptor, DMT activated the major intracellular signaling pathway (phosphoinositide hydrolysis) to an extent comparable to that produced by serotonin. Because drug efficacy changes with receptor density and cellular microenvironment, we also examined the properties of DMT in native preparations using a behavioral and biochemical approach. Rats were trained to discriminate an antagonist ketanserin from an agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) in a two-lever choice paradigm. Pharmacological studies showed that responding on the DOI and ketanserin lever reflected agonist and antagonist activity at 5-HT2A receptors, and hence, was a suitable model for evaluating the in vivo functional properties of DMT. Like other 5-HT2A receptor agonists, DMT substituted fully for DOI. Intact choroid plexus was used to evaluate the agonist properties at endogenous 5-HT2C receptors; DMT was a partial agonist at 5-HT2C receptors in this native preparation. Thus, we conclude that DMT behaves as an agonist at both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2A receptors. One difference was evident in that the 5-HT2C, but not the 5-HT2A, receptor showed a profound desensitization to DMT over time. This difference is interesting in light of the recent report that the hallucinogenic activity of DMT does not tolerate in humans and suggests the 5-HT2C receptor plays a less prominent role in the action of DMT.

  6. Both substance P agonists and antagonists inhibit ion conductance through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Eardley, D; McGee, R

    1985-08-07

    Substance P stimulates substance P receptors but also inhibits ion conductance through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Substance P analogs, classified as agonists or antagonists based on their actions on smooth muscle, were tested to determine if they also could act at nicotinic receptors on the pheochromocytoma, PC12. All of the analogs tested, [D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9]SP, [D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11]SP, [pGlu5, MePhe8, Sar9]SP-(5-11), and [D-Pro4, D-Trp7,9,10]SP-(4-11), inhibited agonist-induced uptake of 86Rb+ through the nicotinic receptors at concentrations quite similar to those required for action at substance P receptors on smooth muscle. Thus, the chemical modifications in the analogs do not substantially alter their ability to inhibit nicotinic receptors.

  7. Selective and non-selective OT receptor agonists induce different locomotor behaviors in male rats via central OT receptors and peripheral V1a receptors.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Monica; Wisniewska, Halina; Tariga, Hiroe; Ibanez, Gerardo; Collins, James C; Wisniewski, Kazimierz; Qi, Steve; Srinivasan, Karthik; Hargrove, Diane; Lindstrom, Beatriz Fioravanti

    2018-05-21

    Oxytocin (OT) continues to inspire much research due to its diverse physiological effects. While the best-understood actions of OT are uterine contraction and milk ejection, OT is also implicated in maternal and bonding behaviors, and potentially in CNS disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, and pain. The dissection of the mechanism of action of OT is complicated by the fact that this peptide activates not only its cognate receptor but also vasopressin type 1a (V1a) receptors. In this study, we evaluated OT and a selective OT receptor (OTR) agonist, FE 204409, in an automated assay that measures rat locomotor activity. The results showed: 1) Subcutaneous (sc) administration of OT decreased locomotor behavior (distance traveled, stereotypy, and rearing). This effect was reversed by a V1a receptor (V1aR) antagonist ([Pmp1,Tyr(ME)2]AVP, sc), suggesting that OT acts through peripheral V1aR to inhibit locomotor activity. 2) A selective OTR agonist (FE 204409, sc) increased stereotypy. This effect was reversed by an OTR antagonist dosed icv, suggesting a central OTR site of action. Our findings identify distinct behavioral effects for OT and the selective agonist FE 204409, adding to the growing body of evidence that the V1aR mediates many effects attributed to OT and that peptides administered systemically at supra-physiological doses may activate receptors in the brain. Our studies further emphasize the importance of utilizing selective agonists and antagonists to assess therapeutic indications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Activation of Protease Activated Receptor 2 by Exogenous Agonist Exacerbates Early Radiation Injury in Rat Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR{sub 2}) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR{sub 2} is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR{sub 2} activation. Methods and Materials: Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR{sub 2} agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH{sub 2}) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 daysmore » after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The PAR{sub 2} agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR{sub 2} agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR{sub 2} agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR{sub 2} did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. Conclusion: The results of the present study support a role for PAR{sub 2} activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR{sub 2} antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios.« less

  9. Differences in acute anorectic effects of long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists in rats.

    PubMed

    Sisley, Stephanie; Smith, Kathleen; Sandoval, Darleen A; Seeley, Randy J

    2014-08-01

    Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have both glucose- and weight-lowering effects. The brain is poised to mediate both of these actions since GLP-1Rs are present in key areas known to control weight and glucose. Although some research has been performed on the effects of exendin-4 in the brain, little data exists on the central effects of liraglutide, a long-acting GLP-1R agonist with much closer structural homology to native GLP-1. In lean, Long-Evans rats, we found that direct intra-third cerebroventricular (i3vt) administration of 0.26 nmol liraglutide caused a 50% reduction in food intake. However, exendin-4 produced the same reduction in food intake with 10-fold greater potency (0.02 nmol). These data are supported by similar c-Fos immunoreactivity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei by exendin-4 as compared to liraglutide despite differing doses. The anorectic effects of both drugs were blocked with i3vt pre-treatment of a GLP-1R competitive antagonist, exendin(9-39), indicating that both drugs required the GLP-1R for their effects. Exendin-4, and not liraglutide, caused hyperglycemia when given i3vt prior to an oral glucose tolerance test, although liraglutide did not lower glucose. Thus, these data show that GLP-1R agonists have differing anorectic potencies in the CNS, which may account for some of their clinical differences. Additionally, we show here that the glucose lowering properties of acute administration of GLP-1R agonists are not accounted for by their central effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-radiation damage effect of polyethylenimine as a toll-like receptor 5 targeted agonist

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Xing, Yaling; Qian, Yuanyu; Chen, Xiaojuan; Tu, Jian; Ren, Lening; Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhongbin

    2013-01-01

    A number of agents are now available for use in protecting against ionizing radiation. These radiation-protective agents, however, have many adverse effects. Efforts have been made to develop new radiation-protective agents for medical application. Here, we investigated whether a compound, polyethylenimine (PEI), which activates Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5)-mediated NF-kB signaling pathways, could have an anti-radiation effect on a mouse model. First, a cell-based screening model for an agonist of TLR5-mediated NF-kB pathway was established and then validated by activation of TLR5-mediated NF-kB luciferase reporter activity with a known TLR5 agonist, flagellin. We found that PEI induced dose-dependent activation of the TLR5-mediated NF-kB pathway, indicating that PEI is indeed a TLR5 agonist. Furthermore, the anti-radiation effect of polyethylenimine was assessed using a γ-ray total body irradiation (TBI) mouse model. Compared with the irradiation control, both survival time and survival rate were significantly improved in mice that received either a low dose of polyethylenimine (P= 0.019) or a high dose of polyethylenimine (P< 0.001). We also observed a positive correlation between animal body weight and survival time in mice that received a low dose of polyethylenimine, a high dose of polyethylenimine and amifostine, over a period of 30 days, r= 0.42 (P< 0.02), 0.72 (P< 0.0001) and 0.95 (P< 0.0001), respectively, while a negative correlation between animal body weight and survival time was observed in the irradiation control (r= –0.89; P< 0.0001). These results indicate that polyethylenimine is a new TLR5 agonist with potential application in offering protection for patients receiving radiotherapy or in radiation-related accidents. PMID:23104900

  11. Anti-radiation damage effect of polyethylenimine as a toll-like receptor 5 targeted agonist.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Xing, Yaling; Qian, Yuanyu; Chen, Xiaojuan; Tu, Jian; Ren, Lening; Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhongbin

    2013-03-01

    A number of agents are now available for use in protecting against ionizing radiation. These radiation-protective agents, however, have many adverse effects. Efforts have been made to develop new radiation-protective agents for medical application. Here, we investigated whether a compound, polyethylenimine (PEI), which activates Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5)-mediated NF-kB signaling pathways, could have an anti-radiation effect on a mouse model. First, a cell-based screening model for an agonist of TLR5-mediated NF-kB pathway was established and then validated by activation of TLR5-mediated NF-kB luciferase reporter activity with a known TLR5 agonist, flagellin. We found that PEI induced dose-dependent activation of the TLR5-mediated NF-kB pathway, indicating that PEI is indeed a TLR5 agonist. Furthermore, the anti-radiation effect of polyethylenimine was assessed using a γ-ray total body irradiation (TBI) mouse model. Compared with the irradiation control, both survival time and survival rate were significantly improved in mice that received either a low dose of polyethylenimine (P= 0.019) or a high dose of polyethylenimine (P< 0.001). We also observed a positive correlation between animal body weight and survival time in mice that received a low dose of polyethylenimine, a high dose of polyethylenimine and amifostine, over a period of 30 days, r= 0.42 (P< 0.02), 0.72 (P< 0.0001) and 0.95 (P< 0.0001), respectively, while a negative correlation between animal body weight and survival time was observed in the irradiation control (r= -0.89; P< 0.0001). These results indicate that polyethylenimine is a new TLR5 agonist with potential application in offering protection for patients receiving radiotherapy or in radiation-related accidents.

  12. Protective effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists on human podocytes: proposed mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Miglio, Gianluca; Rosa, Arianna Carolina; Rattazzi, Lorenza; Grange, Cristina; Camussi, Giovanni; Fantozzi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists exert anti-albuminuric effects. However, the nephroprotective effects of these drugs remain to be fully understood. We have investigated whether gemfibrozil, GW0742 and pioglitazone protect human podocytes against nutrient deprivation (ND)-induced cell death and the role of mitochondrial biogenesis as a cytoprotective process. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Immortalized human podocytes were pre-treated with the PPAR agonists and exposed to ND (5 h) under normoxia, hypoxia or in the presence of pyruvate. Cell death was measured at the end of the ND and of the recovery phase (24 h). Mitochondrial mass, cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits 1 and 4 were measured as markers of mitochondrial cell content, while membrane potential as an index of mitochondrial function. PGC-1α, NRF1 and Tfam expression was studied, as crucial regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. KEY RESULTS Cell pre-treatment with gemfibrozil, GW0742, or pioglitazone significantly decreased the ND-induced cell loss, necrosis and apoptosis. These effects were attenuated by hypoxia and potentiated by pyruvate. Pre-treatment with these drugs significantly increased mitochondrial cell content, while it did not affect mitochondrial function. In all these experiments pioglitazone exerted significantly larger effects than gemfibrozil or GW0742. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Gemfibrozil, GW0742 and pioglitazone may exert direct protective effects on human podocytes. Mitochondrial biogenesis is a cell response to the PPAR agonists related to their cytoprotective activity. These results provide a mechanistic support to the clinical evidence indicating PPAR agonists as disease-modifying agents for glomerular diseases. PMID:22594945

  13. Tethered agonists: a new mechanism underlying adhesion G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Schöneberg, Torsten; Liebscher, Ines; Luo, Rong; Monk, Kelly R; Piao, Xianhua

    2015-06-01

    The family of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) comprises 33 members in the human genome, which are subdivided into nine subclasses. Many aGPCRs undergo an autoproteolytic process via their GPCR Autoproteolysis-INducing (GAIN) domain during protein maturation to generate an N- and a C-terminal fragments, NTF and CTF, respectively. The NTF and CTF are non-covalently reassociated on the plasma membrane to form a single receptor unit. How aGPCRs are activated upon ligand binding remains one of the leading questions in the field of aGPCR research. Recent work from our labs and others shows that ligand binding can remove the NTF from the plasma membrane-bound CTF, exposing a tethered agonist which potently activates downstream signaling.

  14. New benzylureas as a novel series of potent, nonpeptidic vasopressin V2 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Yea, Christopher M; Allan, Christine E; Ashworth, Doreen M; Barnett, James; Baxter, Andy J; Broadbridge, Janice D; Franklin, Richard J; Hampton, Sally L; Hudson, Peter; Horton, John A; Jenkins, Paul D; Penson, Andy M; Pitt, Gary R W; Rivière, Pierre; Robson, Peter A; Rooker, David P; Semple, Graeme; Sheppard, Andy; Haigh, Robert M; Roe, Michael B

    2008-12-25

    Vasopressin (AVP) is a hormone that stimulates an increase in water permeability through activation of V2 receptors in the kidney. The analogue of AVP, desmopressin, has proven an effective drug for diseases where a reduction of urine output is desired. However, its peptidic nature limits its bioavailability. We report herein the discovery of potent, nonpeptidic, benzylurea derived agonists of the vasopressin V2 receptor. We describe substitutions on the benzyl group to give improvements in potency and subsequent modifications to the urea end group to provide improvements in solubility and increased oral efficacy in a rat model of diuresis. The lead compound 20e (VA106483) is reported for the first time and has been selected for clinical development.

  15. SGLT2 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists as second-line therapy in type 2 diabetes: patient selection and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gurgle, Holly E; White, Karen; McAdam-Marx, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the selection of second-line therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who are unable to achieve glycemic control with metformin therapy alone. Newer pharmacologic treatments for T2DM include glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. Both the classes of medication are efficacious, exhibit positive effects on weight, and are associated with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. The purpose of this review is to compare the clinical trial and real-world effectiveness data of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists versus sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors related to A1c reduction, weight loss, cost-effectiveness, cardiovascular outcomes, and safety in patients with T2DM. This review summarizes comparative evidence for providers who are determining which of the two classes may be the most appropriate for a specific patient.

  16. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased κ-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 μM at the G-protein and β-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50=9 μM) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting β-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa β-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 μM. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations>1 μM in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  17. The serotonin 5-HT₁A receptor agonist tandospirone improves executive function in common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Baba, Satoko; Murai, Takeshi; Nakako, Tomokazu; Enomoto, Takeshi; Ono, Michiko; Shimizu, Isao; Ikeda, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Previous pilot clinical studies have shown that the serotonin 5-HT1A receptor agonist tandospirone has beneficial effect on cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. In the present study, we evaluated the cognitive efficacy of tandospirone, given alone or in combination with the antipsychotic blonanserin, risperidone or haloperidol, on executive function in marmosets using the object retrieval with detour (ORD) task. Treatment with tandospirone alone at 20 and 40 mg/kg increased the number of correct responses in the difficult trial, while risperidone (0.3mg/kg) and haloperidol (0.3mg/kg) decreased the number of correct responses in this trial. On the other hand, blonanserin (0.1-0.3mg/kg), an atypical antipsychotic highly selective for dopamine D2/D3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors, did not affect the number of correct responses in both the easy and difficult trials. Co-treatment with tandospirone (20mg/kg) and risperidone (0.1-0.3mg/kg) or haloperidol (0.1-0.3mg/kg) did not improve animals' performance in the difficult trial. However, co-treatment with tandospirone and blonanserin (0.1-0.3mg/kg) increased the number of correct responses in the difficult trial. In addition, treatment with the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-81297 at 1mg/kg increased marmosets correct responses in the difficult trial. These results suggest that tandospirone is a promising candidate for the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia and that adjunctive treatment with tandospirone and blonanserin is more appropriate for cognitive deficits than combination therapy with tandospirone and risperidone or haloperidol. The results of this study also indicate that the putative mechanism of action of tandospirone might be related to enhancement of dopamine neurotransmission via activation of the 5-HT1A receptor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biased agonist pharmacochaperones of the AVP V2 receptor may treat congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Jean-Alphonse, Frédéric; Perkovska, Sanja; Frantz, Marie-Céline; Durroux, Thierry; Méjean, Catherine; Morin, Denis; Loison, Stéphanie; Bonnet, Dominique; Hibert, Marcel; Mouillac, Bernard; Mendre, Christiane

    2009-10-01

    X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (cNDI) results from inactivating mutations of the human arginine vasopressin (AVP) V2 receptor (hV(2)R). Most of these mutations lead to intracellular retention of the hV(2)R, preventing its interaction with AVP and thereby limiting water reabsorption and concentration of urine. Because the majority of cNDI-hV(2)Rs exhibit protein misfolding, molecular chaperones hold promise as therapeutic agents; therefore, we sought to identify pharmacochaperones for hV(2)R that also acted as agonists. Here, we describe high-affinity nonpeptide compounds that promoted maturation and membrane rescue of L44P, A294P, and R337X cNDI mutants and restored a functional AVP-dependent cAMP signal. Contrary to pharmacochaperone antagonists, these compounds directly activated a cAMP signal upon binding to several cNDI mutants. In addition, these molecules displayed original functionally selective properties (biased agonism) toward the hV(2)R, being unable to recruit arrestin, trigger receptor internalization, or stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinases. These characteristics make these hV(2)R agonist pharmacochaperones promising therapeutic candidates for cNDI.

  19. Recent Advances in GLP-1 Receptor Agonists for Use in Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    McBrayer, Dominic N; Tal-Gan, Yftah

    2017-09-01

    Preclinical Research Mimetics of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) represent a useful alternative or complementary treatment choice to insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The lack of hypoglycemia as a side effect when GLP-1 receptor agonists are used along with the tendency of these therapeutic agents to prevent or even reduce weight gain makes them valuable targets in therapy development. However, native GLP-1 and many of its early analogues have very short half-lives, requiring repeated treatment to maintain therapeutic levels. As all current treatments are injected subcutaneously, a large focus has been made on trying to extend the half-lives of GLP-1 analogues while retaining bioactivity. Most success in this regard has been achieved with the use of peptide-protein fusions, which are not as well suited for oral administration. However, recent work focused on the development of non-fusion peptides with increased half-lives that may be more appropriate for oral administration. This minireview discusses the structural characteristics of past and present analogues as well as the recent work conducted toward developing novel GLP-1 receptor agonists. Drug Dev Res 78 : 292-299, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. GLP-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lamos, Elizabeth Mary; Malek, Rana; Davis, Stephen N

    2017-04-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) affects many women of child-bearing age and is characterized by hyperandrogenism, ovulatory and metabolic dysfunction. A primary treatment goal is weight reduction. The weight loss effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA), previously demonstrated in diabetic and obese non-diabetic patients, offer a unique opportunity to expand the medical options available to PCOS patients. Areas covered: Available clinical trials of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist therapy in PCOS were reviewed. Literature was searched from PubMed using appropriate search terms up to November 2016. Expert commentary: The available studies of GLP-1 RA therapy in the treatment of excess body weight in women with PCOS demonstrate that exenatide and liraglutide are effective in weight reduction either as monotherapy or in combination with metformin. A few studies showed that androgens may be modestly decreased and menstrual frequency may be increased. Eating behavior may be improved with liraglutide therapy. Glucose parameters are generally improved. GLP-1RAs were well-tolerated, with nausea being the most significant adverse side effect. Barriers to utilization may be the short duration studies, lack of familiarity of the medication, the route of administration (injection) and the variable outcomes on ovulation and hyperandrogenism.

  1. Protection from liver fibrosis by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ agonist.

    PubMed

    Iwaisako, Keiko; Haimerl, Michael; Paik, Yong-Han; Taura, Kojiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Sirlin, Claude; Yu, Elizabeth; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M; Brenner, David A; Schnabl, Bernd

    2012-05-22

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ), a member of the nuclear receptor family, is emerging as a key metabolic regulator with pleiotropic actions on various tissues including fat, skeletal muscle, and liver. Here we show that the PPARδ agonist KD3010, but not the well-validated GW501516, dramatically ameliorates liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) injections. Deposition of extracellular matrix proteins was lower in the KD3010-treated group than in the vehicle- or GW501516-treated group. Interestingly, profibrogenic connective tissue growth factor was induced significantly by GW501516, but not by KD3010, following CCl(4) treatment. The hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effect of KD3010 was confirmed in a model of cholestasis-induced liver injury and fibrosis using bile duct ligation for 3 wk. Primary hepatocytes treated with KD3010 but not GW501516 were protected from starvation or CCl(4)-induced cell death, in part because of reduced reactive oxygen species production. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that an orally active PPARδ agonist has hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects in animal models of liver fibrosis, suggesting a possible mechanistic and therapeutic approach in treating patients with chronic liver diseases.

  2. Thrombopoietin-receptor agonists for children with immune thrombocytopenia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaxing; Liang, Yi; Ai, Yuan; Xie, Juan; Li, Youping; Zheng, Wenyi

    2017-10-01

    We conducted a systematic review to assess the efficacy and safety of Thrombopoietin-receptor agonists (TPOras) for pediatric immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). We searched PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library from their earliest records to January 2017. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Primary outcomes were durable response and clinically significant bleeding. Secondary outcomes were overall response, overall bleeding events, the use of rescue medication and adverse events (AEs). Five randomized RCTs (261participants) were included. Compared with placebo group, the proportion of patients achieving durable platelet response was significantly higher in Eltrombopag (P = 0.0004) or Romiplostim (P = 0.002) group, so was the overall response in Eltrombopag [RR = 2.64, 95% CI (1.58, 4.44)] or Romiplostim [RR = 5.05, 95% CI (2.21, 11.53)] group. Both clinically significant bleeding (P = 0.04) and total bleeding (P = 0.01) in Eltrombopag group were significantly less frequent than those in placebo group, while no significant difference between Romiplostim and placebo group. The proportion of patients receiving rescue medication, the incidence of overall AEs and serious AEs between TPO-receptor agonists and placebo group were not significantly different. TPOras might improve both durable and overall platelet response in pediatric ITP, compared with placebo.

  3. Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist acts as a homeostatic regulator of bone marrow hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Vacek, Antonín; Streitová, Denisa

    2007-07-01

    The present study was performed to define the optimum conditions of the stimulatory action of the adenosine A(3) receptor agonist, N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA), on bone marrow hematopoiesis in mice. Effects of 2-day treatment with IB-MECA given at single doses of 200nmol/kg twice daily were investigated in normal mice and in mice whose femoral bone marrow cells were either depleted or regenerating after pretreatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. Morphological criteria were used to determine the proliferation state of the granulocytic and erythroid cell systems. Significant negative correlation between the control proliferation state and the increase of cell proliferation after IB-MECA treatment irrespective of the cell lineage investigated was found. The results suggest the homeostatic character of the induced stimulatory effects and the need to respect the functional state of the target tissue when investigating effects of adenosine receptor agonists under in vivo conditions.

  4. Biased Agonist Pharmacochaperones of the AVP V2 Receptor May Treat Congenital Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Jean-Alphonse, Frédéric; Perkovska, Sanja; Frantz, Marie-Céline; Durroux, Thierry; Méjean, Catherine; Morin, Denis; Loison, Stéphanie; Bonnet, Dominique; Hibert, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (cNDI) results from inactivating mutations of the human arginine vasopressin (AVP) V2 receptor (hV2R). Most of these mutations lead to intracellular retention of the hV2R, preventing its interaction with AVP and thereby limiting water reabsorption and concentration of urine. Because the majority of cNDI-hV2Rs exhibit protein misfolding, molecular chaperones hold promise as therapeutic agents; therefore, we sought to identify pharmacochaperones for hV2R that also acted as agonists. Here, we describe high-affinity nonpeptide compounds that promoted maturation and membrane rescue of L44P, A294P, and R337X cNDI mutants and restored a functional AVP-dependent cAMP signal. Contrary to pharmacochaperone antagonists, these compounds directly activated a cAMP signal upon binding to several cNDI mutants. In addition, these molecules displayed original functionally selective properties (biased agonism) toward the hV2R, being unable to recruit arrestin, trigger receptor internalization, or stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinases. These characteristics make these hV2R agonist pharmacochaperones promising therapeutic candidates for cNDI. PMID:19729439

  5. Regional peripheral and CNS hemodynamic effects of intrathecal administration of a substance P receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Helke, C J; Phillips, E T; O'Neill, J T

    1987-11-01

    Regional CNS and peripheral hemodynamic effects of the intrathecal (i.t.) administration of a substance P receptor agonist, [pGlu5,MePhe8,MeGly9]-substance P5-11 ([DiMe]-SP), were studied in anesthetized rats with the radioactive microsphere technique. It was previously shown that [DiMe]-SP caused a sympathetically mediated increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) by an action within the spinal cord. In this study, [DiMe]-SP (5 and 33 nmol, i.t.) increased MAP. The 5 nmol dose increased resistance in cutaneous, renal, splanchnic, and adrenal vascular beds but decreased resistance, and increased blood flow in some skeletal muscle beds. Total peripheral resistance was unchanged. The 33 nmol dose increased resistance in each peripheral vascular bed analyzed and increased total peripheral resistance. Whereas each dose increased heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output were unchanged with the 5 nmol dose and were reduced with the 33 nmol dose. Neither dose of [DiMe]-SP significantly altered regional brain or spinal cord blood flows. These data show that the i.t. administration of the SP agonist, [DiMe]-SP, increased vascular tone to most peripheral vascular beds whereas the low dose caused a vasodilation of skeletal muscle. These effects are consistent with the notion of a dose-related activation of SP receptors in the spinal cord affecting sympathetic outflow to the adrenals and to the vasculature.

  6. A ghrelin receptor agonist is an effective colokinetic in rats with diet-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Pustovit, R V; Furness, J B; Rivera, L R

    2015-05-01

    Despite constipation being a common problem, the treatments that are available have side effects and are only partly effective. Recent studies show that centrally penetrant ghrelin receptor agonists cause defecation in humans and other species. Here, we describe some features of a rat model of low fiber-induced constipation, and investigate the effectiveness of the ghrelin agonist, capromorelin. Rats were given low-fiber diets for 5 weeks. Their colorectal responsiveness to distension and to a behavioral test, water avoidance and colon histology were compared to those of rats on a standard diet. After the low-fiber diet, distension of the colon produced fewer propulsive contractions, behaviorally induced defecation was reduced, and the lining of the colorectum was inflamed. However, capromorelin was similarly effective in causing defecation in constipated and non-constipated rats. Low-fiber diet in rats produces a constipation phenotype, characterized by reduced responsiveness of the colorectum to distension and to a behavioral stimulus of defecation, water avoidance. The effectiveness of capromorelin suggests that centrally penetrant ghrelin receptor stimulants may be effective in treating constipation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. On the role of subtype selective adenosine receptor agonists during proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human primary bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Costa, M Adelina; Barbosa, A; Neto, E; Sá-e-Sousa, A; Freitas, R; Neves, J M; Magalhães-Cardoso, T; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2011-05-01

    Purines are important modulators of bone cell biology. ATP is metabolized into adenosine by human primary osteoblast cells (HPOC); due to very low activity of adenosine deaminase, the nucleoside is the end product of the ecto-nucleotidase cascade. We, therefore, investigated the expression and function of adenosine receptor subtypes (A(1) , A(2A) , A(2B) , and A(3) ) during proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of HPOC. Adenosine A(1) (CPA), A(2A) (CGS21680C), A(2B) (NECA), and A(3) (2-Cl-IB-MECA) receptor agonists concentration-dependently increased HPOC proliferation. Agonist-induced HPOC proliferation was prevented by their selective antagonists, DPCPX, SCH442416, PSB603, and MRS1191. CPA and NECA facilitated osteogenic differentiation measured by increases in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. This contrasts with the effect of CGS21680C which delayed HPOC differentiation; 2-Cl-IB-MECA was devoid of effect. Blockade of the A(2B) receptor with PSB603 prevented osteogenic differentiation by NECA. In the presence of the A(1) antagonist, DPCPX, CPA reduced ALP activity at 21 and 28 days in culture. At the same time points, blockade of A(2A) receptors with SCH442416 transformed the inhibitory effect of CGS21680C into facilitation. Inhibition of adenosine uptake with dipyridamole caused a net increase in osteogenic differentiation. The presence of all subtypes of adenosine receptors on HPOC was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Data show that adenosine is an important regulator of osteogenic cell differentiation through the activation of subtype-specific receptors. The most abundant A(2B) receptor seems to have a consistent role in cell differentiation, which may be balanced through the relative strengths of A(1) or A(2A) receptors determining whether osteoblasts are driven into proliferation or differentiation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Interaction between the mu-agonist dermorphin and the delta-agonist [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin in supraspinal antinociception and delta-opioid receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Negri, L.; Improta, G.; Lattanzi, R.; Potenza, R. L.; Luchetti, F.; Melchiorri, P.

    1995-01-01

    1. In rats, the interaction between the mu-opioid agonist dermorphin and the delta-opioid agonist [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin was studied in binding experiments to delta-opioid receptors and in the antinociceptive test to radiant heat. 2. When injected i.c.v., doses of [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin higher than 20 nmol produced antinociception in the rat tail-flick test to radiant heat. Lower doses were inactive. None of the doses tested elicited the maximum achievable response. This partial antinociception was accomplished with an in vivo occupancy of more than 97% of brain delta-opioid receptors and of 17% of mu-opioid receptors. Naloxone (0.1 mg kg-1, s.c.), and naloxonazine (10 mg kg-1, i.v., 24 h before), but not the selective delta-opioid antagonist naltrindole, antagonized the antinociception. 3. In vitro competitive inhibition studies in rat brain membranes showed that [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin displaced [3H]-naltrindole from two delta-binding sites of high and low affinity. The addition of 100 microM Gpp[NH]p produced a three fold increase in the [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin Ki value for both binding sites. The addition of 10 nM dermorphin increased the Ki value of the delta-agonist for the high affinity site five times. When Gpp[NH]p was added to the incubation medium together with 10 nM dermorphin, the high affinity Ki of the delta-agonist increased 15 times. 4. Co-administration into the rat brain ventricles of subanalgesic doses of dermorphin and [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin resulted in synergistic antinociceptive responses. 5. Pretreatment with naloxone or with the non-equilibrium mu-antagonists naloxonazine and beta-funaltrexamine completely abolished the antinociceptive response of the mu-delta agonist combinations. 6. Pretreatment with the delta-opioid antagonists naltrindole and DALCE reduced the antinociceptive response of the dermorphin-[D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin combinations to a value near that observed after the mu-agonist alone. At the dosage used, naltrindole

  9. Opioid agonist efficacy predicts the magnitude of tolerance and the regulation of mu-opioid receptors and dynamin-2.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Mohit; Kumar, Priyank; Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Ellen A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2007-06-01

    It has been proposed that opioid agonist efficacy may play a role in tolerance and the regulation of opioid receptor density. To address this issue, the present studies estimated the in vivo efficacy of three opioid agonists and then examined changes in spinal mu-opioid receptor density following chronic treatment in the mouse. In addition, tolerance and regulation of the trafficking protein dynamin-2 were determined. To evaluate efficacy, the method of irreversible receptor alkylation was employed and the efficacy parameter tau estimated. Mice were injected with the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist clocinnamox (0.32-25.6 mg/kg, i.p), and 24 h later, the analgesic potency of s.c. morphine, oxycodone and etorphine were determined. Clocinnamox dose-dependently antagonized the analgesic effects of morphine, etorphine and oxycodone. The shift to the right of the dose-response curves was greater for morphine and oxycodone compared to etorphine and the highest dose of clocinnamox reduced the maximal effect of morphine and oxycodone, but not etorphine. The order of efficacy calculated from these results was etorphine>morphine>oxycodone. Other mice were infused for 7 days with oxycodone (10-150 mg/kg/day, s.c.) or etorphine (50-250 microg/kg/day, s.c.) and the analgesic potency of s.c. morphine determined. The low efficacy agonist (oxycodone) produced more tolerance than the high efficacy agonist (etorphine) at equi-effective infusion doses. In saturation binding experiments, the low efficacy opioid agonists (morphine, oxycodone) did not regulate the density of spinal mu-opioid receptors, while etorphine produced approximately 40% reduction in mu-opioid receptor density. Furthermore, etorphine increased spinal dynamin-2 abundance, while oxycodone did not produce any significant change in dynamin-2 abundance. Overall, these data indicate that high efficacy agonists produce less tolerance at equi-effective doses. Furthermore, increased efficacy was associated with

  10. The melanocortin MC1 receptor agonist BMS-470539 inhibits leucocyte trafficking in the inflamed vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, G; Voisin, M-B; Carlson, K; Getting, SJ; Nourshargh, S; Perretti, M

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Over three decades of research evaluating the biology of melanocortin (MC) hormones and synthetic peptides, activation of the MC type 1 (MC1) receptor has been identified as a viable target for the development of novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents. Here, we have tested a recently described selective agonist of MC1 receptors, BMS-470539, on leucocyte/post-capillary venule interactions in murine microvascular beds. Experimental approach: Intravital microscopy of two murine microcirculations were utilized, applying two distinct modes of promoting inflammation. The specificity of the effects of BMS-470539 was assessed using mice bearing mutant inactive MC1 receptors (the recessive yellow e/e colony). Key results: BMS-470539, given before an ischaemia–reperfusion protocol, inhibited cell adhesion and emigration with no effect on cell rolling, as assessed 90 min into the reperfusion phase. These properties were paralleled by inhibition of tissue expression of both CXCL1 and CCL2. Confocal investigations of inflamed post-capillary venules revealed immunostaining for MC1 receptors on adherent and emigrated leucocytes. Congruently, the anti-inflammatory properties of BMS-470539 were lost in mesenteries of mice bearing the inactive mutant MC1 receptors. Therapeutic administration of BMS-470539 stopped cell emigration, but did not affect cell adhesion in the cremasteric microcirculation inflamed by superfusion with platelet-activating factor. Conclusions and implications: Activation of MC1 receptors inhibited leucocyte adhesion and emigration. Development of new chemical entities directed at MC1 receptors could be a viable approach in the development of novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents with potential application to post-ischaemic conditions. PMID:20331604

  11. Agonist-induced conformational changes in the G-protein-coupling domain of the β2 adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ghanouni, Pejman; Steenhuis, Jacqueline J.; Farrens, David L.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of extracellular physiologic signaling molecules act by stimulating GTP-binding protein (G-protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs). To monitor directly the formation of the active state of a prototypical GPCR, we devised a method to site specifically attach fluorescein to an endogenous cysteine (Cys-265) at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane 6 (TM6) of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), adjacent to the G-protein-coupling domain. We demonstrate that this tag reports agonist-induced conformational changes in the receptor, with agonists causing a decline in the fluorescence intensity of fluorescein-β2AR that is proportional to the biological efficacy of the agonist. We also find that agonists alter the interaction between the fluorescein at Cys-265 and fluorescence-quenching reagents localized to different molecular environments of the receptor. These observations are consistent with a rotation and/or tilting of TM6 on agonist activation. Our studies, when compared with studies of activation in rhodopsin, indicate a general mechanism for GPCR activation; however, a notable difference is the relatively slow kinetics of the conformational changes in the β2AR, which may reflect the different energetics of activation by diffusible ligands. PMID:11353823

  12. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Selective Agonist Enhances Collateral Growth and Protects against Subsequent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Li, Fuying; Yui, Daishi; Miki, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Collateral growth after acute occlusion of an intracranial artery is triggered by increasing shear stress in preexisting collateral pathways. Recently, sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1PR1) on endothelial cells was reported to be essential in sensing fluid shear stress. Here, we evaluated the expression of S1PR1 in the hypoperfused mouse brain and investigated the effect of a selective S1PR1 agonist on leptomeningeal collateral growth and subsequent ischemic damage after focal ischemia. Methods In C57Bl/6 mice (n = 133) subjected to unilateral common carotid occlusion (CCAO) and sham surgery. The first series examined the time course of collateral growth, cell proliferation, and S1PR1 expression in the leptomeningeal arteries after CCAO. The second series examined the relationship between pharmacological regulation of S1PR1 and collateral growth of leptomeningeal anastomoses. Animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: LtCCAO and daily intraperitoneal (ip) injection for 7 days of an S1PR1 selective agonist (SEW2871, 5 mg/kg/day); sham surgery and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 after surgery; LtCCAO and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 and an S1PR1 inverse agonist (VPC23019, 0.5 mg/kg); LtCCAO and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days after surgery; and sham surgery and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days. Leptomeningeal anastomoses were visualized 14 days after LtCCAO by latex perfusion method, and a set of animals underwent subsequent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) 7days after the treatment termination. Neurological functions 1hour, 1, 4, and 7days and infarction volume 7days after pMCAO were evaluated. Results In parallel with the increase in S1PR1 mRNA levels, S1PR1 expression colocalized with endothelial cell markers in the leptomeningeal arteries, increased markedly on the side of the CCAO, and peaked 7 days after CCAO. Mitotic cell numbers in the leptomeningeal arteries

  13. Opioid Peptidomimetics: Leads for the Design of Bioavailable Mixed Efficacy Mu Opioid Receptor (MOR) Agonist/Delta Opioid Receptor (DOR) Antagonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mosberg, Henry I.; Yeomans, Larisa; Harland, Aubrie A.; Bender, Aaron M.; Sobczyk-Kojiro, Katarzyna; Anand, Jessica P.; Clark, Mary J.; Jutkiewicz, Emily M.; Traynor, John R.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described opioid peptidomimetic, 1, employing a tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and modeled on a series of cyclic tetrapeptide opioid agonists. We have recently described modifications to these peptides that confer a mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist, delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist profile, which has been shown to reduce the development of tolerance to the analgesic actions of MOR agonists. Several such bifunctional ligands have been reported, but none has been demonstrated to cross the blood brain barrier. Here we describe the transfer of structural features that evoked MOR agonist/DOR antagonist behavior in the cyclic peptides to the tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and show that the resulting peptidomimetics maintain the desired pharmacological profile. Further, the 4R diastereomer of 1 was fully efficacious and approximately equipotent to morphine in the mouse warm water tail withdrawal assay following intraperitoneal administration and thus a promising lead for the development of opioid analgesics with reduced tolerance. PMID:23419026

  14. Reinforcing effects of sigma-receptor agonists in rats trained to self-administer cocaine.

    PubMed

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L; Tanda, Gianluigi; Katz, Jonathan L

    2010-02-01

    sigma-Receptor (sigmaR) antagonists have been reported to block certain effects of psychostimulant drugs. The present study examined the effects of sigmaR ligands in rats trained to self-administer cocaine (0.032-1.0 mg/kg/inj i.v.) under fixed-ratio 5-response schedules of reinforcement. Maximal rates of responding were maintained by 0.32 mg/kg/inj cocaine, or by the sigmaR agonists, 1,3-di-(2-tolyl)guanidine (DTG; 1.0 mg/kg/inj) or 2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate hydrochloride (PRE-084; 0.32 mg/kg/inj), when substituted for cocaine. Lower response rates were maintained at higher and lower doses of the compounds. No dose of the sigmaR antagonists [N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine (BD 1008), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino)ethylamine (BD 1047), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-methylpiperazine (BD 1063)] maintained responding appreciably above levels obtained when responding had no consequences. Presession treatment with sigmaR agonists dose-dependently shifted the cocaine self-administration dose-effect curve leftward. The dopamine-uptake inhibitor, (-)-2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (WIN 35,428), dose-dependently shifted the DTG and PRE-084 self-administration dose-effect curves leftward. Treatment with the sigmaR antagonists dose-dependently decreased response rates maintained by DTG or PRE-084, but did not affect cocaine self-administration. Response rates maintained by maximally effective DTG or PRE-084 doses were decreased by sigmaR antagonists at lower doses than those that decreased response rates maintained by food reinforcement. Although sigmaR antagonists block some cocaine-induced effects, the lack of effect on cocaine self-administration suggests that the primary reinforcing effects of cocaine do not involve direct effects at sigmaRs. However, the self-administration of sigmaR agonists in cocaine-trained subjects, facilitation of cocaine self

  15. Reinforcing Effects of σ-Receptor Agonists in Rats Trained to Self-Administer Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L.; Tanda, Gianluigi

    2010-01-01

    σ-Receptor (σR) antagonists have been reported to block certain effects of psychostimulant drugs. The present study examined the effects of σR ligands in rats trained to self-administer cocaine (0.032–1.0 mg/kg/inj i.v.) under fixed-ratio 5-response schedules of reinforcement. Maximal rates of responding were maintained by 0.32 mg/kg/inj cocaine, or by the σR agonists, 1,3-di-(2-tolyl)guanidine (DTG; 1.0 mg/kg/inj) or 2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexane-1-carboxylate hydrochloride (PRE-084; 0.32 mg/kg/inj), when substituted for cocaine. Lower response rates were maintained at higher and lower doses of the compounds. No dose of the σR antagonists [N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine (BD 1008), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino)ethylamine (BD 1047), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-methylpiperazine (BD 1063)] maintained responding appreciably above levels obtained when responding had no consequences. Presession treatment with σR agonists dose-dependently shifted the cocaine self-administration dose-effect curve leftward. The dopamine-uptake inhibitor, (−)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (WIN 35,428), dose-dependently shifted the DTG and PRE-084 self-administration dose-effect curves leftward. Treatment with the σR antagonists dose-dependently decreased response rates maintained by DTG or PRE-084, but did not affect cocaine self-administration. Response rates maintained by maximally effective DTG or PRE-084 doses were decreased by σR antagonists at lower doses than those that decreased response rates maintained by food reinforcement. Although σR antagonists block some cocaine-induced effects, the lack of effect on cocaine self-administration suggests that the primary reinforcing effects of cocaine do not involve direct effects at σRs. However, the self-administration of σR agonists in cocaine-trained subjects, facilitation of cocaine self-administration by σR-agonist

  16. Prospects for Creation of Cardioprotective Drugs Based on Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Leonid N; Khaliulin, Igor; Zhang, Yi; Krylatov, Andrey V; Naryzhnaya, Natalia V; Mechoulam, Raphael; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Downey, James M

    2016-05-01

    Cannabinoids can mimic the infarct-reducing effect of early ischemic preconditioning, delayed ischemic preconditioning, and ischemic postconditioning against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. They do this primarily through both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Cannabinoids are also involved in remote preconditioning of the heart. The cannabinoid receptor ligands also exhibit an antiapoptotic effect during ischemia/reperfusion of the heart. The acute cardioprotective effect of cannabinoids is mediated by activation of protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 kinase. The delayed cardioprotective effect of cannabinoid anandamide is mediated via stimulation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt signaling pathway and enhancement of heat shock protein 72 expression. The delayed cardioprotective effect of another cannabinoid, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, is associated with augmentation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression, but data on the involvement of NO synthase in the acute cardioprotective effect of cannabinoids are contradictory. The adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+)channel is involved in the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210-induced cardiac resistance to ischemia/reperfusion injury. Cannabinoids inhibit Na(+)/Ca(2+)exchange via peripheral cannabinoid receptor (CB2) activation that may also be related to the antiapoptotic and cardioprotective effects of cannabinoids. The cannabinoid receptor agonists should be considered as prospective group of compounds for creation of drugs that are able to protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury in the clinical setting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Taurine release from the developing and ageing hippocampus: stimulation by agonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Saransaari, P; Oja, S S

    1997-12-30

    The inhibitory amino acid taurine has been held to function as a modulator and osmoregulator in the brain, being of particular importance in the immature brain. The release of preloaded [3H]taurine was now studied in hippocampal slices from developing (7-day-old), adult (3-month-old) and ageing (6-24-month-old) mice focussing on the effects of agonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainate and 2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) potentiated taurine release concentration-dependently at each age, more so in the immature than in the adult and ageing hippocampus. The effect of kainate was blocked by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) in the developing and aged hippocampus and those of AMPA and NMDA by 6-nitro-7-sulphamoylbenzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX) and dizocilpine a(MK-801) at every age studied. This indicates the involvement of NMDA and AMPA receptors in taurine release throughout the life-span of mice, while the kainate-receptor-mediated release does not appear to function in adults. The increased hippocampal taurine release evoked by ionotropic glutamate receptors could act neuroprotectively, counteracting by several mechanisms the harmful effects of the simultaneous release of excitatory amino acids. The substantial release of taurine in the immature hippocampus might be particularly significant in view of the vulnerability of brain tissue to excitotoxicity at early age.

  18. Optical Control of Dopamine Receptors Using a Photoswitchable Tethered Inverse Agonist.

    PubMed

    Donthamsetti, Prashant C; Winter, Nils; Schönberger, Matthias; Levitz, Joshua; Stanley, Cherise; Javitch, Jonathan A; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Trauner, Dirk

    2017-12-27

    Family A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) control diverse biological processes and are of great clinical relevance. Their archetype rhodopsin becomes naturally light sensitive by binding covalently to the photoswitchable tethered ligand (PTL) retinal. Other GPCRs, however, neither bind covalently to ligands nor are light sensitive. We sought to impart the logic of rhodopsin to light-insensitive Family A GPCRs in order to enable their remote control in a receptor-specific, cell-type-specific, and spatiotemporally precise manner. Dopamine receptors (DARs) are of particular interest for their roles in motor coordination, appetitive, and aversive behavior, as well as neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, mood disorders, and addiction. Using an azobenzene derivative of the well-known DAR ligand 2-(N-phenethyl-N-propyl)amino-5-hydroxytetralin (PPHT), we were able to rapidly, reversibly, and selectively block dopamine D1 and D2 receptors (D1R and D2R) when the PTL was conjugated to an engineered cysteine near the dopamine binding site. Depending on the site of tethering, the ligand behaved as either a photoswitchable tethered neutral antagonist or inverse agonist. Our results indicate that DARs can be chemically engineered for selective remote control by light and provide a template for precision control of Family A GPCRs.

  19. N-(4-Trifluoromethylphenyl)amide group of the synthetic histamine receptor agonist inhibits nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Chan; Park, Yong-Soo; Jun, Dong-Jae; Hur, Eun-Mi; Kim, Sun-Hee; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2006-02-28

    The therapeutic targeting of nicotinic receptors requires the identification of drugs that selectively activate or inhibit a limited range of nicotine acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In this study, we identified N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)amide group of the synthetic histamine receptor ligands, histamine-trifluoromethyltoluide, that act as potent inhibitors of nAChRs in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Catecholamine secretion induced by the nAChRs agonist, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP), was significantly inhibited by histamine-trifluoromethyltoluide. Real time carbon-fiber amperometry confirmed the ability of histamine-trifluoromethyltoluide to inhibit DMPP-induced exocytosis in single chromaffin cells. We also found that histamine-trifluoromethyltoluide inhibited DMPP-induced [Ca(2+)](i) and [Na(+)](i) increases, as well as DMPP-induced inward currents in the absence of extracellular calcium. Histamine-trifluoromethyltoluide had no effect on [(3)H]nicotine binding or on calcium increases induced by high K(+), bradykinin, veratridine, histamine, and benzoylbenzoyl ATP. Among the synthetic histamine receptor ligands, clobenpropit exhibited similarity. In addition, 4'-nitroacetanilide also significantly attenuated nAChR-mediated catecholamine secretion. In conclusion, the N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)amide group of the histamine-trifluoromethyltoluide might be the critical moiety in the inhibition of nAChR-mediated CA secretion.

  20. Differential activation of G-proteins by mu-opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Saidak, Zuzana; Blake-Palmer, Katherine; Hay, Debbie L; Northup, John K; Glass, Michelle

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the ability of the activated mu-opioid receptor (MOR) to differentiate between myristoylated G(alphai1) and G(alphaoA) type G(alpha) proteins, and the maximal activity of a range of synthetic and endogenous agonists to activate each G(alpha) protein. Membranes from HEK293 cells stably expressing transfected MOR were chaotrope extracted to denature endogenous G-proteins and reconstituted with specific purified G-proteins. The G(alpha) subunits were generated in bacteria and were demonstrated to be recognised equivalently to bovine brain purified G(alpha) protein by CB(1) cannabinoid receptors. The ability of agonists to catalyse the MOR-dependent GDP/[(35)S]GTP(gamma)S exchange was then compared for G(alphai1) and G(alphaoA). Activation of MOR by DAMGO produced a high-affinity saturable interaction for G(alphaoA) (K(m)=20+/-1 nM) but a low-affinity interaction with G(alphai1) (K(m)=116+/-12 nM). DAMGO, met-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalin displayed maximal G(alpha) activation among the agonists evaluated. Endomorphins 1 and 2, methadone and beta-endorphin activated both G(alpha) to more than 75% of the maximal response, whereas fentanyl partially activated both G-proteins. Buprenorphine and morphine demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the maximal activities between G(alphai1) and G(alphaoA). Interestingly, DAMGO, morphine, endomorphins 1 and 2, displayed significant differences in the potencies for the activation of the two G(alpha). Differences in maximal activity and potency, for G(alphai1) versus G(alphaoA), are both indicative of agonist selective activation of G-proteins in response to MOR activation. These findings may provide a starting point for the design of drugs that demonstrate greater selectivity between these two G-proteins and therefore produce a more limited range of effects.

  1. Agonist-biased trafficking of somatostatin receptor 2A in enteric neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peishen; Canals, Meritxell; Murphy, Jane E; Klingler, Diana; Eriksson, Emily M; Pelayo, Juan-Carlos; Hardt, Markus; Bunnett, Nigel W; Poole, Daniel P

    2013-09-06

    Somatostatin (SST) 14 and SST 28 activate somatostatin 2A receptors (SSTR2A) on enteric neurons to control gut functions. SST analogs are treatments of neuroendocrine and bleeding disorders, cancer, and diarrhea, with gastrointestinal side effects of constipation, abdominal pain, and nausea. How endogenous agonists and drugs differentially regulate neuronal SSTR2A is unexplored. We evaluated SSTR2A trafficking in murine myenteric neurons and neuroendocrine AtT-20 cells by microscopy and determined whether agonist degradation by endosomal endothelin-converting enzyme 1 (ECE-1) controls SSTR2A trafficking and association with β-arrestins, key regulators of receptors. SST-14, SST-28, and peptide analogs (octreotide, lanreotide, and vapreotide) stimulated clathrin- and dynamin-mediated internalization of SSTR2A, which colocalized with ECE-1 in endosomes and the Golgi. After incubation with SST-14, SSTR2A recycled to the plasma membrane, which required active ECE-1 and an intact Golgi. SSTR2A activated by SST-28, octreotide, lanreotide, or vapreotide was retained within the Golgi and did not recycle. Although ECE-1 rapidly degraded SST-14, SST-28 was resistant to degradation, and ECE-1 did not degrade SST analogs. SST-14 and SST-28 induced transient interactions between SSTR2A and β-arrestins that were stabilized by an ECE-1 inhibitor. Octreotide induced sustained SSTR2A/β-arrestin interactions that were not regulated by ECE-1. Thus, when activated by SST-14, SSTR2A internalizes and recycles via the Golgi, which requires ECE-1 degradation of SST-14 and receptor dissociation from β-arrestins. After activation by ECE-1-resistant SST-28 and analogs, SSTR2A remains in endosomes because of sustained β-arrestin interactions. Therapeutic SST analogs are ECE-1-resistant and retain SSTR2A in endosomes, which may explain their long-lasting actions.

  2. Agonist-biased Trafficking of Somatostatin Receptor 2A in Enteric Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peishen; Canals, Meritxell; Murphy, Jane E.; Klingler, Diana; Eriksson, Emily M.; Pelayo, Juan-Carlos; Hardt, Markus; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Poole, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) 14 and SST 28 activate somatostatin 2A receptors (SSTR2A) on enteric neurons to control gut functions. SST analogs are treatments of neuroendocrine and bleeding disorders, cancer, and diarrhea, with gastrointestinal side effects of constipation, abdominal pain, and nausea. How endogenous agonists and drugs differentially regulate neuronal SSTR2A is unexplored. We evaluated SSTR2A trafficking in murine myenteric neurons and neuroendocrine AtT-20 cells by microscopy and determined whether agonist degradation by endosomal endothelin-converting enzyme 1 (ECE-1) controls SSTR2A trafficking and association with β-arrestins, key regulators of receptors. SST-14, SST-28, and peptide analogs (octreotide, lanreotide, and vapreotide) stimulated clathrin- and dynamin-mediated internalization of SSTR2A, which colocalized with ECE-1 in endosomes and the Golgi. After incubation with SST-14, SSTR2A recycled to the plasma membrane, which required active ECE-1 and an intact Golgi. SSTR2A activated by SST-28, octreotide, lanreotide, or vapreotide was retained within the Golgi and did not recycle. Although ECE-1 rapidly degraded SST-14, SST-28 was resistant to degradation, and ECE-1 did not degrade SST analogs. SST-14 and SST-28 induced transient interactions between SSTR2A and β-arrestins that were stabilized by an ECE-1 inhibitor. Octreotide induced sustained SSTR2A/β-arrestin interactions that were not regulated by ECE-1. Thus, when activated by SST-14, SSTR2A internalizes and recycles via the Golgi, which requires ECE-1 degradation of SST-14 and receptor dissociation from β-arrestins. After activation by ECE-1-resistant SST-28 and analogs, SSTR2A remains in endosomes because of sustained β-arrestin interactions. Therapeutic SST analogs are ECE-1-resistant and retain SSTR2A in endosomes, which may explain their long-lasting actions. PMID:23913690

  3. Peripheral Administration of a Long-Acting Peptide Oxytocin Receptor Agonist Inhibits Fear-Induced Freezing.

    PubMed

    Modi, Meera E; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fonseca, Kari R; Doran, Angela; Osgood, Sarah; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle; Feyfant, Eric; McInnes, Heather; Darvari, Ramin; Buhl, Derek L; Kablaoui, Natasha M

    2016-08-01

    Oxytocin (OT) modulates the expression of social and emotional behaviors and consequently has been proposed as a pharmacologic treatment of psychiatric diseases, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia; however, endogenous OT has a short half-life in plasma and poor permeability across the blood-brain barrier. Recent efforts have focused on the development of novel drug delivery methods to enhance brain penetration, but few efforts have aimed at improving its half-life. To explore the behavioral efficacy of an OT analog with enhanced plasma stability, we developed PF-06655075 (PF1), a novel non-brain-penetrant OT receptor agonist with increased selectivity for the OT receptor and significantly increased pharmacokinetic stability. PF-06478939 was generated with only increased stability to disambiguate changes to selectivity versus stability. The efficacy of these compounds in evoking behavioral effects was tested in a conditioned fear paradigm. Both central and peripheral administration of PF1 inhibited freezing in response to a conditioned fear stimulus. Peripheral administration of PF1 resulted in a sustained level of plasma concentrations for greater than 20 hours but no detectable accumulation in brain tissue, suggesting that plasma or cerebrospinal fluid exposure was sufficient to evoke behavioral effects. Behavioral efficacy of peripherally administered OT receptor agonists on conditioned fear response opens the door to potential peripheral mechanisms in other behavioral paradigms, whether they are mediated by direct peripheral activation or feed-forward responses. Compound PF1 is freely available as a tool compound to further explore the role of peripheral OT in behavioral response. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Identification of Estrogen-Related Receptor α Agonists in the Tox21 Compound Library.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Caitlin; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Kanaya, Noriko; Bernal, Lauren; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Auerbach, Scott S; Witt, Kristine L; Merrick, B Alex; Chen, Shiuan; Teng, Christina T; Xia, Menghang

    2018-02-01

    The estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) is an orphan nuclear receptor (NR) that plays a role in energy homeostasis and controls mitochondrial oxidative respiration. Increased expression of ERRα in certain ovarian, breast, and colon cancers has a negative prognosis, indicating an important role for ERRα in cancer progression. An interaction between ERRα and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) has also recently been shown to regulate an enzyme in the β-oxidation of free fatty acids, thereby suggesting that ERRα plays an important role in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, it would be prudent to identify compounds that can act as activators of ERRα. In this study, we screened ∼10,000 (8311 unique) compounds, known as the Tox21 10K collection, to identify agonists of ERRα. We performed this screen using two stably transfected HEK 293 cell lines, one with the ERRα-reporter alone and the other with both ERRα-reporter and PGC-1α expression vectors. After the primary screening, we identified more than five agonist clusters based on compound structural similarity analysis (e.g., statins). By examining the activities of the confirmed ERRα modulators in other Tox21 NR assays, eliminating those with promiscuous NR activity, and performing follow-up assays (e.g., small interfering RNA knockdown), we identified compounds that might act as endocrine disrupters through effects on ERRα signaling. To our knowledge, this study is the first comprehensive analysis in discovering potential endocrine disrupters that affect the ERRα signaling pathway. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  5. Somatostatin displayed on filamentous phage as a receptor-specific agonist

    PubMed Central

    Rousch, Mat; Lutgerink, Jan T; Coote, James; de Bruïne, Adriaan; Arends, Jan-Willem; Hoogenboom, Hennie R

    1998-01-01

    In search of methods to identify bio-active ligands specific for G protein-coupled receptors with seven transmembrane spanning regions, we have developed a filamentous phage-based selection and functional screening method. First, methods for panning peptide phage on cells were established, using the hormone somatostatin as a model. Somatostatin was displayed on the surface of filamentous phage by cloning into phage(mid) vectors and fusion to either pIII or pVIII viral coat proteins. Peptide displaying phage bound to a polyclonal anti-somatostatin serum, and, more importantly, to several somatostatin receptor subtypes (Sst) expressed on transfected CHO-K1 cells, in a pattern which was dependent on the used display method. Binding was competed with somatostatin, with an IC50 in the nanomolar range. The phage were specifically enriched by panning on cells, establishing conditions for cell selections of phage libraries. Binding of somatostatin displaying phage to sst2 on a reporter cell line, in which binding of natural ligand reduces secretion of alkaline phosphatase (via a cyclic AMP responsive element sensitive promoter), proved that the phage particles act as receptor-specific agonists. Less than 100 phage particles per cell were required for this activity, which is approximately 1000 fold less than soluble somatostatin, suggesting that phage binding interferes with normal receptor desensitization and/or recycling. The combination of biopanning of phage libraries on cells with functional screening of phage particles for receptor triggering activity, may be used to select novel, bio-active ligands from phage libraries of random peptides, antibody fragments, or libraries based on the natural receptor ligand. PMID:9776337

  6. Pharmacokinetics of the novel oral prostacyclin receptor agonist selexipag in subjects with hepatic or renal impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Hans G.; Krause, Andreas; Ulč, Ivan; Halabi, Atef; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of hepatic or renal dysfunction on the pharmacokinetics (PK), tolerability and safety of selexipag, an orally active prostacyclin receptor agonist. Methods Two prospective, open‐label studies evaluated the PK of selexipag and its active metabolite ACT‐333679 in healthy subjects and in subjects with mild, moderate and severe hepatic impairment or severe renal function impairment (SRFI). A single dose of 200 μg or 400 μg was administered. The PK parameters were derived from plasma concentration–time profiles. Results Exposure increased with the severity of hepatic impairment. Geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals of the area under the concentration–time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) for selexipag and ACT‐333679 increased 2.1‐fold (1.7–2.6) and 1.2‐fold (0.9–1.6) in subjects with mild hepatic impairment, and 4.5‐fold (3.4–5.8) and 2.2‐fold (1.7–2.8) in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment when compared with healthy subjects. The two subjects with severe hepatic impairment showed similar dose‐normalized exposure to that of subjects with moderate hepatic impairment. A 1.7‐fold increase in the AUC0–∞ of selexipag and ACT‐333679 was observed with SRFI compared with healthy subjects. Although exposure to selexipag and/or ACT‐333679 was higher in subjects with mild or moderate hepatic impairment or SRFI vs. healthy subjects, no safety concerns were raised in these groups. Conclusions Based on these observations, the PK data suggest that the clinically used starting dose needs no adjustments in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment or SRFI. However, doses should be up‐titrated with caution in these patients. The small number of subjects limits the interpretation of selexipag PK in subjects with severe hepatic impairment. PMID:27062188

  7. Ipragliflozin Add-on Therapy to a GLP-1 Receptor Agonist in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes (AGATE): A 52-Week Open-Label Study.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Nakao, Ikko; Sakatani, Taishi

    2018-06-20

    Few data are available regarding ipragliflozin treatment in combination with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ipragliflozin in combination with GLP-1 receptor agonists in Japanese patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This multicenter study (consisting of three periods: a 4-week washout period, a 6-week observation period, and a 52-week open-label treatment period) included patients aged ≥ 20 years who received a stable dose/regimen of a GLP-1 receptor agonist either solely or in combination therapy with a sulfonylurea for ≥ 6 weeks, with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of ≥ 7.5% and a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) of ≥ 126 mg/dL. Ipragliflozin treatment was given at a fixed dose of 50 mg/day for 20 weeks, followed by 50 or 100 mg/day for 32 weeks. Changes from baseline in glycemic control and other parameters were examined; safety was also assessed. The mean changes in HbA1c and body weight from baseline to end of treatment were - 0.92% and - 2.69 kg, respectively, in all ipragliflozin-treated patients (n = 103). Overall, sustained reductions from baseline were observed for HbA1c, FPG, self-monitored blood glucose, and body weight during the 52-week treatment. The dose increase of ipragliflozin to 100 mg/day resulted in better glycemic control and weight reduction for patients in whom the 50-mg dose was insufficient. Overall, 46.6% (48/103) of patients experienced drug-related adverse events. The most common drug-related treatment-emergent adverse events were pollakiuria (9.7%), hypoglycemia (8.7%), constipation (6.8%), and thirst (5.8%). Combined therapy with ipragliflozin and GLP-1 receptor agonists/sulfonylureas was significantly efficacious in reducing glycemic parameters in patients with T2DM with inadequate glycemic control, and no major safety concerns were identified. The results from this study suggest

  8. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate CAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of CAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of CAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of CAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of CAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  9. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Cureri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of cAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of cAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  10. Effect of α₇ nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice.

    PubMed

    Welch, Kevin D; Pfister, James A; Lima, Flavia G; Green, Benedict T; Gardner, Dale R

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. PF-06827443 Displays Robust Allosteric Agonist and Positive Allosteric Modulator Activity in High Receptor Reserve and Native Systems.

    PubMed

    Moran, Sean P; Cho, Hyekyung P; Maksymetz, James; Remke, Daniel H; Hanson, Ryan M; Niswender, Colleen M; Lindsley, Craig W; Rook, Jerri M; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2018-04-25

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the M 1 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor have attracted intense interest as an exciting new approach for improving the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Recent evidence suggests that the presence of intrinsic agonist activity of some M 1 PAMs may reduce efficacy and contribute to adverse effect liability. However, the M 1 PAM PF-06827443 was reported to have only weak agonist activity at human M 1 receptors but produced M 1 -dependent adverse effects. We now report that PF-06827443 is an allosteric agonist in cell lines expressing rat, dog, and human M 1 and use of inducible cell lines shows that agonist activity of PF-06827443 is dependent on receptor reserve. Furthermore, PF-06827443 is an agonist in native tissue preparations and induces behavioral convulsions in mice similar to other ago-PAMs. These findings suggest that PF-06827443 is a robust ago-PAM, independent of species, in cell lines and native systems.

  12. Transcriptional Modulation of the Immune Response by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated ReceptorAgonists in Autoimmune Disease1

    PubMed Central

    Gocke, Anne R.; Hussain, Rehana Z.; Yang, Yuhong; Peng, Haiyan; Weiner, Jeffrey; Ben, Li-Hong; Drew, Paul D.; Stuve, Olaf; Lovett-Racke, Amy E.; Racke, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) agonists have been shown to have a therapeutic benefit in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which the PPARα agonist gemfibrozil induces immune deviation and protects mice from EAE. We demonstrated that treatment with gemfibrozil increases expression of the Th2 transcription factor GATA-3 and decreases expression of the Th1 transcription factor T-bet in vitro and directly ex vivo. These changes correlated with an increase in nuclear PPARα expression. Moreover, the protective effects of PPARα agonists in EAE were shown to be partially dependent on IL-4 and to occur in a receptor-dependent manner. PPARα was demonstrated, for the first time, to regulate the IL-4 and IL-5 genes and to bind the IL-4 promoter in the presence of steroid receptor coactivator-1, indicating that PPARα can directly transactivate the IL-4 gene. Finally, therapeutic administration of PPARα agonists ameliorated clinically established EAE, suggesting that PPARα agonists may provide a treatment option for immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:19299749

  13. Red Clover Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) and Estrogen Receptor (ER) Agonists Enhance Genotoxic Estrogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Many women consider botanical dietary supplements (BDSs) as safe alternatives to hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms. However, the effect of BDSs on breast cancer risk is largely unknown. In the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, P450 1B1 metabolizes estrogens to 4-hydroxylated catechols, which are oxidized to genotoxic quinones that initiate and promote breast cancer. In contrast, P450 1A1 catalyzed 2-hydroxylation represents a detoxification pathway. The current study evaluated the effects of red clover, a popular BDS used for women’s health, and its isoflavones, biochanin A (BA), formononetin (FN), genistein (GN), and daidzein (DZ), on estrogen metabolism. The methoxy estrogen metabolites (2-MeOE1, 4-MeOE1) were measured by LC-MS/MS, and CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Nonmalignant ER-negative breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and ER-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were derived from normal breast epithelial tissue and ER+ breast cancer tissue. Red clover extract (RCE, 10 μg/mL) and isoflavones had no effect on estrogen metabolism in MCF-10A cells. However, in MCF-7 cells, RCE treatments downregulated CYP1A1 expression and enhanced genotoxic metabolism (4-MeOE1/CYP1B1 > 2-MeOE1/CYP1A1). Experiments with the isoflavones showed that the AhR agonists (BA, FN) preferentially induced CYP1B1 expression as well as 4-MeOE1. In contrast, the ER agonists (GN, DZ) downregulated CYP1A1 expression likely through an epigenetic mechanism. Finally, the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 potentiated isoflavone-induced XRE-luciferase reporter activity and reversed GN and DZ induced downregulation of CYP1A1 expression. Overall, these studies show that red clover and its isoflavones have differential effects on estrogen metabolism in “normal” vs breast cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, the AhR agonists stimulate genotoxic metabolism, and the ER agonists downregulate the detoxification pathway. These data may suggest that especially breast

  14. Exploring pharmacological activities and signaling of morphinans substituted in position 6 as potent agonists interacting with the μ opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Opioid analgesics are the most effective drugs for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. However, they also produce several adverse effects that can complicate pain management. The μ opioid (MOP) receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor, is recognized as the opioid receptor type which primarily mediates the pharmacological actions of clinically used opioid agonists. The morphinan class of analgesics including morphine and oxycodone are of main importance as therapeutically valuable drugs. Though the natural alkaloid morphine contains a C-6-hydroxyl group and the semisynthetic derivative oxycodone has a 6-carbonyl function, chemical approaches have uncovered that functionalizing position 6 gives rise to a range of diverse activities. Hence, position 6 of N-methylmorphinans is one of the most manipulated sites, and is established to play a key role in ligand binding at the MOP receptor, efficacy, signaling, and analgesic potency. We have earlier reported on a chemically innovative modification in oxycodone resulting in novel morphinans with 6-acrylonitrile incorporated substructures. Results This study describes in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activities and signaling of new morphinans substituted in position 6 with acrylonitrile and amido functions as potent agonists and antinociceptive agents interacting with MOP receptors. We show that the presence of a 6-cyano group in N-methylmorphinans has a strong influence on the binding to the opioid receptors and post-receptor signaling. One 6-cyano-N-methylmorphinan of the series was identified as the highest affinity and most selective MOP agonist, and very potent in stimulating G protein coupling and intracellular calcium release through the MOP receptor. In vivo, this MOP agonist showed to be greatly effective against thermal and chemical nociception in mice with marked increased antinociceptive potency than the lead molecule oxycodone. Conclusion Development of such novel chemotypes by targeting

  15. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  16. (+)Lysergic acid diethylamide, but not its nonhallucinogenic congeners, is a potent serotonin 5HT1C receptor agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, K.D.; Breeding, M.; Sanders-Bush, E.

    Activation of central serotonin 5HT2 receptors is believed to be the primary mechanism whereby lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and other hallucinogens induce psychoactive effects. This hypothesis is based on extensive radioligand binding and electrophysiological and behavioral studies in laboratory animals. However, the pharmacological profiles of 5HT2 and 5HT1C receptors are similar, making it difficult to distinguish between effects due to activation of one or the other receptor. For this reason, it was of interest to investigate the interaction of LSD with 5HT1C receptors. Agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat choroid plexus was used as a direct measure of 5HT1C receptor activation.more » (+)LSD potently stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in intact choroid plexus and in cultures of choroid plexus epithelial cells, with EC50 values of 9 and 26 nM, respectively. The effect of (+)LSD in both systems was blocked by 5HT receptor antagonists with an order of activity consistent with interaction at 5HT1C receptors. Neither (+)-2-bromo-LSD nor lisuride, two nonhallucinogenic congeners of LSD, were able to stimulate 5HT1C receptors in cultured cells or intact choroid plexus. In contrast, lisuride, like (+)LSD, is a partial agonist at 5HT2 receptors in cerebral cortex slices and in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with 5HT2 receptor cDNA. The present finding that (+)LSD, but not its nonhallucinogenic congeners, is a 5HT1C receptor agonist suggests a possible role for these receptors in mediating the psychoactive effects of LSD.« less

  17. Drug Insight: mechanisms of action and therapeutic applications for agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Gervois, Philippe; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2007-02-01

    Intensive preclinical investigations have delineated a role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in energy metabolism and inflammation. PPARs are activated by natural lipophilic ligands such as fatty acids and their derivatives. Normalization of lipid and glucose metabolism is achieved via pharmacological modulation of PPAR activity. PPARs may also alter atherosclerosis progression through direct effects on the vascular wall. PPARs regulate genes involved in the recruitment of leukocytes to endothelial cells, in vascular inflammation, in macrophage lipid homeostasis, and in thrombosis. PPARs therefore modulate metabolic and inflammatory perturbations that predispose to cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. The hypolipidemic fibrates and the antidiabetic thiazolidinediones are drugs that act via PPARalpha and PPARgamma, respectively, and are used in clinical practice. PPARbeta/delta ligands are currently in clinical evaluation. The pleiotropic actions of PPARs and the fact that chemically diverse PPAR agonists may induce distinct pharmacological responses have led to the emergence of new concepts for drug design. A more precise understanding of the molecular pathways implicated in the response to chemically distinct PPAR agonists should provide new opportunities for targeted therapeutic applications in the management of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.

  18. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist affects honey bee sucrose responsiveness and decreases waggle dancing.

    PubMed

    Eiri, Daren M; Nieh, James C

    2012-06-15

    A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, imidacloprid, impairs memory formation in honey bees and has general effects on foraging. However, little is known about how this agonist affects two specific aspects of foraging: sucrose responsiveness (SR) and waggle dancing (which recruits nestmates). Using lab and field experiments, we tested the effect of sublethal doses of imidacloprid on (1) bee SR with the proboscis extension response assay, and (2) free-flying foragers visiting and dancing for a sucrose feeder. Bees that ingested imidacloprid (0.21 or 2.16 ng bee(-1)) had higher sucrose response thresholds 1 h after treatment. Foragers that ingested imidacloprid also produced significantly fewer waggle dance circuits (10.5- and 4.5-fold fewer for 50% and 30% sucrose solutions, respectively) 24 h after treatment as compared with controls. However, there was no significant effect of imidacloprid on the sucrose concentrations that foragers collected at a feeder 24 h after treatment. Thus, imidacloprid temporarily increased the minimum sucrose concentration that foragers would accept (short time scale, 1 h after treatment) and reduced waggle dancing (longer time scale, 24 h after treatment). The effect of time suggests different neurological effects of imidacloprid resulting from the parent compound and its metabolites. Waggle dancing can significantly increase colony food intake, and thus a sublethal dose (0.21 ng bee(-1), 24 p.p.b.) of this commonly used pesticide may impair colony fitness.

  19. Sodium ion modulates D2 receptor characteristics of dopamine agonist and antagonist binding sites in striatum and retina

    PubMed Central

    Makman, Maynard H.; Dvorkin, B.; Klein, Patrice N.

    1982-01-01

    Sodium ion (Na+) influences binding of both dopamine agonists and antagonists to D2 receptors in striatum and retina. Also, Na+ markedly potentiates the loss of high-affinity agonist binding due to the GTP analogue p[NH]ppG. 2-Amino-6, 7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro[5,8-3H]naphthalene ([3H]ADTN) binds exclusively to an agonist conformation of D2 receptor in both striatum and retina, distinct from the antagonist conformation labeled by [3H]spiroperidol or [3H]domperidone in striatum or by [3H]spiroperidol in retina. Na+ is not required for interaction of [3H]ADTN or antagonist radioligand sites with the selective D2 agonist LY-141865, the D2 antagonist domperidone, or nonselective dopamine agonists or antagonists; however, Na+ is necessary for high affinity interaction of those radioligand sites with the D2 antagonists molindone and metoclopramide. With Na+ present, striatal sites for [3H]ADTN, [3H]spiroperidol, and [3H]domperidone have similar affinities for antagonists but only [3H]ADTN sites have high affinity for agonists. Na+ further decreases the low affinity of dopamine agonists for [3H]spiroperidol binding sites. Also, Na+ enhances [3H]spiroperidol and decreases [3H]ADTN binding. Na+ alone causes bound [3H]ADTN to dissociate from at least 30% of striatal and 50% of retinal sites, and with Na+ present [3H]ADTN rapidly dissociates from the remaining sites upon addition of p[NH]ppG. It is proposed that D2 receptors in striatum and retina exist in distinct but interconvertible conformational states, with different properties depending on the presence or absence of Na+ and of guanine nucleotide. PMID:6213964

  20. Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist enhances the subjective effects of cocaine in humans.

    PubMed

    Newton, Thomas F; Haile, Colin N; Mahoney, James J; Shah, Ravi; Verrico, Christopher D; De La Garza, Richard; Kosten, Thomas R

    2015-11-30

    Pramipexole is a D3 dopamine receptor-preferring agonist indicated for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Studies associate pramipexole with pathological gambling and impulse control disorders suggesting a role for D3 receptors in reinforcement processes. Clinical studies showed pramipexole decreased cocaine craving and reversed central deficits in individuals with cocaine use disorder. Preclinical studies have shown acute administration of pramipexole increases cocaine's reinforcing effects whereas other reports suggest chronic pramipexole produces tolerance to cocaine. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we examined the impact of pramipexole treatment on the subjective effects produced by cocaine in volunteers with cocaine use disorder. Volunteers received pramipexole titrated up to 3.0mg/d or placebo over 15 days. Participants then received intravenous cocaine (0, 20 and 40mg) on day 15. Cardiovascular and subjective effects were obtained with visual analog scales at time points across the session. Pramipexole alone increased peak heart rate following saline and diastolic blood pressure following cocaine. Pramipexole produced upwards of two-fold increases in positive subjective effects ratings following cocaine. These results indicate that chronic D3 receptor activation increases the subjective effects of cocaine in humans. Caution should be used when prescribing pramipexole to patients that may also use cocaine. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Modeling and simulation studies of human β3 adrenergic receptor and its interactions with agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahi, Shakti; Tewatia, Parul; Malik, Balwant K

    2012-12-01

    β3 adrenergic receptor (β3AR) is known to mediate various pharmacological and physiological effects such as thermogenesis in brown adipocytes, lipolysis in white adipocytes, glucose homeostasis and intestinal smooth muscle relaxation. Several efforts have been made in this field to understand their function and regulation in different human tissues and they have emerged as potential attractive targets in drug discovery for the treatment of diabetes, depression, obesity etc. Although the crystal structures of Bovine Rhodopsin and β2 adrenergic receptor have been resolved, to date there is no three dimensional structural information on β3AR. Our aim in this study was to model 3D structure of β3AR by various molecular modeling and simulation techniques. In this paper, we describe a refined predicted model of β3AR using different algorithms for structure prediction. The structural refinement and minimization of the generated 3D model of β3AR were done by Schrodinger suite 9.1. Docking studies of β3AR model with the known agonists enabled us to identify specific residues, viz, Asp 117, Ser 208, Ser 209, Ser 212, Arg 315, Asn 332, within the β3AR binding pocket, which might play an important role in ligand binding. Receptor ligand interaction studies clearly indicated that these five residues showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions with the ligands. The results have been correlated with the experimental data available. The predicted ligand binding interactions and the simulation studies validate the methods used to predict the 3D-structure.

  2. Synthesis of iboga-like isoquinuclidines: Dual opioid receptors agonists having antinociceptive properties.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tuhin Suvro; Paul, Sibasish; Sinha, Surajit; Das, Sumantra

    2014-11-01

    Some novel iboga-analogues consisting of benzofuran moiety and dehydroisoquinuclidine ring connected by -CH2-, (CH2)2 and (CH2)3 linkers have been synthesized with the view to develop potential antinociceptive drugs. The compounds 14 and 21 showed binding at the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), while the compound 11a exhibited dual affinities at both MOR and κ-opioid receptor (KOR). MAP kinase activation indicated all three compounds have opioid agonistic properties. The presence of a double bond and endo-methylcarboxylate group in the dehydroisoquinuclidine ring and the benzofuran and methylene spacer appeared to be essential for opioid receptor binding. Further studies demonstrated 11a caused significant antinociception in mice in the hot-plate test which was comparable to that produced by morphine. The compound 11a was also found to be nontremorigenic unlike various iboga congeners. This study identifies a new pharmacophore which may lead to the development of suitable substitute of morphine in the treatment of pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In Vivo Protection against Strychnine Toxicity in Mice by the Glycine Receptor Agonist Ivermectin

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Rasha

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory glycine receptor, a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates fast synaptic inhibition in mammalian spinal cord and brainstem, is potently and selectively inhibited by the alkaloid strychnine. The anthelminthic and anticonvulsant ivermectin is a strychnine-independent agonist of spinal glycine receptors. Here we show that ivermectin is an effective antidote of strychnine toxicity in vivo and determine time course and extent of ivermectin protection. Mice received doses of 1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg ivermectin orally or intraperitoneally, followed by an intraperitoneal strychnine challenge (2 mg/kg). Ivermectin, through both routes of application, protected mice against strychnine toxicity. Maximum protection was observed 14 hours after ivermectin administration. Combining intraperitoneal and oral dosage of ivermectin further improved protection, resulting in survival rates of up to 80% of animals and a significant delay of strychnine effects in up to 100% of tested animals. Strychnine action developed within minutes, much faster than ivermectin, which acted on a time scale of hours. The data agree with a two-compartment distribution of ivermectin, with fat deposits acting as storage compartment. The data demonstrate that toxic effects of strychnine in mice can be prevented if a basal level of glycinergic signalling is maintained through receptor activation by ivermectin. PMID:25317421

  4. Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist enhances the subjective effects of cocaine in humans

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Thomas F.; Haile, Colin N.; Mahoney, James J.; Shah, Ravi; Verrico, Christopher D.; De La Garza, Richard; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Pramipexole is a D3 dopamine receptor-preferring agonist indicated for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Studies associate pramipexole with pathological gambling and impulse control disorders suggesting a role for D3 receptors in reinforcement processes. Clinical studies showed pramipexole decreased cocaine craving and reversed central deficits in individuals with cocaine use disorder. Preclinical studies have shown acute administration of pramipexole increases cocaine’s reinforcing effects whereas other reports suggest chronic pramipexole produces tolerance to cocaine. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we examined the impact of pramipexole treatment on the subjective effects produced by cocaine in volunteers with cocaine use disorder. Volunteers received pramipexole titrated up to 3.0 mg/d or placebo over 15 days. Participants then received intravenous cocaine (0, 20 and 40 mg) on day 15. Cardiovascular and subjective effects were obtained with visual analog scales at time points across the session. Pramipexole alone increased peak heart rate following saline and diastolic blood pressure following cocaine. Pramipexole produced upwards of two-fold increases in positive subjective effects ratings following cocaine. These results indicate that chronic D3 receptor activation increases the subjective effects of cocaine in humans. Caution should be used when prescribing pramipexole to patients that may also use cocaine. PMID:26239766

  5. Triazolophostins: a library of novel and potent agonists of IP3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Vibhute, Amol M; Konieczny, Vera; Taylor, Colin W; Sureshan, Kana M

    2015-06-28

    IP3 receptors are channels that mediate the release of Ca(2+) from the intracellular stores of cells stimulated by hormones or neurotransmitters. Adenophostin A (AdA) is the most potent agonist of IP3 receptors, with the β-anomeric adenine contributing to the increased potency. The potency of AdA and its stability towards the enzymes that degrade IP3 have aroused interest in AdA analogs for biological studies. The complex structure of AdA poses problems that have necessitated optimization of synthetic conditions for each analog. Such lengthy one-at-a-time syntheses limit access to AdA analogs. We have addressed this problem by synthesizing a library of triazole-based AdA analogs, triazolophostins, by employing click chemistry. An advanced intermediate having all the necessary phosphates and a β-azide at the anomeric position was reacted with various alkynes under Cu(i) catalysis to yield triazoles, which upon deprotection gave triazolophostins. All eleven triazolophostins synthesized are more potent than IP3 and some are equipotent with AdA in functional analyses of IP3 receptors. We show that a triazole ring can replace adenine without compromising the potency of AdA and provide facile routes to novel AdA analogs.

  6. Clinical assessment of drug-drug interactions of tasimelteon, a novel dual melatonin receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Brian W; Torres, Rosarelis; Dressman, Marlene A; Kramer, William G; Baroldi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Tasimelteon ([1R-trans]-N-[(2-[2,3-dihydro-4-benzofuranyl] cyclopropyl) methyl] propanamide), a novel dual melatonin receptor agonist that demonstrates specificity and high affinity for melatonin receptor types 1 and 2 (MT1 and MT2 receptors), is the first treatment approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder. Tasimelteon is rapidly absorbed, with a mean absolute bioavailability of approximately 38%, and is extensively metabolized primarily by oxidation at multiple sites, mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and CYP3A4/5, as initially demonstrated by in vitro studies and confirmed by the results of clinical drug-drug interactions presented here. The effects of strong inhibitors and moderate or strong inducers of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4/5 on the pharmacokinetics of tasimelteon were evaluated in humans. Coadministration with fluvoxamine resulted in an approximately 6.5-fold increase in tasimelteon's area under the curve (AUC), whereas cigarette smoking decreased tasimelteon's exposure by approximately 40%. Coadministration with ketoconazole resulted in an approximately 54% increase in tasimelteon's AUC, whereas rifampin pretreatment resulted in a decrease in tasimelteon's exposure of approximately 89%. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. Rotigotine, a dopamine receptor agonist, increased BDNF protein levels in the rat cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Naoki; Yoshimura, Aya; Chiba, Shuichi; Ogawa, Shintaro; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) critically controls the fate and function of the neuronal network and has received much attention as a target of many brain diseases. Dopaminergic system dysfunction has also been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases. Rotigotine, a non-ergot dopamine receptor agonist, is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome. To investigate the effects of rotigotine on neuronal functions both in vivo and in vitro, rats and primary cortical neurons were administered rotigotine, and the mRNA and protein expression levels of BDNF, its receptor TrkB and downstream signaling molecules, and synaptic proteins were determined. We found that BDNF protein was increased in the cortex and hippocampus of rats after 7days of rotigotine treatment. In contrast, BDNF mRNAs were reduced 6h after rotigotine treatment in cultured neurons presumably through the transient suppression of neuronal activity. We identified differential expression of D1, D2, and D3 receptors in the rat brain and cultured neurons. The observed increase in the expression of BDNF protein in the cortex and hippocampus after subchronic administration of rotigotine suggests that it may exert its medical effect in part through improving BDNF function in the brain. In addition, our results highlight the complex relationships between rotigotine and BDNF expression, which depend on the brain region, time course, and dose of the drug. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential manipulation of arrestin-3 binding to basal and agonist-activated G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Susanne; Perry, Nicole A; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Toth, Andras D; Inoue, Asuka; Milligan, Graeme; Iverson, Tina M; Hunyady, Laszlo; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2017-08-01

    Non-visual arrestins interact with hundreds of different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here we show that by introducing mutations into elements that directly bind receptors, the specificity of arrestin-3 can be altered. Several mutations in the two parts of the central "crest" of the arrestin molecule, middle-loop and C-loop, enhanced or reduced arrestin-3 interactions with several GPCRs in receptor subtype and functional state-specific manner. For example, the Lys139Ile substitution in the middle-loop dramatically enhanced the binding to inactive M 2 muscarinic receptor, so that agonist activation of the M 2 did not further increase arrestin-3 binding. Thus, the Lys139Ile mutation made arrestin-3 essentially an activation-independent binding partner of M 2 , whereas its interactions with other receptors, including the β 2 -adrenergic receptor and the D 1 and D 2 dopamine receptors, retained normal activation dependence. In contrast, the Ala248Val mutation enhanced agonist-induced arrestin-3 binding to the β 2 -adrenergic and D 2 dopamine receptors, while reducing its interaction with the D 1 dopamine receptor. These mutations represent the first example of altering arrestin specificity via enhancement of the arrestin-receptor interactions rather than selective reduction of the binding to certain subtypes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Novel 2-aminotetralin and 3-aminochroman derivatives as selective serotonin 5-HT7 receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Pär; Sohn, Daniel; Leideborg, Robert; Caldirola, Patrizia; Zlatoidsky, Pavel; Hanson, Sverker; Mohell, Nina; Rosqvist, Susanne; Nordvall, Gunnar; Johansson, Anette M; Johansson, Rolf

    2004-07-29

    The understanding of the physiological role of the G-protein coupled serotonin 5-HT(7) receptor is largely rudimentary. Therefore, selective and potent pharmacological tools will add to the understanding of serotonergic effects mediated through this receptor. In this report, we describe two compound classes, chromans and tetralins, encompassing compounds with nanomolar affinity for the 5-HT(7) receptor and with good selectivity. Within theses classes, we have discovered both agonists and antagonists that can be used for further understanding of the pharmacology of the 5-HT(7) receptor.

  10. Effects of central histamine receptors blockade on GABA(A) agonist-induced food intake in broiler cockerels.

    PubMed

    Morteza, Zendehdel; Vahhab, Babapour; Hossein, Jonaidi

    2008-02-01

    In this study, the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) injection of H1, H2 and H3 antagonists on feed intake induced by GABA(A) agonist was evaluated. In Experiment 1, the animals received chloropheniramine, a H1 antagonist and then muscimol, a GABA(A) agonist. In Experiment 2, chickens received famotidine, a H2 receptor antagonist, prior to injection of muscimol. Finally in Experiment 3, the birds were injected with thioperamide, a H3 receptor antagonist and muscimol. Cumulative food intake was measured 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min after injections. The results of this study indicated that effects of muscimol on food intake inhibited by pretreatment with chloropheneramine maleate (p < or = 0.05), significantly, while the famotidine and thioperamide were ineffective. These results suggest the existence of H1-receptor mediated histamine-GABA(A) receptor interaction on food intake in broiler cockerels.

  11. Slow to fast alterations in skeletal muscle fibers caused by clenbuterol, a beta(2)-receptor agonist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Easton, Thomas G.; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2)-receptor agonist, clenbuterol, and a beta(2) antagonist, butoxamine, on the skeletal muscle fibers of rats were investigated. It was found that chronic treatment of rats with clenbuterol caused hypertrophy of histochemically identified fast-twitch, but not slow-twitch, fibers within the soleus, while in the extensor digitorum longus the mean areas of both fiber types were increased; in both muscles, the ratio of the number of fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was increased. In contrast, a treatment with butoxamine caused a reduction of the fast-twitch fiber size in both muscles, and the ratio of the fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was decreased.

  12. Microglial cells and peritoneal macrophages release activin A upon stimulation with Toll-like receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Sandra; Zeretzke, Moritz; Nau, Roland; Michel, Uwe

    2007-02-21

    Activin A levels are elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with meningitis and in the sera of patients with sepsis. The source(s) of the elevated concentrations of activin A in CSF and serum have not yet been discovered. Here we demonstrate that primary mouse microglial cells and peritoneal macrophages release activin A after treatment with agonists of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, 4, and 9. These findings provide further evidence for a role of activin in the innate immune response and suggest that microglial cells and macrophages are a source of elevated activin A concentrations observed in the CSF during bacterial meningitis and in the systemic circulation during sepsis.

  13. The Natural Product Magnolol as a Lead Structure for the Development of Potent Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christa E.

    2013-01-01

    Magnolol (4-allyl-2-(5-allyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)phenol), the main bioactive constituent of the medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, and its main metabolite tetrahydromagnolol were recently found to activate cannabinoid (CB) receptors. We now investigated the structure-activity relationships of (tetrahydro)magnolol analogs with variations of the alkyl chains and the phenolic groups and could considerably improve potency. Among the most potent compounds were the dual CB1/CB2 full agonist 2-(2-methoxy-5-propyl-phenyl)-4-hexylphenol (61a, K i CB1∶0.00957 µM; K i CB2∶0.0238 µM), and the CB2-selective partial agonist 2-(2-hydroxy-5-propylphenyl)-4-pentylphenol (60, K i CB1∶0.362 µM; K i CB2∶0.0371 µM), which showed high selectivity versus GPR18 and GPR55. Compound 61b, an isomer of 61a, was the most potent GPR55 antagonist with an IC50 value of 3.25 µM but was non-selective. The relatively simple structures, which possess no stereocenters, are easily accessible in a four- to five-step synthetic procedure from common starting materials. The central reaction step is the well-elaborated Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction, which is suitable for a combinatorial chemistry approach. The scaffold is versatile and may be fine-tuned to obtain a broad range of receptor affinities, selectivities and efficacies. PMID:24204944

  14. Catalposide is a natural agonistic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji Hae; Jun, Hee-jin; Hoang, Minh-Hien

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposide is a novel ligand for PPAR{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell stimulated with catalposide improved fatty acid uptake, regulated target genes in fatty acid {beta}-oxidation and synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalposdie reduces hepatic triacylglycerides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theses demonstrate catalposide could ameliorate hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes related to cellular lipid uptake and oxidation. Thus, PPAR{alpha} agonists may be important in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis. In this study, we demonstrated that catalposide is a novel natural PPAR{alpha} agonist, identified from reporter gene assay-based activity screening withmore » approximately 900 natural plant and seaweed extracts. Results of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses suggested that the compound interacted directly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR{alpha}. Cultured hepatocytes stimulated with catalposide exhibited significantly reduced cellular triglyceride concentrations, by 21%, while cellular uptake of fatty acids was increased, by 70% (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the increase in cellular fatty acid uptake was due to upregulation of fatty acid transporter protein-4 (+19% vs. the control) in cells stimulated with catalposide. Additionally, expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation and high-density lipoprotein metabolism were upregulated, while that of genes related to fatty acid synthesis were suppressed. In conclusion, catalposide is hypolipidemic by activation of PPAR{alpha} via a ligand-mediated mechanism that modulates the expression of in lipid metabolism genes in hepatocytes.« less

  15. Non-nucleotide Agonists Triggering P2X7 Receptor Activation and Pore Formation.

    PubMed

    Di Virgilio, Francesco; Giuliani, Anna L; Vultaggio-Poma, Valentina; Falzoni, Simonetta; Sarti, Alba C

    2018-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a ligand-gated plasma membrane ion channel belonging to the P2X receptor subfamily activated by extracellular nucleotides. General consensus holds that the physiological (and maybe the only) agonist is ATP. However, scattered evidence generated over the last several years suggests that ATP might not be the only agonist, especially at inflammatory sites. Solid data show that NAD + covalently modifies the P2X7R of mouse T lymphocytes, thus lowering the ATP threshold for activation. Other structurally unrelated agents have been reported to activate the P2X7R via a poorly understood mechanism of action: (a) the antibiotic polymyxin B, possibly a positive allosteric P2X7R modulator, (b) the bactericidal peptide LL-37, (c) the amyloidogenic β peptide, and (d) serum amyloid A. Some agents, such as Alu-RNA, have been suggested to activate the P2X7R acting on the intracellular N- or C-terminal domains. Mode of P2X7R activation by these non-nucleotide ligands is as yet unknown; however, these observations raise the intriguing question of how these different non-nucleotide ligands may co-operate with ATP at inflammatory or tumor sites. New information obtained from the cloning and characterization of the P2X7R from exotic mammalian species (e.g., giant panda) and data from recent patch-clamp studies are strongly accelerating our understanding of P2X7R mode of operation, and may provide hints to the mechanism of activation of P2X7R by non-nucleotide ligands.

  16. Agonists of proteinase-activated receptor 1 induce plasma extravasation by a neurogenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    de Garavilla, L; Vergnolle, N; Young, S H; Ennes, H; Steinhoff, M; Ossovskaya, V S; D'Andrea, M R; Mayer, E A; Wallace, J L; Hollenberg, M D; Andrade-Gordon, P; Bunnett, N W

    2001-08-01

    Thrombin, generated in the circulation during injury, cleaves proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) to stimulate plasma extravasation and granulocyte infiltration. However, the mechanism of thrombin-induced inflammation in intact tissues is unknown. We hypothesized that thrombin cleaves PAR1 on sensory nerves to release substance P (SP), which interacts with the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) on endothelial cells to cause plasma extravasation. PAR1 was detected in small diameter neurons known to contain SP in rat dorsal root ganglia by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Thrombin and the PAR1 agonist TFLLR-NH(2) (TF-NH(2)) increased [Ca(2+)](i) >50% of cultured neurons (EC(50)s 24 mu ml(-1) and 1.9 microM, respectively), assessed using Fura-2 AM. The PAR1 agonist completely desensitized responses to thrombin, indicating that thrombin stimulates neurons through PAR1. Injection of TF-NH(2) into the rat paw stimulated a marked and sustained oedema. An NK1R antagonist and ablation of sensory nerves with capsaicin inhibited oedema by 44% at 1 h and completely by 5 h. In wild-type but not PAR1(-/-) mice, TF-NH(2) stimulated Evans blue extravasation in the bladder, oesophagus, stomach, intestine and pancreas by 2 - 8 fold. Extravasation in the bladder, oesophagus and stomach was abolished by an NK1R antagonist. Thus, thrombin cleaves PAR1 on primary spinal afferent neurons to release SP, which activates the NK1R on endothelial cells to stimulate gap formation, extravasation of plasma proteins, and oedema. In intact tissues, neurogenic mechanisms are predominantly responsible for PAR1-induced oedema.

  17. Differential pathway coupling efficiency of the activated insulin receptor drives signaling selectivity by xmeta, an allosteric partial agonist antibody

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    XMetA, an anti-insulin receptor (IR) monoclonal antibody, is an allosteric partial agonist of the IR. We have previously reported that XMetA activates the “metabolic-biased” Akt kinase signaling pathway while having little or no effect on the “mitogenic” MAPK signaling pathwayof ERK 1/2. To inves...

  18. Novel 5-aryl-1,3-dihydro-indole-2-thiones. potent, orally active progesterone receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Fensome, Andrew; Koko, Marci; Wrobel, Jay; Zhang, Puwen; Zhang, Zhiming; Cohen, Jeffrey; Lundeen, Scott; Rudnick, Kelly; Zhu, Yuan; Winneker, Richard

    2003-04-07

    During the course of our studies on 3,3-disubstituted-5-aryloxindoles derived progesterone receptor (PR) antagonists we discovered that changing the amide funtionality to a thio-amide resulted in compounds displaying potent PR agonist activity. In this communication, the synthesis, structure activity relationships (SAR) and in vivo activity of various 5-arylthio-oxindoles will be discussed.

  19. Beta 2-adrenergic receptor agonists are novel regulators of macrophage activation in diabetic renal and cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin; Yu, Mi Ra; Kim, Hyun Joo; Lee, Ji Hye; Park, Byoung-Won; Wu, I-Hsien; Matsumoto, Motonobu; King, George L

    2017-07-01

    Macrophage activation is increased in diabetes and correlated with the onset and progression of vascular complications. To identify drugs that could inhibit macrophage activation, we developed a cell-based assay and screened a 1,040 compound library for anti-inflammatory effects. Beta2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists were identified as the most potent inhibitors of phorbol myristate acetate-induced tumor necrosis factor-α production in rat bone marrow macrophages. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, β2AR agonists inhibited diabetes-induced tumor necrosis factor-α production, which was prevented by co-treatment with a selective β2AR blocker. To clarify the underlying mechanisms, THP-1 cells and bone marrow macrophages were exposed to high glucose. High glucose reduced β-arrestin2, a negative regulator of NF-κB activation, and its interaction with IκBα. This subsequently enhanced phosphorylation of IκBα and activation of NF-κB. The β2AR agonists enhanced β-arrestin2 and its interaction with IκBα, leading to downregulation of NF-κB. A siRNA specific for β-arrestin2 reversed β2AR agonist-mediated inhibition of NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokine production. Treatment of Zucker diabetic fatty rats with a β2AR agonist for 12 weeks attenuated monocyte activation as well as pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses in the kidneys and heart. Thus, β2AR agonists might have protective effects against diabetic renal and cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The cannabinoid receptor inverse agonist AM251 regulates the expression of the EGF receptor and its ligands via destabilization of oestrogen-related receptor α protein

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, JL; Sanghvi, M; O'Connell, MP; Krzysik-Walker, SM; Moaddel, R; Bernier, M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE AM251 is an inverse agonist of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) that can exert ‘off-target’ effects in vitro and in CB1R knock-out mice. AM251 is also potent at modulating tumour cell growth, suggesting that growth factor-mediated oncogenic signalling could be regulated by AM251. Since dysregulation of the EGF receptor has been associated with carcinogenesis, we examined AM251 regulation of EGF receptor (EGFR) expression and function. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The various biological functions of AM251 were measured in CB1R-negative human cancer cells. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to validate the data. KEY RESULTS The mRNA levels for EGFR and its associated ligands, including HB-EGF, were induced several fold in PANC-1 and HCT116 cells in response to AM251. This event was associated with enhanced expression of EGFR on the cell surface with concomitant increase in EGF-induced cellular responses in AM251-treated cells. Exposure to XCT790, a synthetic inverse agonist of the orphan nuclear oestrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), also induced EGFR and HB-EGF expression to the same extent as AM251, whereas pretreatment with the ERRα-selective agonist, biochanin A, blunted AM251 actions. AM251 promoted the degradation of ERRα protein without loss of the corresponding mRNA. Knock-down of ERRα by siRNA-based approach led to constitutive induction of EGFR and HB-EGF levels, and eliminated the biological responses of AM251 and XCT790. Finally, AM251 displaced diethylstilbestrol prebound to the ligand-binding domain of ERRα. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS AM251 up-regulates EGFR expression and signalling via a novel non-CB1R-mediated pathway involving destabilization of ERRα protein in selected cancer cell lines. PMID:21449913

  1. Agonist-dependent consequences of proline to alanine substitution in the transmembrane helices of the calcitonin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, R J; Hay, D L

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transmembrane proline (P) residues in family A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form functionally important kinks in their helices. These residues are little studied in family B GPCRs but experiments with the VPAC1 receptor and calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL) show parallels with family A receptors. We sought to determine the function of these residues in the insert negative form of the human calcitonin receptor, a close relative of CL. Experimental approach: Proline residues within the transmembrane domains of the calcitonin receptor (P246, P249, P280, P326, P336) were individually mutated to alanine (A) using site-directed mutagenesis. Receptors were transiently transfected into Cos-7 cells using polyethylenimine and salmon and human calcitonin-induced cAMP responses measured. Salmon and human calcitonin competition binding experiments were also performed and receptor cell-surface expression assessed by whole cell ELISA. Key results: P246A, P249A and P280A were wild-type in terms of human calcitonin-induced cAMP activation. P326A and P336A had reduced function (165 and 12-fold, respectively). In membranes, human calcitonin binding was not detectable for any mutant receptor but in whole cells, binding was detected for all mutants apart from P326A. Salmon calcitonin activated mutant and wild-type receptors equally, although Bmax values were reduced for all mutants apart from P326A. Conclusions and Implications: P326 and P336 are important for the function of human calcitonin receptors and are likely to be involved in generating receptor conformations appropriate for agonist binding and receptor activation. However, agonist-specific effects were observed , implying distinct conformations of the human calcitonin receptor. PMID:17486143

  2. Cardiovascular effects of spinal cord substance P: studies with a stable receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Keeler, J R; Charlton, C G; Helke, C J

    1985-06-01

    The role of spinal cord substance P (SP) in regulating sympathetic outflow to the cardiovascular system was assessed with the stable active analog [pGlu5,MePhE8,MeGly9]-SP(5-11) (DiME-SP). The interaction of DiME-SP with spinal cord SP receptors was evaluated initially in binding studies. Saturable, high-affinity binding of [125I]Bolton-Hunter-SP to rat spinal cord membranes was dose-dependently inhibited by DiME-SP (IC50 = 1.5 microM). Intrathecal (i.t.) injections of DiME-SP (1.0-33 nmol) in anesthetized rats produced dose-dependent increases in blood pressure and heart rate that were accompanied by increases in plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine. Intravenous injections of the ganglionic blocker pentolinium blocked the cardiovascular and plasma catecholamine responses to i.t. injections of DiME-SP. Bulbospinal sympathoexcitatory pathways originating in the ventral medulla and their mediation by SP were also assessed. As demonstrated previously, application of bicuculline, the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor antagonist, to the ventral surface of the medulla produced sympathetic mediated increases in blood pressure and these effects were blocked by i.t. injection of the SP receptor antagonist [D-Arg1,D-Pro2,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]-SP. In this study, we studied the specificity of the SP antagonist for SP receptors by attempting to alter the actions of the SP antagonist with a SP agonist. Administration of DiME-SP (33 nmol i.t.) blocked the effects of [D-Arg1,D-Pro2,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]-SP (3.3 nmol i.t.). Specifically, the SP agonist countered the SP antagonist-mediated 1) hypotensive response and 2) inhibitory effect on bicuculline-induced sympathoexcitatory responses elicited from the ventral surface of the medulla. These data provide further evidence that SP transmits excitatory information to the cardiovascular system via spinal sympathetic pathways.

  3. Receptor binding properties and antinociceptive effects of chimeric peptides consisting of a micro-opioid receptor agonist and an ORL1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Susumu; Ito, Risa; Nishiyama, Miharu; Kubo, Mai; Matsushima, Tomoko; Minamisawa, Motoko; Ambo, Akihiro; Sasaki, Yusuke

    2007-07-01

    Receptor binding properties and antinociceptive activities of chimeric peptides linked by spacers were investigated. The peptides consisted of the micro-opioid receptor ligand dermorphin (Tyr-D-Ala-Phe-Gly-Tyr-Pro-Ser-NH(2)) or its analog YRFB (Tyr-D-Arg-Phe-betaAla-NH(2)) linked to the ORL1 receptor ligand Ac-Arg-Tyr-Tyr-Arg-Ile-Lys-NH(2) (Ac-RYYRIK-NH(2)). All chimeric peptides were found to possess high receptor binding affinities for both micro-opioid and ORL1 receptors in mouse brain membranes although their binding affinities for both receptors in spinal membranes were significantly lower. Among them, chimeric peptide 2, which consists of dermorphin and Ac-RYYRIK-NH(2) connected by a long spacer, had the highest binding affinity towards both receptors. In the tail-flick test following intrathecal (i.t.) administration to mice, all chimeric peptides showed potent and dose-dependent antinociceptive activities with an ED(50) of 1.34-4.51 (pmol/mouse), nearly comparable to dermorphin alone (ED(50); 1.08 pmol/mouse). In contrast to their micro-opioid receptor binding profiles, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the chimeric peptides resulted in much less potent antinociceptive activity (ED(50) 5.55-100< pmol/mouse) than when administered i.t. (ED(50): 1.34-4.51 pmol/mouse). These results suggest the involvement of nociceptin-like agonistic effects of the Ac-RYYRIK pharmacophore in the peptides, and the regulation of mu-opioid receptor-mediated antinociception in brain. The present chimeric peptides may be useful as pharmacological tools for studies on micro-opioid receptor/ORL1 receptor heterodimers.

  4. Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Agonist Ameliorates MK801-Induced Dysfunction of NMDA Receptors via the Akt/GSK-3β Pathway in Adult Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Dong; Li, Yan-Chun; Snyder, Melissa A; Gao, Ruby Y; Adelman, Alicia E; Zhang, Wentong; Shumsky, Jed S; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological intervention targeting mGluRs has emerged as a potential treatment for schizophrenia, whereas the mechanisms involved remain elusive. We explored the antipsychotic effects of an mGluR2/3 agonist in the MK-801 model of schizophrenia in the rat prefrontal cortex. We found that the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 effectively recovered the disrupted expression of NMDA receptors induced by MK-801 administration. This effect was attributable to the direct regulatory action of LY379268 on NMDA receptors via activation of the Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway. As occurs with the antipsychotic drug clozapine, acute treatment with LY379268 significantly increased the expression and phosphorylation of NMDA receptors, as well as Akt and GSK-3β. Physiologically, LY379268 significantly enhanced NMDA-induced current in prefrontal neurons and a GSK-3β inhibitor occluded this effect. In contrast to the widely proposed mechanism of modulating presynaptic glutamate release, our results strongly argue that mGluR2/3 agonists modulate the function of NMDA receptors through postsynaptic actions and reverse the MK-801-induced NMDA dysfunction via the Akt/GSK-3β pathway. This study provides novel evidence for postsynaptic mechanisms of mGluR2/3 in regulation of NMDA receptors and presents useful insights into the mechanistic actions of mGluR2/3 agonists as potential antipsychotic agents for treating schizophrenia. PMID:21326193

  5. Age-dependent changes of presynaptic neuromodulation via A1-adenosine receptors in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Sperlágh, B; Zsilla, G; Baranyi, M; Kékes-Szabó, A; Vizi, E S

    1997-10-01

    The presynaptic neuromodulation of stimulation-evoked release of [3H]-acetylcholine by endogenous adenosine, via A1-adenosine receptors, was studied in superfused hippocampal slices taken from 4-, 12- and 24-month-old rats. 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (0.25 microM), a selective A1-receptor antagonist, increased significantly the electrical field stimulation-induced release of [3H]-acetylcholine in slices prepared from 4- and 12-month-old rats, showing a tonic inhibitory action of endogenous adenosine via stimulation of presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors. In contrast, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine had no effect in 24-month-old rats. 2-Chloroadenosine (10 microM), an adenosine receptor agonist decreased the release of [3H]-acetylcholine in slices taken from 4- and 12-month-old rats, and no significant change was observed in slices taken from 24-month-old rats. In order to show whether the number/or affinity of the A1-receptors was affected in aged rats, [3H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine binding was studied in hippocampal membranes prepared from rats of different ages. Whereas the Bmax value was significantly lower in 2-year-old rats than in younger counterparts, the dissociation constant (Kd) was not affected by aging, indicating that the density rather than the affinity of adenosine receptors was altered. Endogenous adenosine levels present in the extracellular space were also measured in the superfusate by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with ultraviolet detection, and an age-related increase in the adenosine level was found. In summary, our results indicate that during aging the level of adenosine in the extracellular fluid is increased in the hippocampus. There is a downregulation and reduced responsiveness of presynaptic adenosine A1-receptors, and it seems likely that these changes are due to the enhanced adenosine level in the extracellular space.

  6. Low-Dose Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptor Agonist Attenuates Tolerance to Repeated Morphine Administration via Regulating μ-Opioid Receptor Expression in Walker 256 Tumor-Bearing Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyue; Wang, Kun; Ma, Min; Tian, Songyu; Wei, Na; Wang, Guonian

    2016-04-01

    Morphine is widely used in patients with moderate and severe cancer pain, whereas the development of drug tolerance remains a major problem associated with opioid use. Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor agonists induce morphine analgesia, attenuate morphine tolerance in normal and neuropathic pain animals, induce transcription of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) gene in Jurkat T cells, and increase morphine analgesia in cancer pain animals. However, no studies of the effects of CB2 receptor agonists on morphine tolerance in cancer pain have been performed. Therefore, we investigated the effect of repeated intrathecal (IT) injection of the low-dose CB2 receptor agonist AM1241 on the development of morphine tolerance in walker 256 tumor-bearing rats. We also tested the influence of the CB2 receptor agonist AM1241 on MOR protein and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression in the rat spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Walker 256 cells were implanted into the plantar region of each rat's right hindpaw. Tumor-bearing rats received IT injection of the CB2 receptor agonist AM1241 or antagonist AM630 with or without morphine subcutaneously twice daily for 8 days. Rats receiving drug vehicle only served as the control group. Mechanical paw withdrawal threshold and thermal paw withdrawal latency were assessed by a von Frey test and hot plate test 30 minutes after drug administration every day. MOR protein and mRNA expression in the spinal cord and DRG were detected after the last day (day 8) of drug administration via Western blot and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The data were analyzed via analysis of variance followed by Student t test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Repeated morphine treatments reduced the mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal latency. Coadministration of a nonanalgetic dose of the CB2 receptor agonist AM1241 with morphine significantly inhibited the

  7. Adenine Nucleotide Analogues Locked in a Northern Methanocarba Conformation: Enhanced Stability and Potency as P2Y1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, R. Gnana; Kim, Hak Sung; Servos, Jörg; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lee, Kyeong; Maddileti, Savitri; Boyer, José L.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Preference for the Northern (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of nucleotide 5′-triphosphate agonists at P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y11 receptors, but not P2Y6 receptors, was established using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a 3.1.0-bicyclohexane) ring as a ribose substitute (Kim et al. J. Med. Chem. 2002, 45, 208–218.). We have now combined the ring-constrained (N)-methanocarba modification of adenine nucleotides with other functionalities known to enhance potency at P2 receptors. The potency of the newly synthesized analogues was determined in the stimulation of phospholipase C through activation of turkey erythrocyte P2Y1 or human P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors stably expressed in astrocytoma cells. An (N)-methanocarba-2-methylthio-ADP analogue displayed an EC50 at the hP2Y1 receptor of 0.40 nM and was 55-fold more potent than the corresponding triphosphate and 16-fold more potent than the riboside 5′-diphosphate. 2-Cl–(N)-methanocarba-ATP and its N6-Me analogue were also highly selective, full agonists at P2Y1 receptors. The (N)-methanocarba-2-methylthio and 2-chloromonophosphate analogues were full agonists exhibiting micromolar potency at P2Y1 receptors, while the corresponding ribosides were inactive. Although β,γ-methylene-ATP was inactive at P2Y receptors, β,γ-methylene-(N)-methanocarba-ATP was a potent hP2Y1 receptor agonist with an EC50 of 160 nM and was selective versus hP2Y2 and hP2Y4 receptors. The rates of hydrolysis of Northern (N) and Southern (S) methanocarba analogues of AMP by rat 5′-ectonucleotidase were negligible. The rates of hydrolysis of the corresponding triphosphates by recombinant rat NTPDase1 and 2 were studied. Both isomers were hydrolyzed by NTPDase 1 at about half the rate of ATP hydrolysis. The (N) isomer was hardly hydrolyzed by NTPDase 2, while the (S) isomer was hydrolyzed at one-third of the rate of ATP hydrolysis. This suggests that new, more stable and selective nucleotide agonists may be designed on the basis of

  8. Agonist- and subunit-dependent potentiation of glutamate receptors by a nootropic drug aniracetam.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, K; Takeuchi, T; Ozawa, S

    1992-11-01

    GluR1 and GluR2 cDNAs encoding non-NMDA subtypes of glutamate receptor were isolated from a rat brain cDNA library by Boulter et al. (Science, 249 (1990) 1033-1037). Functional receptors activated by kainate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) and glutamate were expressed in Xenopus oocytes injected with GluR1, GluR2 or a mixture of GluR1 and GluR2 RNAs. In GluR1-expressed oocytes, 1 mM aniracetam potentiated AMPA-induced currents by 99 +/- 10% (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 5) and glutamate-induced currents by 140 +/- 8% (n = 4), but little affected kainate-induced currents. Aniracetam was effective from a concentration of 0.1 mM, and it exhibited more conspicuous effects with the increase of the dose. In oocytes injected with GluR1 plus GluR2 RNAs, aniracetam more markedly potentiated current responses to AMPA and glutamate than those in oocytes injected with GluR1 RNA alone. For example, 1 mM aniracetam potentiated AMPA-induced currents by 396 +/- 76% (n = 4) and glutamate-induced currents by 970 +/- 65% (n = 5) in oocytes injected with 10% GluR1 and 90% GluR2 RNAs. In these oocytes, however, the potentiation of kainate-induced currents by 1 mM aniracetam was only 8 +/- 5% (n = 4). Thus, we conclude that the potentiation of the AMPA/kainate receptor by aniracetam depends on both species of agonists and subunit composition of the receptor.

  9. Novel 5-HT6 receptor antagonists/D2 receptor partial agonists targeting behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Marcinkowska, Monika; Bucki, Adam; Śniecikowska, Joanna; Pawłowski, Maciej; Kazek, Grzegorz; Siwek, Agata; Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Partyka, Anna; Wasik, Anna; Wesołowska, Anna; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2015-03-06

    We describe a novel class of designed multiple ligands (DMLs) combining serotonin 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) antagonism with dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) partial agonism. Prototype hybrid molecules were designed using docking to receptor homology models. Diverse pharmacophore moieties yielded 3 series of hybrids with varying in vitro properties at 5-HT6R and D2R, and at M1 receptor and hERG channel antitargets. 4-(piperazin-1-yl)-1H-indole derivatives showed highest antagonist potency at 5-HT6R, with 7-butoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-2(1H)-one and 2-propoxybenzamide derivatives having promising D2R partial agonism. 2-(3-(4-(1-(phenylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)propoxy)benzamide (47) exhibited nanomolar affinity at both 5-HT6R and D2R and was evaluated in rat models. It displayed potent antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like activity in the Porsolt and Vogel tests, respectively, more pronounced than that of a reference selective 5-HT6R antagonist or D2R partial agonist. In addition, 47 also showed antidepressant-like activity (Porsolt's test) and anxiolytic-like activity (open field test) in aged (>18-month old) rats. In operant conditioning tests, 47 enhanced responding for sweet reward in the saccharin self-administration test, consistent with anti-anhedonic properties. Further, 47 facilitated extinction of non-reinforced responding for sweet reward, suggesting potential procognitive activity. Taken together, these studies suggest that DMLs combining 5-HT6R antagonism and D2R partial agonism may successfully target affective disorders in patients from different age groups without a risk of cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Impaired β-arrestin recruitment and reduced desensitization by non-catechol agonists of the D1 dopamine receptor.

    PubMed

    Gray, David L; Allen, John A; Mente, Scot; O'Connor, Rebecca E; DeMarco, George J; Efremov, Ivan; Tierney, Patrick; Volfson, Dmitri; Davoren, Jennifer; Guilmette, Edward; Salafia, Michelle; Kozak, Rouba; Ehlers, Michael D

    2018-02-14

    Selective activation of dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) has been pursued for 40 years as a therapeutic strategy for neurologic and psychiatric diseases due to the fundamental role of D1Rs in motor function, reward processing, and cognition. All known D1R-selective agonists are catechols, which are rapidly metabolized and desensitize the D1R after prolonged exposure, reducing agonist response. As such, drug-like selective D1R agonists have remained elusive. Here we report a novel series of selective, potent non-catechol D1R agonists with promising in vivo pharmacokinetic properties. These ligands stimulate adenylyl cyclase signaling and are efficacious in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease after oral administration. They exhibit distinct binding to the D1R orthosteric site and a novel functional profile including minimal receptor desensitization, reduced recruitment of β-arrestin, and sustained in vivo efficacy. These results reveal a novel class of D1 agonists with favorable drug-like properties, and define the molecular basis for catechol-specific recruitment of β-arrestin to D1Rs.

  11. Pharmacological Characterization of 30 Human Melanocortin-4 Receptor Polymorphisms with the Endogenous Proopiomelanocortin Derived Agonists, Synthetic Agonists, and the Endogenous Agouti-Related Protein (AGRP) Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhimin; Proneth, Bettina; Dirain, Marvin L.; Litherland, Sally A.; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in the central nervous system and has a role in regulating feeding behavior, obesity, energy homeostasis, male erectile response, and blood pressure. Since the report of the MC4R knockout mouse in 1997, the field has been searching for links between this genetic bio marker and human obesity and type 2 diabetes. More then 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified from human patients, both obese and non-obese controls. Many significant studies have been performed examining the pharmacological characteristics of these hMC4R SNPs in attempts to identify a molecular defects/insights that might link a genetic factor to the obese phenotype observed in patients possessing these mutations. Our laboratory has previously reported the pharmacological characterization of 40 of these polymorphic hMC4 receptors with multiple endogenous and synthetic ligands. The goal of the current study is to perform a similar comprehensive side-by-side characterization of 30 additional human hMC4R with single nucleotide polymorphisms using multiple endogenous agonists [α-, β, γ2-melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)], the antagonist agouti-related protein hAGRP(87-132), and synthetic agonists [NDP-MSH, MTII, and the tetrapeptide Ac-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH2 (JRH887-9)]. These in vitro data, in some cases, provide a putative molecular link between dysfunctional hMC4R's and human obesity. These 30 hMC4R SNPs include R7H, R18H, R18L, S36Y, P48S, V50M, F51L, E61K, I69T, D90N, S94R, G98R, I121T, A154D, Y157S, W174C, G181D, F202L, A219V, I226T, G231S, G238D, N240S, C271R, S295P, P299L, E308K, I317V, L325F and 750DelGA. All but the N240S hMC4R were identified in obese patients. Additionally, we have characterized a double I102T/V103I hMC4R. In addition to the pharmacological characterization, the hMC4R variants were evaluated for cell surface expression by flow

  12. Pharmacological characterization of 30 human melanocortin-4 receptor polymorphisms with the endogenous proopiomelanocortin-derived agonists, synthetic agonists, and the endogenous agouti-related protein antagonist.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhimin; Proneth, Bettina; Dirain, Marvin L; Litherland, Sally A; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2010-06-08

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in the central nervous system and has a role in regulating feeding behavior, obesity, energy homeostasis, male erectile response, and blood pressure. Since the report of the MC4R knockout mouse in 1997, the field has been searching for links between this genetic biomarker and human obesity and type 2 diabetes. More then 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified from human patients, both obese and nonobese controls. Many significant studies have been performed examining the pharmacological characteristics of these hMC4R SNPs in attempts to identify a molecular defects/insights that might link a genetic factor to the obese phenotype observed in patients possessing these mutations. Our laboratory has previously reported the pharmacological characterization of 40 of these polymorphic hMC4 receptors with multiple endogenous and synthetic ligands. The goal of the current study is to perform a similar comprehensive side-by-side characterization of 30 additional human hMC4R with single nucleotide polymorphisms using multiple endogenous agonists [alpha-, beta-, and gamma(2)-melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)], the antagonist agouti-related protein hAGRP(87-132), and synthetic agonists [NDP-MSH, MTII, and the tetrapeptide Ac-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-NH(2) (JRH887-9)]. These in vitro data, in some cases, provide a putative molecular link between dysfunctional hMC4R's and human obesity. These 30 hMC4R SNPs include R7H, R18H, R18L, S36Y, P48S, V50M, F51L, E61K, I69T, D90N, S94R, G98R, I121T, A154D, Y157S, W174C, G181D, F202L, A219 V, I226T, G231S, G238D, N240S, C271R, S295P, P299L, E308K, I317V, L325F, and 750DelGA. All but the N240S hMC4R were identified in obese patients. Additionally, we have characterized a double I102T/V103I hMC4R. In addition to the pharmacological characterization, the hMC4R variants were evaluated for cell surface

  13. A Small Molecule Agonist of EphA2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibits Tumor Cell Migration In Vitro and Prostate Cancer Metastasis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hong; Miao, Hui; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Page, Phillip; Liu, Lili; Lindner, Daniel J.; Acharya, Chayan; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Ficker, Eckhard; Song, Jianxing; Wang, Bingcheng

    2012-01-01

    During tumor progression, EphA2 receptor can gain ligand-independent pro-oncogenic functions due to Akt activation and reduced ephrin-A ligand engagement. The effects can be reversed by ligand stimulation, which triggers the intrinsic tumor suppressive signaling pathways of EphA2 including inhibition of PI3/Akt and Ras/ERK pathways. These observations argue for development of small molecule agonists for EphA2 as potential tumor intervention agents. Through virtual screening and cell-based assays, we report here the identification and characterization of doxazosin as a novel small molecule agonist for EphA2 and EphA4, but not for other Eph receptors tested. NMR studies revealed extensive contacts of doxazosin with EphA2/A4, recapitulating both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions recently found in the EphA2/ephrin-A1 complex. Clinically used as an α1-adrenoreceptor antagonist (Cardura®) for treating hypertension and benign prostate hyperplasia, doxazosin activated EphA2 independent of α1-adrenoreceptor. Similar to ephrin-A1, doxazosin inhibited Akt and ERK kinase activities in an EphA2-dependent manner. Treatment with doxazosin triggered EphA2 receptor internalization, and suppressed haptotactic and chemotactic migration of prostate cancer, breast cancer, and glioma cells. Moreover, in an orthotopic xenograft model, doxazosin reduced distal metastasis of human prostate cancer cells and prolonged survival in recipient mice. To our knowledge, doxazosin is the first small molecule agonist of a receptor tyrosine kinase that is capable of inhibiting malignant behaviors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22916121

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists versus insulin glargine for type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Xin; Gou, Jian-Feng; Tian, Jin-Hui; Yan, Xiang; Yang, Lin

    2010-01-01

    the metaanalysis suggest that insulin glargine was significantly better in reducing the fasting blood glucose (mean difference [MD] [95% CI], 1.31 [1.04 to 1.58]; P < 0.001), but exhibits greater incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia (risk ratio [RR] [95% CI], 0.40 [0.23 to 0.71]; P = 0.002) and influenza (RR [95% CI], 0.56 [0.32 to 0.98]; P = 0.04). GLP-1 receptor agonists are more conducive to reducing weight (MD [95% CI], −3.96 [−5.14 to -2.77]; P < 0.001), postprandial blood glucose (after breakfast, P < 0.001; after dinner, P < 0.001), and LDL-C (MD [95% CI], −0.18 [−0.28 to −0.08]; P < 0.001), but have significantly more gastrointestinal adverse effects (eg, nausea/ vomiting, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between GLP-1 receptor agonists and insulin glargine in reducing glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (MD [95% CI], −0.03 [−0.13 to 0.08]) and the overall incidence of hypoglycemia (RR [95% CI], 0.69 [0.42 to 1.14]). Conclusions: Compared with insulin glargine, GLP-1 receptor agonists did not have a significant difference in regard to reducing HbA1c levels and they were significantly associated with decreased weight but increased gastrointestinal adverse events. It remains unclear whether GLP-1 receptor agonists influence mortality or diabetes-associated complications in patients with T2DM. More trials with longer follow-up are needed to determine the exact long-term efficacy and safety profiles of this new class of hypoglycemic drugs. PMID:24688145

  15. Adaptability and selectivity of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pan agonists revealed from crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Takuji; Toyota, Kenji; Waku, Tsuyoshi

    2009-08-01

    The structures of the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα, PPARγ and PPARδ) in complexes with a pan agonist, an α/δ dual agonist and a PPARδ-specific agonist were determined. The results explain how each ligand is recognized by the PPAR LBDs at an atomic level. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear hormone receptor family, which is defined as transcriptional factors that are activated by the binding of ligands to their ligand-binding domains (LBDs). Although the three PPAR subtypes display different tissue distribution patterns and distinct pharmacological profiles, they all are essentially related to fatty-acid andmore » glucose metabolism. Since the PPARs share similar three-dimensional structures within the LBDs, synthetic ligands which simultaneously activate two or all of the PPARs could be potent candidates in terms of drugs for the treatment of abnormal metabolic homeostasis. The structures of several PPAR LBDs were determined in complex with synthetic ligands, derivatives of 3-(4-alkoxyphenyl)propanoic acid, which exhibit unique agonistic activities. The PPARα and PPARγ LBDs were complexed with the same pan agonist, TIPP-703, which activates all three PPARs and their crystal structures were determined. The two LBD–ligand complex structures revealed how the pan agonist is adapted to the similar, but significantly different, ligand-binding pockets of the PPARs. The structures of the PPARδ LBD in complex with an α/δ-selective ligand, TIPP-401, and with a related δ-specific ligand, TIPP-204, were also determined. The comparison between the two PPARδ complexes revealed how each ligand exhibits either a ‘dual selective’ or ‘single specific’ binding mode.« less

  16. Investigational peptide and peptidomimetic μ and δ opioid receptor agonists in the relief of pain

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Aswini Kumar; Hruby, Victor J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Current methods for treating prolonged and neuropathic pain are inadequate and lead to toxicities that greatly diminish quality of life. Therefore, new approaches to the treatment of pain states are needed to address these problems. Areas covered The review primarily reviews approaches that have been taken in the peer-reviewed literature of multivalent ligands that interact with both μ and δ opioid receptors as agonists, and in some cases, also with pharmacophores for antagonist ligands that interact with other receptors as antagonists to block pain. Expert opinion Although there are a number of drugs currently on the market for the treatment of pain; none of them are 100% successful. In the authors’ opinion, it is clear that new directions and modalities are needed to better address the treatment of prolonged and neuropathic pain; one drug or class clearly is not the answer for all pain therapy. Undoubtedly, there are many different phenotypes of prolonged and neuropathic pain and this should be one avenue to further develop appropriate therapies. PMID:24329035

  17. Dacarbazine and the Agonistic TRAIL Receptor-2 Antibody Lexatumumab Induce Synergistic Anticancer Effects in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Engesæter, Birgit; Engebraaten, Olav; Flørenes, Vivi Ann; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari

    2012-01-01

    Mapatumumab and lexatumumab (targeting death receptor 4 (DR4) and 5 (DR5), respectively) are agonistic TRAIL receptor antibodies that induce apoptosis in a wide range of cancer cells. The potency of mapatumumab and lexatumumab was assessed in mono therapy protocols, and the ability to sensitize for dacarbazine (DTIC) treatment was explored in ten different melanoma cell lines. Our data indicated that melanoma cell lines tend to be resistant to mapatumumab, most likely due to low expression of DR4, while a dose dependent response to lexatumumab was observed. Combining DTIC and lexatumumab induced an additive or synergistic effect on cell death in the various melanoma cell lines. The synergistic effect observed in the FEMX-1 cell line was related to enhanced cleavage of Bid in parallel with elevated expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bim, Bax and Bak. Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-XL, cIAP-1, XIAP and livin were down regulated. Cleavage of Bid and down regulation of cIAP-2 and livin were observed in vivo. Altogether, these data suggest a change in the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins favoring induction of apoptosis. In the more therapy resistant cell line, HHMS, no changes in the pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins were observed. FEMX-1 xenografts treated with DTIC and lexatumumab showed reduced growth and increased level of apoptosis compared to the control groups, providing arguments for further evaluation of this combination in melanoma patients. PMID:23029050

  18. Dacarbazine and the agonistic TRAIL receptor-2 antibody lexatumumab induce synergistic anticancer effects in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Engesæter, Birgit; Engebraaten, Olav; Flørenes, Vivi Ann; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari

    2012-01-01

    Mapatumumab and lexatumumab (targeting death receptor 4 (DR4) and 5 (DR5), respectively) are agonistic TRAIL receptor antibodies that induce apoptosis in a wide range of cancer cells. The potency of mapatumumab and lexatumumab was assessed in mono therapy protocols, and the ability to sensitize for dacarbazine (DTIC) treatment was explored in ten different melanoma cell lines. Our data indicated that melanoma cell lines tend to be resistant to mapatumumab, most likely due to low expression of DR4, while a dose dependent response to lexatumumab was observed. Combining DTIC and lexatumumab induced an additive or synergistic effect on cell death in the various melanoma cell lines. The synergistic effect observed in the FEMX-1 cell line was related to enhanced cleavage of Bid in parallel with elevated expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bim, Bax and Bak. Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-XL, cIAP-1, XIAP and livin were down regulated. Cleavage of Bid and down regulation of cIAP-2 and livin were observed in vivo. Altogether, these data suggest a change in the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins favoring induction of apoptosis. In the more therapy resistant cell line, HHMS, no changes in the pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins were observed. FEMX-1 xenografts treated with DTIC and lexatumumab showed reduced growth and increased level of apoptosis compared to the control groups, providing arguments for further evaluation of this combination in melanoma patients.

  19. Mechanisms of anorexia-cachexia syndrome and rational for treatment with selective ghrelin receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Angela; Criscitiello, Carmen; Gelao, Lucia; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Locatelli, Marzia; Minchella, Ida; Di Leo, Maria; Liuzzi, Rita; Milani, Alessandra; Massaro, Mariangela; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cachexia is a multi-organ, multifactorial and often irreversible syndrome affecting many patients with cancer. Cancer cachexia is invariably associated with weight loss, mainly from loss of skeletal muscle and body fat, conditioning a reduced quality of life due to asthenia, anorexia, anaemia and fatigue. Treatment options for treating cancer cachexia are limited. The approach is multimodal and may include: treatment of secondary gastrointestinal symptoms, nutritional treatments, drug, and non-drug treatments. Nutritional counselling and physical training may be beneficial in delaying or preventing the development of anorexia-cachexia. However, these interventions are limited in their effect, and no definitive pharmacological treatment is available to address the relevant components of the syndrome. Anamorelin is a first-in-class, orally active ghrelin receptor agonist that binds and stimulates the growth hormone secretagogue receptor centrally, thereby mimicking the appetite-enhancing and anabolic effects of ghrelin. It represents a new class of drug and an additional treatment option for this patient group, whose therapeutic options are currently limited. In this review we examine the mechanisms of anamorelin by which it contrasts catabolic states, its role in regulation of metabolism and energy homeostasis, the data of recent trials in the setting of cancer cachexia and its safety profile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Probing for and Quantifying Agonist Hydrogen Bonds in α6β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Post, Michael R; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2017-04-04

    Designing subtype-selective agonists for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is a challenging and significant goal aided by intricate knowledge of each subtype's binding patterns. We previously reported that in α6β2 receptors, acetylcholine makes a functional cation-π interaction with Trp149, but nicotine and TC299423 do not, suggesting a distinctive binding site. This work explores hydrogen binding at the backbone carbonyl associated with α6β2 Trp149. Substituting residue i + 1, Thr150, with its α-hydroxy analogue (Tah) attenuates the carbonyl's hydrogen bond accepting ability. At α6(T150Tah)β2, nicotine shows a 24-fold loss of function, TC299423 shows a modest loss, and acetylcholine shows no effect. Nicotine was further analyzed via a double-mutant cycle analysis utilizing N'-methylnicotinium, which indicated a hydrogen bond in α6β2 with a ΔΔG of 2.6 kcal/mol. Thus, even though nicotine does not make the conserved cation-π interaction with Trp149, it still makes a functional hydrogen bond to its associated backbone carbonyl.

  1. Liver X receptor agonist prevents LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Tian, Yuan; Wei, Zhengkai; Liu, Hui; Song, Xiaojing; Liu, Wenbo; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a ligand-activated transcription factor. Best known for its ability to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, LXRs have recently also been implicated in regulation of inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of synthetic LXR-α agonist T0901317 on LPS-induced mastitis in mice. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. T0901317 was injected 1h before and 12h after induction of LPS intraperitoneally. The results showed that T0901317 significantly attenuated the infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes, and the activation of myeloperoxidase (MPO); down-regulated the level of pro-inflammatory mediators including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and PEG2; inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65, caused by LPS. Moreover, we report for the first time that LXR-α activation impaired LPS-induced mastitis. Taken together, these data indicated that T0901317 had protective effect on mastitis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of T0901317 on LPS induced mastitis in mice may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB signaling pathway. LXR-α activation can be used as a therapeutic approach to treat mastitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Choosing between GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and DPP-4 Inhibitors: A Pharmacological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dominique Xavier; Evans, Marc

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the incretin therapies have provided a new treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The incretin therapies focus on the increasing levels of the two incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). This results in increased glucose dependent insulin synthesis and release. GLP-1 receptor agonists such as liraglutide and exenatide exert an intrinsic biological effect on GLP-1 receptors directly stimulating the release of insulin from pancreatic beta cells. DPP-4 inhibitors such as sitagliptin and linagliptin prevent the inactivation of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP through competitive inhibition of the DPP-4 enzyme. Both incretin therapies have good safety and tolerability profiles and interact minimally with a number of medications commonly prescribed in T2DM. This paper focuses on the pharmacological basis by which the incretin therapies function and how this knowledge can inform and benefit clinical decisions. Each individual incretin agent has benefits and pitfalls relating to aspects such as glycaemic and nonglycaemic efficacy, safety and tolerability, ease of administration, and cost. Overall, a personalized medicine approach has been found to be favourable, tailoring the incretin agent to benefit and suit patient's needs such as renal impairment (RI) or hepatic impairment (HI). PMID:23125920

  3. Anti-Brownian ELectrokinetic (ABEL) trapping of single β2-adrenergic receptors in the absence and presence of agonist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockenhauer, Samuel; Fuerstenberg, Alexandre; Yao, Xiao Jie; Kobilka, Brian K.; Moerner, W. E.

    2012-02-01

    The ABEL trap allows trapping of single biomolecules in solution for extended observation without immobilization. The essential idea combines fluorescence-based position estimation with fast electrokinetic feedback in a microfluidic geometry to counter the Brownian motion of a single nanoscale object, hence maintaining its position in the field of view for hundreds of milliseconds to seconds. Such prolonged observation of single proteins allows access to slow dynamics, as probed by any available photophysical observables. We have used the ABEL trap to study conformational dynamics of the β2-adrenergic receptor, a key G-protein coupled receptor and drug target, in the absence and presence of agonist. A single environment-sensitive dye reports on the receptor microenvironment, providing a real-time readout of conformational change for each trapped receptor. The focus of this paper will be a quantitative comparison of the ligandfree and agonist-bound receptor data from our ABEL trap experiments. We observe a small but clearly detectable shift in conformational equilibria and a lengthening of fluctuation timescales upon binding of agonist. In order to quantify the shift in state distributions and timescales, we apply nonparametric statistical tests to place error bounds on the resulting single-molecule distributions.

  4. NMR spectroscopy of the ligand binding core of ionotropic glutamate receptor 2 bound to 5-substituted willardiine partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Oswald, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate receptors mediate neuronal intercommunication in the central nervous system by coupling extracellular neurotransmitter-receptor interactions to ion channel conductivity. To gain insight into structural and dynamical factors that underlie this coupling, solution NMR experiments were performed on the bi-lobed ligand-binding core of glutamate receptor 2 in complexes with a set of willardiine partial agonists. These agonists are valuable for studying structure-function relationships because their 5-position substituent size is correlated with ligand efficacy and extent of receptor desensitization whereas the substituent electronegativity is correlated with ligand potency. NMR results show that the protein backbone amide chemical shift deviations correlate mainly with efficacy and extent of desensitization. Pronounced deviations occur at specific residues in the ligand-binding site and in the two helical segments that join the lobes by a disulfide bond. Experiments detecting conformational exchange show that micro- to millisecond timescale motions also occur near the disulfide bond and vary largely with efficacy and extent of desensitization. These results thus identify regions displaying structural and dynamical dissimilarity arising from differences in ligand-protein interactions and lobe closure which may play a critical role in receptor response. Furthermore, measures of line broadening and conformational exchange for a portion of the ligand-binding site correlate with ligand EC50 data. These results do not have any correlate in the currently available crystal structures and thus provide a novel view of ligand-binding events that may be associated with agonist potency differences. PMID:18387631

  5. JWH-133, a Selective Cannabinoid CB₂ Receptor Agonist, Exerts Toxic Effects on Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszak, Jakub; Krzemień, Wojciech; Zawilska, Jolanta B

    2016-04-01

    Endocannabinoid system plays an important role in the regulation of diverse physiological functions. Although cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB2) are involved in the modulation of immune system in peripheral tissues, recent findings demonstrated that they are also expressed in the central nervous system and could constitute a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. At present, very little is known about the potential effects of CB2-mimetic drugs on neuronal cells. This study aimed to examine whether JWH-133, a selective CB2 receptor agonist, affects the survival of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line, a widely used experimental in vitro model to study mechanisms of toxicity and protection in nigral dopaminergic neurons. Cell viability was assessed using two complementary methods: MTT test measuring mitochondrial activity and LDHe test indicating disruption of cell membrane integrity. In addition, cell proliferation was measured using BrdU incorporation assay. JWH-133 (10-40 μM) induced a concentration-dependent decrease of SH-SY5Y cell viability and proliferation rate. Using AM-630, a reverse agonist of CB2 receptors, as well as Z-VAD-FMK, a pan-caspase inhibitor, we demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of JWH-133 presumably was not mediated by activation of CB2 receptors or by caspase pathway. Results of this work suggest that agonists of CB2 receptors when administered in multiple/high doses may induce neuronal damage.

  6. Modifying Expression Modes of Human Neurotensin Receptor Type 1 Alters Sensing Capabilities for Agonists in Yeast Signaling Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Hiroki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko

    2018-04-01

    Neurotensin receptor type 1 (NTSR1), a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, is naturally activated by binding of a neurotensin peptide, leading to a variety of physiological effects. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a proven host organism for assaying the agonistic activation of human GPCRs. Previous studies showed that yeast cells can functionally express human NTSR1 receptor, permitting the detection of neurotensin-promoted signaling using a ZsGreen fluorescent reporter gene. However, the fluorescence intensity (sensitivity) of NTSR1-expressing yeast cells is low compared to that of yeast cells expressing other human GPCRs (e.g., human somatostatin receptors). The present study sought to increase the sensitivity of the NTSR1-expressing yeast for use as a fluorescent biosensor, including modification of the expression of human NTSR1 in yeast. Changes in the transcription, translation, and transport of the receptor are attempted by altering the promoter, consensus Kozak-like sequence, and secretion signal sequences of the NTSR1-encoding gene. The resulting yeast cells exhibited increased sensitivity to exogenously added peptide. The cells are further engineered by using cell-surface display technology to ensure that the agonistic peptides are secreted and tethered to the yeast cell wall, yielding cells with enhanced NTSR1 activation. This yeast biosensor holds promise for the identification of agonists to treat NTSR1-related diseases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Discovery of Potent and Selective Agonists of δ Opioid Receptor by Revisiting the "Message-Address" Concept.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing; Qian, Yuanyuan; Huang, Xiaoqin; Xu, Xuejun; Li, Wei; Liu, Jinggen; Fu, Wei

    2016-04-14

    The classic "message-address" concept was proposed to address the binding of endogenous peptides to the opioid receptors and was later successfully applied in the discovery of the first nonpeptide δ opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist naltrindole. By revisiting this concept, and based on the structure of tramadol, we designed a series of novel compounds that act as highly potent and selective agonists of DOR among which (-)-6j showed the highest affinity (K i = 2.7 nM), best agonistic activity (EC50 = 2.6 nM), and DOR selectivity (more than 1000-fold over the other two subtype opioid receptors). Molecular docking studies suggest that the "message" part of (-)-6j interacts with residue Asp128(3.32) and a neighboring water molecule, and the "address" part of (-)-6j packs with hydrophobic residues Leu300(7.35), Val281(6.55), and Trp284(6.58), rendering DOR selectivity. The discovery of novel compound (-)-6j, and the obtained insights into DOR-agonist binding will help us design more potent and selective DOR agonists.

  8. Dual agonist Surrobody™ simultaneously activates death receptors DR4 and DR5 to induce cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Kashyap, Arun K.; Yanagi, Teruki; Wimer, Carina; Zhou, Sihong; O' Neil, Ryann; Kurtzman, Aaron L.; Faynboym, Alexsandr; Xu, Li; Hannum, Charles H.; Diaz, Paul W.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Horowitz, Michael; Horowitz, Lawrence; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Reed, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Death receptors of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family are found on surface of most cancer cells and their activation typically kills cancer cells through the stimulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. The endogenous ligand for death receptors-4 and -5 (DR4 and DR5) is Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand, TRAIL (Apo2L). Since most untransformed cells are not susceptible to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, death receptor activators have emerged as promising cancer therapeutic agents. One strategy to stimulate death receptors in cancer patients is to use soluble human recombinant TRAIL protein, but this agent has limitations of a short half-life and decoy receptor sequestration. Another strategy that attempted to evade decoy receptor sequestration and to provide improved pharmacokinetic properties was to generate DR4 or DR5 agonist antibodies. The resulting monoclonal agonist antibodies overcame the limitations of short half-life and avoided decoy receptor sequestration, but are limited by activating only one of the two death receptors. Here, we describe a DR4 and DR5 dual agonist produced using Surrobody™ technology that activates both DR4 and DR5 to induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and also avoids decoy receptor sequestration. This fully human anti-DR4/DR5 Surrobody displays superior potency to DR4- and DR5-specific antibodies, even when combined with TRAIL-sensitizing pro-apoptotic agents. Moreover, cancer cells were less likely to acquire resistance to Surrobody than either anti-DR4 or anti-DR5 mono-specific antibodies. Taken together, Surrobody shows promising preclinical pro-apoptotic activity against cancer cells, meriting further exploration of its potential as a novel cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:26516157

  9. Dual Agonist Surrobody Simultaneously Activates Death Receptors DR4 and DR5 to Induce Cancer Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Kashyap, Arun K; Yanagi, Teruki; Wimer, Carina; Zhou, Sihong; O'Neil, Ryann; Kurtzman, Aaron L; Faynboym, Alexsandr; Xu, Li; Hannum, Charles H; Diaz, Paul W; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Horowitz, Michael; Horowitz, Lawrence; Bhatt, Ramesh R; Reed, John C

    2016-01-01

    Death receptors of the TNF family are found on the surface of most cancer cells and their activation typically kills cancer cells through the stimulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. The endogenous ligand for death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5) is TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, TRAIL (Apo2L). As most untransformed cells are not susceptible to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, death receptor activators have emerged as promising cancer therapeutic agents. One strategy to stimulate death receptors in cancer patients is to use soluble human recombinant TRAIL protein, but this agent has limitations of a short half-life and decoy receptor sequestration. Another strategy that attempted to evade decoy receptor sequestration and to provide improved pharmacokinetic properties was to generate DR4 or DR5 agonist antibodies. The resulting monoclonal agonist antibodies overcame the limitations of short half-life and avoided decoy receptor sequestration, but are limited by activating only one of the two death receptors. Here, we describe a DR4 and DR5 dual agonist produced using Surrobody technology that activates both DR4 and DR5 to induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and also avoids decoy receptor sequestration. This fully human anti-DR4/DR5 Surrobody displays superior potency to DR4- and DR5-specific antibodies, even when combined with TRAIL-sensitizing proapoptotic agents. Moreover, cancer cells were less likely to acquire resistance to Surrobody than either anti-DR4 or anti-DR5 monospecific antibodies. Taken together, Surrobody shows promising preclinical proapoptotic activity against cancer cells, meriting further exploration of its potential as a novel cancer therapeutic agent. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Analysis of opioid receptor subtype antagonist effects upon mu opioid agonist-induced feeding elicited from the ventral tegmental area of rats.

    PubMed

    Lamonte, Nicole; Echo, Joyce A; Ackerman, Tsippa F; Christian, Garrison; Bodnar, Richard J

    2002-03-01

    The present study examined opioid receptor(s) mediation of feeding elicited by mu opioid agonists in the ventral tegmental area using general or selective opioid antagonist pretreatment. Naltrexone as well as equimolar doses of selective mu and kappa, but not delta opioid antagonists in the ventral tegmental area significantly reduced mu agonist-induced feeding, indicating a pivotal role for these receptor subtypes in the full expression of this response.

  11. The effects of dopamine receptor 1 and 2 agonists and antagonists on sexual and aggressive behaviors in male green anoles.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexandra N; Kabelik, David

    2017-01-01

    The propensity to exhibit social behaviors during interactions with same-sex and opposite-sex conspecifics is modulated by various neurotransmitters, including dopamine. Dopamine is a conserved neurotransmitter among vertebrates and dopaminergic receptors are also highly conserved among taxa. Activation of D1 and D2 dopamine receptor subtypes has been shown to modulate social behaviors, especially in mammalian and avian studies. However, the specific behavioral functions of these receptors vary across taxa. In reptiles there have been few studies examining the relationship between dopaminergic receptors and social behaviors. We therefore examined the effects of D1 and D2 agonists and antagonists on sexual and aggressive behaviors in the male green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis). Treatment with high doses of both D1 and D2 agonists was found to impair both sexual and aggressive behaviors. However, the D1 agonist treatment was also found to impair motor function, suggesting that those effects were likely nonspecific. Lower doses of both agonists and antagonists failed to affect social behaviors. These findings provide some evidence for D2 receptor regulation of social behaviors, but in contrast with previous research, these effects are all inhibitory and no effects were found for manipulations of D1 receptors. A potential reason for the lack of more widespread effects on social behaviors using moderate or low drug doses is that systemic injection of drugs resulted in effects throughout the whole brain, thus affecting counteracting circuits which negated one another, making measurable changes in behavioral output difficult to detect. Future studies should administer drugs directly into brain regions known to regulate sexual and aggressive behaviors.

  12. δ-Opioid receptor agonists inhibit migraine-related hyperalgesia, aversive state and cortical spreading depression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A; Smith, Monique L; Zyuzin, Jekaterina; Charles, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine is an extraordinarily common brain disorder for which treatment options continue to be limited. Agonists that activate the δ-opioid receptor may be promising for the treatment of migraine as they are highly effective for the treatment of chronic rather than acute pain, do not induce hyperalgesia, have low abuse potential and have anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of δ-opioid receptor agonists for migraine by characterizing their effects in mouse migraine models. Experimental Approach Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed in mice treated with acute and chronic doses of nitroglycerin (NTG), a known human migraine trigger. Conditioned place aversion to NTG was also measured as a model of migraine-associated negative affect. In addition, we assessed evoked cortical spreading depression (CSD), an established model of migraine aura, in a thinned skull preparation. Key Results NTG evoked acute and chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice, as well as conditioned place aversion. Three different δ-opioid receptor agonists, SNC80, ARM390 and JNJ20788560, significantly reduced NTG-evoked hyperalgesia. SNC80 also abolished NTG-induced conditioned place aversion, suggesting that δ-opioid receptor activation may also alleviate the negative emotional state associated with migraine. We also found that SNC80 significantly attenuated CSD, a model that is considered predictive of migraine preventive therapies. Conclusions and Implications These data show that δ-opioid receptor agonists modulate multiple basic mechanisms associated with migraine, indicating that δ-opioid receptors are a promising therapeutic target for this disorder. PMID:24467301

  13. Design of novel neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists based on conformationally constrained aromatic amino acids and discovery of a potent chimeric opioid agonist-neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ballet, Steven; Feytens, Debby; Buysse, Koen; Chung, Nga N; Lemieux, Carole; Tumati, Suneeta; Keresztes, Attila; Van Duppen, Joost; Lai, Josephine; Varga, Eva; Porreca, Frank; Schiller, Peter W; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Tourwé, Dirk

    2011-04-14

    A screening of conformationally constrained aromatic amino acids as base cores for the preparation of new NK1 receptor antagonists resulted in the discovery of three new NK1 receptor antagonists, 19 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NH-3',5'-(CF(3))(2)-Bn], 20 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NMe-3',5'-(CF(3))(2)-Bn], and 23 [Ac-Tic-NMe-3',5'-(CF(3))(2)-Bn], which were able to counteract the agonist effect of substance P, the endogenous ligand of NK1R. The most active NK1 antagonist of the series, 20 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NMe-3',5'-(CF(3))(2)-Bn], was then used in the design of a novel, potent chimeric opioid agonist-NK1 receptor antagonist, 35 [Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-NMe-3',5'-(CF(3))(2)-Bn], which combines the N terminus of the established Dmt(1)-DALDA agonist opioid pharmacophore (H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2)) and 20, the NK1R ligand. The opioid component of the chimeric compound 35, that is, Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-NH(2) (36), also proved to be an extremely potent and balanced μ and δ opioid receptor agonist with subnanomolar binding and in vitro functional activity.

  14. Design of novel neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists based on conformationally constrained aromatic amino acids and discovery of a potent chimeric opioid agonist-neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Ballet, Steven; Feytens, Debby; Buysse, Koen; Chung, Nga N.; Lemieux, Carole; Tumati, Suneeta; Keresztes, Attila; Van Duppen, Joost; Lai, Josephine; Varga, Eva; Porreca, Frank; Schiller, Peter W.; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Tourwé, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    A screening of conformationally constrained aromatic amino acids as base cores for the preparation of new NK1 receptor antagonists resulted in the discovery of three new NK1 receptor antagonists, 19 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NH-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], 20 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn] and 23 [Ac-Tic-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], which were able to counteract the agonist effect of substance P, the endogenous ligand of NK1R. The most active NK1 antagonist of the series, 20 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], was then used in the design of a novel, potent chimeric opioid agonist-NK1 receptor antagonist, 35 [Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], which combines the N-terminus of the established Dmt1-DALDA agonist opioid pharmacophore (H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2) and 20, the NK1R ligand. The opioid component of the chimeric compound 35, i.e. Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-NH2 36, also proved to be an extremely potent and balanced μ- and δ opioid receptor agonist with subnanomolar binding and in vitro functional activity. PMID:21413804

  15. Agonist-specific coupling of a cloned Drosophila octopamine/tyramine receptor to multiple second messenger systems.

    PubMed Central

    Robb, S; Cheek, T R; Hannan, F L; Hall, L M; Midgley, J M; Evans, P D

    1994-01-01

    A cloned seven transmembrane-spanning Drosophila octopamine/tyramine receptor, permanently expressed in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, both inhibits adenylate cyclase activity and leads to the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels by separate G-protein-coupled pathways. Agonists of this receptor (octopamine and tyramine), differing by only a single hydroxyl group in their side chain, may be capable of differentially coupling it to different second messenger systems. Thus, a single receptor may have a different pharmacological profile depending on which second messenger system is used to assay its efficacy. PMID:8137817

  16. In vivo pharmacological profile of S 38093, a novel histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Panayi, Fany; Sors, Aurore; Bert, Lionel; Martin, Brigitte; Rollin-Jego, Gaelle; Billiras, Rodolphe; Carrié, Isabelle; Albinet, Karine; Danober, Laurence; Rogez, Nathalie; Thomas, Jean-Yves; Pira, Luigi; Bertaina-Anglade, Valérie; Lestage, Pierre

    2017-05-15

    S 38093, a novel histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist, was tested in a series of neurochemical and behavioral paradigms designed to evaluate its procognitive and arousal properties. In intracerebral microdialysis studies performed in rats, S 38093 dose-dependently increased histamine extracellular levels in the prefrontal cortex and facilitated cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats after acute and chronic administration (10mg/kg i.p.). Acute oral administration of S 38093 at 0.1mg/kg significantly improved spatial working memory in rats in the Morris water maze test. The compound also displayed cognition enhancing properties in the two-trial object recognition task in rats, in a natural forgetting paradigm at 0.3 and 1mg/kg p.o. and in a scopolamine-induced memory deficit situation at 3mg/kg p.o. The property of S 38093 to promote episodic memory was confirmed in a social recognition test in rats at 0.3 and 1mg/kg i.p. Arousal properties of S 38093 were assessed in freely moving rats by using electroencephalographic recordings: at 3 and 10mg/kg i.p., S 38093 significantly reduced slow wave sleep delta power and induced at the highest dose a delay in sleep latency. S 38093 at 10mg/kg p.o. also decreased the barbital-induced sleeping time in rats. Taken together these data indicate that S 38093, a novel H3 inverse agonist, displays cognition enhancing at low doses and arousal properties at higher doses in rodents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuronal nicotinic receptor agonists improve gait and balance in olivocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Wecker, L; Engberg, M E; Philpot, R M; Lambert, C S; Kang, C W; Antilla, J C; Bickford, P C; Hudson, C E; Zesiewicz, T A; Rowell, Peter P

    2013-10-01

    Clinical studies have reported that the nicotinic receptor agonist varenicline improves balance and coordination in patients with several types of ataxia, but confirmation in an animal model has not been demonstrated. This study investigated whether varenicline and nicotine could attenuate the ataxia induced in rats following destruction of the olivocerebellar pathway by the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP). The administration of 3-AP (70 mg/kg followed by 300 mg niacinamide/kg; i.p.) led to an 85% loss of inferior olivary neurons within one week without evidence of recovery, and was accompanied by a 72% decrease in rotorod activity, a 3-fold increase in the time to traverse a stationary beam, a 19% decrease in velocity and 31% decrease in distance moved in the open field, and alterations in gait parameters, with a 19% increase in hindpaw stride width. The daily administration of nicotine (0.33 mg free base/kg) for one week improved rotorod performance by 50% and normalized the increased hindpaw stride width, effects that were prevented by the daily preadministration of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (0.8 mg free base/kg). Varenicline (1 and 3 mg free base/kg daily) also improved rotorod performance by approximately 50% following one week of administration, and although it did not alter the time to traverse the beam, it did improve the ability to maintain balance on the beam. Neither varenicline nor nicotine, at doses that improved balance, affected impaired locomotor activity in the open field. Results provide evidence that nicotinic agonists are of benefit for alleviating some of the behavioral deficits in olivocerebellar ataxia and warrant further studies to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) involved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. p-( sup 125 I)iodoclonidine is a partial agonist at the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, M.A.; Wade, S.M.; Neubig, R.R.

    1990-08-01

    The binding properties of p-(125I)iodoclonidine (( 125I)PIC) to human platelet membranes and the functional characteristics of PIC are reported. (125I)PIC bound rapidly and reversibly to platelet membranes, with a first-order association rate constant (kon) at room temperature of 8.0 +/- 2.7 x 10(6) M-1 sec-1 and a dissociation rate constant (koff) of 2.0 +/- 0.8 x 10(-3) sec-1. Scatchard plots of specific (125I)PIC binding (0.1-5 nM) were linear, with a Kd of 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. (125I)PIC bound to the same number of high affinity sites as the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2-AR) full agonist (3H) bromoxidine (UK14,304), which representedmore » approximately 40% of the sites bound by the antagonist (3H)yohimbine. Guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate greatly reduced the amount of (125I)PIC bound (greater than 80%), without changing the Kd of the residual binding. In competition experiments, the alpha 2-AR-selective ligands yohimbine, bromoxidine, oxymetazoline, clonidine, p-aminoclonidine, (-)-epinephrine, and idazoxan all had Ki values in the low nanomolar range, whereas prazosin, propranolol, and serotonin yielded Ki values in the micromolar range. Epinephrine competition for (125I)PIC binding was stereoselective. Competition for (3H)bromoxidine binding by PIC gave a Ki of 1.0 nM (nH = 1.0), whereas competition for (3H)yohimbine could be resolved into high and low affinity components, with Ki values of 3.7 and 84 nM, respectively. PIC had minimal agonist activity in inhibiting adenylate cyclase in platelet membranes, but it potentiated platelet aggregation induced by ADP with an EC50 of 1.5 microM. PIC also inhibited epinephrine-induced aggregation, with an IC50 of 5.1 microM. Thus, PIC behaves as a partial agonist in a human platelet aggregation assay. (125I)PIC binds to the alpha 2B-AR in NG-10815 cell membranes with a Kd of 0.5 +/- 0.1 nM.« less

  19. Effects of Trace Amine-associated Receptor 1 Agonists on the Expression, Reconsolidation, and Extinction of Cocaine Reward Memory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Feng; Thorn, David A; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2016-07-01

    As a modulator of dopaminergic system, trace amine-associated receptor 1 has been shown to play a critical role in regulating the rewarding properties of additive drugs. It has been demonstrated that activation of trace amine-associated receptor 1 decreased the abuse-related behaviors of cocaine in rats. However, the role of trace amine-associated receptor 1 in specific stages of cocaine reward memory is still unclear. Here, using a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference model, we tested the effects of a selective trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonist RO5166017 on the expression, reconsolidation, and extinction of cocaine reward memory. We found that RO5166017 inhibited the expression but not retention of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. RO5166017 had no effect on the reconsolidation of cocaine reward memory. Pretreatment with RO5166017 before extinction hindered the formation of extinction long-term memory. RO5166017 did not affect the movement during the conditioned place preference test, indicating the inhibitory effect of RO5166017 on the expression of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference was not caused by locomotion inhibition. Using a cocaine i.v. self-administration model, we found that the combined trace amine-associated receptor 1 partial agonist RO5263397 with extinction had no effect on the following cue- and drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Repeated administration of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonist during extinction showed a continually inhibitory effect on the expression of cocaine reward memory both in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference and cocaine self-administration models. Taken together, these results indicate that activation of trace amine-associated receptor 1 specifically inhibited the expression of cocaine reward memory. The inhibitory effect of trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonists on cocaine reward memory suggests that trace amine-associated receptor 1

  20. An intrinsic agonist mechanism for activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor by its extracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yanting; Zhou, X Edward; Hou, Li; Zhao, Li-Hua; Liu, Bo; Wang, Gaihong; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is a class B G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays key roles in glucose metabolism and is a major therapeutic target for diabetes. The classic two-domain model for class B GPCR activation proposes that the apo-state receptor is auto-inhibited by its extracellular domain, which physically interacts with the transmembrane domain. The binding of the C-terminus of the peptide hormone to the extracellular domain allows the N-terminus of the hormone to insert into the transmembrane domain to induce receptor activation. In contrast to this model, here we demonstrate that glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor can be activated by N-terminally truncated glucagon-like peptide-1 or exendin-4 when fused to the receptor, raising the question regarding the role of N-terminal residues of peptide hormone in glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation. Mutations of cysteine 347 to lysine or arginine in intracellular loop 3 transform the receptor into a G protein-biased receptor and allow it to be activated by a nonspecific five-residue linker that is completely devoid of exendin-4 or glucagon-like peptide-1 sequence but still requires the presence of an intact extracellular domain. Moreover, the extracellular domain can activate the receptor in trans in the presence of an intact peptide hormone, and specific mutations in three extracellular loops abolished this extracellular domain trans-activation. Together, our data reveal a dominant role of the extracellular domain in glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation and support an intrinsic agonist model of the extracellular domain, in which peptide binding switches the receptor from the auto-inhibited state to the auto-activated state by releasing the intrinsic agonist activity of the extracellular domain. PMID:27917297

  1. Role of dopamine D4 receptors in copulatory behavior: Studies with selective D4 agonists and antagonists in male rats.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Contini, Andrea; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Argiolas, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Dopamine influences the anticipatory and consummatory phases of sexual behavior, by acting on receptors of the D2 family (D2, D3 and D4) and in particular of the D2 subtype, although evidence for a role of D4 receptors in erectile function and copulatory behavior is also available. In order to clarify such a role of D4 receptors, the effect of selective D4 receptor agonists and antagonists on copulatory behavior of sexually potent male rats in classic copulation tests with a receptive female, was compared with that of apomorphine and haloperidol, a classic dopamine receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively. PD-168,077 (0.05-0.2mg/kg) and ABT-724 (0.01-0.04mg/kg), two selective D4 receptor agonists, given subcutaneously, improved dose-dependently copulatory behavior as shown by the decrease of mount frequency and post ejaculatory interval induced by PD-168,077, and of mount frequency, ejaculation latency, post ejaculatory and inter intromission intervals induced by ABT-724, and by the increase of ejaculation frequency and copulatory efficacy induced by both drugs. Conversely, L-745,870 (1-5mg/kg), a selective D4 receptor antagonist, given intraperitoneally, impaired dose-dependently copulatory behavior, as shown by the increase in intromission and ejaculation latencies, mount frequency, post ejaculatory interval and the decrease in ejaculation frequency and copulatory efficacy induced by this drug. L-745,870 (5mg/kg) administered before PD-168,077 (0.2mg/kg) or ABT-724 (0.04mg/kg), also abolished completely the facilitatory effects of both PD-168,077 and ABT-724 on sexual behavior. These results confirm the involvement of D4 receptors in specific aspects of male rat copulatory behavior that overlap only partially with those influenced by apomorphine and haloperidol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential actions of antiparkinson agents at multiple classes of monoaminergic receptor. III. Agonist and antagonist properties at serotonin, 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2), receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Cussac, Didier; Quentric, Yann; Touzard, Manuelle; Verrièle, Laurence; Carpentier, Nathalie; Millan, Mark J

    2002-11-01

    Although certain antiparkinson agents interact with serotonin (5-HT) receptors, little information is available concerning functional actions. Herein, we characterized efficacies of apomorphine, bromocriptine, cabergoline, lisuride, piribedil, pergolide, roxindole, and terguride at human (h)5-HT(1A), h5-HT(1B), and h5-HT(1D) receptors [guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPgammaS) binding], and at h5-HT(2A), h5-HT(2B), and h5-HT(2C) receptors (depletion of membrane-bound [(3)H]phosphatydilinositol). All drugs stimulated h5-HT(1A) receptors with efficacies (compared with 5-HT, 100%) ranging from modest (apomorphine, 35%) to high (cabergoline, 93%). At h5-HT(1B) receptors, efficacies varied from mild (terguride, 37%) to marked (cabergoline, 102%) and potencies were modest (pEC(50) values of 5.8-7.6): h5-HT(1D) sites were activated with a similar range of efficacies and greater potency (7.1-8.5). Piribedil and apomorphine were inactive at h5-HT(1B) and h5-HT(1D) receptors. At h5-HT(2A) receptors, terguride, lisuride, bromocriptine, cabergoline, and pergolide displayed potent (7.6-8.8) agonist properties (49-103%), whereas apomorphine and roxindole were antagonists and piribedil was inactive. Only pergolide (113%/8.2) and cabergoline (123%/8.6) displayed pronounced agonist properties at h5-HT(2B) receptors. At 5-HT(2C) receptors, lisuride, bromocriptine, pergolide, and cabergoline were efficacious (75-96%) agonists, apomorphine and terguride were antagonists, and piribedil was inactive. MDL100,907 and SB242,084, selective antagonists at 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors, respectively, abolished these actions of pergolide, cabergoline, and bromocriptine. In conclusion, antiparkinson agents display markedly different patterns of agonist and antagonist properties at multiple 5-HT receptor subtypes. Although all show modest (agonist) activity at 5-HT(1A) sites, their contrasting actions at 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) sites may be of particular significance to their

  3. Design and synthesis of novel δ opioid receptor agonists with an azatricyclodecane skeleton for improving blood-brain barrier penetration.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshikazu; Hayashida, Kohei; Saito, Daisuke; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Sakai, Junichi; Nakata, Eriko; Kanda, Takashi; Iwai, Takashi; Hirayama, Shigeto; Fujii, Hideaki; Yamakawa, Tomio; Nagase, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    We designed and synthesized novel δ opioid receptor (DOR) agonists 3a-i with an azatricyclodecane skeleton, which was a novel structural class of DOR agonists. Among them, 3b exhibited high values of binding affinity and potent agonistic activity for the DOR that were approximately equivalent to those of 2 which bore an oxazatricyclodecane skeleton. In vitro assays using the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability test kit supported the idea that 3b achieved an excellent BBB permeability by converting an oxygen atom of 2 to a carbon atom (methylene group) in the core skeleton. As a result, 3b showed potent antinociceptive effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Taking a Toll on human disease: Toll-like receptor 4 agonists as vaccine adjuvants and monotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Baldridge, Jory R; McGowan, Patrick; Evans, Jay T; Cluff, Christopher; Mossman, Sally; Johnson, David; Persing, David

    2004-07-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are being developed for use as vaccine adjuvants and as stand-alone immunomodulators because of their ability to stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Among the most thoroughly studied TLR agonists are the lipid A molecules that target the TLR4 complex. One promising candidate, monophosphoryl lipid A, which is a derivative of lipid A from Salmonella minnesota, has proven to be safe and effective as a vaccine adjuvant in > 120,000 human doses. A new class of synthetic lipid A mimetics, the aminoalkyl glucosaminide 4-phosphates (AGPs), have been engineered specifically to target human TLR4 and are showing promise as vaccine adjuvants and as monotherapeutic agents capable of eliciting nonspecific protection against a wide range of infectious pathogens. In this review, the authors provide an update of the preclinical and clinical experiences with the TLR4 agonists, MPL (Corixa Corporation) adjuvant and the AGPs.

  5. A DFT approach to discriminate the antagonist and partial agonist activity of ligands binding to the NMDA receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslak, Zeynep Pinar; Bozkurt, Esra; Dutagaci, Bercem; De Proft, Frank; Aviyente, Viktorya; De Vleeschouwer, Freija

    2018-02-01

    The activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors is found to be intimately associated with neurodegenerative diseases which make them promising therapeutic targets. Despite the significantly increasing multidisciplinary interests centred on this ionotropic channel, design of new ligands with intended functional activity remains a great challenge. In this article, a computational study based on density functional theory is presented to understand the structural factors of ligands determining their function as antagonists and partial agonists. With this aim, the GluN1 subunit is chosen as being one of the essential components in the activation mechanism, and quantum chemical calculations are implemented for 30 antagonists and 30 partial agonists known to bind to this subunit with different binding affinities. Several quantum chemical descriptors are investigated which might unlock the difference between antagonists and partial agonists.

  6. A Modular Dual-Labeling Scaffold That Retains Agonistic Properties for Somatostatin Receptor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sukhen C.; Rodriguez, Melissa; Carmon, Kendra S.; Voss, Julie; Wilganowski, Nathaniel L.; Schonbrunn, Agnes

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence-guided surgery is an emerging imaging technique that can enhance the ability of surgeons to detect tumors when compared with visual observation. To facilitate characterization, fluorescently labeled probes have been dual-labeled with a radionuclide to enable cross-validation with nuclear imaging. In this study, we selected the somatostatin receptor imaging agent DOTATOC as the foundation for developing a dual-labeled analog. We hypothesized that a customized dual-labeling approach with a multimodality chelation (MMC) scaffold would minimize steric effects of dye conjugation and retain agonist properties. Methods: An MMC conjugate (MMC-TOC) was synthesized on solid-phase and compared with an analog prepared using conventional methods (DA-TOC). Both analogs were conjugated to IRDye 800 using copper-free click chemistry. The resulting compounds, MMC(IR800)-TOC and DA(IR800)-TOC, were labeled with Cu and 64Cu and tested in vitro in somatostatin receptor subtype 2–overexpressing HEK-293 cells to assess agonist properties, and in AR42J rat pancreatic cancer cells to determine receptor binding characteristics. Multimodality imaging was performed in AR42J xenografts. Results: Cu-MMC(IR800)-TOC demonstrated higher potency for cyclic adenosine monophosphate inhibition (half maximal effective concentration [EC50]: 0.21 ± 0.18 vs. 1.38 ± 0.54 nM) and receptor internalization (EC50: 41.9 ± 29.8 vs. 455 ± 299 nM) than Cu-DA(IR800)-TOC. Radioactive uptake studies showed that blocking with octreotide caused a dose-dependent reduction in 64Cu-MMC(IR800)-TOC uptake whereas 64Cu-DA(IR800)-TOC was not affected. In vivo studies revealed higher tumor uptake for 64Cu-MMC(IR800)-TOC than 64Cu-DA(IR800)-TOC (5.2 ± 0.2 vs. 3.6 ± 0.4 percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo blocking studies with octreotide reduced tumor uptake of 64Cu-MMC(IR800)-TOC by 66%. Excretion of 64Cu-MMC(IR800)-TOC was primarily through the liver and spleen whereas 64Cu-DA(IR800)-TOC was

  7. Comparison of receptor mechanisms and efficacy requirements for delta-agonist-induced convulsive activity and antinociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Broom, Daniel C; Nitsche, Joshua F; Pintar, John E; Rice, Kenner C; Woods, James H; Traynor, John R

    2002-11-01

    Delta-opioid receptor-selective agonists produce antinociception and convulsions in several species, including mice. This article examines two hypotheses in mice: 1) that antinociception and convulsive activity are mediated through the same type of delta-receptor and 2) that greater delta-agonist efficacy is required for antinociception than for convulsive activity. Delta-mediated antinociception was evaluated in the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction assay, which involves a low-intensity noxious stimulus; convulsive activity was indicated as a mild tonic-clonic convulsive episode followed by a period of catalepsy. In delta-opioid receptor knockout mice [DOR-1(-/-)], the nonpeptidic delta-agonists (+/-)-4-[(R*)-[(2S*,5R*)-2,5-dimethyl-4-(2-propenyl)-1- piperazinyl]-(3-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide hydrochloride (BW373U86) and (+)-4-[(R)-[(2S,5R)-2,5-dimethyl-4-(2-propenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-(3-methoxyphenyl)methyl]-N, N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80) failed to produce convulsive behavior demonstrating the absolute involvement of DOR-1 in this effect. In NIH Swiss mice expressing delta-opioid receptors, BW373U86 produced both antinociception and convulsive activity. These effects were antagonized by the putative delta(1)-receptor-selective antagonist 7-benzylidenenaltrexone and the putative delta(2)-receptor-selective antagonist naltriben. Tolerance developed to both the convulsive and antinociceptive effects of BW373U86. Tolerance to the convulsive, but not the antinociceptive, effects of BW373U86 was largely prevented when the antagonist naltrindole was given 20 min after each dose of the agonist in a 3-day treatment paradigm. The convulsive action of BW373U86 was also less sensitive than the antinociceptive action to treatment with the irreversible delta-antagonist naltrindole isothiocyanate. Collectively, these data suggest that the convulsive and antinociceptive activities of delta-agonists are mediated through the same receptor but that the

  8. Effects of Serotonin 2C Receptor Agonists on the Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects of Cocaine in Squirrel Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Manvich, Daniel F.; Kimmel, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the serotonin system modulates the behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine, but the receptor subtypes mediating these effects remain unknown. Recent studies have demonstrated that pharmacological activation of the serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR) attenuates the behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine in rodents, but such compounds have not been systematically evaluated in nonhuman primates. The present experiments sought to determine the impact of pretreatment with the preferential 5-HT2CR agonist m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) and the selective 5-HT2CR agonist Ro 60-0175 [(α-S)-6-chloro-5-fluoro-α-methyl-1H-indole-1-ethanamine fumarate] on the behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. In subjects trained to lever-press according to a 300-s fixed-interval schedule of stimulus termination, pretreatment with either 5-HT2CR agonist dose-dependently and insurmountably attenuated the behavioral stimulant effects of cocaine. In subjects trained to self-administer cocaine, both compounds dose-dependently and insurmountably attenuated cocaine-induced reinstatement of previously extinguished responding in an antagonist-reversible manner, and the selective agonist Ro 60-0175 also attenuated the reinforcing effects of cocaine during ongoing cocaine self-administration. It is noteworthy that the selective agonist Ro 60-0175 exhibited behavioral specificity because it did not significantly alter nondrug-maintained responding. Finally, in vivo microdialysis studies revealed that pretreatment with Ro 60-0175 caused a reduction of cocaine-induced dopamine increases within the nucleus accumbens, but not the caudate nucleus. These results suggest that 5-HT2CR agonists functionally antagonize the behavioral effects of cocaine in nonhuman primates, possibly via a selective modulation of cocaine-induced dopamine increases within the mesolimbic dopamine system and may therefore represent a novel class of

  9. The selective V1a receptor agonist selepressin (FE 202158) blocks vascular leak in ovine severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wiśniewska, Halina; Traber, Lillian D.; Lin, ChiiDean; Fan, Juanjuan; Hawkins, Hal K.; Cox, Robert A.; Wiśniewski, Kazimierz; Schteingart, Claudio D.; Landry, Donald W.; Rivière, Pierre J.-M.; Traber, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if the selective vasopressin type 1a receptor (V1aR) agonist selepressin (FE 202158) is as effective as the mixed V1a/V2 receptor (V1aR/V2R) agonist vasopressor hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) when used as a titrated first-line vasopressor therapy in an ovine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia-induced severe sepsis. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled laboratory experiment. Setting University animal research facility. Subjects Forty-five chronically instrumented sheep. Interventions Sheep were anesthetized, insufflated with cooled cotton smoke via tracheostomy, and P. aeruginosa were instilled into their airways. They were then placed on assisted ventilation, awakened, and resuscitated with lactated Ringer's solution titrated to maintain hematocrit ± 3% from baseline levels. If, despite fluid management, mean arterial pressure (MAP) fell by > 10 mm Hg from baseline levels, a continuous i.v. infusion of AVP or selepressin was titrated to raise and maintain MAP within 10 mm Hg of baseline. Effects of combination treatment of selepressin with the selective V2R agonist desmopressin were similarly investigated. Measurements and Main Results In septic sheep, MAP fell by ~30 mm Hg, systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) decreased by ~50%, and ~7 L of fluid were retained over 24 h; this fluid accumulation was partially reduced by AVP and almost completely blocked by selepressin; combined infusion of selepressin and desmopressin increased fluid accumulation to levels similar to AVP treatment. Conclusions Resuscitation with the selective V1aR agonist selepressin blocked vascular leak more effectively than the mixed V1aR/V2R agonist AVP because of its lack of agonist activity at the V2R. PMID:24674922

  10. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonists protect the striatum against malonate toxicity: relevance for Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sagredo, Onintza; González, Sara; Aroyo, Ilia; Pazos, María Ruth; Benito, Cristina; Lastres-Becker, Isabel; Romero, Juan P.; Tolón, Rosa M.; Mechoulam, Raphael; Brouillet, Emman