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Sample records for a1 receptor-mediated inhibition

  1. Adenosine A1 receptors mediate inhibition of tachykinin release from perifused enteric nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Broad, R M; McDonald, T J; Brodin, E; Cook, M A

    1992-03-01

    A perifused preparation of guinea pig myenteric nerve varicosities (synaptosomes) was used to determine the characteristics of evoked tachykinin release and the inhibition of such release by adenosine analogues. Release of substance P-like immunoreactivity (SP-LI) and neurokinin A-like immunoreactivity (NKA-LI) was evoked by elevated extracellular [K+] in a reversible and repeatable manner. This release was completely abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Perifusion in the presence of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a nonselective A1/A2 adenosine receptor agonist, decreased K(+)-evoked release of SP-LI and NKA-LI compared with that in the absence of the nucleoside. Similar decrements in peptide release were obtained with N6-cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), a selective A1 agonist, and 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)]phenethylamino-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosi ne (CGS 21680), a selective A2 agonist. Response to all nucleosides was graded. Potency order of adenosine analogues was CPA greater than NECA much greater than CGS 21680. Inhibition due to the nucleosides was diminished in the presence of the highly selective A1-receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) while perifusion in the presence of DPCPX alone did not alter evoked release of either peptide. These findings provide direct measurements of inhibitory effects of adenine nucleosides on the release, from enteric nerve endings, of endogenous neuromediators SP and NKA. The findings also directly demonstrate the presence of functional adenosine receptors of the A1 subtype on enteric nerve endings coupled negatively to release of tachykinins. The presence of A2 receptors on enteric nerve endings is neither supported nor excluded.

  2. The Role of cGMP on Adenosine A1 Receptor-mediated Inhibition of Synaptic Transmission at the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Isa; Serpa, André; Sebastião, Ana M.; Cascalheira, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Both adenosine A1 receptor and cGMP inhibit synaptic transmission at the hippocampus and recently it was found that A1 receptor increased cGMP levels in hippocampus, but the role of cGMP on A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission remains to be established. In the present work we investigated if blocking the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway using nitric oxide synthase (NOS), protein kinase G (PKG), and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitors modify the A1 receptor effect on synaptic transmission. Neurotransmission was evaluated by measuring the slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation at hippocampal slices. N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 15 nM), a selective A1 receptor agonist, reversibly decreased the fEPSPs by 54 ± 5%. Incubation of the slices with an inhibitor of NOS (L-NAME, 200 μM) decreased the CPA effect on fEPSPs by 57 ± 9% in female rats. In males, ODQ (10 μM), an sGC inhibitor, decreased the CPA inhibitory effect on fEPSPs by 23 ± 6%, but only when adenosine deaminase (ADA,1 U/ml) was present; similar results were found in females, where ODQ decreased CPA-induced inhibition of fEPSP slope by 23 ± 7%. In male rats, the presence of the PKG inhibitor (KT5823, 1 nM) decreased the CPA effect by 45.0 ± 9%; similar results were obtained in females, where KT5823 caused a 32 ± 9% decrease on the CPA effect. In conclusion, the results suggest that the inhibitory action of adenosine A1 receptors on synaptic transmission at hippocampus is, in part, mediated by the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway. PMID:27148059

  3. Adenosine A1 receptors mediate inhibition of cAMP formation in vitro in the pontine, REM sleep induction zone.

    PubMed

    Marks, Gerald A; Birabil, Christian G; Speciale, Samuel G

    2005-11-09

    Microinjection of adenosine A1 receptor agonist or an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase into the caudal, oral pontine reticular formation (PnOc) of the rat induces a long-lasting increase in REM sleep. Here, we report significant inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP in dissected pontine tissue slices containing the PnOc incubated with the A1 receptor agonist, cyclohexaladenosine (10(-8) M). These data are consistent with adenosine A1 receptor agonist actions on REM sleep mediated through inhibition of cAMP.

  4. Carnosol, a Constituent of Zyflamend, Inhibits Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Mediated Activation of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 Transcription and Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mohebati, Arash; Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kochhar, Amit; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated member of the basic-helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, plays a significant role in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) induced carcinogenesis. In the upper aerodigestive tract of humans, tobacco smoke, a source of PAHs, activates the AhR leading to increased expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, which encode proteins that convert PAHs to genotoxic metabolites. Inhibitors of Hsp90 ATPase cause a rapid decrease in levels of AhR, an Hsp90 client protein, and thereby block PAH-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1. The main objective of this study was to determine whether Zyflamend, a polyherbal preparation, suppressed PAH-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 and inhibited DNA adduct formation and mutagenesis. We also investigated whether carnosol, one of multiple phenolic antioxidants in Zyflamend, had similar inhibitory effects. Treatment of cell lines derived from oral leukoplakia (MSK-Leuk1) and skin (HaCaT) with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a prototypic PAH, induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 transcription, resulting in enhanced levels of message and protein. Both Zyflamend and carnosol suppressed these effects of B[a]P. Notably, both Zyflamend and carnosol inhibited Hsp90 ATPase activity and caused a rapid reduction in AhR levels. The formation of B[a]P induced DNA adducts and mutagenesis were also inhibited by Zyflamend and carnosol. Collectively, these results show that Zyflamend and carnosol inhibit Hsp90 ATPase leading to reduced levels of AhR, suppression of B[a]P-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 and inhibition of mutagenesis. Carnosol-mediated inhibition of Hsp90 ATPase activity can help explain the chemopreventive activity of herbs such as Rosemary, which contain this phenolic antioxidant. PMID:22374940

  5. Menthol inhibits 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents.

    PubMed

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Shuba, Yaroslav; Al Kury, Lina; Sadek, Bassem; Howarth, Frank C; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-11-01

    The effects of alcohol monoterpene menthol, a major active ingredient of the peppermint plant, were tested on the function of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. 5-HT (1 μM)-evoked currents recorded by two-electrode voltage-clamp technique were reversibly inhibited by menthol in a concentration-dependent (IC50 = 163 μM) manner. The effects of menthol developed gradually, reaching a steady-state level within 10-15 minutes and did not involve G-proteins, since GTPγS activity remained unaltered and the effect of menthol was not sensitive to pertussis toxin pretreatment. The actions of menthol were not stereoselective as (-), (+), and racemic menthol inhibited 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents to the same extent. Menthol inhibition was not altered by intracellular 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid injections and transmembrane potential changes. The maximum inhibition observed for menthol was not reversed by increasing concentrations of 5-HT. Furthermore, specific binding of the 5-HT3 antagonist [(3)H]GR65630 was not altered in the presence of menthol (up to 1 mM), indicating that menthol acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of the 5-HT3 receptor. Finally, 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents in acutely dissociated nodose ganglion neurons were also inhibited by menthol (100 μM). These data demonstrate that menthol, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, is an allosteric inhibitor of 5-HT3 receptors.

  6. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Werthwein, S; Zentner, J

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked 3H-noradrenaline release in human cerebrocortical slices was inhibited by histamine (in a manner sensitive to clobenpropit) and by imetit, suggesting H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in human brain.

  7. Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition of thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Christopher J.; Tupone, Domenico; Cano, Georgina; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) agonists have been use as anti-hypertensive agents, in the management of drug withdrawal, and as sedative analgesics. Since α2-AR agonists also influence the regulation of body temperature, we explored their potential as antipyretic agents. This study delineates the central neural substrate for the inhibition of rat brown adipose tissue (BAT) and shivering thermogenesis by α2-AR agonists. Nanoinjection of the α2-AR agonist, clonidine (1.2 nmol), into the rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa) inhibited BAT sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and BAT thermogenesis. Subsequent nanoinjection of the α2-AR antagonist, idazoxan (6nmol) into the rRPa reversed the clonidine-evoked inhibition of BAT SNA and BAT thermogenesis. Systemic administration of the α2-AR agonists, dexmedetomidine (25ug/kg, iv) or clonidine (100ug/kg, iv) inhibited shivering EMGs, BAT SNA and BAT thermogenesis effects that were reversed by nanoinjection of idazoxan (6nmol) into the rRPa. Dexmedetomidine (100µg/kg, ip) prevented and reversed lipopolysaccharide (10µg/kg ip)-evoked thermogenesis in free-behaving rats. Cholera toxin subunit b retrograde tracing from rRPa and pseudorabies virus transynaptic retrograde tracing from BAT combined with immunohistochemistry for catecholaminergic biosynthetic enzymes revealed the ventrolateral medulla as the source of catecholaminergic input to the rRPa and demonstrated that these catecholaminergic neurons are synaptically connected to BAT. Photostimulation of VLM neurons expressing of the PRSx8-ChR2-mCherry lentiviral vector inhibited BAT SNA via activation of α2-ARs in the rRPa. These results indicate a potent inhibition of BAT and shivering thermogenesis by α2-AR activation in the rRPa, and suggest a therapeutic potential of α2-AR agonists for reducing potentially-lethal elevations in body temperature during excessive fever. PMID:23365239

  8. Voltage-dependent inhibition of recombinant NMDA receptor-mediated currents by 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Kloda, Anna; Adams, David J

    2005-01-01

    The effect of 5-HT and related indolealkylamines on heteromeric recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes was investigated using the two-electrode voltage-clamp recording technique. In the absence of external Mg2+ ions, 5-HT inhibited NMDA receptor-mediated currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of 5-HT was independent of the NR1a and NR2 subunit combination. The inhibition of glutamate-evoked currents by 5-HT was use- and voltage-dependent. The voltage sensitivity of inhibition for NR1a+NR2 subunit combinations by 5-HT was similar, exhibiting an e-fold change per ∼20 mV, indicating that 5-HT binds to a site deep within the membrane electric field. The inhibition of the open NMDA receptor by external Mg2+ and 5-HT was not additive, suggesting competition between Mg2+ and 5-HT for a binding site in the NMDA receptor channel. The concentration-dependence curves for 5-HT and 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeOT) inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated currents are shifted to the right in the presence of external Mg2+. The related indolealkylamines inhibited glutamate-evoked currents with the following order of inhibitory potency: 5-MeOT=5-methyltryptamine>tryptamine>7-methyltryptamine>5-HT≫tryptophan=melatonin. Taken together, these data suggest that 5-HT and related compounds can attenuate glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic responses and may provide a basis for drug treatment of excitoxic neurodegeneration. PMID:15655527

  9. A1 receptor mediated adenosinergic regulation of perifornical-lateral hypothalamic area neurons in freely behaving rats

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Seema; Kumar, Sunil; Alam, Md. Aftab; Szymusiak, Ronald; McGinty, Dennis; Alam, Md. Noor

    2010-01-01

    The perifornical-lateral hypothalamic area (PF-LHA) plays a central role in the regulation of behavioral arousal. The PF-LHA contains several neuronal types including wake-active hypocretin (HCRT) neurons that have been implicated in the promotion and/or maintenance of behavioral arousal. Adenosine is an endogenous sleep factor and recent evidence suggests that activation and blockade of adenosine A1 receptors within the PF-LHA promote and suppress sleep, respectively. Although, an in vitro study indicates that adenosine inhibits HCRT neurons via A1 receptor, the in vivo effects of A1 receptor mediated adenosinergic transmission on PF-LHA neurons including HCRT neurons are not known. First, we determined the effects of N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, on the sleep-wake discharge activity of the PF-LHA neurons recorded via microwires placed adjacent to the microdialysis probe used for its delivery. Second, we determined the effects of CPA and that of an A1 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-phenylxanthine (CPDX) into the PF-LHA on cFos-protein immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) in HCRT and non-HCRT neurons around the microdialysis probe used for their delivery. The effect of CPA was studied in rats that were kept awake during lights-off phase, whereas the effect of CPDX was examined in undisturbed rats during lights-on phase. CPA significantly suppressed the sleep-wake discharge activity of PF-LHA neurons. Doses of CPA (50μM) and CPDX (50μM) that suppressed and induced arousal, respectively, in our earlier study (Alam et al., 2009), significantly suppressed and increased Fos-IR in HCRT and non-HCRT neurons. These findings suggest that wake-promoting PF-LHA system is subject to increased endogenous adenosinergic inhibition and that adenosine acting via A1 receptors, in part, inhibits HCRT neurons to promote sleep. PMID:20109537

  10. Cloned M1 muscarinic receptors mediate both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, R; Pinkas-Kramarski, R; Sokolovsky, M

    1988-01-01

    The rat M1 muscarinic receptor gene was cloned and expressed in a rat cell line lacking endogenous muscarinic receptors. Assignment of the cloned receptors to the M1 class was pharmacologically confirmed by their high affinity for the M1-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine and low affinity for the M2-selective antagonist AF-DX-116. Guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] converted agonist binding sites on the receptor, from high-affinity to the low-affinity state, thus indicating that the cloned receptors couple to endogenous G-proteins. The cloned receptors mediated both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide hydrolysis, but by different mechanisms. Pertussis toxin blocked the inhibition of adenylate cyclase (indicating coupling of the receptor to inhibitory G-protein), but did not affect phosphoinositide turnover. Furthermore, the stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis was less efficient than the inhibition of adenylate cyclase. These findings demonstrate that cloned M1 receptors are capable of mediating multiple responses in the cell by coupling to different effectors, possibly to different G-proteins. Images PMID:2846274

  11. PKCɛ mediates substance P inhibition of GABAA receptors-mediated current in rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Yang; Ma, Ke-tao; Shi, Wen-yan; Wang, Ying-zi; Si, Jun-qiang

    2015-02-01

    The mechanism underlying the modulatory effect of substance P (SP) on GABA-activated response in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was investigated. In freshly dissociated rat DRG neurons, whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record GABA-activated current and sharp electrode intracellular recording technique was used to record GABA-induced membrane depolarization. Application of GABA (1-1000 μmol/L) induced an inward current in a concentration-dependent manner in 114 out of 127 DRG neurons (89.8 %) examined with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Bath application of GABA (1-1000 μmol/L) evoked a depolarizing response in 236 out of 257 (91.8%) DRG neurons examined with intracellular recordings. Application of SP (0.001-1 μmol/L) suppressed the GABA-activated inward current and membrane depolarization. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent and could be blocked by the selective neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors antagonist spantide but not by L659187 and SR142801 (1 μmol/L, n=7), selective antagonists of NK2 and NK3. The inhibitory effect of SP was significantly reduced by the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM, phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, and PKC inhibitor chelerythrine, respectively. The PKA inhibitor H-89 did not affect the SP effect. Remarkably, the inhibitory effect of SP on GABA-activated current was nearly completely removed by a selective PKCε inhibitor epilon-V1-2 but not by safingol and LY333531, selective inhibitors of PKCα and PKCβ. Our results suggest that NK1 receptor mediates SP-induced inhibition of GABA-activated current and membrane depolarization by activating intracellular PLC-Ca²⁺-PKCε cascade. SP might regulate the excitability of peripheral nociceptors through inhibition of the "pre-synaptic inhibition" evoked by GABA, which may explain its role in pain and neurogenic inflammation.

  12. Endostatin inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth by suppressing nuclear receptor-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyoung; Kang, Minsung; Wang, Hong; Naik, Gurudatta; Mobley, James A; Sonpavde, Guru; Garvey, W Timothy; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2017-04-01

    Androgen-deprivation therapy has been identified to induce oxidative stress in prostate cancer (PCa), leading to reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) signaling in a hormone-refractory manner. Thus, antioxidant therapies have gained attention as adjuvants for castration-resistant PCa. Here, we report for the first time that human endostatin (ES) prevents androgen-independent growth phenotype in PCa cells through its molecular targeting of AR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and downstream pro-oxidant signaling. This reversal after ES treatment significantly decreased PCa cell proliferation through down-regulation of GR and up-regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione levels. Proteome and biochemical analyses of ES-treated PCa cells further indicated a significant up-regulation of enzymes in the major reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging machinery, including catalase, glutathione synthetase, glutathione reductase, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, biliverdin reductase, and thioredoxin reductase, resulting in a concomitant reduction of intracellular ROS. ES further augmented the antioxidant system through up-regulation of glucose influx, the pentose phosphate pathway, and NAD salvaging pathways. This shift in cancer cell redox homeostasis by ES significantly decreased the effect of protumorigenic oxidative machinery on androgen-independent PCa growth, suggesting that ES can suppress GR-induced resistant phenotype upon AR antagonism and that the dual targeting action of ES on AR and GR can be further translated to PCa therapy.-Lee, J. H., Kang, M., Wang, H., Naik, G., Mobley, J. A., Sonpavde, G., Garvey, W. T., Darley-Usmar, V. M., Ponnazhagan, S. Endostatin inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth by suppressing nuclear receptor-mediated oxidative stress.

  13. Characterization of prejunctional 5-HT receptors mediating inhibition of sympathetic vasopressor responses in the pithed rat.

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, C. M.; Contreras, J.; Ramírez-San Juan, E.; Castillo, C.; Perusquía, M.; Terrón, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    1. It has recently been shown that continuous infusions of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) are able to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the pressor responses induced by preganglionic (T7-T9) sympathetic stimulation in pithed rats pretreated with desipramine (50 micrograms kg-1, i.v.). This inhibitory effect, besides being significantly more pronounced at lower frequencies of stimulation (0.03-I Hz) and devoid of tachyphylaxis, is reversible after interrupting the infusions of 5-HT (up to 5.6 micrograms kg-1 min-1). In the present study we have characterized the pharmacological profile of the receptors mediating the above inhibitory effect of 5-HT. 2. The inhibition induced by 5.6 micrograms kg-1 min-1 of 5-HT on sympathetically-induced pressor responses was not blocked after i.v. treatment with physiological saline (1 ml kg-1), ritanserin (0.1 mg kg-1), MDL 72222 (0.15 mg kg-1) or tropisetron (3 mg kg-1), which did not modify the sympathetically-induced pressor responses per se, but was significantly antagonized by the 5-HT1-like and 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, methysergide (0.3 mg kg-1), which also produced a slight attenuation of the pressor responses to 0.03 and 0.1 Hz per se. 3. Unexpectedly and contrasting with methysergide, the 5-HT1-like and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, methiothepin (0.01, 0.03 and 0.1 mg kg-1) and metergoline (1 and 3 mg kg-1), apparently failed to block the above 5-HT-induced inhibition. Nevertheless, it is noteworthy that these antagonists also blocked the electrically-induced pressor responses per se, presumably by blockade of vascular alpha 1-adrenoceptors and, indeed, this property might have masked their potential antagonism at the inhibitory 5-HT1-like receptors. 4. Consistent with the above findings, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, a potent 5-HT1-like receptor agonist), metergoline and methysergide mimicked the inhibitory action of 5-HT with the following rank order of agonist potency: 5CT > > 5-HT > metergoline > or = methysergide. 5

  14. H2 receptor-mediated facilitation and H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain.

    PubMed

    Timm, J; Marr, I; Werthwein, S; Elz, S; Schunack, W; Schlicker, E

    1998-03-01

    , hippocampal or hypothalamic slices were used instead of cortical slices. The Ca2+-induced tritium overflow in guinea-pig cortex slices was inhibited by histamine (in the presence of ranitidine); this effect was abolished by clobenpropit. In slices superfused in the presence of clobenpropit, impromidine failed to facilitate the Ca2+-evoked tritium overflow. The electrically evoked tritium overflow in mouse brain cortex slices was inhibited by histamine by about 60% (both in the absence or presence of ranitidine). The inhibitory effect of histamine was abolished (but not reversed) by clobenpropit. In conclusion, noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain cortex is inhibited via presynaptic H3 receptors and facilitated via H2 receptors not located presynaptically. In the mouse brain cortex, only inhibitory H3 receptors occur. The extent of the H3 receptor-mediated effect is more marked in the mouse than in the guinea-pig brain cortex.

  15. Ethanol inhibits epileptiform activity and NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in rat amygdaloid slices

    SciTech Connect

    Gean, P.W. )

    1992-02-26

    The effect of ethanol on the epileptiform activity induced by Mg{sup ++}-free solution was studied in rat amygdalar slices using intracellular recording techniques. The spontaneous and evoked epileptiform discharges consisting of an initial burst followed by afterdischarges were observed 20-30 min after switching to Mg{sup ++}-free medium. Superfusion with ethanol reversibly reduced the duration of spontaneous and evoked bursting discharges in a concentration-dependent manner. Synaptic response mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation was isolated by application of a solution containing the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and either in Mg{sup ++}-free solution or in the presence of 50 {mu}M bicuculline. Application of ethanol reversibly suppressed the duration of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic response. These results suggest that intoxicating concentrations of ethanol possess anticonvulsant activity through blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic excitation.

  16. Morphine inhibits an alpha9-acetylcholine nicotinic receptor-mediated response by a mechanism which does not involve opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Lioudyno, M I; Verbitsky, M; Holt, J C; Elgoyhen, A B; Guth, P S

    2000-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors are known to be targets for modulation by a number of substances, including the opiates. It is known that acetylcholine (ACh) coexists with opioid peptides in cochlear efferent neurons, and such a colocalization has been proposed for the vestibular system. In the present study we test the hypothesis that morphine, an opioid receptor agonist with a broad spectrum of selectivity, modulates alpha9nACh receptor-mediated responses in frog vestibular hair cells. Morphine dose-dependently and reversibly inhibited ACh-induced currents as recorded by the perforated patch-clamp method. In the presence of morphine the ACh dose-response curve was shifted to the right in a parallel fashion, suggesting a competitive interaction. However, naloxone did not antagonize the inhibition produced by morphine. To test the hypothesis that morphine could interact with the alpha9nACh receptor without the involvement of opioid receptors, experiments were performed using Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with the alpha9nACh receptor cRNA. The currents activated by ACh in Xenopus oocytes, a system that lacks opioid receptors, were also dose-dependently inhibited by morphine. We conclude that morphine inhibits the alpha9nACh receptor-mediated response in hair cells and Xenopus oocytes through a mechanism which does not involve opioid receptors but may be a direct block of the alpha9nACh receptor.

  17. Halothane inhibits the cholinergic-receptor-mediated influx of calcium in primary culture of bovine adrenal medulla cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, N.; Wada, A.; Izumi, F.

    1986-04-01

    Adrenal medulla cells are cholinoceptive cells. Stimulation of the acetylcholine receptor causes the influx of Ca to the cells, and Ca acts as the coupler of the stimulus-secretion coupling. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of halothane on the receptor-mediated influx of /sup 45/Ca using cultured bovine adrenal medulla cells. Halothane at clinical concentrations (0.5-2%) inhibited the influx of /sup 45/Ca caused by carbachol, with simultaneous inhibition of catecholamine secretion. The influx of /sup 45/Ca and the secretion of catecholamines caused by K depolarization were inhibited by a large concentration of Mg, which competes with Ca at Ca channels, but not inhibited by halothane. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not overcome by increase in the carbachol concentration. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was examined in comparison with that caused by a large concentration of Mg by the application of Scatchard analysis as the function of the external Ca concentration. Halothane decreased the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca without altering the apparent kinetic constant of Ca to Ca channels. On the contrary, a large concentration of Mg increased the apparent kinetic constant without altering the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not due to the direct competitive inhibition of Ca channels, nor to the competitive antagonism of agonist-receptor interaction. As a possibility, halothane seems to inhibit the receptor-mediated activation of Ca channels through the interference of coupling between the receptor and Ca channels.

  18. Cobaltous chloride and hypoxia inhibit aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated responses in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shaheen; Liu Shengxi; Stoner, Matthew; Safe, Stephen

    2007-08-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is expressed in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive ZR-75 breast cancer cells. Treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces CYP1A1 protein and mRNA levels and also activates inhibitory AhR-ER{alpha} crosstalk associated with hormone-induced reporter gene expression. In ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxia, induction of these AhR-mediated responses by TCDD was significantly inhibited. This was not accompanied by decreased nuclear AhR levels or decreased interaction of the AhR complex with the CYP1A1 gene promoter as determined in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Hypoxia-induced loss of Ah-responsiveness was not associated with induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} or other factors that sequester the AhR nuclear translocation (Arnt) protein, and overexpression of Arnt under hypoxia did not restore Ah-responsiveness. The p65 subunit of NF{kappa}B which inhibits AhR-mediated transactivation was not induced by hypoxia and was primarily cytosolic in ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. In ZR-75 cells maintained under hypoxic conditions for 24 h, BRCA1 (an enhancer of AhR-mediated transactivation in breast cancer cells) was significantly decreased and this contributed to loss of Ah-responsiveness. In cells grown under hypoxia for 6 h, BRCA1 was not decreased, but induction of CYP1A1 by TCDD was significantly decreased. Cotreatment of ZR-75 cells with TCDD plus the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide for 6 h enhanced CYP1A1 expression in cells grown under hypoxia and normoxia. These results suggest that hypoxia rapidly induces protein(s) that inhibit Ah-responsiveness and these may be similar to constitutively expressed inhibitors of Ah-responsiveness (under normoxia) that are also inhibited by cycloheximide.

  19. Cobaltous chloride and hypoxia inhibit aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated responses in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaheen; Liu, Shengxi; Stoner, Matthew; Safe, Stephen

    2007-08-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is expressed in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive ZR-75 breast cancer cells. Treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces CYP1A1 protein and mRNA levels and also activates inhibitory AhR-ERalpha crosstalk associated with hormone-induced reporter gene expression. In ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxia, induction of these AhR-mediated responses by TCDD was significantly inhibited. This was not accompanied by decreased nuclear AhR levels or decreased interaction of the AhR complex with the CYP1A1 gene promoter as determined in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Hypoxia-induced loss of Ah-responsiveness was not associated with induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha or other factors that sequester the AhR nuclear translocation (Arnt) protein, and overexpression of Arnt under hypoxia did not restore Ah-responsiveness. The p65 subunit of NFkappaB which inhibits AhR-mediated transactivation was not induced by hypoxia and was primarily cytosolic in ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. In ZR-75 cells maintained under hypoxic conditions for 24 h, BRCA1 (an enhancer of AhR-mediated transactivation in breast cancer cells) was significantly decreased and this contributed to loss of Ah-responsiveness. In cells grown under hypoxia for 6 h, BRCA1 was not decreased, but induction of CYP1A1 by TCDD was significantly decreased. Cotreatment of ZR-75 cells with TCDD plus the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide for 6 h enhanced CYP1A1 expression in cells grown under hypoxia and normoxia. These results suggest that hypoxia rapidly induces protein(s) that inhibit Ah-responsiveness and these may be similar to constitutively expressed inhibitors of Ah-responsiveness (under normoxia) that are also inhibited by cycloheximide.

  20. COBALTOUS CHLORIDE AND HYPOXIA INHIBIT ARYL HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR-MEDIATED RESPONSES IN BREAST CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shaheen; Liu, Shengxi; Stoner, Matthew; Safe, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is expressed in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive ZR-75 breast cancer cells. Treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces CYP1A1 protein and mRNA levels and also activates inhibitory AhR-Erα crosstalk associated with hormone-induced reporter gene expression. In ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxia, induction of these AhR-mediated responses by TCDD was significantly inhibited. This was not accompanied by decreased nuclear AhR levels or decreased interaction of the AhR complex with the CYP1A1 gene promoter as determined in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Hypoxia-induced loss of Ah-responsiveness was not associated with induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α or other factors that sequester the AhR nuclear translocation (Arnt) protein, and overexpression of Arnt under hypoxia did not restore Ah-responsiveness. The p65 subunit of NFκB which inhibits AhR-mediated transactivation was not induced by hypoxia and was primarily cytosolic in ZR-75 cells grown under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. In ZR-75 cells maintained under hypoxic conditions for 24 hr, BRCA1 (an enhancer of AhR-mediated transactivation in breast cancer cells) was significantly decreased and this contributed to loss of Ah-responsiveness. In cells grown under hypoxia for 6 hr, BRCA1 was not decreased, but induction of CYP1A1 by TCDD was significantly decreased. Cotreatment of ZR-75 cells with TCDD plus the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide for 6 hr enhanced CYP1A1 expression in cells grown under hypoxia and normoxia. These results suggest that hypoxia rapidly induces protein(s) that inhibit Ah-responsiveness and these may be similar to constitutively expressed inhibitors of Ah-responsiveness (under normoxia) that are also inhibited by cycloheximide. PMID:17599377

  1. Cholera Toxin Inhibits the T-Cell Antigen Receptor-Mediated Increases in Inositol Trisphosphate and Cytoplasmic Free Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, John B.; Shoback, Dolores M.; Pattison, Gregory; Stobo, John D.

    1986-08-01

    The addition of monoclonal antibodies to the antigen receptor complex on the malignant human T-cell line Jurkat generates increases in inositol trisphosphate and in the concentration of cytoplasmic free calcium. Exposure of Jurkat cells to cholera toxin for 3 hr inhibited these receptor-mediated events and led to a selective, partial loss of the antigen receptor complex from the cellular surface. None of the effects of cholera toxin on the antigen receptor complex were mimicked by the B subunit of cholera toxin or by increasing intracellular cAMP levels with either forskolin or 8-bromo cAMP. These results suggest that a cholera toxin substrate can regulate signal transduction by the T-cell antigen receptor.

  2. The Second Extracellular Loop of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Mediates Activity of Allosteric Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Dylan P.; McRobb, Fiona M.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Purdy, Michael; Figler, Heidi; Marshall, Melissa A.; Chordia, Mahendra; Figler, Robert; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric enhancers of the adenosine A1 receptor amplify signaling by orthosteric agonists. Allosteric enhancers are appealing drug candidates because their activity requires that the orthosteric site be occupied by an agonist, thereby conferring specificity to stressed or injured tissues that produce adenosine. To explore the mechanism of allosteric enhancer activity, we examined their action on several A1 receptor constructs, including (1) species variants, (2) species chimeras, (3) alanine scanning mutants, and (4) site-specific mutants. These findings were combined with homology modeling of the A1 receptor and in silico screening of an allosteric enhancer library. The binding modes of known docked allosteric enhancers correlated with the known structure-activity relationship, suggesting that these allosteric enhancers bind to a pocket formed by the second extracellular loop, flanked by residues S150 and M162. We propose a model in which this vestibule controls the entry and efflux of agonists from the orthosteric site and agonist binding elicits a conformational change that enables allosteric enhancer binding. This model provides a mechanism for the observations that allosteric enhancers slow the dissociation of orthosteric agonists but not antagonists. PMID:24217444

  3. Hippocampal GluA1-containing AMPA receptors mediate context-dependent sensitization to morphine

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yan; Portugal, George S.; Fakira, Amanda K.; Melyan, Zara; Neve, Rachael; Lee, H. Thomas; Russo, Scott J.; Liu, Jie; Morón, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamatergic systems, including α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are involved in opiate-induced neuronal and behavioral plasticity, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated morphine administration on AMPAR expression, synaptic plasticity, and context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine. We found that morphine treatment produced changes of synaptic AMPAR expression in the hippocampus, a brain area that is critically involved in learning and memory. These changes could be observed one week after the treatment, but only when mice developed context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine in which morphine treatment was associated with drug administration environment. Context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine was also associated with increased basal synaptic transmission and disrupted hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas these effects were less robust when morphine administration was not paired with the drug administration environment. Interestingly, some effects may be related to the prior history of morphine exposure in the drug-associated environment, since alterations of AMPAR expression, basal synaptic transmission, and LTP were observed in mice that received a saline challenge one week after discontinuation of morphine treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of GluA1 AMPAR subunit plays a critical role in the acquisition and expression of context-dependent behavioral sensitization, as this behavior is blocked by a viral vector that disrupts GluA1 phosphorylation. These data provide evidence that glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus plays an important role in context-dependent sensitization to morphine and supports further investigation of glutamate-based strategies for treating opiate addiction. PMID:22072679

  4. Hippocampal GluA1-containing AMPA receptors mediate context-dependent sensitization to morphine.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Portugal, George S; Fakira, Amanda K; Melyan, Zara; Neve, Rachael; Lee, H Thomas; Russo, Scott J; Liu, Jie; Morón, Jose A

    2011-11-09

    Glutamatergic systems, including AMPA receptors (AMPARs), are involved in opiate-induced neuronal and behavioral plasticity, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated morphine administration on AMPAR expression, synaptic plasticity, and context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine. We found that morphine treatment produced changes of synaptic AMPAR expression in the hippocampus, a brain area that is critically involved in learning and memory. These changes could be observed 1 week after the treatment, but only when mice developed context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine in which morphine treatment was associated with drug administration environment. Context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine was also associated with increased basal synaptic transmission and disrupted hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas these effects were less robust when morphine administration was not paired with the drug administration environment. Interestingly, some effects may be related to the prior history of morphine exposure in the drug-associated environment, since alterations of AMPAR expression, basal synaptic transmission, and LTP were observed in mice that received a saline challenge 1 week after discontinuation of morphine treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of GluA1 AMPAR subunit plays a critical role in the acquisition and expression of context-dependent behavioral sensitization, as this behavior is blocked by a viral vector that disrupts GluA1 phosphorylation. These data provide evidence that glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus plays an important role in context-dependent sensitization to morphine and supports further investigation of glutamate-based strategies for treating opiate addiction.

  5. A1 and A2a receptors mediate inhibitory effects of adenosine on the motor activity of human colon.

    PubMed

    Fornai, M; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Ghisu, N; Buccianti, P; Marioni, A; Chiarugi, M; Tuccori, M; Blandizzi, C; Del Tacca, M

    2009-04-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that adenosine is involved in the regulation of digestive functions. This study examines the influence of adenosine on the contractile activity of human colon. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed A(1) and A(2a) receptor expression in colonic neuromuscular layers. Circular muscle preparations were connected to isotonic transducers to determine the effects of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A(1) receptor antagonist), ZM 241385 (A(2a) receptor antagonist), CCPA (A(1) receptor agonist) and 2-[(p-2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamide-adenosine (CGS 21680; A(2a) receptor agonist) on motor responses evoked by electrical stimulation or carbachol. Electrically evoked contractions were enhanced by DPCPX and ZM 241385, and reduced by CCPA and CGS 21680. Similar effects were observed when colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine (noradrenergic blocker), L-732,138, GR-159897 and SB-218795 (NK receptor antagonists). However, in the presence of guanethidine, NK receptor antagonists and N(omega)-propyl-L-arginine (NPA; neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), the effects of DPCPX and CCPA were still evident, while those of ZM 241385 and CGS 21680 no longer occurred. Carbachol-induced contractions were unaffected by A(2a) receptor ligands, but they were enhanced or reduced by DPCPX and CCPA, respectively. When colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine, NK antagonists and atropine, electrically induced relaxations were partly reduced by ZM 241385 or NPA, but unaffected by DPCPX. Dipyridamole or application of exogenous adenosine reduced electrically and carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas adenosine deaminase enhanced such motor responses. In conclusion, adenosine exerts an inhibitory control on human colonic motility. A(1) receptors mediate direct modulating actions on smooth muscle, whereas A(2a) receptors operate through inhibitory nitrergic nerve pathways.

  6. GABAB receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition in guinea-pig hippocampus is caused by reduction of presynaptic Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L G; Saggau, P

    1995-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that activation of GABAB receptors inhibits evoked synaptic transmission by reducing the presynaptic Ca2+ influx was tested using a recently developed technique for simultaneously recording the presynaptic Ca2+ transient ([Ca2+]t) and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) evoked by a single electrical stimulus at CA3 to CA1 synapses of guinea-pig hippocampus. 2. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reversibly blocked, in a dose-dependant manner, both the fEPSP and the presynaptic [Ca2+]t with similar time courses. During application of baclofen, the fEPSP was proportional to about the fourth power of the presynaptic [Ca2+]t, and the presynaptic fibre volley and the resting Ca2+ level did not change. These results are similar to those we previously observed following application of several voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that baclofen inhibits the fEPSP by blocking the presynaptic Ca2+ influx. 3. The inhibition by baclofen of both the fEPSP and the presynaptic [Ca2+]t was blocked by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348, consistent with the causal relationship between the GABAB receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition of the [Ca2+]t and the fEPSP. 4. The inhibition by baclofen of the [Ca2+]t was partially occluded by application of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blocker omega-conotoxin-GVIA (omega-CgTX-GVIA), but not omega-agatoxin-IVA (omega-AgaTX-IVA), suggesting that baclofen reduces the presynaptic [Ca2+]t by blocking Ca2+ channels including the omega-CgTX-GVIA-sensitive type. 5. We conclude that baclofen inhibits evoked transmitter release by reducing presynaptic Ca2+ influx.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7562607

  7. Protein kinase C regulates tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the hippocampus and thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Damian P; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-01-01

    Tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) is an important regulator of neuronal excitability. Phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) provides a key mode of regulation for synaptic GABAARs underlying phasic inhibition; however, less attention has been focused on the plasticity of tonic inhibition and whether this can also be modulated by receptor phosphorylation. To address this issue, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording in acute murine brain slices at both room and physiological temperatures to examine the effects of PKC-mediated phosphorylation on tonic inhibition. Recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells in the hippocampus and dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons in the thalamus demonstrated that PKC activation caused downregulation of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. Conversely, inhibition of PKC resulted in an increase in tonic GABAAR activity. These findings were corroborated by experiments on human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing recombinant α4β2δ GABAARs, which represent a key extrasynaptic GABAAR isoform in the hippocampus and thalamus. Using bath application of low GABA concentrations to mimic activation by ambient neurotransmitter, we demonstrated a similar inhibition of receptor function following PKC activation at physiological temperature. Live cell imaging revealed that this was correlated with a loss of cell surface GABAARs. The inhibitory effects of PKC activation on α4β2δ GABAAR activity appeared to be mediated by direct phosphorylation at a previously identified site on the β2 subunit, serine 410. These results indicate that PKC-mediated phosphorylation can be an important physiological regulator of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. PMID:24102973

  8. Estradiol Rapidly Attenuates ORL-1 Receptor-Mediated Inhibition of Proopiomelanocortin Neurons via Gq-Coupled, Membrane-Initiated Signaling.

    PubMed

    Conde, Kristie; Meza, Cecilia; Kelly, Martin J; Sinchak, Kevin; Wagner, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol rapidly regulates the activity of arcuate nucleus (ARH) proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons that project to the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) to regulate lordosis. Orphanin FQ/nociceptin (OFQ/N) acts via opioid receptor-like (ORL)-1 receptors to inhibit these POMC neurons. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that estradiol excites POMC neurons by rapidly attenuating inhibitory ORL-1 signaling in these cells. Hypothalamic slices through the ARH were prepared from ovariectomized rats injected with Fluorogold into the MPN. Electrophysiological recordings were generated in ARH neurons held at or near -60 mV, and neuronal phenotype was determined post hoc by immunohistofluorescence. OFQ/N application induced robust outward currents and hyperpolarizations via G protein-gated, inwardly rectifying K+ (GIRK) channels that were attenuated by pretreatment with either 17-β estradiol (E2) or E2 conjugated to bovine serum albumin. This was blocked by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780 and mimicked by the Gq-coupled membrane ER (Gq-mER) ligand STX and the ERα agonist PPT. Inhibiting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) blocked the estrogenic attenuation of ORL-1/GIRK currents. Antagonizing either phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase A (PKA) or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) also abrogated E2 inhibition of ORL-1/GIRK currents, whereas activation of PKC, PKA, protein kinase B (Akt) and nNOS substrate L-arginine all attenuated the OFQ/N response. This was observed in 92 MPN-projecting, POMC-positive ARH neurons. Thus, ORL-1 receptor-mediated inhibition of POMC neurons is rapidly and negatively modulated by E2, an effect which is stereoselective and membrane initiated via Gq-mER and ERα activation that signals through PLC, PKC, PKA, PI3K and nNOS.

  9. Estradiol rapidly attenuates ORL-1 receptor-mediated inhibition of proopiomelanocortin neurons via Gq-coupled, membrane-initiated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Kristie; Meza, Cecilia; Kelly, Martin J.; Sinchak, Kevin; Wagner, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol rapidly regulates the activity of arcuate nucleus (ARH) proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons that project to the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) to regulate lordosis. Orphanin FQ/nociceptin (OFQ/N) acts via opioid receptor-like (ORL)-1 receptors to inhibit these POMC neurons. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that estradiol excites POMC neurons by rapidly attenuating inhibitory ORL-1 signaling in these cells. Hypothalamic slices through the ARH were prepared from ovariectomized rats injected with Fluorogold into the MPN. Electrophysiologic recordings were generated in ARH neurons held at or near −60 mV, and neuronal phenotype was determined posthoc by immunohistofluorescence. OFQ/N application induced robust outward currents and hyperpolarizations via GIRK channels that were attenuated by pretreatment with either 17-β estradiol (E2) or E2 conjugated to bovine serum albumin. This was blocked by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780, and mimicked by the Gq-coupled, membrane ER (Gq-mER) ligand STX and the ERα agonist PPT. Inhibiting phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) blocked the estrogenic attenuation of ORL-1/GIRK currents. Antagonizing either phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase A (PKA) or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) also abrogated E2 inhibition of ORL-1/GIRK currents, whereas activation of PKC, PKA, protein kinase B (Akt) and nNOS substrate L-arginine all attenuated the OFQ/N response. This was observed in 92 MPN-projecting, POMC-positive ARH neurons. Thus, ORL-1 receptor-mediated inhibition of POMC neurons is rapidly and negatively modulated by E2, an effect which is stereoselective and membrane initiated via Gq-coupled mER and ERα activation that signals through PLC, PKC, PKA, PI3K and nNOS. PMID:26765570

  10. Heterogeneity of prejunctional NPY receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Serone, Adrian P; Wright, Christine E; Angus, James A

    1999-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been proposed as the candidate inhibitory peptide mediating interactions between sympathetic and vagal neurotransmission in several species, including man. Here, we have defined the NPY receptors involved in modulation of cardiac autonomic neurotransmission using receptor-selective agonists and antagonists in the rabbit and guinea-pig isolated right atria.In isolated atrial preparations, sympathetically-mediated tachycardia (ST; with atropine 1 μM) or vagally-mediated bradycardia (VB; with propranolol 0.1–1 μM) in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1–4 pulses) were tested 0–30 min after incubation with single concentrations of vehicle, NPY (0.01–10 μM), the Y2 receptor agonist N-Acetyl-[Leu28,31]NPY(24–36) (termed N-A[L]NPY(24–36)) or the Y1 receptor agonist [Leu31,Pro34]NPY (LP). The effect of NPY on the concentration-chronotropic response curves to isoprenaline and bethanechol were also assessed.Guinea-pig atria: NPY and N-A[L]NPY(24–36) caused concentration-dependent inhibition of VB and ST to EFS. Both peptides caused maximal inhibition of VB and ST within 10 min incubation and this remained constant. LP caused a concentration-dependent, transient inhibition of ST which was antagonized by the Y1-receptor antagonist GR231118 (0.3 μM), with apparent competitive kinetics. Rabbit atria: NPY (1 or 10 μM) had no effect on VB at any time point, but both NPY and LP caused a transient (∼10 min) inhibition of sympathetic tachycardia. This inhibition could be prevented by 0.3 μM GR231118. N-A[L]NPY(24–36) had no effect on ST. NPY had no effect on the response to β-adrenoceptor stimulation by isoprenaline nor muscarinic-receptor stimulation by bethanechol in either species.Thus, in the guinea-pig, NPY causes a stable inhibition of both VB and ST to EFS via Y2 receptors and transient inhibition of ST via Y1 receptors. In contrast in the rabbit, NPY has no effect on the cardiac vagus and

  11. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase augments GABAA receptor-mediated analgesia via a spinal mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Asiedu, Marina N.; Mejia, Galo L.; Hübner, Christian A.; Kaila, Kai; Price, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury negatively influences spinal GABAergic networks via a reduction in the neuron-specific K+-Cl- cotransporter KCC2. This process has been linked to the emergence of neuropathic allodynia. In vivo pharmacological and modeling studies show that a loss of KCC2 function results in a decrease in the efficacy of GABAA -mediated spinal inhibition. One potential strategy to mitigate this effect entails inhibition of carbonic anhydrase activity to reduce HCO3- -dependent depolarization via GABAA receptors when KCC2 function is compromised. We have tested this hypothesis here. Our results show that, similarly to when KCC2 is pharmacologically blocked, peripheral nerve injury causes a loss of analgesic effect for neurosteroid GABAA allosteric modulators at maximally effective doses in naïve mice in the tail flick test. Remarkably, inhibition of carbonic anhydrase activity with intrathecal acetazolamide rapidly restores an analgesic effect for these compounds suggesting an important role of carbonic anhydrase activity in regulating GABAA -mediated analgesia after peripheral nerve injury. Moreover, spinal acetazolamide administration leads to a profound reduction in the mouse formalin pain test indicating that spinal carbonic anhydrase inhibition produces analgesia when primary afferent activity is driven by chemical mediators. Finally, we demonstrate that systemic administration of acetazolamide to rats with peripheral nerve injury produces an anti-allodynia effect by itself and an enhancement of the peak analgesic effect with a change in the shape of the dose response curve of the α1-sparing benzodiazepine L-838,417. Thus, carbonic anhydrase inhibition mitigates the negative effects of loss of KCC2 function after nerve injury in multiple species and through multiple administration routes resulting in an enhancement of analgesic effects for several GABAA allosteric modulators. We suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, many of which are clinically

  12. Inhibition of nicotinic receptor-mediated responses in bovine chromaffin cells by diltiazem.

    PubMed

    Gandía, L; Villarroya, M; Sala, F; Reig, J A; Viniegra, S; Quintanar, J L; García, A G; Gutiérrez, L M

    1996-07-01

    1. The effects of diltiazem on various functional parameters were studied in bovine cultured adrenal chromaffin cells stimulated with the nicotinic receptor agonist dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) or with depolarizing Krebs-HEPES solutions containing high K+ concentrations. 2. The release of [3H]-noradrenaline induced by DMPP (100 microM for 5 min) was gradually and fully inhibited by increasing concentrations of diltiazem (IC50 = 1.3 microM). In contrast, the highest concentration of diltiazem used (10 microM) inhibited the response to high K+ (59 mM for 5 min) by only 25%. 3. 45Ca2+ uptake into cells stimulated with DMPP (100 microM for 1 min) was also blocked by diltiazem in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.4 microM). Again, diltiazem blocked the K(+)-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake (70 mM K+ for 1 min) only by 20%. In contrast, the N-P-Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker omega-conotoxin MVIIC depressed the K+ signal by 70%. In the presence of this toxin, diltiazem exhibited an additional small inhibitory effect, indicating that the compound was acting on L-type Ca2+ channels. 4. Whole-cell Ba2+ currents through Ca2+ channels in voltage-clamped chromaffin cells were inhibited by 3-10 microM diltiazem by 20-25%. The inhibition was readily reversed upon washout of the drug. 5. The whole-cell currents elicited by 100 microM DMPP (IDMPP) were inhibited in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner by diltiazem. Maximal effects were found at 10 microM, which reduced the peak IDMPP by 70%. The area of each curve represented by total current (QDMPP) was reduced more than the peak current. At 10 microM, the inhibition amounted to 80%; the IC50 for QDMPP inhibition was 0.73 microM, a figure close to the IC50 for 45Ca2+ uptake (0.4 microM) and [3H]-noradrenaline release (1.3 microM). The blocking effects of diltiazem developed very quickly and did not exhibit use-dependence; thus the drug blocked the channel in its closed state. The blocking effects of 1 microM diltiazem on

  13. FcR-Like 2 Inhibition of B Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation of B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Tanisha A.; Haga, Christopher L.; Ehrhardt, Götz R. A.; Davis, Randall S.; Cooper, Max D.

    2017-01-01

    FcR-like (FCRL) 2 is a transmembrane protein with immunomodulatory potential that is preferentially expressed by memory B cells in humans. It has two consensus ITIMs in addition to a putative ITAM sequence in its cytoplasmic domain. We have confirmed the cellular distribution of FCRL2 and analyzed its functional potential to show that coligation with the BCR leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of its ITIM motifs and subsequent Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 recruitment to facilitate inhibition of BCR signaling. Mutational analysis indicates that the tyrosine residues in both inhibitory motifs of FCRL2 are required for complete inhibition of BCR signaling, whereas tyrosines in the putative activation motif are dispensable for signal modulation. These findings suggest a negative immunomodulatory function for FCRL2 in the regulation of memory B cells. PMID:21068405

  14. Methods for recording and measuring tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bright, Damian P; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-12-05

    Tonic inhibitory conductances mediated by GABAA receptors have now been identified and characterized in many different brain regions. Most experimental studies of tonic GABAergic inhibition have been carried out using acute brain slice preparations but tonic currents have been recorded under a variety of different conditions. This diversity of recording conditions is likely to impact upon many of the factors responsible for controlling tonic inhibition and can make comparison between different studies difficult. In this review, we will firstly consider how various experimental conditions, including age of animal, recording temperature and solution composition, are likely to influence tonic GABAA conductances. We will then consider some technical considerations related to how the tonic conductance is measured and subsequently analyzed, including how the use of current noise may provide a complementary and reliable method for quantifying changes in tonic current.

  15. Methods for recording and measuring tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Damian P.; Smart, Trevor G.

    2013-01-01

    Tonic inhibitory conductances mediated by GABAA receptors have now been identified and characterized in many different brain regions. Most experimental studies of tonic GABAergic inhibition have been carried out using acute brain slice preparations but tonic currents have been recorded under a variety of different conditions. This diversity of recording conditions is likely to impact upon many of the factors responsible for controlling tonic inhibition and can make comparison between different studies difficult. In this review, we will firstly consider how various experimental conditions, including age of animal, recording temperature and solution composition, are likely to influence tonic GABAA conductances. We will then consider some technical considerations related to how the tonic conductance is measured and subsequently analyzed, including how the use of current noise may provide a complementary and reliable method for quantifying changes in tonic current. PMID:24367296

  16. Protein Expression Signatures for Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-mediated Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Matthew V.; Manning, H. Charles; Coffey, Robert J.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of cellular signaling networks typically involves targeted measurements of phosphorylated protein intermediates. However, phosphoproteomic analyses usually require affinity enrichment of phosphopeptides and can be complicated by artifactual changes in phosphorylation caused by uncontrolled preanalytical variables, particularly in the analysis of tissue specimens. We asked whether changes in protein expression, which are more stable and easily analyzed, could reflect network stimulation and inhibition. We employed this approach to analyze stimulation and inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by EGF and selective EGFR inhibitors. Shotgun analysis of proteomes from proliferating A431 cells, EGF-stimulated cells, and cells co-treated with the EGFR inhibitors cetuximab or gefitinib identified groups of differentially expressed proteins. Comparisons of these protein groups identified 13 proteins whose EGF-induced expression changes were reversed by both EGFR inhibitors. Targeted multiple reaction monitoring analysis verified differential expression of 12 of these proteins, which comprise a candidate EGFR inhibition signature. We then tested these 12 proteins by multiple reaction monitoring analysis in three other models: 1) a comparison of DiFi (EGFR inhibitor-sensitive) and HCT116 (EGFR-insensitive) cell lines, 2) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded mouse xenograft DiFi and HCT116 tumors, and 3) in tissue biopsies from a patient with the gastric hyperproliferative disorder Ménétrier's disease who was treated with cetuximab. Of the proteins in the candidate signature, a core group, including c-Jun, Jagged-1, and Claudin 4, were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in all three models. Although the goal of these studies was not to validate a clinically useful EGFR inhibition signature, the results confirm the hypothesis that clinically used EGFR inhibitors generate characteristic protein expression changes. This work further outlines a prototypical

  17. The TM2 6′ Position of GABAA Receptors Mediates Alcohol Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2012-01-01

    Ionotropic GABAA receptors (GABAARs), which mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system, are implicated in the behavioral effects of alcohol and alcoholism. Site-directed mutagenesis studies support the presence of discrete molecular sites involved in alcohol enhancement and, more recently, inhibition of GABAARs. We used Xenopus laevis oocytes to investigate the 6′ position in the second transmembrane region of GABAARs as a site influencing alcohol inhibition. We asked whether modification of the 6′ position by substitution with larger residues or methanethiol labeling [using methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS)] of a substituted cysteine, reduced GABA action and/or blocked further inhibition by alcohols. Labeling of the 6′ position in either α2 or β2 subunits reduced responses to GABA. In addition, methanol and ethanol potentiation increased after MMTS labeling or substitution with tryptophan or methionine, consistent with elimination of an inhibitory site for these alcohols. Specific alcohols, but not the anesthetic etomidate, competed with MMTS labeling at the 6′ position. We verified a role for the 6′ position in previously tested α2β2 as well as more physiologically relevant α2β2γ2s GABAARs. Finally, we built a novel molecular model based on the invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride channel receptor, a GABAAR homolog, revealing that the 6′ position residue faces the channel pore, and modification of this residue alters volume and polarity of the pore-facing cavity in this region. These results indicate that the 6′ positions in both α2 and β2 GABAAR subunits mediate inhibition by short-chain alcohols, which is consistent with the presence of multiple counteracting sites of action for alcohols on ligand-gated ion channels. PMID:22072732

  18. The TM2 6' position of GABA(A) receptors mediates alcohol inhibition.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W David; Howard, Rebecca J; Trudell, James R; Harris, R Adron

    2012-02-01

    Ionotropic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs), which mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system, are implicated in the behavioral effects of alcohol and alcoholism. Site-directed mutagenesis studies support the presence of discrete molecular sites involved in alcohol enhancement and, more recently, inhibition of GABA(A)Rs. We used Xenopus laevis oocytes to investigate the 6' position in the second transmembrane region of GABA(A)Rs as a site influencing alcohol inhibition. We asked whether modification of the 6' position by substitution with larger residues or methanethiol labeling [using methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS)] of a substituted cysteine, reduced GABA action and/or blocked further inhibition by alcohols. Labeling of the 6' position in either α2 or β2 subunits reduced responses to GABA. In addition, methanol and ethanol potentiation increased after MMTS labeling or substitution with tryptophan or methionine, consistent with elimination of an inhibitory site for these alcohols. Specific alcohols, but not the anesthetic etomidate, competed with MMTS labeling at the 6' position. We verified a role for the 6' position in previously tested α2β2 as well as more physiologically relevant α2β2γ2s GABA(A)Rs. Finally, we built a novel molecular model based on the invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride channel receptor, a GABA(A)R homolog, revealing that the 6' position residue faces the channel pore, and modification of this residue alters volume and polarity of the pore-facing cavity in this region. These results indicate that the 6' positions in both α2 and β2 GABA(A)R subunits mediate inhibition by short-chain alcohols, which is consistent with the presence of multiple counteracting sites of action for alcohols on ligand-gated ion channels.

  19. 5-HT2 presynaptic receptors mediate inhibition of glutamate release from cerebellar mossy fibre terminals.

    PubMed

    Maura, G; Carbone, R; Guido, M; Pestarino, M; Raiteri, M

    1991-09-17

    'Giant' synaptosomes originating from mossy fibre terminals and having sedimentation properties different from those of standard synaptosomes were obtained from rat cerebellum. Exposure of superfused giant synaptosomes to 15 mM KCl caused the release of endogenous glutamate in a largely (about 80%) calcium-dependent manner. The K(+)-evoked overflow of glutamate was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and by the 5-HT2 receptor agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane HCl (DOI), but not by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). The effects of 5-HT and DOI were quite potent, already reaching significant inhibition (about 25%) at 10 nM. The 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin counteracted the inhibitory effect of 5-HT. In cerebellar slices, ketanserin increased on its own the calcium-dependent K(+)-evoked release of glutamate and this effect was not prevented by tetrodotoxin (TTX). The results support the idea that cerebellar mossy fibres use glutamate as a transmitter and show that the release of glutamate can be inhibited via presynaptic heteroreceptors of the 5-HT2 type probably localized on the mossy fibre terminals.

  20. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  1. Nortriptyline induces mitochondria and death receptor-mediated apoptosis in bladder cancer cells and inhibits bladder tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Sheau-Yun; Cheng, Chen-Li; Ho, Hao-Chung; Wang, Shian-Shiang; Chiu, Kun-Yuan; Su, Chung-Kuang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2015-08-15

    Nortriptyline (NTP), an antidepressant, has antitumor effects on some human cancer cells, but its effect on human bladder cancer cells is not known. In this study, we used a cell viability assay to demonstrate that NTP is cytotoxic to human TCCSUP and mouse MBT-2 bladder cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. We also performed cell cycle analysis, annexin V and mitochondrial membrane potential assays, and Western blot analysis to show that NTP inhibits cell growth in these cells by inducing both mitochondria-mediated and death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Specifically, NTP increases the expression of Fas, FasL, FADD, Bax, Bak, and cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, NTP decreases the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, BH3 interacting domain death agonist, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, and survivin. Furthermore, NTP-induced apoptosis is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which can be reduced by antioxidants, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Finally, we showed that NTP suppresses tumor growth in mice inoculated with MBT-2 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that NTP induces both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis in human and mouse bladder cancer cells and that it may be a clinically useful chemotherapeutic agent for bladder cancer in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated responses in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Oz, Murat; Ravindran, Arippa; Diaz-Ruiz, Oscar; Zhang, Li; Morales, Marisela

    2003-09-01

    The effect of the endogenous cannabinoid ligand anandamide on the function of the cloned alpha7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes was investigated by using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Anandamide reversibly inhibited nicotine (10 microM) induced-currents in a concentration-dependent manner (10 nM to 30 microM), with an IC50 value of 229.7 +/- 20.4 nM. The effect of anandamide was neither dependent on the membrane potential nor meditated by endogenous Ca2+ dependent Cl- channels since it was unaffected by intracellularly injected BAPTA and perfusion with Ca2+-free bathing solution containing 2 mM Ba2+. Anandamide decreased the maximal nicotine-induced responses without significantly affecting its potency, indicating that it acts as a noncompetitive antagonist on nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) alpha7 receptors. This effect was not mediated by CB1 or CB2 receptors, as neither the selective CB1 receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboximide hydrochloride (SR 141716A) nor CB2 receptor antagonist N-((1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethyl-bicyclo-heptan-2-yl]-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR 144528) reduced the inhibition by anandamide. In addition, inhibition of nicotinic responses by anandamide was not sensitive to either pertussis toxin treatment or to the membrane permeable cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP (0.2 mM). Inhibitors of enzymes involved in anandamide metabolism including phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, superoxide dismutase, and indomethacin, or the anandamide transport inhibitor AM404 did not prevent anandamide inhibition of nicotinic responses, suggesting that anandamide itself acted on nicotinic receptors. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits the function of nACh alpha7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes in a cannabinoid receptor-independent and

  3. Inhibition of T-cell antigen receptor-mediated transmembrane signaling by protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, R T; Ho, S N; Barna, T J; Rusovick, K M; McKean, D J

    1988-01-01

    The murine T-lymphoma cell line LBRM-33 is known to require synergistic signals delivered through the antigen receptor (Ti-CD3) complex, together with interleukin 1 (IL-1), for activation of IL-2 gene expression and IL-2 production. Although 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was capable of replacing IL-1 as an activating stimulus under certain conditions, biologic studies indicated that TPA failed to synergize with Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli under conditions in which IL-1 was clearly active. Acute exposure to TPA and other active phorbol esters resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of the increases in phosphoinositide hydrolysis and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration stimulated by phytohemagglutinin or anti-Ti antibodies. TPA treatment induced no direct alteration of phospholipase C enzymatic activities in LBRM-33 cells. In contrast, both Ti-CD3 cross-linkage and TPA rapidly stimulated the phosphorylation of identical CD3 complex polypeptides, presumably via activation of protein kinase C. Exposure of LBRM-33 cells to TPA resulted in a time-dependent, partial down-regulation of surface Ti-CD3 expression. Thus, TPA treatment inhibited the responsiveness of LBRM-33 cells to Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli by inducing an early desensitization of Ti-CD3 receptors, followed by a decrease in membrane receptor expression. These studies indicate that phorbol esters deliver bidirectional signals that both inhibit Ti-CD3-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis and augment IL-2 production in LBRM-33 cells. Images PMID:2977423

  4. Inhibition of the receptor-mediated virion attachment to a lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2012-10-01

    The forefront of the anti-viral defence is sometimes aimed at virion attachment to a host membrane. This step or, more specifically, virion contacts with cellular membrane receptors (or, e.g., glycolipids) can be inhibited by antibodies (or specially chosen or designed compounds) via their association with virions. In this case, the full-scale attachment of virions to a host membrane occurs via a subtle interplay of the formation and rupture of multiple virion-inhibitor and virion-receptor bonds. We present a kinetic model describing this interplay and illustrating general trends in the process under consideration.

  5. H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response in pithed rats.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, B; Schlicker, E

    1991-12-03

    In pithed rats, the H3 agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (R alpha MeHA) inhibited the electrically induced increase in blood pressure without affecting the vasopressor response to exogenous noradrenaline. The effect of R alpha MeHA was not affected by the H1 and H2 antagonists dimetindene and ranitidine, but attenuated by the H3 antagonist thioperamide. At higher doses, R alpha MeHA itself increased basal blood pressure; this effect was not affected by the H1, H2 and H3 antagonists. In conclusion, the neurogenic vasopressor response can be modulated via H3 receptors, probably located presynaptically on postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibres.

  6. The Wedelolactone Derivative Inhibits Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Breast, Endometrial, and Ovarian Cancer Cells Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Defeng; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Cheng, Max A.; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the etiology and progression of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Attenuating ER activities by natural products and their derivatives is a relatively practical strategy to control and reduce breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk. Here, we found 3-butoxy-1,8,9-trihydroxy-6H-benzofuro[3,2-c]benzopyran-6-one (BTB), a new derivative of wedelolactone, could effectively inhibit the 17-estradiol (E2)-induced ER transactivation and suppress the growth of breast cancer as well as endometrial and ovarian cancer cells. Our results indicate that 2.5 μM BTB effectively suppresses ER-positive, but not ER-negative, breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that BTB can modulate ER transactivation and suppress the expression of E2-mediated ER target genes (Cyclin D1, E2F1, and TERT) in the ER-positive MCF-7, Ishikawa, and SKOV-3 cells. Importantly, this BTB mediated inhibition of ER activity is selective since BTB does not suppress the activities of other nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor and progesterone receptor, suggesting that BTB functions as a selective ER signaling inhibitor with the potential to treat breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. PMID:25221777

  7. Two PTP receptors mediate CSPG inhibition by convergent and divergent signaling pathways in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Yosuke; Wong, Daniella; Abdul-Muneer, P. M.; Selzer, Michael E.; Li, Shuxin

    2016-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ) and its subfamily member LAR act as transmembrane receptors that mediate growth inhibition of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Inhibition of either receptor increases axon growth into and beyond scar tissues after CNS injury. However, it is unclear why neurons express two similar CSPG receptors, nor whether they use the same or different intracellular pathways. We have now studied the signaling pathways of these two receptors using N2A cells and primary neurons derived from knockout mice. We demonstrate that both receptors share certain signaling pathways (RhoA, Akt and Erk), but also use distinct signals to mediate CSPG actions. Activation of PTPσ by CSPGs selectively inactivated CRMP2, APC, S6 kinase and CREB. By contrast LAR activation inactivated PKCζ, cofilin and LKB1. For the first time, we propose a model of the signaling pathways downstream of these two CSPG receptors. We also demonstrate that deleting both receptors exhibits additive enhancement of axon growth in adult neuronal cultures in vitro. Our findings elucidate the novel downstream pathways of CSPGs and suggest potential synergy of blocking their two PTP receptors. PMID:27849007

  8. Phasic, Nonsynaptic GABA-A Receptor-Mediated Inhibition Entrains Thalamocortical Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Rovó, Zita; Mátyás, Ferenc; Barthó, Péter; Slézia, Andrea; Lecci, Sandro; Pellegrini, Chiara; Astori, Simone; Dávid, Csaba; Hangya, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    GABA-A receptors (GABA-ARs) are typically expressed at synaptic or nonsynaptic sites mediating phasic and tonic inhibition, respectively. These two forms of inhibition conjointly control various network oscillations. To disentangle their roles in thalamocortical rhythms, we focally deleted synaptic, γ2 subunit-containing GABA-ARs in the thalamus using viral intervention in mice. After successful removal of γ2 subunit clusters, spontaneous and evoked GABAergic synaptic currents disappeared in thalamocortical cells when the presynaptic, reticular thalamic (nRT) neurons fired in tonic mode. However, when nRT cells fired in burst mode, slow phasic GABA-AR-mediated events persisted, indicating a dynamic, burst-specific recruitment of nonsynaptic GABA-ARs. In vivo, removal of synaptic GABA-ARs reduced the firing of individual thalamocortical cells but did not abolish slow oscillations or sleep spindles. We conclude that nonsynaptic GABA-ARs are recruited in a phasic manner specifically during burst firing of nRT cells and provide sufficient GABA-AR activation to control major thalamocortical oscillations. PMID:24849349

  9. Benzodiazepine-receptor mediated inhibition of isolation-induced aggression in mice.

    PubMed

    Skolnick, P; Reed, G F; Paul, S M

    1985-07-01

    The effects of a benzodiazepine receptor agonist (diazepam), antagonist (Ro 15-1788), and an "active" antagonist [inverse agonist] (3-carboethoxy-beta-carboline) were examined in an isolation-induced model of aggression. Diazepam (4 mg/kg) and 3-carboethoxy-beta-carboline (10 mg/kg), but not Ro 15-1788, significantly inhibited aggressive behavior in this model. Ro 15-1788 (10 mg/kg) reduced the anti-aggressive actions of both diazepam and 3-carboethoxy-beta-carboline, while mice treated with a combination of diazepam and 3-carboethoxy-beta-carboline had aggression scores increased to values not significantly different from vehicle treated mice. These findings suggest that both diazepam and 3-carboethoxy-beta-carboline have anti-aggressive properties in the isolation-induced model of aggression which are mediated through CNS benzodiazepine receptors.

  10. TGF-beta receptor mediated telomerase inhibition, telomere shortening and breast cancer cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Cassar, Lucy; Nicholls, Craig; Pinto, Alex R; Chen, Ruping; Wang, Lihui; Li, He; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) plays a central role in telomere lengthening for continuous cell proliferation, but it remains unclear how extracellular cues regulate telomerase lengthening of telomeres. Here we report that the cytokine bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) induces the hTERT gene repression in a BMPRII receptor- and Smad3-dependent manner in human breast cancer cells. Chonic exposure of human breast cancer cells to BMP7 results in short telomeres, cell senescence and apoptosis. Mutation of the BMPRII receptor, but not TGFbRII, ACTRIIA or ACTRIIB receptor, inhibits BMP7-induced repression of the hTERT gene promoter activity, leading to increased telomerase activity, lengthened telomeres and continued cell proliferation. Expression of hTERT prevents BMP7-induced breast cancer cell senescence and apoptosis. Thus, our data suggest that BMP7 induces breast cancer cell aging by a mechanism involving BMPRII receptor- and Smad3-mediated repression of the hTERT gene.

  11. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  12. Histamine H3A receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the mouse brain cortex.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Behling, A; Lümmen, G; Göthert, M

    1992-04-01

    Mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were superfused with physiological salt solution containing desipramine plus a drug with alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist properties, and the effects of histamine receptor ligands on the electrically (0.3 Hz) evoked tritium overflow were studied. The evoked overflow (from slices superfused with phentolamine) was inhibited by histamine (pIC35 6.53), the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (7.47) and its S-(+)-enantiomer (5.82) but not influenced by the H1 receptor agonist 2-(2-thiazolyl)-ethylamine 3.2 mumol/l and the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit 10 mumol/l. The inhibitory effect of histamine was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene 1 mumol/l and the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine 10 mumol/l. The concentration-response curve of histamine (determined in the presence of rauwolscine) was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonists thioperamide (apparent pA2 8.67), impromidine (7.30) and burimamide (6.82) as well as by dimaprit (6.16). The pA2 values of the four drugs were compared with their affinities for H3A and H3B binding sites in rat brain membranes (West et al. 1990 Mol Pharmacol 38:610); a significant correlation was obtained for the H3A, but not for the H3B sites. The results suggest that noradrenaline release in the mouse brain cortex is inhibited by histamine via H3A receptors and that dimaprit is an H3 receptor antagonist of moderate potency.

  13. Kainate receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition at the mouse hippocampal mossy fibre synapse

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Haruyuki; Ozawa, Seiji

    2000-01-01

    The presynaptic action of kainate (KA) receptor activation at the mossy fibre-CA3 synapse was examined using fluorescence measurement of presynaptic Ca2+ influx as well as electrophysiological recordings in mouse hippocampal slices. Bath application of a low concentration (0·2 μM) of KA reversibly increased the amplitude of presynaptic volley evoked by stimulation of mossy fibres to 146 ± 6 % of control (n = 6), whereas it reduced the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSPs) to 30 ± 4 %. The potentiating effect of KA on the presynaptic volleys was also observed in Ca2+-free solution, and was partly antagonized by (2S,4R)-4-methylglutamic acid (SYM 2081, 1 μM), which selectively desensitizes KA receptors. The antidromic population spike of dentate granule cells evoked by stimulation of mossy fibres was increased by application of 0·2 μM KA to 160 ± 10 % of control (n = 6). Whole-cell current-clamp recordings revealed that the stimulus threshold for generating antidromic spikes recorded from a single granule cell was lowered by KA application. Application of KA (0·2 μM) suppressed presynaptic Ca2+ influx to 78 ± 4 % of control (n = 6), whereas the amplitude of the presynaptic volley was increased. KA at 0·2 μM reversibly suppressed excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by mossy fibre simulation to 38 ± 9 % of control (n = 5). These results suggest that KA receptor activation enhances the excitability of mossy fibres, probably via axonal depolarization, and reduces action potential-induced Ca2+ influx, thereby inhibiting mossy fibre EPSCs presynaptically. This novel presynaptic inhibitory action of KA at the mossy fibre-CA3 synapse may regulate the excitability of highly interconnected CA3 networks. PMID:10718745

  14. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in pig retina discs.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Schunack, W; Göthert, M

    1990-11-01

    Discs of pig retina were preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline, 3H-dopamine or 3H-serotonin and then superfused. Electrical field stimulation increased the outflow of tritium from discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline or 3H-dopamine, but no from discs preincubated with 3H-serotonin. The tritium content at the end of superfusion was similar in discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline or 3H-dopamine but about tenfold lower in discs preincubated with 3H-serotonin. The tritium content in discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline was markedly reduced when desipramine was present during preincubation but was not affected by selective inhibitors of dopamine and serotonin uptake. The tritium content in discs preincubated with 3H-dopamine and 3H-serotonin, in contrast, was reduced or tended to be reduced by a selective dopamine and serotonin uptake inhibitor, respectively. The electrically evoked overflow of tritium from discs preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline was abolished by tetrodotoxin or omission of Ca2+. In discs superfused with desipramine, the electrically evoked overflow was enhanced by phentolamine but not affected by histamine. When both desipramine and phentolamine were present in the superfusion medium, histamine inhibited the evoked overflow (pIC15 6.85). This effect was mimicked by the histamine H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine as well as by its S-(+)-enantiomer (pIC15 7.85 and 5.30, respectively) but not by the H1 receptor agonist 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine and the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (each 10 mumol/l).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Paroxysmal beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated alterations in ventricular repolarization at rapid heart rates during inhibition of delayed rectifier currents.

    PubMed

    Overholser, Brian R; Zheng, Xiaomei; Tisdale, James E

    2009-09-01

    The contribution of the slow component of the delayed rectifier current (IKs) to ventricular repolarization is increased during rapid heart rates and prolonged repolarization. The objective was to characterize physiologically relevant paroxysmal beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated alterations on ventricular repolarization under these conditions. Paced guinea pig hearts were perfused with (1) control, (2) sparfloxacin (IKr inhibitor), or (3) sparfloxacin and HMR 1556 (IKs inhibitor). The mean +/- standard error of the mean epicardial action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD90) increased from baseline with IKr inhibition (12.9% +/- 4.7%) and dual IKr/IKs inhibition (25.1% +/- 5.3). Paroxysmal isoproterenol (0.01 and 1.0 nM) significantly decreased APD90 in the presence of IKr inhibition but was attenuated with the addition of IKs inhibition. Spontaneous episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia were observed with isoproterenol during dual IKr and IKs inhibition. The endocardial expression of KCNQ1 increased greater than 2-fold after exposure to IKr and dual IKr/IKs inhibition relative to control but was not altered in epicardial tissue. The beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated decrease in APD90 during IKr inhibition is reversed in the presence of IKs inhibition at rapid heart rates. IKs may serve as an important compensatory mechanism to protect against adrenergically induced arrhythmias when the repolarization reserve is depleted.

  16. Presynaptic BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels are involved in prostanoid TP receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release from the rat gastric sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kumiko; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2010-03-10

    Previously, we reported that prostanoid TP receptor mediates the inhibition of electrically evoked noradrenaline release from gastric sympathetic nerves in rats. Prostanoid TP receptor has been shown to activate phospholipase C (PLC), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate to inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)) and diacylglycerol; IP(3) triggers the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores and diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C. In the present study, therefore, we examined whether these PLC-mediated mechanisms are involved in the TP receptor-mediated inhibition of gastric noradrenaline release using an isolated, vascularly perfused rat stomach. U-46619 (9,11-dideoxy-9alpha,11alpha-methanoepoxy PGF(2alpha)) (a prostanoid TP receptor agonist)-induced inhibition of noradrenaline release from the stomach was reduced by U-73122 [1-[6-[[(17beta)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]-amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dine] (a PLC inhibitor) and ET-18-OCH(3) (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine) (a phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC inhibitor), respectively. 2-APB (2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate) (a putative IP(3) receptor antagonist) also abolished the U-46619-induced inhibition of noradrenaline release, but Ro 31-8220 [2-{1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl]-1H-indol-3-yl}-3-(1-methylindol-3-yl)-maleimide] (a protein kinase C inhibitor) had no effect. Furthermore, a small dose of tetraethylammonium and charybdotoxin [blockers of BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel] abolished the U-46619-induced inhibition, but apamin (a blocker of SK-type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel) had no effect. These results suggest that BK type Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels are involved in prostanoid TP receptor-mediated inhibition of electrically evoked noradrenaline release from the gastric sympathetic nerve terminals in rats.

  17. LSD and DOB: interaction with 5-HT2A receptors to inhibit NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in the rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Arvanov, V L; Liang, X; Russo, A; Wang, R Y

    1999-09-01

    Both the phenethylamine hallucinogen (-)-1-2, 5-dimethoxy-4-bromophenyl-2-aminopropane (DOB), a selective serotonin 5-HT2A,2C receptor agonist, and the indoleamine hallucinogen D-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD, which binds to 5-HT1A, 1B, 1D, 1E, 1F, 2A, 2C, 5, 6, 7, dopamine D1 and D2, and alpha1 and alpha2 adrenergic receptors), but not their non-hallucinogenic congeners, inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced inward current and NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses evoked by electrical stimulation of the forceps minor in pyramidal cells of the prefrontal cortical slices. The inhibitory effect of hallucinogens was mimicked by 5-HT in the presence of selective 5-HT1A and 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. The inhibitory action of DOB, LSD and 5-HT on the NMDA transmission was blocked by the 5-HT2A receptor antagonists R-(+)-alpha-(2, 3-dimethoxyphenil)-1-[4-fluorophenylethyl]-4-piperidineme thanol (M100907) and ketanserin. However, at low concentrations, when both LSD and DOB by themselves only partially depressed the NMDA response, they blocked the inhibitory effect of 5-HT, suggesting a partial agonist action. Whereas N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulphonamide (W-7, a calmodulin antagonist) and N-[2-[[[3-(4'-chlorophenyl)- 2-propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4'-methoxy-b enzenesulphonamide phosphate (KN-93, a Ca2+/CaM-KII inhibitor), but not the negative control 2-[N-4'methoxybenzenesulphonyl]amino-N-(4'-chlorophenyl)-2-propeny l-N -methylbenzylamine phosphate (KN-92), blocked the inhibitory action of LSD and DOB, the selective protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine was without any effect. We conclude that phenethylamine and indoleamine hallucinogens may exert their hallucinogenic effect by interacting with 5-HT2A receptors via a Ca2+/CaM-KII-dependent signal transduction pathway as partial agonists and modulating the NMDA receptors-mediated sensory, perceptual, affective and cognitive processes.

  18. Acamprosate enhances N-methyl-D-apartate receptor-mediated neurotransmission but inhibits presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in nucleus accumbens neurons.

    PubMed

    Berton, F; Francesconi, W G; Madamba, S G; Zieglgänsberger, W; Siggins, G R

    1998-02-01

    Acamprosate (calcium acetylhomotaurine) is used therapeutically in Europe to reduce relapse in weaned alcoholics. However, the mechanisms of acamprosate action in the central nervous system are still obscure, although early studies suggested an action on GABA receptors. The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) is a brain region thought to underlie ethanol reinforcement. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that ethanol inhibits both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA types of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the NAcc. In the present study, we used voltage- and current-clamp intracellular recording of NAcc core neurons in a slice preparation to examine acamprosate actions on resting membrane properties and pharmacologically isolated synaptic responses. We isolated NMDA and non-NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials or currents (EPSP/Cs) with 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (d-APV), respectively. Bicuculline was also included to block GABA(A) receptors. Superfusion of acamprosate (5, 50, and 300 microM) did not alter the resting membrane properties of NAcc neurons. However, 300 microM acamprosate significantly increased the NMDA receptor-mediated components of EPSP/Cs (NMDA-EPSP/Cs) with recovery on washout. In contrast, 300 microM acamprosate had no significant effect on the non-NMDA receptor component of the EPSP/Cs (non-NMDA-EPSP/Cs). To test acamprosate actions on the GABA system, we superfused 60 microM d-APV and 20 microM CNQX to block glutamatergic transmission and evoked monosynaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic responses within the NAcc. Acamprosate (300 microM) did not change these monosynaptic GABA(A)-IPSCs. We also used a paired-pulse paradigm to test whether acamprosate could act on presynaptic GABA(B) autoreceptors, in the presence of d-APV and CNQX to block glutamatergic transmission. Like 0.5 microM CGP 34358 (a GABA[B] receptor blocker), acamprosate significantly

  19. GABAA receptor-mediated feedforward and feedback inhibition differentially modulate the gain and the neural code transformation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Jae; Park, Kyerl; Lee, Jaedong; Kim, Hyuncheol; Han, Kyu Hun; Kwag, Jeehyun

    2015-12-01

    Diverse variety of hippocampal interneurons exists in the CA1 area, which provides either feedforward (FF) or feedback (FB) inhibition to CA1 pyramidal cell (PC). However, how the two different inhibitory network architectures modulate the computational mode of CA1 PC is unknown. By investigating the CA3 PC rate-driven input-output function of CA1 PC using in vitro electrophysiology, in vitro-simulation of inhibitory network, and in silico computational modeling, we demonstrated for the first time that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibition differentially modulate the gain, the spike precision, the neural code transformation and the information capacity of CA1 PC. Recruitment of FF inhibition buffered the CA1 PC spikes to theta-frequency regardless of the input frequency, abolishing the gain and making CA1 PC insensitive to its inputs. Instead, temporal variability of the CA1 PC spikes was increased, promoting the rate-to-temporal code transformation to enhance the information capacity of CA1 PC. In contrast, the recruitment of FB inhibition sub-linearly transformed the input rate to spike output rate with high gain and low spike temporal variability, promoting the rate-to-rate code transformation. These results suggest that GABAA receptor-mediated FF and FB inhibitory circuits could serve as network mechanisms for differentially modulating the gain of CA1 PC, allowing CA1 PC to switch between different computational modes using rate and temporal codes ad hoc. Such switch will allow CA1 PC to efficiently respond to spatio-temporally dynamic inputs and expand its computational capacity during different behavioral and neuromodulatory states in vivo.

  20. Resveratrol attenuates acute kidney injury by inhibiting death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathways in a cisplatin-induced rat model

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qiufa; Xiao, Xiaoyan; Zhen, Junhui; Feng, Jinbo; Song, Chun; Jiang, Bei; Hu, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a clinical syndrome characterized by a loss of renal function and acute tubular necrosis. Resveratrol exerts a wide range of pharmacological effects based on its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cytoprotective properties. The present study aimed to evaluate whether resveratrol attenuates acute kidney injury in a cisplatin-induced rat model and to investigate the potential mechanisms involved. Rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: Control, cisplatin, resveratrol, and cisplatin plus resveratrol. Rats exposed to cisplatin displayed acute kidney injury, identified by analysis of renal function and histopathological observation. Resveratrol significantly ameliorated the increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, renal index and histopathological damage induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, compared with untreated control animals, cisplatin lead to significantly increased expression of Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), caspase-8 and Bcl-2 associated protein X apoptosis regulator (Bax), and decreased expression of anti-apoptosis regulators, BH3 interacting domain death agonist (BID) and B cell lymphoma 2 apoptosis regulator (Bcl-2). Administration of resveratrol significantly reversed the cisplatin-induced alteration in these apoptosis-associated proteins. In conclusion, these findings suggest that resveratrol attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury through inactivation of the death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway, and may provide a new therapeutic strategy to ameliorate the process of acute kidney injury. PMID:27600998

  1. A whole-genome RNAi screen identifies an 8q22 gene cluster that inhibits death receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dompe, Nicholas; Rivers, Celina Sanchez; Li, Li; Cordes, Shaun; Schwickart, Martin; Punnoose, Elizabeth A; Amler, Lukas; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Tang, Jerry; Modrusan, Zora; Davis, David P

    2011-10-25

    Deregulation of apoptosis is a common occurrence in cancer, for which emerging oncology therapeutic agents designed to engage this pathway are undergoing clinical trials. With the aim of uncovering strategies to activate apoptosis in cancer cells, we used a pooled shRNA screen to interrogate death receptor signaling. This screening approach identified 16 genes that modulate the sensitivity to ligand induced apoptosis, with several genes exhibiting frequent overexpression and/or copy number gain in cancer. Interestingly, two of the top hits, EDD1 and GRHL2, are found 50 kb apart on chromosome 8q22, a region that is frequently amplified in many cancers. By using a series of silencing and overexpression studies, we show that EDD1 and GRHL2 suppress death-receptor expression, and that EDD1 expression is elevated in breast, pancreas, and lung cancer cell lines resistant to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Supporting the relevance of EDD1 and GRHL2 as therapeutic candidates to engage apoptosis in cancer cells, silencing the expression of either gene sensitizes 8q22-amplified breast cancer cell lines to death receptor induced apoptosis. Our findings highlight a mechanism by which cancer cells may evade apoptosis, and therefore provide insight in the search for new targets and functional biomarkers for this pathway.

  2. Blocking GABA(A) inhibition reveals AMPA- and NMDA-receptor-mediated polysynaptic responses in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Crépel, V; Khazipov, R; Ben-Ari, Y

    1997-04-01

    -A inhibition reveals glutamate receptor-mediated network-driven events in the isolated CA1 region. These polysynaptic responses are mediated by AMPA and/or NMDA receptors depending on the pharmacological conditions and the external concentration of Mg2+ used. We suggest that these responses are driven by local recurrent collaterals of CA1 pyramidal cells.

  3. Selective inhibition of beta(2)-adrenergic receptor-mediated cAMP generation by activation of the P2Y(2) receptor in mouse pineal gland tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, B C; Kim, J S; Namgung, U; Han, S; Kim, K T

    2001-06-01

    Rhythmic noradrenergic signaling from the hypothalamic clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus to the pineal gland causes an increase in intracellular cAMP which regulates the circadian fluctuation of melatonin synthesis. The activation of phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled P2Y(2) receptors upon treatment with ATP and UTP exclusively inhibited the isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP production in mouse pineal gland tumor cells. However, the activation of other PLC-coupled receptors including P2Y(1) and bombesin receptors had little or no effect on the isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP production. Also, ATP did not inhibit cAMP production caused by forskolin, prostaglandin E(2), or the adenosine analog NECA. These results suggest a selective coupling between signalings of P2Y(2) and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors. The binding of [(3)H]CGP12177 to beta(2)-adrenergic receptors was not effected by the presence of ATP or UTP. Ionomycin decreased the isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP production, whereas phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate slightly potentiated the isoproterenol response. Chelation of intracellular Ca(2+), however, had little effect on the ATP-induced inhibition of cAMP production, while it completely reversed the ionomycin-induced inhibition. Treatment of cells with pertussis toxin almost completely blocked the inhibitory effect of nucleotides. Pertussis toxin also inhibited the nucleotide-induced increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production by 30-40%, suggesting that the ATP-mediated inhibition of the cAMP generation and the partial activation of PLC are mediated by pertussis toxin-sensitive G(i)-protein. We conclude that one of the functions of P2Y(2) receptors on the pineal gland is the selective inhibition of beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated signaling pathways via the inhibitory G-proteins.

  4. Essential oil of Cephalotaxus griffithii needle inhibits proliferation and migration of human cervical cancer cells: involvement of mitochondria-initiated and death receptor-mediated apoptosis pathways.

    PubMed

    Moirangthem, Dinesh Singh; Laishram, Surbala; Rana, Virendra Singh; Borah, Jagat Chandra; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of Cephalotaxus griffithii needle essential oil (CGNO) on proliferation and migration of human cervical cancer (HCC) cells. CGNO treatment decreased the viability of all the tested HCC (HeLa, ME-180 and SiHa) cells. Morphological and DNA fragmentation analysis of CGNO-treated HeLa cells indicated the involvement of apoptosis in inducing HCC cell death. CGNO increased mitochondrial membrane depolarisation and upregulated the expression of caspase-9, caspase-8, caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP. The activity of caspase-8 and caspase-9 was also significantly increased. Wound healing and transwell migration assay demonstrated that CGNO significantly inhibited the migration of HeLa cells to close a scratched wound and also inhibited their migration through filter towards a chemotactic stimulus. Taken together, these results indicated that CGNO inhibited the proliferation and migration of HCC cells. Of note, CGNO induced HeLa cell death through mitochondria-initiated and death receptor-mediated apoptosis pathway.

  5. Shifting topographic activation and 5-HT1A receptor-mediated inhibition of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons produced by nicotine exposure and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Robin; Commons, Kathryn G

    2011-05-01

    Nicotine activates serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] neurons innervating the forebrain, and this is thought to reduce anxiety. Nicotine withdrawal has also been associated with an activation of 5-HT neurotransmission, although withdrawal increases anxiety. In each case, 5-HT1A receptors have been implicated in the response. To determine whether there are different subgroups of 5-HT cells activated during nicotine administration and withdrawal, we mapped the appearance of Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, in 5-HT cells of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and median raphe nucleus (MR). To understand the role of 5-HT1A receptor feedback inhibitory pathways in 5-HT cell activity during these conditions, we administered a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist and measured novel disinhibited Fos expression within 5-HT cells. Using these approaches, we found evidence that acute nicotine exposure activates 5-HT neurons rostrally and in the lateral wings of the DR, whereas there is 5-HT1A receptor-dependent inhibition of cells located ventrally at both the rostral level and mid-level. Previous chronic nicotine exposure did not modify the pattern of activation produced by acute nicotine exposure, but increased 5-HT1A receptor-dependent inhibition of 5-HT cells in the caudal DR. This pattern was nearly reversed during nicotine withdrawal, when there was evidence for caudal activation and mid-level and rostral 5-HT1A receptor-dependent inhibition. These results suggest that the distinct behavioral states produced by nicotine exposure and withdrawal correlate with reciprocal rostral-caudal patterns of activation and 5-HT1A receptor-mediated inhibition of DR 5-HT neurons. The complementary patterns of activation and inhibition suggest that 5-HT1A receptors may help to shape distinct topographic patterns of activation within the DR.

  6. Cathepsin Inhibition Prevents Autophagic Protein Turnover and Downregulates Insulin Growth Factor-1 Receptor-Mediated Signaling in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Soori, Mehrnoosh; Lu, Guizhen; Mason, Robert W

    2016-02-01

    Inhibition of the major lysosomal proteases, cathepsins B, D, and L, impairs growth of several cell types but leads to apoptosis in neuroblastoma. The goal of this study was to examine the mechanisms by which enzyme inhibition could cause cell death. Cathepsin inhibition caused cellular accumulation of fragments of the insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor. The fragments were located in dense organelles that were characterized as autophagosomes. This novel discovery provides the first clear link between lysosomal function, autophagy, and IGF-1- mediated cell proliferation. A more in-depth analysis of the IGF1 signaling pathway revealed that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cell-proliferation pathway was impaired in inhibitor treated cells, whereas the Akt cell survival pathway remained functional. Shc, an adapter protein that transmits IGF-1 signaling through the MAPK pathway, was sequestered in autophagosomes; whereas IRS-2, an adapter protein that transmits IGF-1 signaling through the Akt pathway, was unaffected by cathepsin inhibition. Furthermore, Shc was sequestered in autophagosomes as its active form, indicating that autophagy is a key mechanism for downregulating IGF-1-induced cell proliferation. Cathepsin inhibition had a greater effect on autophagic sequestration of the neuronal specific adapter protein, Shc-C, than ubiquitously expressed Shc-A, providing mechanistic support for the enhanced sensitivity of neuronally derived tumor cells. We also observed impaired activation of MAPK by epidermal growth factor treatment in inhibitor-treated cells. The Shc adapter proteins are central to transducing proliferation signaling by a range of receptor tyrosine kinases; consequently, cathepsin inhibition may become an important therapeutic approach for treating neuroblastoma and other tumors of neuronal origin.

  7. Pharmacological Inhibition of O-GlcNAcase Does Not Increase Sensitivity of Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Transrepression.

    PubMed

    Stivers, Peter J; Harmonay, Lauren; Hicks, Alexandra; Mehmet, Huseyin; Morris, Melody; Robinson, Gain M; Strack, Peter R; Savage, Mary J; Zaller, Dennis M; Zwierzynski, Izabela; Brandish, Philip E

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid signaling regulates target genes by multiple mechanisms, including the repression of transcriptional activities of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) though direct protein-protein interactions and subsequent O-GlcNAcylation of RNA polymerase II (pol II). Recent studies have shown that overexpression of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), which adds an O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) group to the C-terminal domain of RNA pol II, increases the transrepression effects of glucocorticoids (GC). As O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is an enzyme that removes O-GlcNAc from O-GlcNAcylated proteins, we hypothesized that the potentiation of GC effects following OGT overexpression could be similarly observed via the direct inhibition of OGA, inhibiting O-GlcNAc removal from pol II. Here we show that despite pharmacological evidence of target engagement by a selective small molecule inhibitor of OGA, there is no evidence for a sensitizing effect on glucocorticoid-mediated effects on TNF-α promoter activity, or gene expression generally, in human cells. Furthermore, inhibition of OGA did not potentiate glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. Thus, despite evidence for O-GlcNAc modification of RNA pol II in GR-mediated transrepression, our data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of OGA does not potentiate or enhance glucocorticoid-mediated transrepression.

  8. Pharmacological Inhibition of O-GlcNAcase Does Not Increase Sensitivity of Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Transrepression

    PubMed Central

    Stivers, Peter J.; Harmonay, Lauren; Hicks, Alexandra; Mehmet, Huseyin; Morris, Melody; Robinson, Gain M.; Strack, Peter R.; Savage, Mary J.; Zaller, Dennis M.; Zwierzynski, Izabela; Brandish, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid signaling regulates target genes by multiple mechanisms, including the repression of transcriptional activities of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) though direct protein-protein interactions and subsequent O-GlcNAcylation of RNA polymerase II (pol II). Recent studies have shown that overexpression of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), which adds an O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) group to the C-terminal domain of RNA pol II, increases the transrepression effects of glucocorticoids (GC). As O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is an enzyme that removes O-GlcNAc from O-GlcNAcylated proteins, we hypothesized that the potentiation of GC effects following OGT overexpression could be similarly observed via the direct inhibition of OGA, inhibiting O-GlcNAc removal from pol II. Here we show that despite pharmacological evidence of target engagement by a selective small molecule inhibitor of OGA, there is no evidence for a sensitizing effect on glucocorticoid-mediated effects on TNF-α promoter activity, or gene expression generally, in human cells. Furthermore, inhibition of OGA did not potentiate glucocorticoid–induced apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. Thus, despite evidence for O-GlcNAc modification of RNA pol II in GR-mediated transrepression, our data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of OGA does not potentiate or enhance glucocorticoid-mediated transrepression. PMID:26670328

  9. Metaplastic LTP inhibition after LTD induction in CA1 hippocampal slices involves NMDA Receptor-mediated Neurosteroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; O'Dell, Kazuko A; Zorumski, Charles F

    2013-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) induced by low-frequency electrical stimulation (LFS) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is a form of synaptic plasticity thought to contribute to learning and memory and to the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In naïve hippocampal slices from juvenile rats, we previously found that LTD induction can impair subsequent induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) via a form of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent metaplasticity, and have recently observed that pharmacologically induced NMDAR-dependent LTP inhibition involves 5α-reduced neurosteroids that augment the actions of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, we found that both LFS-induced LTD and subsequent inhibition of LTP induction involve neurosteroid synthesis via NMDAR activation. Furthermore, the timing of 5α-reductase inhibition relative to LFS can dissociate effects on LTD and metaplastic LTP inhibition. These findings indicate that 5α-reduced neurosteroids play an important role in synaptic plasticity and synaptic modulation in the hippocampus. PMID:24303196

  10. Signaling Cascades for δ-Opioid Receptor-Mediated Inhibition of GABA Synaptic Transmission and Behavioral Antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi

    2012-01-01

    Membrane trafficking of the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) from intracellular compartments to plasma membrane in central neurons, induced by various pathological conditions such as long-term opioid exposure, represents unique receptor plasticity involved in the mechanisms of long-term opioid effects in opioid addiction and opioid treatment of chronic pain. However, the signaling pathways coupled to the newly emerged functional DOR in central neurons are largely unknown at present. In this study, we investigated the signaling cascades of long-term morphine-induced DOR for its cellular and behavioral effects in neurons of the rat brainstem nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), a key supraspinal site for opioid analgesia. We found that, among the three phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-regulated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolic pathways of lipoxygenase, cyclooxygenase, and epoxygenase, 12-lipoxygenase of the lipoxygenase pathway primarily mediated DOR inhibition of GABA synaptic transmission, because inhibitors of 12-lipoxygenase as well as lipoxygenases and PLA2 largely blocked the DOR- or AA-induced GABA inhibition in NRM neurons in brainstem slices in vitro. Blockade of the epoxygenase pathway was ineffective, whereas blocking either 5-lipoxygenase of the lipoxygenase pathway or the cyclooxygenase pathway enhanced the DOR-mediated GABA inhibition. Behaviorally in rats in vivo, NRM infusion of 12-lipoxygenase inhibitors significantly reduced DOR-induced antinociceptive effect whereas inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase augmented the DOR antinociception. These findings suggest the PLA2-AA-12-lipoxygenase pathway as a primary signaling cascade for DOR-mediated analgesia through inhibition of GABA neurotransmission and indicate potential therapeutic benefits of combining 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase inhibitors for maximal pain inhibition. PMID:22144670

  11. Control of Spike Transfer at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses In Vivo by GABAA and GABAB Receptor-Mediated Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Stefano; Griguoli, Marilena; Malézieux, Meryl; Grosjean, Noëlle; Carta, Mario; Mulle, Christophe

    2017-01-18

    Despite extensive studies in hippocampal slices and incentive from computational theories, the synaptic mechanisms underlying information transfer at mossy fiber (mf) connections between the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 neurons in vivo are still elusive. Here we used an optogenetic approach in mice to selectively target and control the activity of DG granule cells (GCs) while performing whole-cell and juxtacellular recordings of CA3 neurons in vivo In CA3 pyramidal cells (PCs), mf-CA3 synaptic responses consisted predominantly of an IPSP at low stimulation frequency (0.05 Hz). Upon increasing the frequency of stimulation, a biphasic response was observed consisting of a brief mf EPSP followed by an inhibitory response lasting on the order of 100 ms. Spike transfer at DG-CA3 interneurons recorded in the juxtacellular mode was efficient at low presynaptic stimulation frequency and appeared insensitive to an increased frequency of GC activity. Overall, this resulted in a robust and slow feedforward inhibition of spike transfer at mf-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. Short-term plasticity of EPSPs with increasing frequency of presynaptic activity allowed inhibition to be overcome to reach spike discharge in CA3 PCs. Whereas the activation of GABAA receptors was responsible for the direct inhibition of light-evoked spike responses, the slow inhibition of spiking activity required the activation of GABAB receptors in CA3 PCs. The slow inhibitory response defined an optimum frequency of presynaptic activity for spike transfer at ∼10 Hz. Altogether these properties define the temporal rules for efficient information transfer at DG-CA3 synaptic connections in the intact circuit.

  12. Ethanol Acutely Inhibits Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor-mediated Responses and Long-Term Potentiation in the Developing CA1 Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Puglia, Michael P.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Background Developmental ethanol (EtOH) exposure damages the hippocampus, causing long-lasting alterations in learning and memory. Alterations in glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity may play a role in the mechanism of action of EtOH. This signaling is fundamental for synaptogenesis, which occurs during the third-trimester of human pregnancy (first 12 days of life in rats). Methods Acute coronal brain slices were prepared from 7–9 day-old rats. Extracellular and patch-clamp electrophysiological recording techniques were used to characterize the acute effects of EtOH on α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (AMPAR)- and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated responses and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 hippocampal region. Results EtOH (40 and 80 mM) inhibited AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs). EtOH (80 mM) also reduced AMPAR-mediated fEPSPs in presence of an inhibitor of Ca2+ permeable AMPARs. The effect of 80 mM EtOH on NMDAR-mediated fEPSPs was significantly greater in presence of Mg2+. EtOH (80 mM) neither affected the paired-pulse ratio of AMPAR-mediated fEPSPs nor the presynaptic volley. The paired-pulse ratio of AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents was not affected either, and the amplitude of these currents was inhibited to a lesser extent than that of fEPSPs. EtOH (80 mM) inhibited LTP of AMPAR-mediated fEPSPs. Conclusions Acute EtOH exposure during the third-trimester equivalent of human pregnancy inhibits hippocampal glutamatergic transmission and LTP induction, which could alter synapse refinement and ultimately contribute to the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. PMID:20102565

  13. Pre-synaptic adenosine A2A receptors control cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Martire, Alberto; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferreira, Samira G; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Köfalvi, Attila; Popoli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    An interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs) and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1) Rs) has been consistently reported to occur in the striatum, although the precise mechanisms are not completely understood. As both receptors control striatal glutamatergic transmission, we now probed the putative interaction between pre-synaptic CB(1) R and A(2A) R in the striatum. In extracellular field potentials recordings in corticostriatal slices from Wistar rats, A(2A) R activation by CGS21680 inhibited CB(1) R-mediated effects (depression of synaptic response and increase in paired-pulse facilitation). Moreover, in superfused rat striatal nerve terminals, A(2A) R activation prevented, while A(2A) R inhibition facilitated, the CB(1) R-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release. In summary, the present study provides converging neurochemical and electrophysiological support for the occurrence of a tight control of CB(1) R function by A(2A) Rs in glutamatergic terminals of the striatum. In view of the key role of glutamate to trigger the recruitment of striatal circuits, this pre-synaptic interaction between CB(1) R and A(2A) R may be of relevance for the pathogenesis and the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia.

  14. Quercetin inhibits the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor-mediated ion current by interacting with pre-transmembrane domain I.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Jeong, Sang-Min; Jung, Sang-Min; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Yoon, In-Soo; Lee, Joon-Hee; Choi, Sun-Hye; Lee, Sang-Mok; Chang, Choon-Gon; Kim, Hyung-Chun; Han, YeSun; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Kim, Yangmee; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2005-08-31

    The flavonoid, quercetin, is a low molecular weight substance found in apple, tomato and other fruit. Besides its antioxidative effect, quercetin, like other flavonoids, has a wide range of neuropharmacological actions including analgesia, and motility, sleep, anticonvulsant, sedative and anxiolytic effects. In the present study, we investigated its effect on mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3A) receptor channel activity, which is involved in pain transmission, analgesia, vomiting, and mood disorders. The 5-HT3A receptor was expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the current was measured with the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. In oocytes injected with 5-HT3A receptor cRNA, quercetin inhibited the 5-HT-induced inward peak current (I(5-HT)) with an IC50 of 64.7 +/- 2.2 microM. Inhibition was competitive and voltage-independent. Point mutations of pre-transmembrane domain 1 (pre-TM1) such as R222T and R222A, but not R222D, R222E and R222K, abolished inhibition, indicating that quercetin interacts with the pre-TM1 of the 5-HT3A receptor.

  15. Receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of arachidonic acid release in 3T3 fibroblasts. Selective susceptibility to islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, T.; Ui, M.

    1985-06-25

    Thrombin exhibited diverse effects on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. It (a) decreased cAMP in the cell suspension, (b) inhibited adenylate cyclase in the Lubrol-permeabilized cell suspension in a GTP-dependent manner, increased releases of (c) arachidonic acid and (d) inositol from the cell monolayer prelabeled with these labeled compounds, (e) increased /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into the cell monolayer, and (f) increased /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into the cell monolayer in a ouabain-sensitive manner. Most of the effects were reproduced by bradykinin, platelet-activating factor, and angiotensin II. The receptors for these agonists are thus likely to be linked to three separate effector systems: the adenylate cyclase inhibition, the phosphoinositide breakdown leading to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and phospholipase A2 activation, and the Na,K-ATPase activation. Among the effects of these agonists, (a), (b), (c), and (e) were abolished, but (d) and (f) were not, by prior treatment of the cells with islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates the Mr = 41,000 protein, the alpha-subunit of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (Ni), thereby abolishing receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The effects (a), (c), (d), and (e) of thrombin, but not (b), were mimicked by A23187, a calcium ionophore. The effects of A23187, in contrast to those of receptor agonists, were not affected by the treatment of cells with IAP. Thus, the IAP substrate, the alpha-subunit of Ni, or the protein alike, may play an additional role in signal transduction arising from the Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilizing receptors, probably mediating process(es) distal to phosphoinositide breakdown and proximal to Ca/sup 2 +/ gating.

  16. H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release: an investigation into the involvement of Ca2+ and K+ ions, G protein and adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Kathmann, M; Detzner, M; Exner, H J; Göthert, M

    1994-07-01

    The present study was aimed at the identification of mechanisms following the activation of histamine H3 receptors. Mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were superfused and the (H3 receptor-mediated) effect of histamine on the electrically evoked tritium overflow was studied under a variety of conditions. The extent of inhibition produced by histamine was inversely related to the frequency of stimulation used to evoke tritium overflow and to the Ca2+ concentration in the superfusion medium. An activator (levcromakalim) and blocker (glibenclamide) of ATP-dependent K+ channels did not affect the electrically evoked tritium overflow and its inhibition by histamine. A blocker of voltage-sensitive K+ channels, tetraethylammonium (TEA), increased the evoked overflow and attenuated the inhibitory effect of histamine. TEA also reduced the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline and prostaglandin E2 on the evoked overflow. When the facilitatory effect of TEA on the evoked overflow was compensated for by reducing the Ca2+ concentration in the superfusion medium, TEA did no longer attenuate the effect of histamine. Exposure of the slices to the SH group-alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide increased the evoked overflow and attenuated the inhibitory effect of histamine; both effects were counteracted by the SH group-protecting agent dithiothreitol, which, by itself, did not affect the evoked overflow and its inhibition by histamine. Mouse brain cortex membranes were used to study the effect of the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine on the basal cAMP accumulation and on the accumulation stimulated by forskolin or noradrenaline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Delta-subunit-containing GABAA-receptors mediate tonic inhibition in paracapsular cells of the mouse amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Marowsky, Anne; Vogt, Kaspar E.

    2014-01-01

    The intercalated paracapsular cells (pcs) are small GABAergic interneurons that form densely populated clusters surrounding the basolateral (BLA) complex of the amygdala. Their main task in the amygdala circuitry appears to be the control of information flow, as they act as an inhibitory interface between input and output nuclei. Modulation of their activity is thus thought to affect amygdala output and the generation of fear and anxiety. Recent evidence indicates that pcs express benzodiazepine (BZ)-sensitive GABAA receptor (GABAAR) variants containing the α2- and α3-subunit for transmission of post-synaptic currents, yet little is known about the expression of extrasynaptic GABAARs, mediating tonic inhibition and regulating neuronal excitability. Here, we show that pcs from the lateral and medial intercalated cell cluster (l- and mITC, respectively) express a tonic GABAergic conductance that could be significantly increased in a concentration-dependent manner by the δ-preferring GABAAR agonist THIP (0.5–10 μM), but not by the BZ diazepam (1 μM). The neurosteroid THDOC (300 nM) also increased tonic currents in pcs significantly, but only in the presence of additional GABA (5 μM). Immunohistochemical stainings revealed that both the δ-GABAAR and the α4-GABAAR subunit are expressed throughout all ITCs, while no staining for the α5-GABAAR subunit could be detected. Moreover, 1 μM THIP dampened excitability in pcs most likely by increasing shunting inhibition. In line with this, THIP significantly decreased lITC-generated inhibition in target cells residing in the BLA nucleus by 30%. Taken together these results demonstrate for the first time that pcs express a tonic inhibitory conductance mediated most likely by α4/δ-containing GABAARs. This data also suggest that δ-GABAAR targeting compounds might possibly interfere with pcs-related neuronal processes such as fear extinction. PMID:24723854

  18. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat dentate gyrus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chang, M; Saito, H; Abe, K

    1998-07-01

    We investigated the effects of histamine H3-receptor ligands on hippocampal synaptic transmission by using anesthetized rats in vivo. The medial perforant path was stimulated, and the population excitatory postsynaptic potential (pEPSP) and population spike were recorded from the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Intracerebroventricular injection of the H3-receptor agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine decreased both the pEPSP and population spike, while H3-receptor antagonists, clobenpropit and thioperamide, increased both the pEPSP and population spike. These results suggest that the histaminergic system plays a role in inhibition of hippocampal synaptic excitation via the H3 receptor.

  19. M1 and M2 muscarinic receptors mediate excitation and inhibition of guinea-pig intracardiac neurones in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, T G; Burnstock, G

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of muscarine upon intracardiac neurones cultured from ganglia within the atria and interatrial septum of the newborn guinea-pig heart were studied using intracellular recording techniques. 2. Muscarine applied to the neuronal soma typically produced a biphasic change in membrane potential which consisted of a small hyperpolarization followed by a depolarization. In addition, muscarine (0.01-10 microM) inhibited the calcium-dependent, after-hyperpolarization (AHP) and greatly increased the number of action potentials that could be evoked by a given depolarizing current. 3. The hyperpolarization was associated with a decrease in input resistance and it reversed to become a depolarization at a potential of -86.5 mV. This response was antagonized by 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine (4-DAMP; 100 nM) and AF-DX 116 (500 nM), but was unaffected by pirenzepine (0.1-5 microM). 4. Two types of slow depolarization were observed in the presence of muscarine. The most common was associated with an increase in input resistance in the potential range -70 to -40 mV. Pirenzepine (100 nM) selectively antagonized this response, 4-DAMP (100 nM) similarly antagonized the response, but was non-selective. AF-DX 116 (0.5-5 microM) showed no antagonist effect. The less common depolarization (5% of cells) had a long latency and was associated with a decrease in input resistance. 5. Muscarine reduced the duration of the action potential and inhibited the AHP. Cadmium chloride (100 microM) mimicked these actions of muscarine. Application of muscarine immediately following a train of action potentials did not inhibit the AHP, suggesting that muscarine did not directly inhibit the calcium-activated potassium current (IK(Ca)). Muscarine-induced depression of the slow AHP was antagonized by 4-DAMP (100 nM) but was not antagonized by either pirenzepine (0.1-0.5 microM) or AF-DX 116 (0.5-5 microM). 6. It is concluded that the muscarine-induced depolarization of guinea

  20. G-protein-coupled receptors mediate ω-3 PUFAs-inhibited colorectal cancer by activating the Hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Hu, Zhimei; Qi, Haixia; Shi, Zhemin; Chang, Yanan; Yao, Qingbin; Cui, Hongmei; Zheng, Lina; Han, Yawei; Han, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Ting; Hong, Wei

    2016-09-06

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers leading to high mortality. However, long-term administration of anti-tumor therapy for CRC is not feasible due to the side effects. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs), particularly DHA and EPA, exert protection against CRC, but the mechanisms are unclear. Here, we show that ω-3 PUFAs inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of CRC cells in vitro and alleviate AOM/DSS-induced mice colorectal cancer in vivo. Moreover, ω-3 PUFAs promote phosphorylation and cytoplasmic retention of YAP and this effect was mediated by MST1/2 and LATS1, suggesting that the canonical Hippo Pathway is involved in ω-3 PUFAs function. We further confirmed that increase of pYAP by ω-3 PUFAs was mediated by GPRs, including GPR40 and GPR120, which subsequently activate PKA via Gαs, thus inducing the Hippo pathway activation. These data provide a novel DHA/EPA-GPR40/120-Gαs-PKA-MST1/2-LATS1-YAP signaling pathway which is linked to ω-3 PUFAs-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of apoptosis in CRC cells, indicating a mechanism that could explain the anti-cancer action of ω-3 PUFAs.

  1. G-protein-coupled receptors mediate ω-3 PUFAs-inhibited colorectal cancer by activating the Hippo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Haixia; Shi, Zhemin; Chang, Yanan; Yao, Qingbin; Cui, Hongmei; Zheng, Lina; Han, Yawei; Han, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Ting; Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers leading to high mortality. However, long-term administration of anti-tumor therapy for CRC is not feasible due to the side effects. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs), particularly DHA and EPA, exert protection against CRC, but the mechanisms are unclear. Here, we show that ω-3 PUFAs inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of CRC cells in vitro and alleviate AOM/DSS-induced mice colorectal cancer in vivo. Moreover, ω-3 PUFAs promote phosphorylation and cytoplasmic retention of YAP and this effect was mediated by MST1/2 and LATS1, suggesting that the canonical Hippo Pathway is involved in ω-3 PUFAs function. We further confirmed that increase of pYAP by ω-3 PUFAs was mediated by GPRs, including GPR40 and GPR120, which subsequently activate PKA via Gαs, thus inducing the Hippo pathway activation. These data provide a novel DHA/EPA-GPR40/120-Gαs-PKA-MST1/2-LATS1-YAP signaling pathway which is linked to ω-3 PUFAs-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of apoptosis in CRC cells, indicating a mechanism that could explain the anti-cancer action of ω-3 PUFAs. PMID:27506947

  2. EP₃ receptor-mediated contraction of human pulmonary arteries and inhibition of neurogenic tachycardia in pithed rats.

    PubMed

    Kozłowska, Hanna; Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; Schlicker, Eberhard; Kozłowski, Mirosław; Zakrzeska, Agnieszka; Grzęda, Emilia; Malinowska, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was (1) the pharmacological characterization of EP(3) receptors in human pulmonary arteries and (2) the examination of the potential involvement of these receptors in the regulation of neurogenic tachycardia in pithed rats. L-826266 served as the EP(3) receptor antagonist. Experiments were performed on isolated human pulmonary arteries and pithed rats. The prostanoid EP(1)/EP(3) receptor agonist sulprostone (1 nM - 100 μM) concentration-dependently contracted isolated human pulmonary arteries (pEC50, 6.88 ± 0.10). The EP(1) receptor antagonist SC 19920 (100 μM) did not affect the vasoconstriction induced by sulprostone, the TP receptor antagonist sulotroban (10 μM) only slightly attenuated the effects elicited by sulprostone >3 μM, whereas L-826266 (10 μM) shifted its concentration-response curve to the right (apparent pA(2) value 6.18; incubation time 0.5 h). In rings exposed to L-826266 (0.1, 1 or 10 μM) for 3 h, a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect against the sulprostone-induced vasoconstriction was obtained, yielding a Schild plot-based pA(2) value of 7.39. In pithed rats, sulprostone (10 - 1,000 nmol/kg), but not the IP/EP(1) receptor agonist iloprost (1-100 nmol/kg), inhibited the electrically evoked increase in heart rate (HR) dose-dependently, maximally by at least 80%. L-826266 (3 μmol/kg) did not affect basal HR and diastolic blood pressure, but reduced the inhibitory effect of sulprostone 1,000 nmol/kg by about 20%. EP(3) receptors (1) located postsynaptically strongly contract human pulmonary arteries and (2) located presynaptically on sympathetic nerve fibers supplying the heart of pithed rats strongly inhibit the neurogenic tachycardia.

  3. Glycine and GABAA receptors mediate tonic and phasic inhibitory processes that contribute to prepulse inhibition in the goldfish startle network

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, Paul C. P.; Preuss, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is understood as a sensorimotor gating process that attenuates sensory flow to the startle pathway during early stages (20–1000 ms) of information processing. Here, we applied in vivo electrophysiology and pharmacology to determine if PPI is mediated by glycine receptors (GlyRs) and/or GABAA receptors (GABAARs) in the goldfish auditory startle circuit. Specifically, we used selective antagonists to dissect the contributions of target receptors on sound-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) recorded in the neurons that initiate startle, the Mauthner-cells (M-cell). We found that strychnine, a GlyR antagonist, disrupted a fast-activated (5 ms) and rapidly (<50 ms) decaying (feed-forward) inhibitory process that contributes to PPI at 20 ms prepulse/pulse inter-stimulus intervals (ISI). Additionally we observed increases of the evoked postsynaptic potential (PSP) peak amplitude (+87.43 ± 21.53%, N = 9) and duration (+204 ± 48.91%, N = 9). In contrast, treatment with bicuculline, a GABAAR antagonist, caused a general reduction in PPI across all tested interstimulus intervals (ISIs) (20–500 ms). Bicuculline also increased PSP peak amplitude (+133.8 ± 10.3%, N = 5) and PSP duration (+284.95 ± 65.64%, N = 5). Treatment with either antagonist also tonically increased post-synaptic excitability in the M-cells, reflected by an increase in the magnitude of antidromically-evoked action potentials (APs) by 15.07 ± 3.21%, N = 7 and 16.23 ± 7.08%, N = 5 for strychnine and bicuculline, respectively. These results suggest that GABAARs and GlyRs are functionally segregated to short- and longer-lasting sound-evoked (phasic) inhibitory processes that contribute to PPI, with the mediation of tonic inhibition by both receptor systems being critical for gain control within the M-cell startle circuit. PMID:25852486

  4. Mas receptor mediates cardioprotection of angiotensin-(1-7) against Angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac remodelling through inhibition of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Liu, Xuebo; Xu, Jianfeng; Weng, Liqing; Ren, Jun; Ge, Junbo; Zou, Yunzeng

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in the onset and development of cardiac remodelling associated with changes of autophagy. Angiotensin1-7 [Ang-(1-7)] is a newly established bioactive peptide of renin-angiotensin system, which has been shown to counteract the deleterious effects of Ang II. However, the precise impact of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy remained essentially elusive. The aim of the present study was to examine if Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced autophagy and the underlying mechanism involved. Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to Ang II for 48 hrs while mice were infused with Ang II for 4 weeks to induce models of cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. LC3b-II and p62, markers of autophagy, expression were significantly elevated in cardiomyocytes, suggesting the presence of autophagy accompanying cardiac hypertrophy in response to Ang II treatment. Besides, Ang II induced oxidative stress, manifesting as an increase in malondialdehyde production and a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. Ang-(1-7) significantly retarded hypertrophy, autophagy and oxidative stress in the heart. Furthermore, a role of Mas receptor in Ang-(1-7)-mediated action was assessed using A779 peptide, a selective Mas receptor antagonist. The beneficial responses of Ang-(1-7) on cardiac remodelling, autophagy and oxidative stress were mitigated by A779. Taken together, these result indicated that Mas receptor mediates cardioprotection of angiotensin-(1-7) against Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac remodelling through inhibition of oxidative stress. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. The MYND domain-containing protein BRAM1 inhibits lymphotoxin beta receptor-mediated signaling through affecting receptor oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Ping; Chung, Pei-Jung; Liang, Chih-Lung; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2011-01-01

    MYND (myeloid-Nervy-DEAF-1) domains exist in a large number of proteins that are functionally important in development or associated with cancers. We have previously demonstrated that a MYND domain-containing protein, the bone morphogenesis protein receptor-associated molecule 1 (BRAM1), is able to interact with Epstein-Barr virus-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), which acts as a constitutively activated tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR). Herein we further demonstrated that BRAM1 additionally associates with the TNFR-superfamily member, the lymphotoxin beta receptor (LTβR), and hence inhibits LTβR-mediated function. Using the yeast two-hybrid assay, we demonstrated that BRAM1 interacts with LTβR mainly through the self-association domain of LTβR (aa 336-398). The co-immunoprecipitation experiment further revealed that BRAM1 as well as MYND domain-containing proteins, MTG8 and DEAF-1, interacts with LTβR via their MYND domains. The BRAM1-LTβR interaction impedes the self-association of LTβR and the recruitment of TNFR-associated factors 2 and 3 (TRAF2 and TRAF3), leading to abolishment of LTβR-induced NF-κB signaling, JNK activation, and caspase-dependent cell death. In sum, our data demonstrate that the MYND-containing protein BRAM1 abrogates LTβR function through a protein-protein interaction. These findings may provide a direction for the treatment of dysregulation of LTβR-mediated signaling.

  6. Ontogenesis of presynaptic GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition in the CA3 region of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caillard, O; McLean, H A; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaïarsa, J L

    1998-03-01

    although GABAB receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms of presynaptic inhibition are present onGABAergic terminals and functional, they do not operate at the level of monosynaptic GABAergic synaptic transmission at early stages of development. Absence of presynaptic autoinhibition of GABA release seems to be due to the small amount of transmitter that can access presynaptic regulatory sites.

  7. Heterogeneous susceptibility of GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs to depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Martin, L A; Wei, D S; Alger, B E

    2001-05-01

    Depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) in central neurons is mediated by a transient reduction of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from interneurons. DSI is induced by a retrograde signal emitted from principal cells. We used electrophysiological recordings from CA1 neurons of the rat hippocampal slice to test the hypothesis that only certain classes of interneurons are susceptible to DSI. DSI of action potential-dependent, spontaneous, inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in hippocampus is facilitated by carbachol (3 microM), which increases the occurrence of large sIPSCs. Besides carbachol, noradrenaline (norepinephrine; 10 microM), or elevated extracellular potassium (8 mM), could abruptly increase the occurrence of large sIPSCs and DSI in many cases. DSI appeared and disappeared concomitantly with the onset and offset of these large sIPSCs. In contrast, application of AP-5 and CNQX often markedly increased baseline sIPSC activity without enhancing DSI. A brief train of extracellular electrical stimulation could trigger the onset of prolonged, repetitive IPSC activity that was susceptible to DSI. The magnitude of DSI of single evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) in a given pyramidal cell could be altered by changes in stimulus strength, but there was no simple relationship between stimulus strength and DSI. Baclofen (0.5-5 microM) eliminated the increase in sIPSC activity and DSI induced by carbachol. A GABA(B)receptor antagonist, CGP 35348, reversed the effects of baclofen. Carbachol-induced sIPSCs had relatively rapid rise and decay phases. There was no marked distinction between DSI-susceptible and non-susceptible sIPSCs. Nevertheless, two kinetically distinct components of the eIPSC could be distinguished by their decay times. DSI reduced GABA(A),(fast) without affecting GABA(A),(slow). Furosemide (frusemide), which blocks only GABA(A),(fast), reduced the eIPSC and occluded DSI. The data suggest that, with respect to DSI, there are at least

  8. Inhibition by islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin, of P2-purinergic receptor-mediated iodide efflux and phosphoinositide turnover in FRTL-5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okajima, F.; Sho, K.; Kondo, Y.

    1988-08-01

    Exposure of FRTL-5 thyroid cells to ATP (1 microM to 1 mM) resulted in the stimulation of I- efflux in association with the induction of inositol trisphosphate production and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Nonhydrolyzable ATP derivatives, ADP and GTP, were also as effective in magnitude as ATP, whereas neither AMP nor adenosine exerted significant effect on I- efflux, suggesting a P2-purinergic receptor-mediated activation of I- efflux. Treatment of the cells with the islet-activating protein (IAP) pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylated a 41,000 mol wt membrane protein, effectively suppressed the phosphoinositide response to ATP in addition to ATP-dependent I- efflux at agonist concentrations below 10 microM. In contrast, the I- efflux stimulated by TSH, A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate was insusceptible to IAP. The IAP substrate, probably GTP-binding protein, is hence proposed to mediate the activation of P2-purinergic receptor-linked phospholipase-C in FRTL-5 cells. However, the responses to ATP, its nonhydrolyzable derivatives, or ADP at the higher agonist concentrations, especially above 100 microM, were only partially inhibited by IAP, even though the IAP substrate was totally ADP ribosylated by the toxin. The responses to GTP in the whole concentration range tested were not influenced by IAP treatment. Thus, signals arising from the P2-receptor might be transduced to phospholipase-C by two different pathways, i.e. IAP-sensitive and insensitive ones, and result in the stimulation of I- efflux.

  9. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in guinea-pig vessels, but not in rat and mouse aorta.

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, T; Flau, K; Kathmann, M; Göthert, M; Schlicker, E

    2005-08-01

    -maximum inhibition of 70%. Prostaglandin E2 also induced an inhibition by 65 and 80% in the rat and mouse aorta respectively, indicating that the present conditions are basically suitable for detecting presynaptic receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release. The results show that the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibres in the guinea-pig aorta, but not in the rat or mouse aorta, are endowed with presynaptic inhibitory cannabinoid CB1 receptors; such receptors also occur in guinea-pig pulmonary artery, basilar artery and portal vein. These CB1 receptors are not subject to an endogenous tone and the extent of inhibition obtainable via these receptors is within the same range as that of several other presynaptic heteroreceptors, but markedly lower than that obtainable via receptors for prostaglandin E2.

  10. The inhibition of phosphoinositide synthesis and muscarinic-receptor-mediated phospholipase C activity by Li+ as secondary, selective, consequences of inositol depletion in 1321N1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Batty, I H; Downes, C P

    1994-01-01

    Conditions are described for culture of 1321N1 cells under which cellular inositol is decreased from approximately 20 mM to < 0.5 mM but phosphoinositide concentrations are unaffected. The effects of the muscarinic-receptor agonist carbachol (1 mM) and/or LiCl (10 mM) on phosphoinositide turnover in these or in inositol-replete cells was examined after steady-state [3H]inositol labelling of phospholipid pools. In both inositol-replete and -depleted cells, carbachol stimulated similar initial (0-15 min) rates of phospholipase C (PLC) activity, in the presence of Li+. Subsequently (> 30-60 min) stimulated PLC activity and [3H]PtdIns concentrations declined dramatically only in depleted cells. In inositol-depleted cells, carbachol alone evoked increased concentrations of [3H]inositol, [3H]InsP1, [3H]InsP2, [3H]InsP3 and [3H]InsP4, which were largely sustained over 90 min, and concentrations of [3H]PtdIns, [3H]PtdInsP and [3H]PtdInsP2 were decreased only to approximately 82, 84 and 93% of control respectively. In the presence of Li+ in these cells, the stimulated rise in [3H]inositol was prevented and, although accumulation of [3H]InsP1, [3H]InsP2 and [3H]InsP3 was initially (0-30 min) potentiated, rates of accumulation of [3H]InsP1 and concentrations of [3H]polyphosphates later (> 30-60 min) declined, and concentrations of [3H]PtdIns, [3H]PtdInsP and [3H]PtdInsP2 were decreased respectively to approximately 39, 48 and 81% of control. After 60 min in the presence of both carbachol and Li+, stimulated PLC activity was decreased by approximately 70% compared with the initial rate in depleted cells. This decreased PLC activity was reflected by changes in the stimulated concentrations of [3H]Ins(1,3,4)P3 but not of [3H]Ins(1,4,5)P3, but effects of Li+ on the latter may have been obscured by the demonstrated, concomitant and equal stimulated accumulation of [3H]inositol 1:2cyclic,4,5-trisphosphate. These data suggest that receptor-mediated PLC activity is selectively

  11. Presymptomatic and symptomatic ALS SOD1(G93A) mice differ in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor-mediated tonic modulation of neuromuscular transmission.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Filipe; Sebastião, Ana M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease leading to neuromuscular transmission impairment. A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) function changes with disease stage, but the role of the A(1) receptors (A1Rs) is unknown and may have a functional cross-talk with A2AR. The role of A1R in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of ALS in presymptomatic (4-6 weeks old) and symptomatic (12-14 weeks old) phases was investigated by recording endplate potentials (EPPs), miniature endplate potentials (MEPPs), and quantal content (q.c.) of EPPs, from Mg(2+) paralyzed hemidiaphragm preparations. In presymptomatic mice, the A1R agonist, N (6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) (50 nM), decreased mean EPP amplitude, MEPP frequency, and q.c. of EPPs, an effect quantitatively similar to that in age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. However, coactivation of A2AR with CGS 21680 (5 nM) prevented the effects of CPA in WT mice but not in presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice, suggestive of A1R/A2AR cross-talk disruption in this phase of ALS. DPCPX (50 nM) impaired CGS 21680 facilitatory action on neuromuscular transmission in WT but not in presymptomatic mice. In symptomatic animals, CPA only inhibited transmission if added in the presence of adenosine deaminase (ADA, 1 U/mL). ADA and DPCPX enhanced more transmission in symptomatic mice than in age-matched WT mice, suggestive of increase in extracellular adenosine during the symptomatic phase of ALS. The data documents that at the neuromuscular junction of presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice, there is a loss of A1R-A2AR functional cross-talk, while in symptomatic mice there is increased A1R tonic activation, and that with disease progression, changes in A1R-mediated adenosine modulation may act as aggravating factors during the symptomatic phase of ALS.

  12. Heat shock protein 90 inhibitors suppress aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activation of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 transcription and DNA adduct formation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Duncan; Guttenplan, Joseph B; Marcus, Craig B; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2008-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a client protein of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), plays a significant role in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced carcinogenesis. Tobacco smoke, a source of PAHs, activates the AhR, leading to enhanced transcription of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, which encode proteins that convert PAHs to genotoxic metabolites. The main objectives of this study were to determine whether HSP90 inhibitors suppress PAH-mediated induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 or block benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced formation of DNA adducts. Treatment of cell lines derived from oral leukoplakia (MSK-Leuk1) or esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (KYSE450) with a saline extract of tobacco smoke, B(a)P, or dioxin induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 transcription, resulting in enhanced levels of message and protein. Inhibitors of HSP90 [17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG); celastrol] suppressed these inductive effects of PAHs. Treatment with 17-AAG and celastrol also caused a rapid and marked decrease in amounts of AhR protein without modulating levels of HSP90. The formation of B(a)P-induced DNA adducts in MSK-Leuk1 cells was inhibited by 17-AAG, celastrol, and alpha-naphthoflavone, a known AhR antagonist. The reduction in B(a)P-induced DNA adducts was due, at least in part, to reduced metabolic activation of B(a)P. Collectively, these results suggest that 17-AAG and celastrol, inhibitors of HSP90, suppress the activation of AhR-dependent gene expression, leading, in turn, to reduced formation of B(a)P-induced DNA adducts. Inhibitors of HSP90 may have a role in chemoprevention in addition to cancer therapy.

  13. Desensitization of adenosine receptor-mediated inhibition of lipolysis. The mechanism involves the development of enhanced cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation in tolerant adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, B B; Chang, H; Dall'Aglio, E; Reaven, G M

    1986-01-01

    Adipocytes contain adenosine receptors, termed A1 receptors, which inhibit lipolysis by decreasing adenylate cyclase activity. The inhibition of lipolysis by adenosine agonists in vivo acutely suppresses the plasma concentrations of free fatty acids (FFA) and triglycerides. We have found that infusions of the adenosine receptor agonist phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) initially decreases plasma FFA concentrations; however, with prolonged exposure (6 d), rats become very tolerant to the effects of the drug. Adipocytes isolated from epididymal fat pads from PIA-infused rats have altered lipolytic responses. When lipolysis is stimulated with a relatively high concentration of isoproterenol (10(-7) M), PIA does not inhibit lipolysis in adipocytes from the infused animals. However, PIA inhibits isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation in adipocytes from the infused rats although with decreased sensitivity compared with controls. The explanation for the impaired antilipolytic effect appears to be due to the fact that isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation is markedly increased in cells from infused rats. Indeed, basal lipolysis and lipolysis stimulated with lower concentrations of isoproterenol (10(-9), 10(-8) M) are effectively inhibited by PIA. cAMP accumulation is greatly increased in adipocytes from infused rats when stimulated by isoproterenol, ACTH, and forskolin. The results have some striking analogies to changes induced in nerve cells by prolonged exposure to narcotics. These data suggest that tolerance to PIA develops in adipocytes as a consequence of enhanced cAMP accumulation. PMID:3013937

  14. Receptor-mediated DNA-targeted photoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Tom C; Lobachevsky, Pavel N; Leung, Brenda K Y; White, Jonathan M; Martin, Roger F

    2006-11-01

    We show the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy that combines the potency of a DNA-binding photosensitizer, UV(A)Sens, with the tumor-targeting potential of receptor-mediated endocytosis. The photosensitizer is an iodinated bibenzimidazole, which, when bound in the minor groove of DNA and excited by UV(A) irradiation, induces cytotoxic lesions attributed to a radical species resulting from photodehalogenation. Although reminiscent of photochemotherapy using psoralens and UV(A) irradiation, an established treatment modality in dermatology particularly for the treatment of psoriasis and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, a critical difference is the extreme photopotency of the iodinated bibenzimidazole, approximately 1,000-fold that of psoralens. This feature prompted consideration of combination with the specificity of receptor-mediated targeting. Using two in vitro model systems, we show the UV(A) cytotoxicity of iodo ligand/protein conjugates, implying binding of the conjugate to cell receptors, internalization, and degradation of the conjugate-receptor complex, with release and translocation of the ligand to nuclear DNA. For ligand-transferrin conjugates, phototoxicity was inhibited by coincubation with excess native transferrin. Receptor-mediated UV(A)-induced cytotoxicity was also shown with the iodo ligand conjugate of an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody, exemplifying the potential application of the strategy to other cancer-specific targets to thus improve the specificity of phototherapy of superficial lesions and for extracorporeal treatments.

  15. Cellular tolerance to adenosine receptor-mediated inhibition of lipolysis: altered adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate metabolism and protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, B B; Prokocimer, P; Thomas, J M; Vagelos, R; Chang, H; Reaven, G M

    1989-05-01

    Prolonged exposure of many types of cells to drugs or hormones that inhibit the activity of the enzyme adenylate cyclase, such as narcotics and alpha 2-adrenergic agonists, leads to enhanced accumulation of cAMP upon removal of the inhibitory drug. We have found previously that chronic infusion of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA), an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, into rats leads to enhanced isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation in adipocytes isolated from these animals. The enhanced cAMP accumulation was associated with an impaired ability of PIA to inhibit lipolysis in these cells. In the present study we have investigated the mechanism of the enhanced cAMP accumulation in adipocytes from PIA-infused rats and the relationship of these changes to the impaired antilipolytic action of the drug. The enhanced isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation in adipocytes prepared from PIA-infused rats was due to both an increased rate of cAMP synthesis and a decreased rate of cAMP metabolism at high concentrations of cAMP without a change in phosphodiesterase activity. There was heterologous desensitization of the ability of PIA, prostaglandin E1, and nicotinic acid to inhibit cAMP accumulation in the adipocytes from PIA-infused rats; there was an increase in the EC50 of each of these agonists, although maximal inhibition of cAMP accumulation was similar. The relationship between the activation of cAMP-dependent kinase and extent of lipolysis was similar in the two groups of cells. We demonstrated that the explanation for the impaired ability of PIA to decrease the rate of isoproterenol (10(-7) M)-stimulated lipolysis in the cells from the PIA-infused rats was due to the markedly increased concentrations of cAMP in these cells, which led to sufficient activation of the kinase to maintain a high rate of lipolysis even in the presence of PIA. In addition, we found that the changes induced by the PIA infusion were largely reversible over a

  16. γ-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor Mediated Inhibition of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons Is Suppressed by Kisspeptin-G Protein-Coupled Receptor 54 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the most important neurotransmitters that regulate the excitability of GnRH neurons. Numerous studies have shown that GABA activates Cl− currents in GnRH neurons, and these effects are antagonized by GABAA receptor antagonists. The GABAB receptor is a heterodimer composed of GABAB R1 and R2, and although both subunits have been localized in GnRH neurons, nothing is known about the cellular signaling of this Gαi,o-coupled receptor in GnRH neurons. Using whole-cell recordings from mouse enhanced green fluorescent protein-GnRH neurons, we found that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen hyperpolarized GnRH neurons through activation of an inwardly rectifying K+ current in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of baclofen were antagonized by the selective GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 52432 with a Ki (inhibitory constant) of 85 nm. Furthermore, in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin, GABA hyperpolarized GnRH neurons in a similar manner. Treatment with 17β-estradiol as compared with oil vehicle did not significantly alter either the EC50 for the baclofen-induced response (0.8 ± 0.1 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1 μm, respectively) or the maximal outward current (10.8 ± 1.7 pA vs. 11.4 ± 0.6 pA, respectively) in GnRH neurons. However, the outward current (and membrane hyperpolarization) was abrogated by submaximal concentrations of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) agonist kisspeptin-10 in both groups, indicating that Gαq-coupled (GPR54) can desensitize the GABAB receptor-mediated response. Therefore, the activation of GABAB receptors in GnRH neurons may provide increased inhibitory tone during estrogen-negative feedback states that is attenuated by kisspeptin during positive feedback. PMID:19164470

  17. Plexin-A1 is required for Toll-like receptor-mediated microglial activation in the development of lipopolysaccharide-induced encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    ITO, TAKUJI; YOSHIDA, KENJI; NEGISHI, TAKAYUKI; MIYAJIMA, MASAYASU; TAKAMATSU, HYOTA; KIKUTANI, HITOSHI; KUMANOGOH, ATSUSHI; YUKAWA, KAZUNORI

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that semaphorins, which are known repulsive axon guidance molecules, may play a crucial role in maintaining brain homeostasis by regulating microglial activity. Sema3A, secreted in higher amounts from injured neurons, is considered to suppress excessive inflammatory responses by inducing microglial apoptosis through its binding to Plexin-A1 receptors on activated microglia. To clarify the in vivo role of Plexin-A1-mediated signaling in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced injury in mouse brain, we examined the neuroinflammatory changes initiated by LPS administration to the cerebral ventricles of wild-type (WT) and Plexin-A1-deficient (−/−) mice. WT mice administered LPS exhibited a significantly higher expression of COX-2, iNOS, IL-1β and TNF-α in the hippocampus, and a significantly greater ventricular enlargement and intracerebral infiltration of leukocytes, as compared with the saline-treated group. By contrast, Plexin-A1−/− mice administered LPS did not exhibit a significantly increased expression of COX-2, iNOS, IL-1β or TNF-α in the hippocampus as compared with the saline-treated group. Plexin-A1−/− mice administered LPS did not show significant increases in ventricle size or infiltration of leukocytes into the brain, as compared with the saline-treated group. In WT, but not in the Plexin-A1−/− primary microglia treated with LPS, Sema3A induced significantly more nitric oxide production than in the immunoglobulin G control. These results revealed the crucial role of the Sema3A-Plexin-A1 interaction in the Toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling of the LPS-induced activation of microglia. Thus, results of the present study revealed the essential role of Plexin-A1 in the development of LPS-induced neuroinflammation in mice, suggesting the possible application of microglial control of the semaphorin-plexin signaling system to the treatment of LPS-induced encephalopathy and other psychiatric diseases

  18. A1 adenosine receptor-mediated GIRK channels contribute to the resting conductance of CA1 neurons in the dorsal hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chung Sub

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal and ventral hippocampi are functionally and anatomically distinct. Recently, we reported that dorsal Cornu Ammonis area 1 (CA1) neurons have a more hyperpolarized resting membrane potential and a lower input resistance and fire fewer action potentials for a given current injection than ventral CA1 neurons. Differences in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation conductance between dorsal and ventral neurons have been reported, but these differences cannot fully account for the different resting properties of these neurons. Here, we show that coupling of A1 adenosine receptors (A1ARs) to G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) conductance contributes to the intrinsic membrane properties of dorsal CA1 neurons but not ventral CA1 neurons. The block of GIRKs with either barium or the more specific blocker Tertiapin-Q revealed that there is more resting GIRK conductance in dorsal CA1 neurons compared with ventral CA1 neurons. We found that the higher resting GIRK conductance in dorsal CA1 neurons was mediated by tonic A1AR activation. These results demonstrate that the different resting membrane properties between dorsal and ventral CA1 neurons are due, in part, to higher A1AR-mediated GIRK activity in dorsal CA1 neurons. PMID:25652929

  19. Involvement of cAMP-PKA pathway in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor-mediated regulation of acetaldehyde-induced activation of HSCs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaru; Wang, He; Lv, Xiongwen; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Yang, Yan; Li, Jun

    2015-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which adenosine receptors (ARs)-mediated the cAMP/PKA/CREB signal pathway regulates the activation of acetaldehyde-induced hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Primary HSCs were isolated from SD rats, cultured in vitro, and activated with different concentrations of acetaldehyde at different time points. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to quantify both protein and mRNA levels of the four AR (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R) in rat HSCs. Selective inhibitors of PDEs and the Gi/o protein pathway, general AR agonists, and AR subtype specific agents were used to study the AR signaling. The level of cAMP was measured by radio-immunoassay, and the expression of α-SMA, collagen type I and III, PKA and p-CREB were also detected by Western blotting. Acetaldehyde could significantly promote HSC proliferation, with a maximum stimulatory effect observed at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. All four AR subtypes could be present in rat HSCs, and the mRNA and protein expression levels for A2AR and A1R in much greater abundance than those for A2BR and A3R. The expression of A2AR and A1R was significantly increased in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs as compared with that of control group, whereas the expression of A2BR and A3R remained unaffected by the addition of acetaldehyde. Curiously, there is coupling of A2AR to the Gs-AC signaling, as well as coupling of A1R to the Gi/o-AC signaling pathway in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Both the A2AR and A1R antagonists could suppress the activation of HSC, although they have opposing effects on cAMP signal transduction. These results suggested that a combination of cAMP/PKA/CREB signals via A2AR and A1R likely mediate the activation of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs, and A1R coupled to the Gi/o-AC signaling pathway may be masked by the more predominant A2AR that coupled to the Gs-AC signaling pathway.

  20. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated changes in basal and histamine-stimulated levels of intracellular calcium in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine A1 receptor stimulation on basal and histamine-stimulated levels of intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) have been investigated in primary astrocyte cultures derived from neonatal rat forebrains. 2. Histamine (0.1 microM-1 mM) caused rapid, concentration-dependent increases in [Ca2+]i over basal levels in single type-2 astrocytes in the presence of extracellular calcium. A maximum mean increase of 1,468 +/- 94 nM over basal levels was recorded in 90% of type-2 cells treated with 1 mM histamine (n = 49). The percentage of type-2 cells exhibiting calcium increases in response to histamine appeared to vary in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the application of 1 mM histamine to type-1 astrocytes had less effect, eliciting a mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 805 +/- 197 nM over basal levels in only 30% of the cells observed (n = 24). 3. In the presence of extracellular calcium, the A1 receptor-selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10 microM), caused a maximum mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 1,110 +/- 181 nM over basal levels in 30% of type-2 astrocytes observed (n = 53). The size of this response was concentration-dependent; however, the percentage of type-2 cells exhibiting calcium increases in response to CPA did not appear to vary in a concentration-dependent manner. A mean calcium increase of 605 +/- 89 nM over basal levels was also recorded in 23% of type-1 astrocytes treated with 10 microM CPA (n = 30). 4. In the absence of extracellular calcium, in medium containing 0.1 mM EGTA, a mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 504 +/- 67 nM over basal levels was recorded in 41% of type-2 astrocytes observed (n = 41) after stimulation with 1 microM CPA. However, in the presence of extracellular calcium, pretreatment with the A1 receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, for 5-10 min before stimulation with 1 microM CPA, completely antagonized the response in 100% of the cells observed. 5. In type-2

  1. Histaminergic H1 and H2 Receptors Mediate the Effects of Propofol on the Noradrenalin-Inhibited Neurons in Rat Ventrolateral Preoptic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Tian

    2017-02-09

    The ventrolateral preoptic nucleus is a sleep-promoting nucleus located in the basal forebrain. A commonly used intravenous anesthetic, propofol, had been reported to induce sleep spindles and augment the firing rate of neurons in ventrolateral preoptic nucleus, but the underlining mechanism is yet to be known. By using patch clamp recording on neuron in acute brain slice, present study tested if histaminergic H1 and H2 receptors play a role in the effect of propofol on the noradrenalin-inhibited neurons in ventrolateral preoptic nucleus. We found that the firing rate of noradrenalin-inhibited neurons were significantly augmented by propofol; the frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents of noradrenalin-inhibited neuron were evidently attenuated by propofol; such inhibition effect was suppressed by histamine; and both triprolidine (antagonist for H1 histamine receptor) and ranitidine (antagonist for H2 histamine receptor) were able to increase the inhibition rate of propofol in presence of histamine. Present study demonstrated that propofol-induced inhibition of inhibitory postsynaptic currents on noradrenalin-inhibited neurons were mediated by histaminergic H1 and H2 receptors.

  2. Characterization of the 5-hydroxytryptamine1a receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in guinea pig and rat hippocampal membranes.

    PubMed

    De Vivo, M; Maayani, S

    1986-07-01

    The inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonists was measured in guinea pig and rat hippocampal membranes. The results were consistent with the inhibition being mediated by a single, homogeneous population of receptors. In guinea pig hippocampal membranes 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin, d-lysergic acid diethylamide, 5-HT and buspirone were potent in inhibiting forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, with EC50 values of 18, 24, 53 and 146 nM, respectively. Spiperone (Kb = 26 nM) and methiothepin (Kb = 13 nM) were potent competitive antagonists at this receptor whereas ketanserin, a high affinity 5-HT2 receptor ligand, and ICS 205-930, a high affinity peripheral neuronal (M) receptor ligand, were not. In rat hippocampal membranes, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin, d-lysergic acid diethylamide, 5-HT and buspirone were potent agonists and exhibited the same rank order of potency as in guinea pig hippocampal membranes. The maximal percentage of inhibition by buspirone was significantly less than the maximal percentage of inhibition by 5-HT in rat membranes, suggesting that it is a partial agonist at this receptor, with an intrinsic activity relative to 5-HT of 0.5. The concentration-response data show that the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in guinea pig and rat hippocampal membranes is mediated by a receptor with the characteristics of the 5-HT1A binding site. We propose that the inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity is a functional correlate of this binding site. This response is suitable for measuring activities and affinities of drugs acting at 5-HT1A receptors.

  3. Non-Dioxin-Like Polychlorinated Biphenyls Inhibit G-Protein Coupled Receptor-Mediated Ca2+ Signaling by Blocking Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yurim; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Jo, Su-Hyun; Chung, Sungkwon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous pollutants which accumulate in the food chain. Recently, several molecular mechanisms by which non-dioxin-like (NDL) PCBs mediate neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral toxicity have been elucidated. However, although the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) is a significant target for neurobehavioral disturbance, our understanding of the effects of PCBs on GPCR signaling remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of NDL-PCBs on GPCR-mediated Ca2+ signaling in PC12 cells. We found that ortho-substituted 2,2’,6-trichlorinated biphenyl (PCB19) caused a rapid decline in the Ca2+ signaling of bradykinin, a typical Gq- and phospholipase Cβ-coupled GPCR, without any effect on its inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production. PCB19 reduced thapsigargin-induced sustained cytosolic Ca2+ levels, suggesting that PCB19 inhibits SOCE. The abilities of other NDL-PCBs to inhibit store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) were also examined and found to be of similar potencies to that of PCB19. PCB19 also showed a manner equivalent to that of known SOCE inhibitors. PCB19-mediated SOCE inhibition was confirmed by demonstrating the ability of PCB19 to inhibit the SOCE current and thapsigargin-induced Mn2+ influx. These results imply that one of the molecular mechanism by which NDL-PCBs cause neurobehavioral disturbances involves NDL-PCB-mediated inhibition of SOCE, thereby interfering with GPCR-mediated Ca2+ signaling. PMID:26963511

  4. Chylomicron components activate duodenal vagal afferents via a cholecystokinin A receptor-mediated pathway to inhibit gastric motor function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Glatzle, Jörg; Wang, Yuhua; Adelson, David W; Kalogeris, Theodore J; Zittel, Tilman T; Tso, Patrick; Wei, Jen-Yu; Raybould, Helen E

    2003-07-15

    Nutrients in the intestine initiate changes in secretory and motor function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The nature of the 'sensors' in the intestinal wall is not well characterized. Intestinal lipid stimulates the release of cholecystokinin (CCK) from mucosal entero-endocrine cells, and it is proposed that CCK activates CCK A receptors on vagal afferent nerve terminals. There is evidence that chylomicron components are involved in this lipid transduction pathway. The aim of the present study was to determine (1) the pathway mediating reflex inhibition of gastric motility and (2) activation of duodenal vagal afferents in response to chylomicrons. Mesenteric lymph was obtained from awake rats fitted with lymph fistulas during intestinal perfusion of lipid (Intralipid, 170 micromol h(-1), chylous lymph) or a dextrose and/or electrolyte solution (control lymph). Inhibition of gastric motility was measured manometrically in urethane-anaesthetized recipient rats in response to intra-arterial injection of lymph close to the upper GI tract. Chylous lymph was significantly more potent than control lymph in inhibiting gastric motility. Functional vagal deafferentation by perineural capsaicin or CCK A receptor antagonist (devazepide, 1 mg kg(-1), i.v.) significantly reduced chylous lymph-induced inhibition of gastric motility. The discharge of duodenal vagal afferent fibres was recorded from the dorsal abdominal vagus nerve in an in vitro preparation of the duodenum. Duodenal vagal afferent nerve fibre discharge was significantly increased by close-arterial injection of CCK (1-100 pmol) in 43 of 83 units tested. The discharge of 88% of CCK-responsive fibres was increased by close-arterial injection of chylous lymph; devazepide (100 microg, i.a.) abolished the afferent response to chylous lymph in 83% of these units. These data suggest that in the intestinal mucosa, chylomicrons or their products release endogenous CCK which activates CCK A receptors on vagal afferent

  5. Pharmacological Evidence that Histamine H3 Receptors Mediate Histamine-Induced Inhibition of the Vagal Bradycardic Out-flow in Pithed Rats.

    PubMed

    García, Mónica; García-Pedraza, José Ángel; Villalón, Carlos M; Morán, Asunción

    2016-02-01

    In vivo stimulation of cardiac vagal neurons induces bradycardia by acetylcholine (ACh) release. As vagal release of ACh may be modulated by autoreceptors (muscarinic M2 ) and heteroreceptors (including serotonin 5-HT1 ), this study has analysed the pharmacological profile of the receptors involved in histamine-induced inhibition of the vagal bradycardic out-flow in pithed rats. For this purpose, 180 male Wistar rats were pithed, artificially ventilated and pre-treated (i.v.) with 1 mg/kg atenolol, followed by i.v. administration of physiological saline (1 ml/kg), histamine (10, 50, 100 and 200 μg/kg) or the selective histamine H1 (2-pyridylethylamine), H2 (dimaprit), H3 (methimepip) and H4 (VUF 8430) receptor agonists (1, 10, 50 and 100 μg/kg each). Under these conditions, electrical stimulation (3, 6 and 9 Hz; 15 ± 3 V and 1 ms) of the vagus nerve resulted in frequency-dependent bradycardic responses, which were (i) unchanged during the infusions of saline, 2-pyridylethylamine, dimaprit or VUF 8430; and (ii) dose-dependently inhibited by histamine or methimepip. Moreover, the inhibition of the bradycardia caused by 50 μg/kg of either histamine or methimepip (which failed to inhibit the bradycardic responses to i.v. bolus injections of acetylcholine; 1-10 μg/kg) was abolished by the H3 receptor antagonist JNJ 10181457 (1 mg/kg, i.v.). In conclusion, our results suggest that histamine-induced inhibition of the vagal bradycardic out-flow in pithed rats is mainly mediated by pre-junctional activation of histamine H3 receptors, as previously demonstrated for the vasopressor sympathetic out-flow and the vasodepressor sensory CGRPergic (calcitonin gene-related peptide) out-flow.

  6. Tetramethylpyrazine reduces glucose and insulin-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells by inhibiting insulin receptor-mediated PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Zili; Kong, Desong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Li; Zhu, Xiaojing; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2014-01-25

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is the central event during liver fibrogenesis. Metabolic syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia contributes to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-associated liver fibrosis. This study was to investigate the effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) on HSC activation induced by glucose and insulin (Glu/Ins) and the underlying mechanisms. Results showed that Glu/Ins significantly stimulated proliferation, invasion, adhesion, and extracellular matrix (ECM) production in HSCs. TMP inhibited HSC proliferation, invasion and adhesion, and reduced the expression of marker genes related to HSC activation in Glu/Ins-activated HSCs. Mechanistic evidence revealed that TMP reduced insulin receptor (InsR) expression and blocked the downstream phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascades, which was required for TMP attenuation of HSC activation. Moreover, TMP modulated the genes relevant to ECM homeostasis favoring ECM degradation. It could be concluded that TMP inhibited Glu/Ins-stimulated HSC activation and ECM production by inhibiting InsR-mediated PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spinal 5-HT1A, not the 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors, mediates descending serotonergic inhibition for late-phase mechanical allodynia of carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Min; Jeong, Seong Wook; Yang, Jihoon; Lee, Seong Heon; Kim, Woon Mo; Jeong, Seongtae; Bae, Hong Beom; Yoon, Myung Ha; Choi, Jeong Il

    2015-07-23

    Previous electrophysiological studies demonstrated a limited role of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor (5-HT3R), but facilitatory role of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in spinal nociceptive processing of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. The release of spinal 5-HT was shown to peak in early-phase and return to baseline in late-phase of carrageenan inflammation. We examined the role of the descending serotonergic projections involving 5-HT1AR, 5-HT1BR, and 5-HT3R in mechanical allodynia of early- (first 4h) and late-phase (24h after) carrageenan-induced inflammation. Intrathecal administration of 5-HT produced a significant anti-allodynic effect in late-phase, but not in early-phase. Similarly, intrathecal 5-HT1AR agonist (8-OH-DPAT) attenuated the intensity of late-phase allodynia in a dose dependent fashion which was antagonized by 5-HT1AR antagonist (WAY-100635), but produced no effect on the early-phase allodynia. However, other agonists or antagonists of 5-HT1BR (CP-93129, SB-224289) and 5-HT3R (m-CPBG, ondansetron) did not produce any anti- or pro-allodynic effect in both early- and late- phase allodynia. These results suggest that spinal 5-HT1A, but not 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors mediate descending serotonergic inhibition on nociceptive processing of late-phase mechanical allodynia in carrageenan-induced inflammation.

  8. The role of pre-junctional D2 -like receptors mediating quinpirole-induced inhibition of the vasodepressor sensory CGRPergic out-flow in pithed rats.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Maldonado, Guadalupe; González-Hernández, Abimael; Altamirano-Espinoza, Alain H; Marichal-Cancino, Bruno A; Ruiz-Salinas, Inna; Villalón, Carlos M

    2014-02-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from perivascular sensory nerves plays a role in the regulation of vascular tone. Indeed, electrical stimulation of the perivascular sensory out-flow in pithed rats produces vasodepressor responses, which are mainly mediated by CGRP release. This study investigated the potential role of dopamine D1 -like and D2 -like receptors in the inhibition of these vasodepressor responses. For this purpose, male Wistar pithed rats (pre-treated i.v. with 25 mg/kg gallamine and 2 mg/kg min. hexamethonium) received i.v. continuous infusions of methoxamine (20 μg/kg min.) followed by physiological saline (0.02 ml/min.), the D1 -like receptor agonist SKF-38393 (0.1-1 μg/kg min.) or the D2 -like receptor agonist quinpirole (0.03-10 μg/kg min.). Under these conditions, electrical stimulation (0.56-5.6 Hz; 50 V and 2 ms) of the thoracic spinal cord (T9 -T12 ) resulted in frequency-dependent vasodepressor responses which were (i) unchanged during the infusions of saline or SKF-38393 and (ii) inhibited during the infusions of quinpirole (except at 0.03 μg/kg min.). Moreover, the inhibition induced by 0.1 μg/kg min. quinpirole (which failed to inhibit the vasodepressor responses elicited by i.v. bolus injections of exogenous α-CGRP; 0.1-1 μg/kg) was (i) unaltered after i.v. treatment with 1 ml/kg of either saline or 5% ascorbic acid and (ii) abolished after 300 μg/kg (i.v.) of the D2 -like receptor antagonists haloperidol or raclopride. These doses of antagonists (enough to completely block D2 -like receptors) essentially failed to modify per se the electrically induced vasodepressor responses. In conclusion, our results suggest that quinpirole-induced inhibition of the vasodepressor sensory CGRPergic out-flow is mainly mediated by pre-junctional D2 -like receptors.

  9. Competition between internal AlF(4)(-) and receptor-mediated stimulation of dorsal raphe neuron G-proteins coupled to calcium current inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Penington, N J

    2000-03-01

    Intracellular aluminum fluoride (AlF(4)(-)), placed in a patch pipette, activated a G-protein, resulting in a "tonic" inhibition of the Ca(2+) current of isolated serotonergic neurons of the rat dorsal raphe nucleus. Serotonin (5-HT) also inhibits the Ca(2+) current of these cells. After external bath application and quick removal of 5-HT to an AlF(4)(-) containing cell, there was a reversal or transient disinhibition (TD) of the inhibitory effect of AlF(4)(-) on Ca(2+) current. A short predepolarization of the membrane potential to +70 mV, a condition that is known to reverse G-protein-mediated inhibition, reversed the inhibitory effect of AlF(4)(-) on Ca(2+) current and brought the Ca(2+) current to the same level as that seen at the peak of the TD current. With AlF(4)(-) in the pipette, the TD phenomenon could be eliminated by lowering pipette MgATP, or by totally chelating pipette Al(3+). In the presence of AlF(4)(-), but with either lowered MgATP or extreme efforts to eliminate pipette Al(3+), the rate of recovery from 5-HT on wash was slowed, a condition opposite to that where a TD occurred. The putative complex of AlF(4)(-)-bound G-protein (Galpha.GDP. AlF(4)(-)) appeared to free G-betagamma-subunits, mimicking the effect on Ca(2+) channels of the G.GTP complex. The ON-rate of the inhibition of Ca(2+) current, after a depolarizing pulse, by betagamma-subunits released by AlF(4)(-) in the pipette was significantly slower than that of the agonist-activated G-protein. The OFF-rate of the AlF(4)(-)-mediated inhibition in response to a depolarizing pulse, a measure of the affinity of the free G-betagamma-subunit for the Ca(2+) channel, was slightly slower than that of the agonist stimulated G-protein. In summary, AlF(4)(-) modified the OFF-rate kinetics of G-protein activation by agonists, but had little effect on the kinetics of the interaction of the betagamma-subunit with Ca(2+) channels. Agonist application temporarily reversed the effects of AlF(4

  10. Adenylyl cyclase type 6 overexpression selectively enhances beta-adrenergic and prostacyclin receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac fibroblast function because of colocalization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Mahautmr, Penden; Stitham, Jeremiah; Hwa, John; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2008-06-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts produce and degrade extracellular matrix and are critical in regulating cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Fibroblasts are activated by factors such as transforming growth factor beta and inhibited by agents that elevate 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. cAMP signal generation and response is known to be compartmentalized in many cell types in part through the colocalization of receptors and specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in lipid rafts and caveolae. The present study sought to define the localization of key G protein-coupled receptors with adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) in lipid rafts of rat cardiac fibroblasts and to determine if this colocalization was functionally relevant. We found that cardiac fibroblasts produce cAMP in response to agonists for beta-adrenergic (isoproterenol), prostaglandin EP2 (butaprost), adenosine (adenosine-5'-N-ethylcarboxamide, NECA), and prostacyclin (beraprost) receptors. Overexpression of AC6 increased cAMP production stimulated by isoproterenol and beraprost but not by butaprost or NECA. A key function of fibroblasts is the production of collagen. Isoproterenol- and beraprostmediated inhibition of collagen synthesis was also enhanced by AC6 overexpression, while inhibition by butaprost and NECA were unaltered. Lipid raft fractions from cardiac fibroblasts contain the preponderance of beta-adrenergic receptors and AC6 but exclude EP2 receptors. While we could not determine the localization of native prostacyclin receptors, we were able to determine that epitope-tagged prostanoid IP receptors (IPR) expressed in COS7 cells did localize, in part, in lipid raft fractions. These findings indicate that IP receptors are expressed in lipid rafts and can activate raft-localized AC isoforms. AC6 is completely compartmentized in lipid raft domains where it is activated solely by coresident G protein-coupled receptors to regulate cardiac fibroblast function.

  11. α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated neuroprotection against dopaminergic neuron loss in an MPTP mouse model via inhibition of astrocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Hu, Jun; Wu, Jie; Zhu, Chenlei; Hui, Yujian; Han, Yaping; Huang, Zuhu; Ellsworth, Kevin; Fan, Weimin

    2012-05-24

    Although evidence suggests that the prevalence of Parkinson's disease (PD) is lower in smokers than in non-smokers, the mechanisms of nicotine-induced neuroprotection remain unclear. Stimulation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) seems to be a crucial mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory potential of cholinergic agonists in immune cells, including astrocytes, and inhibition of astrocyte activation has been proposed as a novel strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as PD. The objective of the present study was to determine whether nicotine-induced neuroprotection in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model occurs via α7-nAChR-mediated inhibition of astrocytes. Both in vivo (MPTP) and in vitro (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) models of PD were used to investigate the role(s) of and possible mechanism(s) by which α7-nAChRs protect against dopaminergic neuron loss. Multiple experimental approaches, including behavioral tests, immunochemistry, and stereology experiments, astrocyte cell cultures, reverse transcriptase PCR, laser scanning confocal microscopy, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α assays, and western blotting, were used to elucidate the mechanisms of the α7-nAChR-mediated neuroprotection. Systemic administration of nicotine alleviated MPTP-induced behavioral symptoms, improved motor coordination, and protected against dopaminergic neuron loss and the activation of astrocytes and microglia in the substantia nigra. The protective effects of nicotine were abolished by administration of the α7-nAChR-selective antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA). In primary cultured mouse astrocytes, pretreatment with nicotine suppressed MPP(+)-induced or LPS-induced astrocyte activation, as evidenced by both decreased production of TNF-α and inhibition of extracellular regulated kinase1/2 (Erk1/2) and p38 activation in astrocytes, and these effects were also

  12. Calcium/calmodulin kinase inhibitors and immunosuppressant macrolides rapamycin and FK506 inhibit progestin- and glucocorticosteroid receptor-mediated transcription in human breast cancer T47D cells.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, S; Marsaud, V; Mercier-Bodard, C; Baulieu, E E; Mader, S; White, J H; Renoir, J M

    1998-07-01

    The effects of immunosuppressants and inhibitors of specific calcium/calmodulin kinase (CaMK) of types II and IV on progestin/glucocorticosteroid-induced transcription were studied in two human stably transfected breast cancer T47D cell lines. The lines contain the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene under control either of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter (T47D-MMTV-CAT), or the minimal promoter containing five glucocorticosteroid/progestin hormone response elements [T47D-(GRE)5-CAT]. Progestin- and triamcinolone acetonide (TA)-induced CAT gene expression was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in both lines by preincubation with rapamycin (Rap) and, to a lesser extent, with FK506, but not with cyclosporin A. CaMK II and/or IV inhibitors KN62 and KN93 also inhibited progestin- and TA-stimulated transcription in both lines. None of these drugs had any effect on basal transcription. The antagonist RU486 inhibited all the effects of both progestin and TA, suggesting that progesterone receptor (PR)-, as well as glucocorticosteroid receptor (GR)- mediated transactivation are targets of immunosuppressants and CaMKs in T47D cells. Indeed, Northern analysis showed that Rap, KN62, and, to a lesser degree, FK506 inhibited progestin stimulation of Cyclin D1 mRNA levels, but not those of the non-steroid-regulated glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene. Addition of Rap or KN62 after exposure of cells to progesterone agonist Org 2058 had no effect on induction of CAT activity. Taken together, these data indicate that Rap and FK506, as well as CaMK inhibitors, inhibit steroid-induced activities of exogenous, as well as of some endogenous, steroid receptor-regulated genes by a mechanism preceding hormone-induced receptor activation. Rap appeared to stabilize a 9S form of [3H]Org 2058-PR complexes isolated from T47D (GRE)5CAT cell nuclei. By contrast, the progesterone receptor (PR) was isolated from cells treated with KN62 as a 5S entity

  13. Caffeine protects against experimental acute pancreatitis by inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Cane, Matthew C; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Szatmary, Peter; Zhang, Xiaoying; Elliott, Victoria; Ouyang, Yulin; Chvanov, Michael; Latawiec, Diane; Wen, Li; Booth, David M; Haynes, Andrea C; Petersen, Ole H; Tepikin, Alexei V; Criddle, David N; Sutton, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Caffeine reduces toxic Ca(2+) signals in pancreatic acinar cells via inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-mediated signalling, but effects of other xanthines have not been evaluated, nor effects of xanthines on experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). We have determined effects of caffeine and its xanthine metabolites on pancreatic acinar IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) signalling and experimental AP. Isolated pancreatic acinar cells were exposed to secretagogues, uncaged IP3 or toxins that induce AP and effects of xanthines, non-xanthine phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors and cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cAMP/cGMP) determined. The intracellular cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]C), mitochondrial depolarisation and necrosis were assessed by confocal microscopy. Effects of xanthines were evaluated in caerulein-induced AP (CER-AP), taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate-induced AP (TLCS-AP) or palmitoleic acid plus ethanol-induced AP (fatty acid ethyl ester AP (FAEE-AP)). Serum xanthines were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Caffeine, dimethylxanthines and non-xanthine PDE inhibitors blocked IP3-mediated Ca(2+) oscillations, while monomethylxanthines had little effect. Caffeine and dimethylxanthines inhibited uncaged IP3-induced Ca(2+) rises, toxin-induced Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial depolarisation and necrotic cell death pathway activation; cAMP/cGMP did not inhibit toxin-induced Ca(2+) rises. Caffeine significantly ameliorated CER-AP with most effect at 25 mg/kg (seven injections hourly); paraxanthine or theophylline did not. Caffeine at 25 mg/kg significantly ameliorated TLCS-AP and FAEE-AP. Mean total serum levels of dimethylxanthines and trimethylxanthines peaked at >2 mM with 25 mg/kg caffeine but at <100 µM with 25 mg/kg paraxanthine or theophylline. Caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites reduced pathological IP3R-mediated pancreatic acinar Ca(2+) signals but only caffeine

  14. Caffeine protects against experimental acute pancreatitis by inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Cane, Matthew C; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Szatmary, Peter; Zhang, Xiaoying; Elliott, Victoria; Ouyang, Yulin; Chvanov, Michael; Latawiec, Diane; Wen, Li; Booth, David M; Haynes, Andrea C; Petersen, Ole H; Tepikin, Alexei V; Criddle, David N

    2017-01-01

    Objective Caffeine reduces toxic Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar cells via inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-mediated signalling, but effects of other xanthines have not been evaluated, nor effects of xanthines on experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). We have determined effects of caffeine and its xanthine metabolites on pancreatic acinar IP3R-mediated Ca2+ signalling and experimental AP. Design Isolated pancreatic acinar cells were exposed to secretagogues, uncaged IP3 or toxins that induce AP and effects of xanthines, non-xanthine phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors and cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cAMP/cGMP) determined. The intracellular cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]C), mitochondrial depolarisation and necrosis were assessed by confocal microscopy. Effects of xanthines were evaluated in caerulein-induced AP (CER-AP), taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate-induced AP (TLCS-AP) or palmitoleic acid plus ethanol-induced AP (fatty acid ethyl ester AP (FAEE-AP)). Serum xanthines were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results Caffeine, dimethylxanthines and non-xanthine PDE inhibitors blocked IP3-mediated Ca2+ oscillations, while monomethylxanthines had little effect. Caffeine and dimethylxanthines inhibited uncaged IP3-induced Ca2+ rises, toxin-induced Ca2+ release, mitochondrial depolarisation and necrotic cell death pathway activation; cAMP/cGMP did not inhibit toxin-induced Ca2+ rises. Caffeine significantly ameliorated CER-AP with most effect at 25 mg/kg (seven injections hourly); paraxanthine or theophylline did not. Caffeine at 25 mg/kg significantly ameliorated TLCS-AP and FAEE-AP. Mean total serum levels of dimethylxanthines and trimethylxanthines peaked at >2 mM with 25 mg/kg caffeine but at <100 µM with 25 mg/kg paraxanthine or theophylline. Conclusions Caffeine and its dimethylxanthine metabolites reduced pathological IP3R-mediated pancreatic acinar Ca2

  15. Dopamine promotes NMDA receptor hypofunction in the retina through D1 receptor-mediated Csk activation, Src inhibition and decrease of GluN2B phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Socodato, Renato; Santiago, Felipe N.; Portugal, Camila C.; Domith, Ivan; Encarnação, Thaísa G.; Loiola, Erick C.; Ventura, Ana L. M.; Cossenza, Marcelo; Relvas, João B.; Castro, Newton G.; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine and glutamate are critical neurotransmitters involved in light-induced synaptic activity in the retina. In brain neurons, dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) and the cytosolic protein tyrosine kinase Src can, independently, modulate the behavior of NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs). Here we studied the interplay between D1Rs, Src and NMDARs in retinal neurons. We reveal that dopamine-mediated D1R stimulation provoked NMDAR hypofunction in retinal neurons by attenuating NMDA-gated currents, by preventing NMDA-elicited calcium mobilization and by decreasing the phosphorylation of NMDAR subunit GluN2B. This dopamine effect was dependent on upregulation of the canonical D1R/adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/PKA pathway, of PKA-induced activation of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and of Src inhibition. Accordingly, knocking down Csk or overexpressing a Csk phosphoresistant Src mutant abrogated the dopamine-induced NMDAR hypofunction. Overall, the interplay between dopamine and NMDAR hypofunction, through the D1R/Csk/Src/GluN2B pathway, might impact on light-regulated synaptic activity in retinal neurons. PMID:28098256

  16. High-density lipoprotein inhibits mechanical stress-induced cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy through angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Liu, Xuebo; Xu, Jianfeng; Weng, Liqing; Ren, Jun; Ge, Junbo; Zou, Yunzeng

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical stress triggers cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy through an angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor-dependent mechanism. Low level of high density lipoprotein (HDL) is an independent risk factor for cardiac hypertrophy. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of HDL on mechanical stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy. A 48-hr mechanical stretch and a 4-week transverse aortic constriction were employed to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo, respectively, prior to the assessment of myocardial autophagy using LC3b-II and beclin-1. Our results indicated that HDL significantly reduced mechanical stretch-induced rise in autophagy as demonstrated by LC3b-II and beclin-1. In addition, mechanical stress up-regulated AT1 receptor expression in both cultured cardiomyocytes and in mouse hearts, whereas HDL significantly suppressed the AT1 receptor. Furthermore, the role of Akt phosphorylation in HDL-mediated action was assessed using MK-2206, a selective inhibitor for Akt phosphorylation. Our data further revealed that MK-2206 mitigated HDL-induced beneficial responses on cardiac remodelling and autophagy. Taken together, our data revealed that HDL inhibited mechanical stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy through downregulation of AT1 receptor, and HDL ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy via Akt-dependent mechanism. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  17. Chronic imipramine enhances 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2) receptors-mediated inhibition of panic-like behavior in the rat dorsal periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Cláudia A; Cabral, Alfredo H C L; Almeida, Leandro P; Magierek, Valeska; Ramos, Patrício L; Zanoveli, Janaína M; Landeira-Fernandez, Jesus; Zangrossi, Hélio; Nogueira, Regina L

    2002-07-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG) has been used to induce panic-like behavior in rats. In the present study, we investigated the effect of chronic imipramine treatment on the sensitivity of different 5-HT receptor subtypes in inhibiting aversion induced by electrical stimulation of this brain area. For that, the effects of intra-DPAG administration of the endogenous agonist 5-HT (20 nmol), the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (8 nmol) and the 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor agonist DOI (16 nmol) were measured in female Wistar rats given either chronic injection of imipramine (15 mg/kg, 3 weeks, ip) or saline. The results showed that the three receptor agonists raised the threshold of aversive electrical stimulation in both groups of animals, but this antiaversive effect was significantly higher in rats treated with imipramine. Treatment with imipramine did not change the basal threshold of aversive electrical stimulation measured before intra-DPAG injection of the 5-HT agonists. The results suggest that sensitization of both 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2) receptors within the DPAG may be involved in the beneficial effect of imipramine in panic disorder (PD).

  18. Norepinephrine Controls Effector T Cell Differentiation through β2-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated Inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 in Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Maisa Carla; Araujo, Leandro Pires; Maricato, Juliana Terzi; Nascimento, Vanessa M; Guereschi, Marcia Grando; Rezende, Rafael Machado; Quintana, Francisco J; Basso, Alexandre S

    2016-01-15

    Despite accumulating evidence indicating that neurotransmitters released by the sympathetic nervous system can modulate the activity of innate immune cells, we still know very little about how norepinephrine impacts signaling pathways in dendritic cells (DC) and the consequence of that in DC-driven T cell differentiation. In this article, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) activation in LPS-stimulated DC does not impair their ability to promote T cell proliferation; however, it diminishes IL-12p70 secretion, leading to a shift in the IL-12p70/IL-23 ratio. Although β2AR stimulation in DC induces protein kinase A-dependent cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation, the effect of changing the profile of cytokines produced upon LPS challenge occurs in a protein kinase A-independent manner and, rather, is associated with inhibition of the NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. Moreover, as a consequence of the inverted IL-12p70/IL-23 ratio following β2AR stimulation, LPS-stimulated DC promoted the generation of CD4(+) T cells that, upon TCR engagement, produced lower amounts of IFN-γ and higher levels of IL-17. These findings provide new insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms by which β2AR stimulation in murine DC can influence the generation of adaptive immune responses and may explain some aspects of how sympathetic nervous system activity can modulate immune function.

  19. Peripheral apelin-13 administration inhibits gastrointestinal motor functions in rats: The role of cholecystokinin through CCK1 receptor-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Mehmet; Sinen, Osman; Birsen, İlknur; Nimet İzgüt-Uysal, V

    2017-06-01

    Apelin is the endogenous ligand of the G protein-coupled receptor APJ. The APJ receptor is widely expressed in gastrointestinal (GI) tissues including stomach and small intestine. Apelin administration was shown to induce the release of cholecystokinin (CCK) which is a well-known alimentary hormone with its inhibitory actions on GI motor functions through CCK1 receptors on vagal afferent fibers. We investigated whether; (i) peripherally injected apelin-13 alters GI motor functions, (ii) apelin-induced changes are mediated by APJ receptor or CCK1 receptor and (iii) vagal afferents are involved in inhibitory effects of apelin. Solid gastric emptying (GE) and colon transit (CT) were measured, whereas duodenal phase III-like contractions were recorded in rats administered with apelin-13 (300μg/kg, ip). CCK1 receptor antagonist lorglumide (10mg/kg, ip) or APJ receptor antagonist F13A (300μg/kg, ip) was administered 30min prior to the apelin-13 injections. Vagal afferent denervation was achieved by systemic administration of vanilloid receptor agonist capsaicin (125mg/kg, sc). Apelin-13 administration significantly (p<0.01) increased the CCK level in portal venous plasma samples. Compared with vehicle-treated rats, apelin-13 significantly delayed both GE (p<0.001) and CT (p<0.01). Pretreatment of lorglumide or F13A completely abolished the apelin-13-induced inhibitory effects on GE and CT, moreover, apelin-13 was found ineffective in rats underwent afferent denervation. F13A administration alone significantly accelerated the basal CT. Apelin-13 noticeably disturbed the duodenal fasting motor pattern by impairing phase III-like contractions while increasing the amplitudes of phase II contractions which were prevented by pretreatment of lorglumide and capsaicin. Compared with vehicle-treated rats, lorglumide and capsaicin significantly (p<0.05) reduced the apelin-13-induced increases in phase II motility index. Peripherally administered apelin-13 inhibits GI motor

  20. [Dihydrotestosterone inhibits foam cell formation via a lectin-like ox-low-density lipoprotein receptor mediated mechanism in J774.1 cell line].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Hu, H D; Hu, B Q; Chen, X Y; Xu, P Y; Cui, L; Li, P; Liu, C; Li, L

    2016-11-15

    Objective: To investigate the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on lectin-like ox- low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor(LOX-1)expression and foam cell formation in the female macrophage cell line J774.1. Methods: In cultured J774.1 cells, after pretreated with DHT at concentrations of 1×10(-9) mol/L and 1×10(-8) mol/L, ox-LDL-induced LOX-1 expression and foam cell formation were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and oil-red O staining. Results: DHT at concentrations of 1×10(-9) mol/L and 1×10(-8) mol/L inhibited ox-LDL-induced LOX-1 mRNA (2.81±0.46 and 2.29±0.21 vs 4.71±0.31, both P<0.01) and protein expression (1.35±0.06 and 1.09±0.04 vs 1.75±0.11, both P<0.05). The effect was partly reversed by the androgen receptor (AR) blocker flutamide (87.6%, P=0.004). Oil-red O staining also revealed that DHT at concentrations of 1×10(-9) mol/L and 1×10(-8) mol/L suppressed ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation as quantified by the number of foam cells per high-power field (HPF) (36.0±3.0 and 29.1±1.3 vs 45.9±3.7, both P<0.05) and by the area of oil-red O stained particles per HPF (7 983±1 035 and 4 060±390 vs 14 750±2 489, both P<0.05). Conclusion: DHT at concentrations of 1×10(-9) mol/L and 1×10(-8) mol/L decreases LOX-1 expression and foam cell formation via AR.

  1. Up-regulation of P2X7 receptor-mediated inhibition of GABA uptake by nerve terminals of the human epileptic neocortex.

    PubMed

    Barros-Barbosa, Aurora R; Fonseca, Ana L; Guerra-Gomes, Sónia; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Santos, Agostinho; Rangel, Rui; Lobo, M Graça; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Cordeiro, J Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Thirty percent of patients with epilepsy are refractory to medication. The majority of these patients have mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). This prompts for new pharmacologic targets, like ATP-mediated signaling pathways, since the extracellular levels of the nucleotide dramatically increase during in vitro epileptic seizures. In this study, we investigated whether sodium-dependent high-affinity γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate uptake by isolated nerve terminals of the human neocortex could be modulated by ATP acting via slow-desensitizing P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Modulation of [(3) H]GABA and [(14) C]glutamate uptake by ATP, through activation of P2X7R, was investigated in isolated nerve terminals of the neocortex of cadaveric controls and patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (non-MTLE or MTLE) submitted to surgery. Tissue density and distribution of P2X7R in the human neocortex was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. The P2X7R agonist, 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP (BzATP, 3-100 μm) decreased [(3) H]GABA and [(14) C]glutamate uptake by nerve terminals of the neocortex of controls and patients with epilepsy. The inhibitory effect of BzATP (100 μm) was prevented by the selective P2X7R antagonist, A-438079 (3 μm). Down-modulation of [(14) C]glutamate uptake by BzATP (100 μm) was roughly similar in controls and patients with epilepsy, but the P2X7R agonist inhibited more effectively [(3) H]GABA uptake in the epileptic tissue. Neocortical nerve terminals of patients with epilepsy express higher amounts of the P2X7R protein than control samples. High-frequency cortical activity during epileptic seizures releases huge amounts of ATP, which by acting on low-affinity slowly desensitizing ionotropic P2X7R, leads to down-modulation of neuronal GABA and glutamate uptake. Increased P2X7R expression in neocortical nerve terminals of patients with epilepsy may, under high-frequency firing, endure GABA signaling and

  2. Purine receptor mediated actin cytoskeleton remodeling of human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Nanna; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Langevin, Helene; Nedergaard, Maiken; Takano, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that activation of adenosine A1 receptors on peripheral pain fibers contributes to acupuncture-induced suppression of painful input. In addition to adenosine, acupuncture triggers the release of other purines, including ATP and ADP that may bind to purine receptors on nearby fibroblasts. We here show that purine agonists trigger increase in cytosolic Ca 2+ signaling in a cultured human fibroblasts cell line. The profile of agonist-induced Ca2+ increases indicates that the cells express functional P2yR2 and P2yR4 receptors, as well as P2yR1 and P2xR7 receptors. Unexpectedly, purine-induced Ca2+ signaling was associated with a remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. ATP induced a transient loss in F-actin stress fiber. The changes of actin cytoskeleton occurred slowly and peaked at 10 min after agonist exposure. Inhibition of ATP-induced increases in Ca2+ by cyclopiazonic acid blocked receptor-mediated cytoskeleton remodeling. The Ca2+ ionophore failed to induce cytoskeletal remodeling despite triggering robust increases in cytosolic Ca2+. These observations indicate that purine signaling induces transient changes in fibroblast cytoarchitecture that could be related to the beneficial effects of acupuncture. PMID:23462235

  3. Valerian extract Ze 911 inhibits postsynaptic potentials by activation of adenosine A1 receptors in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Vissiennon, Z; Sichardt, K; Koetter, U; Brattström, A; Nieber, K

    2006-06-01

    In this study we evaluated the adenosine A1 receptor-mediated effect of valerian extract (Ze 911) on postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) in pyramidal cells of the rat cingulate cortex in a slice preparation. We first observed that N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 0.01 - 10 microM), an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, inhibited PSPs in a concentration-dependent manner. The CPA (10 microM)-induced inhibition was antagonized by 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.1 microM), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. Ze 911 concentration dependently (0.1 - 15 mg/mL) inhibited PSPs in the presence of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine (CSC, 0.2 microM) and adenosine deaminase (1 U/mL). The maximal inhibition induced by 10 mg/mL was completely antagonised by DPCPX (0.1 microM), an A1 receptor blocker. The data suggest that activation of adenosine A1 receptors is involved in the pharmacological effects of the valerian extract Ze 911.

  4. Receptor-Mediated Tobacco Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Juan; Chernyavsky, Alexander I.; Marubio, Lisa M.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Jolkovsky, David L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2005-01-01

    Tobacco is a known cause of oral disease but the mechanism remains elusive. Nicotine (Nic) is a likely culprit of pathobiological effects because it displaces the local cytotransmitter acetylcholine from the nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) expressed by oral keratinocytes (KCs). To gain a mechanistic insight into tobacco-induced morbidity in the oral cavity, we studied effects of exposures to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) versus equivalent concentration of pure Nic on human and murine KCs. Both ETS and Nic up-regulated expression of cell cycle and apoptosis regulators, differentiation marker filaggrin, and signal transduction factors at both the mRNA and protein levels. These changes could be abolished in cultured human oral KCs transfected with anti-α3 small interfering RNA or treated with the α3β2-preferring antagonist α-conotoxin MII. Functional inactivation of α3-mediated signaling in α3−/− mutant KCs prevented most of the ETS/Nic-dependent changes in gene expression. To determine relevance of the in vitro findings to the in vivo situation, we studied gene expression in oral mucosa of neonatal α3+/+ and α3−/− littermates delivered by heterozygous mice soon after their exposures to ETS or equivalent concentration of pure Nic in drinking water. In addition to reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, the ETS/Nic-dependent alterations in gene expression were also detected by semiquantitative immunofluorescence assay directly in KCs comprising murine oral mucosa. Only wild-type mice consistently developed significant (P < 0.05) changes in the gene expression. These results identified α3β2 nAChR as a major receptor mediating effects of tobacco products on KC gene expression. Real-time polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that in all three model systems the common genes targeted by α3β2-mediated ETS/Nic toxicity were p21, Bcl-2, NF-κB, and STAT-1. The expression of the nAChR subunits α5 and β2 and the muscarinic

  5. Ion Fluxes through KCa2 (SK) and Cav1 (L-type) Channels Contribute to Chronoselectivity of Adenosine A1 Receptor-Mediated Actions in Spontaneously Beating Rat Atria

    PubMed Central

    Bragança, Bruno; Oliveira-Monteiro, Nádia; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Lima, Pedro A.; Faria, Miguel; Fontes-Sousa, Ana P.; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Impulse generation in supraventricular tissue is inhibited by adenosine and acetylcholine via the activation of A1 and M2 receptors coupled to inwardly rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels, respectively. Unlike M2 receptors, bradycardia produced by A1 receptors activation predominates over negative inotropy. Such difference suggests that other ion currents may contribute to adenosine chronoselectivity. In isolated spontaneously beating rat atria, blockade of KCa2/SK channels with apamin and Cav1 (L-type) channels with nifedipine or verapamil, sensitized atria to the negative inotropic action of the A1 agonist, R-PIA, without affecting the nucleoside negative chronotropy. Patch-clamp experiments in the whole-cell configuration mode demonstrate that adenosine, via A1 receptors, activates the inwardly-rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/KIR3.4 current resulting in hyperpolarization of atrial cardiomyocytes, which may slow down heart rate. Conversely, the nucleoside inactivates a small conductance Ca2+-activated KCa2/SK outward current, which eventually reduces the repolarizing force and thereby prolong action potentials duration and Ca2+ influx into cardiomyocytes. Immunolocalization studies showed that differences in A1 receptors distribution between the sinoatrial node and surrounding cardiomyocytes do not afford a rationale for adenosine chronoselectivity. Immunolabelling of KIR3.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3, and Cav1 was also observed throughout the right atrium. Functional data indicate that while both A1 and M2 receptors favor the opening of GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels modulating atrial chronotropy, A1 receptors may additionally restrain KCa2/SK activation thereby compensating atrial inotropic depression by increasing the time available for Ca2+ influx through Cav1 (L-type) channels. PMID:27014060

  6. Site of action of the general anesthetic propofol in muscarinic M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Murasaki, Osamu; Kaibara, Muneshige; Nagase, Yoshihisa; Mitarai, Sayaka; Doi, Yoshiyuki; Sumikawa, Koji; Taniyama, Kohtaro

    2003-12-01

    Although a potential target site of general anesthetics is primarily the GABA A receptor, a chloride ion channel, a previous study suggested that the intravenous general anesthetic propofol attenuates the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 receptor)-mediated signal transduction. In the present study, we examined the target site of propofol in M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction. Two-electrode voltage-clamp method was used in Xenopus oocytes expressing both M1 receptors and associated G protein alpha subunits (Gqalpha). Propofol inhibited M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 50 nM). Injection of guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPgammaS) into oocytes overexpressing Gqalpha was used to investigate direct effects of propofol on G protein coupled with the M1 receptor. Propofol did not affect activation of Gqalpha-mediated signal transduction with the intracellular injection of GTPgammaS. We also studied effects of propofol on l-[N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride ([3H]NMS) binding and M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction in mammalian cells expressing M1 receptor. Propofol inhibited the M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction but did not inhibit binding of [3H]NMS. Effects of propofol on Gs- and Gi/o-coupled signal transduction were investigated, using oocytes expressing the beta2 adrenoceptor (beta2 receptor)/cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or oocytes expressing the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor)/Kir3.1 (a member of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) channels). Neither beta2 receptor-mediated nor M2 receptor-mediated signal transduction was inhibited by a relatively high concentration of propofol (50 microM). These results indicate that propofol inhibits M1 receptor-mediated signal transduction by selectively disrupting interaction between the receptor and associated G protein.

  7. Receptor-mediated signaling in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Grice, C. M.; Bertuzzi, M.; Bignell, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most pathogenic species among the Aspergilli, and the major fungal agent of human pulmonary infection. To prosper in diverse ecological niches, Aspergilli have evolved numerous mechanisms for adaptive gene regulation, some of which are also crucial for mammalian infection. Among the molecules which govern such responses, integral membrane receptors are thought to be the most amenable to therapeutic modulation. This is due to the localization of these molecular sensors at the periphery of the fungal cell, and to the prevalence of small molecules and licensed drugs which target receptor-mediated signaling in higher eukaryotic cells. In this review we highlight the progress made in characterizing receptor-mediated environmental adaptation in A. fumigatus and its relevance for pathogenicity in mammals. By presenting a first genomic survey of integral membrane proteins in this organism, we highlight an abundance of putative seven transmembrane domain (7TMD) receptors, the majority of which remain uncharacterized. Given the dependency of A. fumigatus upon stress adaptation for colonization and infection of mammalian hosts, and the merits of targeting receptor-mediated signaling as an antifungal strategy, a closer scrutiny of sensory perception and signal transduction in this organism is warranted. PMID:23430083

  8. Receptor-Mediated Transport of Insulin across Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, George L.; Johnson, Sandra M.

    1985-03-01

    Hormones such as insulin are transported from the interior to the exterior of blood vessels. Whether endothelial cells, which line the inner walls of blood vessels have a role in this transport of hormones is not clear, but it is known that endothelial cells can internalize and release insulin rapidly with little degradation. The transport of iodine-125-labeled insulin was measured directly through the use of dual chambers separated by a horizontal monolayer of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. In this setting, endothelial cells took up and released the labeled insulin, thereby transporting it across the cells. The transport of insulin across the endothelial cells was temperature sensitive and was inhibited by unlabeled insulin and by antibody to insulin receptor in proportion to the ability of these substances to inhibit insulin binding to its receptor. More than 80 percent of the transported insulin was intact. These data suggest that insulin is rapidly transported across endothelial cells by a receptor-mediated process.

  9. The 5-HT1-like receptors mediating inhibition of sympathetic vasopressor outflow in the pithed rat: operational correlation with the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, Carlos M; Centurión, David; Rabelo, Gonzalo; de Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R; Sánchez-López, Araceli

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that the inhibition of sympathetically-induced vasopressor responses produced by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in pithed rats is mediated by 5-HT1-like receptors. The present study has re-analysed this suggestion with regard to the classification schemes recently proposed by the NC-IUPHAR subcommittee on 5-HT receptors.Intravenous (i.v.) continuous infusions of 5-HT and the 5-HT1 receptor agonists, 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A), indorenate (5-HT1A), CP 93,129 (5-HT1B) and sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D), resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of sympathetically-induced vasopressor responses.The sympatho-inhibitory responses induced by 5-HT, 8-OH-DPAT, indorenate, CP 93,129 or sumatriptan were analysed before and after i.v. treatment with blocking doses of the putative 5-HT receptor antagonists, WAY 100635 (5-HT1A), cyanopindolol (5-HT1A/1B) or GR 127935 (5-HT1B/1D). Thus, after WAY 100635, the responses to 5-HT and indorenate, but not to 8-OH-DPAT, CP 93,129 and sumatriptan, were blocked. After cyanopindolol, the responses to 5-HT, indorenate and CP 93,129 were abolished, whilst those to 8-OH-DPAT and sumatriptan (except at the lowest frequency of stimulation) remained unaltered. In contrast, after GR 127935, the responses to 5-HT, CP 93,129 and sumatriptan, but not to 8-OH-DPAT and indorenate, were abolished.In additional experiments, the inhibition induced by 5-HT was not modified after 5-HT7 receptor blocking doses of mesulergine.The above results suggest that the 5-HT1-like receptors, which inhibit the sympathetic vasopressor outflow in pithed rats, display the pharmacological profile of the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D, but not that of 5-HT7, receptors. PMID:9692787

  10. Interaction of ApoA-IV with NR4A1 and NR1D1 Represses G6Pase and PEPCK Transcription: Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Downregulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in Mice and a Human Hepatocyte Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Fei; Ji, Yong; DavidsoN, W. Sean; Li, Zongfang; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the nuclear receptor, NR1D1, is a cofactor in ApoA-IV-mediated downregulation of gluconeogenesis. Nuclear receptor, NR4A1, is involved in the transcriptional regulation of various genes involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. We investigated whether NR4A1 influences the effect of ApoA-IV on hepatic glucose metabolism. Our in situ proximity ligation assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that ApoA-IV colocalized with NR4A1 in human liver (HepG2) and kidney (HEK-293) cell lines. The chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase reporter assays indicated that the ApoA-IV and NR4A1 colocalized at the RORα response element of the human G6Pase promoter, reducing its transcriptional activity. Our RNA interference experiments showed that knocking down the expression of NR4A1 in primary mouse hepatocytes treated with ApoA-IV increased the expression of NR1D1, G6Pase, and PEPCK, and that knocking down NR1D1 expression increased the level of NR4A1. We also found that ApoA-IV induced the expression of endogenous NR4A1 in both cultured primary mouse hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and decreased glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Our findings showed that ApoA-IV colocalizes with NR4A1, which suppresses G6Pase and PEPCK gene expression at the transcriptional level, reducing hepatic glucose output and lowering blood glucose. The ApoA-IV-induced increase in NR4A1 expression in hepatocytes mediates further repression of gluconeogenesis. Our findings suggest that NR1D1 and NR4A1 serve similar or complementary functions in the ApoA-IV-mediated regulation of gluconeogenesis. PMID:26556724

  11. Interaction of ApoA-IV with NR4A1 and NR1D1 Represses G6Pase and PEPCK Transcription: Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Downregulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in Mice and a Human Hepatocyte Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Fei; Ji, Yong; DavidsoN, W Sean; Li, Zongfang; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the nuclear receptor, NR1D1, is a cofactor in ApoA-IV-mediated downregulation of gluconeogenesis. Nuclear receptor, NR4A1, is involved in the transcriptional regulation of various genes involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. We investigated whether NR4A1 influences the effect of ApoA-IV on hepatic glucose metabolism. Our in situ proximity ligation assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that ApoA-IV colocalized with NR4A1 in human liver (HepG2) and kidney (HEK-293) cell lines. The chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase reporter assays indicated that the ApoA-IV and NR4A1 colocalized at the RORα response element of the human G6Pase promoter, reducing its transcriptional activity. Our RNA interference experiments showed that knocking down the expression of NR4A1 in primary mouse hepatocytes treated with ApoA-IV increased the expression of NR1D1, G6Pase, and PEPCK, and that knocking down NR1D1 expression increased the level of NR4A1. We also found that ApoA-IV induced the expression of endogenous NR4A1 in both cultured primary mouse hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and decreased glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Our findings showed that ApoA-IV colocalizes with NR4A1, which suppresses G6Pase and PEPCK gene expression at the transcriptional level, reducing hepatic glucose output and lowering blood glucose. The ApoA-IV-induced increase in NR4A1 expression in hepatocytes mediates further repression of gluconeogenesis. Our findings suggest that NR1D1 and NR4A1 serve similar or complementary functions in the ApoA-IV-mediated regulation of gluconeogenesis.

  12. 5-HT 1A/1B receptor-mediated effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram, on sleep: studies in 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 1B knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Monaca, Christelle; Boutrel, Benjamin; Hen, René; Hamon, Michel; Adrien, Joëlle

    2003-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are extensively used for the treatment of depression. Aside from their antidepressant properties, they provoke a deficit in paradoxical sleep (PS) that is most probably mediated by the transporter blockade-induced increase in serotonin concentration in the extracellular space. Such an effect can be accounted for by the action of serotonin at various types of serotonergic receptors involved in PS regulation, among which the 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) types are the best candidates. According to this hypothesis, we examined the effects of citalopram, the most selective SSRI available to date, on sleep in the mouse after inactivation of 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(1B) receptors, either by homologous recombination of their encoding genes, or pharmacological blockade with selective antagonists. For this purpose, sleep parameters of knockout mice that do not express these receptors and their wild-type counterparts were monitored during 8 h after injection of citalopram alone or in association with 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonists. Citalopram induced mainly a dose-dependent inhibition of PS during 2-6 h after injection, which was observed in wild-type and 5-HT(1B)-/- mice, but not in 5-HT(1A)-/- mutants. This PS inhibition was fully antagonized by pretreatment with the 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY 100635, but only partially with the 5-HT(1B) antagonist GR 127935. These data indicate that the action of the SSRI citalopram on sleep in the mouse is essentially mediated by 5-HT(1A) receptors. Such a mechanism of action provides further support to the clinical strategy of antidepressant augmentation by 5-HT(1A) antagonists, because the latter would also counteract the direct sleep-inhibitory side-effects of SSRIs.

  13. Caffeine Inhibits the Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Acetaldehyde via Adenosine A2A Receptor Mediated by the cAMP/PKA/SRC/ERK1/2/P38 MAPK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanzhi; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis. Evidence suggests that adenosine aggravates liver fibrosis via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). Caffeine, which is being widely consumed during daily life, inhibits the action of adenosine. In this study, we attempted to validate the hypothesis that caffeine influences acetaldehyde-induced HSC activation by acting on A2AR. Acetaldehyde at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM significantly increased HSC-T6 cells proliferation, and cell proliferation reached a maximum at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. Caffeine and the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased the cell viability and inhibited the expression of procollagen type I and type III in acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells. In addition, the inhibitory effect of caffeine on the expression of procollagen type I was regulated by A2AR-mediated signal pathway involving cAMP, PKA, SRC, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, caffeine’s inhibitory effect on the expression of procollagen type III may depend upon the A2AR-mediated P38 MAPK-dependent pathway. Conclusions: Caffeine significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells activation by distinct A2AR mediated signal pathway via inhibition of cAMP-PKA-SRC-ERK1/2 for procollagen type I and via P38 MAPK for procollagen type III. PMID:24682220

  14. P2X7 Receptor-mediated Scavenger Activity of Mononuclear Phagocytes toward Non-opsonized Particles and Apoptotic Cells Is Inhibited by Serum Glycoproteins but Remains Active in Cerebrospinal Fluid*

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ben J.; Duce, James A.; Valova, Valentina A.; Wong, Bruce; Bush, Ashley I.; Petrou, Steven; Wiley, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid phagocytosis of non-opsonized particles including apoptotic cells is an important process that involves direct recognition of the target by multiple scavenger receptors including P2X7 on the phagocyte surface. Using a real-time phagocytosis assay, we studied the effect of serum proteins on this phagocytic process. Inclusion of 1–5% serum completely abolished phagocytosis of non-opsonized YG beads by human monocytes. Inhibition was reversed by pretreatment of serum with 1–10 mm tetraethylenepentamine, a copper/zinc chelator. Inhibitory proteins from the serum were determined as negatively charged glycoproteins (pI < 6) with molecular masses between 100 and 300 kDa. A glycoprotein-rich inhibitory fraction of serum not only abolished YG bead uptake but also inhibited phagocytosis of apoptotic lymphocytes or neuronal cells by human monocyte-derived macrophages. Three copper- and/or zinc-containing serum glycoproteins, ceruloplasmin, serum amyloid P-component, and amyloid precursor protein, were identified, and the purified proteins were shown to inhibit the phagocytosis of beads by monocytes as well as phagocytosis of apoptotic neuronal cells by macrophages. Human adult cerebrospinal fluid, which contains very little glycoprotein, had no inhibitory effect on phagocytosis of either beads or apoptotic cells. These data suggest for the first time that metal-interacting glycoproteins present within serum are able to inhibit the scavenger activity of mononuclear phagocytes toward insoluble debris and apoptotic cells. PMID:22461619

  15. SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE RECEPTORS MEDIATE NEUROMODULATORY FUNCTIONS IN THE CNS

    PubMed Central

    Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Goforth, Paulette B.; Mba, Mba U.; Macdonald, Timothy L.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Satin, Leslie S.; Welch, Sandra P.; Selley, Dana E.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate is a ubiquitous, lipophilic cellular mediator that acts in part by activation of G-protein-coupled receptors. Modulation of S1P signaling is an emerging pharmacotherapeutic target for immunomodulatory drugs. Although multiple S1P receptor types exist in the CNS, little is known about their function. Here we report that S1P stimulated G- protein activity in the CNS, and results from [35S]GTPγS autoradiography using the S1P1-selective agonist SEW2871 and the S1P1/3-selective antagonist VPC44116 show that in several regions a majority of this activity is mediated by S1P1 receptors. S1P receptor activation inhibited glutamatergic neurotransmission as determined by electrophysiological recordings in cortical neurons in vitro, and this effect was mimicked by SEW2871 and inhibited by VPC44116. Moreover, central administration of S1P produced in vivo effects resembling the actions of cannabinoids, including thermal antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy and hypolocomotion, but these actions were independent of CB1 receptors. At least one of the central effects of S1P, thermal antinociception, is also at least partly S1P1 receptor mediated because it was produced by SEW2871 and attenuated by VPC44116. These results indicate that CNS S1P receptors are part of a physiologically relevant and widespread neuromodulatory system, and that the S1P1 receptor contributes to S1P-mediated antinociception. PMID:19493165

  16. Mechanics of receptor-mediated endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huajian; Shi, Wendong; Freund, Lambert B.

    2005-07-01

    Most viruses and bioparticles endocytosed by cells have characteristic sizes in the range of tens to hundreds of nanometers. The process of viruses entering and leaving animal cells is mediated by the binding interaction between ligand molecules on the viral capid and their receptor molecules on the cell membrane. How does the size of a bioparticle affect receptor-mediated endocytosis? Here, we study how a cell membrane containing diffusive mobile receptors wraps around a ligand-coated cylindrical or spherical particle. It is shown that particles in the size range of tens to hundreds of nanometers can enter or exit cells via wrapping even in the absence of clathrin or caveolin coats, and an optimal particles size exists for the smallest wrapping time. This model can also be extended to include the effect of clathrin coat. The results seem to show broad agreement with experimental observations. Author contributions: H.G. and L.B.F. designed research; H.G., W.S., and L.B.F. performed research; and H.G., W.S., and L.B.F. wrote the paper.Abbreviations: CNT, carbon nanotube; SWNT, single-walled nanotube.

  17. Receptor-mediated signaling at plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) generate continuity between plant cells via the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membrane (PM), allowing movement of different classes of molecules between cells. Proteomic data indicates that the PD PM hosts many receptors and receptor kinases, as well as lipid raft and tetraspanin enriched microdomain associated proteins, suggesting the hypothesis that the PD PM is specialized with respect to both composition and function. PD-located receptor proteins and receptor kinases are responsible for perception of microbe associated molecular patterns at PD and initiate signaling that mediates changes to PD flux. In addition, developmentally relevant receptor kinases have different interactions dependent upon whether located at the PD PM or the cellular PM. The implications of these findings are that receptor-mediated signaling in PD membranes differs from that in the cellular PM and, in light the identification of PD-located proteins associated with membrane microdomains and the role of membrane microdomains in analogous signaling processes in animals, suggests that the PD PM contains specialized signaling platforms.

  18. Long-term administration of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol desensitizes CB1-, adenosine A1-, and GABAB-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Selley, Dana E; Cassidy, Michael P; Martin, Billy R; Sim-Selley, Laura J

    2004-11-01

    Cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in the cerebellum mediate the inhibitory effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on motor coordination. Intracellular effects of CB(1) receptors include inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via activation of G(i/o) proteins. There is evidence for the convergence of other neuronal receptors, such as adenosine A(1) and GABA(B), with the cannabinoid system on this signaling pathway to influence motor function. Previous studies have shown that brain CB(1) receptors are desensitized and down-regulated by long-term THC treatment, but few studies have examined the effects of long-term THC treatment on downstream effector activity in brain. Therefore, these studies examined the relationship between CB(1), adenosine A(1), and GABA(B) receptors in cerebella of mice undergoing prolonged treatment with vehicle or THC at the level of G protein activation and adenylyl cyclase inhibition. In control cerebella, CB(1) receptors produced less than additive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase with GABA(B) and A(1) receptors, indicating that these receptors are localized on overlapping populations of cells. Long-term THC treatment produced CB(1) receptor down-regulation and desensitization of both cannabinoid agonist-stimulated G protein activation and inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase. However, G protein activation by GABA(B) or A(1) receptors was unaffected. It is noteworthy that heterologous attenuation of GABA(B) and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase was observed, even though absolute levels of basal and forskolin- or G(s)-stimulated activity were unchanged. These results indicate that long-term THC administration produces a disruption of inhibitory receptor control of cerebellar adenylyl cyclase and suggest a potential mechanism of cross-tolerance to the motor incoordinating effects of cannabinoid, GABA(B), and A(1) agonists.

  19. Induction of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated and estrogen receptor-mediated activities, and modulation of cell proliferation by dinaphthofurans.

    PubMed

    Vondrácek, Jan; Chramostová, Katerina; Plísková, Martina; Bláha, Ludek; Brack, Werner; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2004-09-01

    A group of heterocyclic aromatic compounds, dinaphthofurans (DNFs), recently have been identified as potentially significant contaminants in freshwater sediments. In the present study, a battery of in vitro assays was used for detection of toxic effects of DNFs that are potentially associated with endocrine disruption and tumor promotion. Dinaphthofurans were found to act as relatively potent inducers of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity in the chemical-activated luciferase reporter gene expression DR-CALUX assay. The relative AhR-inducing potencies of DNFs were similar or even higher than relative potencies of unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with dinaphtho[1,2-b;2'3'-d]furan being the most potent AhR agonist. Two compounds, dinaphtho[2,1-b;2'3'-d]furan and dinaphtho[1,2-b;1'2'-d]furan, induced estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated activity in the estrogen receptor-mediated CALUX (the ER-CALUX) assay. Two types of potential tumor-promoting effects of DNFs were investigated, using in vitro bioassays for detection of inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication and detection of a release from contact inhibition. Although the acute inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication was not observed, all six tested DNFs were able to release rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells from contact inhibition at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In summary, the present study indicated that DNFs can exert multiple biological effects in vitro, including induction of the AhR-mediated activity, release of cells from contact inhibition, and induction of ER-mediated activity.

  20. Biologically bounded risk assessment for receptor-mediated nongenotoxic carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Gastel, J A; Sutter, T R

    1995-12-01

    We have developed a biologically bounded marginal effect model for use in risk assessment of human exposure to receptor-mediated nongenotoxic carcinogens. Schematically this model can be reduced to four components: CI, the absence of an observable biological response; CII, observable biochemical responses but no observable pathology; CIII, observable pathology; and CIV, both observable pathology and lethality. The inflection point in the marginal response curve between CI and CII is defined as the biologically evaluated scientifically tested no observable effect level (BESTNOEL). We demonstrate the utility of this approach by applying it to the well-studied nongenotoxic carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Using a well-developed mechanistic understanding of the initial interactions of TCDD with the cell, we justify the selection of the minimal effective dose for CYP1A1 mRNA induction as the BESTNOEL. With allowance for variation in human sensitivity to TCDD, the BESTNOEL is assigned a human liver tissue burden of approximately 0.25-25 ppt and an allowable daily intake level in the range of 15-1500 fg/kg/day. In the future, the BESTNOEL can help establish a lower boundary for acceptable extrapolation when using either statistical or biologically based attributable risk models.

  1. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Ying; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS). The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  2. Investigations of receptor-mediated phagocytosis by hormone-induced (imprinted) Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Sundermann, C A; Csaba, G

    1996-08-15

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis by Tetrahvmena pyriformis was studied using tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled concanavalin A (TRITC-Con A) with fluorescence and confocal microscopy. In the presence of insulin, or 24 h after insulin pretreatment (hormonal imprinting), the binding and uptake of TRITC-Con A increased when compared to controls, owing to the binding of TRITC-Con A to sugar oligomers of insulin receptors. Mannose inhibited the binding of Con A, thus demonstrating the specificity of binding. Histamine, a phagocytosis-promoting factor in mammals and Tetrahymena, and galactose, did not influence the uptake of TRITC-Con A.

  3. Functional evaluation of the receptors mediating vasoconstriction of rat aorta by trace amines and amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Broadley, Kenneth J; Fehler, Martina; Ford, William R; Kidd, Emma J

    2013-09-05

    Trace amines including β-phenylethylamine (β-PEA) and amphetamines classically exert pharmacological actions via indirect sympathomimetic mechanisms. However, there is evidence for other mechanisms and this study explores the receptors mediating vasoconstriction in rat aorta. β-PEA, d-amphetamine, MDMA, cathinone and methylphenidate caused concentration-dependent contractions of rat isolated aortic rings which were unaffected by prazosin (1 μM), ICI-118,551 (1 μM), cocaine (10 μM) and pargyline (10 μM), to inhibit α1- and β2-adrenoceptors, neuronal transport and monoamine oxidase (MAO), respectively. Octopamine concentration-response curves, however, were shifted to the right. In the presence of the inhibitors, the rate of onset of octopamine contractions was slowed. Lineweaver-Burk analysis of the kinetics of the response generated different KM values for octopamine in the absence (2.35 × 10(-6)M) and presence (6.09 × 10(-5)M) of inhibitors, indicating mediation by different receptors. Tryptamine-induced vasoconstriction also resisted blockade by adrenergic inhibitors and the 5-HT1A, 1B, 1D and 5-HT2A receptor antagonists, methiothepin (50 nM) and ketanserin (30 nM), respectively. Trace amines and amphetamines therefore exert vasoconstriction independently of adrenoceptors, neuronal transport and 5-HT receptor activation. There was no evidence of tachyphylaxis or cross-tachyphylaxis of the vasoconstriction to these amines. Tyramine was a partial agonist and in its presence, β-PEA, d-amphetamine and octopamine were antagonised indicating that they all act through a common receptor for which tyramine serves as an antagonist. We conclude that the vasoconstriction is via TAAR-1, because of structural similarities between amines, ability to stimulate recombinant trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR-1) and the presence of TAAR-1 in rat aorta. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Adenosine A2B-receptor-mediated cyclic AMP accumulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on the accumulation of cyclic AMP have been investigated in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. 2. Adenosine A2-receptor stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP in cells prelabelled with [3H]-adenine. The rank order of agonist potencies was 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; EC50 = 1 microM) > adenosine (EC50 = 5 microM) > 2-chloroadenosine (EC50 = 20 microM) >> CGS 21680 (EC50 > 10 microM). The presence of 0.5 microM dipyridamole, an adenosine uptake blocker, had no effect on the potency of adenosine. 3. The response to 10 microM NECA was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonists, xanthine amine congener (apparent KD = 12 nM), PD 115,199 (apparent KD = 134 nM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (apparent KD = 126 nM). However, the A1-receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, had no significant effect on the responses to NECA or 2-chloroadenosine at concentrations up to 1 microM. 4. Stimulation of A1-receptors with the selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine, did not alter the basal accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP but inhibited a forskolin-mediated elevation of [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation by a maximal value of 42%. This inhibition was fully reversed in the presence of 0.1 microM, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. 5. The time course for NECA-mediated [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation was investigated. The results suggest that there is a substantial efflux of cyclic AMP from the cells in addition to the rapid and sustained elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (5 fold over basal) which was also observed. 6. These data indicate that rat astrocytes in primary culture express an A2B-adenosine receptor coupled positively to adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, the presence of A1-receptors negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase appears to have no significant effect on the A2B-receptor-mediated

  5. 5-HT1-like receptor-mediated contraction in the human internal mammary artery.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, O; Ciçek, S; Ay, I; Tatar, H; Tuncer, M

    1996-07-01

    We wished to characterize the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors mediating vasoconstriction in the human internal mammary artery (IMA). Segments of the IMA obtained from patients undergoing coronary by-pass surgery were suspended in an organ bath and exposed to 5-HT and sumatriptan (SUM), a 5-HT1-like receptor agonist, in the presence and absence of potassium chloride (KCl) and angiotensin II. 5-HT induced concentration-dependent contractions in all quiescent and pre-contracted preparations. SUM induced small contractions in 70% of quiescent IMA rings, whereas it elicited marked and concentration-dependent contractions in all of the preparations given a moderate tone by a threshold concentration of KCl and angiotensin II. The efficacy of SUM was higher in precontracted arteries. Concentration-effect curves (CEC) of 5-HT and SUM were not affected by the 5-HT3-receptor antagonist tropisetron (1 microM). The nonselective antagonist, methiothepin (30 nM), shifted the CEC of SUM to the right. 5-HT2A-receptor antagonist, ketanserin (1 microM) inhibited responses to 5-HT, whereas it affected only the responses to the smaller concentrations of SUM. When methiothepin (30 nM) was applied in the presence of ketanserin (1 microM), a further inhibition in the responses to 5-HT was observed. These results suggest that 5-HT1-like receptors mediate the contractile action of SUM and contribute to that of 5-HT in IMA.

  6. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  7. The miR-199-dynamin regulatory axis controls receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan F; Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Goedeke, Leigh; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression that modulate many physiological processes; however, their role in regulating intracellular transport remains largely unknown. Intriguingly, we found that the dynamin (DNM) genes, a GTPase family of proteins responsible for endocytosis in eukaryotic cells, encode the conserved miR-199a and miR-199b family of miRNAs within their intronic sequences. Here, we demonstrate that miR-199a and miR-199b regulate endocytic transport by controlling the expression of important mediators of endocytosis such as clathrin heavy chain (CLTC), Rab5A, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). Importantly, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p overexpression markedly inhibits CLTC, Rab5A, LDLR and Cav-1 expression, thus preventing receptor-mediated endocytosis in human cell lines (Huh7 and HeLa). Of note, miR-199a-5p inhibition increases target gene expression and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Taken together, our work identifies a new mechanism by which microRNAs regulate intracellular trafficking. In particular, we demonstrate that the DNM, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p genes act as a bifunctional locus that regulates endocytosis, thus adding an unexpected layer of complexity in the regulation of intracellular trafficking.

  8. Comparative analyses of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Ishii, Shoichi; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Katoh, Kazutaka

    2015-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator that activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to exert fundamental cellular functions. Six LPA receptor genes have been identified in vertebrates and are classified into two subfamilies, the endothelial differentiation genes (edg) and the non-edg family. Studies using genetically engineered mice, frogs, and zebrafish have demonstrated that LPA receptor-mediated signaling has biological, developmental, and pathophysiological functions. Computational analyses have also identified several amino acids (aa) critical for LPA recognition by human LPA receptors. This review focuses on the evolutionary aspects of LPA receptor-mediated signaling by comparing the aa sequences of vertebrate LPA receptors and LPA-producing enzymes; it also summarizes the LPA receptor-dependent effects commonly observed in mouse, frog, and fish.

  9. Receptor-mediated Endocytosis in the Caenorhabditis elegans Oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Barth; Hirsh, David

    1999-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte is a highly amenable system for forward and reverse genetic analysis of receptor-mediated endocytosis. We describe the use of transgenic strains expressing a vitellogenin::green fluorescent protein (YP170::GFP) fusion to monitor yolk endocytosis by the C. elegans oocyte in vivo. This YP170::GFP reporter was used to assay the functions of C. elegans predicted proteins homologous to vertebrate endocytosis factors using RNA-mediated interference. We show that the basic components and pathways of endocytic trafficking are conserved between C. elegans and vertebrates, and that this system can be used to test the endocytic functions of any new gene. We also used the YP170::GFP assay to identify rme (receptor-mediated endocytosis) mutants. We describe a new member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor superfamily, RME-2, identified in our screens for endocytosis defective mutants. We show that RME-2 is the C. elegans yolk receptor. PMID:10588660

  10. Receptors mediating toxicity and their involvement in endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Rüegg, Joëlle; Penttinen-Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Mäkelä, Sari; Pongratz, Ingemar; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2009-01-01

    Many toxic compounds exert their harmful effects by activating of certain receptors, which in turn leads to dysregulation of transcription. Some of these receptors are so called xenosensors. They are activated by external chemicals and evoke a cascade of events that lead to the elimination of the chemical from the system. Other receptors that are modulated by toxic substances are hormone receptors, particularly the ones of the nuclear receptor family. Some environmental chemicals resemble endogenous hormones and can falsely activate these receptors, leading to undesired activity in the cell. Furthermore, excessive activation of the xenosensors can lead to disturbances of the integrity of the system as well. In this chapter, the concepts of receptor-mediated toxicity and hormone disruption are introduced. We start by describing environmental chemicals that can bind to xenosensors and nuclear hormone receptors. We then describe the receptors most commonly targeted by environmental chemicals. Finally, the mechanisms by which receptor-mediated events can disrupt the system are depicted.

  11. Multiscale Modeling of Virus Entry via Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Virus infections are ubiquitous and remain major threats to human health worldwide. Viruses are intracellular parasites and must enter host cells to initiate infection. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the most common entry pathway taken by viruses, the whole process is highly complex and dictated by various events, such as virus motions, membrane deformations, receptor diffusion and ligand-receptor reactions, occurring at multiple length and time scales. We develop a multiscale model for virus entry through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The binding of virus to cell surface is based on a mesoscale three dimensional stochastic adhesion model, the internalization (endocytosis) of virus and cellular membrane deformation is based on the discretization of Helfrich Hamiltonian in a curvilinear space using Monte Carlo method. The multiscale model is based on the combination of these two models. We will implement this model to study the herpes simplex virus entry into B78 cells and compare the model predictions with experimental measurements.

  12. A1 adenosine receptors inhibit chloride transport in the shark rectal gland. Dissociation of inhibition and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, G G; Poeschla, E M; Barron, H V; Forrest, J N

    1990-01-01

    In the in vitro perfused rectal gland of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias), the adenosine analogue 2-chloroadenosine (2Clado) completely and reversibly inhibited forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion with an IC50 of 5 nM. Other A1 receptor agonists including cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine (NECA) and R-phenylisopropyl-adenosine (R-PIA) also completely inhibited forskolin stimulated chloride secretion. The "S" stereoisomer of PIA (S-PIA) was a less potent inhibitor of forskolin stimulated chloride secretion, consistent with the affinity profile of PIA stereoisomers for an A1 receptor. The adenosine receptor antagonists 8-phenyltheophylline and 8-cyclopentyltheophylline completely blocked the effect of 2Clado to inhibit forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion. When chloride secretion and tissue cyclic (c)AMP content were determined simultaneously in perfused glands, 2Clado completely inhibited secretion but only inhibited forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation by 34-40%, indicating that the mechanism of inhibition of secretion by 2Clado is at least partially cAMP independent. Consistent with these results, A1 receptor agonists only modestly inhibited (9-15%) forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and 2Clado markedly inhibited chloride secretion stimulated by a permeant cAMP analogue, 8-chlorophenylthio cAMP (8CPT cAMP). These findings provide the first evidence for a high affinity A1 adenosine receptor that inhibits hormone stimulated ion transport in a model epithelia. A major portion of this inhibition occurs by a mechanism that is independent of the cAMP messenger system. PMID:1970583

  13. Folate receptor mediated intracellular protein delivery using PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate.

    PubMed

    Hwa Kim, Sun; Hoon Jeong, Ji; Joe, Cheol O; Gwan Park, Tae

    2005-04-18

    To develop a receptor-mediated intracellular delivery system that can transport therapeutic proteins or other bioactive macromolecules into a specific cell, a di-block copolymer conjugate, poly(L-lysine)-poly(ethylene glycol)-folate (PLL-PEG-FOL), was synthesized. The PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate was physically complexed with fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) in an aqueous phase by ionic interactions. Cellular uptake of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes was greatly enhanced against a folate receptor over-expressing cell line (KB cells) compared to a folate receptor deficient cell line (A549 cells). The presence of an excess amount of free folate (1 mM) in the medium inhibited the intracellular delivery of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes. This suggests that the enhanced cellular uptake of FITC-BSA by KB cells in a specific manner was attributed to folate receptor-mediated endocytosis of the complexes having folate moieties on the surface. The PLL-PEG-FOL di-block copolymer could be potentially applied for intracellular delivery of a wide range of other biological active agents that have negative charges on the surface.

  14. Neuregulin-1-beta1 enters brain and spinal cord by receptor-mediated transport.

    PubMed

    Kastin, Abba J; Akerstrom, Victoria; Pan, Weihong

    2004-02-01

    Proteins of the neuregulin (NRG) family play important regulatory roles in neuronal survival and synaptic activity. NRG-1-beta1 has particular potential as a therapeutic agent because it enhances myelination of neurites in spinal cord explants. In this study, we determined the permeation of NRG-1-beta1 across the blood-brain and blood-spinal cord barriers (BBB and BSCB respectively). Intact radioactively labeled NRG-1-beta1 had a saturable and relatively rapid influx rate from blood to the CNS in mice. Capillary depletion studies showed that NRG-1-beta1 entered the parenchyma of the brain and spinal cord rather than being trapped in the capillaries that compose the BBB. The possible mechanism of receptor-mediated transport was shown by the ability of antibodies to erbB3 and erbB4 receptors to inhibit the influx. Lipophilicity, less important for such saturable transport mechanisms, was measured by the octanol : buffer partition coefficient and found to be low. The results indicate that NRG-1-beta1 enters spinal cord and brain by a saturable receptor-mediated mechanism, which provides the opportunity for possible therapeutic manipulation at the BBB level.

  15. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by adenosine receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R A; Davies, C H

    1997-01-01

    '-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680; 0.5-1.0 microM) did not significantly affect the EPSPm. 4. The selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 0.2 microM) fully reversed the depressant effects of both adenosine (100 microM) and CADO (1 microM) on the EPSPm and the stimulus-evoked reductions in spike frequency adaptation. 5. DPCPX (0.2 microM) alone caused a small but variable mean increase in the EPSPm of 22 +/- 19% and enabled activation of an EPSPm by a previously subthreshold stimulus. In contrast, the selective adenosine kinase inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-IT; 10 microM) inhibited the EPSPm by 74 +/- 10%, an effect that was reversed by DPCPX. 6. The concentration-response relationship for the depressant action of CADO on the EPSPm more closely paralleled that for its presynaptic depressant action on glutamate-mediated EPSPs than that for postsynaptic hyperpolarization. The respective mean IC50 and EC50 concentrations for these effects were 0.3, 0.8 and 3.0 microM. 7. CADO (1-5 microM) did not have a significant effect on the postsynaptic depolarization, increase in input resistance and reduction in spike frequency adaptation evoked by carbachol (0.5-3.0 microM). All these effects were abolished by atropine (1 microM). 8. These data provide good evidence for an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of mAChR-mediated synaptic responses in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones. This inhibition is mediated predominantly presynaptically, is active tonically and can be enhanced when extracellular levels of endogenous adenosine are raised. PMID:9234198

  16. Inhibition of purified lysosomal phospholipase A1 by beta-adrenoceptor blockers.

    PubMed

    Pappu, A S; Yazaki, P J; Hostetler, K Y

    1985-02-15

    Inhibition of rat liver lysosomal phospholipases is one of the main events that leads to accumulation of tissue phospholipids during drug-induced phospholipidosis. Drug inhibition of lysosomal phospholipase A may occur by direct effects of drugs on the enzyme (or substrate) or by drug-induced increases in intralysosomal pH. Although beta-adrenoceptor blockers have not been reported to cause lipid storage, they do inhibit lysosomal phospholipase A. To investigate the structural requirements for drug inhibition, we studied the effects of six beta-adrenoceptor blockers on purified rat liver lysosomal phospholipase A1. The agents studied include: propranolol, timolol, metoprolol, practolol, atenolol and the combined alpha and beta adrenoceptor blocking agent, labetalol. The drugs varied by two logs in their abilities to inhibit phospholipase A1 activity. The relative inhibitory potencies were propranolol greater than labetalol much greater than timolol greater than metoprolol much greater than practolol greater than atenolol. Our studies identify drug hydrophobicity as a key determinant for phospholipase A1 inhibition. A strong negative correlation was noted between the octanol/water partition coefficients and IC50 for phospholipase inhibition (r = -0.91). The ability of propranolol to inhibit phospholipase A1 was identical for the d, l and the d and l stereoisomers.

  17. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion.

  18. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  19. Acute calcineurin inhibition with tacrolimus increases phosphorylated UT-A1.

    PubMed

    Ilori, Titilayo O; Wang, Yanhua; Blount, Mitsi A; Martin, Christopher F; Sands, Jeff M; Klein, Janet D

    2012-04-15

    UT-A1, the urea transporter present in the apical membrane of the inner medullary collecting duct, is crucial to the kidney's ability to concentrate urine. Phosphorylation of UT-A1 on serines 486 and 499 is important for plasma membrane trafficking. The effect of calcineurin on dephosphorylation of UT-A1 was investigated. Inner medullary collecting ducts from Sprague-Dawley rats were metabolically labeled and treated with tacrolimus to inhibit calcineurin or calyculin to inhibit protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. UT-A1 was immunoprecipitated, electrophoresed, blotted, and total UT-A1 phosphorylation was assessed by autoradiography. Total UT-A1 was determined by Western blotting. A phospho-specific antibody to pser486-UT-A1 was used to determine whether serine 486 can be hyperphosphorylated by inhibiting phosphatases. Inhibition of calcineurin showed an increase in phosphorylation per unit protein at serine 486. In contrast, inhibition of phosphatases 1 and 2A resulted in an increase in UT-A1 phosphorylation but no increase in pser486-UT-A1. In vitro perfusion of inner medullary collecting ducts showed tacrolimus-stimulated urea permeability consistent with stimulated urea transport. The location of phosphorylated UT-A1 in rats treated acutely and chronically with tacrolimus was determined using immunohistochemistry. Inner medullary collecting ducts of the acutely treated rats showed increased apical membrane association of phosphorylated UT-A1 while chronic treatment reduced membrane association of phosphorylated UT-A1. We conclude that UT-A1 may be dephosphorylated by multiple phosphatases and that the PKA-phosphorylated serine 486 is dephosphorylated by calcineurin. This is the first documentation of the role of phosphatases and the specific site of phosphorylation of UT-A1, in response to tacrolimus.

  20. Extracellular acidosis impairs P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling and migration of microglia.

    PubMed

    Langfelder, Antonia; Okonji, Emeka; Deca, Diana; Wei, Wei-Chun; Glitsch, Maike D

    2015-04-01

    Microglia are the resident macrophage and immune cell of the brain and are critically involved in combating disease and assaults on the brain. Virtually all brain pathologies are accompanied by acidosis of the interstitial fluid, meaning that microglia are exposed to an acidic environment. However, little is known about how extracellular acidosis impacts on microglial function. The activity of microglia is tightly controlled by 'on' and 'off' signals, the presence or absence of which results in generation of distinct phenotypes in microglia. Activation of G protein coupled purinergic (P2Y) receptors triggers a number of distinct behaviours in microglia, including activation, migration, and phagocytosis. Using pharmacological tools and fluorescence imaging of the murine cerebellar microglia cell line C8B4, we show that extracellular acidosis interferes with P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling in these cells. Distinct P2Y receptors give rise to signature intracellular Ca(2+) signals, and Ca(2+) release from stores and Ca(2+) influx are differentially affected by acidotic conditions: Ca(2+) release is virtually unaffected, whereas Ca(2+) influx, mediated at least in part by store-operated Ca(2+) channels, is profoundly inhibited. Furthermore, P2Y1 and P2Y6-mediated stimulation of migration is inhibited under conditions of extracellular acidosis, whereas basal migration independent of P2Y receptor activation is not. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an acidic microenvironment impacts on P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling, thereby influencing microglial responses and responsiveness to extracellular signals. This may result in altered behaviour of microglia under pathological conditions compared with microglial responses in healthy tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities, and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of subthreshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOPs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR; the CAR/PXR, and the PPARa. This paper describes the workshop process, key issues discussed, and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the

  2. Stronger Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Farré, Daniel; Muñoz, Ana; Moreno, Estefanía; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Canet-Pons, Júlia; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Rico, Alberto J; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Navarro, Gemma; Canela, Enric I; Cortés, Antonio; Labandeira-García, José L; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José L; Franco, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Radioligand binding assays to rat striatal dopamine D1 receptors showed that brain lateralization of the dopaminergic system were not due to changes in expression but in agonist affinity. D1 receptor-mediated striatal imbalance resulted from a significantly higher agonist affinity in the left striatum. D1 receptors heteromerize with dopamine D3 receptors, which are considered therapeutic targets for dyskinesia in parkinsonian patients. Expression of both D3 and D1-D3 receptor heteromers were increased in samples from 6-hydroxy-dopamine-hemilesioned rats rendered dyskinetic by treatment with 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA). Similar findings were obtained using striatal samples from primates. Radioligand binding studies in the presence of a D3 agonist led in dyskinetic, but not in lesioned or L-DOPA-treated rats, to a higher dopamine sensitivity. Upon D3-receptor activation, the affinity of agonists for binding to the right striatal D1 receptor increased. Excess dopamine coming from L-DOPA medication likely activates D3 receptors thus making right and left striatal D1 receptors equally responsive to dopamine. These results show that dyskinesia occurs concurrently with a right/left striatal balance in D1 receptor-mediated neurotransmission.

  3. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities, and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of subthreshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOPs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR; the CAR/PXR, and the PPARa. This paper describes the workshop process, key issues discussed, and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the

  4. GABAB and adenosine receptors mediate enhancement of the K+ current, IAHP, by reducing adenylyl cyclase activity in rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gerber, U; Gähwiler, B H

    1994-11-01

    1. Gamma-aminobuturic acid-B (GABAB) and adenosine A1 receptors, which are expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cells, are linked to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins known to be coupled negatively to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. This study investigates the electrophysiological consequences of adenylyl cyclase inhibition in response to stimulation of these receptors. 2. Single-electrode voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slice cultures in presence of tetrodotoxin. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IAHP), which is very sensitive to intracellular levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used as an electrophysiological indicator of adenylyl cyclase activity. 3. Application of baclofen (10 microM), a selective agonist at GABAB receptors, or adenosine (50 microM) each resulted in a transient decrease followed by a significant enhancement in the amplitude of evoked IAHP. The initial reduction in amplitude of IAHP probably reflects inadequacies in voltage clamp of electronically distant dendritic sites, due to the shunting caused by concomitant activation of potassium conductance by baclofen/adenosine. Comparable increases in membrane conductance in response to the GABAA agonist, muscimol, caused a similar reduction in IAHP. The enhancement of IAHP is consistent with an inhibition of constitutively active adenylyl cyclase. 4. The receptor mediating the responses to adenosine was identified as belonging to the A1 subtype on the basis of its sensitivity to the selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-01-01

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism. PMID:6896821

  6. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

    PubMed

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-05-15

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism.

  7. Enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Blue, Mary E; Erzurumlu, Reha S

    2016-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from mutations in the X-linked gene for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The underlying cellular mechanism for the sensory deficits in patients with RTT is largely unknown. This study used the Bird mouse model of RTT to investigate sensory thalamocortical synaptic transmission in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice. Electrophysiological results showed an excitation/inhibition imbalance, biased toward inhibition, due to an increase in efficacy of postsynaptic GABAA receptors rather than alterations in inhibitory network and presynaptic release properties. Enhanced inhibition impaired the transmission of tonic sensory signals from the thalamus to the somatosensory cortex. Previous morphological studies showed an upregulation of NMDA receptors in the neocortex of both RTT patients and Mecp2-null mice at early ages [Blue ME, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Ann Neurol 45: 541-545, 1999; Blue ME, Kaufmann WE, Bressler J, Eyring C, O'Driscoll C, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294: 1624-1634, 2011]. Although AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission was not altered in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice, extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses increased markedly. These responses were blocked by memantine, suggesting that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of RTT. The results suggest that enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses may underlie impaired somatosensation and that pharmacological blockade of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors may have therapeutic value for RTT.

  8. Enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Blue, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from mutations in the X-linked gene for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The underlying cellular mechanism for the sensory deficits in patients with RTT is largely unknown. This study used the Bird mouse model of RTT to investigate sensory thalamocortical synaptic transmission in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice. Electrophysiological results showed an excitation/inhibition imbalance, biased toward inhibition, due to an increase in efficacy of postsynaptic GABAA receptors rather than alterations in inhibitory network and presynaptic release properties. Enhanced inhibition impaired the transmission of tonic sensory signals from the thalamus to the somatosensory cortex. Previous morphological studies showed an upregulation of NMDA receptors in the neocortex of both RTT patients and Mecp2-null mice at early ages [Blue ME, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Ann Neurol 45: 541–545, 1999; Blue ME, Kaufmann WE, Bressler J, Eyring C, O'Driscoll C, Naidu S, Johnston MV. Anat Rec (Hoboken) 294: 1624–1634, 2011]. Although AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission was not altered in the barrel cortex of Mecp2-null mice, extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses increased markedly. These responses were blocked by memantine, suggesting that extrasynaptic NMDA receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of RTT. The results suggest that enhancement of postsynaptic GABAA and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-mediated responses may underlie impaired somatosensation and that pharmacological blockade of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors may have therapeutic value for RTT. PMID:26683074

  9. NR4A1 Antagonists Inhibit β1-Integrin-Dependent Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Erik; Lee, Syng-Ook; Doddapaneni, Ravi; Singh, Mandip

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the nuclear receptor 4A1 (NR4A1) in breast cancer patients is a prognostic factor for decreased survival and increased metastasis, and this has been linked to NR4A1-dependent regulation of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling. Results of RNA interference studies demonstrate that basal migration of aggressive SKBR3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells is TGF-β independent and dependent on regulation of β1-integrin gene expression by NR4A1 which can be inhibited by the NR4A1 antagonists 1,1-bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-hydroxyphenyl)methane (DIM-C-pPhOH) and a related p-carboxymethylphenyl [1,1-bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-carboxymethylphenyl)methane (DIM-C-pPhCO2Me)] analog. The NR4A1 antagonists also inhibited TGF-β-induced migration of MDA-MB-231 cells by blocking nuclear export of NR4A1, which is an essential step in TGF-β-induced cell migration. We also observed that NR4A1 regulates expression of both β1- and β3-integrins, and unlike other β1-integrin inhibitors which induce prometastatic β3-integrin, NR4A1 antagonists inhibit expression of both β1- and β3-integrin, demonstrating a novel mechanism-based approach for targeting integrins and integrin-dependent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26929200

  10. Mutual Regioselective Inhibition of Human UGT1A1-Mediated Glucuronidation of Four Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guo; Wu, Baojian; Gao, Song; Yang, Zhen; Ma, Yong; Hu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1-catalyzed glucuronidation is an important elimination pathway of flavonoids, and mutually inhibitory interactions may occur when two or more flavonoids are co-administered. Our recent research suggested that glucuronidation of flavonoids displayed distinct positional preferences, but whether this will lead to the mutually regioselective inhibition of UGT1A1-mediated glucuronidation of flavonoids is unknown. Therefore, we chose three monohydroxyflavone isomers 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF), 7-hydroxyflavone (7HF), 4′-hydroxyflavone (4′HF) and one trihydroxyflavone 3,7,4′-trihydroxyflavone (3,7,4′THF) as the model compounds to characterize the possible mutually regioselective inhibition of glucuronidation using expressed human UGT1A1. Apparent kinetic parameters [e.g., reaction velocity (V), Michaelis-Menten constant (Km), maximum rate of metabolism (Vmax), concentration at which inhibitor achieve 50% inhibition or IC50] and the Lineweaver-Burk plots were used to evaluate the apparent kinetic mechanisms of inhibition of glucuronidation. The results showed that UGT1A1-mediated glucuronidation of three monohydroxyflavones (i.e., 3HF, 7HF and 4′HF) and 3,7,4′THF was mutually inhibitory, and the mechanisms of inhibition appeared to be the mixed-typed inhibition. Specifically, the inhibitory effects displayed certain positional preference. Glucuronidation of 3HF was more easily inhibited by 3,7,4′THF than that of 7HF or 4′HF. Compared to 7-O-glucuronidation of 3,7,4′THF, 3-O-glucuronidation of 3,7,4′THF was more inhibited by 3HF and 4′HF, whereas glucuronidation at both 3-OH and 7-OH positions of 3,7,4′THF was more easily inhibited by 7HF than by 3HF and 4′HF. In conclusion, 3HF, 7HF, 4′HF and 3,7,4′THF were both substrates and inhibitors of UGT1A1, and they exhibited mutually regioselective inhibition of UGT1A1-mediated glucuronidation via a mixed-type inhibitory mechanism. PMID:23786524

  11. Chronic psychoemotional stress impairs cannabinoid-receptor-mediated control of GABA transmission in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Silvia; De Chiara, Valentina; Musella, Alessandra; Kusayanagi, Hajime; Mataluni, Giorgia; Bernardi, Giorgio; Usiello, Alessandro; Centonze, Diego

    2008-07-16

    Exposure to stressful events has a myriad of consequences in animals and in humans, and triggers synaptic adaptations in many brain areas. Stress might also alter cannabinoid-receptor-mediated transmission in the brain, but no physiological study has addressed this issue so far. In the present study, we found that social defeat stress, induced in mice by exposure to aggression, altered cannabinoid CB(1)-receptor-mediated control of synaptic transmission in the striatum. In fact, the presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic IPSCs induced by the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor agonist HU210 [(6aR)-trans-3-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-6a,7,10,10a-tetrahydro-1-hydroxy-6,6-dimethyl-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-9-methanol] was reduced after a single stressful episode and fully abolished after 3 and 7 d of stress exposure. Repeated psychoemotional stress also impaired the sensitivity of GABA synapses to endocannabinoids mobilized by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation, whereas the cannabinoid CB(1)-mediated control of glutamate transmission was unaffected by repeated exposure to an aggressor. Corticosteroids released in response to the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis played a major role in the synaptic defects observed in stressed animals, because these alterations were fully prevented by pharmacological blockade of glucocorticoid receptors and were mimicked by corticosterone injections. The recovery of stress-induced synaptic defects was favored when stressed mice were given access to a running wheel or to sucrose consumption, which function as potent natural rewards. A similar rescuing effect was obtained by a single injection of cocaine, a psychostimulant with strong rewarding properties. Targeting cannabinoid CB(1) receptors or endocannabinoid metabolism might be a valuable option to treat stress-associated neuropsychiatric conditions.

  12. Receptor mediated cellular uptake of low molecular weight dendritic polyglycerols.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Marcelo; Reichert, Stephanie; Welker, Pia; Licha, Kai; Kratz, Felix; Haag, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective polymer-based nanocarriers which are able to target diseased tissues still remains a great challenge in current research. Dendritic polyglycerols have emerged as novel polymeric scaffolds that have demonstrated a great potential for diverse biomedical applications. These architectures have already proven their usefulness in therapeutic approaches related to multivalency, given by the synergy between the nanosized dimensions combined with the high density of functional groups. However, a continuous effort is necessary to modify and tailor polyglycerol architectures to fit the future demands of biomedical applications. The present work deals with the development of a general synthetic strategy that allows the linkage of low molecular weight dendritic polyglycerols to fluorescent dyes and cell targeting ligands. The receptor mediated cellular uptake of the polyglycerol conjugates highlight their potential to acts as new targeted nanocarriers that should be able to decrease non-specific cellular uptake.

  13. Hits identified in library screening demonstrate selective CYP17A1 lyase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Krug, Sebastian J; Hu, Qingzhong; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2013-03-01

    A screening of structurally different steroid hormone synthesis inhibitors was performed in order to find a starting point for the development of a new inhibitor of the bifunctional steroidogenic enzyme CYP17A1. Emphasis was placed on determination of selectivity between the two catalytic steps, namely 17α-hydroxylase and C(17,20)-lyase. For that purpose a new inhibition assay has been developed. Hits identified within this novel assay demonstrated selective inhibition of CYP17A1 lyase activity, and thus mark the basis for the development of selective C(17,20)-lyase inhibitors for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  14. Toluene exposure during brain growth spurt and adolescence produces differential effects on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated currents in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Lin, Yi-Ruu; Chan, Ming-Huan

    2011-09-10

    Toluene, an industrial organic solvent, is voluntarily inhaled as drug of abuse. Because inhibition of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is one of the possible mechanisms underlying developmental neurotoxicity of toluene, the purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of toluene exposure during two major neurodevelopmental stages, brain growth spurt and adolescence, on NMDA receptor-mediated current. Rats were administered with toluene (500 mg/kg, i.p.) or corn oil daily over postnatal days (PN) 4-9 (brain growth spurt) or PN 21-26 (early adolescence). Intracellular electrophysiological recordings employing in CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal slices were performed during PN 30-38. Toluene exposure during brain growth spurt enhanced NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) by electrical stimulation, but impaired the paired-pulse facilitation and NMDA response by exogenous application of NMDA. Toluene exposure during adolescence resulted in an increase in NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs and a decrease in exogenous NMDA-induced currents, while lack of any effect on paired-pulse facilitation. These findings suggest that toluene exposure during brain growth spurt and adolescence might result in an increase in synaptic NMDA receptor responsiveness and a decrease in extrasynaptic NMDA receptor responsiveness, while only toluene exposure during brain growth spurt can produce presynaptic modulation in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The functional changes in NMDA receptor-mediated transmission underlying developmental toluene exposure may lead to the neurobehavioral disturbances.

  15. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubule cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, N J; Stuart, J; Tobin, A B; Walls, J; Nahorski, S

    1998-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin is an important function of the kidney proximal tubule epithelium. We have measured endocytosis of [125I]-albumin in opossum kidney cells and examined the regulation of this process by phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). Albumin endocytosis was inhibited by both wortmannin (IC50 6.9 nM) and LY294002 (IC50 6.5 microM) at concentrations that suggested the involvement of PI 3-kinase in its regulation. Recycling rates were unaffected. We transfected OK cells with either a wild-type p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, or a dominant negative form of the p85 subunit (Deltap85) using the LacSwitch expression system. Transfects were screened by immunoblotting with anti-PI 3-kinase antibodies. Under basal conditions, transfects demonstrated no expression of p85 or Deltap85, but expression was briskly induced by treatment of the cells with IPTG (EC50 13.7 microM). Inhibition of PI 3-kinase activity by Deltap85 was confirmed by in vitro kinase assay of anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates from transfected cells stimulated with insulin. Expression of Deltap85 resulted in marked inhibition of albumin endocytosis, predominantly as a result of reduction of the Vmax of the transport process. Expression of p85 had no significant effect on albumin uptake. The results demonstrate that PI 3-kinase regulates an early step in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by kidney proximal tubular cells. PMID:9593770

  16. Direct Visualization of Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transcription in Living Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Receptor-Mediated Transcription in Living Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul M. Yen, M.D...reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of...Sep 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Direct Visualization of Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Transcription in Living Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  17. The effect of vanadate on receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid in rat liver parenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kindberg, G.M.; Gudmundsen, O.; Berg, T. )

    1990-06-05

    Vanadate is a phosphate analogue that inhibits enzymes involved in phosphate release and transfer reactions. Since such reactions may play important roles in endocytosis, we studied the effects of vanadate on various steps in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid labeled with 125I-tyramine-cellobiose (125I-TC-AOM). The labeled degradation products formed from 125I-TC-AOM are trapped in the lysosomes and may therefore serve as lysosomal markers in subcellular fractionation studies. Vanadate reduced the amount of active surface asialoglycoprotein receptors approximately 70%, but had no effect on the rate of internalization and retroendocytosis of ligand. The amount of surface asialoglycoprotein receptors can be reduced by lowering the incubation temperature gradually from 37 to 15 degrees C; vanadate affected only the temperature--sensitive receptors. Vanadate inhibited degradation of 125I-TC-AOM 70-80%. Degradation was much more sensitive to vanadate than binding; half-maximal effects were seen at approximately 1 mM vanadate for binding and approximately 0.1 mM vanadate for degradation. By subcellular fractionation in sucrose and Nycodenz gradients, it was shown that vanadate completely prevented the transfer of 125I-TC-AOM from endosomes to lysosomes. Therefore, the inhibition of degradation by vanadate was indirect; in the presence of vanadate, ligand did not gain access to the lysosomes. The limited degradation in the presence of vanadate took place in a prelysosomal compartment. Vanadate did not affect cell viability and ATP content.

  18. Inhibition of human and rat CYP1A1 enzyme by grapefruit juice compounds.

    PubMed

    Santes-Palacios, Rebeca; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2016-09-06

    Cytochrome P4501A1 is involved in the metabolism of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; therefore, its inhibition interferes with the carcinogenesis process induced by these compounds in rats. The human and rat CYP1A1 differ by 21% in amino acid sequence, including the active site of the enzyme; this difference may be an important factor when results obtained using animal models are interpolated to humans. Based on its previously reported CYP inhibitory properties, we studied the effects of two molecules contained within grapefruit juice, naringenin and 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin, on human and rat CYP1A1 activity. For this purpose, the kinetics of inhibition as well as computational simulations were used. Naringenin and 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin were found to be competitive inhibitors of human and rat CYP1A1. Additionally, naringenin exerted a mixed type inhibition effect on rat CYP1A1. Computational docking showed that inhibitors might block the oxidation of 7-ethoxyresorufin by binding to the CYP1A1 active site. Our results demonstrate the differences in CYP inhibitory mechanisms for the same molecule when CYP from different species are considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal acidification is impaired in proximal tubule epithelial cells of Dent disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gorvin, Caroline M; Wilmer, Martijn J; Piret, Sian E; Harding, Brian; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Wrong, Oliver; Jat, Parmjit S; Lippiat, Jonathan D; Levtchenko, Elena N; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2013-04-23

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis, involving megalin and cubilin, mediates renal proximal-tubular reabsorption and is decreased in Dent disease because of mutations of the chloride/proton antiporter, chloride channel-5 (CLC-5), resulting in low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, and renal failure. To facilitate studies of receptor-mediated endocytosis and the role of CLC-5, we established conditionally immortalized proximal-tubular epithelial cell lines (ciPTECs) from three patients with CLC-5 mutations (30:insH, R637X, and del132-241) and a normal male. Confocal microscopy using the tight junction marker zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) and end-binding protein-1 (EB-1), which is specific for the plus end of microtubules demonstrated that the ciPTECs polarized. Receptor-mediated endocytic uptake of fluorescent albumin and transferrin in 30:insH and R637X ciPTECs was significantly decreased, compared with normal ciPTECs, and could be further reduced by competition with 10-fold excess of unlabeled albumin and transferrin, whereas in the del132-241 ciPTEC, receptor-mediated endocytic uptake was abolished. Investigation of endosomal acidification by live-cell imaging of pHluorin-VAMP2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-2), a pH-sensitive-GFP construct, revealed that the endosomal pH in normal and 30:insH ciPTECs was similar, whereas in del132-241 and R637X ciPTECs, it was significantly more alkaline, indicating defective acidification in these ciPTECs. The addition of bafilomycin-A1, a V-ATPase inhibitor, raised the pH significantly in all ciPTECs, demonstrating that the differences in acidification were not due to alterations in the V-ATPase, but instead to abnormalities of CLC-5. Thus, our studies, which have established human Dent disease ciPTECs that will facilitate studies of mechanisms in renal reabsorption, demonstrate that Dent disease-causing CLC-5 mutations have differing effects on endosomal acidification and receptor-mediated endocytosis

  20. Insulin-Independent GABAA Receptor-Mediated Response in the Barrel Cortex of Mice with Impaired Met Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by genetic variants, susceptibility alleles, and environmental perturbations. The autism associated gene MET tyrosine kinase has been implicated in many behavioral domains and endophenotypes of autism, including abnormal neural signaling in human sensory cortex. We investigated somatosensory thalamocortical synaptic communication in mice deficient in Met activity in cortical excitatory neurons to gain insights into aberrant somatosensation characteristic of ASD. The ratio of excitation to inhibition is dramatically increased due to decreased postsynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the trigeminal thalamocortical pathway of mice lacking active Met in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type mice, insulin failed to increase GABAA receptor-mediated response in the barrel cortex of mice with compromised Met signaling. Thus, lacking insulin effects may be a risk factor in ASD pathogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A proposed common cause of neurodevelopmental disorders is an imbalance in excitatory neural transmission, provided by the glutamatergic neurons, and the inhibitory signals from the GABAergic interneurons. Many genes associated with autism spectrum disorders impair synaptic transmission in the expected cell type. Previously, inactivation of the autism-associated Met tyrosine kinase receptor in GABAergic interneurons led to decreased inhibition. In thus report, decreased Met signaling in glutamatergic neurons had no effect on excitation, but decimated inhibition. Further experiments indicate that loss of Met activity downregulates GABAA receptors on glutamatergic neurons in an insulin independent manner. These data provide a new mechanism for the loss of inhibition and subsequent abnormal excitation/inhibition balance and potential molecular candidates for treatment or prevention. PMID:27030755

  1. Dual effects of anandamide on NMDA receptor-mediated responses and neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Hampson, A J; Bornheim, L M; Scanziani, M; Yost, C S; Gray, A T; Hansen, B M; Leonoudakis, D J; Bickler, P E

    1998-02-01

    Anandamide is an endogenous ligand of cannabinoid receptors that induces pharmacological responses in animals similar to those of cannabinoids such as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Typical pharmacological effects of cannabinoids include disruption of pain, memory formation, and motor coordination, systems that all depend on NMDA receptor mediated neurotransmission. We investigated whether anandamide can influence NMDA receptor activity by examining NMDA-induced calcium flux (deltaCa2+NMDA) in rat brain slices. The presence of anandamide reduced deltaCa2+NMDA and the inhibition was disrupted by cannabinoid receptor antagonist, pertussis toxin treatment, and agatoxin (a calcium channel inhibitor). Whereas these treatments prevented anandamide inhibiting deltaCa2+NMDA, they also revealed another, underlying mechanism by which anandamide influences deltaCa2+NMDA. In the presence of cannabinoid receptor antagonist, anandamide potentiated deltaCa2+NMDA in cortical, cerebellar, and hippocampal slices. Anandamide (but not THC) also augmented NMDA-stimulated currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing cloned NMDA receptors, suggesting a capacity to directly modulate NMDA receptor activity. In a similar manner, anandamide enhanced neurotransmission across NMDA receptor-dependent synapses in hippocampus in a manner that was not mimicked by THC and was unaffected by cannabinoid receptor antagonist. These data demonstrate that anandamide can modulate NMDA receptor activity in addition to its role as a cannabinoid receptor ligand.

  2. Wnt5a promotes cancer cell invasion and proliferation by receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Kensaku; Sato, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsujimoto, Ikuko; Nakamura, Masahiro; Hattori, Kazunari; Sato, Yuji; Dohi, Keiji; Hirata, Michinari; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a activates the Wnt/β-catenin-independent pathway and its overexpression is associated with tumor aggressiveness enhancing invasive activity. For this action, Wnt5a-induced receptor endocytosis with clathrin is required. Wnt5a expression was previously believed to be associated with cancer cell motility but not proliferation. Recently, it was reported that Wnt5a is also implicated in cancer cell proliferation, but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we generated a neutralizing anti-Wnt5a monoclonal antibody (mAb5A16) to investigate the mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates cancer cell proliferation. Wnt5a stimulated both invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, including HeLaS3 cervical cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells although Wnt5a promoted invasion but not proliferation in other cancer cells such as KKLS gastric cancer cells. mAb5A16 did not affect the binding of Wnt5a to its receptor, but it suppressed Wnt5a-induced receptor-mediated endocytosis. mAb5A16 inhibited invasion but not proliferation of HeLaS3 and A549 cells. Wnt5a activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and Wnt5a-dependent cancer cell proliferation was dependent on SFKs, yet blockade of receptor-mediated endocytosis did not affect cancer cell proliferation and SFK activity. These results suggest that Wnt5a promotes invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:25622531

  3. Receptor-mediated toxicity of pahutoxin, a marine trunkfish surfactant.

    PubMed

    Kalmanzon, Eliahu; Rahamim, Yocheved; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Carmeli, Shmuel; Zlotkin, Eliahu

    2003-07-01

    Pahutoxin (PHN, choline chloride ester of 3-acetoxypalmitic acid) is a natural fish-killing (ichthyotoxic) agent derived from the defensive secretions of trunkfish. In spite of its obvious structural resemblance to synthetic cationic long-chain quaternary ammonium detergents, we show that PHN's action does not rely on its surfactant properties and is in fact, receptor-mediated. The above conclusion is supported by the following data: 1. Ichthyotoxicity is not related to its detergency or surfactivity, as indicated by the fact that the lethal concentration is about 1.5 orders of magnitude below its critical micelle concentration value (69 microM) and its liposomal/seawater partition coefficient is low (62-85); 2. The trunkfish is tolerant to its own pahutoxin; 3. Ichthyotoxicity occurs only upon application to the surrounding water, suggesting the existence of externally located receptors; 4. The receptor hypothesis was supported by the aid of equilibrium saturation binding assays revealing the presence of specific binding sites to PHN on the fish gill membranes; 5. The PHN tolerant trunkfish was shown to be devoid of PHN-binding sites. Some chemo-ecological, and environmental implications are discussed.

  4. Glutamate receptor-mediated toxicity in optic nerve oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Carlos; Sánchez-Gómez, M. Victoria; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Miledi, Ricardo

    1997-01-01

    In cultured oligodendrocytes isolated from perinatal rat optic nerves, we have analyzed the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits as well as the effect of the activation of these receptors on oligodendrocyte viability. Reverse transcription–PCR, in combination with immunocytochemistry, demonstrated that most oligodendrocytes differentiated in vitro express the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluR3 and GluR4 and the kainate receptor subunits GluR6, GluR7, KA1 and KA2. Acute and chronic exposure to kainate caused extensive oligodendrocyte death in culture. This effect was partially prevented by the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 and was completely abolished by the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), suggesting that both AMPA and kainate receptors mediate the observed kainate toxicity. Furthermore, chronic application of kainate to optic nerves in vivo resulted in massive oligodendrocyte death which, as in vitro, could be prevented by coinfusion of the toxin with CNQX. These findings suggest that excessive activation of the ionotropic glutamate receptors expressed by oligodendrocytes may act as a negative regulator of the size of this cell population. PMID:9238063

  5. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediated hepatocyte targeting - strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anisha A; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-04-10

    Hepatocyte resident afflictions continue to affect the human population unabated. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is primarily expressed on hepatocytes and minimally on extra-hepatic cells. This makes it specifically attractive for receptor-mediated drug delivery with minimum concerns of toxicity. ASGPR facilitates internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and exhibits high affinity for carbohydrates specifically galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and glucose. Isomeric forms of sugar, galactose density and branching, spatial geometry and galactose linkages are key factors influencing ligand-receptor binding. Popular ligands for ASGPR mediated targeting are carbohydrate polymers, arabinogalactan and pullulan. Other ligands include galactose-bearing glycoproteins, glycopeptides and galactose modified polymers and lipids. Drug-ligand conjugates provide a viable strategy; nevertheless ligand-anchored nanocarriers provide an attractive option for ASGPR targeted delivery and are widely explored. The present review details various ligands and nanocarriers exploited for ASGPR mediated delivery of drugs to hepatocytes. Nanocarrier properties affecting ASGPR mediated uptake are discussed at length. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of ASGPR mediated targeting and applications in diagnostics. ASGPR mediated hepatocyte targeting provides great promise for improved therapy of hepatic afflictions.

  6. Visualization of Receptor-mediated Endocytosis in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, Jon; Konopka, James; Singer-Kruger, Birgit; Zerial, Marino; Botstein, David

    1999-01-01

    We studied the ligand-induced endocytosis of the yeast α-factor receptor Ste2p by immuno-electron microscopy. We observed and quantitated time-dependent loss of Ste2p from the plasma membrane of cells exposed to α-factor. This ligand-induced internalization of Ste2p was blocked in the well-characterized endocytosis-deficient mutant sac6Δ. We provide evidence that implicates furrow-like invaginations of the plasma membrane as the site of receptor internalization. These invaginations are distinct from the finger-like plasma membrane invaginations within actin cortical patches. Consistent with this, we show that Ste2p is not located within the cortical actin patch before and during receptor-mediated endocytosis. In wild-type cells exposed to α-factor we also observed and quantitated a time-dependent accumulation of Ste2p in intracellular, membrane-bound compartments. These compartments have a characteristic electron density but variable shape and size and are often located adjacent to the vacuole. In immuno-electron microscopy experiments these compartments labeled with antibodies directed against the rab5 homologue Ypt51p (Vps21p), the resident vacuolar protease carboxypeptidase Y, and the vacuolar H+-ATPase Vph1p. Using a new double-labeling technique we have colocalized antibodies against Ste2p and carboxypeptidase Y to this compartment, thereby identifying these compartments as prevacuolar late endosomes. PMID:10069819

  7. Hemoglobin Uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. Is Receptor-Mediated

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24831516

  8. Hemoglobin uptake by Paracoccidioides spp. is receptor-mediated.

    PubMed

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia Luiz Cardoso; Parente, Juliana Alves; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; de Castro, Kelly Pacheco; Fonseca, Fernanda Lopes; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Báo, Sônia Nair; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-05-01

    Iron is essential for the proliferation of fungal pathogens during infection. The availability of iron is limited due to its association with host proteins. Fungal pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to acquire iron from host; however, little is known regarding how Paracoccidioides species incorporate and metabolize this ion. In this work, host iron sources that are used by Paracoccidioides spp. were investigated. Robust fungal growth in the presence of the iron-containing molecules hemin and hemoglobin was observed. Paracoccidioides spp. present hemolytic activity and have the ability to internalize a protoporphyrin ring. Using real-time PCR and nanoUPLC-MSE proteomic approaches, fungal growth in the presence of hemoglobin was shown to result in the positive regulation of transcripts that encode putative hemoglobin receptors, in addition to the induction of proteins that are required for amino acid metabolism and vacuolar protein degradation. In fact, one hemoglobin receptor ortholog, Rbt5, was identified as a surface GPI-anchored protein that recognized hemin, protoporphyrin and hemoglobin in vitro. Antisense RNA technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation were used to generate mitotically stable Pbrbt5 mutants. The knockdown strain had a lower survival inside macrophages and in mouse spleen when compared with the parental strain, which suggested that Rbt5 could act as a virulence factor. In summary, our data indicate that Paracoccidioides spp. can use hemoglobin as an iron source most likely through receptor-mediated pathways that might be relevant for pathogenic mechanisms.

  9. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Yongsheng Li, Yan

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 {sup low} and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96{sup ®}Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 – RUNX3 {sup low}, the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. - Highlights: • HCV core protein inhibits HepG2 cell sensitivity to cisplatin. • Core expression in HepG2 decreases

  10. Bradykinin B2-receptor-mediated modulation of membrane currents in guinea-pig cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Naoya; Uemura, Hiroko; Hara, Yukio; Saito, Toshihiro; Masuda, Yoshiaki; Nakaya, Haruaki

    1998-01-01

    In order to define the electrophysiological mechanism(s) responsible for bradykinin (BK)-induced positive inotropic and chronotropic responses in isolated guinea-pig atria, effects of BK on the membrane currents were examined in isolated atrial cells using patch clamp techniques.BK (0.1–1000 nM) increased the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa), which was recorded from enzymatically-dissociated atrial myocytes by the nystatin-perforated patch method, in a concentration-dependent fashion, and the calculated EC50 value for increasing ICa was 5.2 nM. In conventional ruptured patch experiments, BK inhibited the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-operated K+ current (IK.ACh) that was activated by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (1 μM) with an EC50 value of 0.57 nM. Both the increase in ICa and the decrease in IK.ACh were blocked by HOE140, a selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist.The BK-induced inhibition of IK.ACh was significantly attenuated by staurosporine and calphostin C, protein kinase C inhibitors. In addition, the IK.ACh inhibition by BK was also attenuated by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein or tyrphostin but not by daidzein, an inactive analogue of genistein. However, neither protein kinase C inhibitor nor tyrosine kinase inhibitor affected the BK-induced increase in ICa.In the presence and absence of muscarinic stimulation, BK prolonged the action potential recorded from the atrial cells in the current clamp mode.We conclude that BK increases ICa and decreases IK.ACh in atrial cells, resulting in positive inotropic and chronotropic responses in atrial preparations. Protein kinase C activation, and possibly tyrosine kinase activation, may be involved in the B2-receptor-mediated IK.ACh inhibition. PMID:9786500

  11. Caffeine inhibits hypothalamic A1R to excite oxytocin neuron and ameliorate dietary obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liufeng; Meng, Jia; Shen, Qing; Zhang, Yi; Pan, Susu; Chen, Zhuo; Zhu, Ling-Qiang; Lu, Youming; Huang, Yuan; Zhang, Guo

    2017-01-01

    Caffeine, an antagonist of the adenosine receptor A1R, is used as a dietary supplement to reduce body weight, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we report that adenosine level in the cerebrospinal fluid, and hypothalamic expression of A1R, are increased in the diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse. We find that mice with overexpression of A1R in the neurons of paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus are hyperphagic, have glucose intolerance and high body weight. Central or peripheral administration of caffeine reduces the body weight of DIO mice by the suppression of appetite and increasing of energy expenditure. We also show that caffeine excites oxytocin expressing neurons, and blockade of the action of oxytocin significantly attenuates the effect of caffeine on energy balance. These data suggest that caffeine inhibits A1Rs expressed on PVN oxytocin neurons to negatively regulate energy balance in DIO mice. PMID:28654087

  12. SK&F 96365, a novel inhibitor of receptor-mediated calcium entry.

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, J E; Armstrong, W P; Benham, C D; Hallam, T J; Jacob, R; Jaxa-Chamiec, A; Leigh, B K; McCarthy, S A; Moores, K E; Rink, T J

    1990-01-01

    A novel inhibitor of receptor-mediated calcium entry (RMCE) is described. SK&F 96365 (1-(beta-[3-(4-methoxy-phenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl)-1H- imidazole hydrochloride) is structurally distinct from the known 'calcium antagonists' and shows selectivity in blocking RMCE compared with receptor-mediated internal Ca2+ release. Human platelets, neutrophils and endothelial cells were loaded with the fluorescent Ca2(+)-indicator dyes quin2 or fura-2, in order to measure Ca2+ or Mn2+ entry through RMCE as well as Ca2+ release from internal stores. The IC50 (concn. producing 50% inhibition) for inhibition of RMCE by SK&F 96365 in platelets stimulated with ADP or thrombin was 8.5 microM or 11.7 microM respectively; these concentrations of SK&F 96365 did not affect internal Ca2+ release. Similar effects of SK&F 96365 were observed in suspensions of neutrophils and in single endothelial cells. SK&F 96365 also inhibited agonist-stimulated Mn2+ entry in platelets and neutrophils. The effects of SK&F 96365 were independent of cell type and of agonist, as would be expected for a compound that modulates post-receptor events. Voltage-gated Ca2+ entry in fura-2-loaded GH3 (pituitary) cells and rabbit ear-artery smooth-muscle cells held under voltage-clamp was also inhibited by SK&F 96365; however, the ATP-gated Ca2(+)-permeable channel of rabbit ear-artery smooth-muscle cells was unaffected by SK&F 96365. Thus SK&F 96365 (unlike the 'organic Ca2+ antagonists') shows no selectivity between voltage-gated Ca2+ entry and RMCE, although the lack of effect on ATP-gated channels indicates that it discriminates between different types of RMCE. The effects of SK&F 96365 on functional responses of cells thought to be dependent on Ca2+ entry via RMCE were also studied. Under conditions where platelet aggregation is dependent on stimulated Ca2+ entry via RMCE, the response was blocked by SK&F 96365 with an IC50 of 15.9 microM, which is similar to the IC50 of 8-12 microM observed for

  13. CYP24A1 Inhibition Enhances the Antitumor Activity of Calcitriol

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Josephia R.; Yu, Wei-Dong; Ma, Yingyu; Engler, Kristie L.; Kong, Rui-Xian; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    High systemic exposures to calcitriol are necessary for optimal antitumor effects. Human prostate cancer PC3 cells are insensitive to calcitriol treatment. Therefore, we investigated whether the inhibition of 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1), the major calcitriol inactivating enzyme, by ketoconazole (KTZ) or RC2204 modulates calcitriol serum pharmacokinetics and biologic effects. Dexamethasone (Dex) was added to minimize calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia and as a steroid replacement for the KTZ inhibition of steroid biosynthesis cytochrome P450 enzymes. KTZ effectively inhibited time-dependent calcitriol-inducible CYP24A1 protein expression and enzyme activity in PC3 cells and C3H/HeJ mouse kidney tissues. Systemic calcitriol exposure area under the curve was higher in mice treated with a combination of calcitriol and KTZ than with calcitriol alone. KTZ and Dex synergistically potentiated calcitriol-mediated antiproliferative effects in PC3 cells in vitro; this effect was associated with enhanced apoptosis. After treatment with calcitriol and KTZ/Dex, although caspase-9 and caspase-3 were not activated and cytochrome c was not released by mitochondria, caspase-8 was activated and the truncated Bid protein level was increased. Translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor to the nucleus was observed, indicating a role of the apoptosis-inducing factor-mediated and caspase-independent apoptotic pathways. Calcitriol and KTZ/Dex combination suppressed the clonogenic survival and enhanced the growth inhibition observed with calcitriol alone in PC3 human prostate cancer xenograft mouse model. Our results show that the administration of calcitriol in combination with CYP24A1 inhibitor enhances antiproliferative effects, increases systemic calcitriol exposure, and promotes the activation of caspase-independent apoptosis pathway. PMID:20591973

  14. Bombesin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity: review and current status

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Veronica; Di Florio, Alessia; Moody, Terry W.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    The three mammalian bombesin (Bn) receptors (gastrin-releasing peptide [GRP] receptor, neuromedin B [NMB] receptor, BRS-3) are one of the classes of G protein-coupled receptors that are most frequently over-express/ectopically expressed by common, important malignancies. Because of the clinical success of somatostatin receptor-mediated imaging and cytotoxicity with neuroendocrine tumors, there is now increasing interest in pursuing a similar approach with Bn receptors. In the last few years then have been more than 200 studies in this area. In the present paper, the in vitro and in vivo results, as well as results of human studies from many of these studies are reviewed and the current state of Bn receptor-mediated imaging or cytotoxicity is discussed. Both Bn receptor-mediated imaging studies as well as Bn receptor-mediated tumoral cytotoxic studies using radioactive and non-radioactive Bn-based ligands are covered. PMID:21034419

  15. Evidence that somatostatin sst2 receptors mediate striatal dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Hathway, G J; Humphrey, P P A; Kendrick, K M

    1999-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a cyclic tetradecapeptide present in medium-sized aspiny interneurones in the rat striatum. We have previously shown that exogenous SRIF potently stimulates striatal dopamine (DA) release via a glutamate-dependent mechanism. We now report the ability of the selective sst2 receptor agonist, BIM-23027, to mimic this effect of SRIF.In vivo microdialysis studies were performed in anaesthetized male Wistar rats. In most experiments, compounds were administered by retrodialysis into the striatum for 15 min periods, 90 min and 225 min after sampling commenced, with levels of neurotransmitters being measured by HPLC with electrochemical and fluorescence detection.BIM-23027 (50 and 100 nM) stimulated DA release with extracellular levels increasing by up to 18 fold.Prior retrodialysis of BIM-23027 (50 nM) abolished the effects of subsequent administration of SRIF (100 nM).The agonist effects of both BIM-23027 and SRIF were abolished by the selective sst2 receptor antagonist, L-Tyr8-CYN-154806 (100 nM).The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, DNQX (100 μM), abolished the agonist effects of BIM-23027 as previously shown for SRIF.This study provides evidence that the sst2 receptor mediates the potent dopamine-releasing actions observed with SRIF in the rat striatum. Dopamine release evoked by both peptides appears to be mediated indirectly via a glutamatergic pathway. Other subtype-specific somatostatin receptor ligands were unable to elicit any effects and therefore we conclude that no other somatostatin receptor types are involved in mediating the dopamine-releasing actions of SRIF in the striatum. PMID:10578151

  16. Activation of innate antiviral immune response via double-stranded RNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Wei-Hua; Azadzoi, Kazem M.; Su, Ning; Dai, Peng; Sun, Jianbin; Wang, Qin; Liang, Ping; Zhang, Wentao; Lei, Xiaoying; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Jing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Viruses induce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the host cells. The mammalian system has developed dsRNA-dependent recognition receptors such as RLRs that recognize the long stretches of dsRNA as PAMPs to activate interferon-mediated antiviral pathways and apoptosis in severe infection. Here we report an efficient antiviral immune response through dsRNA-dependent RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis against infections from different classes of viruses. We demonstrated that virus-infected A549 cells were efficiently killed in the presence of a chimeric RLR receptor, dsCARE. It measurably suppressed the interferon antiviral pathway but promoted IL-1β production. Canonical cell death analysis by morphologic assessment, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase cleavage and chemical inhibition excluded the involvement of apoptosis and consistently suggested RLR receptor-mediated necroptosis as the underlying mechanism of infected cell death. The necroptotic pathway was augmented by the formation of RIP1-RIP3 necrosome, recruitment of MLKL protein and the activation of cathepsin D. Contributing roles of RIP1 and RIP3 were confirmed by gene knockdown. Furthermore, the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 but not the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD impeded dsCARE-dependent infected cell death. Our data provides compelling evidence that the chimeric RLR receptor shifts the common interferon antiviral responses of infected cells to necroptosis and leads to rapid death of the virus-infected cells. This mechanism could be targeted as an efficient antiviral strategy. PMID:26935990

  17. GIPC interacts with the beta1-adrenergic receptor and regulates beta1-adrenergic receptor-mediated ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liaoyuan A; Chen, Wei; Martin, Negin P; Whalen, Erin J; Premont, Richard T; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2003-07-11

    Beta1-adrenergic receptors, expressed at high levels in the human heart, have a carboxyl-terminal ESKV motif that can directly interact with PDZ domain-containing proteins. Using the beta1-adrenergic receptor carboxyl terminus as bait, we identified the novel beta1-adrenergic receptor-binding partner GIPC in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart cDNA library. Here we demonstrate that the PDZ domain-containing protein, GIPC, co-immunoprecipitates with the beta1-adrenergic receptor in COS-7 cells. Essential for this interaction is the Ser residue of the beta1-adrenergic receptor carboxyl-terminal ESKV motif. Our data also demonstrate that beta1-adrenergic receptor stimulation activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase, ERK1/2. beta1-adrenergic receptor-mediated ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by pertussis toxin, implicating Gi, and was substantially decreased by the expression of GIPC. Expression of GIPC had no observable effect on beta1-adrenergic receptor sequestration or receptor-mediated cAMP accumulation. This GIPC effect was specific for the beta1-adrenergic receptor and was dependent on an intact PDZ binding motif. These data suggest that GIPC can regulate beta1-adrenergic receptor-stimulated, Gi-mediated, ERK activation while having no effect on receptor internalization or Gs-mediated cAMP signaling.

  18. 5-HT7 receptor-mediated fear conditioning and possible involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kotaro; Tsuji, Minoru; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2017-01-18

    Fear conditioning is a valuable behavioral paradigm for studying the neural basis of emotional learning and memory. The present study examined the involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) signaling on the serotonin (5-HT)7 receptor-mediated fear conditioning. Conditioning was performed in a trial in which a tone was followed by an electrical foot-shock. Context- and tone-dependent fear were examined in tests conducted 24 and 48h after conditioning, respectively. The selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist 2a-[4-(4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridyl)butyl]-2a,3,4,-tetrahydrobenzo(c,d)indol-2-(1H)-one (DR4004) (5mg/kg), when administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) immediately after conditioning, caused a significant decrease in both context- and tone-dependent fear responses (freezing behavior). A significant increase in ERK activity was observed in the amygdala of mice that displayed context- or tone-dependent fear responses, and these changes were also inhibited by the administration of DR4004 (5mg/kg, i.p.) immediately after conditioning. In contrast, the increase in hippocampal ERK activity in mice that displayed context-dependent fear responses was further enhanced by the administration of DR4004 (5mg/kg, i.p.). These results suggest that 5-HT7 receptor-mediated ERK signaling may play a significant role in the processes of emotional learning and memory.

  19. Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Modifies NMDA Receptor Mediated Release of Intracellular Calcium: Implications for Endocannabinoid Control of Hippocampal Neural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Robert E.; Miller, Frances; Palchik, Guillermo; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors (CB1) leads to continuous suppression of neuronal plasticity in hippocampus and other brain regions, suggesting that endocannabinoids may have a functional role in synaptic processes that produce state-dependent transient modulation of hippocampal cell activity. In support of this, it has previously been shown in vitro that cannabinoid CB1 receptors modulate second messenger systems in hippocampal neurons that can modulate intracellular ion channels, including channels which release calcium from intracellular stores. Here we demonstrate in hippocampal slices a similar endocannabinoid action on excitatory glutamatergic synapses via modulation of NMDA-receptor mediated intracellular calcium levels in confocal imaged neurons. Calcium entry through glutamatergic NMDA-mediated ion channels increases intracellular calcium concentrations via modulation of release from ryanodine-sensitive channels in endoplasmic reticulum. The studies reported here show that NMDA-elicited increases in Calcium Green fluorescence are enhanced by CB1 receptor antagonists (i.e. rimonabant), and inhibited by CB1 agonists (i.e. WIN 55,212-2). Suppression of endocannabinoid breakdown by either reuptake inhibition (AM404) or fatty-acid amide hydrolase inhibition (URB597) produced suppression of NMDA elicited calcium increases comparable to WIN 55,212-2, while enhancement of calcium release provoked by endocannabinoid receptor antagonists (Rimonabant) was shown to depend on the blockade of CB1 receptor mediated de-phosphorylation of Ryanodine receptors. Such CB1 receptor modulation of NMDA elicited increases in intracellular calcium may account for the respective disruption and enhancement by CB1 agents of trial-specific hippocampal neuron ensemble firing patterns during performance of a short-term memory task, reported previously from this laboratory. PMID:21288475

  20. Histamine H4 receptor mediates eosinophil chemotaxis with cell shape change and adhesion molecule upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Ping; Ngo, Karen; Nguyen, Steven; Thurmond, Robin L; Edwards, James P; Karlsson, Lars; Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping

    2004-01-01

    During mast cell degranulation, histamine is released in large quantities. Human eosinophils were found to express histamine H4 but not H3 receptors. The possible effects of histamine on eosinophils and the receptor mediating these effects were investigated in our studies. Histamine (0.01–30 μM) induced a rapid and transient cell shape change in human eosinophils, but had no effects on neutrophils. The maximal shape change was at 0.3 μM histamine with EC50 at 19 nM. After 60 min incubation with 1 μM histamine, eosinophils were desensitized and were refractory to shape change response upon histamine restimulation. Histamine (0.01–1 μM) also enhanced the eosinophil shape change induced by other chemokines. Histamine-induced eosinophil shape change was mediated by the H4 receptor. This effect was completely inhibited by H4 receptor-specific antagonist JNJ 7777120 (IC50 0.3 μM) and H3/H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (IC50 1.4 μM), but not by selective H1, H2 or H3 receptor antagonists. H4 receptor agonists imetit (EC50 25 nM) and clobenpropit (EC50 72 nM) could mimic histamine effect in inducing eosinophil shape change. Histamine (0.01–100 μM) induced upregulation of adhesion molecules CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) and CD54 (ICAM-1) on eosinophils. This effect was mediated by the H4 receptor and could be blocked by H4 receptor antagonists JNJ 7777120 and thioperamide. Histamine (0.01–10 μM) induced eosinophil chemotaxis with an EC50 of 83 nM. This effect was mediated by the H4 receptor and could be blocked by H4 receptor antagonists JNJ 7777120 (IC50 86 nM) and thioperamide (IC50 519 nM). Histamine (0.5 μM) also enhanced the eosinophil shape change induced by other chemokines. In conclusion, we have demonstrated a new mechanism of eosinophil recruitment driven by mast cells via the release of histamine. Using specific histamine receptor ligands, we have provided a definitive proof that the H4 receptor mediates eosinophil chemotaxis, cell shape change and

  1. S-nitrosylated SHP-2 contributes to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhong-Qing; Sunico, Carmen R.; McKercher, Scott R.; Cui, Jiankun; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) can cause neuronal damage, contributing to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases and stroke (i.e., focal cerebral ischemia). NO can mediate neurotoxic effects at least in part via protein S-nitrosylation, a reaction that covalently attaches NO to a cysteine thiol (or thiolate anion) to form an S-nitrosothiol. Recently, the tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) and its downstream pathways have emerged as important mediators of cell survival. Here we report that in neurons and brain tissue NO can S-nitrosylate SHP-2 at its active site cysteine, forming S-nitrosylated SHP-2 (SNO–SHP-2). We found that NMDA exposure in vitro and transient focal cerebral ischemia in vivo resulted in increased levels of SNO–SHP-2. S-Nitrosylation of SHP-2 inhibited its phosphatase activity, blocking downstream activation of the neuroprotective physiological ERK1/2 pathway, thus increasing susceptibility to NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity. These findings suggest that formation of SNO–SHP-2 represents a key chemical reaction contributing to excitotoxic damage in stroke and potentially other neurological disorders. PMID:23382182

  2. Fluid shear stress sensitizes cancer cells to receptor-mediated apoptosis via trimeric death receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to apoptotic agents has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlates with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increases in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis is not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress does not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments reveal that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear forces can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents.

  3. MAGI-1 acts as a scaffolding molecule for NGF receptor-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidenori; Morishita, Rika; Iwamoto, Ikuko; Mizuno, Makoto; Nagata, Koh-ichi

    2013-10-01

    We have recently found that the membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted organization-1 (MAGI-1) was enriched in rat nervous tissues such as the glomeruli in olfactory bulb of adult rats and dorsal root entry zone in spinal cord of embryonic rats. In addition, we revealed the localization of MAGI-1 in the growth cone of the primary cultured rat dorsal root ganglion cells. These results point out the possibility that MAGI-1 is involved in the regulation of neurite extension or guidance. In this study, we attempted to reveal the physiological role(s) of MAGI-1 in neurite extension. We found that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of MAGI-1 caused inhibition of nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. To clarify the involvement of MAGI-1 in NGF-mediated signal pathway, we tried to identify binding partners for MAGI-1 and identified p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), a low affinity NGF receptor, and Shc, a phosphotyrosine-binding adaptor. These three proteins formed an immunocomplex in PC12 cells. Knockdown as well as overexpression of MAGI-1 caused suppression of NGF-stimulated activation of the Shc-ERK pathway, which is supposed to play important roles in neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. These results indicate that MAGI-1 may act as a scaffolding molecule for NGF receptor-mediated signaling pathway.

  4. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  5. Spinal GABA receptors mediate the suppressive effect of electroacupuncture on cold allodynia in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Han, Jae-Bok; Kim, Sun-Kwang; Park, Jung-Hyuk; Go, Dong-Hyun; Sun, Boram; Min, Byung-Il

    2010-03-31

    This study was performed to determine whether spinal GABAergic systems mediate the relieving effects of low frequency electroacupuncture (EA) on cold allodynia in a rat tail model of neuropathic pain. For neuropathic surgery, the right superior caudal trunk was resected at the level between the S1 and S2 spinal nerves innervating the tail. Two weeks after the nerve injury, the intrathecal catheter was implanted. Five days after the catheterization, rats were intrathecally injected with gabazine (GABA(A) receptor antagonist, 0.0003, 0.001 or 0.003mug), or saclofen (GABA(B) receptor antagonist, 3, 10 or 30mug). Ten minutes after the injection, EA (2Hz) was applied to the ST36 acupoint for 30min. The cold allodynia was assessed by the tail immersion test (i.e. immersing the tail in cold (4 degrees C) water and measuring the latency of an abrupt tail movement) before and after the EA treatment. EA stimulation at ST36 significantly inhibited the cold allodynia sign, whereas EA at non-acupoint and plain acupuncture at ST36 (without electrical stimulation) did not show antiallodynic effects. Intrathecal administration of gabazine or saclofen blocked the relieving effects of ST36 EA stimulation on cold allodynia. These results suggest that spinal GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors mediate the suppressive effect of low frequency EA on cold allodynia in the tail neuropathic rats.

  6. Receptor mediated endocytosis of vicilin in Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) larval midgut epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Daniele; Oliveira, Gabriel B; Uchôa, Adriana F; Samuels, Richard I; Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Silva, Carlos P

    2017-08-01

    The transport of proteins across the intestinal epithelium of insects is still not well understood. There is evidence that vicilin, a major storage protein of cowpea seeds (Vigna unguiculata), is internalized in larvae of the seed-beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. It has been reported that this vicilin interacts with proteins present in the microvillar membranes of columnar cells along the digestive tract of the larvae. In the present work, we studied the cellular pathway involved in endocytosis of vicilin in larval C. maculatus by employing ex vivo experiments. In the ex vivo approach, we incubated FITC-labelled vicilin with isolated midgut wholemounts in the absence or in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors. The fate of labelled or non-labelled globulins was monitored by confocal microscopy and fluorescence measurement. Our results suggest that the internalization of vicilins is due to receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here we report the identity of a microvillar vicilin-binding protein that was purified using affinity chromatography on a vicilin-sepharose column. The putative vicilin receptor showed high homology to proteins with the CRAL-TRIO domain, specifically the Sec14 superfamily member α-tocopherol transfer protein. The precise mechanism involved in vicilin internalization was defined through the use of specific inhibitors of the endocytosis pathway. The inhibitors filipin III and nystatin significantly inhibited the endocytosis of vicilin, while chlorpromazine and phenylarsine oxide had a much lower effect on endocytosis, suggesting that the endocytic pathway is predominantly mediated by caveolin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of Mayaro virus replication by prostaglandin A(1) in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Burlandy, F M; Rebello, M A

    2001-01-01

    Prostaglandins exhibit antiviral activity against a wide variety of RNA and DNA viruses. In the present report, we describe the effect of cyclopentenone prostaglandin A(1) (PGA(1)) on Mayaro virus replication in Vero cells. Virus yield was significantly reduced at nontoxic concentrations which did not suppress DNA, RNA or protein synthesis in uninfected or infected cells. Antiviral action decreased if PGA(1) was added at later times after infection. In Mayaro virus-infected cells, PGA(1) inhibited the synthesis of virus proteins. This effect is accompanied by the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Actinomycin D treatment not only inhibited the induction of HSPs but also partially prevented PGA(1) antiviral activity.

  8. Prostaglandin A1 inhibits replication of Mayaro virus in Aedes albopictus cells.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J A; Rebello, M A

    1995-01-01

    Prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) reduced Mayaro virus replication in Aedes albopictus (mosquito) cells in culture. The highest nontoxic dose of PGA1, 7.5 microM, decreased virus production by 90%. In Mayaro virus-infected cells, PGA1 inhibited virus-specific protein synthesis. However, in mock-infected cells the presence of PGA1 stimulated the synthesis of several proteins with molecular masses of 70, 57 and 23 kDa, respectively. The data obtained from this study show that PGA1 plays a role in the metabolic regulation of Aedes albopictus cells, blocking the synthesis of Mayaro virus and inducing the synthesis of cellular polypeptides.

  9. Intracellular Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors contributes to AMPA receptor-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress in oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, A; Matute, C; Alberdi, E

    2010-01-01

    Overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oligodendrocytes induces cytosolic Ca2+ overload and excitotoxic death, a process that contributes to demyelination and multiple sclerosis. Excitotoxic insults cause well-characterized mitochondrial alterations and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, which is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the contribution of ER-Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) to excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes in vitro. First, we observed that oligodendrocytes express all previously characterized RyRs and IP3Rs. Blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release by TMB-8 following α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor-mediated insults attenuated both oligodendrocyte death and cytosolic Ca2+ overload. In turn, RyR inhibition by ryanodine reduced as well the Ca2+ overload whereas IP3R inhibition was ineffective. Furthermore, AMPA-triggered mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxidative stress and activation of caspase-3, which in all instances was diminished by RyR inhibition. In addition, we observed that AMPA induced an ER stress response as revealed by α subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation, overexpression of GRP chaperones and RyR-dependent cleavage of caspase-12. Finally, attenuating ER stress with salubrinal protected oligodendrocytes from AMPA excitotoxicity. Together, these results show that Ca2+ release through RyRs contributes to cytosolic Ca2+ overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress and cell death following AMPA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes. PMID:21364659

  10. A new CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors-mediated anaphylaxis guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Sekioka, Tomohiko; Kadode, Michiaki; Osakada, Noriko; Fujita, Manabu; Matsumura, Naoya; Yamaura, Yoshiyuki; Nakade, Shinji; Nabe, Takeshi; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2017-04-01

    Although the effectiveness of CysLT1 receptor antagonists on asthma has been clinically established, the effects of CysLT2 receptor antagonists are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to develop a new CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors-mediated anaphylaxis guinea pig model using S-hexyl GSH, a γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GTP) inhibitor, to suppress conversion of LTC4 to LTD4. Actively sensitized guinea pigs were challenged with OVA in the absence or presence of S-hexyl GSH, and survival rate following anaphylactic response was monitored. OVA-induced fatal anaphylaxis in the absence of S-hexyl GSH was almost completely inhibited by montelukast, a CysLT1 receptor antagonist, but not by the CysLT2 receptor antagonist BayCysLT2RA. However, under treatment with S-hexyl-GSH, the inhibitory effect of motelukast was dramatically diminished, whereas that of BayCysLT2RA was markedly increased. The dual CysLT1/2 receptor antagonist ONO-6950 effectively inhibited anaphylactic response in both S-hexyl GSH-treated and non-treated animals. LC/MS/MS analysis revealed that S-hexyl GSH treatment actually inhibited LTC4 metabolism in the blood and lung tissues. Using S-hexyl GSH, we developed a novel CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors-mediated anaphylaxis guinea pig model that can be useful for not only screening both CysLT2 and CysLT1/2 receptors antagonists, but also for functional analysis of CysLT2 receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptor Mediates Tissue Factor Expression in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ling; Ma, Wanshu; Littmann, Timothy; Camp, Riley; Shen, Jianzhong

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the role of P2Y12 receptor in platelet aggregation leads to a new anti-thrombotic drug Plavix; however, little is known about non-platelet P2Y receptors in thrombosis. This study tested the hypothesis that endothelial P2Y receptor(s) mediates up-regulation of tissue factor (TF), the initiator of coagulation cascade. Stimulation of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) by UTP/ATP increased the mRNA level of TF but not of its counterpart-tissue factor pathway inhibitor, which was accompanied by up-regulation of TF protein and cell surface activity. RT-PCR revealed a selective expression of P2Y2 and P2Y11 receptors in HCAEC. Consistent with this, TF up-regulation was inhibited by suramin or by siRNA silencing of P2Y2 receptor, but not by NF-157, a P2Y11-selective antagonist, suggesting a role for the P2Y2 receptor. In addition, P2Y2 receptor activated ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways without affecting the positive NF-κB and negative AKT regulatory pathways of TF expression. Furthermore, TF up-regulation was abolished or partially suppressed by inhibition of p38 or JNK but not ERK1/2. Interestingly, blockade of the PLC/Ca2+ pathway did not affect P2Y2 receptor activation of p38, JNK, and TF induction. However, blockade of Src kinase reduced phosphorylation of p38 but not JNK, eliminating TF induction. In contrast, inhibition of Rho kinase reduced phosphorylation of JNK but not p38, decreasing TF expression. These findings demonstrate that P2Y2 receptor mediates TF expression in HCAEC through new mechanisms involving Src/p38 and Rho/JNK pathways, possibly contributing to a pro-thrombotic status after vascular injury. PMID:21652710

  12. CYP46A1 inhibition, brain cholesterol accumulation and neurodegeneration pave the way for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Djelti, Fathia; Braudeau, Jerome; Hudry, Eloise; Dhenain, Marc; Varin, Jennifer; Bièche, Ivan; Marquer, Catherine; Chali, Farah; Ayciriex, Sophie; Auzeil, Nicolas; Alves, Sandro; Langui, Dominique; Potier, Marie-Claude; Laprevote, Olivier; Vidaud, Michel; Duyckaerts, Charles; Miles, Richard; Aubourg, Patrick; Cartier, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Abnormalities in neuronal cholesterol homeostasis have been suspected or observed in several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. However, it has not been demonstrated whether an increased abundance of cholesterol in neurons in vivo contributes to neurodegeneration. To address this issue, we used RNA interference methodology to inhibit the expression of cholesterol 24-hydroxylase, encoded by the Cyp46a1 gene, in the hippocampus of normal mice. Cholesterol 24-hydroxylase controls cholesterol efflux from the brain and thereby plays a major role in regulating brain cholesterol homeostasis. We used an adeno-associated virus vector encoding short hairpin RNA directed against the mouse Cyp46a1 mRNA to decrease the expression of the Cyp46a1 gene in hippocampal neurons of normal mice. This increased the cholesterol concentration in neurons, followed by cognitive deficits and hippocampal atrophy due to apoptotic neuronal death. Prior to neuronal death, the recruitment of the amyloid protein precursor to lipid rafts was enhanced leading to the production of β-C-terminal fragment and amyloid-β peptides. Abnormal phosphorylation of tau and endoplasmic reticulum stress were also observed. In the APP23 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, the abundance of amyloid-β peptides increased following inhibition of Cyp46a1 expression, and neuronal death was more widespread than in normal mice. Altogether, these results suggest that increased amounts of neuronal cholesterol within the brain may contribute to inducing and/or aggravating Alzheimer's disease. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Self-Assembly into Nanoparticles Is Essential for Receptor Mediated Uptake of Therapeutic Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Kariem; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Koo, Taeyoung; McClorey, Graham; Benner, Leif; Coenen-Stass, Anna; O'Donovan, Liz; Lehto, Taavi; Garcia-Guerra, Antonio; Nordin, Joel; Saleh, Amer F; Behlke, Mark; Morris, John; Goyenvalle, Aurelie; Dugovic, Branislav; Leumann, Christian; Gordon, Siamon; Gait, Michael J; El-Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-07-08

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) have the potential to revolutionize medicine due to their ability to manipulate gene function for therapeutic purposes. ASOs are chemically modified and/or incorporated within nanoparticles to enhance their stability and cellular uptake, however, a major challenge is the poor understanding of their uptake mechanisms, which would facilitate improved ASO designs with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here, we study the uptake mechanism of three therapeutically relevant ASOs (peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PPMO), 2'Omethyl phosphorothioate (2'OMe), and phosphorothioated tricyclo DNA (tcDNA) that have been optimized to induce exon skipping in models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We show that PPMO and tcDNA have high propensity to spontaneously self-assemble into nanoparticles. PPMO forms micelles of defined size and their net charge (zeta potential) is dependent on the medium and concentration. In biomimetic conditions and at low concentrations, PPMO obtains net negative charge and its uptake is mediated by class A scavenger receptor subtypes (SCARAs) as shown by competitive inhibition and RNAi silencing experiments in vitro. In vivo, the activity of PPMO was significantly decreased in SCARA1 knockout mice compared to wild-type animals. Additionally, we show that SCARA1 is involved in the uptake of tcDNA and 2'OMe as shown by competitive inhibition and colocalization experiments. Surface plasmon resonance binding analysis to SCARA1 demonstrated that PPMO and tcDNA have higher binding profiles to the receptor compared to 2'OMe. These results demonstrate receptor-mediated uptake for a range of therapeutic ASO chemistries, a mechanism that is dependent on their self-assembly into nanoparticles.

  14. The trimeric serine protease HtrA1 forms a cage-like inhibition complex with an anti-HtrA1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Ciferri, Claudio; Lipari, Michael T; Liang, Wei-Ching; Estevez, Alberto; Hang, Julie; Stawicki, Scott; Wu, Yan; Moran, Paul; Elliott, Mike; Eigenbrot, Charles; Katschke, Kenneth J; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    High temperature requirement A1 (HtrA1) is a trypsin-fold serine protease implicated in the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Our interest in an antibody therapy to neutralize HtrA1 faces the complication that the target adopts a trimeric arrangement, with three active sites in close proximity. In the present study, we describe antibody 94, obtained from a human antibody phage display library, which forms a distinct macromolecular complex with HtrA1 and inhibits the enzymatic activity of recombinant and native HtrA1 forms. Using biochemical methods and negative-staining EM we were able to elucidate the molecular composition of the IgG94 and Fab94 complexes and the associated inhibition mechanism. The 246-kDa complex between the HtrA1 catalytic domain trimer (HtrA1_Cat) and Fab94 had a propeller-like organization with one Fab bound peripherally to each protomer. Low-resolution EM structures and epitope mapping indicated that the antibody binds to the surface-exposed loops B and C of the catalytic domain, suggesting an allosteric inhibition mechanism. The HtrA1_Cat-IgG94 complex (636 kDa) is a cage-like structure with three centrally located IgG94 molecules co-ordinating two HtrA1_Cat trimers and the six active sites pointing into the cavity of the cage. In both complexes, all antigen-recognition regions (paratopes) are found to bind one HtrA1 protomer and all protomers are bound by a paratope, consistent with the complete inhibition of enzyme activity. Therefore, in addition to its potential therapeutic usefulness, antibody 94 establishes a new paradigm of multimeric serine protease inhibition.

  15. M2-like macrophages are responsible for collagen degradation through a mannose receptor-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Daniel H; Leonard, Daniel; Masedunskas, Andrius; Moyer, Amanda; Jürgensen, Henrik Jessen; Peters, Diane E; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Selvaraj, Arul; Yamada, Susan S; Brenner, David A; Burgdorf, Sven; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels; Holmbeck, Kenn; Weigert, Roberto; Bugge, Thomas H

    2013-09-16

    Tissue remodeling processes critically depend on the timely removal and remodeling of preexisting collagen scaffolds. Nevertheless, many aspects related to the turnover of this abundant extracellular matrix component in vivo are still incompletely understood. We therefore took advantage of recent advances in optical imaging to develop an assay to visualize collagen turnover in situ and identify cell types and molecules involved in this process. Collagen introduced into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis in a partially matrix metalloproteinase-dependent manner and was subsequently routed to lysosomes for complete degradation. Collagen uptake was predominantly executed by a quantitatively minor population of M2-like macrophages, whereas more abundant Col1a1-expressing fibroblasts and Cx3cr1-expressing macrophages internalized collagen at lower levels. Genetic ablation of the collagen receptors mannose receptor (Mrc1) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (Endo180 and Mrc2) impaired this intracellular collagen degradation pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of receptor-mediated cellular uptake to collagen turnover in vivo and identifies a key role of M2-like macrophages in this process.

  16. Inhibition of 17β-estradiol activation by CYP1A1: genotype- and regioselective inhibition by St. John's Wort and several natural polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Dieter; Kisselev, Pyotr; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen; Roots, Ivar

    2011-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies associate certain CYP1A1 genotypes, alone or in combination, with an increased risk of estrogen-related cancers. Previously we demonstrated that metabolic activation of estrogens by CYP1A1 is a genotype-dependent reaction with the CYP1A1.2 (Ile462Val) variant being the most efficient catalyst (Kisselev et al.). To answer the question whether genotype-dependent inhibition of activation of estrogens by CYP1A1 could also contribute, we studied the inhibition of hydroxylation activity of the most common allelic variants of human CYP1A1 towards 17β-estradiol. We expressed and purified CYP1A1.1 (wild-type), CYP1A1.2 (Ile462Val), and CYP1A1.4 (Thr461Asn) and performed inhibition assays by natural polyphenols of our diet and drugs of NADPH-dependent estradiol hydroxylation in reconstituted CYP1A1 systems. From the polyphenols studied, a St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) extract, some of its main single constituents hypericin, pseudohypericin, and quercetin, as well as the flavonols kaempferol, myricetin and the phytoestrogens resveratrol and tetramethyl-stilbene exhibited strong inhibition. For the St. John's Wort extract and its single constituents hypericin, pseudohypericin, and quercetin, inhibition exhibited a remarkable dependency on the CYP1A1 genotype. Whereas (wild-type) CYP1A1.1 was most inhibited by the whole crude extract, the variant CYP1A1.2 (Ile462Val) was significantly stronger inhibited by the constituents in its pure form: IC₅₀ values for 2-hydroxylation was more than two times lower compared with the wild-type enzyme and the variant CYP1A1.4 (Thr461Asn). Besides this, the inhibition exhibited a remarkable regioselectivity. The data suggest that risk of estrogen-mediated diseases might be not only influenced by CYP1A1 genotype-dependent activation but also its inhibition by natural polyphenols of our diet and drugs.

  17. Characterization of GABA/sub A/ receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride uptake in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Luu, M.D.; Morrow, A.L.; Paul, S.M.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1987-09-07

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) uptake was measured in synaptoneurosomes from rat brain. GABA and GABA agonists stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake in a concentration-dependent manner with the following order of potency: Muscimol>GABA>piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (P4S)>4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol (THIP)=3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (3APS)>>taurine. Both P4S and 3APS behaved as partial agonists, while the GABA/sub B/ agonist, baclofen, was ineffective. The response to muscimol was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin in a mixed competitive/non-competitive manner. Other inhibitors of GABA receptor-opened channels or non-neuronal anion channels such as penicillin, picrate, furosemide and disulfonic acid stilbenes also inhibited the response to muscimol. A regional variation in muscimol-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was observed; the largest responses were observed in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus, moderate responses were obtained in the striatum and hypothalamus and the smallest response was observed in the pons-medulla. GABA receptor-mediated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was also dependent on the anion present in the media. The muscinol response varied in media containing the following anions: Br/sup -/>Cl/sup -/greater than or equal toNO/sub 3//sup -/>I/sup -/greater than or equal toSCN/sup -/>>C/sub 3/H/sub 5/OO/sup -/greater than or equal toClO/sub 4//sup -/>F/sup -/, consistent with the relative anion permeability through GABA receptor-gated anion channels and the enhancement of convulsant binding to the GABA receptor-gated Cl/sup -/ channel. 43 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Caffeine reverses antinociception by oxcarbazepine by inhibition of adenosine A1 receptors: insights using knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, Jana; Reid, Allison R; Fredholm, Bertil B

    2010-04-12

    Oxcarbazepine is an anticonvulsant drug that has been explored as a novel therapeutic agent to treat neuropathic pain in humans. It produces antinociception in several preclinical models of pain, and these actions are blocked by methylxanthine adenosine receptor antagonists which implicates adenosine it its actions. In this study, the antinociceptive effect of oxcarbazepine, and the ability of caffeine to reverse its actions, were examined using the formalin test (2%) in wild-type mice and in mice lacking adenosine A(1) receptors by way of further exploring the involvement of adenosine in its actions. Oxcarbazepine produced dose-related suppression of formalin-evoked flinching responses in wild-type mice following both systemic and intraplantar administration, and this action was reversed by systemic and intraplantar administration of caffeine, respectively. The ability of oxcarbazepine to inhibit flinching after systemic and intraplantar administration was unaltered in homozygous (-/-) and heterozygous (+/-) adenosine A(1) receptor knockout mice. However, caffeine no longer reversed this antinociception. Our results indicate that, while adenosine A(1) receptors are not required for oxcarbazepine to produce antinociception in knockout mice, such receptors are essential in order to see caffeine reversal of this antinociceptive effect. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Muscarinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat intracardiac ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Michiko; Ogata, Masanori; Kawamata, Tomoyuki; Ishibashi, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Modulation of the membrane excitability of rat parasympathetic intracardiac ganglion neurons by muscarinic receptors was studied using an amphotericin B-perforated patch-clamp recording configuration. Activation of muscarinic receptors by oxotremorine-M (OxoM) depolarized the membrane, accompanied by repetitive action potentials. OxoM evoked inward currents under voltage-clamp conditions at a holding potential of -60 mV. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) markedly increased the OxoM-induced current (IOxoM). The inward IOxoM in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) was fully inhibited by removal of extracellular Na(+), indicating the involvement of non-selective cation channels. The IOxoM was inhibited by organic cation channel antagonists including SKF-96365 and ML-204. The IOxoM was antagonized by muscarinic receptor antagonists with the following potency: 4-DAMP > pirenzepine = darifenacin > methoctramine. Muscarinic toxin 7 (MT-7), a highly selective inhibitor for M1 receptor, produced partial inhibition of the IOxoM. In the presence of MT-7, concentration-inhibition curve of the M3-preferring antagonist darifenacin was shifted to the left. These results suggest the contribution of M1 and M3 receptors to the OxoM response. The IOxoM was inhibited by U-73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor. The membrane-permeable IP3 receptor blocker xestospongin C also inhibited the IOxoM. Furthermore, pretreatment with thapsigargin and BAPTA-AM inhibited the IOxoM, while KN-62, a blocker of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, had no effect. These results suggest that the activation mechanism involves a PLC pathway, release of Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores and calmodulin. The cation channels activated by muscarinic receptors may play an important role in neuronal membrane depolarization in rat intracardiac ganglion neurons.

  20. Potentiating effect of eszopiclone on GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses in pedunculopontine neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, Meijun; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2009-07-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the cholinergic arm of the reticular activating system, which is mostly active during waking and REM sleep. GABAergic modulation of this area appears to regulate sleep-wake cycles. Eszopiclone (ESZ), a nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic agent, appears to modulate GABAergic receptors. However, the action site of ESZ in the brain is still unresolved. We tested the hypothesis that ESZ acts by potentiating GABA(A) receptors on PPN neurons. Wholecell voltage clamp recordings were performed on PPN neurons in 7-15 day rat brainstem slices, and the potentiating effects of ESZ on the responses to the GABA(A) receptor agonist isoguvacine (IGV), and on GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs), were determined. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, ESZ (1) increased the amplitude of the outward current induced by IGV, (2) increased its duration, and (3) enhanced the IGV-induced decrease in input resistance (Rin). The GABA(A) receptor antagonist gabazine (GBZ) blocked these effects. ESZ alone did not induce detectable currents or change Rin at a holding potential of -60 mV, but when held at 0 mV, ESZ induced an outward current in 13/21 PPN cells, an effect blocked by GBZ. ESZ also increased the amplitude (n = 18/21), duration (n = 17/21), and frequency (n = 13/15) of IPSCs. ESZ may potentiate GABA(A) inhibition in the PPN via pre- and post-synaptic modulation, which may underlie the hypnotic effects of ESZ. The differential effects of ESZ on both pre- and post-synaptic sites may partially explain why it has less significant side effects compared to other hypnotic agents.

  1. EP2 receptor mediates PGE2-induced cystogenesis of human renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elberg, Gerard; Elberg, Dorit; Lewis, Teresa V; Guruswamy, Suresh; Chen, Lijuan; Logan, Charlotte J; Chan, Michael D; Turman, Martin A

    2007-11-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by formation of cysts from tubular epithelial cells. Previous studies indicate that secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) into cyst fluid and production of cAMP underlie cyst expansion. However, the mechanism by which PGE2 directly stimulates cAMP formation and modulates cystogenesis is still unclear, because the particular E-prostanoid (EP) receptor mediating the PGE2 effect has not been characterized. Our goal is to define the PGE2 receptor subtype involved in ADPKD. We used a three-dimensional cell-culture system of human epithelial cells from normal and ADPKD kidneys in primary cultures to demonstrate that PGE2 induces cyst formation. Biochemical evidence gathered by using real-time RT-PCR mRNA analysis and immunodetection indicate the presence of EP2 receptor in cystic epithelial cells in ADPKD kidney. Pharmacological evidence obtained by using PGE2-selective analogs further demonstrates that EP2 mediates cAMP formation and cystogenesis. Functional evidence for a role of EP2 receptor in mediating cAMP signaling was also provided by inhibiting EP2 receptor expression with transfection of small interfering RNA in cystic epithelial cells. Our results indicate that PGE2 produced in cyst fluid binds to adjacent EP2 receptors located on the apical side of cysts and stimulates EP2 receptor expression. PGE2 binding to EP2 receptor leads to cAMP signaling and cystogenesis by a mechanism that involves protection of cystic epithelial cells from apoptosis. The role of EP2 receptor in mediating the PGE2 effect on stimulating cyst formation may have direct pharmacological implications for the treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

  2. Direct muscarinic and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelan, K. D.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have utilized intracellular recording techniques to investigate the cholinoceptivity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in a submerged brain slice preparation. Exogenous application of the mixed cholinergic agonists, acetylcholine (ACh) or carbachol (CCh), produced predominantly membrane depolarization, induction of action potential firing, and decreased input resistance. Application of the selective muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine (MUSC), or the selective nicotinic receptor agonists nicotine (NIC) or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP) also produced membrane depolarizations. The MUSC-induced depolarization was accompanied by decreased conductance, while an increase in conductance appeared to underlie the NIC- and DMPP-induced depolarizations. The muscarinic and nicotinic receptor mediated depolarizations persisted in tetrodotoxin and/or low Ca2+/high Mg2+ containing media, suggesting direct postsynaptic receptor activation. The MUSC-induced depolarization could be reversibly blocked by the selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, atropine, while the DMPP-induced depolarization could be reversibly suppressed by the selective ganglionic nicotinic-receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. Some neurons exhibited a transient membrane hyperpolarization during the depolarizing response to CCh or MUSC application. This transient inhibition could be reversibly blocked by the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline, suggesting that the underlying hyperpolarization results indirectly from the endogenous release of GABA acting at GABA receptors. This study confirms the cholinoceptivity of MVN neurons and establishes that individual MVN cells possess muscarinic as well as nicotinic receptors. The data provide support for a prominent role of cholinergic mechanisms in the direct and indirect regulation of the excitability of MVN neurons.

  3. Direct muscarinic and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelan, K. D.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have utilized intracellular recording techniques to investigate the cholinoceptivity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in a submerged brain slice preparation. Exogenous application of the mixed cholinergic agonists, acetylcholine (ACh) or carbachol (CCh), produced predominantly membrane depolarization, induction of action potential firing, and decreased input resistance. Application of the selective muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine (MUSC), or the selective nicotinic receptor agonists nicotine (NIC) or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP) also produced membrane depolarizations. The MUSC-induced depolarization was accompanied by decreased conductance, while an increase in conductance appeared to underlie the NIC- and DMPP-induced depolarizations. The muscarinic and nicotinic receptor mediated depolarizations persisted in tetrodotoxin and/or low Ca2+/high Mg2+ containing media, suggesting direct postsynaptic receptor activation. The MUSC-induced depolarization could be reversibly blocked by the selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, atropine, while the DMPP-induced depolarization could be reversibly suppressed by the selective ganglionic nicotinic-receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. Some neurons exhibited a transient membrane hyperpolarization during the depolarizing response to CCh or MUSC application. This transient inhibition could be reversibly blocked by the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline, suggesting that the underlying hyperpolarization results indirectly from the endogenous release of GABA acting at GABA receptors. This study confirms the cholinoceptivity of MVN neurons and establishes that individual MVN cells possess muscarinic as well as nicotinic receptors. The data provide support for a prominent role of cholinergic mechanisms in the direct and indirect regulation of the excitability of MVN neurons.

  4. Fc receptor-mediated immune responses: new tools but increased complexity in HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2013-07-01

    The modest success of the RV144 HIV vaccine trial in Thailand and the ensuing suggestion that a Fc-receptormediated antibody activity might have played a role in the protection observed have intensified investigations on Fcrelated immune responses. HIV neutralizing antibodies have been and continue to be the focal point of research into humoral immune protection. However, recent knowledge that their protective efficacy can be augmented by Fc-FcR interactions has increased the complexity of identifying immune correlates of protection. If anything, continued studies of both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms point to the lack of a single protective anti-HIV immune response. Here we focus on humoral immunity, analyzing the role played by Fc receptor-related responses and discussing how new knowledge of their interactions requires further investigation, but may also spur novel vaccination approaches. We initially address classical Fc-receptor mediated anti-viral mechanisms including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cell mediated viral inhibition (ADCVI), and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), as well as the effector cells that mediate these functions. Next, we summarize key aspects of FcR-Fc interactions that are important for potential control of HIV/SIV such as FcR polymorphisms and post-transcriptional modifications. Finally we discuss less commonly studied non-mechanistic anti-HIV immune functions: antibody avidity and envelopespecific B cell memory. Overall, a spectrum of immune responses, reflecting the immune system's redundancy, will likely be needed to prevent HIV infection and/or disease progression. Aside from elicitation of critical immune mechanisms, a successful vaccine will need to induce mature B cell responses and long-lasting immune memory.

  5. Inhibition of PDE5A1 guanosine cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) hydrolysing activity by sildenafil analogues that inhibit cellular cGMP efflux.

    PubMed

    Subbotina, Anna; Ravna, Aina W; Lysaa, Roy A; Abagyan, Ruben; Bugno, Ryszard; Sager, Georg

    2017-06-01

    To determine the ability of 11 sildenafil analogues to discriminate between cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (cnPDEs) and to characterise their inhibitory potencies (Ki values) of PDE5A1-dependent guanosine cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) hydrolysis. Sildenafil analogues were identified by virtual ligand screening (VLS) and screened for their ability to inhibit adenosine cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) hydrolysis by PDE1A1, PDE1B1, PDE2A1, PDE3A, PDE10A1 and PDE10A2, and cGMP hydrolysis by PDE5A, PDE6C, PDE9A2 for a low (1 nm) and high concentration (10 μm). Complete IC50 plots for all analogues were performed for PDE5A-dependent cGMP hydrolysis. Docking studies and scoring were made using the ICM molecular modelling software. The analogues in a low concentration showed no or low inhibition of PDE1A1, PDE1B1, PDE2A1, PDE3A, PDE10A1 and PDE10A2. In contrast, PDE5A and PDE6C were markedly inhibited to a similar extent by the analogues in a low concentration, whereas PDE9A2 was much less inhibited. The analogues showed a relative narrow range of Ki values for PDE5A inhibition (1.2-14 nm). The sildenafil molecule was docked in the structure of PDE5A1 co-crystallised with sildenafil. All the analogues had similar binding poses as sildenafil. Sildenafil analogues that inhibit cellular cGMP efflux are potent inhibitors of PDE5A and PDE6C. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  6. Receptor-mediated endocytosis for drug delivery in African trypanosomes: fulfilling Paul Ehrlich's vision of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Alsford, Sam; Field, Mark C; Horn, David

    2013-05-01

    Bloodstream-form cells of Trypanosoma brucei exhibit massively increased endocytic activity relative to the insect midgut stage, enabling rapid recycling of variant surface glycoprotein and antibody clearance from the surface. In addition, recent advances have identified a role for receptor-mediated endocytosis in the uptake of the antitrypanosomal drug, suramin, via invariant surface glycoprotein 75, and in the uptake of trypanosome lytic factor 1 via haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor. Here, we argue that receptor-mediated endocytosis represents both a validated drug target and a promising route for the delivery of novel therapeutics into trypanosomes.

  7. Adenosine A2 receptor-mediated regulation of renal hemodynamics and glomerular filtration rate is abolished in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Persson, Patrik; Hansell, Peter; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are one of the earliest indications of altered kidney function in diabetes. Adenosine regulates GFR through tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism acting on adenosine A1 receptor. In addition, adenosine can directly regulate vascular tone by acting on A1 and A2 receptors expressed in afferent and efferent arterioles. Opposite to A1 receptors, A2 receptors mediate vasorelaxation. This study investigates the involvement of adenosine A2 receptors in regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) and GFR in control and diabetic kidneys. GFR was measured by inulin clearance and RBF by a transonic flow probe placed around the renal artery. Measurements were performed in isoflurane-anesthetized normoglycemic and alloxan-diabetic C57BL/6 mice during baseline and after acute administration of 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX), a selective A2 receptor antagonist. GFR and RBF were lower in diabetic mice compared to control (258 ± 61 vs. 443 ± 33 μl min(-1) and 1,083 ± 51 vs. 1,405 ± 78 μl min(-1)). In control animals, DMPX decreased RBF by -6%, whereas GFR increased +44%. DMPX had no effects on GFR and RBF in diabetic mice. Sodium excretion increased in diabetic mice after A2 receptor blockade (+78%). In conclusion, adenosine acting on A2 receptors mediates an efferent arteriolar dilatation which reduces filtration fraction (FF) and maintains GFR within normal range in normoglycemic mice. However, this regulation is absent in diabetic mice, which may contribute to reduced oxygen availability in the diabetic kidney.

  8. Annexin A1 can inhibit the in vitro invasive ability of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells possibly through Annexin A1/S100A9/Vimentin interaction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiguo; Tang, Yunlian; Fu, Weiting

    2017-01-01

    Annexin A1 is a member of a large superfamily of glucocorticoid-regulated, calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins. Our previous studies have shown that the abnormal expression of Annexin A1 is related to the occurrence and development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). To understand the roles of Annexin A1 in the tumorigenesis of NPC, targeted proteomic analysis was performed on Annexin A1-associated proteins from NPC cells. We identified 436 proteins associated with Annexin A1, as well as two Annexin A1-interacted key proteins, S100A9 and Vimentin, which were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Gene function classification revealed that the Annexin A1-associated proteins can be grouped into 21 clusters based on their molecular functions. Protein–protein interaction analysis indicated that Annexin A1 /S100A9/Vimentin interactions may be involved in the invasion and metastasis of NPC because they can form complexes in NPC cells. The down-regulation of Annexin A1 in NPC may lead to the overexpression of S100A9/Vimentin, which may increase the possibility of the invasion ability of NPC cells by adjusting the function of cytoskeleton proteins. Results suggested that the biological functions of Annexin A1 in NPC were diverse, and that Annexin A1 can inhibit the in vitro invasive ability of NPC cells through Annexin A1 /S100A9/Vimentin interaction. PMID:28355254

  9. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanisms from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    well as mechanisms associated with prostate cancer growth and expansion, we may be able to develop therapies that prolong lives. Understanding the...and G. A. Coetzee. 2004. Androgen receptor signaling: mechanism of interleukin-6 inhibition. Cancer Res. 64:2619–2626. 19. Jia, L., and G. A. Coetzee...the prostate specific antigen locus: steroidal and non-steroidal mechanisms . Mol. Cancer Res. 1:385–392. 21. Johnstone, R. W. 2002. Histone

  10. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanism from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-31

    is a fundamental and an increasingly central aspect of transcriptional control in higher eukaryotic cells , and we therefore hypothesized that (i) the...regions (ARORs) in PCa cells . Our work suggests that only some ARORs function under the given physiological conditions, utilizing diverse mechanisms. This...exemplify the AR-dependence of ablation-resistant PCa cells . First, disruption of AR expression by a specific antibody or ribozyme inhibited

  11. Lipoprotein lipase regulates Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages maintained in glucose-deficient medium.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, B; Loike, J D; Kako, Y; Weinstock, P H; Breslow, J L; Silverstein, S C; Goldberg, I J

    1997-01-01

    During periods of intense activity such as phagocytosis, macrophages are thought to derive most of their energy from glucose metabolism under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To determine whether fatty acids released from lipoproteins by macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) could substitute for glucose as a source of energy for phagocytosis, we cultured peritoneal macrophages from normal and LPL knockout (LPL-KO) mice that had been rescued from neonatal demise by expression of human LPL via the muscle creatine kinase promoter. Normal and LPL-KO macrophages were cultured in medium containing normal (5 mM) or low (1 mM) glucose, and were tested for their capacity to phagocytose IgG-opsonized sheep erythrocytes. LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 and 5 mM glucose phagocytosed 67 and 79% fewer IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, respectively, than macrophages from normal mice. Addition of VLDL to LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose enhanced the macrophages' phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, but did not stimulate phagocytosis by LPL-KO macrophages. Inhibition of secreted LPL with a monoclonal anti-LPL antibody or with tetrahydrolipstatin blocked the ability of VLDL to enhance phagocytosis by LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Addition of oleic acid significantly enhanced phagocytosis by both LPL-expressing and LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Moreover, oleic acid stimulated phagocytosis in cells cultured in non-glucose-containing medium, and increased the intracellular stores of creatine phosphate. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, but not of glycolysis, blocked the capacity of oleic acid to stimulate phagocytosis. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl LDL by macrophages from LPL-expressing and LPL-KO mice was similar whether the cells were maintained in 5 or 1 mM glucose, and was not augmented by VLDL. We postulate that fatty acids derived from macrophage LPL-catalyzed hydrolysis of triglycerides and

  12. The Impact of Hyperthermia on Receptor-Mediated Interleukin-6 Regulation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Welc, Steven S.; Morse, Deborah A.; Mattingly, Alex J.; Laitano, Orlando; King, Michelle A.; Clanton, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    In inflammatory cells, hyperthermia inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene expression and protein secretion. Since hyperthermia alone stimulates IL-6 in skeletal muscle, we hypothesized that it would amplify responses to other receptor-mediated stimuli. IL-6 regulation was tested in C2C12 myotubes and in soleus during treatment with epinephrine (EPI) or LPS. In EPI-treated myotubes (100 ng/ml), 1 h exposure at 40.5°C-42°C transiently increased IL-6 mRNA compared to EPI treatment alone at 37°C. In LPS-treated myotubes (1 μg/ml), exposure to 41°C-42°C also increased IL-6 mRNA. In isolated mouse soleus, similar amplifications of IL-6 gene expression were observed in 41°C, during both low (1 ng/ml) and high dose (100 ng/ml) EPI, but only in high dose LPS (1 μg/ml). In myotubes, heat increased IL-6 secretion during EPI exposure but had no effect or inhibited secretion with LPS. In soleus there were no effects of heat on IL-6 secretion during either EPI or LPS treatment. Mechanisms for the effects of heat on IL-6 mRNA were explored using a luciferase-reporter in C2C12 myotubes. Overexpression of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) had no impact on IL-6 promoter activity during EPI stimulation, but elevated IL-6 promoter activity during LPS stimulation. In contrast, when the activator protein-1 (AP-1) element was mutated, responses to both LPS and EPI were suppressed in heat. Using siRNA against activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3), a heat-stress-induced inhibitor of IL-6, no ATF-3-dependent effects were observed. The results demonstrate that, unlike inflammatory cells, hyperthermia in muscle fibers amplifies IL-6 gene expression to EPI and LPS. The effect appears to reflect differential engagement of HSF-1 and AP-1 sensitive elements on the IL-6 gene, with no evidence for involvement of ATF-3. The functional significance of increased IL-6 mRNA expression during heat may serve to overcome the well-known suppression of protein synthetic

  13. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production

    SciTech Connect

    abdullah, huda ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L.; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D.; McGiff, John C.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca2+ were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  14. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Huda Ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D; McGiff, John C; Ferreri, Nicholas R

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca(2+) (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca(2+) were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  15. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-10-13

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting.

  16. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting. PMID:26431498

  17. Structural, Biochemical, and Computational Studies Reveal the Mechanism of Selective Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 Inhibition by Cytotoxic Duocarmycin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Koch, Maximilian F; Harteis, Sabrina; Blank, Iris D; Pestel, Galina; Tietze, Lutz F; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Schneider, Sabine; Sieber, Stephan A

    2015-11-09

    Analogues of the natural product duocarmycin bearing an indole moiety were shown to bind aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) in addition to DNA, while derivatives without the indole solely addressed the ALDH1A1 protein. The molecular mechanism of selective ALDH1A1 inhibition by duocarmycin analogues was unraveled through cocrystallization, mutational studies, and molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of the complex shows the compound embedded in a hydrophobic pocket, where it is stabilized by several crucial π-stacking and van der Waals interactions. This binding mode positions the cyclopropyl electrophile for nucleophilic attack by the noncatalytic residue Cys302, thereby resulting in covalent attachment, steric occlusion of the active site, and inhibition of catalysis. The selectivity of duocarmycin analogues for ALDH1A1 is unique, since only minor alterations in the sequence of closely related protein isoforms restrict compound accessibility. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Inhibition of Mayaro virus replication by prostaglandin A1 and B2 in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, D; Marcicano, F G; Rebello, M A

    1998-09-01

    The effect of prostaglandins (PGA1 and PGB2) on the replication of Mayaro virus was studied in Vero cells. PGA1 and PGB2 antiviral activity was found to be dose-dependent. However, while 10 micrograms/ml PGB2 inhibited virus yield by 60%, at the same dose PGA1 suppressed virus replication by more than 90%. SDS-PAGE analysis of [35S]-methionine-labelled proteins showed that PGA1 did not alter cellular protein synthesis. In infected cells, PGA1 slightly inhibited the synthesis of protein C, while drastically inhibiting the synthesis of glycoproteins E1 and E2.

  19. Ligand Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Growth in Plants.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Sussman, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Growth and development of multicellular organisms are coordinately regulated by various signaling pathways involving the communication of inter- and intracellular components. To form the appropriate body patterns, cellular growth and development are modulated by either stimulating or inhibiting these pathways. Hormones and second messengers help to mediate the initiation and/or interaction of the various signaling pathways in all complex multicellular eukaryotes. In plants, hormones include small organic molecules, as well as larger peptides and small proteins, which, as in animals, act as ligands and interact with receptor proteins to trigger rapid biochemical changes and induce the intracellular transcriptional and long-term physiological responses. During the past two decades, the availability of genetic and genomic resources in the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly helped in the discovery of plant hormone receptors and the components of signal transduction pathways and mechanisms used by these immobile but highly complex organisms. Recently, it has been shown that two of the most important plant hormones, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA), act through signaling pathways that have not yet been recognized in animals. For example, auxins stimulate cell elongation by bringing negatively acting transcriptional repressor proteins to the proteasome to be degraded, thus unleashing the gene expression program required for increasing cell size. The "dormancy" inducing hormone, ABA, binds to soluble receptor proteins and inhibits a specific class of protein phosphatases (PP2C), which activates phosphorylation signaling leading to transcriptional changes needed for the desiccation of the seeds prior to entering dormancy. While these two hormone receptors have no known animal counterparts, there are also many similarities between animal and plant signaling pathways. For example, in plants, the largest single gene family in the genome is the protein kinase

  20. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D.; Stewart, Alan J.; Pitt, Samantha J.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Zn2+ homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn2+ modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca2+ dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn2+ is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn2+ concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca2+. At concentrations of free Zn2+ >1 nm, Zn2+ is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca2+ is removed. Zn2+ is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca2+. Millimolar levels of free Zn2+ were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn2+ modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca2+ waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn2+ elicit Ca2+ release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca2+. This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn2+ in shaping Ca2+ dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating. PMID:26041778

  1. Intracellular Zinc Modulates Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor-mediated Calcium Release.

    PubMed

    Woodier, Jason; Rainbow, Richard D; Stewart, Alan J; Pitt, Samantha J

    2015-07-10

    Aberrant Zn(2+) homeostasis is a hallmark of certain cardiomyopathies associated with altered contractile force. In this study, we addressed whether Zn(2+) modulates cardiac ryanodine receptor gating and Ca(2+) dynamics in isolated cardiomyocytes. We reveal that Zn(2+) is a high affinity regulator of RyR2 displaying three modes of operation. Picomolar free Zn(2+) concentrations potentiate RyR2 responses, but channel activation is still dependent on the presence of cytosolic Ca(2+). At concentrations of free Zn(2+) >1 nm, Zn(2+) is the main activating ligand, and the dependence on Ca(2+) is removed. Zn(2+) is therefore a higher affinity activator of RyR2 than Ca(2+). Millimolar levels of free Zn(2+) were found to inhibit channel openings. In cardiomyocytes, consistent with our single channel results, we show that Zn(2+) modulates both the frequency and amplitude of Ca(2+) waves in a concentration-dependent manner and that physiological levels of Zn(2+) elicit Ca(2+) release in the absence of activating levels of cytosolic Ca(2+). This highlights a new role for intracellular Zn(2+) in shaping Ca(2+) dynamics in cardiomyocytes through modulation of RyR2 gating.

  2. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibition of col1a1 promoter expression in calvariae from neonatal transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedalov, A.; Salvatori, R.; Dodig, M.; Kapural, B.; Pavlin, D.; Kream, B. E.; Clark, S. H.; Woody, C. O.; Rowe, D. W.; Lichtler, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) on organ cultures of transgenic mouse calvariae containing segments of the Col1a1 promoter extending to -3518, -2297, -1997, -1794, -1763, and -1719 bp upstream of the transcription start site fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene. 1,25(OH)2D3 had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the expression of the -3518 bp promoter construct (ColCAT3.6), with maximal inhibition of about 50% at 10 nM. This level of inhibition was consistent with the previously observed effect on the endogenous Col1a1 gene in bone cell models. All of the shorter constructs were also inhibited by 10 nM 1,25(OH)2D3, suggesting that the sequences required for 1, 25(OH)2D3 inhibition are downstream of -1719 bp. The inhibitory effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on transgene mRNA was maintained in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, suggesting that the inhibitory effect on Col1a1 gene transcription does not require de novo protein synthesis. We also examined the in vivo effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment of transgenic mice on ColCAT activity, and found that 48 h treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition of CAT activity in calvariae comparable to that observed in organ cultures. In conclusion, we demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits Col1A1 promoter activity in transgenic mouse calvariae, both in vivo and in vitro. The results indicate that there is a 1, 25(OH)2D3 responsive element downstream of -1719 bp. The inhibitory effect does not require new protein synthesis.

  3. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibition of col1a1 promoter expression in calvariae from neonatal transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedalov, A.; Salvatori, R.; Dodig, M.; Kapural, B.; Pavlin, D.; Kream, B. E.; Clark, S. H.; Woody, C. O.; Rowe, D. W.; Lichtler, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) on organ cultures of transgenic mouse calvariae containing segments of the Col1a1 promoter extending to -3518, -2297, -1997, -1794, -1763, and -1719 bp upstream of the transcription start site fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene. 1,25(OH)2D3 had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the expression of the -3518 bp promoter construct (ColCAT3.6), with maximal inhibition of about 50% at 10 nM. This level of inhibition was consistent with the previously observed effect on the endogenous Col1a1 gene in bone cell models. All of the shorter constructs were also inhibited by 10 nM 1,25(OH)2D3, suggesting that the sequences required for 1, 25(OH)2D3 inhibition are downstream of -1719 bp. The inhibitory effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on transgene mRNA was maintained in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, suggesting that the inhibitory effect on Col1a1 gene transcription does not require de novo protein synthesis. We also examined the in vivo effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment of transgenic mice on ColCAT activity, and found that 48 h treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition of CAT activity in calvariae comparable to that observed in organ cultures. In conclusion, we demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits Col1A1 promoter activity in transgenic mouse calvariae, both in vivo and in vitro. The results indicate that there is a 1, 25(OH)2D3 responsive element downstream of -1719 bp. The inhibitory effect does not require new protein synthesis.

  4. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  5. Paired-pulse depression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated synaptic potentials in the amygdala.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C C; Gean, P W

    1994-01-01

    1. An in vitro slice preparation of rat amygdala was used to study the paired-pulse depression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic potential e.p.s.p.NMDA. 2. The e.p.s.p.NMDA was isolated pharmacologically by applying a solution containing the non-NMDA receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) blocker picrotoxin and increasing the stimulus intensity. 3. When two stimuli of identical strength were applied in close succession, the second e.p.s.p.NMDA was depressed. This paired-pulse depression was seen with interstimulus intervals of between 100 ms and 2000 ms; the maximal depression was observed at interval of 200 ms. 4. Superfusion of phaclofen or 2-hydroxy-saclofen inhibited the paired-pulse depression indicating the involvement of GABAB receptors. 5. Bath applications of Ba2+ or intracellular injection of Cs+ to block post- but not presynaptic GABAB receptors failed to inhibit the paired-pulse depression (PPD). 6. Incubation of slices with pertussis toxin prevented the postsynaptic hyperpolarization induced by baclofen. The PPD of e.p.s.p.NMDA, however, was not affected by pertussis toxin treatment. 7. These results suggest that GABA released by the first stimulus acts on GABAB receptors to suppress the second e.p.s.p.NMDA via mechanisms other than activation of a postsynaptic GABAB receptor-coupled K+ conductance. PMID:7858845

  6. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  7. Effect of taurine deficiency on adenosine receptor-mediated relaxation of the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Worku; Mozaffari, Mahmood S

    2003-11-01

    not altered by taurine deficiency. The results indicate that endogenous taurine deficiency causes differential inhibitory effects on adenosine receptor-mediated vasorelaxation, depending upon the agonists used. Given the recognized role of adenosine in the vasculature, these alterations suggest taurine-mediated modulation of blood flow regulation.

  8. Inhibition of phagocytosis by Haemophilus ducreyi requires expression of the LspA1 and LspA2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Vakevainen, Merja; Greenberg, Steven; Hansen, Eric J

    2003-10-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi previously has been shown to inhibit the phagocytosis of both secondary targets and itself by certain cells in vitro. Wild-type H. ducreyi strain 35000HP contains two genes, lspA1 and lspA2, whose encoded protein products are predicted to be 456 and 543 kDa, respectively. An isogenic mutant of H. ducreyi 35000HP with inactivated lspA1 and lspA2 genes has been shown to exhibit substantially decreased virulence in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for chancroid. This lspA1 lspA2 mutant was tested for its ability to inhibit phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G-opsonized particles by differentiated HL-60 and U-937 cells and by J774A.1 cells. The wild-type strain H. ducreyi 35000HP readily inhibited phagocytosis, whereas the lspA1 lspA2 mutant was unable to inhibit phagocytosis. Similarly, the wild-type strain was resistant to phagocytosis, whereas the lspA1 lspA2 mutant was readily engulfed by phagocytes. This inhibitory effect of wild-type H. ducreyi on phagocytic activity was primarily associated with live bacterial cells but could also be found, under certain conditions, in concentrated H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluids that lacked detectable outer membrane fragments. Both the wild-type strain and the lspA1 lspA2 mutant attached to phagocytes at similar levels. These results indicate that the LspA1 and LspA2 proteins of H. ducreyi are involved, directly or indirectly, in the antiphagocytic activity of this pathogen, and they provide a possible explanation for the greatly reduced virulence of the lspA1 lspA2 mutant.

  9. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors mediate the effects of dipyrone.

    PubMed

    Crunfli, Fernanda; Vilela, Fabiana C; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Dipyrone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used primarily as an analgesic and antipyretic. Some hypothesize that dipyrone activity can modulate other pathways, including endocannabinoid signalling. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible role of endocannabinoids in mediating dipyrone activity. This study is based on the tetrad effects of cannabinoids, namely an antinociceptive and cataleptic state, hypolocomotion and hypothermia. Dipyrone (500 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment decreased locomotor activity, increased the latency to a thermal analgesic response and induced a cataleptic and hypothermic state. These reactions are similar to the tetrad effects caused by the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the effects of dipyrone on locomotor activity, the cataleptic response and thermal analgesia. Both AM251 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) accentuated the reduction in body temperature caused by dipyrone. However, the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630 did not alter the hypothermic response to dipyrone. These results indicate involvement of the endocannabinoid system, especially CB1 receptors, in the analgesic and cataleptic effects of dipyrone, as well as hypolocomotion. However, cannabinoid receptors and TRPV1 were not involved in the hypothermic effects of dipyrone. We hypothesize that the mechanism of action of dipyrone may involve inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase and fatty acid amide hydrolase, which together provide additional arachidonic acid as substrate for endocannabinoid synthesis or other related molecules. This increase in endocannabinoid availability enhances CB1 receptor stimulation, contributing to the observed effects. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Qin, Jinzhong

    2005-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) belong to the Toll-interleukin 1 receptor superfamily, which is defined by a common intracellular Toll-IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain. A group of TIR domain containing adaptors (MyD88, TIRAP, TRIF and TRAM), are differentially recruited to the Toll-IL-1 receptors, contributing to the specificity of signaling. The IL-1 mediated signaling pathway serves as a "prototype" for other family members. Genetic and biochemical studies reveal that IL-1R uses adaptor molecule MyD88 to mediate a very complex pathway, involving a cascade of kinases organized by multiple adapter molecules into signaling complexes, leading to activation of the transcription factor NFkappaB. Several Toll-like receptors utilize variations of the "prototype" pathway by employing different adaptor molecules. Double-stranded RNA triggered, TLR3-mediated signaling is independent of MyD88, IRAK4, and IRAK. The adapter molecule TRIF is utilized by TLR3 to mediate the activation of NFkappaB and IRF3. LPS-induced, TLR4-mediated signaling employs multiple TIR-domain containing adaptors, MyD88/TIRAP to mediate NFkappaB activation, TRIF/TRAM for IRF3 activation. Recent studies have also begun to unravel how these pathways are negatively regulated. SIGIRR (also known as TIR8), a member of TIR superfamily that does not activate the transcription factors NFkappaB and IRF3, instead negatively modulates responses. Cells from SIGIRR-null mice show enhanced activation in response to either IL-1 or certain Toll ligands. In addition to SIGIRR, several other negative regulators have been shown to inhibit the TIR signaling, including ST2, IRAKM, MyD88s, SOCS1, and Triad3A. The coordinated positive and negative regulation of the TIR signaling ensures the appropriate modulation of the innate and inflammatory responses.

  11. Increased efficiency of the GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kleschevnikov, Alexander M; Belichenko, Pavel V; Gall, Jessica; George, Lizzy; Nosheny, Rachel; Maloney, Michael T; Salehi, Ahmad; Mobley, William C

    2012-02-01

    Cognitive impairment in Down syndrome (DS) involves the hippocampus. In the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and synaptic plasticity were linked to enhanced inhibition. However, the mechanistic basis of changes in inhibitory efficiency remains largely unexplored, and efficiency of the GABAergic synaptic neurotransmission has not yet been investigated in direct electrophysiological experiments. To investigate this important feature of neurobiology of DS, we examined synaptic and molecular properties of the GABAergic system in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adult Ts65Dn mice. Both GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated components of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were significantly increased in Ts65Dn vs. control (2N) DG granule cells. These changes were unaccompanied by alterations in hippocampal levels of GABAA (α1, α2, α3, α5 and γ2) or GABAB (Gbr1a and Gbr1b) receptor subunits. Immunoreactivity for GAD65, a marker for GABAergic terminals, was also unchanged. In contrast, there was a marked change in functional parameters of GABAergic synapses. Paired stimulations showed reduced paired-pulse ratios of both GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated IPSC components (IPSC2/IPSC1), suggesting an increase in presynaptic release of GABA. Consistent with increased gene dose, the level of the Kir3.2 subunit of potassium channels, effectors for postsynaptic GABAB receptors, was increased. This change was associated with enhanced postsynaptic GABAB/Kir3.2 signaling following application of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen. Thus, both GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated synaptic efficiency is increased in the Ts65Dn DG, thus likely contributing to deficient synaptic plasticity and poor learning in DS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 5-HT(1A), SST(1), and SST(2) receptors mediate inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in the submucous plexus of the guinea pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Foong, Jaime Pei Pei; Parry, Laura J; Gwynne, Rachel M; Bornstein, Joel C

    2010-03-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunoreactive neurons are important secretomotor neurons in the submucous plexus. They are the only submucosal neurons to receive inhibitory inputs and exhibit both noradrenergic and nonadrenergic inhibitory synaptic potentials (IPSPs). The former are mediated by alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, but the receptors mediating the latter have not been identified. We used standard intracellular recording, RT-PCR, and confocal microscopy to test whether 5-HT(1A), SST(1), and/or SST(2) receptors mediate nonadrenergic IPSPs in VIP submucosal neurons in guinea pig ileum in vitro. The specific 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY 100135 (1 microM) reduced the amplitude of IPSPs, an effect that persisted in the presence of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan (2 microM), suggesting that 5-HT might mediate a component of the IPSPs. Confocal microscopy revealed that there were many 5-HT-immunoreactive varicosities in close contact with VIP neurons. The specific SSTR(2) antagonist CYN 154806 (100 nM) and a specific SSTR(1) antagonist SRA 880 (3 microM) each reduced the amplitude of nonadrenergic IPSPs and hyperpolarizations evoked by somatostatin. In contrast with the other antagonists, CYN 154806 also reduced the durations of nonadrenergic IPSPs. Effects of WAY 100135 and CYN 154806 were additive. RT-PCR revealed gene transcripts for 5-HT(1A), SST(1), and SST(2) receptors in stripped submucous plexus preparations consistent with the pharmacological data. Although the involvement of other neurotransmitters or receptors cannot be excluded, we conclude that 5-HT(1A), SST(1), and SST(2) receptors mediate nonadrenergic IPSPs in the noncholinergic (VIP) secretomotor neurons. This study thus provides the tools to identify functions of enteric neural pathways that inhibit secretomotor reflexes.

  13. Prostaglandin A1 metabolism and inhibition of cyclic AMP extrusion by avian erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Heasley, L.E.; Brunton, L.L.

    1985-09-25

    Prostaglandins (PG) inhibit active cyclic AMP export from pigeon red cells, PGA1 and PGA2 most potently. To probe the mechanism of this action of PGA1, the authors have studied the interaction of (TH)PGA1 with suspensions of pigeon red cells. The interaction of PGA1 with pigeon red cells is a multistep process of uptake, metabolism, and secretion. (TH) PGA1 rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized to a compound(s) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethylacetate extraction. The glutathione-depleting agent, diamide, inhibits formation of the PGA1 metabolite. The red cells secrete the polar metabolite of PGA1 by a saturable mechanism that lowered temperatures inhibit. Because uptake and metabolism progress with much greater rates than metabolite secretion, red cells transiently concentrate the polar compound intracellularly. Onset and reversal of inhibition of cyclic AMP export by PGA1 coincide with accumulation and secretion of PGA1 metabolite, suggesting that the polar metabolite acts at an intracellular site to inhibit cyclic AMP efflux.

  14. Presynaptic 5-HT3 receptor-mediated modulation of synaptic GABA release in the mechanically dissociated rat amygdala neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Susumu; Matsumoto, Nozomu; Kubo, Chiharu; Akaike, Norio

    2000-01-01

    Nystatin-perforated patch recordings were made from mechanically dissociated basolateral amygdala neurons with preserved intact native presynaptic nerve terminals to study the mechanism of 5-HT3 receptor-mediated serotonergic modulation of GABAergic inhibition. The specific 5-HT3 agonist mCPBG (1 μM) rapidly facilitated the frequency of GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) and this facilitation desensitized within 1 min. Tropisetron (30 nM), a specific 5-HT3 antagonist, blocked the mCPBG effect. mCPBG augmented mIPSC amplitude. However, no direct postsynaptic serotonergic currents were evoked by mCPBG. Neither GABA-evoked current amplitude nor the kinetics of individual GABAergic mIPSCs were affected by mCPBG. Therefore, the augmentation is unlikely to be due to postsynaptic effects evoked by mCPBG. At higher concentrations mCPBG produced shorter-duration facilitation of miniature events. While mCPBG increased the mIPSC frequency in calcium-containing solution with Cd2+, this increase was absent in Ca2+-free external solution. It appears that the Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels was not as crucial as that through 5-HT3 receptors for synaptic GABA release. When two pulses of mCPBG (each 1 μM, 1 min) were given, the response to the second pulse elicited full recovery when the interval between pulses was at least 9 min. Protein kinase A (PKA) activation by 8-Br-cAMP (300 μM) shortened and PKA inhibition by Rp-cAMP (100 μM) prolonged the recovery time. PKA activity did not affect the time course of fast desensitization. Our results suggest that a 5-HT3-specific agonist acts on presynaptic nerve terminals facilitating synaptic GABA release without postsynaptic effects. The facilitation requires calcium influx through presynaptic 5-HT3 receptors. PKA modulates the recovery process from desensitization of presynaptic 5-HT3 receptor-mediated regulation of synaptic GABA release. PMID:11101647

  15. Scavenger receptor mediates systemic RNA interference in ticks.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw Min; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Liao, Min; Xuenan, Xuan; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Galay, Remil Linggatong; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference is an efficient method to silence gene and protein expressions. Here, the class B scavenger receptor CD36 (SRB) mediated the uptake of exogenous dsRNAs in the induction of the RNAi responses in ticks. Unfed female Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks were injected with a single or a combination of H. longicornis SRB (HlSRB) dsRNA, vitellogenin-1 (HlVg-1) dsRNA, and vitellogenin receptor (HlVgR) dsRNA. We found that specific and systemic silencing of the HlSRB, HlVg-1, and HlVgR genes was achieved in ticks injected with a single dsRNA of HlSRB, HlVg-1, and HlVgR. In ticks injected first with HlVg-1 or HlVgR dsRNA followed 96 hours later with HlSRB dsRNA (HlVg-1/HlSRB or HlVgR/HlSRB), gene silencing of HlSRB was achieved in addition to first knockdown in HlVg-1 or HlVgR, and prominent phenotypic changes were observed in engorgement, mortality, and hatchability, indicating that a systemic and specific double knockdown of target genes had been simultaneously attained in these ticks. However, in ticks injected with HlSRB dsRNA followed 96 hours later with HlVg-1 or HlVgR dsRNAs, silencing of HlSRB was achieved, but no subsequent knockdown in HlVgR or HlVg-1 was observed. The Westernblot and immunohistochemical examinations revealed that the endogenous HlSRB protein was fully abolished in midguts of ticks injected with HlSRB/HlVg-1 dsRNAs but HlVg-1 was normally expressed in midguts, suggesting that HlVg-1 dsRNA-mediated RNAi was fully inhibited by the first knockdown of HlSRB. Similarly, the abolished localization of HlSRB protein was recognized in ovaries of ticks injected with HlSRB/HlVgR, while normal localization of HlVgR was observed in ovaries, suggesting that the failure to knock-down HlVgR could be attributed to the first knockdown of HlSRB. In summary, we demonstrated for the first time that SRB may not only mediate the effective knock-down of gene expression by RNAi but also play essential roles for systemic RNAi of ticks.

  16. Scavenger Receptor Mediates Systemic RNA Interference in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Kyaw Min; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Liao, Min; Xuenan, Xuan; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Linggatong Galay, Remil; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference is an efficient method to silence gene and protein expressions. Here, the class B scavenger receptor CD36 (SRB) mediated the uptake of exogenous dsRNAs in the induction of the RNAi responses in ticks. Unfed female Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks were injected with a single or a combination of H. longicornis SRB (HlSRB) dsRNA, vitellogenin-1 (HlVg-1) dsRNA, and vitellogenin receptor (HlVgR) dsRNA. We found that specific and systemic silencing of the HlSRB, HlVg-1, and HlVgR genes was achieved in ticks injected with a single dsRNA of HlSRB, HlVg-1, and HlVgR. In ticks injected first with HlVg-1 or HlVgR dsRNA followed 96 hours later with HlSRB dsRNA (HlVg-1/HlSRB or HlVgR/HlSRB), gene silencing of HlSRB was achieved in addition to first knockdown in HlVg-1 or HlVgR, and prominent phenotypic changes were observed in engorgement, mortality, and hatchability, indicating that a systemic and specific double knockdown of target genes had been simultaneously attained in these ticks. However, in ticks injected with HlSRB dsRNA followed 96 hours later with HlVg-1 or HlVgR dsRNAs, silencing of HlSRB was achieved, but no subsequent knockdown in HlVgR or HlVg-1 was observed. The Westernblot and immunohistochemical examinations revealed that the endogenous HlSRB protein was fully abolished in midguts of ticks injected with HlSRB/HlVg-1 dsRNAs but HlVg-1 was normally expressed in midguts, suggesting that HlVg-1 dsRNA-mediated RNAi was fully inhibited by the first knockdown of HlSRB. Similarly, the abolished localization of HlSRB protein was recognized in ovaries of ticks injected with HlSRB/HlVgR, while normal localization of HlVgR was observed in ovaries, suggesting that the failure to knock-down HlVgR could be attributed to the first knockdown of HlSRB. In summary, we demonstrated for the first time that SRB may not only mediate the effective knock-down of gene expression by RNAi but also play essential roles for systemic RNAi of ticks. PMID:22145043

  17. High Throughput Synthesis and Screening for Agents Inhibiting Androgen Receptor Mediated Gene Transcription

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    and 2.56 (m, 5, the magnitude of the reductions is notable. From 2H), 2.20 (m, 6H), 1.38 (s, 9H); IR (NaC1, film) v,..... 3309, molecular modeling...universal template, In Molecular Diversity and Combi- tions, CA78045; DNA binding compounds, natorial Chemistry: Libraries and Drug Discovery; Chaiken...34- o -tially any target it has been screened against. Counter to the 17 0 0 F0 prevailing trend of preparing libraries of increasing molecular ൓

  18. Pharmacology of nicotinic receptor-mediated inhibition in rat dorsolateral septal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, L A; Gallagher, J P

    1991-01-01

    1. Intracellular electrophysiological techniques were employed to investigate the effects of nicotinic receptor stimulation on rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN) neurones in a submerged rat brain slice preparation. 2. Acetylcholine (in the presence of the muscarinic antagonist, atropine), nicotine or dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP), applied either by pressure ejection or superfusion, produced predominantly a membrane potential hyperpolarization. 3. Following concentration-response comparisons, DMPP appeared to exhibit fewer desensitizing properties and greater efficacy than nicotine with half-maximal hyperpolarizing responses attainable at 3 and 10 microM, respectively. 4. Pharmacological analyses revealed that the agonist-induced membrane hyperpolarization was sensitive to antagonism by mecamylamine (50-100 microM) and neuronal bungarotoxin (0.2-0.3 microM), but not alpha-bungarotoxin (0.5-1.0 microM), curare (10-50 microM) or dihydro-beta-erythroidine (50-100 microM). 5. Hyperpolarizing responses to DMPP were found to reverse near the equilibrium potential for potassium and were sensitive to changes in extracellular potassium concentration as predicted by the Nernst equation. Under single-electrode voltage clamp, application of DMPP produced an outward current (75-100 pA) which approached reversal at around -88 mV. These findings indicated that the hyperpolarizing response to nicotinic receptor stimulation was mediated by changes in membrane permeability to potassium. 6. DMPP-induced membrane hyperpolarization resulted from a direct action on postsynaptic DLSN neurones since the response persisted under conditions of superfusion with calcium-free/high-magnesium media or tetrodotoxin; both conditions blocked orthodromically induced neurotransmission. The hyperpolarizing response remained unaltered in TTX but was diminished in calcium-free/high-magnesium media. Further studies revealed blockade of the DMPP response following intracellular injection of EGTA. This response was also sensitive to antagonism by various calcium-dependent potassium channel blockers including apamin, barium and tetraethylammonium. 7. Our studies reveal a novel class of CNS nicotinic receptor whose action upon stimulation by an agonist results in a membrane hyperpolarization via a calcium-dependent increase in potassium ion conductance. PMID:2061835

  19. Metabotropic GABAB receptors mediate GABA inhibition of acetylcholine release in the rat neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Malomouzh, Artem I; Petrov, Konstantin A; Nurullin, Leniz F; Nikolsky, Evgeny E

    2015-12-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an amino acid which acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Here, we studied the effects of GABA on non-quantal, spontaneous, and evoked quantal acetylcholine (ACh) release from motor nerve endings. We found that while the application of 10 μM of GABA had no effect on spontaneous quantal ACh release, as detected by the frequency of miniature endplate potentials, GABA reduced the non-quantal ACh release by 57%, as determined by the H-effect value. Finally, the evoked quantal ACh release, estimated by calculating the quantal content of full-sized endplate potentials (EPPs), was reduced by 34%. GABA's inhibitory effect remained unchanged after pre-incubation with picrotoxin, an ionotropic GABAA receptor blocker, but was attenuated following application of the GABAB receptor blocker CGP 55845, which itself had no effect on ACh release. An inhibitor of phospholipase C, U73122, completely prevented the GABA-induced decrease in ACh release. Immunofluorescence demonstrated the presence of both subunits of the GABAB receptor (GABAB R1 and GABAB R2) in the neuromuscular junction. These findings suggest that metabotropic GABAB receptors are expressed in the mammalian neuromuscular synapse and their activation results in a phospholipase C-mediated reduction in the intensity of non-quantal and evoked quantal ACh release. We investigated the effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on neuromuscular transmission. GABA reduced the non-quantal and evoked quantal release of acetylcholine. These effects are mediated by GABAB receptors and are implemented via phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Our findings suggest that in the mammalian neuromuscular synapse, metabotropic GABAB receptors are expressed and their activation results in a reduction in the intensity of acetylcholine release. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Androgen receptor mediated compensation of estradiol in response to aromatase inhibition: a mathematical model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemicals in the environment have the potential to cause reproductive toxicity by acting on the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. We have developed a mathematical model to predict chemical impacts on reproductive hormone production in the highly conserved HPG axis using...

  1. Inhibition of pattern recognition receptor-mediated inflammation by bioactive phytochemicals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emerging evidence reveals that pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs) mediate both infection-induced and sterile inflammation by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and endogenous molecules...

  2. GABA(A) receptor mediated inhibition contributes to corticostriatal frequency filtering.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Devin A; Partridge, L Donald

    2012-11-21

    The striatum plays an important role in the initiation and learning of skilled motor behavior [6] and receives topographic input from most areas of the cortex. Cortical afferents make divergent contact with many striatal medium spiny neurons while individual medium spiny neurons receive tens of thousands of these glutamatergic synapses [13]. Temporal filtering of frequency information within synaptic fields plays an important role in the processing of neuronal signals. We have previously shown differential filtering characteristics within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus [26] and have now extended these studies to the cortical input to the dorsal striatum in order to address the network filtering characteristics in this important synaptic field. We measured field potentials of striatal medium spiny neurons in response to layer V cortical input over a range of stimulus frequencies from 2Hz to 100Hz. The average population spike amplitude in response to these stimulus trains exhibited a non-linear relationship to frequency, with characteristics of a low pass filter. In order to assess potential modulation of these filter properties, we examined the frequency response in the presence of antagonists to CB1, D2, nACh, and GABA(A) receptors, which are all known to be expressed at these synapses [13]. Of these, only GABA(A) receptor antagonists significantly modulated the frequency filtering characteristics over the examined frequency range. High frequency stimulation induces long term plasticity at corticostriatal synapses [4] and this process is strengthened when GABA(A) receptors are blocked [7,20,29]. Our results suggest a model whereby a temporary decrease in GABA level would modulate the filtering parameters of the corticostriatal circuit, allowing a more robust induction of high frequency-dependent plasticity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Androgen receptor mediated compensation of estradiol in response to aromatase inhibition: a mathematical model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemicals in the environment have the potential to cause reproductive toxicity by acting on the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. We have developed a mathematical model to predict chemical impacts on reproductive hormone production in the highly conserved HPG axis using...

  4. Dominant-Negative Mutants Identify a Role for Girk Channels in D3 Dopamine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Spontaneous Secretory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V.; Oxford, Gerry S.

    2000-01-01

    The human D3 dopamine receptor can activate G-protein–coupled inward rectifier potassium channels (GIRKs), inhibit P/Q-type calcium channels, and inhibit spontaneous secretory activity in AtT-20 neuroendocrine cells (Kuzhikandathil, E.V., W. Yu, and G.S. Oxford. 1998. Mol. Cell. Neurosci. 12:390–402; Kuzhikandathil, E.V., and G.S. Oxford. 1999. J. Neurosci. 19:1698–1707). In this study, we evaluate the role of GIRKs in the D3 receptor-mediated inhibition of secretory activity in AtT-20 cells. The absence of selective blockers for GIRKs has precluded a direct test of the hypothesis that they play an important role in inhibiting secretory activity. However, the tetrameric structure of these channels provides a means of disrupting endogenous GIRK function using a dominant negative approach. To develop a dominant-negative GIRK mutant, the K+ selectivity amino acid sequence -GYG- in the putative pore domain of the human GIRK2 channels was mutated to -AAA-, -GLG-, or -GFG-. While the mutation of -GYG- to -GFG- did not affect channel function, both the -AAA- and -GLG- GIRK2 mutants were nonfunctional. This suggests that the aromatic ring of the tyrosine residue rather than its hydroxyl group is involved in maintaining the pore architecture of human GIRK2 channels. When expressed in AtT-20 cells, the nonfunctional AAA-GIRK2 and GLG-GIRK2 acted as effective dominant-negative mutants and significantly attenuated endogenous GIRK currents. Furthermore, these dominant-negative mutants interfered with the D3 receptor-mediated inhibition of secretion in AtT-20 cells, suggesting they are centrally involved in the signaling pathway of this secretory response. These results indicate that dominant-negative GIRK mutants are effective molecular tools to examine the role of GIRK channels in vivo. PMID:10828244

  5. Menthol enhances phasic and tonic GABAA receptor-mediated currents in midbrain periaqueductal grey neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Benjamin K; Karim, Shafinaz; Goodchild, Ann K; Vaughan, Christopher W; Drew, Geoffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Menthol, a naturally occurring compound in the essential oil of mint leaves, is used for its medicinal, sensory and fragrant properties. Menthol acts via transient receptor potential (TRPM8 and TRPA1) channels and as a positive allosteric modulator of recombinant GABAA receptors. Here, we examined the actions of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated currents in intact midbrain slices. Experimental Approach Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons in midbrain slices from rats to determine the effects of menthol on GABAA receptor-mediated phasic IPSCs and tonic currents. Key Results Menthol (150–750 μM) produced a concentration-dependent prolongation of spontaneous GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs, but not non-NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs throughout the PAG. Menthol actions were unaffected by TRPM8 and TRPA1 antagonists, tetrodotoxin and the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil. Menthol also enhanced a tonic current, which was sensitive to the GABAA receptor antagonists, picrotoxin (100 μM), bicuculline (30 μM) and Zn2+ (100 μM), but unaffected by gabazine (10 μM) and a GABAC receptor antagonist, 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid hydrate (TPMPA; 50 μM). In addition, menthol potentiated currents induced by the extrasynaptic GABAA receptor agonist THIP/gaboxadol (10 μM). Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that menthol positively modulates both synaptic and extrasynaptic populations of GABAA receptors in native PAG neurons. The development of agents that potentiate GABAA-mediated tonic currents and phasic IPSCs in a manner similar to menthol could provide a basis for novel GABAA-related pharmacotherapies. PMID:24460753

  6. Mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into antigen presenting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Diebold, Sandra S; Plank, Christian; Cotten, Matt; Wagner, Ernst; Zenke, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells and are unique in their ability to prime naïve T cells. Gene modification of dendritic cells is of particular interest for immunotherapy of diseases where the immune system has failed or is aberrantly regulated, such as in cancer or autoimmune disease, respectively. Dendritic cells abundantly express mannose receptor and mannose receptor-related receptors, and receptor-mediated gene transfer via mannose receptor offers a versatile tool for targeted gene delivery into these cells. Accordingly, mannose polyethylenimine DNA transfer complexes were generated and used for gene delivery into dendritic cells. Mannose receptor belongs to the group of scavenger receptors that allow dendritic cells to take up pathogenic material, which is directed for degradation and MHC class II presentation. Therefore, a limiting step of transgene expression by mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery is endosomal degradation of DNA. Several strategies have been explored to overcome this limitation including the addition of endosomolytic components to DNA transfer complexes like adenovirus particles and influenza peptides. Here, we review the current understanding of mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into dendritic cells and discuss strategies to identify appropriate endosomolytic agents to improve DNA transfer efficacy.

  7. Size of single-wall carbon nanotube affects the folate receptor-mediated cancer cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Charbgoo, Fahimeh; Nikkhah, Maryam; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2017-08-30

    Advances in nanobiotechnology and targeting strategy could improve the delivery of therapeutic molecules into cancer cells, leading to improved treatment efficiency with minimal side effects on normal cells. To design an efficient nanocarrier, consideration of parameters that facilitate direct drug delivery into the target cells is important. We studied the effect of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) size on their cell internalization level via the folate receptor-mediated pathway through folic acid targeting. Folate-SWNTs were covalently synthesized and characterized. Folate-SWNTs ≤ 450 nm had lower cell internalization level than folate-SWNTs >450 nm with a P value of ≤0.01. This indicated that using folate-SWNT with an average length of ≤450 nm was not suitable for receptor-mediated cancer cell targeting. Receptor-mediated uptake of folate-SWNTs is dependent on the nanoparticle length. However, sub-450 nm SWNTs could serve as a vehicle to transfer nucleic acids into the cells due to direct cell penetrance based on their needle-like structure. We find that SWNTs larger than 450 nm were suitable to target the cells through receptors. These results might provide a promising approach for designing more effective targeted delivery systems based on SWNTs. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Nanoscale imaging and mechanical analysis of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2014-02-18

    Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells is an important mechanism in the immune therapy of cancers. Traditional research about macrophage phagocytosis was based on optical microscopy, which cannot reveal detailed information because of the 200-nm-resolution limit. Quantitatively investigating the macrophage phagocytosis at micro- and nanoscale levels is still scarce. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers an excellent analytical instrument for quantitatively investigating the biological processes at single-cell and single-molecule levels under native conditions. In this work, we combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy to visualize and quantify the detailed changes in cell morphology and mechanical properties during the process of Fc receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis against cancer cells. Lymphoma cells were discernible by fluorescence staining. Then, the dynamic process of phagocytosis was observed by time-lapse optical microscopy. Next, AFM was applied to investigate the detailed cellular behaviors during macrophage phagocytosis under the guidance of fluorescence recognition. AFM imaging revealed the distinct features in cellular ultramicrostructures for the different steps of macrophage phagocytosis. AFM cell mechanical property measurements indicated that the binding of cancer cells to macrophages could make macrophages become stiffer. The experimental results provide novel insights in understanding the Fc-receptor-mediated macrophage phagocytosis.

  9. Mechanism of Inhibition of Hsp90 Dimerization by Gyrase B Inhibitor Coumermycin A1 (C-A1) Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Thermodynamic Calculations.

    PubMed

    Cele, Favourite N; Kumalo, Hezekiel; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2016-09-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 an emerging and attracting target in the anti-HIV drug discovery process due to the key role it plays in the pathogenicity of HIV-1 virus. In this research study, long-range all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were engaged for the bound and the unbound proteins to enhance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 dimerization and inhibition. Results evidently showed that coumermycin A1 (C-A1), a recently discovered Hsp90 inhibitor, binds at the dimer's active site of the Hsp90 protein and leads to a substantial parting between dimeric opposed residues, which include Arg591.B, Lys594.A, Ser663.A, Thr653.B, Ala665.A, Thr649.B, Leu646.B and Asn669.A. Significant differences in magnitudes were observed in radius of gyration, root-mean-square deviation and root-mean-square fluctuation, which confirms a reasonably more flexible state in the apo conformation associated with it dimerization. In contrast, the bound conformer of Hsp90 showed less flexibility. This visibly highpoints the inhibition process resulting from the binding of the ligand. These findings were further validated by principal component analysis. We believe that the detailed dynamic analyses of Hsp90 presented in this study, would give an imperative insight and better understanding to the function and mechanisms of inhibition. Furthermore, information obtained from the binding mode of the inhibitor would be of great assistance in the design of more potent inhibitors against the HIV target Hsp90.

  10. Slowly developing depression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated responses in young rat hippocampi

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail; Li, Rui; Xu, Hui-Ping; Jilderos, Barbro; Wigström, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Background Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type glutamate receptors is essential in triggering various forms of synaptic plasticity. A critical issue is to what extent such plasticity involves persistent changes of glutamate receptor subtypes and many prior studies have suggested a main role for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in mediating the effect. Our previous work in hippocampal slices revealed that, under pharmacological unblocking of NMDA receptors, both AMPA and NMDA receptor mediated responses undergo a slowly developing depression. In the present study we have further adressed this phenomenon, focusing on the contribution via NMDA receptors. Pharmacologically isolated NMDA receptor mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded for two independent synaptic pathways in CA1 area using perfusion with low Mg2+ (0.1 mM) to unblock NMDA receptors. Results Following unblocking of NMDA receptors, there was a gradual decline of NMDA receptor mediated EPSPs for 2–3 hours towards a stable level of ca. 60–70 % of the maximal size. If such an experimental session was repeated twice in the same pathway with a period of NMDA receptor blockade in between, the depression attained in the first session was still evident in the second one and no further decay occurred. The persistency of the depression was also validated by comparison between pathways. It was found that the responses of a control pathway, unstimulated in the first session of receptor unblocking, behaved as novel responses when tested in association with the depressed pathway under the second session. In similar experiments, but with AP5 present during the first session, there was no subsequent difference between NMDA EPSPs. Conclusions Our findings show that merely evoking NMDA receptor mediated responses results in a depression which is input specific, induced via NMDA receptor activation, and is maintained for several hours through

  11. 5-HT2 receptors mediate functional modulation of GABAa receptors and inhibitory synaptic transmissions in human iPS-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Su, Zhenghui; Wang, Lihui; Pan, Guangjin; Guo, Yiping; He, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitors differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) hold potentials for treating neurological diseases. Serotonin has potent effects on neuronal functions through multiple receptors, underlying a variety of neural disorders. Glutamate and GABA receptors have been proven functional in neurons differentiated from iPS, however, little is known about 5-HT receptor-mediated modulation in such neuronal networks. In the present study, human iPS were differentiated into cells possessing featured physiological properties of cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to examine the involvement of 5-HT2 receptors in functional modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. We found that serotonin and DOI (a selective agonist of 5-HT2A/C receptor) reversibly reduced GABA-activated currents, and this 5-HT2A/C receptor mediated inhibition required G protein, PLC, PKC, and Ca2+ signaling. Serotonin increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), which could be mimicked by α-methylserotonin, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist. In contrast, DOI reduced both frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs. These findings suggested that in iPS-derived human neurons serotonin postsynaptically reduced GABAa receptor function through 5-HT2A/C receptors, but presynaptically other 5-HT2 receptors counteracted the action of 5-HT2A/C receptors. Functional expression of serotonin receptors in human iPS-derived neurons provides a pre-requisite for their normal behaviors after grafting. PMID:26837719

  12. Inhibitory effects of benzodiazepines on the adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated secretion of interleukin-8 in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kristina; Xifró, Rosa Altarcheh; Hartweg, Julia Lisa; Spitzlei, Petra; Meis, Kirsten; Molderings, Gerhard J; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2013-01-30

    The activation of adenosine A(2B) receptors in human mast cells causes pro-inflammatory responses such as the secretion of interleukin-8. There is evidence for an inhibitory effect of benzodiazepines on mast cell mediated symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease. Therefore, we investigated the effects of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast cell leukaemia (HMC1) cells by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The adenosine analogue N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 0.3-3 μM) increased interleukin-8 production about 5-fold above baseline. This effect was attenuated by the adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonist MRS1754 (N-(4-cyanophenyl)-2-{4-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl)phenoxy}-acetamide) 1 μM. In addition, diazepam, 4'-chlorodiazepam and flunitrazepam (1-30 μM) markedly reduced NECA-induced interleukin-8 production in that order of potency, whereas clonazepam showed only a modest inhibition. The inhibitory effect of diazepam was not altered by flumazenil 10 μM or PK11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide) 10 μM. Diazepam attenuated the NECA-induced expression of mRNA encoding for interleukin-8. Moreover, diazepam and flunitrazepam reduced the increasing effects of NECA on cAMP-response element- and nuclear factor of activated t-cells-driven luciferase reporter gene activities in HMC1 cells. Neither diazepam nor flunitrazepam affected NECA-induced increases in cellular cAMP levels in CHO Flp-In cells stably expressing recombinant human adenosine A(2B) receptors, excluding a direct action of benzodiazepines on human adenosine A(2B) receptors. In conclusion, this is the first study showing an inhibitory action of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast (HMC1) cells. The rank order of potency indicates the involvement of an atypical benzodiazepine binding site.

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans Is Internalized by Receptor-Mediated or ‘Triggered’ Phagocytosis, Dependent on Actin Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Caroline Rezende; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; de Souza, Wanderley; Rozental, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcosis by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans affects mostly immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent neurological complication in AIDS patients. Recent studies support the idea that intracellular survival of Cryptococcus yeast cells is important for the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis. However, the initial steps of Cryptococcus internalization by host cells remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Cryptococcus neoformans phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages using confocal and electron microscopy techniques, as well as flow cytometry quantification, evaluating the importance of fungal capsule production and of host cell cytoskeletal elements for fungal phagocytosis. Electron microscopy analyses revealed that capsular and acapsular strains of C. neoformans are internalized by macrophages via both ‘zipper’ (receptor-mediated) and ‘trigger’ (membrane ruffle-dependent) phagocytosis mechanisms. Actin filaments surrounded phagosomes of capsular and acapsular yeasts, and the actin depolymerizing drugs cytochalasin D and latrunculin B inhibited yeast internalization and actin recruitment to the phagosome area. In contrast, nocodazole and paclitaxel, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics decreased internalization but did not prevent actin recruitment to the site of phagocytosis. Our results show that different uptake mechanisms, dependent on both actin and tubulin dynamics occur during yeast internalization by macrophages, and that capsule production does not affect the mode of Cryptococcus uptake by host cells. PMID:24586631

  14. Functional interaction of heat shock protein 90 and Beclin 1 modulates Toll-like receptor-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Congfeng; Liu, Jin; Hsu, Li-Chung; Luo, Yunping; Xiang, Rong; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the downstream effector mechanisms for elimination of intracellular microbes following activation of the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Although the detailed molecular mechanism for this cellular process is still unclear, Beclin 1, a key molecule for autophagy, has been suggested to play a role. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that regulates the stability of signaling proteins. Herein, we show that Hsp90 forms a complex with Beclin 1 through an evolutionarily conserved domain to maintain the stability of Beclin 1. In monocytic cells, geldanamycin (GA), an Hsp90 inhibitor, effectively promoted proteasomal degradation of Beclin 1 in a concentration-dependent (EC50 100 nM) and time-dependent (t50 2 h) manner. In contrast, KNK437/Hsp inhibitor I had no effect. Hsp90 specifically interacted with Beclin 1 but not with other adapter proteins in the TLR signalsome. Treatment of cells with GA inhibited TLR3- and TLR4-mediated autophagy. In addition, S. typhimurium infection-induced autophagy was blocked by GA treatment. This further suggested a role of the Hsp90/Beclin 1 in controlling autophagy in response to microbial infections. Taken together, our data revealed that by maintaining the homeostasis of Beclin 1, Hsp90 plays a novel role in TLR-mediated autophagy.—Xu, C., Liu, J., Hsu, L. -C., Luo, Y., Xiang, R., Chuang, T. -H. Functional interaction of Hsp90 and Beclin 1 modulates Toll-like receptor-mediated autophagy. PMID:21543763

  15. Efficient Receptor Mediated siRNA Delivery in Vitro by Folic Acid Targeted Pentablock Copolymer-Based Micelleplexes.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Roman; Liu, Kegang; Wang, Xueya; Hunziker, Patrick

    2017-08-14

    Novel, biocompatible polyplexes, based on the combination of cationic pentablock copolymers with folic acid functionalized copolymers, were designed and developed for target-specific siRNA delivery. The resulting micelleplexes spontaneously formed polymeric micelles with a hydrophobic core surrounded directly by a cationic poly-2-(4-aminobutyl)-oxazole (PABOXA) and subsequently shielded by hydrophilic poly-2-methyl-oxazole (PMOXA) layer. The described micelleplexes form highly stable particles even in complete serum after 24 h compared with the highly cationic polymer PEI, which show aggregate formation in serum containing buffer solution. Targeted siRNA delivery and gene knockdown could be shown using green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing HeLa cells, resulting in ∼31% and ∼8% suppression of the expression of GFP for targeted and nontargeted micelleplexes, respectively. Comparison studies of folic-receptor positive HeLa cells with normal folic-receptor-negative HEK293 cells revealed involvement of receptor mediated cellular uptake of fluorescently labeled siRNA. The new designed nanocarrier showed no cytotoxicity, having a potential application. The presented concept of shielding a nucleic-acid complexing cationic chains with a stealth layer and combining it with receptor ligand overcomes typical problems with undesired protein and cell interactions in delivery of nucleic acids using polymeric systems, opening new doors for application if RNA inhibition in the organism.

  16. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  17. Dual actions of (-)-stepholidine on the dopamine receptor-mediated adenylate cyclase activity in rat corpus striatum.

    PubMed

    Dong, Z J; Guo, X; Chen, L J; Han, Y F; Jin, G Z

    1997-01-01

    (-)-Stepholidine (SPD) is an antagonist of normosensitive dopamine (DA) receptors, but it exhibits D1 agonistic action on rotational behaviour in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). In the present study, agonistic and antagonistic effects of SPD on the DA receptor-mediated synaptosomal adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in rat striatum were investigated. After blockade of D2 receptors, SPD augmented AC activity dose-dependently. The EC50 value was 41.1 +/- 8.6 micromol/L. At the concentration of 10 micromol/L, SPD increased cAMP formation from a basal level (50.8 +/- 10.3 pmol/mg protein/min) to 133.7 +/- 31.8 pmol/mg protein/min. The SPD-induced stimulation of AC activity was almost completely reversed by 10 micromol/L Sch23390. These results indicate that SPD possesses an agonistic action on the D1 receptor. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase (FSAC) activity was used as a model to elucidate the effect of SPD on D2 receptors. The results indicate that DA inhibited FSAC activity dose-dependently, while SPD partially restored FSAC activity. Taken together, these results support the conclusion that SPD has dual actions on DA receptors that mediate AC activity, i.e., an agonistic action on D1 receptors and an antagonistic action on D2 receptors.

  18. Marketed Drugs Can Inhibit Cytochrome P450 27A1, a Potential New Target for Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mast, Natalia; Lin, Joseph B; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP27A1 is the only enzyme in humans converting cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol of multiple functions, including tissue-specific modulation of estrogen and liver X receptors. Both receptors seem to mediate adverse effects of 27-hydroxycholesterol in breast cancer when the levels of this oxysterol are elevated. The present work assessed druggability of CYP27A1 as a potential antibreast cancer target. We selected 26 anticancer and noncancer medications, most approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and evaluated them first in vitro for inhibition of purified recombinant CYP27A1 and binding to the enzyme active site. Six strong CYP27A1 inhibitors/binders were identified. These were the two antibreast cancer pharmaceuticals anastrozole and fadrozole, antiprostate cancer drug bicalutamide, sedative dexmedetomidine, and two antifungals ravuconazole and posaconazole. Anastrozole was then tested in vivo on mice, which received subcutaneous drug injections for 1 week. Mouse plasma and hepatic 27-hydroxycholesterol levels were decreased 2.6- and 1.6-fold, respectively, whereas plasma and hepatic cholesterol content remained unchanged. Thus, pharmacologic CYP27A1 inhibition is possible in the whole body and individual organs, but does not negatively affect cholesterol elimination. Our results enhance the potential of CYP27A1 as an antibreast cancer target, could be of importance for the interpretation of Femara versus Anastrozole Clinical Evaluation Trial, and bring attention to posaconazole as a potential complementary anti-breast cancer medication. More medications on the US market may have unanticipated off-target inhibition of CYP27A1, and we propose strategies for their identification.

  19. Marketed Drugs Can Inhibit Cytochrome P450 27A1, a Potential New Target for Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Lin, Joseph B.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 CYP27A1 is the only enzyme in humans converting cholesterol to 27-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol of multiple functions, including tissue-specific modulation of estrogen and liver X receptors. Both receptors seem to mediate adverse effects of 27-hydroxycholesterol in breast cancer when the levels of this oxysterol are elevated. The present work assessed druggability of CYP27A1 as a potential antibreast cancer target. We selected 26 anticancer and noncancer medications, most approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and evaluated them first in vitro for inhibition of purified recombinant CYP27A1 and binding to the enzyme active site. Six strong CYP27A1 inhibitors/binders were identified. These were the two antibreast cancer pharmaceuticals anastrozole and fadrozole, antiprostate cancer drug bicalutamide, sedative dexmedetomidine, and two antifungals ravuconazole and posaconazole. Anastrozole was then tested in vivo on mice, which received subcutaneous drug injections for 1 week. Mouse plasma and hepatic 27-hydroxycholesterol levels were decreased 2.6- and 1.6-fold, respectively, whereas plasma and hepatic cholesterol content remained unchanged. Thus, pharmacologic CYP27A1 inhibition is possible in the whole body and individual organs, but does not negatively affect cholesterol elimination. Our results enhance the potential of CYP27A1 as an antibreast cancer target, could be of importance for the interpretation of Femara versus Anastrozole Clinical Evaluation Trial, and bring attention to posaconazole as a potential complementary anti-breast cancer medication. More medications on the US market may have unanticipated off-target inhibition of CYP27A1, and we propose strategies for their identification. PMID:26082378

  20. Acute exposure to apolipoprotein A1 inhibits macrophage chemotaxis in vitro and monocyte recruitment in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Asif J; Barrett, Tessa J; Taylor, Lewis; McNeill, Eileen; Manmadhan, Arun; Recio, Carlota; Carmineri, Alfredo; Brodermann, Maximillian H; White, Gemma E; Cooper, Dianne; DiDonato, Joseph A; Zamanian-Daryoush, Maryam; Hazen, Stanley L; Channon, Keith M

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) is the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and has well documented anti-inflammatory properties. To better understand the cellular and molecular basis of the anti-inflammatory actions of apoA1, we explored the effect of acute human apoA1 exposure on the migratory capacity of monocyte-derived cells in vitro and in vivo. Acute (20–60 min) apoA1 treatment induced a substantial (50–90%) reduction in macrophage chemotaxis to a range of chemoattractants. This acute treatment was anti-inflammatory in vivo as shown by pre-treatment of monocytes prior to adoptive transfer into an on-going murine peritonitis model. We find that apoA1 rapidly disrupts membrane lipid rafts, and as a consequence, dampens the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway that coordinates reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration. Our data strengthen the evidence base for therapeutic apoA1 infusions in situations where reduced monocyte recruitment to sites of inflammation could have beneficial outcomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15190.001 PMID:27572261

  1. Evaluation and interference study of hemoglobin A1c measured by turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Chang, J; Hoke, C; Ettinger, B; Penerian, G

    1998-03-01

    The technical performance of the turbidimetric immunoinhibition (TI) assay for hemoglobin (Hb) A1c (Tina-quant Hb A1c, Boehringer Mannheim, Indianapolis, Ind) was evaluated by using the BM/Hitachi 911 analyzer. Intra-assay imprecision was less than 2.7%, and interassay imprecision was less than 2.8% as measured by coefficient of variation. In 93 subjects with diabetes who did not have hemoglobin variants, results of the TI assay for Hb A1c correlated strongly with those obtained by using a high-performance liquid chromatography analyzer (Diamat, BioRad Laboratories, Hercules, Calif). Among 241 subjects who had or did not have hemoglobin variants, the TI assay for Hb A1c correlated strongly with results of affinity chromatography for total glycated hemoglobin (Glyc-Affin GHb, IsoLab, Akron, Ohio). We also studied the effect of various percentages of hemoglobin S, C, E, and F on the accuracy of the TI Hb A1c assay. Only high hemoglobin F percentages caused interference. More than 14 times as many samples can be analyzed per hour by using the TI Hb A1c assay than can be analyzed by using the HPLC assay. For high-volume reference laboratories, using the fully automated TI Hb A1c assay to monitor glycemic control in patients with diabetes may be preferable to using the conventional ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography Hb A1c assay because the TI assay measures Hb A1c more accurately in patients with diabetes who have hemoglobin variants, and it requires less time.

  2. Treatment with an SLC12A1 antagonist inhibits tumorigenesis in a subset of hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ce; Dong, Jiayong; Zhang, Lei; Zou, You; Chen, Rui; Sun, Keyan; Fu, Hong; Fu, Zhiren; Guo, Wenyuan; Ding, Guoshan

    2016-01-01

    A central aim in cancer research is to identify genes with altered expression patterns in tumor specimens and their potential role in tumorigenesis. Most types of tumors, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), are heterogeneous in terms of genotype and phenotype. Thus, traditional analytical methods like the t-test fail to identify all oncogenes from expression profiles. In this study, we performed a meta-Cancer Outlier Profile Analysis (meta-COPA) across six microarray datasets for HCC from the GEO database. We found that gene SLC12A1 was overexpressed in the Hep3B cell line, compared with five other HCC cell lines and L02 cells. We also found that the upregulation of SLC12A1 was mediated by histone methylation within its promoter region, and that SLC12A1 is a positive regulator of the WNK1/ERK5 pathway. Consistent with in vitro results, treatment with the SLC12A1 antagonist Bumetanide delayed tumor formation and reduced Hep3B cell tumor size in mouse xenografts. In summary, our research reveals a novel subset of HCCs that are sensitive to SLC12A1 antagonist treatment, thereby offering a new strategy for precision HCC treatment. PMID:27447551

  3. Dopaminergic enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission in layer II entorhinal neurons is dependent on D₁-like receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Glovaci, I; Caruana, D A; Chapman, C A

    2014-01-31

    The modulatory neurotransmitter dopamine induces concentration-dependent changes in synaptic transmission in the entorhinal cortex, in which high concentrations of dopamine suppress evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and lower concentrations induce an acute synaptic facilitation. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings were used to investigate the dopaminergic facilitation of synaptic responses in layer II neurons of the rat lateral entorhinal cortex. A constant bath application of 1 μM dopamine resulted in a consistent facilitation of EPSPs evoked in layer II fan cells by layer I stimulation; the size of the facilitation was more variable in pyramidal neurons, and synaptic responses in a small group of multiform neurons were not modulated by dopamine. Isolated inhibitory synaptic responses were not affected by dopamine, and the facilitation of EPSPs was not associated with a change in paired-pulse facilitation ratio. Voltage-clamp recordings of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were facilitated by dopamine, but N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated currents were not. Bath application of the dopamine D₁-like receptor blocker SCH23390 (50 μM), but not the D₂-like receptor blocker sulpiride (50 μM), prevented the facilitation, indicating that it is dependent upon D₁-like receptor activation. Dopamine D₁ receptors lead to activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and including the PKA inhibitor H-89 or KT 5720 in the recording pipette solution prevented the facilitation of EPSCs. PKA-dependent phosphorylation of inhibitor 1 or the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated protein phosphatase (DARPP-32) can lead to a facilitation of AMPA receptor responses by inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) that reduces dephosphorylation of AMPA receptors, and we found here that inhibition of PP1 occluded the facilitatory effect of dopamine. The dopamine

  4. AT1 receptor-mediated accumulation of extracellular angiotensin II in proximal tubule cells: role of cytoskeleton microtubules and tyrosine phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao C.; Carretero, Oscar A.; Navar, L. Gabriel; Zhuo, Jia L.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term angiotensin II (ANG II) administration is associated with increased ANG II accumulation in the kidney, but intrarenal compartment(s) involved in this response remains to be determined. We tested the hypothesis that 1) extracellular ANG II is taken up by proximal tubule cells (PTCs) through AT1 receptor-mediated endocytosis, 2) this process is regulated by cytoskeleton microtubule- and tyrosine phosphatase-dependent mechanisms, and 3) AT1 receptor-mediated endocytosis of ANG II has a functional relevance by modulating intracellular cAMP signaling. In cultured PTCs, [125I]Tyr-labeled ANG II and fluorescein labeled-ANG II were internalized in a time-dependent manner and colocalized with the endosome marker Alexa Fluor 594-transferrin. Endocytosis of extracellular ANG II was inhibited by the AT1 receptor blocker losartan (16.5 ± 4.6%, P < 0.01 vs. ANG II, 78.3 ± 6.2%) and by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor phenylarsine oxide (PAO; 30.0 ± 3.5%, P < 0.05 vs. ANG II). Intracellular ANG II levels were increased by ~58% (basal, 229.8 ± 11.4 vs. ANG II, 361.3 ± 11.8 pg ANG II/mg protein, P < 0.01), and the responses were blocked by losartan (P < 0.01), the cytoskeleton microtubule inhibitor colchicine (P < 0.05), and PAO (P < 0.01), whereas depletion of clathrin-coated pits with hyperosmotic sucrose had no effect (356.1 ± 25.5 pg ANG II/mg protein, not significant). ANG II accumulation was associated with significant inhibition of both basal (control, 15.5 ± 2.8 vs. ANG II, 9.1 ± 2.4 pmol/mg protein, P < 0.05) and forskolin-stimulated cAMP signaling (forskolin, 68.7 ± 8.6 vs. forskolin + ANG II, 42.8 ± 13.8 pmol/mg protein, P < 0.01). These effects were blocked by losartan and PAO. We conclude that extracellular ANG II is internalized in PTCs through AT1 receptor-mediated endocytosis and that internalized ANG II may play a functional role in proximal tubule cells by inhibiting intracellular cAMP signaling. PMID:16478976

  5. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptor-mediated increase in the mass of phosphatidic acid and 1,2-diacylglycerol in ischemic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kurz, T; Schneider, I; Tölg, R; Richardt, G

    1999-04-01

    1,2-Diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) are produced by phospholipase C and D activity and play a key role as second messengers in receptor-mediated signal transduction. So far, little is known about alterations of endogenous 1,2-DAG and PA production during myocardial ischemia. Rat isolated perfused hearts were subjected to global ischemia, total lipids were extracted, and separated by thin-layer chromatography. The mass of PA and 1,2-DAG were quantified using laserdensitometric analysis of visualized lipids. Compared to normoxic control values (1,2-DAG 713 +/- 45 ng/mg protein, PA 171 +/- 11 ng/mg protein), the myocardial content of 1,2-DAG and PA was unaltered after 10 min of ischemia. Prolonged myocardial ischemia (20 min), however, which was accompanied by marked overflow of endogenous norepinephrine, significantly increased the mass of both second messengers (1,2-DAG 1062 +/- 100 ng/mg protein, PA 340 +/- 29 ng/mg protein). The increase in PA and 1,2-DAG in response to ischemia was abolished by inhibition of ischemia-induced norepinephrine release as well as by alpha1-adrenergic blockade but unaffected by beta-adrenergic blockade. While inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase did not affect ischemia-induced increase in PA and 1,2-DAG, inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C activity significantly suppressed ischemia-induced increase in 1,2-DAG but did not affect endogenous production of PA indicating phospholipase C-independent formation of PA and activation of both, phospholipase C and D, in the ischemic heart. Ischemia elicits an alpha1-adrenergic receptor-mediated increase in the mass of myocardial PA and 1,2-DAG. The increase in endogenous PA is suggested to be due to the activation of myocardial phospholipase D, whereas 1,2-DAG is formed predominantly by activation of phospholipase C in the ischemic heart.

  6. [Growth inhibition of tanshinones on SPC-A-1 cell line and their structure-activity relationship].

    PubMed

    Shi, Huayue; Zhang, Qing; Li, Hui; Chu, Ting; Jin, Hui; Mao, Shengjun

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that Tanshinones have anti-tumor effects in vitro, but few studies were focusing on the anti-tumor activity of Tanshinones against one special cancer cell line. The aim of this study is to investigate the growth inhibition effect of four Tanshinones on SPC-A-1 cell line and the relationship between their structures and cytotoxicity. The modified MTT assay was adopted to measure the inhibition effect of Tanshinones on SPC-A-1 cells at different concentrations at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, and the changes of cell morphology were observed by inverted phase contrast microscope. Tanshinones could inhibit the proliferation of SPC-A-1 cells effectively, and their cytotoxicities on SPC-A-1 cells are all in concentration-dependent and time-dependent manners. The IC50 of dihydro-Tanshinone I, Tanshinone I, Tanshinone IIA and Cryptotanshinone at 24 h were 2.77 μg/mL, 6.01 μg/mL, over 10 μg/mL and over 10 μg/mL, at 48 h were 1.80 μg/mL, 4.04 μg/mL, 8.12 μg/mL, 8.71 μg/mL, at 72 h were 1.36 μg/mL, 1.69 μg/mL, 3.81 μg/mL, 7.35 μg/mL, respectively. All of the four Tanshinones have proliferation inhibitory effects on SPC-A-1 cell line, among which the Dihydrotanshinone I is the most active one, followed by Tanshinone I, Tanshinone IIA and Cryptotanshinone subsequently. The results showed that the structure of aromatic ring A could enhance the cytotoxicity and the structure of furan ring C would influence the cytotoxicity, but the mechanism is still remained to be further investigated.

  7. a1-acid glycoprotein inhibits lipogenesis in neonatal swine adipose tissue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Serum a1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) is elevated during late gestation and at birth in the pig and rapidly declines postnatally. In contrast, the pig is born with minimal lipid stores in the adipose tissue, but rapidly accumulates lipid during the first week. The present study examined if AGP can affe...

  8. Histone macroH2A1.2 promotes metabolic health and leanness by inhibiting adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pazienza, Valerio; Panebianco, Concetta; Rappa, Francesca; Memoli, Domenico; Borghesan, Michela; Cannito, Sara; Oji, Asami; Mazza, Giuseppe; Tamburrino, Domenico; Fusai, Giuseppe; Barone, Rosario; Bolasco, Giulia; Villarroya, Francesc; Villarroya, Joan; Hatsuzawa, Kiyotaka; Cappello, Francesco; Tarallo, Roberta; Nakanishi, Tomoko; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has tremendous impact on the health systems. Its epigenetic bases are unclear. MacroH2A1 is a variant of histone H2A, present in two alternatively exon-spliced isoforms macroH2A1.1 and macroH2A1.2, regulating cell plasticity and proliferation, during pluripotency and tumorigenesis. Their role in adipose tissue plasticity is unknown. Here, we show evidence that macroH2A1.1 protein levels in the visceral adipose tissue of obese humans positively correlate with BMI, while macroH2A1.2 is nearly absent. We thus introduced a constitutive GFP-tagged transgene for macroH2A1.2 in mice, and we characterized their metabolic health upon being fed a standard chow diet or a high fat diet. Despite unchanged food intake, these mice exhibit lower adipose mass and improved glucose metabolism both under a chow and an obesogenic diet. In the latter regimen, transgenic mice display smaller pancreatic islets and significantly less inflammation. MacroH2A1.2 overexpression in the mouse adipose tissue induced dramatic changes in the transcript levels of key adipogenic genes; genomic analyses comparing pre-adipocytes to mature adipocytes uncovered only minor changes in macroH2A1.2 genomic distribution upon adipogenic differentiation and suggested differential cooperation with transcription factors. MacroH2A1.2 overexpression markedly inhibited adipogenesis, while overexpression of macroH2A1.1 had opposite effects. MacroH2A1.2 is an unprecedented chromatin component powerfully promoting metabolic health by modulating anti-adipogenic transcriptional networks in the differentiating adipose tissue. Strategies aiming at enhancing macroH2A1.2 expression might counteract excessive adiposity in humans.

  9. Methamphetamine exposure antagonizes N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine J; Self, Rachel L; Butler, Tracy R; Mullins, Michael M; Ghayoumi, Layla; Holley, Robert C; Littleton, John M; Prendergast, Mark A

    2007-07-09

    Glutamatergic systems have been increasingly recognized as mediators of methamphetamine's (METH) pharmacological effects though little is known about the means by which METH interacts with glutamate receptors. The present studies examined effects of METH (0.1-100 microM) on [3H]MK-801 binding to membranes prepared from adult rat cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, as well as the neurotoxicity produced by 24-h exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (5-10 microM; NMDA) employing organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of neonatal rat. Co-incubation of [3H]MK-801 with METH (0.1-100 microM) did not reduce dextromethorphan (1 mM)-displaceable ligand binding. Exposure of slice cultures to NMDA for 24-h produced increases in uptake of the non-vital fluorescent marker propidium iodide (PI) of 150-500% above control levels, most notably, in the CA1 region pyramidal cell layer. Co-exposure to METH (>1.0 microM) with NMDA (5 microM) reduced PI uptake by approximately 50% in each subregion, though the CA1 pyramidal cell layer was markedly more sensitive to the protective effects of METH exposure. In contrast, METH exposure did not reduce PI uptake stimulated by 24-h exposure to 10 microM NMDA. Co-exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (20 microM) prevented toxicity produced by exposure to 5 or 10 microM NMDA. These findings indicate that the pharmacological effects of short-term METH exposure involve inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal signaling, not reflective of direct channel inhibition at an MK-801-sensitive site.

  10. Chloride transporters and receptor-mediated endocytosis in the renal proximal tubule

    PubMed Central

    Devuyst, Olivier; Luciani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The epithelial cells lining the proximal tubules of the kidney reabsorb a large amount of filtered ions and solutes owing to receptor-mediated endocytosis and polarized transport systems that reflect final cell differentiation. Dedifferentiation of proximal tubule cells and dysfunction of receptor-mediated endocytosis characterize Dent’s disease, a rare disorder caused by inactivating mutations in the CLCN5 gene that encodes the endosomal chloride–proton exchanger, ClC-5. The disease is characterized by a massive urinary loss of solutes (renal Fanconi syndrome), with severe metabolic complications and progressive renal failure. Investigations of mutations affecting the gating of ClC-5 revealed that the proximal tubule dysfunction may occur despite normal endosomal acidification. In addition to defective endocytosis, proximal tubule cells lacking ClC-5 show a trafficking defect in apical receptors and transporters, as well as lysosomal dysfunction and typical features of dedifferentiation, proliferation and oxidative stress. A similar but milder defect is observed in mouse models with defective CFTR, a chloride channel that is also expressed in the endosomes of proximal tubule cells. These data suggest a major role for endosomal chloride transport in the maintenance of epithelial differentiation and reabsorption capacity of the renal proximal tubule. Key points The reabsorptive activity of renal proximal tubule cells is mediated by receptor-mediated endocytosis and polarized transport systems that reflect final cell differentiation. Loss-of-function mutations of the endosomal chloride–proton exchanger ClC-5 (Dent’s disease) cause a major trafficking defect in proximal tubule cells, associated with lysosomal dysfunction, oxidative stress and dedifferentiation/proliferation. A similar but milder defect is associated with mutations in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). Vesicular chloride transport appears to be important for

  11. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery to Macrophages in Chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Arora, Sunil K.; Sehgal, Shobha; Basu, Sandip K.

    1989-05-01

    Methotrexate coupled to maleylated bovine serum albumin was taken up efficiently through the ``scavenger'' receptors present on macrophages and led to selective killing of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amazonensis amastigotes in cultured hamster peritoneal macrophages. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free methotrexate in eliminating the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, in a model of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in hamsters, the drug conjugate brought about more than 90% reduction in the size of footpad lesions within 11 days. In contrast, the free drug at a similar concentration did not significantly affect lesion size. These studies demonstrate the potential of receptor-mediated drug delivery in the therapy of macrophage-associated diseases.

  12. Transient receptor potential a1 (TRPA1) agonists inhibit contractions of the isolated human ureter.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Philipp; Hennenberg, Martin; Strittmatter, Frank; Stief, Christian G; Gratzke, Christian; Hedlund, Petter

    2017-07-03

    Mechanoafferent and peristaltic mechanisms of the human ureter involve transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1)- and purinoceptor-mediated functions. Hydrogen sulphide, an endogenous TRPA1 ligand, is linked to inhibitory neurotransmission of the pig ureter. No information is available on TRPA1 activity in the human ureter. We therefore examined the distribution and function of TRPA1 in the human ureter. Expression of TRPA1 in human ureter tissue was studied by Western blot and immunofluorescence. The TRPA1 distribution was compared to TRPV1, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and vimentin. Effects of the TRPA1 agonists allyl isothiocyanate (AI), cinnamaldehyde (CA), sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS), and capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) on human ureter preparations were studied in organ baths. By Western blot, bands were detected at the expected molecular weight for TRPA1. TRPA1- and TRPV1-immunoreactivities were located on CGRP-positive nerves, but not on TH-positive nerves. TRPA1 was also located in vimentin-positive interstitial cells. In functional experiments, neither of the TRPA1-agonists (1-100 μM) had any direct effects on ureter tension (baseline/potassium-induced contractions). However, CA, AI, NaHS, and capsaicin (10 μM) decreased (P < 0.01-0.05) tetrodotoxin-sensitive electrically induced (2,4,8,16,32 Hz) contractions. Inhibitory activities were 50-61% (CA), 30-56% (AI), 30-40% (NaHS), and 37-67% (Capsaicin). In the human ureter, TRPA1 is located to sensory nerves and interstitial cells. TRPA1 agonists inhibited electrically induced contractions but had no direct effect on smooth muscle tension of the human ureter. A role for TRPA1 in modulating neurotransmission and possibly peristalsis of the human ureter is proposed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Compounds and methods for inhibiting histone demethylases: a patent evaluation of US20160102096A1.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Florian; Mercurio, Ciro

    2016-12-01

    The Jumonji C (JmjC) domain containing histone lysine demethylases have a clear role both in the development and in some diseases including inflammation and cancer. The histone lysine demethylases represent an attractive target for the identification of therapeutic agents and the pyridine derivatives are a scaffolds largely investigated for the identification and development of inhibitors of enzymes of the Jumonji family. This commentary is a scientific evaluation of a patent application US20160102096A1 that describes novel pyridine derivatives in which the introduction of specific substituents is used to modulate the selectivity profile of the inhibitors.

  14. STAT1 Regulates the Homeostatic Component of Visual Cortical Plasticity via an AMPA Receptor-Mediated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Van Wart, Audra; Petravicz, Jeremy; Tropea, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence points to a role for Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) immune signaling in neuronal function; however, its role in experience-dependent plasticity is unknown. Here we show that one of its components, STAT1, negatively regulates the homeostatic component of ocular dominance plasticity in visual cortex. After brief monocular deprivation (MD), STAT1 knock-out (KO) mice show an accelerated increase of open-eye responses, to a level comparable with open-eye responses after a longer duration of MD in wild-type (WT) mice. Therefore, this component of plasticity is abnormally enhanced in KO mice. Conversely, increasing STAT1 signaling by IFNγ treatment in WT mice reduces the homeostatic component of plasticity by impairing open-eye responses. Enhanced plasticity in KO mice is accompanied by sustained surface levels of GluA1 AMPA receptors and increased amplitude and frequency of AMPA receptor-mediated mEPSCs, which resemble changes in WT mice after a longer duration of MD. These results demonstrate a unique role for STAT1 during visual cortical plasticity in vivo through a mechanism that includes AMPA receptors. PMID:25080587

  15. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Shanaka, W.W.; Rodrigo, I.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcγRI, but not its associated γ chain, and was not supported by other FcγR family members (FcγRIIA, FcγRIIB and FcγRIII). Studies using chlorpromazine and latrunculin A revealed an important role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (chlorpromazine) and actin filaments (latrunculin A) in antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. This was confirmed by experiments using inhibitors of endosomal acidification (bafilomycin A1, monensin) and by immunocytochemical colocalization of internalized phage particles with early endosome-associated protein-1 (EAA1) . In contrast, microtubule-targeting agents (nocodazole, taxol) increased the efficiency of antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. These results reveal an unexpected antibody-dependent, FcγRI-mediated enhancement of phage transduction in mammalian cells, and suggest new approaches to improve bacteriophage-mediated gene transfer. PMID:18191979

  16. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Rodrigo, W W Shanaka I; Schlesinger, Jacob J; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-04-10

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcgammaRI, but not its associated gamma-chain, and was not supported by other FcgammaR family members (FcgammaRIIA, FcgammaRIIB, and FcgammaRIII). Studies using chlorpromazine and latrunculin A revealed an important role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (chlorpromazine) and actin filaments (latrunculin A) in antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. This was confirmed by experiments using inhibitors of endosomal acidification (bafilomycin A1, monensin) and by immunocytochemical colocalization of internalized phage particles with early endosome-associated protein-1 (EAA1). In contrast, microtubule-targeting agents (nocodazole, taxol) increased the efficiency of antibody-enhanced phage gene transfer. These results reveal an unexpected antibody-dependent, FcgammaRI-mediated enhancement of phage transduction in mammalian cells, and suggest new approaches to improve bacteriophage-mediated gene transfer.

  17. Characterization of the structural determinants required for potent mechanism-based inhibition of human cytochrome P450 1A1 by cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Yamaori, Satoshi; Okushima, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuhito

    2014-05-25

    We previously demonstrated that cannabidiol (CBD) was a potent mechanism-based inhibitor of human cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). However, the moiety of CBD that contributes to the potent mechanism-based inhibition of human CYP1A1 remains unknown. Thus, the effects of compounds structurally related to CBD on CYP1A1 activity were examined with recombinant human CYP1A1 in order to characterize the structural requirements for potent inactivation by CBD. When preincubated in the presence of NADPH for 20min, olivetol, which corresponds to the pentylresorcinol moiety of CBD, enhanced the inhibition of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity of CYP1A1. In contrast, d-limonene, which corresponds to the terpene moiety of CBD, failed to inhibit CYP1A1 activity in a metabolism-dependent manner. Pentylbenzene, which lacks two free phenolic hydroxyl groups, also did not enhance CYP1A1 inhibition. On the other hand, preincubation of the CBD-2'-monomethyl ether (CBDM) and CBD-2',6'-dimethyl ether (CBDD) enhanced the inhibition of CYP1A1 activity. Inhibition by cannabidivarin (CBDV), which possessed a propyl side chain, was strongly potentiated by its preincubation. Orcinol, which has a methyl group, augmented CYP1A1 inhibition, whereas its derivative without an alkyl side chain, resorcinol, did not exhibit any metabolism-dependent inhibition. The preincubation of CBD-hydroxyquinone did not markedly enhance CYP1A1 inhibition. We further confirmed that olivetol, CBDM, CBDD, CBDV, and orcinol, as well as CBD (kinact=0.215min(-1)), inactivated CYP1A1 activity; their kinact values were 0.154, 0.0638, 0.0643, 0.226, and 0.0353min(-1), respectively. These results suggest that the methylresorcinol structure in CBD may have structurally important roles in the inactivation of CYP1A1.

  18. CD36 Is a Novel Serum Amyloid A (SAA) Receptor Mediating SAA Binding and SAA-induced Signaling in Human and Rodent Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, Irina N.; Bocharov, Alexander V.; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G.; Kurlander, Roger; Chen, Zhigang; Fu, Dong; Arias, Irwin M.; Csako, Gyorgy; Patterson, Amy P.; Eggerman, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes. This study provides experimental evidence that CD36, a phagocyte class B scavenger receptor, functions as a novel SAA receptor mediating SAA proinflammatory activity. The uptake of Alexa Fluor® 488 SAA as well as of other well established CD36 ligands was increased 5–10-fold in HeLa cells stably transfected with CD36 when compared with mock-transfected cells. Unlike other apolipoproteins that bind to CD36, only SAA induced a 10–50-fold increase of interleukin-8 secretion in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells when compared with control cells. SAA-mediated effects were thermolabile, inhibitable by anti-SAA antibody, and also neutralized by association with high density lipoprotein but not by association with bovine serum albumin. SAA-induced cell activation was inhibited by a CD36 peptide based on the CD36 hexarelin-binding site but not by a peptide based on the thrombospondin-1-binding site. A pronounced reduction (up to 60–75%) of SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was observed in cd36−/− rat macrophages and Kupffer cells when compared with wild type rat cells. The results of the MAPK phosphorylation assay as well as of the studies with NF-κB and MAPK inhibitors revealed that two MAPKs, JNK and to a lesser extent ERK1/2, primarily contribute to elevated cytokine production in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells. In macrophages, four signaling pathways involving NF-κB and three MAPKs all appeared to contribute to SAA-induced cytokine release. These observations indicate that CD36 is a receptor mediating SAA binding and SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion predominantly through JNK- and ERK1/2-mediated signaling. PMID:20075072

  19. CD36 is a novel serum amyloid A (SAA) receptor mediating SAA binding and SAA-induced signaling in human and rodent cells.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Irina N; Bocharov, Alexander V; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G; Kurlander, Roger; Chen, Zhigang; Fu, Dong; Arias, Irwin M; Csako, Gyorgy; Patterson, Amy P; Eggerman, Thomas L

    2010-03-12

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes. This study provides experimental evidence that CD36, a phagocyte class B scavenger receptor, functions as a novel SAA receptor mediating SAA proinflammatory activity. The uptake of Alexa Fluor 488 SAA as well as of other well established CD36 ligands was increased 5-10-fold in HeLa cells stably transfected with CD36 when compared with mock-transfected cells. Unlike other apolipoproteins that bind to CD36, only SAA induced a 10-50-fold increase of interleukin-8 secretion in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells when compared with control cells. SAA-mediated effects were thermolabile, inhibitable by anti-SAA antibody, and also neutralized by association with high density lipoprotein but not by association with bovine serum albumin. SAA-induced cell activation was inhibited by a CD36 peptide based on the CD36 hexarelin-binding site but not by a peptide based on the thrombospondin-1-binding site. A pronounced reduction (up to 60-75%) of SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was observed in cd36(-/-) rat macrophages and Kupffer cells when compared with wild type rat cells. The results of the MAPK phosphorylation assay as well as of the studies with NF-kappaB and MAPK inhibitors revealed that two MAPKs, JNK and to a lesser extent ERK1/2, primarily contribute to elevated cytokine production in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells. In macrophages, four signaling pathways involving NF-kappaB and three MAPKs all appeared to contribute to SAA-induced cytokine release. These observations indicate that CD36 is a receptor mediating SAA binding and SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion predominantly through JNK- and ERK1/2-mediated signaling.

  20. A(1) and A(3) adenosine receptors inhibit LPS-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 accumulation in murine astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Stefanelli, Angela; Fazzi, Debora; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2013-10-01

    Adenosine (Ado) exerts neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory functions by acting through four receptor subtypes A1, A2A, A2B and A3. Astrocytes are one of its targets in the central nervous system. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis, is induced after hypoxia, ischemia and inflammation and plays an important role in brain injury. HIF-1 is expressed by astrocytes, however the regulatory role played by Ado on HIF-1α modulation induced by inflammatory and hypoxic conditions has not been investigated. Primary murine astrocytes were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without Ado, Ado receptor agonists, antagonists and receptor silencing, before exposure to normoxia or hypoxia. HIF-1α accumulation and downstream genes regulation were determined. Ado inhibited LPS-increased HIF-1α accumulation under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, through activation of A1 and A3 receptors. In cells incubated with the blockers of p44/42 MAPK and Akt, LPS-induced HIF-1α accumulation was significantly decreased in normoxia and hypoxia, suggesting the involvement of p44/42 MAPK and Akt in this effect and Ado inhibited kinases phosphorylation. A series of angiogenesis and metabolism related genes were modulated by hypoxia in an HIF-1 dependent way, but not further increased by LPS, with the exception of GLUT-1 and hexochinase II that were elevated by LPS only in normoxia and inhibited by Ado receptors. Instead, genes involved in inflammation, like inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and A2B receptors, were increased by LPS in normoxia, strongly stimulated by LPS in concert with hypoxia and inhibited by Ado, through A1 and A3 receptor subtypes. In conclusion A1 and A3 receptors reduce the LPS-mediated HIF-1α accumulation in murine astrocytes, resulting in a downregulation of genes involved in inflammation and hypoxic injury, like iNOS and A2B receptors, in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  1. Receptor-mediated binding and uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist by pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jennes, L.; Stumpf, W.E.; Conn, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular pathway of an enzyme resistant GnRH agonist (D- Lys6 -GnRH) conjugated to ferritin or to colloidal gold was followed in cultured pituitary cells. After an initial uniform distribution over the cell surface of gonadotropes, the electrondense marker was internalized, either individually or in small groups. After longer incubation times, the marker appeared in the lysosomal compartment and the Golgi apparatus, where it could be found in the vesicular as well as cisternal portion. In addition, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of the GnRH antagonist D-p-Glu1-D-Phe2-D-Trp3-D- Lys6 -GnRH was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography after 30 and 60 min of incubation to ensure uptake. At both time points, in in vitro as well as in vivo studies, silver grains were localized over cytoplasmic organelles of castration cells, including dilated endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, and clear vesicles. No consistent association with cell nuclei, mitochondria, or secretory vesicles could be observed. The results suggest that both agonist and antagonist are binding selectively to the plasma membrane of gonadotropes and subsequently are taken up via receptor-mediated endocytosis for degradation or possible action on synthetic processes.

  2. Understanding magnetic nanoparticle osteoblast receptor-mediated endocytosis using experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhiem; Webster, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are promising candidates for controlling drug delivery through an external magnetic force to treat a wide range of diseases, including osteoporosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that in the presence of hydroxyapatite coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, osteoblast (or bone forming cell) proliferation and long-term functions (such as calcium deposition) were significantly enhanced. Hydroxyapatite is the major inorganic component of bone. As a further attempt to understand why, in the current study, the uptake of such nanoparticles into osteoblasts was experimentally investigated and mathematically modeled. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using a co-precipitation method and were coated with hydroxyapatite. A cellular uptake experiment at low temperatures indicated that receptor-mediated endocytosis contributed to the internalization of the magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts. A model was further developed to explain the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into osteoblasts using receptor-mediated endocytosis. This model may explain the internalization of hydroxyapatite into osteoblasts to elevate intracellular calcium levels necessary to promote osteoblast functions to treat a wide range of orthopedic problems, including osteoporosis.

  3. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    PubMed

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils.

  4. Target shape dependence in a simple model of receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Richards, David M; Endres, Robert G

    2016-05-31

    Phagocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis are vitally important particle uptake mechanisms in many cell types, ranging from single-cell organisms to immune cells. In both processes, engulfment by the cell depends critically on both particle shape and orientation. However, most previous theoretical work has focused only on spherical particles and hence disregards the wide-ranging particle shapes occurring in nature, such as those of bacteria. Here, by implementing a simple model in one and two dimensions, we compare and contrast receptor-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis for a range of biologically relevant shapes, including spheres, ellipsoids, capped cylinders, and hourglasses. We find a whole range of different engulfment behaviors with some ellipsoids engulfing faster than spheres, and that phagocytosis is able to engulf a greater range of target shapes than other types of endocytosis. Further, the 2D model can explain why some nonspherical particles engulf fastest (not at all) when presented to the membrane tip-first (lying flat). Our work reveals how some bacteria may avoid being internalized simply because of their shape, and suggests shapes for optimal drug delivery.

  5. Contribution of Resting Conductance, GABAA-Receptor Mediated Miniature Synaptic Currents and Neurosteroid to Chloride Homeostasis in Central Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yelhekar, Tushar D.; Druzin, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Maintenance of a low intraneuronal Cl– concentration, [Cl–]i, is critical for inhibition in the CNS. Here, the contribution of passive, conductive Cl– flux to recovery of [Cl–]i after a high load was analyzed in mature central neurons from rat. A novel method for quantifying the resting Cl– conductance, important for [Cl–]i recovery, was developed and the possible contribution of GABAA and glycine receptors and of ClC-2 channels to this conductance was analyzed. The hypothesis that spontaneous, action potential-independent release of GABA is important for [Cl–]i recovery was tested. [Cl–]i was examined by gramicidin-perforated patch recordings in medial preoptic neurons. Cells were loaded with Cl– by combining GABA or glycine application with a depolarized voltage, and the time course of [Cl–]i was followed by measurements of the Cl– equilibrium potential, as obtained from the current recorded during voltage ramps combined with GABA or glycine application. The results show that passive Cl– flux contributes significantly, in the same order of magnitude as does K+-Cl– cotransporter 2 (KCC2), to [Cl–]i recovery and that Cl– conductance accounts for ∼ 6% of the total resting conductance. A major fraction of this resting Cl– conductance is picrotoxin (PTX)-sensitive and likely due to open GABAA receptors, but ClC-2 channels do not contribute. The results also show that when the decay of GABAA receptor-mediated miniature postsynaptic currents (minis) is slowed by the neurosteroid allopregnanolone, such minis may significantly quicken [Cl–]i recovery, suggesting a possible steroid-regulated role for minis in the control of Cl– homeostasis. PMID:28374007

  6. LPA1 receptor-mediated thromboxane A2 release is responsible for lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Dancs, Péter Tibor; Ruisanchez, Éva; Balogh, Andrea; Panta, Cecília Rita; Miklós, Zsuzsanna; Nüsing, Rolf M; Aoki, Junken; Chun, Jerold; Offermanns, Stefan; Tigyi, Gábor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been recognized recently as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, but several lines of evidence indicate that it may also stimulate vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), thereby contributing to vasoregulation and remodeling. In the present study, mRNA expression of all 6 LPA receptor genes was detected in murine aortic VSMCs, with the highest levels of LPA1, LPA2, LPA4, and LPA6 In endothelium-denuded thoracic aorta (TA) and abdominal aorta (AA) segments, 1-oleoyl-LPA and the LPA1-3 agonist VPC31143 induced dose-dependent vasoconstriction. VPC31143-induced AA contraction was sensitive to pertussis toxin (PTX), the LPA1&3 antagonist Ki16425, and genetic deletion of LPA1 but not that of LPA2 or inhibition of LPA3, by diacylglycerol pyrophosphate. Surprisingly, vasoconstriction was also diminished in vessels lacking cyclooxygenase-1 [COX1 knockout (KO)] or the thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptor (TP KO). VPC31143 increased thromboxane A2 (TXA2) release from TA of wild-type, TP-KO, and LPA2-KO mice but not from LPA1-KO or COX1-KO mice, and PTX blocked this effect. Our findings indicate that LPA causes vasoconstriction in VSMCs, mediated by LPA1-, Gi-, and COX1-dependent autocrine/paracrine TXA2 release and consequent TP activation. We propose that this new-found interaction between the LPA/LPA1 and TXA2/TP pathways plays significant roles in vasoregulation, hemostasis, thrombosis, and vascular remodeling.-Dancs, P. T., Ruisanchez, E., Balogh, A., Panta, C. R., Miklós, Z., Nüsing, R. M., Aoki, J., Chun, J., Offermanns, S., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. LPA1 receptor-mediated thromboxane A2 release is responsible for lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular smooth muscle contraction. © FASEB.

  7. Plasticity of NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents at perforant path inputs to dendrite-targeting interneurons.

    PubMed

    Harney, Sarah C; Anwyl, Roger

    2012-08-15

    Synaptic plasticity of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) has been recently described in a number of brain regions and we have previously characterised LTP and LTD of glutamatergic NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs (NMDAR-EPSCs) in granule cells of dentate gyrus. The functional significance of NMDAR plasticity at perforant path synapses on hippocampal network activity depends on whether this is a common feature of perforant path synapses on all postsynaptic target cells or if this plasticity occurs only at synapses on principal cells. We recorded NMDAR-EPSCs at medial perforant path synapses on interneurons in dentate gyrus which had significantly slower decay kinetics compared to those recorded in granule cells. NMDAR pharmacology in interneurons was consistent with expression of both GluN2B- and GluN2D-containing receptors. In contrast to previously described high frequency stimulation-induced bidirectional plasticity of NMDAR-EPSCs in granule cells, only LTD of NMDAR-EPSCs was induced in interneurons in our standard experimental conditions. In interneurons, LTD of NMDAR-EPSCs was associated with a loss of sensitivity to a GluN2D-selective antagonist and was inhibited by the actin stabilising agent, jasplakinolide. While LTP of NMDAR-EPSCs can be readily induced in granule cells, this form of plasticity was only observed in interneurons when extracellular calcium was increased above physiological concentrations during HFS or when PKC was directly activated by phorbol ester, suggesting that opposing forms of plasticity at inputs to interneurons and principal cells may act to regulate granule cell dendritic integration and processing.

  8. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediates the toxic effects of an asialofetuin-diphtheria toxin fragment A conjugate on cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cawley, D B; Simpson, D L; Herschman, H R

    1981-01-01

    We have constructed a toxic hybrid protein that is recognized by asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptors of cultured rat hepatocytes. The conjugate consists of fragment A of diphtheria toxin (DTA) linked by a disulfide bond to asialofetuin (ASF). This conjugate is highly toxic, inhibiting protein synthesis in primary rat hepatocytes at concentrations as low as 10 pM. The ASF-DTA conjugate was 600 and 1800 times as toxic as diphtheria toxin and DTA, respectively, on primary rat hepatocytes. The ASGP receptor recognizes galactose-terminated proteins. We tested a series of glycoproteins for their ability to block the action of the ASF-DTA conjugate. Fetuin and orosomucoid, two glycoproteins with terminal sialic acid on their oligosaccharide chains, did not block the action of the conjugate. Their galactose-terminated asialo derivatives, ASF and asialoorosomucoid, as expected, did block the action of the conjugate. The N-acetylglucosaminyl-terminated derivative (asialogalactoorsomucoid) had no appreciable effect on the activity of the conjugate. We tested the ASF-DTA conjugate on six cell types; except for primary rat hepatocytes, none of them were affected by a high concentration (10 nM) of ASF-DTA conjugate. A fetuin-DTA conjugate was less toxic by a factor of 300 than the ASF-DTA conjugate and exerted its effects primarily through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms. The highly toxic ASF-DTA conjugate is cell-type specific, and its action is mediated by a well-characterized receptor, whose mechanism of receptor-ligand internalization has been extensively investigated. Images PMID:6167984

  9. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediates the toxic effects of an asialofetuin-diphtheria toxin fragment A conjugate on cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cawley, D.B.; Simpson, D.L.; Herschman, H.R.

    1981-06-01

    We have constructed a toxic hybrid protein that is recognized by asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptors of cultured rat hepatocytes. The conjugate consists of fragment A of diphtheria toxin (DTA) linked by a disulfide bond to asialofetuin (ASF). This conjugate is highly toxic, inhibiting protein synthesis in primary rat hepatocytes at concentrations as low as 10 pM. The ASF-DTA conjugate was 600 and 1800 times as toxic as diphtheria toxin and DTA, respectively, on primary rat hepatocytes. The ASGP receptor recognizes galactose-terminated proteins. We tested a series of glycoproteins for their ability to block the action of the ASF-DTA conjugate. Fetuin and orosomucoid, two glycoproteins with terminal sialic acid on their oligosaccharide chains, did not block the action of the conjugate. Their galactose-terminated asialo derivatives, ASF and asialoorosomucoid, as expected, did block the action of the conjugate. The N-acetylglucosaminyl-terminated derivative (asialoagalactoorosomucoid) had no appreciable effect on the activity of the conjugate. We tested the ASF-DTA conjugate on six cell types; except for primary rat hepatocytes, none of them were affected by a high concentration (10 nM) of ASF-DTA conjugate. A fetuin-DTA conjugate was less toxic by a factor of 300 than the ASF-DTA conjugate and exerted its effects primarily through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms. The highly toxic ASF-DTA conjugate is cell-type specific, and its action is mediated by a well-characterized receptor, whose mechanism of receptor-ligand internalization has been extensively investigated.

  10. Decreases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species initiate GABAA receptor-mediated electrical suppression in anoxia-tolerant turtle neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, David W; Pamenter, Matthew E; Dukoff, David J; Buck, Leslie T

    2015-01-01

    Key points Anoxia induces hyper-excitability and cell death in mammalian brain but in the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) enhanced GABA transmission prevents injury. The mechanism responsible for increased GABA transmission is unknown; however, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by mitochondria may play a role because this is an oxygen-sensitive process. In this study, we show that inhibition of mitochondrial ROS production is sufficient to initiate a redox-sensitive GABA signalling cascade that suppresses pyramidal neuron action potential frequency. These results further our understanding of the turtle's unique strategy for reducing ATP consumption during anoxia and highlights a natural mechanism in which to explore therapies to protect mammalian brain from low-oxygen insults (e.g. cerebral stroke). Abstract Anoxia induces hyper-excitability and cell death in mammalian brain but in the anoxia-tolerant western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) neuronal electrical activity is suppressed (i.e. spike arrest), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption is reduced, and cell death does not occur. Electrical suppression is primarily the result of enhanced γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for initiating oxygen-sensitive GABAergic spike arrest is unknown. In turtle cortical pyramidal neurons there are three types of GABAA receptor-mediated currents: spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), giant IPSCs and tonic currents. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging on these three currents since ROS levels naturally decrease with anoxia and may serve as a redox signal to initiate spike arrest. We found that anoxia, pharmacological ROS scavenging, or inhibition of mitochondrial ROS generation enhanced all three types of GABA currents, with tonic currents comprising ∼50% of the total current. Application of hydrogen peroxide inhibited

  11. Enzyme induction and histopathology elucidate aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated versus non-aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated effects of Aroclor 1268 in American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations reported in preferred prey and blubber of bottlenose dolphins from the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (Georgia, USA) suggest the potential for adverse effects. However, PCBs in Turtle-Brunswick River estuary dolphins are primarily derived from Aroclor 1268, and predicting toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 is uncertain because of the mixture's unique composition and associated physiochemical characteristics. These differences suggest that toxicity benchmarks for other PCB mixtures may not be relevant to dolphins exposed to Aroclor 1268. American mink (Neovison vison) were used as a surrogate model for cetaceans to characterize mechanisms of action associated with Aroclor 1268 exposure. Mink share similarities in phylogeny and life history with cetaceans and are characteristically sensitive to PCBs, making them an attractive surrogate species for marine mammals in ecotoxicity studies. Adult female mink and a subsequent F1 generation were exposed to Aroclor 1268 through diet, and effects on enzyme induction, histopathology, thyroid hormone regulation, hematology, organ weights, and body condition index were compared to a negative control and a 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)-positive control. Aroclor 1268 dietary exposure concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g wet weight to 29 µg/g wet weight. Anemia, hypothyroidism, and hepatomegaly were observed in mink exposed to Aroclor 1268 beyond various dietary thresholds. Cytochrome P450 induction and squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions were low in Aroclor 1268 treatments relative to the positive control. Differences in enzyme induction and the development of squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions between Aroclor 1268 treatments and the positive control, coupled with effects observed in Aroclor 1268 treatments not observed in the positive control, indicate that mechanisms additional to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway are associated with

  12. Signal transduction of receptor-mediated antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells involves dual activation of Gα(s) and Gα(q) proteins.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Stephen Y W; Pang, Bo; Tam, Chun W; Yao, Kwok-Ming

    2010-10-01

    Melatonin has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of malignant and transformed human prostate epithelial cells by transcriptional up-regulation of p27(Kip1) expression via MTNR1A receptor-mediated activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) in parallel. Given that melatonin MTNR1A receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor, this study was conducted to identify the specific G proteins that mediate the antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells. In 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells, knockdown of either Gα(s) or Gα(q) , but not Gα(i2) expression by RNA interference, abrogated the effects of melatonin on p27(Kip1) and cell proliferation. Conversely, cellular overexpression of activated mutants of Gα(s) and Gα(q) in 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells mimicked the effects of melatonin on prostate epithelial cell antiproliferation by increasing p27(Kip1) expression through downstream activation of PKA and PKC in parallel. Moreover, melatonin or 2-iodomelatonin induced elevation of adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells. The effects of 2-iodomelatonin on cAMP were blocked by the nonselective MTNR1A/MTNR1B receptor antagonist luzindole but were not affected by the selective MTNR1B receptor antagonist 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline (4-P-PDOT). Furthermore, knockdown of Gα(s) mitigated the stimulatory effects of 2-iodomelatonin on cAMP. Collectively, the data demonstrated, for the first time, functional coupling of MTNR1A receptor to Gα(s) in cancerous or transformed human cells expressing endogenous melatonin receptors. Our results also showed that dual activation of Gα(s) and Gα(q) proteins is involved in the signal transduction of MTNR1A receptor-mediated antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells.

  13. The CB₁ receptor-mediated endocannabinoid signaling and NGF: the novel targets of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Parichehr; Hassanzadeh, Anna

    2012-05-01

    Increasing interest has recently been attracted towards the identification of natural compounds including those with antidepressant properties. Curcumin has shown promising antidepressant effect, however, its molecular target(s) have not been well defined. Based on the interaction between the neurotrophins and endocannabinoid system as well as their contribution to the emotional reactivity and antidepressant action, here we show that 4-week treatment with curcumin, similar to the classical antidepressant amitriptyline, results in the sustained elevation of brain nerve growth factor (NGF) and endocannabinoids in dose-dependent and brain region-specific fashion. Pretreatment with cannabinoid CB(1) receptor neutral antagonist AM4113, but not the CB(2) antagonist SR144528, prevents the enhancement of brain NGF contents. AM4113 exerts no effect by itself. Our findings by presenting the CB(1) receptor-mediated endocannabinoid signaling and NGF as novel targets for curcumin, suggest that more attention should be focused on the therapeutic potential of herbal medicines including curcumin.

  14. Using GFP--ligand fusions to measure receptor-mediated endocytosis in living cells.

    PubMed

    Medina-Kauwe, Lali K; Chen, Xinhua

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technology has enabled the production of many types of chimeric proteins containing heterologous functional domains that have served a variety of useful capacities for cell biology research. Among proteins gaining wide use as a fusion partner is Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP). GFP has been employed by numerous groups as a reporter gene for cell transfection and as an autofluorescent tag by recombinant fusion to foreign sequences. Here we describe the use of GFP as a tag for ligands, and provide examples of how purified recombinant GFP-ligand fusion proteins may be used to detect ligand-receptor interactions, including receptor-mediated endocytosis. Both its utility and limitations are discussed.

  15. The C-kit receptor-mediated signal transduction and tumor-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Wu, Yan-Ling; Chen, Bing-Jia; Zhang, Wen; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    As an important member of tyrosine kinase family, c-kit receptor causes specific expression of certain genes, regulates cell differentiation and proliferation, resists cell apoptosis, and plays a key role in tumor occurrence, development, migration and recurrence through activating the downstream signaling molecules following interaction with stem cell factor (SCF). The abnormality of SCF/c-kit signaling pathway is closely related to some certain tumors. The discovery of c-kit receptor-targeted drugs has promoted clinical-related cancer's diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we review recent research progress on c-kit receptor-mediated signal transduction and its potential therapeutic application as a target in tumor-related diseases.

  16. Bicarbonate contributes to GABAA receptor-mediated neuronal excitation in surgically resected human hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Young; Fenoglio, Kristina A; Kerrigan, John F; Rho, Jong M

    2009-01-01

    The role of bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) in GABA(A) receptor-mediated depolarization of human hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) neurons was investigated using cellular electrophysiological and calcium imaging techniques. Activation of GABA(A) receptors with muscimol (30 microM) provoked neuronal excitation in over 70% of large (18-22 microM) HH neurons in HCO(3)(-) buffer. Subsequent perfusion of HCO(3)(-)-free HEPES buffer produced partial suppression of muscimol-induced excitation. Additionally, 53% of large HH neurons under HCO(3)(-)-free conditions exhibited reduced intracellular calcium accumulation by muscimol. These results suggest that HCO(3)(-) efflux through GABA(A) receptors on a subpopulation of large HH neurons may contribute to membrane depolarization and subsequent activation of L-type calcium channels.

  17. D2-like dopamine receptors mediate the response to amphetamine in a mouse model of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of psychostimulants in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are not well understood, but indirect evidence implicates D2 dopamine receptors. Here we dissect the components of dopaminergic neurotransmission in the hyperactive mouse mutant coloboma to identify pre- and postsynaptic elements essential for the effects of amphetamine in these mice. Amphetamine treatment reduced locomotor activity in coloboma mice, but induced a robust increase in dopamine overflow suggesting that abnormal regulation of dopamine efflux does not account for the behavioral effect. However, the D2-like dopamine receptor antagonists haloperidol and raclopride, but not the D1-like dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390, blocked the amphetamine-induced reduction in locomotor activity in coloboma mice, providing direct evidence that D2-like dopamine receptors mediate the effect of amphetamine in these mice. With the precedent established that it is possible to directly antagonize this response, this strategy should prove useful for identifying novel therapeutics in ADHD. PMID:17291774

  18. The C-Kit Receptor-Mediated Signal Transduction and Tumor-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Wu, Yan-Ling; Chen, Bing-Jia; Zhang, Wen; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    As an important member of tyrosine kinase family, c-kit receptor causes specific expression of certain genes, regulates cell differentiation and proliferation, resists cell apoptosis, and plays a key role in tumor occurrence, development, migration and recurrence through activating the downstream signaling molecules following interaction with stem cell factor (SCF). The abnormality of SCF/c-kit signaling pathway is closely related to some certain tumors. The discovery of c-kit receptor-targeted drugs has promoted clinical-related cancer's diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we review recent research progress on c-kit receptor-mediated signal transduction and its potential therapeutic application as a target in tumor-related diseases. PMID:23678293

  19. Current injection and receptor-mediated excitation produce similar maximal firing rates in hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Hilary E; Fregosi, Ralph F; Fuglevand, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    The maximum firing rates of motoneurons (MNs), activated in response to synaptic drive, appear to be much lower than that elicited by current injection. It could be that the decrease in input resistance associated with increased synaptic activity (but not current injection) might blunt overall changes in membrane depolarization and thereby limit spike-frequency output. To test this idea, we recorded, in the same cells, maximal firing responses to current injection and to synaptic activation. We prepared 300 μm medullary slices in neonatal rats that contained hypoglossal MNs and used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to record their maximum firing rates in response to triangular-ramp current injections and to glutamate receptor-mediated excitation. Brief pressure pulses of high-concentration glutamate led to significant depolarization, high firing rates, and temporary cessation of spiking due to spike inactivation. In the same cells, we applied current clamp protocols that approximated the time course of membrane potential change associated with glutamate application and with peak current levels large enough to cause spike inactivation. Means (SD) of maximum firing rates obtained in response to glutamate application were nearly identical to those obtained in response to ramp current injection [glutamate 47.1 ± 12.0 impulses (imp)/s, current injection 47.5 ± 11.2 imp/s], even though input resistance was 40% less during glutamate application compared with current injection. Therefore, these data suggest that the reduction in input resistance associated with receptor-mediated excitation does not, by itself, limit the maximal firing rate responses in MNs. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Up-Regulation of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gondeau, Claire; Douam, Florian; Lebreton, Stéphanie; Lagaye, Sylvie; Pol, Stanislas; Helle, François; Plengpanich, Wanee; Guérin, Maryse; Bourgine, Maryline; Michel, Marie Louise; Lavillette, Dimitri; Roingeard, Philippe; le Goff, Wilfried; Budkowska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes infection using host lipid metabolism pathways that are thus considered potential targets for indirect anti-HCV strategies. HCV enters the cell via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, interacting with several receptors, and virus-cell fusion, which depends on acidic pH and the integrity of cholesterol-rich domains of the hepatocyte membrane. The ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates cholesterol efflux from hepatocytes to extracellular Apolipoprotein A1 and moves cholesterol within cell membranes. Furthermore, it generates high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. HDL protects against arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We show that the up-regulation of ABCA1 gene expression and its cholesterol efflux function in Huh7.5 hepatoma cells, using the liver X receptor (LXR) agonist GW3965, impairs HCV infection and decreases levels of virus produced. ABCA1-stimulation inhibited HCV cell entry, acting on virus-host cell fusion, but had no impact on virus attachment, replication, or assembly/secretion. It did not affect infectivity or properties of virus particles produced. Silencing of the ABCA1 gene and reduction of the specific cholesterol efflux function counteracted the inhibitory effect of the GW3965 on HCV infection, providing evidence for a key role of ABCA1 in this process. Impaired virus-cell entry correlated with the reorganisation of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts). The inhibitory effect could be reversed by an exogenous cholesterol supply, indicating that restriction of HCV infection was induced by changes of cholesterol content/distribution in membrane regions essential for virus-cell fusion. Stimulation of ABCA1 expression by GW3965 inhibited HCV infection of both human primary hepatocytes and isolated human liver slices. This study reveals that pharmacological stimulation of the ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux pathway disrupts membrane cholesterol homeostasis, leading to the

  1. Synthesis and mannose receptor-mediated uptake of clustered glycomimetics by human dendritic cells: effect of charge.

    PubMed

    Angyalosi, Gerhild; Grandjean, Cyrille; Lamirand, Mélanie; Auriault, Claude; Gras-Masse, Hélène; Melnyk, Oleg

    2002-10-07

    Effect of charge and shape of multivalent lysine-based cluster glycomimetics on their mannose receptor-mediated uptake by human dendritic cells has been evaluated: The capture is strongly affected by the shape of the ligands. The effect of charge is less pronounced although positive charges on the ligands seem to favor non-specific endocytosis capture.

  2. 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors differently modulate AMPA receptor-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Costa, L; Trovato, C; Musumeci, S A; Catania, M V; Ciranna, L

    2012-04-01

    We have studied the effects of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) serotonin receptor activation in hippocampal CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission using patch clamp on mouse brain slices. Application of either 5-HT or 8-OH DPAT, a mixed 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(7) receptor agonist, inhibited AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory post synaptic currents (EPSCs); this effect was mimicked by the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH PIPAT and blocked by the 5-HT(1A) antagonist NAN-190. 8-OH DPAT increased paired-pulse facilitation and reduced the frequency of mEPSCs, indicating a presynaptic reduction of glutamate release probability. In another group of neurons, 8-OH DPAT enhanced EPSC amplitude but did not alter paired-pulse facilitation, suggesting a postsynaptic action; this effect persisted in the presence of NAN-190 and was blocked by the 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB-269970. To confirm that EPSC enhancement was mediated by 5-HT(7) receptors, we used the compound LP-44, which is considered a selective 5-HT(7) agonist. However, LP-44 reduced EPSC amplitude in most cells and instead increased EPSC amplitude in a subset of neurons, similarly to 8-OH DPAT. These effects were respectively antagonized by NAN-190 and by SB-269970, indicating that under our experimental condition LP-44 behaved as a mixed agonist. 8-OH DPAT also modulated the current evoked by exogenously applied AMPA, inducing either a reduction or an increase of amplitude in distinct neurons; these effects were respectively blocked by 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonists, indicating that both receptors exert a postsynaptic action. Our results show that 5-HT(1A) receptors inhibit CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission acting both pre- and postsynaptically, whereas 5-HT(7) receptors enhance CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission acting exclusively at a postsynaptic site. We suggest that a selective pharmacological targeting of either subtype may be envisaged in pathological loss of hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions. In this respect, we underline the

  3. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Nuclear Protein Complex Involved in Nuclear Hormone Receptor-mediated Gene Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Garapaty, Shivani; Xu, Chong-Feng; Trojer, Patrick; Mahajan, Muktar A.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Samuels, Herbert H.

    2009-01-01

    NRC/NCoA6 plays an important role in mediating the effects of ligand-bound nuclear hormone receptors as well as other transcription factors. NRC interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) was cloned as a novel factor that interacts in vivo with NRC. Although NIF-1 does not directly interact with nuclear hormone receptors, it enhances activation by nuclear hormone receptors presumably through its interaction with NRC. To further understand the cellular and biological function of NIF-1, we identified NIF-1-associated proteins by in-solution proteolysis followed by mass spectrometry. The identified components revealed factors involved in histone methylation and cell cycle control and include Ash2L, RbBP5, WDR5, HCF-1, DBC-1, and EMSY. Although the NIF-1 complex contains Ash2L, RbBP5, and WDR5, suggesting that the complex might methylate histone H3-Lys-4, we found that the complex contains a H3 methyltransferase activity that modifies a residue other than H3-Lys-4. The identified components form at least two distinctly sized NIF-1 complexes. DBC-1 and EMSY were identified as integral components of an NIF-1 complex of ∼1.5 MDa and were found to play an important role in the regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription. Stimulation of the Sox9 and HoxA1 genes by retinoic acid receptor-α was found to require both DBC-1 and EMSY in addition to NIF-1 for maximal transcriptional activation. Interestingly, NRC was not identified as a component of the NIF-1 complex, suggesting that NIF-1 and NRC do not exist as stable in vitro purified complexes, although the separate NIF-1 and NRC complexes appear to functionally interact in the cell. PMID:19131338

  4. Identification and characterization of a novel nuclear protein complex involved in nuclear hormone receptor-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Garapaty, Shivani; Xu, Chong-Feng; Trojer, Patrick; Mahajan, Muktar A; Neubert, Thomas A; Samuels, Herbert H

    2009-03-20

    NRC/NCoA6 plays an important role in mediating the effects of ligand-bound nuclear hormone receptors as well as other transcription factors. NRC interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) was cloned as a novel factor that interacts in vivo with NRC. Although NIF-1 does not directly interact with nuclear hormone receptors, it enhances activation by nuclear hormone receptors presumably through its interaction with NRC. To further understand the cellular and biological function of NIF-1, we identified NIF-1-associated proteins by in-solution proteolysis followed by mass spectrometry. The identified components revealed factors involved in histone methylation and cell cycle control and include Ash2L, RbBP5, WDR5, HCF-1, DBC-1, and EMSY. Although the NIF-1 complex contains Ash2L, RbBP5, and WDR5, suggesting that the complex might methylate histone H3-Lys-4, we found that the complex contains a H3 methyltransferase activity that modifies a residue other than H3-Lys-4. The identified components form at least two distinctly sized NIF-1 complexes. DBC-1 and EMSY were identified as integral components of an NIF-1 complex of approximately 1.5 MDa and were found to play an important role in the regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription. Stimulation of the Sox9 and HoxA1 genes by retinoic acid receptor-alpha was found to require both DBC-1 and EMSY in addition to NIF-1 for maximal transcriptional activation. Interestingly, NRC was not identified as a component of the NIF-1 complex, suggesting that NIF-1 and NRC do not exist as stable in vitro purified complexes, although the separate NIF-1 and NRC complexes appear to functionally interact in the cell.

  5. Fangchinoline inhibits the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells by blocking cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xue; Peng, Jian-Ming; Su, Lan-DI; Wang, Dong-Yan; Yu, You-Jiang

    2016-02-01

    Fangchinoline (Fan) is a bioactive compound isolated from the Chinese herb Stephania tetrandra S. Moore (Fen Fang Ji). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Fan on the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells, and to define the associated molecular mechanisms. Following treatment with Fan, Cell Counting Kit-8, phase contrast imaging and Giemsa staining assays were used to detect cell viability; flow cytometry was performed to analyze the cell cycle distribution; and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays were used to investigate changes in the expression levels of cell cycle-associated genes and proteins. In the present study, treatment with Fan markedly inhibited the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells and significantly increased the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05 for 2.5-5 µm; P<0.01 for 10 µm), whereas the percentage of cells in the S and G2/M phases were significantly reduced following treatment (P<0.05 for 5 µm; P<0.01 for 10 µm). Mechanistically, Fan significantly reduced the mRNA expression levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK6 (P<0.05 for 2.5-5 µm; P<0.01 for 10 µm), which are key genes in the regulation of the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, treatment with Fan also decreased the expression of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F transcription factor-1 (E2F-1) proteins (P<0.05 for 5 µm; P<0.01 for 10 µm). In summary, the present study demonstrated that Fan inhibited the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells and induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. These effects may be mediated by the downregulation of cellular CDK4, CDK6 and cyclin D1 levels, thus leading to hypophosphorylation of Rb and subsequent suppression of E2F-1 activity. Therefore, the present results suggest that Fan may be a potential drug candidate for the prevention of lung cancer.

  6. Developmental changes in AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated quantal transmission at thalamocortical synapses in the barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Neil J; Benke, Timothy A; Mellor, Jack; Scott, Helen; Gürdal, Esra; Crabtree, John W; Isaac, John T R

    2005-05-25

    During the first week of life, there is a shift from kainate to AMPA receptor-mediated thalamocortical transmission in layer IV barrel cortex. However, the mechanisms underlying this change and the differential properties of AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated transmission remain essentially unexplored. To investigate this, we studied the quantal properties of AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated transmission using strontium-evoked miniature EPSCs. AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated transmission exhibited very different quantal properties but were never coactivated by a single quantum of transmitter, indicating complete segregation to different synapses within the thalamocortical input. Nonstationary fluctuation analysis showed that synaptic AMPA receptors exhibited a range of single-channel conductance (gamma) and a strong negative correlation between gamma and functional channel number, indicating that these two parameters are reciprocally regulated at thalamocortical synapses. We obtained the first estimate of gamma for synaptic kainate receptors (<2 pS), and this primarily accounted for the small quantal size of kainate receptor-mediated transmission. Developmentally, the quantal contribution to transmission of AMPA receptors increased and that of kainate receptors decreased. No changes in AMPA or kainate quantal amplitude or in AMPA receptor gamma were observed, demonstrating that the developmental change was attributable to a decrease in the number of kainate synapses and an increase in the number of AMPA synapses contributing to transmission. Therefore, we demonstrate fundamental differences in the quantal properties for these two types of synapse. Thus, the developmental switch in transmission will dramatically alter information transfer at thalamocortical inputs to layer IV.

  7. Impairment of ATP hydrolysis decreases adenosine A1 receptor tonus favoring cholinergic nerve hyperactivity in the obstructed human urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ramos, M; Silva, I; Faria, M; Magalhães-Cardoso, M T; Correia, J; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether reduced adenosine formation linked to deficits in extracellular ATP hydrolysis by NTPDases contributes to detrusor neuromodulatory changes associated with bladder outlet obstruction in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The kinetics of ATP catabolism and adenosine formation as well as the role of P1 receptor agonists on muscle tension and nerve-evoked [(3)H]ACh release were evaluated in mucosal-denuded detrusor strips from BPH patients (n = 31) and control organ donors (n = 23). The neurogenic release of ATP and [(3)H]ACh was higher (P < 0.05) in detrusor strips from BPH patients. The extracellular hydrolysis of ATP and, subsequent, adenosine formation was slower (t (1/2) 73 vs. 36 min, P < 0.05) in BPH detrusor strips. The A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of evoked [(3)H]ACh release by adenosine (100 μM), NECA (1 μM), and R-PIA (0.3 μM) was enhanced in BPH bladders. Relaxation of detrusor contractions induced by acetylcholine required 30-fold higher concentrations of adenosine. Despite VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves exhibiting higher A(1) immunoreactivity in BPH bladders, the endogenous adenosine tonus revealed by adenosine deaminase is missing. Restoration of A1 inhibition was achieved by favoring (1) ATP hydrolysis with apyrase (2 U mL(-1)) or (2) extracellular adenosine accumulation with dipyridamole or EHNA, as these drugs inhibit adenosine uptake and deamination, respectively. In conclusion, reduced ATP hydrolysis leads to deficient adenosine formation and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of cholinergic nerve activity in the obstructed human bladder. Thus, we propose that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous adenosine levels and/or A(1) receptor activation might be useful to control bladder overactivity in BPH patients.

  8. Differential A1-adenosine receptor reserve for inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation and G-protein activation in DDT1 MF-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stephen P; Scammells, Peter J; Belardinelli, Luiz

    2000-01-01

    The A1-adenosine receptor (A1AdoR) reserve for N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) mediated inhibition of (−)isoprenaline stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation and stimulation of [35S]-guanosine-5′-O-(thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) binding, a measure of guanine nucleotide binding protein (G-protein) activation, was determined in DDT1 MF-2 cells. Inactivation of the A1AdoRs with the chemoreactive ligand 8-cyclopentyl-3-[3-[[4-(fluorosulphonyl)benzoyl]oxy]propyl]-1-propylxanthine (FSCPX) caused a progressive rightward shift of the concentration-response curves for CPA to inhibit cyclic AMP accumulation, with a maximum of 10 fold increase in the EC50 value. In contrast, inactivation of A1AdoR's caused only a 1.7 fold rightward shift in the CPA concentration-response for stimulation of [35S]-GTPγS binding. The A1AdoR occupancy-response relationship for CPA inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation was hyperbolic with 43% receptor occupancy required to elicit the maximal response, i.e. a 57% A1AdoR reserve. In contrast, the A1AdoR occupancy-response relationship for CPA mediated stimulation of [35S]-GTPγS binding was linear indicating little or no receptor reserve for G-protein activation. The relationship between CPA stimulation of [35S]-GTPγS binding and cyclic AMP inhibition was also hyperbolic with 44% G-protein activation sufficient to cause maximal inhibition. The data suggest that the A1AdoR reserve for CPA mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs at the level of G-protein interaction with adenylyl cyclase. However, each A1AdoR appears to activate a constant fraction of the total G-protein population suggesting signal amplification at the receptor-G-protein level which may also contribute to the receptor reserve for CPA. PMID:10882402

  9. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  10. Receptor-mediated control of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and apoptotic volume decrease (AVD)

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yasunobu; Maeno, Emi; Shimizu, Takahiro; Dezaki, Katsuya; Wang, Jun; Morishima, Shigeru

    2001-01-01

    A fundamental property of animal cells is the ability to regulate their own cell volume. Even under hypotonic stress imposed by either decreased extracellular or increased intracellular osmolarity, the cells can re-adjust their volume after transient osmotic swelling by a mechanism known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). In most cell types, RVD is accomplished mainly by KCl efflux induced by parallel activation of K+ and Cl− channels. We have studied the molecular mechanism of RVD in a human epithelial cell line (Intestine 407). Osmotic swelling results in a significant increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and thereby activates intermediate-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (IK) channels. Osmotic swelling also induces ATP release from the cells to the extracellular compartment. Released ATP stimulates purinergic ATP (P2Y2) receptors, thereby inducing phospholipase C-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. Thus, RVD is facilitated by stimulation of P2Y2 receptors due to augmentation of IK channels. In contrast, stimulation of another G protein-coupled Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR) enhances the activity of volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl− channels, thereby facilitating RVD. Therefore, it is possible that Ca2+ efflux stimulated by swelling-induced and P2Y2 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization activates the CaR, thereby secondarily upregulating the volume-regulatory Cl− conductance. On the other hand, the initial process towards apoptotic cell death is coupled to normotonic cell shrinkage, called apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). Stimulation of death receptors, such as TNFα receptor and Fas, induces AVD and thereafter biochemical apoptotic events in human lymphoid (U937), human epithelial (HeLa), mouse neuroblastoma × rat glioma hybrid (NG108-15) and rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In those cells exhibiting AVD, facilitation of RVD is always observed. Both AVD induction and RVD facilitation as well as succeeding apoptotic events can be

  11. Receptor-mediated control of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and apoptotic volume decrease (AVD).

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Maeno, E; Shimizu, T; Dezaki, K; Wang, J; Morishima, S

    2001-04-01

    A fundamental property of animal cells is the ability to regulate their own cell volume. Even under hypotonic stress imposed by either decreased extracellular or increased intracellular osmolarity, the cells can re-adjust their volume after transient osmotic swelling by a mechanism known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). In most cell types, RVD is accomplished mainly by KCl efflux induced by parallel activation of K+ and Cl- channels. We have studied the molecular mechanism of RVD in a human epithelial cell line (Intestine 407). Osmotic swelling results in a significant increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and thereby activates intermediate-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (IK) channels. Osmotic swelling also induces ATP release from the cells to the extracellular compartment. Released ATP stimulates purinergic ATP (P2Y2) receptors, thereby inducing phospholipase C-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. Thus, RVD is facilitated by stimulation of P2Y2 receptors due to augmentation of IK channels. In contrast, stimulation of another G protein-coupled Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaR) enhances the activity of volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying Cl- channels, thereby facilitating RVD. Therefore, it is possible that Ca2+ efflux stimulated by swelling-induced and P2Y2 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization activates the CaR, thereby secondarily upregulating the volume-regulatory Cl- conductance. On the other hand, the initial process towards apoptotic cell death is coupled to normotonic cell shrinkage, called apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). Stimulation of death receptors, such as TNF receptor and Fas, induces AVD and thereafter biochemical apoptotic events in human lymphoid (U937), human epithelial (HeLa), mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid (NG108-15) and rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In those cells exhibiting AVD, facilitation of RVD is always observed. Both AVD induction and RVD facilitation as well as succeeding apoptotic events can be abolished by

  12. Autophagy and endosomal trafficking inhibition by Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-specific phospholipase A1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shivani; Kim, Hyunjin; Chan, Robin B.; Agarwal, Shivangi; Williamson, Rebecca; Cho, Wonhwa; Paolo, Gilbert D.; Satchell, Karla J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, responsible for acute gastroenteritis secretes a large multifunctional-autoprocessing repeat-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin linked to evasion of host immune system, facilitating colonization of small intestine. Unlike other effector domains of the multifunctional toxin that target cytoskeleton, the function of alpha-beta hydrolase (ABH) remained elusive. This study demonstrates that ABH is an esterase/lipase with catalytic Ser–His–Asp triad. ABH binds with high affinity to phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and cleaves the fatty acid in PtdIns3P at the sn1 position in vitro making it the first PtdIns3P-specific phospholipase A1 (PLA1). Expression of ABH in vivo reduces intracellular PtdIns3P levels and its PtdIns3P-specific PLA1 activity blocks endosomal and autophagic pathways. In accordance with recent studies acknowledging the potential of extracellular pathogens to evade or exploit autophagy to prevent their clearance and facilitate survival, this is the first report highlighting the role of ABH in inhibiting autophagy and endosomal trafficking induced by extracellular V. cholerae. PMID:26498860

  13. A Therapeutic Chemical Chaperone Inhibits Cholera Intoxication and Unfolding/Translocation of the Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Huerta, Jazmin; Massey, Shane; Burlingame, Mansfield; Pande, Abhay H.; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) travels as an intact AB5 protein toxin from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of an intoxicated cell. In the ER, the catalytic A1 subunit dissociates from the rest of the toxin. Translocation of CTA1 from the ER to the cytosol is then facilitated by the quality control mechanism of ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Thermal instability in the isolated CTA1 subunit generates an unfolded toxin conformation that acts as the trigger for ERAD-mediated translocation to the cytosol. In this work, we show by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy that exposure to 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) inhibited the thermal unfolding of CTA1. This, in turn, blocked the ER-to-cytosol export of CTA1 and productive intoxication of either cultured cells or rat ileal loops. In cell culture studies PBA did not affect CT trafficking to the ER, CTA1 dissociation from the holotoxin, or functioning of the ERAD system. PBA is currently used as a therapeutic agent to treat urea cycle disorders. Our data suggest PBA could also be used in a new application to prevent or possibly treat cholera. PMID:21526142

  14. The role of G protein coupled receptor-mediated signaling in the biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Manan, Zainab; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    Despite advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care, the prognosis of Acanthamoeba infections remains poor, suggesting that new targets are needed that can affect parasite survival and host-pathogen interactions. G proteins and their coupled receptors are well known regulators of a variety of cellular functions. The overall aim of the present study was to study the role of G-protein coupled receptor, β adrenergic receptor on the biology and pathogenesis of keratitis isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype. Inhibition of β adrenergic receptor using antagonist, propranolol had detrimental effects on the extracellular proteolytic activities A. castellanii as determined using zymographic assays. Conversely, β adrenergic receptor agonist, isoprenaline showed increased proteases. Interestingly, β adrenergic receptor inhibition affected A. castellanii growth (using amoebistatic assays), viability (using amoebicidal assays by measuring uptake of Trypan blue) and encystation as determined by trophozoite transformation into the cyst form. Pre-treatment of parasites with propranolol hampered A. castellanii-mediated human brain microvascular endothelial cell cytotoxicity, as measured by the lacatate dehydrogenase release. The aforementioned findings suggest that G-protein coupled receptor, β adrenergic receptor-mediated signaling in A. castellanii biology and pathogenesis may offer new pharmacological targets.

  15. Receptor-mediated uptake and transport of macromolecules in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Henning; Miller, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    The human placenta is required to be the anchor, the conduit and the controller during pregnancy. The survival of the baby and its associated placenta is dependent upon the placenta shielding the embryo/fetus from harm, e.g., autoimmune disease - thrombophilia, antiphospholipid syndrome or infections, while simultaneously providing for the passage of critical nutrients (e.g., amino acids, vitamins) and beneficial immunoglobulins. In a number of instances, the movements of macromolecules into and through the placenta can result in the passage of the intact molecules into the fetal circulation or in the case of proteins - catabolism to amino acids which are utilized by the placenta and the fetus for continued growth and development. The transfer of two such macromolecules, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin or B12), are examined as to the unique receptor-mediated transfer capability of the human placenta, its transfer specificity as related to specific receptors and the role of endogeneous placental proteins (trancobalamins) in facilitating the recognition and transport of specifically B12. Brief comparisons will be made to other animal species and the differences in specific organ transfer capabilities.

  16. Kainate Receptors Mediate Signaling in Both Transient and Sustained OFF Bipolar Cell Pathways in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Looger, Loren L.; Tomita, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental question in sensory neuroscience is how parallel processing is implemented at the level of molecular and circuit mechanisms. In the retina, it has been proposed that distinct OFF cone bipolar cell types generate fast/transient and slow/sustained pathways by the differential expression of AMPA- and kainate-type glutamate receptors, respectively. However, the functional significance of these receptors in the intact circuit during light stimulation remains unclear. Here, we measured glutamate release from mouse bipolar cells by two-photon imaging of a glutamate sensor (iGluSnFR) expressed on postsynaptic amacrine and ganglion cell dendrites. In both transient and sustained OFF layers, cone-driven glutamate release from bipolar cells was blocked by antagonists to kainate receptors but not AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological recordings from bipolar and ganglion cells confirmed the essential role of kainate receptors for signaling in both transient and sustained OFF pathways. Kainate receptors mediated responses to contrast modulation up to 20 Hz. Light-evoked responses in all mouse OFF bipolar pathways depend on kainate, not AMPA, receptors. PMID:24790183

  17. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guseva, Daria; Wirth, Alexander; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes. PMID:25324743

  18. Multivalent ligand-receptor-mediated interaction of small filled vesicles with a cellular membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2017-07-01

    The ligand-receptor-mediated contacts of small sub-100-nm-sized lipid vesicles (or nanoparticles) with the cellular membrane are of interest in the contexts of cell-to-cell communication, endocytosis of membrane-coated virions, and drug (RNA) delivery. In all these cases, the interior of vesicles is filled by biologically relevant content. Despite the diversity of such systems, the corresponding ligand-receptor interaction possesses universal features. One of them is that the vesicle-membrane contacts can be accompanied by the redistribution of ligands and receptors between the contact and contact-free regions. In particular, the concentrations of ligands and receptors may become appreciably higher in the contact regions and their composition may there be different compared to that in the suspended state in the solution. A statistical model presented herein describes the corresponding distribution of various ligands and receptors and allows one to calculate the related change of the free energy with variation of the vesicle-engulfment extent. The results obtained are used to clarify the necessary conditions for the vesicle-assisted pathway of drug delivery.

  19. Beta receptor-mediated modulation of the late positive potential in humans.

    PubMed

    de Rover, Mischa; Brown, Stephen B R E; Boot, Nathalie; Hajcak, Greg; van Noorden, Martijn S; van der Wee, Nic J A; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2012-02-01

    Electrophysiological studies have identified a scalp potential, the late positive potential (LPP), which is modulated by the emotional intensity of observed stimuli. Previous work has shown that the LPP reflects the modulation of activity in extrastriate visual cortical structures, but little is known about the source of that modulation. The present study investigated whether beta-adrenergic receptors are involved in the generation of the LPP. We used a genetic individual differences approach (experiment 1) and a pharmacological manipulation (experiment 2) to test the hypothesis that the LPP is modulated by the activation of β-adrenergic receptors. In experiment 1, we found that LPP amplitude depends on allelic variation in the β1-receptor gene polymorphism. In experiment 2, we found that LPP amplitude was modulated by the β-blocker propranolol in a direction dependent on subjects' level of trait anxiety: In participants with lower trait anxiety, propranolol led to a (nonsignificant) decrease in the LPP modulation; in participants with higher trait anxiety, propranolol increased the emotion-related LPP modulation. These results provide initial support for the hypothesis that the LPP reflects the downstream effects, in visual cortical areas, of β-receptor-mediated activation of the amygdala.

  20. Selective antagonism of AMPA receptors unmasks kainate receptor-mediated responses in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Paternain, A V; Morales, M; Lerma, J

    1995-01-01

    Although both protein and mRNAs for kainate receptor subunits are abundant in several brain regions, the responsiveness of AMPA receptors to kainate has made it difficult to demonstrate the presence of functional kainate-type receptors in native cells. Recently, however, we have shown that many hippocampal neurons in culture express glutamate receptors of the kainate type. The large nondesensitizing response that kainate induces at AMPA receptors precludes detection and analysis of smaller, rapidly desensitizing currents induced by kainate at kainate receptors. Consequently, the functional significance of these strongly desensitizing glutamate receptors remains enigmatic. We report here that the family of new noncompetitive antagonists of AMPA receptors (GYKI 52466 and 53655) minimally affects kainate-induced responses at kainate receptors while completely blocking AMPA receptor-mediated currents, making it possible to separate the responses mediated by each receptor. These compounds will allow determination of the role played by kainate receptors in synaptic transmission and plasticity in the mammalian brain, as well as evaluation of their involvement in neurotoxicity.

  1. Muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol tetrakisphosphate response in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, B.B.; Schneider, A.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), a product of the phosphoinositide cycle, mobilizes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in many cell types. New evidence suggests that inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP{sub 4}), an IP{sub 3} derivative, may act as another second messenger to further alter calcium homeostasis. However, the function and mechanism of action of IP{sub 4} are presently unresolved. We now report evidence of muscarinic receptor-mediated accumulation of IP{sub 4} in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, a classic neurosecretory system in which calcium movements have been well studied. Muscarine stimulated an increase in ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} and ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} accumulation in chromaffin cells and this effect was completely blocked by atropine. ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} accumulation was detectable within 15 sec, increased to a maximum by 30 sec and thereafter declined. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an inhibitor of IP{sub 3} and IP{sub 4} hydrolysis, enhanced accumulation of these inositol polyphosphates. The results provide the first evidence of a rapid inositol tetrakisphosphate response in adrenal chromaffin cells, which should facilitate the future resolution of the relationship between IP{sub 4} and calcium homeostasis.

  2. Substance P selectively modulates GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Govindaiah, G; Wang, Yanyan; Cox, Charles L

    2010-02-01

    Substance P (SP) is co-localized and co-released with gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) from approximately 50% of GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum. MSNs innervate several cellular targets including neighboring MSNs and cholinergic interneurons via collaterals. However, the functional role of SP release onto striatal interneurons is unknown. Here we examined SP-mediated actions on inhibitory synaptic transmission in cholinergic interneurons using whole-cell recordings in mouse corticostriatal slices. We found that SP selectively suppressed GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs), but not excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) in cholinergic interneurons. In contrast, SP did not alter IPSCs in fast-spiking interneurons and MSNs. SP suppressed IPSC amplitude in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner, and the NK1 receptor antagonist RP67580 attenuated the SP-mediated suppression. In addition, RP67580 alone enhanced the evoked IPSC amplitude in cholinergic interneurons, suggesting an endogenous action of SP on regulation of inhibitory synaptic transmission. SP did not alter the paired-pulse ratio, but reduced the amplitudes of GABA(A) agonist muscimol-induced outward currents and miniature IPSCs in cholinergic interneurons, suggesting SP exerts its effects primarily at the post-synaptic site. Our results indicate that the physiological effects of SP are to enhance the activity of striatal cholinergic interneurons and provide a rationale for designing potential new antiparkinsonian agents.

  3. Different receptors mediate the electrophysiological and growth cone responses of an identified neuron to applied dopamine.

    PubMed

    Dobson, K S; Dmetrichuk, J M; Spencer, G E

    2006-09-15

    Neurotransmitters are among the many cues that may guide developing axons toward appropriate targets in the developing nervous system. We have previously shown in the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis that dopamine, released from an identified pre-synaptic cell, differentially affects growth cone behavior of its target and non-target cells in vitro. Here, we describe a group of non-target cells that also produce an inhibitory electrophysiological response to applied dopamine. We first determined, using pharmacological blockers, which receptors mediate this physiological response. We demonstrated that the dopaminergic electrophysiological responses of non-target cells were sensitive to a D2 receptor antagonist, as are known target cell responses. However, the non-target cell receptors were linked to different G-proteins and intracellular signaling pathways than the target cell receptors. Despite the presence of a D2-like receptor at the soma, the growth cone collapse of these non-target cells was mediated by D1-like receptors. This study shows that different dopamine receptor sub-types mediated the inhibitory physiological and growth cone responses of an identified cell type. We therefore not only provide further evidence that D2- and D1-like receptors can be present on the same neuron in invertebrates, but also show that these receptors are likely involved in very different cellular functions.

  4. Internalisation of the bleomycin molecules responsible for bleomycin toxicity: a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pron, G; Mahrour, N; Orlowski, S; Tounekti, O; Poddevin, B; Belehradek, J; Mir, L M

    1999-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) does not diffuse through the plasma membrane but nevertheless displays cytotoxic activity due to DNA break generation. The aim of the study was to describe the mechanism of BLM internalisation. We previously provided evidence for the existence of BLM-binding sites at the surface of DC-3F Chinese hamster fibroblasts, as well as of their involvement in BLM cytotoxicity on DC-3F cells and related BLM-resistant sublines. Here we report that A253 human cells and their BLM-resistant subline C-10E also possessed a membrane protein of ca. 250 kDa specifically binding BLM. Part of this C-10E cell resistance could be explained by a decrease in the number of BLM-binding sites exposed at the cell surface with respect to A253 cells. The comparison between A253 and DC-3F cells exposing a similar number of BLM-binding sites revealed that the faster the fluid phase endocytosis, the greater the cell sensitivity to BLM. Moreover, the experimental modification of endocytotic vesicle size showed that BLM cytotoxicity was directly correlated with the flux of plasma membrane area engulfed during endocytosis rather than with the fluid phase volume incorporated. Thus, BLM would be internalised by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism which would first require BLM binding to its membrane receptor and then the transfer of the complex into intracellular endocytotic vesicles, followed by BLM entry into the cytosol, probably from a nonacidic compartment.

  5. Optimization of stress response through the nuclear receptor-mediated cortisol signalling network

    PubMed Central

    Kolodkin, Alexey; Sahin, Nilgun; Phillips, Anna; Hood, Steve R.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Plant, Nick

    2013-01-01

    It is an accepted paradigm that extended stress predisposes an individual to pathophysiology. However, the biological adaptations to minimize this risk are poorly understood. Using a computational model based upon realistic kinetic parameters we are able to reproduce the interaction of the stress hormone cortisol with its two nuclear receptors, the high-affinity glucocorticoid receptor and the low-affinity pregnane X-receptor. We demonstrate that regulatory signals between these two nuclear receptors are necessary to optimize the body’s response to stress episodes, attenuating both the magnitude and duration of the biological response. In addition, we predict that the activation of pregnane X-receptor by multiple, low-affinity endobiotic ligands is necessary for the significant pregnane X-receptor-mediated transcriptional response observed following stress episodes. This integration allows responses mediated through both the high and low-affinity nuclear receptors, which we predict is an important strategy to minimize the risk of disease from chronic stress. PMID:23653204

  6. Endothelial adenosine A2a receptor-mediated glycolysis is essential for pathological retinal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiping; Yan, Siyuan; Wang, Jiaojiao; Xu, Yiming; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Shuya; Xu, Xizhen; Yang, Qiuhua; Zeng, Xianqiu; Zhou, Yaqi; Gu, Xuejiao; Lu, Sarah; Fu, Zhongjie; Fulton, David J; Weintraub, Neal L; Caldwell, Ruth B; Zhang, Wenbo; Wu, Chaodong; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Ahmad, Aftab; Kaddour-Djebbar, Ismail; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Li, Qinkai; Jiang, Xuejun; Sun, Ye; Sodhi, Akrit; Smith, Lois; Hong, Mei; Huo, Yuqing

    2017-09-19

    Adenosine/adenosine receptor-mediated signaling has been implicated in the development of various ischemic diseases, including ischemic retinopathies. Here, we show that the adenosine A2a receptor (ADORA2A) promotes hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1)-dependent endothelial cell glycolysis, which is crucial for pathological angiogenesis in proliferative retinopathies. Adora2a expression is markedly increased in the retina of mice with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Endothelial cell-specific, but not macrophage-specific Adora2a deletion decreases key glycolytic enzymes and reduces pathological neovascularization in the OIR mice. In human primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells, hypoxia induces the expression of ADORA2A by activating HIF-2α. ADORA2A knockdown decreases hypoxia-induced glycolytic enzyme expression, glycolytic flux, and endothelial cell proliferation, sprouting and tubule formation. Mechanistically, ADORA2A activation promotes the transcriptional induction of glycolytic enzymes via ERK- and Akt-dependent translational activation of HIF-1α protein. Taken together, these findings advance translation of ADORA2A as a therapeutic target in the treatment of proliferative retinopathies and other diseases dependent on pathological angiogenesis.Pathological angiogenesis in the retina is a major cause of blindness. Here the authors show that adenosine receptor A2A drives pathological angiogenesis in the oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model by promoting glycolysis in endothelial cells via the ERK/Akt/HIF-1α pathway, thereby suggesting new therapeutic targets for disease treatment.

  7. Cell receptors: definition, mechanisms and regulation of receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Féger, J; Gil-Falgon, S; Lamaze, C

    1994-12-01

    Receptors allow the cells to recognize specific ligands and to receive extracellular messages. They can be classified into five families: 1) receptors for lipidic or lipophilic ligands; 2) the seven transmembrane receptors which mediate their messages by transduction through the activation of G-proteins, effectors and second messengers to amplify the response; 3) receptors which present an enzymatic activity on their transmembrane domains; 4) channel-receptors, transmembrane oligomeric molecules which let ions flow into the cell and 5) receptors which role is to internalize ligands, whatever their various functions. In parallel a concept of membrane plasticity was developed: vesicles are constantly formed from the plasma membrane, addressing complexes of ligand-receptors to specific intracellular compartments. This receptor-mediated endocytosis of ligand plays a critical role in regulating the number of a given receptor at the plasma membrane and in the cellular uptake of nutrients, growth factors and hormones. Many pathways exist for these transports but little is known about the signals which select the ligands or the receptors and direct them to their appropriate intracellular destination.

  8. FLIP ing the coin? Death receptor-mediated signals during skin tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Leverkus, Martin; Diessenbacher, Philip; Geserick, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Keratinocyte skin cancer is a multi-step process, during which a number of obstacles have to be overcome by the tumor cell to allow the development of a manifest tumor. Beside proliferation and immortality, apoptosis resistance is one additional and critical step during skin carcinogenesis. Over the past two decades, much has been learned about the prototypical membrane-bound inducers of apoptosis, namely the death receptors and their ligands, and the apoptosis signalling pathways activated by death receptors have been elucidated in great detail. In contrast, much less is known about the tissue-specific role of the death receptor/ligands systems during the development of skin cancer. Here, we summarize and discuss the role of this intriguing receptor family and the potential mechanistical impact of the intracellular caspase-8 inhibitor cFLIP for keratinocyte skin cancer. Given more recent data about cFLIP and its isoforms, a more complex regulatory role of cFLIP can be suspected. Indeed, cFLIP may not solely interfere with death receptor-mediated apoptosis signalling pathways, but may positively or negatively influence other, potential harmful signalling pathways such as the production of inflammatory cytokines, tumor cell migration or the activation of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB, considered crucial during skin tumorigenesis. In this respect, cFLIP may act to 'FLIP the coin' during the development of keratinocyte skin cancer.

  9. Receptor-mediated transcytosis: a mechanism for active extravascular transport of nanoparticles in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Xiong, Chiyi; Zhang, Rui; Shi, Lifang; Huang, Miao; Zhang, Guodong; Song, Shaoli; Huang, Qian; Liu, Gang-Yu; Li, Chun

    2012-08-10

    Targeted nanoparticle-based delivery systems have been used extensively to develop effective cancer theranostics. However, how targeting ligands affect extravascular transport of nanoparticles in solid tumors remains unclear. Here, we show, using B16/F10 melanoma cells expressing melanocortin type-1 receptor (MC1R), that the nature of targeting ligands, i.e., whether they are agonists or antagonists, directs tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution after extravasation of nanoparticles from tumor vessels into the extravascular fluid space. Pegylated hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS, diameter=40 nm) coated with MC1R agonist are internalized upon ligand-receptor binding, whereas MC1R antagonist-conjugated HAuNS remain attached on the cell surface. Transcellular transport of agonist-conjugated HAuNS was confirmed by a multilayer tumor cell model and by transmission electron microscopy. MC1R agonist- but not MC1R antagonist-conjugated nanoparticles exhibit significantly higher tumor uptake than nontargeted HAuNS and are quickly dispersed from tumor vessels via receptor-mediated endocytosis and subsequent transcytosis. These results confirm an active transport mechanism that can be used to overcome one of the major biological barriers for efficient nanoparticle delivery to solid tumors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Receptor-Mediated Entry of Pristine Octahedral DNA Nanocages in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Giulia; Raniolo, Sofia; Ottaviani, Alessio; Falconi, Mattia; Franch, Oskar; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Desideri, Alessandro; Biocca, Silvia

    2016-06-28

    DNA offers excellent programming properties for the generation of nanometer-scaled polyhedral structures with a broad variety of potential applications. Translation to biomedical applications requires improving stability in biological fluids, efficient and selective cell binding, and/or internalization of the assembled DNA nanostructures. Here, we report an investigation on the selective mechanism of cellular uptake of pristine DNA nanocages in cells expressing the receptor "oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1" (LOX-1), a scavenger receptor associated with cardiovascular diseases and, more recently, identified as a tumor marker. For this purpose a truncated octahedral DNA nanocage functionalized with a single biotin molecule, which allows DNA cage detection through the biotin-streptavidin assays, was constructed. The results indicate that DNA nanocages are stable in biological fluids, including human serum, and are selectively bound and very efficiently internalized in vesicles only in LOX-1-expressing cells. The amount of internalized cages is 30 times higher in LOX-1-expressing cells than in normal fibroblasts, indicating that the receptor-mediated uptake of pristine DNA nanocages can be pursued for a selective cellular internalization. These results open the route for a therapeutic use of pristine DNA cages targeting LOX-1-overexpressing tumor cells.

  11. Accumbens shell AMPA receptors mediate expression of extinguished reward seeking through interactions with basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Millan, E Zayra; McNally, Gavan P

    2011-07-01

    Extinction is the reduction in drug seeking when the contingency between drug seeking behavior and the delivery of drug reward is broken. Here, we investigated a role for the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh). Rats were trained to respond for 4% (v/v) alcoholic beer in one context (Context A) followed by extinction in a second context (Context B). Rats were subsequently tested in the training context, A (ABA), or the extinction context, B (ABB). Pre-test injections of the glutamate AMPA receptor antagonist, NBQX (1 µg) into AcbSh had no effect on renewal of alcoholic beer seeking when rats were returned to the training context (ABA). However, NBQX increased responding when rats were tested in the extinction context (ABB). In a second experiment, rats received training, extinction, and test in the same context. Pre-test injections of NBQX (0, 0.3, and 1 µg) into the AcbSh dose-dependently attenuated expression of extinction. We also found that NBQX in the AcbSh had no effect on initial acquisition of extinction or the motivation to respond for reward as measured by break point on a progressive ratio schedule. Finally, we show that pharmacological disconnection of a basolateral amygdala (BLA) → AcbSh pathway via NBQX in AcbSh combined with reversible inactivation of the contralateral BLA attenuates expression of extinction. Together, these results suggest that AcbSh AMPA receptors mediate expression of extinguished reward seeking through glutamatergic inputs from the BLA.

  12. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Guseva, Daria; Wirth, Alexander; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  13. Low temperature blocks fluid-phase pinocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, R C; Soares, M J

    2000-05-01

    Gold-labeled albumin and transferrin were used to follow at the ultrastructural level the early events and the effect of low temperature on protein uptake by Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. In parasites incubated for 5 min at 28 degrees C with protein-gold complexes, extracellular markers were found only at the cytostome and/or the flagellar pocket regions, whereas intracellular gold particles were detected inside small uncoated vesicles located nearby. Within 10 min, labeling was also observed in uncoated vesicles close to the nucleus. Only after 30 min could the tracers be detected in the reservosomes. Weak labeling in the cytostome and flagellar pocket of parasites incubated at 4 degrees C with the albumin-gold solution indicated that albumin uptake occurred by fluid-phase pinocytosis. On the other hand, intense labeling at the cytostome was observed in parasites incubated at 4 degrees C with gold-labeled transferrin, showing that receptor-mediated endocytosis occurs mainly at this site. Both proteins were absent from the cells at 4 degrees C and 12 degrees C. Raising the temperature from 12 degrees C to 28 degrees C led to transferrin labeling in intracellular vesicles dispersed throughout the cytoplasm, but not in reservosomes. Our results suggest that low temperatures affect the transport and pinching of endocytic vesicles as well as the rate of delivery of transferrin to reservosomes.

  14. Killing of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis by receptor-mediated drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Basu, S.K. )

    1991-01-01

    p-Aminosalicylic acid (PAS) conjugated to maleylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA) was taken up efficiently through high-affinity MBSA-binding sites on macrophages. Binding of the radiolabeled conjugate to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages at 4 degrees C was competed for by MBSA but not by PAS. At 37 degrees C, the radiolabeled conjugate was rapidly degraded by the macrophages, leading to release of acid-soluble degradation products in the medium. The drug conjugate was nearly 100 times as effective as free PAS in killing the intracellular mycobacteria in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected in culture with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The killing of intracellular mycobacteria mediated by the drug conjugate was effectively prevented by simultaneous addition of excess MBSA (100 micrograms/ml) or chloroquine (3 microM) to the medium, whereas these agents did not affect the microbicidal action of free PAS. These results suggest that (i) uptake of the PAS-MBSA conjugate was mediated by cell surface receptors on macrophages which recognize MBSA and (ii) lysosomal hydrolysis of the internalized conjugate resulted in intracellular release of a pharmacologically active form of the drug, which led to selective killing of the M. tuberculosis harbored by mouse macrophages infected in culture. This receptor-mediated modality of delivering drugs to macrophages could contribute to greater therapeutic efficacy and minimization of toxic side effects in the management of tuberculosis and other intracellular mycobacterial infections.

  15. Lactate modulates the activity of primary cortical neurons through a receptor-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Bozzo, Luigi; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM). To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM) or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM). None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism.

  16. Lactate Modulates the Activity of Primary Cortical Neurons through a Receptor-Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bozzo, Luigi; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM). To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM) or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM). None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism. PMID:23951229

  17. Selective inhibition of virus protein synthesis by prostaglandin A1: a translational block associated with HSP70 synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Amici, C; Giorgi, C; Rossi, A; Santoro, M G

    1994-01-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins are potent inhibitors of virus replication. The antiviral activity has been associated with the induction of 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) synthesis. In this report, we describe that in African green monkey kidney cells infected with Sendai virus (SV) and treated with prostaglandin A1 (PGA1), SV protein synthesis was selectively blocked as long as HSP70 was being synthesized by the host cell. The block appeared to be at the translational level, as indicated by the following (i) PGA1 had no effect on SV primary transcription, and a dramatic decrease in the abundance of SV mRNA occurred only at later stages of infection; and (ii) treatment with PGA1 started at 6 h postinfection, at which time SV mRNA had already accumulated in infected cells, did not suppress the levels of NP mRNA, but it reduced the amount of ribosome-bound NP mRNA and caused a dramatic decrease in the level of genomic RNA. The PGA1-induced block of SV protein synthesis appeared to be cell mediated, since it was prevented by actinomycin D, while PGA1 had no effect on SV mRNA translation in vitro. The possibility that HSP70 could be a mediator of the antiviral effect is suggested by the fact that treatment with other classical inducers of HSP70, including sodium arsenite, cadmium, and heat shock at 42 degrees C for 5 h, also selectively prevented SV protein synthesis as long as heat shock protein synthesis occurred. Moreover, SV protein synthesis was not inhibited by PGA1 in murine Friend erythroleukemic cells, which lack the ability to induce HSP70 expression in response to PGA1. Images PMID:7933069

  18. Estrogen receptor α can selectively repress dioxin receptor-mediated gene expression by targeting DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maud; Laflamme, Liette; Gaudreau, Luc

    2013-09-01

    Selective inhibitory crosstalk has been known to occur within the signaling pathways of the dioxin (AhR) and estrogen (ERα) receptors. More specifically, ERα represses a cytochrome P450-encoding gene (CYP1A1) that converts cellular estradiol into a metabolite that inhibits the cell cycle, while it has no effect on a P450-encoding gene (CYP1B1) that converts estrodiol into a genotoxic product. Here we show that ERα represses CYP1A1 by targeting the Dnmt3B DNA methyltransferase and concomitant DNA methylation of the promoter. We also find that histone H2A.Z can positively contribute to CYP1A1 gene expression, and its presence at that gene is inversely correlated with DNA methylation. Taken together, our results provide a framework for how ERα can repress transcription, and how that impinges on the production of an enzyme that generates genotoxic estradiol metabolites, and potential breast cancer progression. Finally, our results reveal a new mechanism for how H2A.Z can positively influence gene expression, which is by potentially competing with DNA methylation events in breast cancer cells.

  19. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure enhances NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses and NMDA receptor expression in hippocampal CA1 region.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T E; Ur, C L; Gruol, D L

    2005-06-28

    In previous studies, we found that chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment-a model of ethanol consumption in which animals are exposed to and withdrawn from intoxicating levels of ethanol on a daily basis-produces neuroadaptive changes in hippocampal area CA1 excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. Synaptic responses mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are known to be sensitive to ethanol and could play an important role in the neuroadaptive changes induced by CIE treatment. To address this issue, we compared electrophysiological recordings of pharmacologically isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices prepared from control rats and rats exposed to 2 weeks of CIE treatment administered by vapor inhalation. We found that fEPSPs induced by NMDA receptor activation were unaltered in slices prepared shortly after cessation of CIE treatment (i.e., < or = 1 day of withdrawal from CIE). However, following 7 days of withdrawal from CIE treatment, NMDA-receptor-mediated fEPSPs were augmented relative to age-matched controls. Western blot analysis of NMDA receptor subunit expression showed that, at 7 days of withdrawal, the level of protein for NR2A and NR2B subunits was elevated in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices from CIE-treated animals compared with slices from age-matched controls. These results are consistent with an involvement of NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses in the neuroadaptive effects of CIE on hippocampal physiology and suggest that such changes may contribute to ethanol-induced changes in processes dependent on NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses such as learning and memory, neural development, hyperexcitability and seizures, and neurotoxicity.

  20. A pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex modulates androgen receptor-mediated transcription and associates with components of the splicing machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Adegbola, Onikepe; Pasternack, Gary R. . E-mail: gpastern@jhmi.edu

    2005-08-26

    We have previously shown pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein interact. pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein are nuclear receptor transcriptional coregulators: the retinoblastoma protein is a coactivator for androgen receptor, the major regulator of prostate cancer growth, while pp32, which is highly expressed in prostate cancer, is a corepressor of the estrogen receptor. We now show pp32 increases androgen receptor-mediated transcription and the retinoblastoma protein modulates this activity. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify members of the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex as PSF and nonO/p54nrb, proteins implicated in coordinate regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and splicing. We show that the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex is modulated during TPA-induced K562 differentiation. Present evidence suggests that nuclear receptors assemble multiprotein complexes to coordinately regulate transcription and mRNA processing. Our results suggest that pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein may be part of a multiprotein complex that coordinately regulates nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and mRNA processing.

  1. Characterization of putative 5-HT7 receptors mediating tachycardia in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, Carlos M; Heiligers, Jan P C; Centurión, David; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R

    1997-01-01

    , sumatriptan (30, 100 and 300 μg kg−1) and indorenate (300 and 1000 μg kg−1) or the 5-HT4 receptor (partial) agonist cisapride (300 and 1000 μg kg−1) were devoid of effects on feline heart rate per se and failed to modify significantly 5-HT-induced tachycardic responses. Based upon the above rank order of agonist potency, the failure of sumatriptan, indorenate or cisapride to produce cardioacceleration and the blockade by a series of drugs showing high affinity for the cloned 5-ht7 receptor, the present results indicate that the 5-HT receptor mediating tachycardia in the cat is operationally similar to other putative 5-HT7 receptors mediating vascular and non-vascular responses (e.g. relaxation of the rabbit femoral vein, canine external carotid and coronary arteries, rat systemic vasculature and guinea-pig ileum). Since these responses represent functional correlates of the 5-ht7 gene product, the 5-HT7 receptor appellation is reinforced. Therefore, the present experimental model, which is not complicated by the presence of other 5-HT receptors, can be utilized to characterize and develop new drugs with potential agonist and antagonist properties at functional 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:9249256

  2. EP₃ receptors mediate PGE₂-induced hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus excitation and sympathetic activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Felder, Robert B

    2011-10-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), an important mediator of the inflammatory response, acts centrally to elicit sympathetic excitation. PGE(2) acts on at least four E-class prostanoid (EP) receptors known as EP(1), EP(2), EP(3), and EP(4). Since PGE(2) production within the brain is ubiquitous, the different functions of PGE(2) depend on the expression of these prostanoid receptors in specific brain areas. The type(s) and location(s) of the EP receptors that mediate sympathetic responses to central PGE(2) remain unknown. We examined this question using PGE(2), the relatively selective EP receptor agonists misoprostol and sulprostone, and the available selective antagonists for EP(1), EP(3), and EP(4). In urethane-anesthetized rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PGE(2), sulprostone or misoprostol increased renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate. These responses were significantly reduced by ICV pretreatment with the EP(3) receptor antagonist; the EP(1) and EP(4) receptor antagonists had little or no effect. ICV PGE(2) or misoprostol increased the discharge of neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). ICV misoprostol increased the c-Fos immunoreactivity of PVN neurons, an effect that was substantially reduced by the EP(3) receptor antagonist. Real-time PCR detected EP(3) receptor mRNA in PVN, and immunohistochemical studies revealed sparsely distributed EP(3) receptors localized in GABAergic terminals and on a few PVN neurons. Direct bilateral PVN microinjections of PGE(2) or sulprostone elicited sympathoexcitatory responses that were significantly reduced by the EP(3) receptor antagonist. These data suggest that EP(3) receptors mediate the central excitatory effects of PGE(2) on PVN neurons and sympathetic discharge.

  3. Characterization of Parameters Influencing Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis in Cultured Soybean Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Mark A.; Heinstein, Peter F.; Low, Philip S.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent publication, we were able to demonstrate that biotin enters plant cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and that impermeable macromolecules can be cotransported into cells by the same pathway if they are first covalently linked to biotin. In the present study, we have exploited the biotin endocytosis pathway to evaluate the variables in the cell wall and surrounding growth medium that influence the efficiency of endocytosis in plants. Under normal growth conditions, the major constraint limiting macromolecule endocytosis was found to be the size of the internalized macromolecule. Thus, a log-linear relationship with a negative slope exists between the molecular weight of the biotin-conjugated macromolecule and its rate of internalization by cultured soybean cells. This relationship, which extends from insulin (Mr approximately 5700) to immunoglobulin G (Mr approximately 160,000), is characterized by a slope of −1.04 × 105 molecules/cell/min per log Mr unit and an x intercept (no endocytosis detectable) of approximately log 160,000 daltons. Unfortunately, mild digestion with cell wall-degrading enzymes is unable to increase significantly the upper size limit of molecules that can be internalized, but uptake of lower molecular weight proteins can be enhanced by mild cell wall digestion. The optimal extracellular pH for endocytosis was found to be 4.6, i.e. near the normal pH of the cell culture medium. Furthermore, the osmotic strength at which endocytosis occurs most rapidly was observed to be isotonic to slightly hypotonic, suggesting that turgor pressure within the plant cell must not be a major determinant of endocytosis rates by cultured soybean (Glycine max) cells. Finally, cell age was found to impact significantly on the rate of macromolecule internalization, with maximal uptake rates occurring during early exponential growth and decreasing by a factor of 2 when the cells reach stationary growth phase. PMID:16668694

  4. PAC₁ receptors mediate positive chronotropic responses to PACAP-27 and VIP in isolated mouse atria.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Donald B; Girard, Beatrice M; Hoover, Jeffrey L; Parsons, Rodney L

    2013-08-05

    PACAP and VIP have prominent effects on cardiac function in several species, but little is known about their influence on the murine heart. Accordingly, we evaluated the expression of PACAP/VIP receptors in mouse heart and the response of isolated atria to peptide agonists. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that PAC₁, VPAC₁, and VPAC₂ receptor mRNAs are present throughout the mouse heart. Expression of all three receptor transcripts was low, PAC₁ being the lowest. No regional differences in expression were detected for individual receptor mRNAs after normalization to L32. Pharmacological effects of PACAP-27, VIP, and the selective PAC₁ agonist maxadilan were evaluated in isolated, spontaneously beating atria from C57BL/6 mice of either sex. Incremental additions of PACAP-27 at 1 min intervals caused a concentration-dependent tachycardia with a logEC₅₀=-9.08 ± 0.15 M (n=7) and a maximum of 96.3 ± 5.9% above baseline heart rate. VIP and maxadilan also caused tachycardia but their potencies were about two orders of magnitude less. Increasing the dosing interval to 5 min caused a leftward shift of the concentration-response curve to maxadilan but no changes in the curves for PACAP-27 or VIP. Under this condition, neither the potency nor the efficacy of maxadilan differed from those of PACAP-27. Neither PACAP-27 nor maxadilan caused tachyphylaxis, and maximal responses to maxadilan were maintained for at least 2 h. We conclude that all three VIP/PACAP family receptors are expressed by mouse cardiac tissue, but only PAC₁ receptors mediate positive chronotropic responses to PACAP-27 and VIP.

  5. Greater Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Mediated Vasodilation in Women Using Oral Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Peltonen, Garrett L.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Harrell, John W.; Kellawan, Jeremy M.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Schrage, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: β-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mitigating the pressor effects of sympathetic nervous system activity in young women. Based on recent data showing oral contraceptive use in women abolishes the relationship between muscle sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure, we hypothesized forearm blood flow responses to a β-adrenergic receptor agonist would be greater in young women currently using oral contraceptives (OC+, n = 13) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (OC–, n = 10). Methods: Women (18–35 years) were studied during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (days 1–5) or placebo phase of oral contraceptive use. Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, brachial arterial catheter) were measured at baseline and during graded brachial artery infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Isoproterenol (ISO), as well as Acetylcholine (ACH, endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and Nitroprusside (NTP, endothelium-independent vasodilation). Forearm vascular conductance was calculated (FVC = FBF/MAP, ml/min/100 mmHg) and the rise in FVC from baseline during infusion quantified vasodilation (ΔFVC = FVCinfusion − FVCbaseline). Results: ISO increased FVC in both groups (p < 0.01) and ISO-mediated ΔFVC was greater in OC+ compared to OC– (Main effect of group, p = 0.02). Expressing data as FVC and FBF resulted in similar conclusions. FVC responses to both ACH and NTP were also greater in OC+ compared to OC–. Conclusions: These data are the first to demonstrate greater β-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasodilation in the forearm of women currently using oral contraceptives (placebo phase) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (early follicular phase), and suggest oral contraceptive use influences neurovascular control. PMID:27375493

  6. Focal kappa-opioid receptor-mediated dependence and withdrawal in the nucleus paragigantocellularis.

    PubMed

    Sinchaisuk, S; Ho, I K; Rockhold, R W

    2002-12-01

    The nucleus paragigantocellularis (PGi) has been hypothesized to play an important role in the development of physical dependence on opioids, including the prototype mu-opioid receptor agonist, morphine, and the mixed agonist/antagonist, butorphanol, which shows selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist activity, in rats. In confirmation of previous work, electrical stimulation of the PGi in opioid-nai;ve rats induced stimulus-intensity-related, withdrawal-like behaviors similar to those observed during naloxone-precipitated withdrawal from dependence upon butorphanol. Novel findings were made in rats surgically implanted with cannulae aimed at the lateral ventricle and the right PGi and made physically dependent by intracerebroventricular infusion of either morphine (26 nmol/microl/h) or butorphanol (26 nmol/microl/h) through an osmotic minipump for 3 days. Two hours following termination of the opioid infusion, microinjections of naloxone (11 nmol/400 nl), a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, or nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) (3.84 nmol/400 nl), a selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, were made into the PGi of morphine-dependent and butorphanol-dependent rats. Discrete PGi injections precipitated withdrawal behaviors, with significant (P<.05) increases noted in the incidence of teeth chattering, wet-dog shakes, and scratching. Composite scores for behavioral withdrawal were significantly higher in nor-BNI-precipitated, butorphanol-dependent rats (score=6.8+/-0.6), in naloxone-precipitated, butorphanol-dependent rats (8.9+/-0.8), and in naloxone-precipitated, morphine-dependent rats (11.5+/-0.9) than in all other groups. Both kappa- and mu-opioid receptor mediated dependence can be demonstrated at the level of a discrete medullary site, the PGi, which further supports a specific role for this nucleus in elicitation of behavioral responses during opioid withdrawal.

  7. P2Y6 Receptor-Mediated Proinflammatory Signaling in Human Bronchial Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yuan; Liang, Jocelyn F.; Chow, Alison W.; Cheung, Wing-tai; Ko, Wing-hung

    2014-01-01

    P2Y receptors are expressed in virtually all epithelia and are responsible for the control of fluid and electrolyte transport. In asthmatic inflammation, the bronchial epithelia are damaged by eosinophil-derived, highly toxic cationic proteins, such as major basic protein (MBP). Consequently, extracellular nucleotides are released into the extracellular space from airway epithelial cells, and act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion to regulate immune functions. Our data show damage to the human bronchial epithelial cell line, 16HBE14o-, by poly-L-arginine-induced UDP release into the extracellular medium. Activation of P2Y6 receptor by its natural ligand, UDP, or its specific agonist, MRS 2693, led to the production of two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. This may have resulted from increased IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression, and activation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK, and NF-κB pathways. Our previous study demonstrated that UDP stimulated transepithelial Cl− secretion via both Ca2+- and cAMP-dependent pathways in 16HBE14o- epithelia. This was further confirmed in this study by simultaneous imaging of Ca2+ and cAMP levels in single cells using the Fura-2 fluorescence technique and a FRET-based approach, respectively. Moreover, the P2Y6 receptor-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-8 was found to be dependent on Ca2+, but not the cAMP/PKA pathway. Together, these studies show that nucleotides released during the airway inflammatory processes will activate P2Y6 receptors, which will lead to further release of inflammatory cytokines. The secretion of cytokines and the formation of such “cytokine networks” play an important role in sustaining the airway inflammatory disease. PMID:25243587

  8. Receptor-Mediated Enhancement of Beta Adrenergic Drug Activity by Ascorbate In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Patrick F.; Root-Bernstein, Robert; Robinson, N. Edward; Abraham, William M.; Berney, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Previous in vitro research demonstrated that ascorbate enhances potency and duration of activity of agonists binding to alpha 1 adrenergic and histamine receptors. Objectives Extending this work to beta 2 adrenergic systems in vitro and in vivo. Methods Ultraviolet spectroscopy was used to study ascorbate binding to adrenergic receptor preparations and peptides. Force transduction studies on acetylcholine-contracted trachealis preparations from pigs and guinea pigs measured the effect of ascorbate on relaxation due to submaximal doses of beta adrenergic agonists. The effect of inhaled albuterol with and without ascorbate was tested on horses with heaves and sheep with carbachol-induced bronchoconstriction. Measurements Binding constants for ascorbate binding to beta adrenergic receptor were derived from concentration-dependent spectral shifts. Dose- dependence curves were obtained for the relaxation of pre-contracted trachealis preparations due to beta agonists in the presence and absence of varied ascorbate. Tachyphylaxis and fade were also measured. Dose response curves were determined for the effect of albuterol plus-and-minus ascorbate on airway resistance in horses and sheep. Main Results Ascorbate binds to the beta 2 adrenergic receptor at physiological concentrations. The receptor recycles dehydroascorbate. Physiological and supra-physiological concentrations of ascorbate enhance submaximal epinephrine and isoproterenol relaxation of trachealis, producing a 3–10-fold increase in sensitivity, preventing tachyphylaxis, and reversing fade. In vivo, ascorbate improves albuterol's effect on heaves and produces a 10-fold enhancement of albuterol activity in “asthmatic” sheep. Conclusions Ascorbate enhances beta-adrenergic activity via a novel receptor-mediated mechanism; increases potency and duration of beta adrenergic agonists effective in asthma and COPD; prevents tachyphylaxis; and reverses fade. These novel effects are probably caused by a

  9. cap alpha. /sub 2/-Adrenergic receptor-mediated sensitization of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.; Toews, M.L.; Turner, J.T.; Bylund, D.B.

    1987-03-01

    Preincubation of HT29 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells with ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonists resulted in a 10- to 20-fold increase in forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production as compared to cells preincubated without agonist. Similar results were obtained using either a (/sup 3/H)adenine prelabeling assay or a cyclic AMP radioimmunoassay to measure cyclic AMP levels. This phenomenon, which is termed sensitization, is ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor-mediated and rapid in onset and reversal. Yohimbine, an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor-selective antagonist, blocked norepinephrine-induced sensitization, whereas prazosin (..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic) and sotalol (..beta..-adrenergic) did not. The time for half-maximal sensitization was 5 min and the half-time for reversal was 10 min. Only a 2-fold sensitization of cyclic AMP production stimulated by vasoactive intestinal peptide was observed, indicating that sensitization is relatively selective for forskolin. Sensitization reflects an increased production of cyclic AMP and not a decreased degradation of cyclic AMP, since incubation with a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and forskolin did not mimic sensitization. Increasing the levels of cyclic AMP during the preincubation had no effect on sensitization, indicating that sensitization is not caused by decreased cyclic AMP levels during the preincubation. This rapid and dramatic sensitization of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is a previously unreported effect that can be added to the growing list of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic responses that are not mediated by a decrease in cyclic AMP.

  10. EP3 receptors mediate PGE2-induced hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus excitation and sympathetic activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important mediator of the inflammatory response, acts centrally to elicit sympathetic excitation. PGE2 acts on at least four E-class prostanoid (EP) receptors known as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. Since PGE2 production within the brain is ubiquitous, the different functions of PGE2 depend on the expression of these prostanoid receptors in specific brain areas. The type(s) and location(s) of the EP receptors that mediate sympathetic responses to central PGE2 remain unknown. We examined this question using PGE2, the relatively selective EP receptor agonists misoprostol and sulprostone, and the available selective antagonists for EP1, EP3, and EP4. In urethane-anesthetized rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PGE2, sulprostone or misoprostol increased renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate. These responses were significantly reduced by ICV pretreatment with the EP3 receptor antagonist; the EP1 and EP4 receptor antagonists had little or no effect. ICV PGE2 or misoprostol increased the discharge of neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). ICV misoprostol increased the c-Fos immunoreactivity of PVN neurons, an effect that was substantially reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. Real-time PCR detected EP3 receptor mRNA in PVN, and immunohistochemical studies revealed sparsely distributed EP3 receptors localized in GABAergic terminals and on a few PVN neurons. Direct bilateral PVN microinjections of PGE2 or sulprostone elicited sympathoexcitatory responses that were significantly reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. These data suggest that EP3 receptors mediate the central excitatory effects of PGE2 on PVN neurons and sympathetic discharge. PMID:21803943

  11. Receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment kinetics. I. Probabilistic model and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C.; Lauffenburger, D. A.; Quinn, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to a ligand-coated surface play a key role in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. We present a probabilistic model of receptor-ligand bond formation between a cell and surface to describe the probability of adhesion in a fluid shear field. Our model extends the deterministic model of Hammer and Lauffenburger (Hammer, D.A., and D.A. Lauffenburger. 1987. Biophys. J. 52:475-487) to a probabilistic framework, in which we calculate the probability that a certain number of bonds between a cell and surface exists at any given time. The probabilistic framework is used to account for deviations from ideal, deterministic behavior, inherent in chemical reactions involving relatively small numbers of reacting molecules. Two situations are investigated: first, cell attachment in the absence of fluid stress; and, second, cell detachment in the presence of fluid stress. In the attachment case, we examine the expected variance in bond formation as a function of attachment time; this also provides an initial condition for the detachment case. Focusing then on detachment, we predict transient behavior as a function of key system parameters, such as the distractive fluid force, the receptor-ligand bond affinity and rate constants, and the receptor and ligand densities. We compare the predictions of the probabilistic model with those of a deterministic model, and show how a deterministic approach can yield some inaccurate results; e.g., it cannot account for temporally continuous cell attach mentor detachment, it can underestimate the time needed for cell attachment, it can overestimate the time required for cell detachment for a given level of force, and it can overestimate the force necessary for cell detachment. PMID:2174271

  12. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor-Mediated Axonal Injury in Adult Rat Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Jianuo; Fox, Howard S.; Xiong, Huangui

    2013-01-01

    Damage to white matter such as corpus callosum (CC) is a pathological characteristic in many brain disorders. Glutamate (Glut) excitotoxicity through AMPA receptors on oligodendrocyte (OL) was previously considered as a mechanism for white matter damage. Recent studies have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are expressed on myelin sheath of neonatal rat OL processes and that activation of these receptors mediated demyelization. Whether NMDARs are expressed in the adult CC and are involved in excitotoxic axonal injury remains to be determined. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of NMDARs in the adult rat CC and their distributions in myelinated nerve fibers and OL somata by means of immunocytochemical staining and Western blot. Incubation of the CC slices with Glut or NMDA induced axonal injury as revealed by analyzing amplitude of CC fiber compound action potentials (CAPs) and input–output response. Both Glut and NMDA decreased the CAP amplitude and input–output responses, suggesting an involvement of NMDARs in Glut- and NMDA-induced axonal injury. The involvement of NMDAR in Glut-induced axonal injury was further assayed by detection of β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) in the CC axonal fibers. Treatment of the CC slices with Glut resulted in β-APP accumulation in the CC fibers as detected by Western blot, reflecting an impairment of axonal transport function. This injurious effect of Glut on CC axonal transport was significantly blocked by MK801. Taken together, these results show that NMDARs are expressed in the adult CC and are involved in excitotoxic activity in adult CC slices in vitro. PMID:23161705

  13. Distinct functions of calmodulin are required for the uptake step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast: the type I myosin Myo5p is one of the calmodulin targets.

    PubMed Central

    Geli, M I; Wesp, A; Riezman, H

    1998-01-01

    The uptake step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast is dependent on the calcium binding protein calmodulin (Cmd1p). In order to understand the role that Cmd1p plays, a search was carried out for possible targets among the genes required for the internalization process. Co-immunoprecipitation, two-hybrid and overlay assays demonstrated that Cmd1p interacts with Myo5p, a type I unconventional myosin. Analysis of the endocytic phenotype and the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction in thermosensitive cmd1 mutants indicated that the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction is required for endocytosis in vivo. However, the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction requirement was partially overcome by deleting the calmodulin binding sites (IQ motifs) from Myo5p, suggesting that these motifs inhibit Myo5p function. Additionally, genetic and biochemical evidence obtained with a collection of cmd1 mutant alleles strongly suggests that Cmd1p plays an additional role in the internalization step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast. PMID:9450989

  14. Distinct functions of calmodulin are required for the uptake step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast: the type I myosin Myo5p is one of the calmodulin targets.

    PubMed

    Geli, M I; Wesp, A; Riezman, H

    1998-02-02

    The uptake step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast is dependent on the calcium binding protein calmodulin (Cmd1p). In order to understand the role that Cmd1p plays, a search was carried out for possible targets among the genes required for the internalization process. Co-immunoprecipitation, two-hybrid and overlay assays demonstrated that Cmd1p interacts with Myo5p, a type I unconventional myosin. Analysis of the endocytic phenotype and the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction in thermosensitive cmd1 mutants indicated that the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction is required for endocytosis in vivo. However, the Cmd1p-Myo5p interaction requirement was partially overcome by deleting the calmodulin binding sites (IQ motifs) from Myo5p, suggesting that these motifs inhibit Myo5p function. Additionally, genetic and biochemical evidence obtained with a collection of cmd1 mutant alleles strongly suggests that Cmd1p plays an additional role in the internalization step of receptor-mediated endocytosis in yeast.

  15. Arsenic as an endocrine disruptor: arsenic disrupts retinoic acid receptor-and thyroid hormone receptor-mediated gene regulation and thyroid hormone-mediated amphibian tail metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Davey, Jennifer C; Nomikos, Athena P; Wungjiranirun, Manida; Sherman, Jenna R; Ingram, Liam; Batki, Cavus; Lariviere, Jean P; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2008-02-01

    Chronic exposure to excess arsenic in drinking water has been strongly associated with increased risks of multiple cancers, diabetes, heart disease, and reproductive and developmental problems in humans. We previously demonstrated that As, a potent endocrine disruptor at low, environmentally relevant levels, alters steroid signaling at the level of receptor-mediated gene regulation for all five steroid receptors. The goal of this study was to determine whether As can also disrupt gene regulation via the retinoic acid (RA) receptor (RAR) and/or the thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR) and whether these effects are similar to previously observed effects on steroid regulation. Human embryonic NT2 or rat pituitary GH3 cells were treated with 0.01-5 microM sodium arsenite for 24 hr, with or without RA or TH, respectively, to examine effects of As on receptor-mediated gene transcription. At low, noncytotoxic doses, As significantly altered RAR-dependent gene transcription of a transfected RAR response element-luciferase construct and the native RA-inducible cytochrome P450 CYP26A gene in NT2 cells. Likewise, low-dose As significantly altered expression of a transfected TR response element-luciferase construct and the endogenous TR-regulated type I deiodinase (DIO1) gene in a similar manner in GH3 cells. An amphibian ex vivo tail metamorphosis assay was used to examine whether endocrine disruption by low-dose As could have specific pathophysiologic consequences, because tail metamorphosis is tightly controlled by TH through TR. TH-dependent tail shrinkage was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by 0.1- 4.0 microM As. As had similar effects on RAR- and TR-mediated gene regulation as those previously observed for the steroid receptors, suggesting a common mechanism or action. Arsenic also profoundly affected a TR-dependent developmental process in a model animal system at very low concentrations. Because RAR and TH are critical for both normal human development and adult

  16. Specific Endocytosis Blockade of Trypanosoma cruzi Exposed to a Poly-LAcNAc Binding Lectin Suggests that Lectin-Sugar Interactions Participate to Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Brosson, Sébastien; Fontaine, Frédéric; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Perez-Morga, David; Pays, Etienne; Bousbata, Sabrina; Salmon, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite transmitted by a triatomine insect, and causing human Chagas disease in South America. This parasite undergoes a complex life cycle alternating between non-proliferative and dividing forms. Owing to their high energy requirement, replicative epimastigotes of the insect midgut display high endocytic activity. This activity is mainly restricted to the cytostome, by which the cargo is taken up and sorted through the endosomal vesicular network to be delivered to reservosomes, the final lysosomal-like compartments. In African trypanosomes tomato lectin (TL) and ricin, respectively specific to poly-N-acetyllactosamine (poly-LacNAc) and β-D-galactose, allowed the identification of giant chains of poly-LacNAc in N-glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway. We show that in T. cruzi epimastigote forms also, glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway are characterized by the presence of N-linked glycans binding to both ricin and TL. Affinity chromatography using both TL and Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSLII), specific to non-reducing terminal residue of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), led to an enrichment of glycoproteins of the trypanosomal endocytic pathway. Incubation of live parasites with TL, which selectively bound to the cytostome/cytopharynx, specifically inhibited endocytosis of transferrin (Tf) but not dextran, a marker of fluid endocytosis. Taken together, our data suggest that N-glycan modification of endocytic components plays a crucial role in receptor-mediated endocytosis of T. cruzi. PMID:27685262

  17. Inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis block the entry of Bacillus anthracis adenylate cyclase toxin but not that of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, V M; Leppla, S H; Hewlett, E L

    1988-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis produce extracytoplasmic adenylate cyclase toxins (AC toxins) with shared features including activation by calmodulin and the ability to enter target cells and catalyze intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) production from host ATP. The two AC toxins were evaluated for sensitivities to a series of inhibitors of known uptake mechanisms. Cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of microfilament function, abrogated the cAMP response to B. anthracis AC toxin (93%) but not the cAMP response elicited by B. pertussis AC toxin. B. anthracis-mediated intoxication of CHO cells was completely inhibited by ammonium chloride (30 mM) and chloroquine (0.1 mM), whereas the cAMP accumulation produced by B. pertussis AC toxin remained unchanged. The block of target cell intoxication by cytochalasin D could be bypassed when cells were first treated with anthrax AC toxin and then exposed to an acidic medium. These data indicate that despite enzymatic similarities, these two AC toxins intoxicate target cells by different mechanisms, with anthrax AC toxin entering by means of receptor-mediated endocytosis into acidic compartments and B. pertussis AC toxin using a separate, and as yet undefined, mechanism. PMID:2895741

  18. Metabolism of glycosylated human salivary amylase: in vivo plasma clearance by rat hepatic endothelial cells and in vitro receptor mediated pinocytosis by rat macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Niesen, T.E.; Alpers, D.H.; Stahl, P.D.; Rosenblum, J.L.

    1984-09-01

    Salivary-type amylase normally comprises about 60% of the amylase activity in human serum, but only a small fraction is a glycosylated isoenzyme (amylase A). In contrast, 1/3 of amylase in human saliva is glycosylated. Since glycosylation can affect circulatory clearance, we studied the clearance of amylase A in rats and its uptake by rat alveolar macrophages. Following intravenous injection, /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A disappeared rapidly from plasma (t 1/2 . 9 min) and accumulated in the liver. Simultaneous injection of mannose-albumin slowed its clearance to a rate comparable to that of /sup 125/I-labeled nonglycosylated salivary amylase (t 1/2 . 45 min). In contrast, galactose-albumin had no effect. Electron microscope autoradiography of the liver following injection of /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A revealed a localization of grains over the hepatic endothelial cells. In vitro studies indicated that amylase A is taken up by alveolar macrophages via receptor-mediated pinocytosis. Uptake was linear over time, saturable, and inhibited by mannan and mannose-albumin, but not by galactose-albumin. We conclude that amylase A, which is a naturally occurring human glycoprotein with at most three terminal L-fucose residues per molecule, is recognized in rats by a mannose receptor located on hepatic endothelial cells. We speculate that this receptor, by rapidly clearing circulating amylase A, may be responsible for the low level of amylase A in human serum.

  19. Glucagon and cAMP inhibit cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) gene expression in human hepatocytes: discordant regulation of bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang-Hoon; Chiang, John Y L

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is tightly regulated to control bile acid synthesis and maintain lipid homeostasis. Recent studies in mice suggest that bile acid synthesis is regulated by the fasted-to-fed cycle, and fasting induces CYP7A1 gene expression in parallel to the induction of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). How glucagon regulates CYP7A1 gene expression in the human liver is not clear. Here we show that glucagon and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) strongly repressed CYP7A1 mRNA expression in human primary hepatocytes. Reporter assays confirmed that cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibited human CYP7A1 gene transcription, in contrast to their stimulation of the PEPCK gene. Mutagenesis analysis identified a PKA-responsive region located within the previously identified HNF4alpha binding site in the human CYP7A1 promoter. Glucagon and cAMP increased HNF4alpha phosphorylation and reduced the amount of HNF4alpha present in CYP7A1 chromatin. Our findings suggest that glucagon inhibited CYP7A1 gene expression via PKA phosphorylation of HNF4alpha, which lost its ability to bind the CYP7A1 gene and resulted in inhibition of human CYP7A1 gene transcription. In conclusion, this study unveils a species difference in nutrient regulation of the human and mouse CYP7A1 gene and suggests a discordant regulation of bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis by glucagon in human livers during fasting.

  20. The Adherence of platelets to adsorbed albumin by receptor-mediated recognition of binding sites exposed by adsorption-induced unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Although albumin (Alb) is the most abundant plasma protein, it is considered to be non-adhesive to platelets, as it lacks any known amino acid sequences for binding platelet receptors. Recent studies have suggested that platelets adhere to adsorbed Alb by mechanisms linked to its conformational state. To definitively address this issue we used circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimetry to characterize the conformation of Alb adsorbed on a broad range of surface chemistries from a wide range of Alb solution concentrations, with platelet adhesion examined using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Our results prove that platelets bind to adsorbed Alb through receptor-mediated processes, with binding sites in Alb exposed and/or formed by adsorption-induced protein unfolding. Most importantly, beyond a critical degree of unfolding, the platelet adhesion levels correlated strongly with the adsorption-induced unfolding in Alb. The blockage of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) specific platelet receptors using an Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) peptide led to significant inhibition of platelet adhesion to adsorbed Alb, with the extent of inhibition and morphology of adherent platelets being similar for both Alb and Fg. Chemical neutralization of arginine (Arg) residues in the adsorbed Alb layer inhibited platelet–Alb interactions significantly, indicating that Arg residues play a prominent role in mediating platelet adhesion to Alb. These results provide deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms that mediate the interactions of platelets with adsorbed proteins, and how to control these interactions to improve the blood compatibility of biomaterials for cardiovascular applications. PMID:19864017

  1. Rho/ROCK acts downstream of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in modulating P2X3 receptor-mediated bone cancer pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing-Xiang; Yuan, Xiao-Min; Wang, Qiong; Wei, Wang; Xu, Mei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and Rho/ROCK signaling is implicated in bone cancer pain development. However, it remains unknown whether the two signaling pathways function together in P2X3 receptor-mediated bone cancer pain. In this study, using a rat model of bone cancer, we examined the expression of P2X3 and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and further dissected whether lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and Rho/ROCK-mediated pathways interacted in modulating rat pain behavior. Bone cancer was established by inoculating Walker 256 cells into the left tibia of female Wistar rats. We observed a gradual and yet significant decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold in rats with bone cancer, but not in control rats. Our immunohistochemical staining revealed that the number of P2X3- and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1-positive dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly greater in rats with bone cancer than control rats. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 blockade with VPC32183 significantly attenuated decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold. Flinching behavior test further showed that lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 inhibition with VPC32183 transiently but significantly attenuated α,β-meATP-induced increase in paw lift time per minute. Rho inhibition by intrathecal BoTXC3 caused a rapid reversal in decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold of rats with bone cancer. Flinching behavior test showed that BoTXC3 transiently and significantly attenuated α,β-meATP-induced increase in paw lift time per minute. Similar findings were observed with ROCK inhibition by intrathecal Y27632. Furthermore, VPC32183 and BoTXC3 effectively aborted the appearance of lysophosphatidic acid-induced calcium influx peak. Lysophosphatidic acid and its receptor LPAR1, acting through the Rho-ROCK pathway, regulate P2X3 receptor in the development of both mechanical and spontaneous pain in bone cancer. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Rho/ROCK acts downstream of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in modulating P2X3 receptor-mediated bone cancer pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-xiang; Yuan, Xiao-min; Wang, Qiong; Wei, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and Rho/ROCK signaling is implicated in bone cancer pain development. However, it remains unknown whether the two signaling pathways function together in P2X3 receptor-mediated bone cancer pain. Results In this study, using a rat model of bone cancer, we examined the expression of P2X3 and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and further dissected whether lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 and Rho/ROCK-mediated pathways interacted in modulating rat pain behavior. Bone cancer was established by inoculating Walker 256 cells into the left tibia of female Wistar rats. We observed a gradual and yet significant decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold in rats with bone cancer, but not in control rats. Our immunohistochemical staining revealed that the number of P2X3- and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1-positive dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly greater in rats with bone cancer than control rats. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 blockade with VPC32183 significantly attenuated decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold. Flinching behavior test further showed that lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 inhibition with VPC32183 transiently but significantly attenuated α,β-meATP-induced increase in paw lift time per minute. Rho inhibition by intrathecal BoTXC3 caused a rapid reversal in decline in mean paw withdrawal threshold of rats with bone cancer. Flinching behavior test showed that BoTXC3 transiently and significantly attenuated α,β-meATP-induced increase in paw lift time per minute. Similar findings were observed with ROCK inhibition by intrathecal Y27632. Furthermore, VPC32183 and BoTXC3 effectively aborted the appearance of lysophosphatidic acid-induced calcium influx peak. Conclusions Lysophosphatidic acid and its receptor LPAR1, acting through the Rho-ROCK pathway, regulate P2X3 receptor in the development of both mechanical and spontaneous pain in bone cancer. PMID:27094551

  3. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression through induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Im, Ji Hye; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Sun Woo; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2015-09-25

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural component of propolis, is reported to have anticarcinogenic properties, although its precise chemopreventive mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of CAPE on 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC)-induced CYP1A1 expression and activities. CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. Moreover, CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 activity, mRNA expression, protein level, and promoter activity. CAPE treatment also decreased 3-MC-inducible xenobiotic-response element (XRE)-linked luciferase, aryl hydrocarbons receptor (AhR) transactivation and nuclear localization. CAPE induced hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein level and HIF-1α responsible element (HRE) transcriptional activity. CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 protein expression. Taken together, CAPE decreases 3-MC-mediated CYP1A1 expression, and this inhibitory response is associated with inhibition of AhR and HIF-1α induction. - Highlights: • CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. • CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. • CAPE induced HIF-1α induction. • CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 expression.

  4. A1E inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bak, Yesol; Ham, Sunyoung; Baatartsogt, O; Jung, Seung Hyun; Choi, Kang-Duk; Han, Tae-Young; Han, Il-Young; Yoon, Do-Young

    2013-07-01

    It has been reported that extracts from Asian traditional/medical herbs possess therapeutic agents against cancers, metabolic diseases, inflammatory diseases, and other intractable diseases. In this study, we assessed the molecular mechanisms involved in the anticancer effects of A1E, the extract of Korean medicinal herbs. We examined the role of the cytotoxic and apoptotic pathways in the cancer chemopreventive activity in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines NCI-H460 and NCI-H1299. A1E inhibited the proliferation of NCI-H460 more efficiently than NCI-H1299 (p53(-/-)) cells. The apoptosis was detected by nuclear morphological changes, annexin V-FITC/PI staining, cell cycle analysis, western blot, RT-PCR, and measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential. A1E induced cellular morphological changes and nuclear condensation at 24 h in a dose-dependent manner. A1E also perturbed cell cycle progression at the sub-G1 stage and altered cell cycle regulatory factors in NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, A1E inhibited the PI3K/Akt and NF-κB survival pathways, and it activated apoptotic intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. A1E increased the expression levels of members of the extrinsic death receptor complex FasL and FADD. In addition, A1E treatment induced cleavage of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), whereas the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl were downregulated. A1E induced mitochondrial membrane potential collapse and cytochrome C release. Our results suggest that A1E induces apoptosis via activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways and inhibition of PI3K/Akt survival signaling pathways in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, these data demonstrate the potential of A1E as a novel chemotherapeutic agent in NSCLC.

  5. EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction-mediated apoptosis and Flt3L-induced immunotherapy inhibits tumor growth in a breast cancer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Manish; Vemula, Sai V.; Sharma, Anurag; Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Shalini; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 is overexpressed in several types of cancers and is currently being pursued as a target for breast cancer therapeutics. The EphA2 ligand EphrinA1 induces EphA2 phosphorylation and intracellular internalization and degradation, thus inhibiting tumor progression. The hematopoietic growth factor, FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor ligand (Flt3L), promotes expansion and mobilization of functional dendritic cells. Methods We tested the EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells focusing on the receptor-ligand-mediated apoptosis of breast cancer cells. In order to determine whether the EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction-associated apoptosis and Flt3L-mediated immunotherapy would have an additive effect in inhibiting tumor growth, we used an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer to evaluate intratumoral (i.t.) inoculation strategies with human adenovirus (HAd) vectors expressing either EphrinA1 (HAd-EphrinA1-Fc), Flt3L (HAd-Flt3L) or a combination of EphrinA1-Fc + Flt3L (HAd-EphrinA1-Fc + HAd-Flt3L). Results In vitro analysis demonstrated that an EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction led to apoptosis-related changes in breast cancer cells. In vivo, three i.t. inoculations of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc showed potent inhibition of tumor growth. Furthermore, increased inhibition in tumor growth was observed with the combination of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc and HAd-Flt3L accompanied by the generation of an anti-tumor adaptive immune response. Conclusions The results indicating induction of apoptosis and inhibition of mammary tumor growth show the potential therapeutic benefits of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc. In combination with HAd-Flt3L, this represents a promising strategy to effectively induce mammary tumor regression by HAd vector-based therapy. PMID:22228563

  6. Metformin inhibits 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced breast carcinogenesis and adduct formation in human breast cells by inhibiting the cytochrome P4501A1/aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Maayah, Zaid H.; Ghebeh, Hazem; Alhaider, Abdulqader A.; El-Kadi, Ayman O.S.; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.; Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad; Korashy, Hesham M.

    2015-04-15

    Recent studies have established that metformin (MET), an oral anti-diabetic drug, possesses antioxidant activity and is effective against different types of cancer in several carcinogen-induced animal models and cell lines. However, whether MET can protect against breast cancer has not been reported before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential chemopreventive effect of MET in non-cancerous human breast MCF10A cells and explore the underlying mechanism involved, specifically the role of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1)/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. Transformation of the MCF10A cells into initiated breast cancer cells with DNA adduct formation was conducted using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), an AhR ligand. The chemopreventive effect of MET against DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was evidenced by the capability of MET to restore the induction of the mRNA levels of basic excision repair genes, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1), and the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Interestingly, the inhibition of DMBA-induced DNA adduct formation was associated with proportional decrease in CYP1A1 and in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene expression. Mechanistically, the involvements of AhR and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the MET-mediated inhibition of DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and NQO1 gene expression were evidenced by the ability of MET to inhibit DMBA-induced xenobiotic responsive element and antioxidant responsive element luciferase reporter gene expression which suggests an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent transcriptional control. However, the inability of MET to bind to AhR suggests that MET is not an AhR ligand. In conclusion, the present work shows a strong evidence that MET inhibits the DMBA-mediated carcinogenicity and adduct formation by inhibiting the expression of CYP1A1 through an AhR ligand-independent mechanism

  7. Arecoline inhibits the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced cytochrome P450 1A1 activation in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eddy Essen; Miao, Zhi-Feng; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Chao, How-Ran; Li, Lih-Ann; Wang, Ya-Fen; Ko, Ying-Chin; Tsai, Feng-Yuan; Yeh, Szu Ching; Tsou, Tsui-Chun

    2007-07-19

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of arecoline, a major areca nut alkaloid, on the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced activation of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) in a human hepatoma cell line Huh-7. We treated Huh-7 cells with 10nM TCDD in the presence of different concentrations of arecoline (50-300 microM). Our results indicated that arecoline attenuated the TCDD-induced CYP1A1 enzyme activation with an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. By using real-time RT-PCR, we demonstrated that arecoline inhibited the TCDD-induced activations of CYP1A1 and AhR repressor (AhRR) mRNA expression in a similar pattern. Our results revealed that arecoline inhibited AhR mRNA expression with no direct effect on CYP1A1 enzyme activity. Therefore, in our present study, the observed inhibitory effect of arecoline on CYP1A1 activation was not due to the up-regulation of AhRR or direct inhibitory effect on CYP1A1. Taken together, here we have demonstrated that arecoline attenuates the TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activation mainly via down-regulation of AhR expression in human hepatoma cells, suggesting the possible involvement of arecoline in the AhR-mediated metabolism of environmental toxicants in liver.

  8. SMN2 exon 7 splicing is inhibited by binding of hnRNP A1 to a common ESS motif that spans the 3' splice site.

    PubMed

    Doktor, Thomas Koed; Schroeder, Lisbeth Dahl; Vested, Anne; Palmfeldt, Johan; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Gregersen, Niels; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2011-02-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy is caused by homozygous loss of SMN1 with phenotypic modulation by SMN2. SMN2 expresses only limited amounts of full-length transcript due to skipping of exon 7 caused by disruption of an SF2/ASF binding ESE. Additionally, hnRNP A1 has been reported to inhibit inclusion of SMN2 exon 7. We previously reported high similarity between the sequence spanning the 3' ss of SMN1 and SMN2 exon 7 and an hnRNP A1 binding ESS, which regulates MCAD exon 5 splicing. We show here that this 3' ss motif indeed functions as a crucial hnRNP A1 binding ESS, which inhibits inclusion of SMN1/2 exon 7 and is antagonized by the SMN1 ESE, but not by the inactive SMN2 sequence. Pull-down experiments revealed a specific interaction between hnRNP A1 and the 3' ss AG-dinucleotide, which could be disrupted by mutations shown to improve splicing in reporter minigenes. Genomic analyses revealed that in the human genome, 3' ss matching the SMN1/2 ESS motif region are much less abundant than 3' ss with a disrupted ESS motif. This indicates that this ESS may be a general splicing inhibitory motif, which binds hnRNP A1 and inhibits exon inclusion by binding to 3' ss harboring this ESS motif.

  9. GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated effects in guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Giotti, A; Luzzi, S; Spagnesi, S; Zilletti, L

    1983-03-01

    1 The effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and related substances were examined in guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle.2 GABA at doses ranging from 10(-7) M to 3 x 10(-6) M elicited a relaxation while at higher doses (3 x 10(-6) M - 10(-4) M), as previously described, it caused a contraction followed by relaxation.3 GABA-induced relaxation was bicuculline-insensitive, was mimicked by (-)-baclofen but not by homotaurine and muscimol. The effect of baclofen was stereospecific. GABA- and (-)-baclofen-induced relaxations were dose-dependent and their ED(50) values were similar. A specific cross-desensitization occurred between GABA and (-)-baclofen.4 The bicuculline-insensitive relaxation induced by GABA and (-)-baclofen was prevented by tetrodotoxin and hyoscine but not by phentolamine plus propranolol, naloxone or theophylline.5 In preparations in which the muscle tone was raised by histamine or prostaglandin F(2alpha), GABA and (-)-baclofen induced relaxation to the same extent as before increasing the tone. If the tone was raised by DMPP, a greater bicuculline-insensitive relaxation occurred.6 Contraction caused by GABA was bicuculline-sensitive and was mimicked by homotaurine and muscimol. Contraction was dose-dependent and muscimol was about three times more potent than GABA or homotaurine. A specific cross-desensitization occurred between the contractile effects of GABA and those of homotaurine or muscimol.7 Bicuculline competitively antagonized the contractile effects of GABA, homotaurine and muscimol and gave closely similar pA(2) values. The slope of the Schild plot for the above drugs was near 1, confirming the competitive nature of the antagonism.8 The bicuculline-sensitive contraction induced by GABA, homotaurine and muscimol was abolished by tetrodotoxin and was non-competitively antagonized by hyoscine, while it was unaffected by hexamethonium, mepyramine and methysergide.9 It is concluded that two receptors mediate the GABA effects in guinea

  10. Pharmacological characterization of prostanoid receptors mediating vasoconstriction in human umbilical vein

    PubMed Central

    Daray, Federico Manuel; Minvielle, Ana Itatí; Puppo, Soledad; Rothlin, Rodolfo Pedro

    2003-01-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize pharmacologically the prostanoid receptor subtypes mediating contraction in human umbilical vein (HUV).HUV rings were mounted in organ baths and concentration–response curves to U-46619 (TXA2 mimetic) were constructed in the absence or presence of SQ-29548 or ICI-192,605 (TP receptor antagonists). U-46619 was a potent constrictor (pEC50: 8.03). SQ-29548 and ICI-192,605 competitively antagonized responses to U-46619 with pKB values of 7.96 and 9.07, respectively.Concentration–response curves to EP receptor agonists: PGE2, misoprostol and 17-phenyl-trinor-PGE2 gave pEC50 values of 5.06, 5.25 and 5.32, respectively. Neither pEC50 nor maximum of PGE2 and 17-phenyl-trinor-PGE2 concentration–response curves were modified by the DP/EP1/EP2 receptor antagonist AH 6809 (1 μM). However, ICI-192,605 produced a concentration-dependent antagonism of the responses to all the EP receptor agonists. The pA2 estimated for ICI-192,605 against PGE2 or misoprostol were 8.91 and 9.22, respectively.Concentration–response curves to FP receptor agonists: PGF2α and fluprostenol gave pEC50 values of 6.20 and 5.82, respectively. ICI-192,605 (100 nM) was completely ineffective against PGF2α or fluprostenol. In addition, lack of antagonistic effect of AH 6809 (1 μM) against PGF2α was observed.In conclusion, the findings obtained with TP-selective agonist and antagonists provide strong evidence of the involvement of TP receptors promoting vasoconstriction in HUV. Furthermore, the action of the natural and synthetic EP receptor agonists appears to be mediated via TP receptors. On the other hand, the results employing FP receptor agonists and antagonists of different prostanoid receptors suggest the presence of FP receptors mediating vasoconstriction in this vessel. PMID:12922927

  11. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mediates glucocorticoid effects on hormone secretion induced by volume and osmotic changes.

    PubMed

    Ruginsk, S G; Uchoa, E T; Elias, L L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, J

    2012-02-01

    The present study provides the first in vivo evidence that the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mediates the effects of dexamethasone on hormone release induced by changes in circulating volume and osmolality. Male adult rats were administered with the CB(1) receptor antagonist rimonabant (10 mg/Kg, p.o.), followed or not in 1 hour by dexamethasone (1 mg/Kg, i.p.). Extracellular volume expansion (EVE, 2 mL/100 g of body weight, i.v.) was performed 2 hours after dexamethasone or vehicle treatment using either isotonic (I-EVE, 0.15 mol/L) or hypertonic (H-EVE, 0.30 mol/L) NaCl solution. Five minutes after EVE, animals were decapitated and trunk blood was collected for all plasma measurements. Rimonabant potentiated oxytocin (OT) secretion induced by H-EVE and completely reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone in response to the same stimulus. These data suggest that glucocorticoid modulation of OT release is mediated by the CB(1) receptor. Although dexamethasone did not affect vasopressin (AVP) secretion induced by H-EVE, the administration of rimonabant potentiated AVP release in response to the same stimulus, supporting the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor regulates AVP secretion independently of glucocorticoid-mediated signalling. Dexamethasone alone did not affect atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release stimulated by I-EVE or H-EVE. However, pretreatment with rimonabant potentiated ANP secretion induced by H-EVE, suggesting a possible role for the CB(1) receptor in the control of peripheral factors that modulate cardiovascular function. Rimonabant also reversed the inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on H-EVE-induced corticosterone secretion, reinforcing the hypothesis that the CB(1) receptor may be involved in the negative feedback exerted by glucocorticoids on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Collectively, the results of the present study indicate that the CB(1) receptor modulates neurohypophyseal hormone secretion and

  12. Melatonin receptors mediate improvements of survival in a model of polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fink, Tobias; Glas, Michael; Wolf, Alexander; Kleber, Astrid; Reus, Erik; Wolff, Martin; Kiefer, Daniel; Wolf, Beate; Rensing, Hauke; Volk, Thomas; Mathes, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    -α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-10 were observed 5 hours after cecal ligation and incision in rats (p < 0.05 vs baseline and corresponding sham); neither ramelteon nor melatonin treatment significantly affected immune response. Melatonin receptors mediate improvements of survival after polymicrobial sepsis in rats and mice; this effect appears to be independent from major alterations of cytokine release.

  13. Dopamine receptor-mediated mechanisms involved in the expression of learned activity of primate striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Kimura, M

    1998-05-01

    background discharge rates nor the responses of TANs were significantly influenced. Background discharge rate of TANs was also not affected by D1- or D2-class antagonists applied by either micropressure injection or iontophoresis. It was concluded that the nigrostriatal DA system enables TANs to express learned activity primarily through D2-class and partly through D1-class receptor-mediated mechanisms in the striatum.

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Chun-Hua; Hsu, Pei-Chien; Sun, Yu-Yo; Huang, Yu-Jie; Zhuo, Jiun-Horng; Wang, Chen-Yu; Gan, Yu-Ling; Hung, Chia-Chi; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Shie, Feng-Shiun

    2015-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) regulates peripheral immunity; but its role in microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in the brain remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AhR mediates both anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia. Activation of AhR by its ligands, formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) or 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), attenuated LPS-induced microglial immune responses. AhR also showed proinflammatory effects, as evidenced by the findings that genetic silence of AhR ameliorated the LPS-induced microglial immune responses and LPS-activated microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. Similarly, LPS-induced expressions of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were reduced in the cerebral cortex of AhR-deficient mice. Intriguingly, LPS upregulated and activated AhR in the absence of AhR ligands via the MEK1/2 signaling pathway, which effects were associated with a transient inhibition of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). Although AhR ligands synergistically enhance LPS-induced AhR activation, leading to suppression of LPS-induced microglial immune responses, they cannot do so on their own in microglia. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results further revealed that LPS-FICZ co-treatment, but not LPS alone, not only resulted in co-recruitment of both AhR and NFκB onto the κB site of TNFα gene promoter but also reduced LPS-induced AhR binding to the DRE site of iNOS gene promoter. Together, we provide evidence showing that microglial AhR, which can be activated by LPS, exerts bi-directional effects on the regulation of LPS-induced neuroinflammation, depending on the availability of external AhR ligands. These findings confer further insights into the potential link between environmental factors and the inflammatory brain disorders.

  15. Tumor suppressor long non-coding RNA, MT1DP is negatively regulated by YAP and Runx2 to inhibit FoxA1 in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjun; Qiao, Yongxia; Tang, Xun; Ma, Lifang; Wang, Yulan; Zhang, Xiao; Weng, Wenhao; Pan, Qiuhui; Yu, Yongchun; Sun, Fenyong; Wang, Jiayi

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies are indicative for strong carcinogenetic roles of Runt related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Yes associated protein (YAP) in several cancer types. However, whether and how the interaction between Runx2 and YAP plays a role in liver tumorigenesis still remain illusive. Here, we identified a close relationship between Runx2 and YAP in liver cancer cells. Runx2 had a positive role on YAP expression and vice versa. We also found that Rux2 and YAP were capable of inhibiting long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), Metallothionein 1D, Pseudogene (MT1DP) expression through direct promoter binding. Overexpression of MT1DP resulted in reduced cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar, but increased apoptosis in liver cancer cells, whereas knockdown of this lncRNA had the opposite effect, indicating that MT1DP acts as a tumor suppressor. Furthermore, MT1DP was revealed as a negative regulator of Alfa-fetoprotein (AFP), a classic liver cancer tumor marker, through inhibiting protein synthesis of Forkhead box A1 (FoxA1), an important transcription factor in liver development and cancer progression. Furthermore, we found that FoxA1 plays a positive role on YAP and Runx2 expression. Specially, opening the compacted chromatin by FoxA1 around CREB binding site within the YAP promoter facilitates CREB-mediated YAP transcription. Finally, MT1DP-inhibited in vivo liver cancer cell growth could be rescued by a combination of overexpression of FoxA1, Runx2 and YAP. Taken together, the close relationship between Rnux2 and YAP plays a pro-carcinogenetic role in liver cancer cells through inhibiting tumor suppressor lncRNA, MT1DP in a FoxA1 dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. μ-Opioid Receptor-Mediated Inhibition of Intercalated Neurons and Effect on Synaptic Transmission to the Central Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Blaesse, Peter; Goedecke, Lena; Bazelot, Michaël; Capogna, Marco; Pape, Hans-Christian; Jüngling, Kay

    2015-05-13

    The amygdala is a key region for the processing of information underlying fear, anxiety, and fear extinction. Within the local neuronal networks of the amygdala, a population of inhibitory, intercalated neurons (ITCs) modulates the flow of information among various nuclei of amygdala, including the basal nucleus (BA) and the centromedial nucleus (CeM) of the amygdala. These ITCs have been shown to be important during fear extinction and are target of a variety of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides. Here we provide evidence that the activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) by the specific agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin) hyperpolarizes medially located ITCs (mITCs) in acute brain slices of mice. Moreover, we use whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in combination with local electrical stimulation or glutamate uncaging to analyze the effect of MOR activation on local microcircuits. We show that the GABAergic transmission between mITCs and CeM neurons is attenuated by DAMGO, whereas the glutamatergic transmission on CeM neurons and mITCs is unaffected. Furthermore, MOR activation induced by theta burst stimulation in BA suppresses plastic changes of feedforward inhibitory transmission onto CeM neurons as revealed by the MOR antagonist CTAP d-Phe-Cys-Tyr-d-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2. In summary, the mITCs constitute a target for the opioid system, and therefore, the activation of MOR in ITCs might play a central role in the modulation of the information processing between the basolateral complex of the amygdala and central nuclei of the amygdala.

  17. Dissection of Glucocorticoid Receptor-mediated Inhibition of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal Axis by Gene Targeting in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laryea, Gloria; Muglia, Lisa; Arnett, Melinda; Muglia, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Negative feedback regulation of glucocorticoid (GC) synthesis and secretion occurs through the function of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at sites in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, as well as in brain regions such as the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and sympathetic nervous system. This function of GRs in negative feedback coordinates basal glucocorticoid secretion and stress-induced increases in secretion that integrate GC production with the magnitude and duration of the stressor. This review describes the effects of GR loss along major sites of negative feedback including the entire brain, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), and the pituitary. In genetic mouse models, we evaluate circadian regulation of the HPA axis, stress-stimulated neuroendocrine response and behavioral activity, as well as the integrated response of organism metabolism. Our analysis provides information on contributions of region-specific GR-mediated negative feedback to provide insight in understanding HPA axis dysregulation and the pathogenesis of psychiatric and metabolic disorders. PMID:25256348

  18. β-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated Cardiac Contractility is Inhibited via Vasopressin Type 1A-Receptor-Dependent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Douglas G.; Zhu, Weizhong; Myers, Valerie D.; Barr, Larry A.; Gao, Erhe; Li, Xue; Song, Jianliang; Carter, Rhonda L.; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Yu, Daohai; Troupes, Constantine D.; Grisanti, Laurel A.; Coleman, Ryan C.; Koch, Walter J.; Houser, Steven R.; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Feldman, Arthur M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Enhanced arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels are associated with increased mortality during end-stage human heart failure (HF), and cardiac AVP type 1A receptor (V1AR) expression becomes increased. Additionally, mice with cardiac-restricted V1AR overexpression develop cardiomyopathy and decreased β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) responsiveness. This led us to hypothesize that V1AR signaling regulated βAR responsiveness and in doing so contributes to HF development. Methods and Results Transaortic constriction resulted in decreased cardiac function and βAR density and increased cardiac V1AR expression, effects reversed by a V1AR-selective antagonist. Molecularly, V1AR stimulation led to decreased βAR ligand affinity, as well as βAR-induced Ca2+ mobilization and cAMP generation in isolated adult cardiomyocytes, effects recapitulated via ex vivo Langendorff analysis. V1AR-mediated regulation of βAR responsiveness was demonstrated to occur in a previously unrecognized Gq protein-independent/GRK-dependent manner. Conclusions This newly discovered relationship between cardiac V1AR and βAR may be informative for the treatment of patients with acute decompensated HF and elevated AVP. PMID:25205804

  19. μ-Opioid Receptor-Mediated Inhibition of Intercalated Neurons and Effect on Synaptic Transmission to the Central Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Blaesse, Peter; Goedecke, Lena; Bazelot, Michaël; Capogna, Marco; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2015-01-01

    The amygdala is a key region for the processing of information underlying fear, anxiety, and fear extinction. Within the local neuronal networks of the amygdala, a population of inhibitory, intercalated neurons (ITCs) modulates the flow of information among various nuclei of amygdala, including the basal nucleus (BA) and the centromedial nucleus (CeM) of the amygdala. These ITCs have been shown to be important during fear extinction and are target of a variety of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides. Here we provide evidence that the activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) by the specific agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin) hyperpolarizes medially located ITCs (mITCs) in acute brain slices of mice. Moreover, we use whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in combination with local electrical stimulation or glutamate uncaging to analyze the effect of MOR activation on local microcircuits. We show that the GABAergic transmission between mITCs and CeM neurons is attenuated by DAMGO, whereas the glutamatergic transmission on CeM neurons and mITCs is unaffected. Furthermore, MOR activation induced by theta burst stimulation in BA suppresses plastic changes of feedforward inhibitory transmission onto CeM neurons as revealed by the MOR antagonist CTAP d-Phe-Cys-Tyr-d-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2. In summary, the mITCs constitute a target for the opioid system, and therefore, the activation of MOR in ITCs might play a central role in the modulation of the information processing between the basolateral complex of the amygdala and central nuclei of the amygdala. PMID:25972162

  20. THE SHARK RECTAL GLAND MODEL: A CHAMPION OF RECEPTOR MEDIATED CHLORIDE SECRETION THROUGH CFTR

    PubMed Central

    FORREST, JOHN N.

    2016-01-01

    The dogfish shark salt gland was predicted by Smith and discovered by Burger at the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine. It is an epithelial organ in the intestine composed of tubules that serve a single function: the secretion of hypertonic NaCl. Many G protein receptors are present on the basolateral surface of these tubules, including stimulatory receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide, adenosine A2, growth hormone releasing hormone, and inhibitory receptors for somatostatin and adenosine A1. An entirely different class of stimulatory receptors is present as C-type natriuretic peptide receptors. Each stimulatory receptor evokes powerful NaCl secretion. G protein receptors bind to Gαs to activate the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase to form cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A that phosphorylates the regulatory domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, opening the channel. The C-type natriuretic peptide receptor stimulates by activating guanylate cyclase and endogenous cyclic guanosine monophosphate which inhibits type 3 phosphodiesterase, the enzyme that breaks down cAMP, thereby elevating cAMP and activating the protein kinase A pathway. PMID:28066051

  1. THE SHARK RECTAL GLAND MODEL: A CHAMPION OF RECEPTOR MEDIATED CHLORIDE SECRETION THROUGH CFTR.

    PubMed

    Forrest, John N

    2016-01-01

    The dogfish shark salt gland was predicted by Smith and discovered by Burger at the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory in Salisbury Cove, Maine. It is an epithelial organ in the intestine composed of tubules that serve a single function: the secretion of hypertonic NaCl. Many G protein receptors are present on the basolateral surface of these tubules, including stimulatory receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide, adenosine A2, growth hormone releasing hormone, and inhibitory receptors for somatostatin and adenosine A1. An entirely different class of stimulatory receptors is present as C-type natriuretic peptide receptors. Each stimulatory receptor evokes powerful NaCl secretion. G protein receptors bind to Gαs to activate the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase to form cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A that phosphorylates the regulatory domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, opening the channel. The C-type natriuretic peptide receptor stimulates by activating guanylate cyclase and endogenous cyclic guanosine monophosphate which inhibits type 3 phosphodiesterase, the enzyme that breaks down cAMP, thereby elevating cAMP and activating the protein kinase A pathway.

  2. The COUP-TFII variant lacking a DNA-binding domain inhibits the activation of the Cyp7a1 promoter through physical interaction with COUP-TFII.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tomoko; Suehiro, Jun-ichi; Miyazaki, Hideki; Minami, Takashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiki; Miyazono, Kohei; Watabe, Tetsuro

    2013-06-01

    The COUP-TFII (chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II) nuclear receptor, which is composed of a DNA-binding domain and a ligand-binding domain, exerts pleiotropic effects on development and cell differentiation by regulating the transcription of its target genes, including Cyp7a1 (cytochrome P450, family 7, subfamily a, polypeptide 1), which plays important roles in catabolism of cholesterol in the liver. Although multiple variants of COUP-TFII exist, their roles in the regulation of Cyp7a1 expression have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the roles of COUP-TFII-V2 (variant 2), which lacks a DNA-binding domain, in the regulation of the transcriptional control of the Cyp7a1 gene by COUP-TFII in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. We found that COUP-TFII-V2 was significantly expressed in Huh7 cells, in which Cyp7a1 was not expressed. Furthermore, knockdown of COUP-TFII-V2 enhanced endogenous Cyp7a1 expression in Huh7 cells. Although COUP-TFII activates the Cyp7a1 promoter through direct binding to DNA, this activation was affected by COUP-TFII-V2, which physically interacted with COUP-TFII and inhibited its DNA-binding ability. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that COUP-TFII-V2 inhibited the binding of endogenous COUP-TFII to the intact Cyp7a1 promoter. The results of the present study suggest that COUP-TFII-V2 negatively regulates the function of COUP-TFII by inhibiting its binding to DNA to decrease Cyp7a1 expression.

  3. Cholera toxin and pertussis toxin regulate the Fc receptor-mediated phagocytic response of human neutrophils in a manner analogous to regulation by monoclonal antibody 1C2.

    PubMed

    Gresham, H D; Clement, L T; Volanakis, J E; Brown, E J

    1987-12-15

    Data presented in this paper indicate that polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis can be markedly augmented and that this augmentation is under regulatory control. Stimulation of PMN with either a low m.w., heat-labile cytokine(s) (the culture supernatant effluent from a YM-10 Centricon unit, YM-10E), phorbol esters (phorbol dibutyrate), or the polyene antibiotic, amphotericin B, enhances Fc-mediated ingestion in a dose-dependent manner. YM-10 effluent- and amphotericin B-stimulated ingestion is completely abrogated by treating the PMN with either pertussis toxin (PT), cholera toxin (CT), or a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 1C2. However, neither toxin nor mAb 1C2 affects nonstimulated ingestion or phagocytosis stimulated by phorbol esters or synthetic diacylglycerol. Increasing intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels by stimulation with prostaglandin E1 and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, isobutylmethylxanthine, does not mimic the effect of either toxin or mAb 1C2. In addition, toxin-mediated inhibition is not due to loss of either the Fc receptor recognized by mAb 3G8 or the antigen recognized by mAb 1C2. These data indicate that both CT and PT regulate the phagocytic response of PMN, in a manner like mAb 1C2, probably by affecting a guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding protein distinct from those that regulate adenylate cyclase. Since phorbol ester-stimulated ingestion is not inhibited by either PT, CT, or mAb 1C2 and phorbol esters activate protein kinase C directly, phagocytosis amplification regulated by PT, CT, and mAb 1C2 may involve protein kinase C activation.

  4. Effects of prostaglandin E{sub 2} on the subcellular localization of Epac-1 and Rap1 proteins during Fc{gamma}-receptor-mediated phagocytosis in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Thomas G.; Serezani, Carlos H.; Carstens, Jennifer K.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Aronoff, David M.

    2008-01-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated a central role for the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) in the inhibition of Fc{gamma}-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and bacterial killing by prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in macrophages. However, the subcellular localization of Epac, and its primary target Rap1, has yet to be determined in primary macrophages. Therefore, we used immunofluorescent techniques and phagosome isolation to localize Epac-1 and Rap1 in alveolar macrophages. Epac-1 was predominantly expressed on punctate and tubular membranes throughout the cell body; on the plasma membrane; and co-localized with microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Rap1 was abundant on punctate membranes, less abundant on plasma membrane, and also found on MTOCs. Following PGE{sub 2} treatment, Epac-1, but not Rap1, accumulated on the nuclear envelope and disappeared from MTOCs. By immunofluorescent microscopy, both Epac-1 and Rap1 were seen to associate with phagosomes containing IgG-opsonized beads, but this association appeared weak, as we failed to observe such interactions in phagosomes isolated from cells at various time points after bead ingestion. Strikingly, however, Epac-1, but not Rap1, appeared to accumulate on maturing phagosomes, but only after PGE{sub 2} treatment (or treatment with a selective Epac-1 agonist). This association was confirmed in isolated phagosome preparations. The changes in Epac-1 localization were too slow to account for the inhibitory effects of PGE{sub 2} on phagocytosis. However, the appearance of Epac-1 on late phagosomes following PGE{sub 2} treatment might be important for suppressing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production and inhibiting the killing of intraphagosomal pathogens. The absence of Rap1 on late phagosomes suggests that the effect of Epac-1 might not require Rap1.

  5. Exposure to 50 Hz magnetic field modulates GABAA currents in cerebellar granule neurons through an EP receptor-mediated PKC pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Ren, Zhen; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2015-01-01

    Previous work from both our lab and others have indicated that exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (ELF-MF) was able to modify ion channel functions. However, very few studies have investigated the effects of MF on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABAARs) channel functioning, which are fundamental to overall neuronal excitability. Here, our major goal is to reveal the potential effects of ELF-MF on GABAARs activity in rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Our results indicated that exposing CGNs to 1 mT ELF-MF for 60 min. significantly increased GABAAR currents without modifying sensitivity to GABA. However, activation of PKA by db-cAMP failed to do so, but led to a slight decrease instead. On the other hand, PKC activation or inhibition by PMA or Bis and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) mimicked or eliminated the field-induced-increase of GABAAR currents. Western blot analysis indicated that the intracellular levels of phosphorylated PKC (pPKC) were significantly elevated after 60 min. of ELF-MF exposure, which was subsequently blocked by application of DHA or EP1 receptor-specific (prostaglandin E receptor 1) antagonist (SC19220), but not by EP2-EP4 receptor-specific antagonists. SC19220 also significantly inhibited the ELF-MF-induced elevation on GABAAR currents. Together, these data obviously demonstrated for the first time that neuronal GABAA currents are significantly increased by ELF-MF exposure, and also suggest that these effects are mediated via an EP1 receptor-mediated PKC pathway. Future work will focus on a more comprehensive analysis of the physiological and/or pathological consequences of these effects. PMID:26176998

  6. Antipsychotic-Induced Alterations in CB1 Receptor-Mediated G-Protein Signaling and In Vivo Pharmacology in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, Seth H.; Burston, James J.; Howard, Daniel R.; Selley, Dana E.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of the endocannabinoid and dopamine systems have been implicated in schizophrenia. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of sub-chronic treatment with two antipsychotics on CB1 receptor-mediated in vitro and in vivo effects. Adult and adolescent male and female rats were injected twice daily with haloperidol (0.3 mg/kg), clozapine (10 mg/kg), or saline for 10 days. Subsequently, CB1 receptor number and function were assessed by [3H]SR141716 and WIN55,212-2-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding, respectively. The effects of sub-chronic antipsychotic treatment on the in vivo actions of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) were also evaluated. In adult female rats, antipsychotic treatment attenuated maximal stimulation of CB1 receptor-mediated G-protein activity in the striatum (clozapine) and prefrontal cortex (both antipsychotics), but not in the ventral midbrain. Associated changes in CB1 receptor number were not observed, suggesting that this attenuation was not due to downregulation. In vivo, sub-chronic treatment with clozapine, but not haloperidol, attenuated Δ9-THC-induced suppression of activity in adult females, whereas neither drug altered hypothermia or catalepsy. In contrast, antipsychotic treatment did not change CB1 receptor-mediated G-protein activation in any brain region in adult male rats and in adolescents of either sex. In vivo, haloperidol, but not clozapine, enhanced Δ9-THC-mediated suppression of activity and hypothermia in adult male rats whereas neither antipsychotic affected Δ9-THC-induced in vivo effects in adolescent rats. These findings suggest that modulation of the endocannabinoid system might contribute in a sex- and age-selective manner to differences in motor side effects of clozapine versus haloperidol. PMID:18708079

  7. Zonal differences in ethanol-induced impairments in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoglycoproteins in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.A.; Kragskow, S.L.; Sorrell, M.F.; Tuma, D.J. )

    1991-02-01

    We have shown previously that ethanol-induced defects in receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoorosomucoid occurred as early as 1 wk after ethanol feeding. This study was undertaken as an initial attempt to establish a possible role of defective receptor-mediated endocytosis in liver injury by investigating whether differences exist in the effects of ethanol on receptor-mediated endocytosis in hepatocytes isolated from different regions of the liver. Perivenule cells, present in the distal half of the liver, are thought to be more susceptible to ethanol-induced liver injury than are the periportal cells located in the proximal half of the liver acini. For these studies, we fed male Sprague-Dawley rats for 7 days with liquid diets containing either ethanol (36% of calories) or isocaloric carbohydrate. Perivenule and periportal hepatocytes were then isolated using a digitonin-collagenase perfusion method. In control animals, cells isolated from the perivenule region bound significantly more ligand than did cells from the periportal region. Amounts of ligand internalized and degraded were also greater in perivenule than in periportal cells in these animals. After ethanol feeding, cells isolated from both the perivenule and periportal regions bound significantly less ligand than their respective controls. This impairment in surface and total binding was more pronounced in perivenule than in periportal cells. Internalization and degradation of the ligand were also more adversely affected in the centrilobular region as shown by decreases of greater than 60% in perivenule cells and by only 20% to 30% in periportal cells of ethanol-fed animals compared with controls.

  8. Targeting of CYP17A1 Lyase by VT-464 Inhibits Adrenal and Intratumoral Androgen Biosynthesis and Tumor Growth of Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Sankar N.; Titus, Mark A.; Gyftaki, Revekka; Wu, Guanglin; Lu, Jing-Fang; Ramachandran, S.; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Araujo, John C.; Efstathiou, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) is a validated treatment target for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Abiraterone acetate (AA) inhibits both 17α-hydroxylase (hydroxylase) and 17,20-lyase (lyase) reactions catalyzed by CYP17A1 and thus depletes androgen biosynthesis. However, coadministration of prednisone is required to suppress the mineralocorticoid excess and cortisol depletion that result from hydroxylase inhibition. VT-464, a nonsteroidal small molecule, selectively inhibits CYP17A1 lyase and therefore does not require prednisone supplementation. Administration of VT-464 in a metastatic CRPC patient presenting with high tumoral expression of both androgen receptor (AR) and CYP17A1, showed significant reduction in the level of both dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and serum PSA. Treatment of a CRPC patient-derived xenograft, MDA-PCa-133 expressing H874Y AR mutant with VT-464, reduced the increase in tumor volume in castrate male mice more than twice as much as the vehicle (P < 0.05). Mass spectrometry analysis of post-treatment xenograft tumor tissues showed that VT-464 significantly decreased intratumoral androgens but not cortisol. VT-464 also reduced AR signaling more effectively than abiraterone in cultured PCa cells expressing T877A AR mutant. Collectively, this study suggests that VT-464 therapy can effectively treat CRPC and be used in precision medicine based on androgen receptor mutation status. PMID:27748439

  9. Targeting ALDH1A1 by disulfiram/copper complex inhibits non-small cell lung cancer recurrence driven by ALDH-positive cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinwei; Wang, Lihui; Cui, Wei; Yuan, Xiangzhong; Lin, Lulu; Cao, Qi; Wang, Nannan; Li, Yi; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Xun; Wu, Chunfu; Yang, Jingyu

    2016-09-06

    The existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has profound implications for cancer therapy. In this study, a disulfiram/copper (DSF/Cu) complex was evaluated in vitro and in vivo for its efficacy to inhibit CSCs, which drive recurrence of NSCLC. First, we investigated whether DSF/Cu could inhibit ALDH-positive NSCLC stem cells in vitro and tumors derived from sorted ALDH-positive CSCs in vivo. DSF/Cu (0.5/1 μmol/l) significantly inhibited the expression of stem cell transcription factors (Sox2, Oct-4 and Nanog) and reduced the capacities of NSCLC stem cells for self-renewal, proliferation and invasion in vitro. Regular injections with DSF/Cu (60/2.4 mg/kg) reduced the size of tumors derived from sorted ALDH-positive stem cells. Two other NOD/SCID xenograft models were used to determine whether DSF/Cu could target NSCLC stem cells and inhibit tumor recurrence in vivo. DSF/Cu treatment eliminated ALDH-positive cells and inhibited tumor recurrence, which was reflected by reduced tumor growth in recipient mice that were inoculated with tumor cells derived from DSF/Cu-treated cells or primary xenografts. RNA interference and overexpression of ALDH isozymes suggested that ALDH1A1, which plays a key role in ALDH-positive NSCLC stem cells, might be the target of the DSF/Cu complex. Collectively, our data demonstrate that DSF/Cu targets ALDH1A1 to inhibit NSCLC recurrence driven by ALDH-positive CSCs. Thus, the DSF/Cu complex may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  10. Targeting ALDH1A1 by disulfiram/copper complex inhibits non-small cell lung cancer recurrence driven by ALDH-positive cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinwei; Wang, Lihui; Cui, Wei; Yuan, Xiangzhong; Lin, Lulu; Cao, Qi; Wang, Nannan; Li, Yi; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Xun; Wu, Chunfu; Yang, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    The existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has profound implications for cancer therapy. In this study, a disulfiram/copper (DSF/Cu) complex was evaluated in vitro and in vivo for its efficacy to inhibit CSCs, which drive recurrence of NSCLC. First, we investigated whether DSF/Cu could inhibit ALDH-positive NSCLC stem cells in vitro and tumors derived from sorted ALDH-positive CSCs in vivo. DSF/Cu (0.5/1 μmol/l) significantly inhibited the expression of stem cell transcription factors (Sox2, Oct-4 and Nanog) and reduced the capacities of NSCLC stem cells for self-renewal, proliferation and invasion in vitro. Regular injections with DSF/Cu (60/2.4 mg/kg) reduced the size of tumors derived from sorted ALDH-positive stem cells. Two other NOD/SCID xenograft models were used to determine whether DSF/Cu could target NSCLC stem cells and inhibit tumor recurrence in vivo. DSF/Cu treatment eliminated ALDH-positive cells and inhibited tumor recurrence, which was reflected by reduced tumor growth in recipient mice that were inoculated with tumor cells derived from DSF/Cu-treated cells or primary xenografts. RNA interference and overexpression of ALDH isozymes suggested that ALDH1A1, which plays a key role in ALDH-positive NSCLC stem cells, might be the target of the DSF/Cu complex. Collectively, our data demonstrate that DSF/Cu targets ALDH1A1 to inhibit NSCLC recurrence driven by ALDH-positive CSCs. Thus, the DSF/Cu complex may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients. PMID:27542268

  11. Sulforaphane inhibits CYP1A1 activity and promotes genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fangxing; Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Heping; Liu, Weiping

    2013-06-15

    Increasing environmental pollution by carcinogens such as some of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has prompted growing interest in searching for chemopreventive compounds which are readily obtainable. Sulforaphane (SFN) is isolated from cruciferous vegetables and has the potentials to reduce carcinogenesis through various pathways. In this study, we studied the effects of SFN on CYP1A1 activity and genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The results showed that SFN inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells by directly inhibiting CYP1A1 activity, probably through binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1 revealed by molecular docking. However, SFN promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells and reduced the viability of initiated yeast cells. Besides, it is surprising that SFN also failed to reduce genotoxicity induced by other genotoxic reagents which possess different mechanisms to lead to DNA damage. Currently, it is difficult to predict whether SFN has the potentials to reduce the risk of TCDD based on the conflicting observations in the study. Therefore, further studies should be urgent to reveal the function and mechanism of SFN in the stress of such POPs on human health. - Highlights: • Sulforaphane inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells. • Sulforaphane may bind to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1. • Sulforaphane promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells. • Sulforaphane may promote DNA damage by DNA strand breaks or DNA alkylation.

  12. GABAa and GABAc receptor-mediated modulation of responses to color stimuli: electroretinographic study in the turtle Emys orbicularis.

    PubMed

    Kupenova, Petia; Vitanova, Lily; Popova, Elka

    2010-04-01

    GABAergic transmission is involved in color coding in the retina. The specific contribution of different GABA receptors to spectral sensitivity of the retinal responses is not well characterized. We studied GABAa and GABAc receptor-mediated effects on the intensity-response functions of the electroretinographic ON (b-wave) and OFF (d-wave) responses to color stimuli. For this purpose, we compared the effects of GABAa receptor blockade by bicuculline with the effects of GABAa + GABAc receptor blockade by picrotoxin. The blockade of both GABAa and GABAc receptors caused an amplitude increase of the electroretinographic responses, but the effects of the two blockades depended in a specific manner on stimulus intensity and wavelength. The effects of GABAa receptor blockade showed distinct color ON/OFF asymmetry. The absolute and relative sensitivities of the ON responses to blue stimuli and OFF responses to red stimuli were increased to the greatest degree while the sensitivity of the ON responses to red stimuli and OFF responses to blue stimuli was least increased. In contrast, color ON/OFF asymmetry was not typical of the effects of GABAc receptor blockade. The most prominent GABAc effect was the sensitivity increase of the ON and OFF responses to blue stimuli and, to some lesser extent, to green stimuli. The results of this study indicate a specific role of GABAa and GABAc receptor-mediated influences in processing of chromatic information in the distal retina.

  13. Loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions induce preterm cellular and structural remodeling of the cervix and premature birth.

    PubMed

    Yellon, Steven M; Dobyns, Abigail E; Beck, Hailey L; Kurtzman, James T; Garfield, Robert E; Kirby, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    A decline in serum progesterone or antagonism of progesterone receptor function results in preterm labor and birth. Whether characteristics of premature remodeling of the cervix after antiprogestins or ovariectomy are similar to that at term was the focus of the present study. Groups of pregnant rats were treated with vehicle, a progesterone receptor antagonist (onapristone or mifepristone), or ovariectomized on day 17 postbreeding. As expected, controls given vehicle delivered at term while rats delivered preterm after progesterone receptor antagonist treatment or ovariectomy. Similar to the cervix before term, the preterm cervix of progesterone receptor antagonist-treated rats was characterized by reduced cell nuclei density, decreased collagen content and structure, as well as a greater presence of macrophages per unit area. Thus, loss of nuclear progesterone receptor-mediated actions promoted structural remodeling of the cervix, increased census of resident macrophages, and preterm birth much like that found in the cervix at term. In contrast to the progesterone receptor antagonist-induced advance in characteristics associated with remodeling, ovariectomy-induced loss of systemic progesterone did not affect hypertrophy, extracellular collagen, or macrophage numbers in the cervix. Thus, the structure and macrophage census in the cervix appear sufficient for premature ripening and birth to occur well before term. With progesterone receptors predominantly localized on cells other than macrophages, the findings suggest that interactions between cells may facilitate the loss of progesterone receptor-mediated actions as part of a final common mechanism that remodels the cervix in certain etiologies of preterm and with parturition at term.

  14. Reboxetine enhances the olanzapine-induced antipsychotic-like effect, cortical dopamine outflow and NMDA receptor-mediated transmission.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Monica M; Jardemark, Kent; Malmerfelt, Anna; Björkholm, Carl; Svensson, Torgny H

    2010-08-01

    Preclinical data have shown that addition of the selective norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor reboxetine increases the antipsychotic-like effect of the D(2/3) antagonist raclopride and, in parallel, enhances cortical dopamine output. Subsequent clinical results suggested that adding reboxetine to stable treatments with various antipsychotic drugs (APDs) may improve positive, negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated in rats the effects of adding reboxetine to the second-generation APD olanzapine on: (i) antipsychotic efficacy, using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test, (ii) extrapyramidal side effect (EPS) liability, using a catalepsy test, (iii) dopamine efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals and (iv) cortical N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmission, using intracellular electrophysiological recording in vitro. Reboxetine (6 mg/kg) enhanced the suppression of CAR induced by a suboptimal dose (1.25 mg/kg), but not an optimal (2.5 mg/kg) dose of olanzapine without any concomitant catalepsy. Addition of reboxetine to the low dose of olanzapine also markedly increased cortical dopamine outflow and facilitated prefrontal NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. Our data suggest that adjunctive treatment with a NET inhibitor may enhance the therapeutic effect of low-dose olanzapine in schizophrenia without increasing EPS liability and add an antidepressant action, thus in principle allowing for a dose reduction of olanzapine with a concomitant reduction of dose-related side effects, such as EPS and weight gain.

  15. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins. PMID:16603603

  16. Antigen-Specific Immune Modulation Targets mTORC1 Function To Drive Chemokine Receptor-Mediated T Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weirong; Wan, Xiaoxiao; Ukah, Tobechukwu K; Miller, Mindy M; Barik, Subhasis; Cattin-Roy, Alexis N; Zaghouani, Habib

    2016-11-01

    To contain autoimmunity, pathogenic T cells must be eliminated or diverted from reaching the target organ. Recently, we defined a novel form of T cell tolerance whereby treatment with Ag downregulates expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and prevents diabetogenic Th1 cells from reaching the pancreas, leading to suppression of type 1 diabetes (T1D). This report defines the signaling events underlying Ag-induced chemokine receptor-mediated tolerance. Specifically, we show that the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a major target for induction of CXCR3 downregulation and crippling of Th1 cells. Indeed, Ag administration induces upregulation of programmed death-ligand 1 on dendritic cells in a T cell-dependent manner. In return, programmed death-ligand 1 interacts with the constitutively expressed programmed death-1 on the target T cells and stimulates docking of Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 phosphatase to the cytoplasmic tail of programmed death-1. Active Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2 impairs the signaling function of the PI3K/protein kinase B (AKT) pathway, leading to functional defect of mTORC1, downregulation of CXCR3 expression, and suppression of T1D. Thus, mTORC1 component of the metabolic pathway serves as a target for chemokine receptor-mediated T cell tolerance and suppression of T1D.

  17. Further characterization of the 5-HT receptor mediating vascular relaxation and elevation of cyclic AMP in porcine isolated vena cava.

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, M. J.; Feniuk, W.; Humphrey, P. P.

    1989-01-01

    1. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) produce both smooth muscle relaxation and elevation of tissue adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels in isolated rings of neonatal porcine vena cava. We now present studies attempting to characterize in more detail the 5-HT receptor mediating these responses. 2. Both 5-HT and 5-CT relaxed porcine isolated vena cava rings (EC50 values 200 nM and 4 nM respectively) and elevated tissue cyclic AMP levels (EC50 values 1500 nM and 16 nM respectively). For both responses 5-CT was approximately 50-100 fold more potent than 5-HT. 3. Both 5-CT-induced smooth muscle relaxation and cyclic AMP elevation were potently and specifically antagonized to a similar extent by methiothepin, methysergide and spiperone. 4. At concentrations up to 1 microM, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin, buspirone, ipsapirone, n,n-dipropyl-5-CT, cyanopindolol, RU24969, ketanserin, GR38032 and GR43175 were devoid of both agonist and antagonist activity for both responses. 5. These findings suggest that the same 5-HT1-like receptor mediates both smooth muscle relaxation and elevation of cyclic AMP. This receptor is unlike any known 5-HT1 ligand binding site or adenylate cyclase-coupled 5-HT receptor in brain tissues. PMID:2541857

  18. 5-Carboxamidotryptamine is a selective agonist at 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors mediating vasodilatation and tachycardia in anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, H. E.; Feniuk, W.; Humphrey, P. P.; Perren, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to characterize the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors mediating bronchoconstriction, vasodilatation, vasodepression and tachycardia in anaesthetized cats following bilateral vagosympathectomy and beta-adrenoceptor blockade with propranolol. 5-HT (1-100 micrograms/kg-1 i.v.) caused dose-related bronchoconstriction and tachycardia but variable and complex effects on diastolic blood pressure and carotid arterial vascular resistance. In contrast, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT; 0.01-1 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) caused consistent, dose-related decreases in diastolic blood pressure and carotid arterial vascular resistance and increases in heart rate. 5-CT did not cause bronchoconstriction. The 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction was dose-dependently antagonized by methiothepin, methysergide and ketanserin (10-100 micrograms kg-1 i.v.). The highest doses used of these antagonists did not antagonize bronchoconstriction induced by prostaglandin F2 alpha. The high potency of all three antagonists indicate a 5-HT2-receptor mediated effect. The 5-HT- and 5-CT-induced tachycardia as well as the 5-CT-induced vasodepressor and carotid arterial vasodilator responses were dose-dependently antagonized by low doses of methiothepin (10-100 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) and by high doses of methysergide (100-1000 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) but were little affected by ketanserin in doses up to 1000 micrograms kg-1 i.v. These selective effects of 5-CT appear to be mediated by '5-HT1-like' receptors. PMID:2937503

  19. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials Undergoes Flat Vesiculation and Occurs by Revolution and Self-Rotation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Pengyu; Liang, Junshi; Guo, Ruohai; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and transitional metal dichalcogenide nanosheets, are promising materials for the development of antimicrobial surfaces and the nanocarriers for intracellular therapy. Understanding cell interaction with these emerging materials is an urgently important issue to promoting their wide applications. Experimental studies suggest that two-dimensional nanomaterials enter cells mainly through receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and kinetic pathways of such processes remain unknown. Here, we combine computer simulations and theoretical derivation of the energy within the system to show that the receptor-mediated transport of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheet across model lipid membrane, experiences a flat vesiculation event governed by the receptor density and membrane tension. The graphene nanosheet is found to undergo revolution relative to the membrane and, particularly, unique self-rotation around its normal during membrane wrapping. We derive explicit expressions for the formation of the flat vesiculation, which reveals that the flat vesiculation event can be fundamentally dominated by a dimensionless parameter and a defined relationship determined by complicated energy contributions. The mechanism offers an essential understanding on the cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  20. In Silico and Intuitive Predictions of CYP46A1 Inhibition by Marketed Drugs with Subsequent Enzyme Crystallization in Complex with Fluvoxamine

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Linger, Marlin; Clark, Matthew; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Stout, C. David

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 46A1 (cholesterol 24-hydroxylase) is an important brain enzyme that may be inhibited by structurally distinct pharmaceutical agents both in vitro and in vivo. To identify additional inhibitors of CYP46A1 among U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved therapeutic agents, we used in silico and intuitive predictions and evaluated some of the predicted binders in the enzyme and spectral binding assays. We tested a total of 298 marketed drugs for the inhibition of CYP46A1-mediated cholesterol hydroxylation in vitro and found that 13 of them reduce CYP46A1 activity by >50%. Of these 13 inhibitors, 7 elicited a spectral response in CYP46A1 with apparent spectral Kd values in a low micromolar range. One of the identified tight binders, the widely used antidepressant fluvoxamine, was cocrystallized with CYP46A