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Sample records for a1 receptors a1rs

  1. Is the COL5A1 rs12722 gene polymorphism associated with running economy?

    PubMed

    Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Pasqua, Leonardo A; Bueno, Salomão; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo; Matsuda, Monique; Marquezini, Monica; Saldiva, Paulo H

    2014-01-01

    The COL5A1 rs12722 polymorphism is considered to be a novel genetic marker for endurance running performance. It has been postulated that COL5A1 rs12722 may influence the elasticity of tendons and the energetic cost of running. To date, there are no experimental data in the literature supporting the relationship between range of motion, running economy, and the COL5A1 rs12722 gene polymorphism. Therefore, the main purpose of the current study was to analyze the influence of the COL5A1rs12722 polymorphism on running economy and range of motion. One hundred and fifty (n = 150) physically active young men performed the following tests: a) a maximal incremental treadmill test, b) two constant-speed running tests (10 km · h(-1)) and 12 km · h(-1)) to determine the running economy, and c) a sit-and-reach test to determine the range of motion. All of the subjects were genotyped for the COL5A1 rs12722 single-nucleotide polymorphism. The genotype frequencies were TT = 27.9%, CT = 55.8%, and CC = 16.3%. There were no significant differences between COL5A1 genotypes for running economy measured at 10 km · h(-1) (p = 0.232) and 12 km · h(-1) (p = 0.259). Similarly, there were no significant differences between COL5A1 genotypes for range of motion (p = 0.337). These findings suggest that the previous relationship reported between COL5A1 rs12722 genotypes and running endurance performance might not be mediated by the energetic cost of running.

  2. Is the COL5A1 rs12722 Gene Polymorphism Associated with Running Economy?

    PubMed Central

    Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Pasqua, Leonardo A.; Bueno, Salomão; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo; Matsuda, Monique; Marquezini, Monica; Saldiva, Paulo H.

    2014-01-01

    The COL5A1 rs12722 polymorphism is considered to be a novel genetic marker for endurance running performance. It has been postulated that COL5A1 rs12722 may influence the elasticity of tendons and the energetic cost of running. To date, there are no experimental data in the literature supporting the relationship between range of motion, running economy, and the COL5A1 rs12722 gene polymorphism. Therefore, the main purpose of the current study was to analyze the influence of the COL5A1rs12722 polymorphism on running economy and range of motion. One hundred and fifty (n = 150) physically active young men performed the following tests: a) a maximal incremental treadmill test, b) two constant-speed running tests (10 km•h−1 and 12 km•h−1) to determine the running economy, and c) a sit-and-reach test to determine the range of motion. All of the subjects were genotyped for the COL5A1 rs12722 single-nucleotide polymorphism. The genotype frequencies were TT = 27.9%, CT = 55.8%, and CC = 16.3%. There were no significant differences between COL5A1 genotypes for running economy measured at 10 km•h−1 (p = 0.232) and 12 km•h−1 (p = 0.259). Similarly, there were no significant differences between COL5A1 genotypes for range of motion (p = 0.337). These findings suggest that the previous relationship reported between COL5A1 rs12722 genotypes and running endurance performance might not be mediated by the energetic cost of running. PMID:25188268

  3. A Variant of COL3A1 (rs3134646) Is Associated With Risk of Developing Diverticulosis in White Men.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Matthias Christian; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Krawczyk, Marcin; Jüngst, Christoph; Casper, Markus; Grünhage, Frank; Appenrodt, Beate; Zimmer, Vincent; Weber, Susanne Nicole; Tamelis, Algimantas; Lukosiene, Jaune Ieva; Pauziene, Neringa; Kiudelis, Gediminas; Jonaitis, Laimas; Schramm, Christoph; Goeser, Tobias; Schulz, Antje; Malinowski, Maciej; Glanemann, Matthias; Kupcinskas, Limas; Lammert, Frank

    2018-05-01

    Colonic diverticulosis is one of the most common gastroenterological disorders. Although diverticulosis is typically benign, many individuals develop diverticulitis or other aspects of diverticular disease. Diverticulosis is thought to stem from a complex interaction of environmental, dietary, and genetic factors; however, the contributing genetic factors remain unknown. The aim of our present study was to determine the role of genetic variants within genes encoding for collagens of the connective tissue in diverticulosis. This was a transsectional genetic association study. This study was conducted at three tertiary referral centers in Germany and Lithuania. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in COL3A1 (rs3134646, rs1800255) and COL1A1 (rs1800012) were genotyped in 422 patients with diverticulosis and 285 controls of white descent by using TaqMan assays. The association of colonoscopy-proven diverticulosis with genetic polymorphisms with herniations was assessed in multivariate models. The rs3134646, rs1800255, and rs1800012 variants were significantly associated with the risk of developing diverticulosis in the univariate model; however, these associations were not significant in the multivariate logistic regression analysis including additional nongenetic variables. When selectively analyzing sexes, the genotype AA (AA) in rs3134646 remained significantly associated with diverticulosis in men (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.04-3.20; p = 0.04). Because a candidate approach was used, additional relevant variants could be missed. Within our cohort of patients with diverticulosis, only a small proportion had diverticular disease and thus, we could not examine the variants in these subgroups. Functional studies, including the analysis of the involved collagens, are also warranted. Our study shows that a variant of COL3A1 (rs3134646) is associated with the risk of developing colonic diverticulosis in white men, whereas rs1800255 (COL3A1) and rs1800012 (COL1A1) were not associated

  4. Association of COL1A1 rs1800012 polymorphism with musculoskeletal degenerative diseases: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Binlong; Huang, Donghua; Ma, Kaige; Deng, Xiangyu; Shi, Deyao; Wu, Fashuai; Shao, Zengwu

    2017-09-26

    It has been reported that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1800012 in COL1A1 gene might be linked to the susceptibility of musculoskeletal degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis (OA) and intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD). However, the data from different studies is contradictory. Here we aimed to comprehensively summarize and clarify the relationship between the SNP and musculoskeletal degenerative diseases. Seven eligible studies including 1339 cases and 5406 controls were screened out from PubMed, Web Of Science and Cochrane library databases. Significant association was identified in sub group analysis of IVDD in homozygote model (GG versus TT: OR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.14-0.78, P = 0.012), heterozygote model (GT versus TT: OR = 0.29, 95% CI 0.11-0.72, P = 0.008) and dominant model (GG/GT versus TT: OR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.13-0.74, P = 0.008). Additionally, significant relationship was also found in sub group analysis of severe degree of IVDD in homozygote model (GG versus TT: OR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.15-0.91, P = 0.031), heterozygote model (GT versus TT: OR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.13-0.87, P = 0.024) and dominant model (GG/GT versus TT: OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.14-0.88, P = 0.025). Although no significance was observed, there is a trend that the more G allele at COL1A1 rs1800012 site, the less possibility of IVDD and severe IVDD would happen. Our results indicate that COL1A1 rs1800012 polymorphism associates with the susceptibility of IVDD. However, this polymorphism may not be associated with OA risk.

  5. Association of COL1A1 rs1800012 polymorphism with musculoskeletal degenerative diseases: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Binlong; Huang, Donghua; Ma, Kaige; Deng, Xiangyu; Shi, Deyao; Wu, Fashuai; Shao, Zengwu

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1800012 in COL1A1 gene might be linked to the susceptibility of musculoskeletal degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis (OA) and intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD). However, the data from different studies is contradictory. Here we aimed to comprehensively summarize and clarify the relationship between the SNP and musculoskeletal degenerative diseases. Seven eligible studies including 1339 cases and 5406 controls were screened out from PubMed, Web Of Science and Cochrane library databases. Significant association was identified in sub group analysis of IVDD in homozygote model (GG versus TT: OR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.14–0.78, P = 0.012), heterozygote model (GT versus TT: OR = 0.29, 95% CI 0.11–0.72, P = 0.008) and dominant model (GG/GT versus TT: OR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.13–0.74, P = 0.008). Additionally, significant relationship was also found in sub group analysis of severe degree of IVDD in homozygote model (GG versus TT: OR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.15–0.91, P = 0.031), heterozygote model (GT versus TT: OR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.13–0.87,P = 0.024) and dominant model (GG/GT versus TT: OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.14–0.88, P = 0.025). Although no significance was observed, there is a trend that the more G allele at COL1A1 rs1800012 site, the less possibility of IVDD and severe IVDD would happen. Our results indicate that COL1A1 rs1800012 polymorphism associates with the susceptibility of IVDD. However, this polymorphism may not be associated with OA risk. PMID:29088884

  6. COL8A1 rs13095226 polymorphism shows no association with neovascular age-related macular degeneration or polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy in Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Huang, Lvzhen; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Chunfang; Bai, Yujing; Li, Xiaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the main cause of visual impairment and legal blindness in older individuals. COL8A1 rs13095226 variants have recently been implicated associated with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy (PCV) in American studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the COL8A1 rs13095226 Polymorphism and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) in Chinese people. 900 Chinese subjects-300 cases with nAMD, 300 cases with PCV and 300 controls, were enrolled in a cross-sectional observational study. The diagnoses of nAMD and PCV were confirmed by Fundus photography, Fluorescence Fundus Angiography (FFA) and Indocyanine Green Angiography (ICGA). Genomic DNA was extracted from venous blood leukocytes and genotypes of rs13095226 were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Differences in allele distribution between cases and controls were tested by chi-square tests, with age and gender adjusted by logistic regression analysis. The COL8A1 rs13095226 polymorphism was not statistically significantly different from the nAMD or PCV to the normal controls (P>0.05) in Chinese Population. The association remained insignificant after adjustment for age and gender differences (P>0.05). This case-control study indicated that the COL8A1 rs13095226 polymorphism is not associated with nAMD or PCV, which suggesting this gene maybe not a susceptibility gene locus for nAMD or PCV in Chinese subjects.

  7. CYP7A1-rs3808607 and APOE isoform associate with LDL cholesterol lowering after plant sterol consumption in a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Dylan S; Eck, Peter K; Gebauer, Sarah K; Baer, David J; Jones, Peter Jh

    2015-10-01

    The benefits of plant sterols (PSs) for cholesterol lowering are hampered by large heterogeneity across individuals, potentially because of genetic polymorphisms. We investigated the impact of candidate genetic variations on cholesterol response to PSs in a trial that recruited individuals with high or low endogenous cholesterol synthesis, estimated by lathosterol to cholesterol (L:C) ratio. Mildly hypercholesterolemic adults preselected as possessing either high endogenous cholesterol synthesis (n = 24; mean ± SEM: L:C ratio = 2.03 ± 0.39 μmol/mmol) or low endogenous cholesterol synthesis (n = 39; mean ± SEM: L:C ratio = 0.99 ± 0.28 μmol/mmol) consumed 2 g PS/d or a placebo for 28 d by using a dual-center, single-blind, randomized crossover design. Cholesterol synthesis and change in cholesterol absorption were measured with stable isotopic tracers. Candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms and apolipoprotein E (APOE) isoform were assessed by TaqMan genotyping assay. The cholesterol fractional synthesis rate was higher (P < 0.001) in participants with high endogenous cholesterol synthesis (mean ± SEM: placebo: 9.16% ± 0.47%; PSs: 9.74% ± 0.47%) than in participants with low endogenous cholesterol synthesis (mean ± SEM placebo: 5.72% ± 0.43%; PS: 7.10% ± 0.43%). Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering in response to PSs was associated with individuals' genotypes. Cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1-rs3808607) T/T homozygotes showed no LDL cholesterol lowering (mean ± SEM: -0.05 ± 0.07 mmol/L, P = 0.9999, n = 20), whereas the presence of the G-allele associated with LDL cholesterol response in a dose-dependent fashion (mean ± SEM G/T: -0.22 ± 0.06 mmol/L, P = 0.0006, n = 35; G/G: -0.46 ± 0.12 mmol/L, P = 0.0009, n = 8). Similarly, APOE ɛ3 carriers (mean ± SEM: -0.13 ± 0.05 mmol/L, P = 0.0370, n = 40) responded less than APOE ɛ4 carriers (mean ± SEM: -0.31 ± 0.07 mmol/L, P < 0.0001, n = 23). Moreover, genoset CYP7A1-rs3808607 T

  8. High-Molecular-Weight β-Glucan Decreases Serum Cholesterol Differentially Based on the CYP7A1 rs3808607 Polymorphism in Mildly Hypercholesterolemic Adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanan; Harding, Scott V; Eck, Peter; Thandapilly, Sijo J; Gamel, Tamer H; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Crow, Gary H; Tosh, Susan M; Jones, Peter Jh; Ames, Nancy P

    2016-04-01

    β-Glucan, a soluble fiber with viscous property, has a documented cholesterol-lowering effect. The molecular weight (MW) of β-glucan, which contributes to viscosity, and an individual's genotype might influence the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of β-glucan. This study was designed to determine whether the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of barley β-glucan varied as a function of MW and the daily dose consumed. Our second aim was to determine whether any gene-diet interactions are associated with the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of β-glucan. In a randomized controlled crossover trial, 30 mildly hypercholesterolemic adults [12 men and 18 women, aged 27-78 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 20-40; total cholesterol (TC): 5.0-8.0 mmol/L; LDL cholesterol: 2.7-5.0 mmol/L] were randomly assigned to receive a breakfast that contained either barley β-glucan at 3 g high MW (HMW)/d, 5 g low MW (LMW)/d, or 3 g LMW/d or a control diet, each for 5 wk. The washout period between the phases was 4 wk. Fasting blood samples were collected at the start and end of each phase for blood lipid analysis and genotyping. Consumption of 3 g HMW β-glucan/d lowered TC by -0.12 mmol/L (95% CI: -0.24, -0.006 mmol/L) compared with the control diet (P= 0.0046), but the LMW β-glucan, at either 3 g/d or 5 g/d, did not change serum cholesterol concentrations. This effect of HMW β-glucan was associated with gene-diet interaction, whereby individuals with the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3808607-G allele (GG or GT) of the cytochrome P450 family 7 subfamily A member 1 gene (CYP7A1) had greater responses to 3 g HMW β-glucan/d in lowering TC than TT carriers (P= 0.0006). The HMW β-glucan rather than LMW β-glucan reduced circulating TC effectively in mildly hypercholesterolemic adults. The cholesterol-lowering effect of β-glucan may also be determined by the genetic characteristics of an individual. These data show that individuals carrying theCYP7A1SNP rs3808607-G allele are more

  9. Association between COL11A1 (rs1337185) and ADAMTS5 (rs162509) gene polymorphisms and lumbar spine pathologies in Chinese Han population: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Yang, Qinghua; Jiang, Jie; Zhan, Xinli; Xiao, Zengming

    2017-01-01

    Objectives A previous study identified a significant association between several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) in Indians. To validate the association between these SNPs and specific lumbar spine pathologies, we performed a case–control study in Chinese Han population. Design An observational study. Setting University Hospital in Nanning, China. Participants This study included 428 patients with LDD and 400 normal controls. Outcome measures Patients with LDD were classified into four subgroups, including disc herniation only (subgroup 1), discopathies or/and osteochondrosis associated with disc herniation (subgroup 2), spinal stenosis or/and spondylolisthesis (subgroup 3) and degenerative scoliosis (subgroup 4). This study was conducted by examining two aspects: environmental factors and SNP genotyping. The environmental factors were evaluated with a questionnaire survey including questions about body mass index, smoking habits, the physical demands of their job and exposure to vibrations. Rs1337185, rs5275, rs5277, rs7575934, rs3213718 and rs162509 were genotyped using a PCR-based invader assay. Results The physical workload was significantly higher in patients with lumbar spine pathologies than in the normal controls (p=0.035). The genotype and allele frequencies of rs1337185 and rs162509 were significantly different between the patients with LDD and the normal controls. In rs1337185, a significant association was found between the C allele (risk allele) and the presence of disc herniation (OR=1.80; 95% CI 1.21 to 2.68; p=0.003, adjusted p=0.012) and the presence of spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis (OR=1.92; 95% CI 1.29 to 2.89; p=0.001, adjusted p=0.004). In rs162509, the G allele represented 1.58-fold increased risk to suffer from disc herniation (OR=1.58; 95% CI 1.20 to 2.09; p=0.001, adjusted p=0.004). Conclusion The SNPs rs1337185 in COL11A1 and rs162509 in ADAMTS5 are associated with susceptibility to LDD

  10. Antinociception by systemically-administered acetaminophen (paracetamol) involves spinal serotonin 5-HT7 and adenosine A1 receptors, as well as peripheral adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jean; Reid, Allison R; Sawynok, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used analgesic, but its sites and mechanisms of action remain incompletely understood. Recent studies have separately implicated spinal adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)Rs) and serotonin 5-HT(7) receptors (5-HT(7)Rs) in the antinociceptive effects of systemically administered acetaminophen. In the present study, we determined whether these two actions are linked by delivering a selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist to the spinal cord of mice and examining nociception using the formalin 2% model. In normal and A(1)R wild type mice, antinociception by systemic (i.p.) acetaminophen 300mg/kg was reduced by intrathecal (i.t.) delivery of the selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist SB269970 3μg. In mice lacking A(1)Rs, i.t. SB269970 did not reverse antinociception by systemic acetaminophen, indicating a link between spinal 5-HT(7)R and A(1)R mechanisms. We also explored potential roles of peripheral A(1)Rs in antinociception by acetaminophen administered both locally and systemically. In normal mice, intraplantar (i.pl.) acetaminophen 200μg produced antinociception in the formalin test, and this was blocked by co-administration of the selective A(1)R antagonist DPCPX 4.5μg. Acetaminophen administered into the contralateral hindpaw had no effect, indicating a local peripheral action. When acetaminophen was administered systemically, its antinociceptive effect was reversed by i.pl. DPCPX in normal mice; this was also observed in A(1)R wild type mice, but not in those lacking A(1)Rs. In summary, we demonstrate a link between spinal 5-HT(7)Rs and A(1)Rs in the spinal cord relevant to antinociception by systemic acetaminophen. Furthermore, we implicate peripheral A(1)Rs in the antinociceptive effects of locally- and systemically-administered acetaminophen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adenosine A1 receptor-dependent antinociception induced by inosine in mice: pharmacological, genetic and biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Francisney Pinto; Macedo-Júnior, Sérgio José; Pamplona, Fabrício Alano; Luiz-Cerutti, Murilo; Córdova, Marina Machado; Constantino, Leandra; Tasca, Carla Inês; Dutra, Rafael Cypriano; Calixto, João B; Reid, Allison; Sawynok, Jana; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares

    2015-01-01

    Inosine is an endogenous nucleoside that has anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties. Inosine is a metabolite of adenosine, and some of its actions suggest the involvement of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). The purpose of this study was to better understand mechanisms of inosine-induced antinociception by investigating the role of A1Rs and purine metabolism inhibitors. Inosine antinociception was evaluated using the formalin test in mice. An A1R-selective antagonist (DPCPX), A1R knockout mice (gene deletion) and mice with A1R reduced expression (antisense oligonucleotides) were used to assess the role of A1Rs in the antinociceptive action of inosine. Binding assays were performed to compare the affinity of inosine and adenosine for A1Rs. Finally, the role of adenosine and inosine breakdown was assessed using deoxycoformycin (DCF) and forodesine (FDS) as enzymatic inhibitors of adenosine deaminase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase, respectively. Inosine induced antinociception in the formalin test when given by systemic, spinal and peripheral routes. Systemically, inosine exhibited a potency similar to adenosine, and its effects were inhibited by DPCPX. Inosine did not induce antinociception in A1R knockout mice or in mice with reduced A1R expression. In binding studies, inosine bound to A1Rs with an affinity similar to adenosine. DCF had no effect on inosine actions. FDS augmented the antinociceptive effect of a low systemic dose of inosine and, at a higher dose, induced antinociception by itself. Collectively, these data indicate that inosine is an agonist for A1Rs with antinociceptive properties and a potency similar to adenosine and can be considered another endogenous ligand for this receptor.

  12. Anticonvulsant effect of AMP by direct activation of adenosine A1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Muzzi, Mirko; Coppi, Elisabetta; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Purinergic neurotransmission mediated by adenosine (Ado) type 1 receptors (A1Rs) plays pivotal roles in negative modulation of epileptic seizures, and Ado is thought to be a key endogenous anticonvulsant. Recent evidence, however, indicates that AMP, the metabolic precursor of Ado, also activate A1Rs. Here, we evaluated the antiepileptic effects of AMP adopting in vitro and in vivo models of epilepsy. We report that AMP reversed the increase in population spike (PS) amplitude and the decrease in PS latency induced by a Mg(2+)-free extracellular solution in CA1 neurons of mouse hippocampal slices. The AMP effects were inhibited by the A1R antagonist DPCPX, but not prevented by inhibiting conversion of AMP into Ado, indicating that AMP inhibited per se sustained hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission by directly activating A1Rs. AMP also reduced seizure severity and mortality in a model of audiogenic convulsion. Of note, the anticonvulsant effects of AMP were potentiated by preventing its conversion into Ado and inhibited by DPCPX. When tested in a model of kainate-induced seizure, AMP prolonged latency of convulsions but had no effects on seizure severity and mortality. Data provide the first evidence that AMP is an endogenous anticonvulsant acting at A1Rs. © 2013.

  13. The Heat Shock Cognate Protein hsc73 Assembles with A1 Adenosine Receptors To Form Functional Modules in the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sarrió, Sara; Casadó, Vicent; Escriche, Marisol; Ciruela, Francisco; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    A1 adenosine receptors (A1Rs) are G protein-coupled heptaspanning receptors that interact at the outer face of the plasma membrane with cell surface ecto-adenosine deaminase (ecto-ADA). By affinity chromatography the heat shock cognate protein hsc73 was identified as a cytosolic component able to interact with the third intracellular loop of the receptor. As demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance, purified A1Rs interact specifically with hsc73 with a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range (0.5 ± 0.1 nM). The interaction between hsc73 and A1R led to a marked reduction in the binding of the ligands and prevented activation of G proteins, as deduced from 35S-labeled guanosine-5′-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding assays. Interestingly this effect was stronger than that exerted by guanine nucleotide analogs, which uncouple receptors from G proteins, and was completely prevented by ADA. As assessed by immunoprecipitation a high percentage of A1Rs in cell lysates are coupled to hsc73. A relatively high level of colocalization between A1R and hsc73 was detected in DDT1MF-2 cells by means of confocal microscopy, and no similar results were obtained for other G protein-coupled receptors. Colocalization between hsc73 and A1R was detected in specific regions of rat cerebellum and in the body of cortical neurons but not in dendrites or synapses. Remarkably, agonist-induced receptor internalization leads to the endocytosis of A1Rs by two qualitatively different vesicle types, one in which A1R and hsc73 colocalize and another in which hsc73 is absent. These results open the interesting possibility that signaling via G protein-coupled receptors may be regulated by heat shock proteins. PMID:10866672

  14. Prolonged adenosine A1 receptor activation in hypoxia and pial vessel disruption focal cortical ischemia facilitates clathrin-mediated AMPA receptor endocytosis and long-lasting synaptic inhibition in rat hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses: differential regulation of GluA2 and GluA1 subunits by p38 MAPK and JNK.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhicheng; Xiong, Cherry; Pancyr, Cassandra; Stockwell, Jocelyn; Walz, Wolfgang; Cayabyab, Francisco S

    2014-07-16

    Activation of presynaptic adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) causes substantial synaptic depression during hypoxia/cerebral ischemia, but postsynaptic actions of A1Rs are less clear. We found that A1Rs and GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs) form stable protein complexes from hippocampal brain homogenates and cultured hippocampal neurons from Sprague Dawley rats. In contrast, adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) did not coprecipitate or colocalize with GluA2-containing AMPARs. Prolonged stimulation of A1Rs with the agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) caused adenosine-induced persistent synaptic depression (APSD) in hippocampal brain slices, and APSD levels were blunted by inhibiting clathrin-mediated endocytosis of GluA2 subunits with the Tat-GluA2-3Y peptide. Using biotinylation and membrane fractionation assays, prolonged CPA incubation showed significant depletion of GluA2/GluA1 surface expression from hippocampal brain slices and cultured neurons. Tat-GluA2-3Y peptide or dynamin inhibitor Dynasore prevented CPA-induced GluA2/GluA1 internalization. Confocal imaging analysis confirmed that functional A1Rs, but not A2ARs, are required for clathrin-mediated AMPAR endocytosis in hippocampal neurons. Pharmacological inhibitors or shRNA knockdown of p38 MAPK and JNK prevented A1R-mediated internalization of GluA2 but not GluA1 subunits. Tat-GluA2-3Y peptide or A1R antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine also prevented hypoxia-mediated GluA2/GluA1 internalization. Finally, in a pial vessel disruption cortical stroke model, a unilateral cortical lesion compared with sham surgery reduced hippocampal GluA2, GluA1, and A1R surface expression and also caused synaptic depression in hippocampal slices that was consistent with AMPAR downregulation and decreased probability of transmitter release. Together, these results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for A1R-induced persistent synaptic depression involving clathrin-mediated GluA2 and GluA1 internalization that

  15. Adenosine A1 Receptors Promote Vasa Vasorum Endothelial Cell Barrier Integrity via Gi and Akt-Dependent Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Siddaramappa Umapathy, Nagavedi; Kaczmarek, Elzbieta; Fatteh, Nooreen; Burns, Nana; Lucas, Rudolf; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Verin, Alexander D.; Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia V.

    2013-01-01

    Background In a neonatal model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, a dramatic pulmonary artery adventitial thickening, accumulation of inflammatory cells in the adventitial compartment, and angiogenic expansion of the vasa vasorum microcirculatory network are observed. These pathophysiological responses suggest that rapidly proliferating vasa vasorum endothelial cells (VVEC) may exhibit increased permeability for circulating blood cells and macromolecules. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these observations remain unexplored. Some reports implicated extracellular adenosine in the regulation of vascular permeability under hypoxic and inflammatory conditions. Thus, we aimed to determine the role of adenosine in barrier regulation of VVEC isolated from the pulmonary arteries of normoxic (VVEC-Co) or chronically hypoxic (VVEC-Hyp) neonatal calves. Principal Findings We demonstrate via a transendothelial electrical resistance measurement that exogenous adenosine significantly enhanced the barrier function in VVEC-Co and, to a lesser extent, in VVEC-Hyp. Our data from a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction show that both VVEC-Co and VVEC-Hyp express all four adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3), with the highest expression level of A1 receptors (A1Rs). However, A1R expression was significantly lower in VVEC-Hyp compared to VVEC-Co. By using an A1R-specific agonist/antagonist and siRNA, we demonstrate that A1Rs are mostly responsible for adenosine-induced enhancement in barrier function. Adenosine-induced barrier integrity enhancement was attenuated by pretreatment of VVEC with pertussis toxin and GSK690693 or LY294002, suggesting the involvement of Gi proteins and the PI3K-Akt pathway. Moreover, we reveal a critical role of actin cytoskeleton in VVEC barrier regulation by using specific inhibitors of actin and microtubule polymerization. Further, we show that adenosine pretreatment blocked the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF

  16. Adenosine A1 Receptor Antagonism Abolished the Anti-seizure Effects of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk Rats.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Zsolt; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Dobolyi, Arpád; Ari, Csilla

    2017-01-01

    The state of therapeutic ketosis can be achieved by using the ketogenic diet (KD) or exogenous ketone supplementation. It was suggested previously that the adenosinergic system may be involved in the mediating effect of KD on suppressing seizure activity in different types of epilepsies, likely by means of adenosine A 1 receptors (A 1 Rs). Thus, we tested in the present study whether exogenous ketone supplements (ketone ester: KE, 2.5 g/kg/day; ketone salt/KS + medium chain triglyceride/MCT: KSMCT, 2.5 g/kg/day) applied sub-chronically (for 7 days) by intragastric gavage can modulate absence epileptic activity in genetically absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. The number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) significantly and similarly decreased after both KE and KSMCT treatment between 3rd and 7th days of gavage. Moreover, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) levels were significantly increased alike after KE and KSMCT gavage, compared to control levels. The SWD number and βHB levels returned to the baseline levels on the first day without ketone supplementation. To determine whether A 1 Rs can modify ketone supplement-evoked changes in absence epileptic activity, we applied a non-pro-epileptic dose of a specific A 1 R antagonist DPCPX (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine) (intraperitoneal/i.p. 0.2 mg/kg) in combination with KSMCT (2.5 g/kg/day, gavage). As expected, DPCPX abolished the KSMCT-evoked decrease in SWD number. Thus, we concluded that application of exogenous ketone supplements may decrease absence epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats. Moreover, our results suggest that among others the adenosinergic system, likely via A 1 Rs, may modulate the exogenous ketone supplements-evoked anti-seizure effects.

  17. Adenosine A1 Receptor Antagonism Abolished the Anti-seizure Effects of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Zsolt; D’Agostino, Dominic P.; Dobolyi, Arpád; Ari, Csilla

    2017-01-01

    The state of therapeutic ketosis can be achieved by using the ketogenic diet (KD) or exogenous ketone supplementation. It was suggested previously that the adenosinergic system may be involved in the mediating effect of KD on suppressing seizure activity in different types of epilepsies, likely by means of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). Thus, we tested in the present study whether exogenous ketone supplements (ketone ester: KE, 2.5 g/kg/day; ketone salt/KS + medium chain triglyceride/MCT: KSMCT, 2.5 g/kg/day) applied sub-chronically (for 7 days) by intragastric gavage can modulate absence epileptic activity in genetically absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. The number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) significantly and similarly decreased after both KE and KSMCT treatment between 3rd and 7th days of gavage. Moreover, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) levels were significantly increased alike after KE and KSMCT gavage, compared to control levels. The SWD number and βHB levels returned to the baseline levels on the first day without ketone supplementation. To determine whether A1Rs can modify ketone supplement-evoked changes in absence epileptic activity, we applied a non-pro-epileptic dose of a specific A1R antagonist DPCPX (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine) (intraperitoneal/i.p. 0.2 mg/kg) in combination with KSMCT (2.5 g/kg/day, gavage). As expected, DPCPX abolished the KSMCT-evoked decrease in SWD number. Thus, we concluded that application of exogenous ketone supplements may decrease absence epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats. Moreover, our results suggest that among others the adenosinergic system, likely via A1Rs, may modulate the exogenous ketone supplements-evoked anti-seizure effects. PMID:28790891

  18. AMP is an adenosine A1 receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Rittiner, Joseph E; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Frye, Stephen V; Zylka, Mark J

    2012-02-17

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5'-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A(2B) receptor (A(2B)R) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A(1)R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A(1)R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A(1)R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A(1)R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine.

  19. Anxiolytic Effect of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation Is Abolished by Adenosine A1 Receptor Inhibition in Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Zsolt; D'Agostino, Dominic P.; Ari, Csilla

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health problems worldwide, but the exact pathophysiology remains largely unknown. It has been demonstrated previously that administration of exogenous ketone supplement KSMCT (ketone salt/KS + medium chain triglyceride/MCT oil) by intragastric gavage for 7 days decreased the anxiety level in genetically absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. To investigate the potential role of the adenosinergic system in the pathomechanism of anxiety we tested whether the inhibition of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) influence the anxiolytic effect of the exogenous ketone supplement. As A1Rs may mediate such an effect, in the present study we used a specific A1R antagonist, DPCPX (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine) to test whether it modulates the anxiolytic effect of sub-chronically (7 days) applied KSMCT in the previously tested animal model by using elevated plus maze (EPM) test. We administered KSMCT (2.5 g/kg/day) alone by intragastric gavage and in combination with intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected of DPCPX in two doses (lower: 0.15 mg/kg, higher: 0.25 mg/kg). Control groups represented i.p saline and water gavage with or without i.p. DPCPX administration (2.5 g/kg/day). After treatments, the level of blood glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), as well as body weight were recorded. KSMCT alone significantly increased the time spent in the open arms and decreased the time spent in the closed arms, supporting our previous results. Injection of lower dose of DPCPX decreased, while higher dose of DPCPX abolished the effect of KSMCT administration on EPM. Blood βHB levels were significantly increased after administration of KSMCT, while DPCPX did not change the KSMCT induced increase in blood βHB levels. These results demonstrate that A1R inhibition modified (decreased) the anti-anxiety effect of KSMCT administration implying that the adenosinergic system, likely via A1Rs, may modulate the exogenous

  20. Anxiolytic Effect of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation Is Abolished by Adenosine A1 Receptor Inhibition in Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk Rats.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Zsolt; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Ari, Csilla

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health problems worldwide, but the exact pathophysiology remains largely unknown. It has been demonstrated previously that administration of exogenous ketone supplement KSMCT (ketone salt/KS + medium chain triglyceride/MCT oil) by intragastric gavage for 7 days decreased the anxiety level in genetically absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. To investigate the potential role of the adenosinergic system in the pathomechanism of anxiety we tested whether the inhibition of adenosine A 1 receptors (A 1 Rs) influence the anxiolytic effect of the exogenous ketone supplement. As A 1 Rs may mediate such an effect, in the present study we used a specific A 1 R antagonist, DPCPX (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine) to test whether it modulates the anxiolytic effect of sub-chronically (7 days) applied KSMCT in the previously tested animal model by using elevated plus maze (EPM) test. We administered KSMCT (2.5 g/kg/day) alone by intragastric gavage and in combination with intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected of DPCPX in two doses (lower: 0.15 mg/kg, higher: 0.25 mg/kg). Control groups represented i.p saline and water gavage with or without i.p. DPCPX administration (2.5 g/kg/day). After treatments, the level of blood glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), as well as body weight were recorded. KSMCT alone significantly increased the time spent in the open arms and decreased the time spent in the closed arms, supporting our previous results. Injection of lower dose of DPCPX decreased, while higher dose of DPCPX abolished the effect of KSMCT administration on EPM. Blood βHB levels were significantly increased after administration of KSMCT, while DPCPX did not change the KSMCT induced increase in blood βHB levels. These results demonstrate that A 1 R inhibition modified (decreased) the anti-anxiety effect of KSMCT administration implying that the adenosinergic system, likely via A 1 Rs, may modulate the

  1. AMP Is an Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist*

    PubMed Central

    Rittiner, Joseph E.; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5′-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A1R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A1R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A1R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A1R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine. PMID:22215671

  2. Dual blockade of the A1 and A2A adenosine receptor prevents amyloid beta toxicity in neuroblastoma cells exposed to aluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Giunta, Salvatore; Andriolo, Violetta; Castorina, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    In a previous work we have shown that exposure to aluminum (Al) chloride (AlCl3) enhanced the neurotoxicity of the amyloid beta(25-35) fragment (Abeta(25-35)) in neuroblastoma cells and affected the expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related genes. Caffein, a compound endowed with beneficial effects against AD, exerts neuroprotection primarily through its antagonist activity on A2A adenosine receptors (A2AR), although it also inhibits A1Rs with similar potency. Still, studies on the specific involvement of these receptors in neuroprotection in a model of combined neurotoxicity (Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3) are missing. To address this issue, cultured SH-SY5Y cells exposed to Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3 were assessed for cell viability, morphology, intracellular ROS activity and expression of apoptosis-, stress- and AD-related proteins. To define the role of A1R and A2ARs, pretreatment with caffein, specific receptor antagonists (DPCPX or SCH58261) or siRNA-mediated gene knockdown were delivered. Results indicate that AlCl3 treatment exacerbated Abeta(25-35) toxicity, increased ROS production, lipid peroxidation, β-secretase-1 (BACE1) and amyloid precursor protein (APP). Interestingly, SCH58261 successfully prevented toxicity associated to Abeta(25-35) only, whereas pretreatment with both DPCPX and SCH58261 was required to fully avert Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3-induced damage, suggesting that A1Rs might also be critically involved in protection during combined toxicity. The effects of caffein were mimicked by both N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, and desferrioxamine, likely acting through distinct mechanisms. Altogether, our data establish a novel protective function associated with A1R inhibition in the setting of combined Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3 neurotoxicity, and expand our current knowledge on the potential beneficial role of caffein to prevent AD progression in subjects environmentally exposed to aluminum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sex Differences in the Neurotoxic Effects of Adenosine A1 Receptor Antagonism During Ethanol Withdrawal: Reversal With an A1 Receptor Agonist or an NMDA Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Tracy R.; Smith, Katherine J.; Self, Rachel L.; Braden, Brittany B.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Neuronal adaptations that occur during chronic ethanol (EtOH) exposure have been observed to sensitize the brain to excitotoxic insult during withdrawal. The adenosine receptor system warrants further examination in this regard, as recent evidence has implicated adenosine receptor involvement in the behavioral effects of both EtOH exposure and withdrawal. Methods The current studies examined effects of adenosine A1 receptor manipulation on neuronal injury in EtOH-naïve and EtOH-withdrawn male and female rat hippocampal slice cultures. EtOH-naïve and EtOH pretreated (43.1 to 26.9 mM from days 5 to 15 DIV) cultures were exposed to the A1 receptor agonist 2-Chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA; 10 nM), the A1 receptor antagonist 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX;10 nM), or the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist D,L,-2-amino-5-phosphovalerate (APV; 20 μM) at 15 days in vitro (DIV). Cytotoxicity was measured in the primary neuronal layers of the dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1 hippocampal regions by quantification of propidium iodide (PI) fluorescence after 24 hours. Immunohistochemical analysis of A1 receptor abundance was conducted in EtOH-naïve and EtOH pretreated slice cultures at 15 DIV. Results Twenty-four hour exposure to DPCPX in EtOH-naïve slice cultures did not produced neurotoxicity in any region of slice cultures. Though withdrawal from 10 day EtOH exposure produced no toxicity in either male or female slice cultures, exposure to DPCPX during 24 hours of EtOH withdrawal produced a marked increase in PI uptake in all hippocampal culture subregions in female cultures (to ~160% of control values). A significant effect for sex was observed in the CA1 region such that toxicity in females cultures exposed to the A1 antagonist during withdrawal was greater than that observed in male cultures. These effects of DPCPX in EtOH withdrawn female and male slices were prevented by co-exposure to either the A1 agonist CCPA or the NMDA

  4. Adenosine receptors and muscarinic receptors cooperate in acetylcholine release modulation in the neuromuscular synapse.

    PubMed

    Santafe, M M; Priego, M; Obis, T; Garcia, N; Tomàs, M; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are present in the motor terminals at the mouse neuromuscular junction. ARs and the presynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) share the functional control of the neuromuscular junction. We analysed their mutual interaction in transmitter release modulation. In electrophysiological experiments with unaltered synaptic transmission (muscles paralysed by blocking the voltage-dependent sodium channel of the muscle cells with μ-conotoxin GIIIB), we found that: (i) a collaborative action between different AR subtypes reduced synaptic depression at a moderate activity level (40 Hz); (ii) at high activity levels (100 Hz), endogenous adenosine production in the synaptic cleft was sufficient to reduce depression through A1 -type receptors (A1 Rs) and A2 A-type receptors (A2 A Rs); (iii) when the non-metabolizable 2-chloroadenosine (CADO) agonist was used, both the quantal content and depression were reduced; (iv) the protective effect of CADO on depression was mediated by A1 Rs, whereas A2 A Rs seemed to modulate A1 Rs; (v) ARs and mAChRs absolutely depended upon each other for the modulation of evoked and spontaneous acetylcholine release in basal conditions and in experimental conditions with CADO stimulation; (vi) the purinergic and muscarinic mechanisms cooperated in the control of depression by sharing a common pathway although the purinergic control was more powerful than the muscarinic control; and (vii) the imbalance of the ARs created by using subtype-selective and non-selective inhibitory and stimulatory agents uncoupled protein kinase C from evoked transmitter release. In summary, ARs (A1 Rs, A2 A Rs) and mAChRs (M1 , M2 ) cooperated in the control of activity-dependent synaptic depression and may share a common protein kinase C pathway. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A ketogenic diet suppresses seizures in mice through adenosine A₁ receptors.

    PubMed

    Masino, Susan A; Li, Tianfu; Theofilas, Panos; Sandau, Ursula S; Ruskin, David N; Fredholm, Bertil B; Geiger, Jonathan D; Aronica, Eleonora; Boison, Detlev

    2011-07-01

    A ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate metabolic regimen; its effectiveness in the treatment of refractory epilepsy suggests that the mechanisms underlying its anticonvulsive effects differ from those targeted by conventional antiepileptic drugs. Recently, KD and analogous metabolic strategies have shown therapeutic promise in other neurologic disorders, such as reducing brain injury, pain, and inflammation. Here, we have shown that KD can reduce seizures in mice by increasing activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). When transgenic mice with spontaneous seizures caused by deficiency in adenosine metabolism or signaling were fed KD, seizures were nearly abolished if mice had intact A1Rs, were reduced if mice expressed reduced A1Rs, and were unaltered if mice lacked A1Rs. Seizures were restored by injecting either glucose (metabolic reversal) or an A1R antagonist (pharmacologic reversal). Western blot analysis demonstrated that the KD reduced adenosine kinase, the major adenosine-metabolizing enzyme. Importantly, hippocampal tissue resected from patients with medically intractable epilepsy demonstrated increased adenosine kinase. We therefore conclude that adenosine deficiency may be relevant to human epilepsy and that KD can reduce seizures by increasing A1R-mediated inhibition.

  6. Adenosine A1 receptor stimulation reduces D1 receptor-mediated GABAergic transmission from striato-nigral terminals and attenuates l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in dopamine-denervated mice.

    PubMed

    Mango, Dalila; Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Ledonne, Ada; Cappellacci, Loredana; Petrelli, Riccardo; Nisticò, Robert; Berretta, Nicola; Fisone, Gilberto; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio

    2014-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABAAR)-mediated postsynaptic currents were recorded in brain slices from substantia nigra pars reticulate neurons. The selective adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), increased the frequency, but not the amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in the presence of the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 (SKF) and phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitors (papaverine or AE90074). Under these conditions, DPCPX also increased the amplitude of evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs). The effect of DPCPX was also examined in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD), generated by unilateral denervation of the dopaminergic input to the striatum. In this model, SKF alone was sufficient to increase sIPSCs frequency and eIPSCs amplitude, and these effects were not potentiated by DPCPX. To confirm a depressive effect of A1Rs on the synaptic release of GABA we used the selective A1R agonist 5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N(6)-(±)-(endo-norborn-2-yl)adenosine (5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA) which has limited peripheral actions. We found that 5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA decreased sIPSCs frequency, without affecting their amplitude, and decreased eIPSCs amplitude. Importantly, in the PD mouse model, 5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA prevented the increase in sIPSC frequency and eIPSC amplitude produced by SKF. Since exaggerated DA transmission along the striato-nigral pathway is involved in the motor complications (e.g. dyskinesia) caused by prolonged and intermittent administration of l-DOPA, we examined the effect of A1R activation in mice with unilateral DA denervation. We found that 5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA, administered in combination with l-DOPA, reduced the development of abnormal involuntary movements. These results indicate the potential benefit of A1R agonists for the treatment of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and hyperkinetic disorders providing a mechanistic framework for the study of the interaction between DA and adenosine in the striatonigral

  7. Downregulation of adenosine and adenosine 1 receptor contributes to neuropathic pain in resiniferatoxin neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kan, Hung-Wei; Chang, Chin-Hong; Lin, Chih-Lung; Lee, Yi-Chen; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang; Hsieh, Yu-Lin

    2018-04-16

    The neurochemical effects of adenosine signaling in small-fiber neuropathy leading to neuropathic pain are yet to be explored in a direct manner. This study examined this system at the level of ligand (via the ectonucleotidase activity of prostatic acid phosphatase, PAP) and adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) in resiniferatoxin (RTX) neuropathy, a peripheral neurodegenerative disorder which specifically affects nociceptive nerves expressing transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1). We conducted immunohistochemistry on dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for functional assays, and pharmacological interventions to alter PAP and A1Rs in mice with RTX neuropathy. In DRG of RTX neuropathy, PAP(+) neurons were reduced compared with vehicle-treated mice (P = 0.002) . Functionally, PAP ectonucleotidase activity was consequently reduced (i.e., the content of adenosine in DRG, P = 0.012). PAP(+) neuronal density was correlated with the degree of mechanical allodynia, which was reversed by intrathecal lumbar puncture (i.t.) injection of recombinant PAP with a dose-dependent effect. Furthermore, A1Rs were downregulated (P = 0.002), and this downregulation was colocalized with the TRPV1 receptor (31.0% ± 2.8%). Mechanical allodynia was attenuated in a dose-dependent response by i.t. injection of the A1R ligand, adenosine; however, no analgesia was evident when an exogenous adenosine was blocked by A1R antagonist. This study demonstrated dual mechanisms of neuropathic pain in TRPV1-induced neuropathy, involving a reduced adenosine system at both the ligand (adenosine) and receptor (A1Rs) levels.

  8. A new ephrin-A1 isoform (ephrin-A1b) with altered receptor binding properties abrogates the cleavage of ephrin-A1a.

    PubMed

    Finne, Eivind F; Munthe, Else; Aasheim, Hans-Christian

    2004-04-01

    Ephrins are ligands for the Eph receptor tyrosine kinases, which play important roles in patterning nervous and vascular systems. Ephrin-A1 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand that binds to the EphA receptor tyrosine kinases. In the present study, we have identified a new ephrin-A1 isoform, denoted ephrin-A1b (ephrin-A1 isoform b). Compared with the originally described ephrin-A1 sequence, ephrin-A1a [Holzman, Marks and Dixit (1990) Mol. Cell. Biol. 10, 5830-5838], ephrin-A1b lacks a segment of 22 amino acids (residues 131-152). At the transcript level, exon 3 is spliced out in the transcript encoding ephrin-A1b. Transfection of HEK-293T cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells) with an ephrin-A1b-expressing plasmid resulted in a significant expression of the protein on the cell surface. However, soluble EphA2 receptor (EphA2-Fc) bound weakly to ephrin-A1b-expressing transfectants, but bound strongly to ephrin-A1a-expressing transfectants. Ephrins have been shown to undergo regulated cleavage after interaction with their receptors. This process is inhibited by co-expression of ephrin-A1a and ephrin-A1b, indicating that ephrin-A1b influences the cleavage process. Taken together, these findings indicate that this newly described isoform may regulate the function of its ephrin-A1a counterpart.

  9. CYP7A1-rs3808607 and APOE isoform associate with LDL cholesterol lowering after plant sterol consumption in a randomized clinical trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The benefits of plant sterols (PS) for cholesterol lowering are hampered by large heterogeneity across individuals, potentially due to genetic polymorphisms. We investigated the impact of candidate genetic variations on cholesterol response to PS, in a trial which recruited individuals with high or ...

  10. Pharmacochaperoning of the A1 adenosine receptor is contingent on the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Málaga-Diéguez, Laura; Yang, Qiong; Bauer, Jan; Pankevych, Halyna; Freissmuth, Michael; Nanoff, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Exchanging each of the conserved aromatic residues of the NPxxY(x)(5,6)F sequence (at the boundary of helices 7 and 8) generated variants of the A(1) adenosine receptor that were retained within the cell. The mutations disconnected a link between alpha-helix 7 and cytosolic helix 8, likely destabilizing the structure of the proximal carboxyl terminus. The mutant receptors were rescued by incubation of cells with a pharmacochaperone, a membrane-permeable ligand that homosterically binds to the receptor; pharmacochaperoning restored the density of functional receptors at the plasma membrane. The following observations support the assumption that retention and the site of pharmacochaperone action were within bounds of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER): 1) the retained receptor colocalized with an ER marker; 2) pharmacochaperoning initiated receptor transfer to Golgi stacks; and 3) the inhibitor of glycoprotein synthesis tunicamycin suppressed receptor chaperoning. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that pharmacochaperoning stabilizes the structure of late folding intermediates and lifts a block on maturation, allowing the receptors to exit from the ER. We suggest that the ER-associated 40-kDa heat shock protein family member D(1) receptor interacting protein 78 (DRiP78; M(r), approximately 78,000) represents a model executor of quality control. Overexpressed DRiP78 interacted physically with the A(1) receptor, inhibited export to the plasma membrane, and in this action was selective for the mutants relative to the wild-type receptor. Both agonist and antagonist were effective chaperone ligands. Thus, occupancy of the binding pocket corrected the mutation-induced disorder, indicating a mutual impingement of the transmembrane domain and the proximal carboxyl terminus in establishing the stable receptor fold.

  11. Adenosine A1 receptor inhibits postnatal neurogenesis and sustains astrogliogenesis from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Benito-Muñoz, Monica; Matute, Carlos; Cavaliere, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that activation of ATP P2X receptors during oxygen and glucose deprivation inhibits neuroblast migration and in vitro neurogenesis from the subventricular zone (SVZ). Here, we have studied the effects of adenosine, the natural end-product of ATP hydrolysis, in modulating neurogenesis and gliogenesis from the SVZ. We provide immunochemical, molecular and pharmacological evidence that adenosine via A1 receptors reduces neuronal differentiation of neurosphere cultures generated from postnatal SVZ. Furthermore, activation of A1 receptors induces downregulation of genes related to neurogenesis as demonstrated by gene expression analysis. Specifically, we found that A1 receptors trigger a signaling cascade that, through the release of IL10, turns on the Bmp2/SMAD pathway. Furthermore, activating A1 receptors in SVZ-neural progenitor cells inhibits neurogenesis and stimulates astrogliogenesis as assayed in vitro in neurosphere cultures and in vivo in the olfactory bulb. Together, these data indicate that adenosine acting at A1 receptors negatively regulates adult neurogenesis while promoting astrogliogenesis, and that this feature may be relevant to pathological conditions whereby purines are profusely released. GLIA 2016;64:1465-1478. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. 5'-Carbamoyl derivatives of 2'-C-methyl-purine nucleosides as selective A1 adenosine receptor agonists: affinity, efficacy, and selectivity for A1 receptor from different species.

    PubMed

    Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Vita, Patrizia; Petrelli, Riccardo; Lavecchia, Antonio; Costa, Barbara; Spinetti, Francesca; Martini, Claudia; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Grifantini, Mario

    2008-01-01

    A series of 5'-carbamoyl and 5'-thionocarbamoyl derivatives of 2'-C-methyl analogues of the A(1) adenosine receptor (A(1)AR) full agonists N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), N(6)-[3-(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl]adenosine (tecadenoson), and 2-chloro analogue (2-Cl-tecadenoson) was synthesized and evaluated for their affinity for adenosine receptor subtypes from bovine, porcine, and human species. In the N(6)-cyclopentylamino series, the 5'-substituted derivatives showed a reduced affinity at the bovine A(1)AR compared to the parent compounds; however, the selectivity for A(1) versus A(2A) receptor was retained or increased. The corresponding N(6)-3-(R)-tetrahydrofuranylamino analogues displayed a very low affinity toward the bovine A(1)AR. The 5'-methylthionocarbamoyl derivative of 2'-Me-CCPA showed the best affinity at porcine A(1)AR with a K(i) value of 13 nM. At human AR subtypes tecadenoson derivatives showed 2.3- to 5-fold lower affinity at A(1)AR and very low affinity at the other subtypes (A(2A), A(2B), and A(3)) compared to the corresponding N(6)-cyclopentyl analogues. The 5'-carbamoyl and 5'-thionocarbamoyl derivatives of 2'-Me-CCPA 3, 4, 7 and tecadenoson derivative 12 were found to be partial A(1) agonists at the porcine receptor. Docking studies explained the lower affinity of N(6)-3-(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl-substituted compounds at bovine A(1)AR compared to that of N(6)-cyclopentyl analogues, showing that the oxygen of the tetrahydrofuranyl ring establishes unfavorable electrostatic interactions with the CO oxygen of Asn254. The low binding affinity of the 2'-C-methyl-N(6)-3-(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl adenosine analogues at human A(1)AR may be ascribed to the presence of unfavorable interactions between the hydrophilic tetrahydrofuranyl ring and the surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu250 (TM6) and Ile274 (TM7).

  13. Dynamic Regulation of FoxA1 by Steroid Receptors | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a key regulator in breast cancer initiation and progression. A widely discussed model proposes that forkhead box protein A1 (FoxA1) acts as a pioneer factor in cancer by binding and penetrating closed chromatin to allow access by transcription factors (TFs), including ER.

  14. Dopamine D1 and adenosine A1 receptors form functionally interacting heteromeric complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ginés, Silvia; Hillion, Joëlle; Torvinen, Maria; Le Crom, Stèphane; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Rondin, Sofia; Lew, Jow Y.; Watson, Stanley; Zoli, Michele; Agnati, Luigi Francesco; Vernier, Philippe; Lluis, Carmen; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Franco, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    The possible molecular basis for the previously described antagonistic interactions between adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) and dopamine D1 receptors (D1R) in the brain have been studied in mouse fibroblast Ltk− cells cotransfected with human A1R and D1R cDNAs or with human A1R and dopamine D2 receptor (long-form) (D2R) cDNAs and in cortical neurons in culture. A1R and D1R, but not A1R and D2R, were found to coimmunoprecipitate in cotransfected fibroblasts. This selective A1R/D1R heteromerization disappeared after pretreatment with the D1R agonist, but not after combined pretreatment with D1R and A1R agonists. A high degree of A1R and D1R colocalization, demonstrated in double immunofluorescence experiments with confocal laser microscopy, was found in both cotransfected fibroblast cells and cortical neurons in culture. On the other hand, a low degree of A1R and D2R colocalization was observed in cotransfected fibroblasts. Pretreatment with the A1R agonist caused coclustering (coaggregation) of A1R and D1R, which was blocked by combined pretreatment with the D1R and A1R agonists in both fibroblast cells and in cortical neurons in culture. Combined pretreatment with D1R and A1R agonists, but not with either one alone, substantially reduced the D1R agonist-induced accumulation of cAMP. The A1R/D1R heteromerization may be one molecular basis for the demonstrated antagonistic modulation of A1R of D1R receptor signaling in the brain. The persistence of A1R/D1R heteromerization seems to be essential for the blockade of A1R agonist-induced A1R/D1R coclustering and for the desensitization of the D1R agonist-induced cAMP accumulation seen on combined pretreatment with D1R and A1R agonists, which indicates a potential role of A1R/D1R heteromers also in desensitization mechanisms and receptor trafficking. PMID:10890919

  15. C-nucleoside analogues of furanfurin as ligands to A1 adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Franchetti, P; Cappellacci, L; Marchetti, S; Martini, C; Costa, B; Varani, K; Borea, P A; Grifantini, M

    2000-09-01

    Furanfurin (2-beta-D-ribofuranosylfuran-4-carboxamide) derivatives and analogues were synthesized and their affinity for adenosine receptors was determined. The agonistic behavior of furanfurin against A1 receptors is preserved only when the furan ring is substituted with isosteric pentatomic ring systems such as oxazole, thiazole or thiophene, and the carboxamide group is unsubstituted. Replacement of the hydrogen atoms of the carboxamide group with alkyl, cycloalkyl or arylalkyl groups generates compounds endowed with moderate antagonistic activity.

  16. Involvement of A1 adenosine receptors in osmotic volume regulation of retinal glial cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Antje; Lipp, Stephan; Pannicke, Thomas; Linnertz, Regina; Färber, Katrin; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Osmotic swelling of Müller glial cells has been suggested to contribute to retinal edema. We determined the role of adenosine signaling in the inhibition of Müller cell swelling in the murine retina. Methods The size of Müller cell somata was recorded before and during perfusion of retinal sections and isolated Müller cells with a hypoosmolar solution. Retinal tissues were freshly isolated from wild-type mice and mice deficient in A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR−/−), or cultured as whole-mounts for three days. The potassium conductance of Müller cells was recorded in isolated cells, and retinal slices were immunostained against Kir4.1. Results Hypotonic exposure for 4 min induced a swelling of Müller cell bodies in retinal slices from A1AR−/− mice but not wild-type mice. Pharmacological inhibition of A1 receptors or of the ecto-5′-nucleotidase induced hypoosmotic swelling of Müller cells from wild-type mice. Exogenous adenosine prevented the swelling of Müller cells from wild-type but not A1AR−/− mice. The antiinflammatory corticosteroid, triamcinolone acetonide, inhibited the swelling of Müller cells from wild-type mice; this effect was blocked by an antagonist of A1 receptors. The potassium conductance of Müller cells and the Kir4.1 immunolabeling of retinal slices were not different between A1AR−/− and wild-type mice, both in freshly isolated tissues and retinal organ cultures. Conclusions The data suggest that autocrine activation of A1 receptors by extracellularly generated adenosine mediates the volume homeostasis of Müller cells in the murine retina. The swelling-inhibitory effect of triamcinolone is mediated by enhancement of endogenous adenosine signaling. PMID:19756184

  17. Adenosine transiently modulates stimulated dopamine release in the caudate putamen via A1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ashley E.; Venton, B. Jill

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine modulates dopamine in the brain via A1 and A2A receptors, but that modulation has only been characterized on a slow time scale. Recent studies have characterized a rapid signaling mode of adenosine that suggests a possible rapid modulatory role. Here, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the extent to which transient adenosine changes modulate stimulated dopamine release (5 pulses at 60 Hz) in rat caudate putamen brain slices. Exogenous adenosine was applied and dopamine concentration monitored. Adenosine only modulated dopamine when it was applied 2 or 5 s before stimulation. Longer time intervals and bath application of 5 µM adenosine did not decrease dopamine release. Mechanical stimulation of endogenous adenosine 2s before dopamine stimulation also decreased stimulated dopamine release by 41 ± 7 %, similar to the 54 ± 6 % decrease in dopamine after exogenous adenosine application. Dopamine inhibition by transient adenosine was recovered within 10 minutes. The A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) blocked the dopamine modulation, whereas dopamine modulation was unaffected by the A2A receptor antagonist SCH 442416. Thus, transient adenosine changes can transiently modulate phasic dopamine release via A1 receptors. These data demonstrate that adenosine has a rapid, but transient, modulatory role in the brain. PMID:25219576

  18. The A1 adenosine receptor as a new player in microglia physiology.

    PubMed

    Luongo, L; Guida, F; Imperatore, R; Napolitano, F; Gatta, L; Cristino, L; Giordano, C; Siniscalco, D; Di Marzo, V; Bellini, G; Petrelli, R; Cappellacci, L; Usiello, A; de Novellis, V; Rossi, F; Maione, S

    2014-01-01

    The purinergic system is highly involved in the regulation of microglial physiological processes. In addition to the accepted roles for the P2 X4,7 and P2 Y12 receptors activated by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate, respectively, recent evidence suggests a role for the adenosine A2A receptor in microglial cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, the expression and function of adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) in microglia is still unclear. Several reports have demonstrated possible expression of A1AR in microglia, but a new study has refuted such evidence. In this study, we investigated the presence and function of A1AR in microglia using biomolecular techniques, live microscopy, live calcium imaging, and in vivo electrophysiological approaches. The aim of this study was to clarify the expression of A1AR in microglia and to highlight its possible roles. We found that microglia express A1AR and that it is highly upregulated upon ATP treatment. Moreover, we observed that selective stimulation of A1AR inhibits the morphological activation of microglia, possibly by suppressing the Ca(2+) influx induced by ATP treatment. Finally, we recorded the spontaneous and evoked activity of spinal nociceptive-specific neuron before and after application of resting or ATP-treated microglia, with or without preincubation with a selective A1AR agonist. We found that the microglial cells, pretreated with the A1AR agonist, exhibit lower capability to facilitate the nociceptive neurons, as compared with the cells treated with ATP alone. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Diadenosine-5-phosphate exerts A1-Receptor-mediated proarrhythmic effects in rabbit atrial myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Brandts, B; Borchard, R; Dirkmann, D; Wickenbrock, I; Sievers, B; van Bracht, M; Prull, M W; Trappe, H -J

    2003-01-01

    Diadenosine polyphosphates have been described to be present in the myocardium and exert purinergic- and nonreceptor-mediated effects. Since the electrophysiological properties of atrial myocardium are effectively regulated by A1 receptors, we investigated the effect of diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) in rabbit myocardium. Parameters of supraventricular electrophysiology and atrial vulnerability were measured in Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Muscarinic potassium current (IK(ACh/Ado)) and ATP-sensitive potassium current (IK(ATP)) were measured by using the whole-cell voltage clamp method. Ap5A prolonged the cycle length of spontaneously beating Langendorff perfused hearts from 225±14 (control) to 1823±400 ms (Ap5A 50 μM; n=6; P<0.05). This effect was paralleled by higher degree of atrio-ventricular block. Atrial effective refractory period (AERP) in control hearts was 84±14 ms (n=6). Ap5A⩾1 μM reduced AERP (100 μM, 58±11 ms; n=6). Extrastimuli delivered to hearts perfused with Ap5A- or adenosine (⩾ μM)-induced atrial fibrillation, the incidence of which correlated to the concentration added to the perfusate. The selective A1-receptor antagonist CPX (20 μM) inhibited the Ap5A- and adenosine-induced decrease of AERP. Atrial fibrillation was no longer observed in the presence of CPX. The described Ap5A-induced effects in the multicellular preparation were enhanced by dipyridamole (10 μM), which is a cellular adenosine uptake inhibitor. Dipyridamole-induced enhancement was inhibited by CPX. Ap5A (⩽1 mM) did neither induce IK(Ado) nor IK(ATP). No effect on activated IK(Ado/ATP) was observed in myocytes superfused with Ap5A. However, effluents from Langendorff hearts perfused with Ap5A 100 μM activated IK(Ado) by using A1 receptors. Ap5A did not activate A1 receptors in rabbit atrial myocytes. The Ap5A induced A1-receptor-mediated effects on supraventricular electrophysiology and vulnerability suggest that in the multicellular preparation Ap5A is

  20. Neuronal A1 receptors mediate increase in extracellular kynurenic acid after local intrastriatal adenosine infusion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Qiu; Fuxe, Kjell; Schwarcz, Robert

    2004-08-01

    The naturally occurring purine nucleoside adenosine has pronounced anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties and plays a neuromodulatory role in the CNS. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an astrocyte-derived, endogenous neuroinhibitory compound, which shares several of adenosine's properties. In a first attempt to examine possible interactions between these two biologically active molecules, adenosine was focally applied into the striatum of freely moving rats by reverse microdialysis, and changes in extracellular KYNA were monitored over time. A 2-h infusion of adenosine increased KYNA levels in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 mm of adenosine causing a twofold elevation within 1 h. This effect was reversible and was effectively blocked by coinfusion of the specific A1 adenosine receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyltheophylline (100 microm). In contrast, coinfusion of adenosine with MSX-3 (100 microm), an A2A receptor antagonist, did not affect the adenosine-induced increase in KYNA levels. Local striatal perfusion with the A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (100 microm) mimicked the effect of adenosine, whereas perfusion with the A2A receptor agonist CGS-21680 (100 microm) was ineffective. Finally, we tested the effect of adenosine (10 mm) on extracellular KYNA in striata that had been injected with quinolinate (60 nmol/1 microL) 7 days earlier. In this neuron-depleted tissue, perfusion with adenosine failed to affect extracellular KYNA levels. These data demonstrate that adenosine is capable of raising extracellular KYNA in the rat striatum by interacting with postsynaptic neuronal A1 receptors. This mechanism may result in a synergism between the neurobiological effects of adenosine and KYNA.

  1. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-05-03

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses.

  2. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing

    PubMed Central

    Preller, Katrin H.; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2016-01-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses. PMID:27091970

  3. Adenosine A1 Receptor-Mediated Attenuation of Reciprocal Dendro-Dendritic Inhibition in the Mouse Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Kristina; Rotermund, Natalie; Grzelka, Katarzyna; Benz, Jan; Lohr, Christian; Hirnet, Daniela

    2018-01-01

    It is well described that A1 adenosine receptors inhibit synaptic transmission at excitatory synapses in the brain, but the effect of adenosine on reciprocal synapses has not been studied so far. In the olfactory bulb, the majority of synapses are reciprocal dendro-dendritic synapses mediating recurrent inhibition. We studied the effect of A1 receptor activation on recurrent dendro-dendritic inhibition in mitral cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Adenosine reduced dendro-dendritic inhibition in wild-type, but not in A1 receptor knock-out mice. Both NMDA receptor-mediated and AMPA receptor-mediated dendro-dendritic inhibition were attenuated by adenosine, indicating that reciprocal synapses between mitral cells and granule cells as well as parvalbumin interneurons were targeted by A1 receptors. Adenosine reduced glutamatergic self-excitation and inhibited N-type and P/Q-type calcium currents, but not L-type calcium currents in mitral cells. Attenuated glutamate release, due to A1 receptor-mediated calcium channel inhibition, resulted in impaired dendro-dendritic inhibition. In behavioral tests we tested the ability of wild-type and A1 receptor knock-out mice to find a hidden piece of food. Knock-out mice were significantly faster in locating the food. Our results indicate that A1 adenosine receptors attenuates dendro-dendritic reciprocal inhibition and suggest that they affect odor information processing. PMID:29379418

  4. Caffeine acts via A1 adenosine receptors to disrupt embryonic cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Buscariollo, Daniela L; Breuer, Gregory A; Wendler, Christopher C; Rivkees, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that adenosine acts via cardiac A1 adenosine receptors (A1ARs) to protect embryos against hypoxia. During embryogenesis, A1ARs are the dominant regulator of heart rate, and A1AR activation reduces heart rate. Adenosine action is inhibited by caffeine, which is widely consumed during pregnancy. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that caffeine influences developing embryos by altering cardiac function. Effects of caffeine and adenosine receptor-selective antagonists on heart rate were studied in vitro using whole murine embryos at E9.5 and isolated hearts at E12.5. Embryos were examined in room air (21% O(2)) or hypoxic (2% O(2)) conditions. Hypoxia decreased heart rates of E9.5 embryos by 15.8% and in E12.5 isolated hearts by 27.1%. In room air, caffeine (200 µM) had no effect on E9.5 heart rates; however, caffeine increased heart rates at E12.5 by 37.7%. Caffeine abolished hypoxia-mediated bradycardia at E9.5 and blunted hypoxia-mediated bradycardia at E12.5. Real-time PCR analysis of RNA from isolated E9.5 and E12.5 hearts showed that A1AR and A2aAR genes were expressed at both ages. Treatment with adenosine receptor-selective antagonists revealed that SCH-58261 (A2aAR-specific antagonist) had no affects on heart function, whereas DPCPX (A1AR-specific antagonist) had effects similar to caffeine treatment at E9.5 and E12.5. At E12.5, embryonic hearts lacking A1AR expression (A1AR-/-) had elevated heart rates compared to A1AR+/- littermates, A1AR-/- heart rates failed to decrease to levels comparable to those of controls. Caffeine did not significantly affect heart rates of A1AR-/- embryos. These data show that caffeine alters embryonic cardiac function and disrupts the normal cardiac response to hypoxia through blockade of A1AR action. Our results raise concern for caffeine exposure during embryogenesis, particularly in pregnancies with increased risk of embryonic hypoxia.

  5. Caffeine Acts via A1 Adenosine Receptors to Disrupt Embryonic Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Buscariollo, Daniela L.; Breuer, Gregory A.; Wendler, Christopher C.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that adenosine acts via cardiac A1 adenosine receptors (A1ARs) to protect embryos against hypoxia. During embryogenesis, A1ARs are the dominant regulator of heart rate, and A1AR activation reduces heart rate. Adenosine action is inhibited by caffeine, which is widely consumed during pregnancy. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that caffeine influences developing embryos by altering cardiac function. Methodology/Principal Findings Effects of caffeine and adenosine receptor-selective antagonists on heart rate were studied in vitro using whole murine embryos at E9.5 and isolated hearts at E12.5. Embryos were examined in room air (21% O2) or hypoxic (2% O2) conditions. Hypoxia decreased heart rates of E9.5 embryos by 15.8% and in E12.5 isolated hearts by 27.1%. In room air, caffeine (200 µM) had no effect on E9.5 heart rates; however, caffeine increased heart rates at E12.5 by 37.7%. Caffeine abolished hypoxia-mediated bradycardia at E9.5 and blunted hypoxia-mediated bradycardia at E12.5. Real-time PCR analysis of RNA from isolated E9.5 and E12.5 hearts showed that A1AR and A2aAR genes were expressed at both ages. Treatment with adenosine receptor-selective antagonists revealed that SCH-58261 (A2aAR-specific antagonist) had no affects on heart function, whereas DPCPX (A1AR-specific antagonist) had effects similar to caffeine treatment at E9.5 and E12.5. At E12.5, embryonic hearts lacking A1AR expression (A1AR−/−) had elevated heart rates compared to A1AR+/− littermates, A1AR−/− heart rates failed to decrease to levels comparable to those of controls. Caffeine did not significantly affect heart rates of A1AR−/− embryos. Conclusions/Significance These data show that caffeine alters embryonic cardiac function and disrupts the normal cardiac response to hypoxia through blockade of A1AR action. Our results raise concern for caffeine exposure during embryogenesis, particularly in pregnancies with increased risk of embryonic

  6. Basal Levels of AMPA Receptor GluA1 Subunit Phosphorylation at Threonine 840 and Serine 845 in Hippocampal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babiec, Walter E.; Guglietta, Ryan; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluA1 subunits at two sites, serine 845 (S845) and threonine 840 (T840), is thought to be involved in NMDA receptor-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Importantly, the notion that dephosphorylation of these sites contributes to LTD assumes that a significant fraction of GluA1 subunits are…

  7. Histone acetylation regulates orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 expression in hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xina; Song, Xuhong; Yuan, Song; Cai, Haitao; Chen, Yequn; Chang, Xiaolan; Liang, Bin; Huang, Dongyang

    2015-12-01

    Hypercholesterolaemia and inflammation are correlated with atherogenesis. Orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1, as a key regulator of inflammation, is closely associated with lipid levels in vivo. However, the mechanism by which lipids regulate NR4A1 expression remains unknown. We aimed to elucidate the underlying mechanism of NR4A1 expression in monocytes during hypercholesterolaemia, and reveal the potential role of NR4A1 in hypercholesterolaemia-induced circulating inflammation. Circulating leucocytes were collected from blood samples of 139 patients with hypercholesterolaemia and 139 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. We found that there was a low-grade inflammatory state and higher expression of NR4A1 in patients. Both total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in plasma were positively correlated with NR4A1 mRNA level. ChIP revealed that acetylation of histone H3 was enriched in the NR4A1 promoter region in patients. Human mononuclear cell lines THP-1 and U937 were treated with cholesterol. Supporting our clinical observations, cholesterol enhanced p300 acetyltransferase and decreased HDAC7 (histone deacetylase 7) recruitment to the NR4A1 promoter region, resulting in histone H3 hyperacetylation and further contributing to NR4A1 up-regulation in monocytes. Moreover, cytosporone B, an NR4A1 agonist, completely reversed cholesterol-induced IL-6 (interleukin 6) and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1) expression to below basal levels, and knockdown of NR4A1 expression by siRNA not only mimicked, but also exaggerated the effects of cholesterol on inflammatory biomarker up-regulation. Thus we conclude that histone acetylation contributes to the regulation of NR4A1 expression in hypercholesterolaemia, and that NR4A1 expression reduces hypercholesterolaemia-induced inflammation. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  8. S100A1 DNA-based Inotropic Therapy Protects Against Proarrhythmogenic Ryanodine Receptor 2 Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ritterhoff, Julia; Völkers, Mirko; Seitz, Andreas; Spaich, Kristin; Gao, Erhe; Peppel, Karsten; Pleger, Sven T; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Friedrich, Oliver; Fink, Rainer H A; Koch, Walter J; Katus, Hugo A; Most, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Restoring expression levels of the EF-hand calcium (Ca(2+)) sensor protein S100A1 has emerged as a key factor in reconstituting normal Ca(2+) handling in failing myocardium. Improved sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function with enhanced Ca(2+) resequestration appears critical for S100A1's cyclic adenosine monophosphate-independent inotropic effects but raises concerns about potential diastolic SR Ca(2+) leakage that might trigger fatal arrhythmias. This study shows for the first time a diminished interaction between S100A1 and ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) in experimental HF. Restoring this link in failing cardiomyocytes, engineered heart tissue and mouse hearts, respectively, by means of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral S100A1 cDNA delivery normalizes diastolic RyR2 function and protects against Ca(2+)- and β-adrenergic receptor-triggered proarrhythmogenic SR Ca(2+) leakage in vitro and in vivo. S100A1 inhibits diastolic SR Ca(2+) leakage despite aberrant RyR2 phosphorylation via protein kinase A and calmodulin-dependent kinase II and stoichiometry with accessory modulators such as calmodulin, FKBP12.6 or sorcin. Our findings demonstrate that S100A1 is a regulator of diastolic RyR2 activity and beneficially modulates diastolic RyR2 dysfunction. S100A1 interaction with the RyR2 is sufficient to protect against basal and catecholamine-triggered arrhythmic SR Ca(2+) leak in HF, combining antiarrhythmic potency with chronic inotropic actions.

  9. S100A1 DNA-based Inotropic Therapy Protects Against Proarrhythmogenic Ryanodine Receptor 2 Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ritterhoff, Julia; Völkers, Mirko; Seitz, Andreas; Spaich, Kristin; Gao, Erhe; Peppel, Karsten; Pleger, Sven T; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Friedrich, Oliver; Fink, Rainer H A; Koch, Walter J; Katus, Hugo A; Most, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Restoring expression levels of the EF-hand calcium (Ca2+) sensor protein S100A1 has emerged as a key factor in reconstituting normal Ca2+ handling in failing myocardium. Improved sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function with enhanced Ca2+ resequestration appears critical for S100A1's cyclic adenosine monophosphate-independent inotropic effects but raises concerns about potential diastolic SR Ca2+ leakage that might trigger fatal arrhythmias. This study shows for the first time a diminished interaction between S100A1 and ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) in experimental HF. Restoring this link in failing cardiomyocytes, engineered heart tissue and mouse hearts, respectively, by means of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral S100A1 cDNA delivery normalizes diastolic RyR2 function and protects against Ca2+- and β-adrenergic receptor-triggered proarrhythmogenic SR Ca2+ leakage in vitro and in vivo. S100A1 inhibits diastolic SR Ca2+ leakage despite aberrant RyR2 phosphorylation via protein kinase A and calmodulin-dependent kinase II and stoichiometry with accessory modulators such as calmodulin, FKBP12.6 or sorcin. Our findings demonstrate that S100A1 is a regulator of diastolic RyR2 activity and beneficially modulates diastolic RyR2 dysfunction. S100A1 interaction with the RyR2 is sufficient to protect against basal and catecholamine-triggered arrhythmic SR Ca2+ leak in HF, combining antiarrhythmic potency with chronic inotropic actions. PMID:26005840

  10. Excessive penile norepinephrine level underlies impaired erectile function in adenosine A1 receptor deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chen; Qi, Lin; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Zhang, Weiru; Wang, Wei; Blackburn, Michael; Kellems, Rodney; Xia, Yang

    2012-10-01

    Penile erection is a complex neurovascular physiological event controlled by multiple factors and signaling pathways. A considerable amount of evidence indicates that adenosine plays a significant role in cavernosal smooth muscle relaxation. However, the specific role of adenosine and its receptors in erectile physiology and pathology is not fully understood. To determine the role of the adenosine A1 receptor (ADORA1) in penile erection. Adenosine A1 receptor deficient (Adora1-/-) mice and aged-matched wild-type (WT) mice were utilized. We evaluated the in vivo erectile function by measuring the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) in response to cavernous nerve stimulation (CNS). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the norepinephrine (NE) plasma concentration in the corpus cavernosum and systemic circulation. We also evaluated the myosin light chain phosphorylation (p-MLC) in penile tissue pre- and post-CNS. The main outcome measurement of this research was the evaluation of in vivo erectile response to CNS by measuring the ICP in Adora1-/- mice and WT mice and to identify the localization and specific neuron types of ADORA1 expression by dual immunostaining and immunofluorescence co-localization. In vivo, both the ratio of CNS-induced Maximum ICP to mean arterial pressure and CNS-induced slope in Adora1-/- mice were significantly lower than WT mice. At the cellular level in penile tissue, we determined that ADORA1 was highly abundant in neuronal cells. During penile erection, Adora1-/- mice exhibited a higher level of NE plasma concentration in the penis than WT mice. And WT mice had a significantly greater reduction in p-MLC compared to Adora1-/- mice. Our results show that ADORA1 is enriched on neuron cells where it functions to control NE release. Activation of this receptor during penile erection results in reduced NE release and reduced cavernosal smooth muscle contraction, therefore facilitating penile erection. © 2012 International Society for

  11. Differences in adenosine A-1 and A-2 receptor density revealed by autoradiography in methylxanthine-sensitive and insensitive mice

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.F.; Williams, M.

    1988-07-01

    Two strains of inbred mice, CBA/J and SWR/J, have been identified which are, respectively, sensitive and insensitive to the behavioral and toxic effects of methylxanthines. Autoradiographic analyses of brain adenosine receptors were conducted with (/sup 3/H)CHA to label adenosine A-1 receptors and (/sup 3/H)NECA, in the presence of 50 nM CPA, to label adenosine A-2 receptors. For both mouse strains, adenosine A-1 receptors were most highly concentrated in the hippocampus and cerebellum whereas adenosine A-2 receptors were selectively localized in the striatum. CBA/J mice displayed a 30% greater density of adenosine A-1 receptors in the hippocampal CA-1 and CA-3 regionsmore » and in the cerebellum as compared to the SWR/J mice. The number of A-2 receptors (Bmax) was 40% greater in the striatum and olfactory tubercle of CBA/J as compared to SWR/J mice. No significant regional differences in A-1 or A-2 receptor affinities were observed between these inbred strains of mice. These results indicate that the differential sensitivity to methylxanthines between these mouse strains may reflect a genetically mediated difference in regional adenosine receptor densities.« less

  12. Harman induces CYP1A1 enzyme through an aryl hydrocarbon receptor mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    El Gendy, Mohamed A.M.; El-Kadi, Ayman O.S., E-mail: aelkadi@pharmacy.ualberta.c

    2010-11-15

    Harman is a common compound in several foods, plants and beverages. Numerous studies have demonstrated its mutagenic, co-mutagenic and carcinogenic effects; however, the exact mechanism has not been fully identified. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor regulating the expression of the carcinogen-activating enzyme; cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). In the present study, we examined the ability of harman to induce AhR-mediated signal transduction in human and rat hepatoma cells; HepG2 and H4IIE cells. Our results showed that harman significantly induced CYP1A1 mRNA in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Similarly, harman significantly induced CYP1A1 at protein and activity levels inmore » a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the AhR antagonist, resveratrol, inhibited the increase in CYP1A1 activity by harman. The RNA polymerase inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely abolished the CYP1A1 mRNA induction by harman, indicating a transcriptional activation. The role of AhR in CYP1A1 induction by harman was confirmed by using siRNA specific for human AhR. The ability of harman to induce CYP1A1 was strongly correlated with its ability to stimulate AhR-dependent luciferase activity and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. At post-transcriptional and post-translational levels, harman did not affect the stability of CYP1A1 at the mRNA and the protein levels, excluding other mechanisms participating in the obtained effects. We concluded that harman can directly induce CYP1A1 gene expression in an AhR-dependent manner and may represent a novel mechanism by which harman promotes mutagenicity, co-mutagenicity and carcinogenicity.« less

  13. Spasticity therapy reacts to astrocyte GluA1 receptor upregulation following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Goiriena, Eider; Taylor, Julian

    2010-01-01

    For almost three decades intrathecal baclofen therapy has been the standard treatment for spinal cord injury spasticity when oral medication is ineffective or produces serious side effects. Although intrathecal baclofen therapy has a good clinical benefit-risk ratio for spinal spasticity, tolerance and the life-threatening withdrawal syndrome present serious problems for its management. Now, in an experimental model of spinal cord injury spasticity, AMPA receptor blockade with NGX424 (Tezampanel) has been shown to reduce stretch reflex activity alone and during tolerance to intrathecal baclofen therapy. These results stem from the observation that GluA1 receptors are overexpressed on reactive astrocytes following experimental ischaemic spinal cord injury. Although further validation is required, the appropriate choice of AMPA receptor antagonists for treatment of stretch hyperreflexia based on our recent understanding of reactive astrocyte neurobiology following spinal cord injury may lead to the development of a better adjunct clinical therapy for spasticity without the side effects of intrathecal baclofen therapy. LINKED ARTICLE This article is a commentary on Oshiro et al., pp. 976–985 of this issue. To view this paper visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00954.x PMID:20662840

  14. A1 adenosine receptor allosteric enhancer PD-81723 protects against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Joo Yun; Ham, Ahrom; Brown, Kevin M; Kim, Mihwa; D'Agati, Vivette D; Lee, H Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Activation of A(1) adenosine receptors (ARs) protects against renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury by reducing necrosis, apoptosis, and inflammation. However, extrarenal side effects (bradycardia, hypotension, and sedation) may limit A(1)AR agonist therapy for ischemic acute kidney injury. Here, we hypothesized that an allosteric enhancer for A(1)AR (PD-81723) protects against renal I/R injury without the undesirable side effects of systemic A(1)AR activation by potentiating the cytoprotective effects of renal adenosine generated locally by ischemia. Pretreatment with PD-81723 produced dose-dependent protection against renal I/R injury in A(1)AR wild-type mice but not in A(1)AR-deficient mice. Significant reductions in renal tubular necrosis, neutrophil infiltration, and inflammation as well as tubular apoptosis were observed in A(1)AR wild-type mice treated with PD-81723. Furthermore, PD-81723 decreased apoptotic cell death in human proximal tubule (HK-2) cells in culture, which was attenuated by a specific A(1)AR antagonist (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine). Mechanistically, PD-81723 induced sphingosine kinase (SK)1 mRNA and protein expression in HK-2 cells and in the mouse kidney. Supporting a critical role of SK1 in A(1)AR allosteric enhancer-mediated renal protection against renal I/R injury, PD-81723 failed to protect SK1-deficient mice against renal I/R injury. Finally, proximal tubule sphingosine-1-phosphate type 1 receptors (S1P(1)Rs) are critical for PD-81723-induced renal protection, as mice selectively deficient in renal proximal tubule S1P(1)Rs (S1P(1)R(flox/flox) PEPCK(Cre/-) mice) were not protected against renal I/R injury with PD-81723 treatment. Taken together, our experiments demonstrate potent renal protection with PD-81723 against I/R injury by reducing necrosis, inflammation, and apoptosis through the induction of renal tubular SK1 and activation of proximal tubule S1P(1)Rs. Our findings imply that selectively enhancing A(1)AR activation

  15. Intrinsic A(1) adenosine receptor activation during ischemia or reperfusion improves recovery in mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Peart, J; Headrick, J P

    2000-11-01

    We assessed the role of A(1) adenosine receptor (A(1)AR) activation by endogenous adenosine in the modulation of ischemic contracture and postischemic recovery in Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts subjected to 20 min of total ischemia and 30 min of reperfusion. In control hearts, the rate-pressure product (RPP) and first derivative of pressure development over time (+dP/dt) recovered to 57 +/- 3 and 58 +/- 3% of preischemia, respectively. Diastolic pressure remained elevated at 20 +/- 2 mmHg (compared with 3 +/- 1 mmHg preischemia). Interstitial adenosine, assessed by microdialysis, rose from approximately 0.3 to 1.9 microM during ischemia compared with approximately 15 microM in rat heart. Nonetheless, these levels will near maximally activate A(1)ARs on the basis of effects of exogenous adenosine and 2-chloroadenosine. Neither A(1)AR blockade with 200 nM 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) during the ischemic period alone nor A(1)AR activation with 50 nM N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine altered rapidity or extent of ischemic contracture. However, ischemic DPCPX treatment significantly depressed postischemic recovery of RPP and +dP/dt (44 +/- 3 and 40 +/- 4% of preischemia, respectively). DPCPX treatment during the reperfusion period alone also reduced recovery of RPP and +dP/dt (to 44 +/- 2 and 47 +/- 2% of preischemia, respectively). These data indicate that 1) interstitial adenosine is lower in mouse versus rat myocardium during ischemia, 2) A(1)AR activation by endogenous adenosine or exogenous agonists does not modify ischemic contracture in murine myocardium, 3) A(1)AR activation by endogenous adenosine during ischemia attenuates postischemic stunning, and 4) A(1)AR activation by endogenous adenosine during the reperfusion period also improves postischemic contractile recovery.

  16. Human Scavenger Receptor A1-Mediated Inflammatory Response to Silica Particle Exposure Is Size Specific

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Nobuo; Hirai, Toshiro; Misato, Kazuki; Aoyama, Michihiko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishii, Ken J.; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    The application of nanotechnology in the health care setting has many potential benefits; however, our understanding of the interactions between nanoparticles and our immune system remains incomplete. Although many of the biological effects of nanoparticles are negatively correlated with particle size, some are clearly size specific and the mechanisms underlying these size-specific biological effects remain unknown. Here, we examined the pro-inflammatory effects of silica particles in THP-1 cells with respect to particle size; a large overall size range with narrow intervals between particle diameters (particle diameter: 10, 30, 50, 70, 100, 300, and 1,000 nm) was used. Secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α induced by exposure to the silica particles had a bell-shaped distribution, where the maximal secretion was induced by silica nanoparticles with a diameter of 50 nm and particles with smaller or larger diameters had progressively less effect. We found that blockade of IL-1β secretion markedly inhibited TNF-α secretion, suggesting that IL-1β is upstream of TNF-α in the inflammatory cascade induced by exposure to silica particles, and that the induction of IL-1β secretion was dependent on both the NLRP3 inflammasome and on uptake of the silica particles into the cells via endocytosis. However, a quantitative analysis of silica particle uptake showed that IL-1β secretion was not correlated with the amount of silica particles taken up by the cells. Further investigation revealed that the induction of IL-1β secretion and uptake of silica nanoparticles with diameters of 50 or 100 nm, but not of 10 or 1,000 nm, was dependent on scavenger receptor (SR) A1. In addition, of the silica particles examined, only those with a diameter of 50 nm induced strong IL-1β secretion via activation of Mer receptor tyrosine kinase, a signal mediator of SR A1. Together, our results suggest that the SR A1

  17. AMP-guided tumour-specific nanoparticle delivery via adenosine A1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Han, Fajun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Active targeting-ligands have been increasingly used to functionalize nanoparticles for tumour-specific clinical applications. Here we utilize nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a novel ligand to functionalize polymer-based fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for tumour-targeted imaging. We demonstrate that AMP-conjugated NPs (NPs-AMP) efficiently bind to and are following internalized into colon cancer cell CW-2 and breast cancer cell MDA-MB-468 in vitro. RNA interference and inhibitor assays reveal that the targeting effects mainly rely on the specific binding of AMP to adenosine A1 receptor (A1R), which is greatly up-regulated in cancer cells than in matched normal cells. More importantly, NPs-AMP specifically accumulate in the tumour site of colon and breast tumour xenografts and are further internalized into the tumour cells in vivo via tail vein injection, confirming that the high in vitro specificity of AMP can be successfully translated into the in vivo efficacy. Furthermore, NPs-AMP exhibit an active tumour-targeting behaviour in various colon and breast cancer cells, which is positively related to the up-regulation level of A1R in cancer cells, suggesting that AMP potentially suits for more extensive A1R-overexpressing cancer models. This work establishes AMP to be a novel tumour-targeting ligand and provides a promising strategy for future diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Glucose-induced intestinal vasodilation via adenosine A1 receptors requires nitric oxide but not K(+)(ATP) channels.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Paul J; Li, Na; Harris, Patrick D; Zakaria, El Rasheid; Garrison, R Neal

    2011-06-15

    Both nitric oxide (NO) and adenosine A1 receptor activation mediate microvascular vasodilation during intestinal glucose absorption. Our overall hypothesis is that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) utilization during glucose absorption would increase adenosine metabolite release, which acts on adenosine A1 receptors to alter endothelial production of NO and/or activate ATP-dependent potassium channels (K(+)(ATP)) to dilate intestinal microvessels. Intravital videomicroscopy of the rat jejunum was used to record the vascular responses of inflow (termed 1A) arterioles, proximal (p3A), and distal (d3A) premucosal arterioles during exposure to isotonic glucose or mannitol solutions alone or in the presence of the selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (L-NMMA), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX)), or a K(+)(ATP) channel inhibitor (glibenclamide). As expected, glucose exposure caused rapid dilation of both p3A and d3A arterioles, while mannitol exposure had no effect on microvascular diameters. Adenosine A1 receptor blockade completely prevented glucose-induced dilation of the premucosal arterioles. NOS inhibition significantly blunted the glucose-induced vasodilation of the premucosal arterioles, but had little effect in the mannitol group. Simultaneous application of both the NOS inhibitor and the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist gave the same reduction in glucose-induced dilation of the premucosal arterioles as the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist alone. Blockade of K(+)(ATP) channels with glibenclamide did not attenuate glucose-induced vasodilation of the premucosal arterioles. These data suggest that glucose-induced vasodilation of premucosal jejunal arterioles is mediated through adenosine A1 receptors, and NO at least partially mediates the adenosine A1 receptor-induced vasodilation. In addition, K(+)(ATP) channels are not involved in premucosal arteriolar vasodilation during intestinal glucose exposure. Copyright

  19. Scavenger receptor mediated endocytosis of silver nanoparticles into J774A.1 macrophages is heterogeneous.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyun; Wu, Linxi; Reinhard, Björn M

    2012-08-28

    We investigated the scavenger receptor mediated uptake and subsequent intracellular spatial distribution and clustering of 57.7 ± 6.9 nm diameter silver nanoparticles (zeta-potential = -28.4 mV) in the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1 through colorimetric imaging. The NPs exhibited an overall red-shift of the plasmon resonance wavelength in the cell ensemble as function of time and concentration, indicative of intracellular NP agglomeration. A detailed analysis of the NP clustering in individual cells revealed a strong phenotypic variability in the intracellular NP organization on the single cell level. Throughout the observation time of 24h cells containing non- or low-agglomerated NPs with a characteristic blue color coexisted with cells containing NPs with varying degrees of agglomeration, as evinced by distinct spectral shifts of their resonance wavelengths. Pharmacological inhibition studies indicated that the observed differences in intracellular NP organization resulted from coexisting actin- and clathrin-dependent endocytosis mechanisms in the macrophage population. Correlation of intracellular NP clustering with macrophage maturity marker (F4/80, CD14) expression revealed that differentiated J774A.1 cells preferentially contained compact NP agglomerates, whereas monocyte-like macrophages contained non-agglomerated NPs.

  20. Scavenger Receptor Mediated Endocytosis of Silver Nanoparticles into J774A.1 Macrophages is Heterogeneous

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyun; Wu, Linxi; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the scavenger receptor mediated uptake and subsequent intracellular spatial distribution and clustering of 57.7 ± 6.9 nm diameter silver nanoparticles (zeta-potential = −28.4 mV) in the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1 through colorimetric imaging. The NPs exhibited an overall red-shift of the plasmon resonance wavelength in the cell ensemble as function of time and concentration, indicative of intracellular NP agglomeration. A detailed analysis of the NP clustering in individual cells revealed a strong phenotypic variability in the intracellular NP organization on the single cell level. Throughout the observation time of 24h cells containing non- or low-agglomerated NPs with a characteristic blue color coexisted with cells containing NPs with varying degrees of agglomeration, as evinced by distinct spectral shifts of their resonance wavelengths. Pharmacological inhibition studies indicated that the observed differences in intracellular NP organization resulted from coexisting actin- and clathrin-dependent endocytosis mechanisms in the macrophage population. Correlation of intracellular NP clustering with macrophage maturity marker (F4/80, CD14) expression revealed that differentiated J774A.1 cells preferentially contained compact NP agglomerates, whereas monocyte-like macrophages contained non-agglomerated NPs. PMID:22799499

  1. Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA Receptor Subunit Alters the Expression of Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, David J.; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H.; Bannerman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit selectively impairs short-term memory for spatial locations. We further investigated this deficit by examining memory for discrete nonspatial visual stimuli in an operant chamber. Unconditioned suppression of magazine responding to visual stimuli was measured in wild-type and GluA1 knockout mice.…

  2. Adenosine A1 receptor antagonist rolofylline alleviates axonopathy caused by human Tau ΔK280

    PubMed Central

    Dennissen, Frank J. A.; Anglada-Huguet, Marta; Sydow, Astrid; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of Tau is a characteristic hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases but the mode of toxic action of Tau is poorly understood. Here, we show that the Tau protein is toxic due to its aggregation propensity, whereas phosphorylation and/or missorting is not sufficient to cause neuronal dysfunction. Aggregate-prone Tau accumulates, when expressed in vitro at near-endogenous levels, in axons as spindle-shaped grains. These axonal grains contain Tau that is folded in a pathological (MC-1) conformation. Proaggregant Tau induces a reduction of neuronal ATP, concomitant with loss of dendritic spines. Counterintuitively, axonal grains of Tau are not targeted for degradation and do not induce a molecular stress response. Proaggregant Tau causes neuronal and astrocytic hypoactivity and presynaptic dysfunction instead. Here, we show that the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist rolofylline (KW-3902) is alleviating the presynaptic dysfunction and restores neuronal activity as well as dendritic spine levels in vitro. Oral administration of rolofylline for 2-wk to 14-mo-old proaggregant Tau transgenic mice restores the spatial memory deficits and normalizes the basic synaptic transmission. These findings make rolofylline an interesting candidate to combat the hypometabolism and neuronal dysfunction associated with Tau-induced neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27671637

  3. Androgen receptor antagonism drives cytochrome P450 17A1 inhibitor efficacy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Norris, John D.; Ellison, Stephanie J.; Baker, Jennifer G.; Stagg, David B.; Wardell, Suzanne E.; Park, Sunghee; Alley, Holly M.; Baldi, Robert M.; Yllanes, Alexander; Andreano, Kaitlyn J.; Stice, James P.; Lawrence, Scott A.; Eisner, Joel R.; Price, Douglas K.; Moore, William R.; Figg, William D.; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2017-01-01

    The clinical utility of inhibiting cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17), a cytochrome p450 enzyme that is required for the production of androgens, has been exemplified by the approval of abiraterone for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Recently, however, it has been reported that CYP17 inhibitors can interact directly with the androgen receptor (AR). A phase I study recently reported that seviteronel, a CYP17 lyase–selective inhibitor, ædemonstrated a sustained reduction in prostate-specific antigen in a patient with CRPC, and another study showed seviteronel’s direct effects on AR function. This suggested that seviteronel may have therapeutically relevant activities in addition to its ability to inhibit androgen production. Here, we have demonstrated that CYP17 inhibitors, with the exception of orteronel, can function as competitive AR antagonists. Conformational profiling revealed that the CYP17 inhibitor–bound AR adopted a conformation that resembled the unliganded AR (apo-AR), precluding nuclear localization and DNA binding. Further, we observed that seviteronel and abiraterone inhibited the growth of tumor xenografts expressing the clinically relevant mutation AR-F876L and that this activity could be attributed entirely to competitive AR antagonism. The results of this study suggest that the ability of CYP17 inhibitors to directly antagonize the AR may contribute to their clinical efficacy in CRPC. PMID:28463227

  4. Hippocampal GluA1-containing AMPA receptors mediate context-dependent sensitization to morphine

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yan; Portugal, George S.; Fakira, Amanda K.; Melyan, Zara; Neve, Rachael; Lee, H. Thomas; Russo, Scott J.; Liu, Jie; Morón, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamatergic systems, including α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are involved in opiate-induced neuronal and behavioral plasticity, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated morphine administration on AMPAR expression, synaptic plasticity, and context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine. We found that morphine treatment produced changes of synaptic AMPAR expression in the hippocampus, a brain area that is critically involved in learning and memory. These changes could be observed one week after the treatment, but only when mice developed context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine in which morphine treatment was associated with drug administration environment. Context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine was also associated with increased basal synaptic transmission and disrupted hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas these effects were less robust when morphine administration was not paired with the drug administration environment. Interestingly, some effects may be related to the prior history of morphine exposure in the drug-associated environment, since alterations of AMPAR expression, basal synaptic transmission, and LTP were observed in mice that received a saline challenge one week after discontinuation of morphine treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of GluA1 AMPAR subunit plays a critical role in the acquisition and expression of context-dependent behavioral sensitization, as this behavior is blocked by a viral vector that disrupts GluA1 phosphorylation. These data provide evidence that glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus plays an important role in context-dependent sensitization to morphine and supports further investigation of glutamate-based strategies for treating opiate addiction. PMID:22072679

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of Monomeric EphrinA1 Binding Site to EphA2 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Lema Tomé, Carla M.; Palma, Enzo; Ferluga, Sara; Lowther, W. Todd; Hantgan, Roy; Wykosky, Jill; Debinski, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    The EphA2 receptor is overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme and has been to shown to contribute to cell transformation, tumor initiation, progression, and maintenance. EphrinA1 (eA1) is a preferred ligand for the receptor. Treatment with monomeric eA1, the form of eA1 found in the extracellular environment, causes receptor phosphorylation, internalization, and down-regulation with subsequent anti-tumor effects. Here, we investigated the structure-function relationship of a monomeric eA1 focusing on its G-H loop (108FQRFTPFTLGKEFKE123G), a highly conserved region among eAs that mediates binding to their receptors. Alanine substitution mutants of the G-H loop amino acids were transfected into U-251 MG glioblastoma multiforme cells, and functional activity of each mutant in conditioned media was assessed by EphA2 down-regulation, ERK and AKT activation and cellular response assays. Alanine substitutions at positions Pro-113 Thr-115, Gly-117, Glu-122, and also Gln-109 enhanced the EphA2 receptor down-regulation and decreased p-ERK and p-AKT. Substitution mutants of eA1 at positions Phe-108, Arg-110, Phe-111, Thr-112, Phe-114, Leu-116, Lys-118, Glu-119, and Phe-120 had a deleterious effect on EphA2 down-regulation when compared with eA1-WT. Mutants at positions Phe-108, Lys-18, Lys-121, Gly-123 retained similar properties to eA1-WT. Recombinant eA1-R110A, -T115A, -G117A, and -F120A have been found to exhibit the same characteristics as the ligands contained in the conditioned media mainly due to the differences in their binding to the receptor. Thus, we have identified variants of eA1 that possess either superagonistic or antagonistic properties. These new findings will be important in the understanding of the receptor/ligand interactions and in further design of anti-cancer therapies targeting the eA/EphA system. PMID:22362770

  6. Structural and functional characterization of monomeric EphrinA1 binding site to EphA2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lema Tomé, Carla M; Palma, Enzo; Ferluga, Sara; Lowther, W Todd; Hantgan, Roy; Wykosky, Jill; Debinski, Waldemar

    2012-04-20

    The EphA2 receptor is overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme and has been to shown to contribute to cell transformation, tumor initiation, progression, and maintenance. EphrinA1 (eA1) is a preferred ligand for the receptor. Treatment with monomeric eA1, the form of eA1 found in the extracellular environment, causes receptor phosphorylation, internalization, and down-regulation with subsequent anti-tumor effects. Here, we investigated the structure-function relationship of a monomeric eA1 focusing on its G-H loop ((108)FQRFTPFTLGKEFKE(123)G), a highly conserved region among eAs that mediates binding to their receptors. Alanine substitution mutants of the G-H loop amino acids were transfected into U-251 MG glioblastoma multiforme cells, and functional activity of each mutant in conditioned media was assessed by EphA2 down-regulation, ERK and AKT activation and cellular response assays. Alanine substitutions at positions Pro-113 Thr-115, Gly-117, Glu-122, and also Gln-109 enhanced the EphA2 receptor down-regulation and decreased p-ERK and p-AKT. Substitution mutants of eA1 at positions Phe-108, Arg-110, Phe-111, Thr-112, Phe-114, Leu-116, Lys-118, Glu-119, and Phe-120 had a deleterious effect on EphA2 down-regulation when compared with eA1-WT. Mutants at positions Phe-108, Lys-18, Lys-121, Gly-123 retained similar properties to eA1-WT. Recombinant eA1-R110A, -T115A, -G117A, and -F120A have been found to exhibit the same characteristics as the ligands contained in the conditioned media mainly due to the differences in their binding to the receptor. Thus, we have identified variants of eA1 that possess either superagonistic or antagonistic properties. These new findings will be important in the understanding of the receptor/ligand interactions and in further design of anti-cancer therapies targeting the eA/EphA system.

  7. Hypothermia in mouse is caused by adenosine A1 and A3 receptor agonists and AMP via three distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Jain, Shalini; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Wan, Tina C; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Auchampach, John A; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gavrilova, Oksana; Reitman, Marc L

    2017-03-01

    Small mammals have the ability to enter torpor, a hypothermic, hypometabolic state, allowing impressive energy conservation. Administration of adenosine or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) can trigger a hypothermic, torpor-like state. We investigated the mechanisms for hypothermia using telemetric monitoring of body temperature in wild type and receptor knock out (Adora1 -/- , Adora3 -/- ) mice. Confirming prior data, stimulation of the A 3 adenosine receptor (AR) induced hypothermia via peripheral mast cell degranulation, histamine release, and activation of central histamine H 1 receptors. In contrast, A 1 AR agonists and AMP both acted centrally to cause hypothermia. Commonly used, selective A 1 AR agonists, including N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), N 6 -cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), and MRS5474, caused hypothermia via both A 1 AR and A 3 AR when given intraperitoneally. Intracerebroventricular dosing, low peripheral doses of Cl-ENBA [(±)-5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N 6 -endo-norbornyladenosine], or using Adora3 -/- mice allowed selective stimulation of A 1 AR. AMP-stimulated hypothermia can occur independently of A 1 AR, A 3 AR, and mast cells. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP cause regulated hypothermia that was characterized by a drop in total energy expenditure, physical inactivity, and preference for cooler environmental temperatures, indicating a reduced body temperature set point. Neither A 1 AR nor A 3 AR was required for fasting-induced torpor. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP trigger regulated hypothermia via three distinct mechanisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Effects of A1 receptor agonist/antagonist on spontaneous seizures in pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Beatriz Oliveira; Hamani, Clement; Ferreira, Elenn; Miranda, Maísa Ferreira; Fernandes, Maria José S; Rodrigues, Antonio M; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G; Covolan, Luciene

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous anticonvulsant that activates pre- and postsynaptic adenosine A1 receptors. A1 receptor agonists increase the latency for the development of seizures and status epilepticus following pilocarpine administration. Although hippocampal adenosine is increased in the chronic phase of the pilocarpine model, it is not known whether the modulation of A1 receptors may influence the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the A1 receptor agonist RPia ([R]-N-phenylisopropyladenosine) and the A1 antagonist DPCPX (8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine) administered to chronic pilocarpine epileptic rats would respectively decrease and increase the frequency of SRS and hippocampal excitability. Four months after Pilo-induced SE, chronic epileptic rats were video-monitored for the recording of SRS before (basal) and after a 2-week treatment with RPia (25μg/kg) or DPCPX (50μg/kg). Following sacrifice, brain slices were studied with electrophysiology. We found that rats given RPia had a 93% nonsignificant reduction in the frequency of seizures compared with their own pretreatment baseline. In contrast, the administration of DPCPX resulted in an 87% significant increase in seizure rate. Nontreated epileptic rats had a similar frequency of seizures along the study. Corroborating our behavioral data, in vitro recordings showed that slices from animals previously given DPCPX had a shorter latency to develop epileptiform activity, longer and higher DC shifts, and higher spike amplitude compared with slices from nontreated Pilo controls. In contrast, smaller spike amplitude was recorded in slices from animals given RPia. In summary, the administration of A1 agonists reduced hippocampal excitability but not the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures in chronic epileptic rats, whereas A1 receptor antagonists increased both. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of the adenosine A1 receptor inhibitor FK 838 on proximal tubular fluid output in rats.

    PubMed

    Bak, Martin; Thomsen, Klaus

    2004-05-01

    Adenosine A(1) receptor blockade has been suggested as a treatment in conditions with sodium and fluid retention because it increases urinary Na(+) excretion and increases proximal tubular fluid output. In the present study, we examine the time course for the renal responses to adenosine A(1) receptor blockade in order to investigate whether the effects may be prolonged and not just temporary. The acute effects of the adenosine A(1) receptor inhibitor FK 838 on segmental tubular Na(+) handling were examined by a renal clearance technique in conscious chronically instrumented rats. Lithium clearance (C(Li)) was used as a clearance marker of proximal tubular fluid output. Acute adenosine A(1) receptor inhibition did not affect the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) significantly. In contrast, the inhibition led to significant increases in C(Li) (from 290+/-28 to 431+/-28 microl/min/100 g), fractional Li(+) excretion (FE(Li)) (from 33+/-2 to 47+/-3%) and fractional Na(+) excretion (FE(Na)) (from 0.44+/-0.07 to 2.03+/-0.42%). Sodium excretion, expressed as a fraction of proximal tubular fluid output (C(Na)/C(Li)), rose from 1.3+/-0.2 to 4.2+/-0.4%, suggesting that the natriuretic effect was supported by inhibition of distal nephron Na(+) reabsorption. All values returned to baseline values during the clearance study and thereby indicated that neither proximal tubular fluid output nor urinary sodium excretion remained elevated for a prolonged time. It is concluded that in conscious unstressed rats, acute adenosine A(1) receptor inhibition by FK 838 led to a significant natriuresis that was caused by inhibition of proximal tubular Na(+) reabsorption, possibly with a contribution from inhibition of distal nephron Na(+) reabsorption. The increased proximal tubular fluid output and the increased urinary Na(+) excretion returned to baseline values during the clearance study, indicating that none of these effects of adenosine A(1) blockade were long lasting.

  10. Combined neuroprotective action of adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Serpa, André; Pinto, Isa; Bernardino, Liliana; Cascalheira, José F

    2015-08-01

    Both adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors trigger similar transduction pathways and protect against neurotoxic insults at the hippocampus, but their combined neuroprotective potential has not been investigated. We set forth to assess the combined action of A1 and CB1 receptors against glutamate NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity at the hippocampus. Cell damage was assessed by measuring propidium iodide (PI) uptake and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity released from cultured hippocampal slices exposed to NMDA. Exposure to NMDA (50 µM) for 1 h increased LDH activity by 92% ± 16%. WIN55212-2 (30 µM), a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, decreased NMDA-induced LDH activity by 53% ± 10% while N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 100 nM), an adenosine A1 receptor selective agonist, decreased it by 37% ± 11%. The combined inhibitory effect of WIN55212-2 and CPA (88% ± 12%) did not differ from the sum of the individual inhibitory effects of each agonist (90% ± 15%) but was different from the effects of CPA or WIN55212-2 alone. An additive inhibitory effect of co-application of WIN55212-2 (30 µM) and CPA (100 nM) on NMDA (50 µM)-induced PI uptake was also observed in CA3 but not in CA1 area of the hippocampal slice. The results suggest that both CB1 and A1 receptors produce additive cumulative neuroprotection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Endogenous expression of adenosine A1, A2 and A3 receptors in rat C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Carlos Alberto; Albasanz, José Luís; Fernández, Mercedes; Martín, Mairena

    2007-06-01

    Inhibitory and stimulatory adenosine receptors have been identified and characterized in both membranes and intact rat C6 glioma cells. In membranes, saturation experiment performed with [(3)H]DPCPX, selective A(1)R antagonist, revealed a single binding site with a K (D) = 9.4 +/- 1.4 nM and B (max) = 62.7 +/- 8.6 fmol/mg protein. Binding of [(3)H]DPCPX in intact cell revealed a K (D) = 17.7 +/- 1.3 nM and B (max )= 567.1 +/- 26.5 fmol/mg protein. On the other hand, [(3)H]ZM241385 binding experiments revealed a single binding site population of receptors with K (D) = 16.5 +/- 1.3 nM and B (max) = 358.9 +/- 52.4 fmol/mg protein in intact cells, and K (D) = 4.7 +/- 0.6 nM and B (max) = 74.3 +/- 7.9 fmol/mg protein in plasma membranes, suggesting the presence of A(2A) receptor in C6 cells. A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3 )adenosine receptors were detected by Western-blotting and immunocytochemistry, and their mRNAs quantified by real time PCR assays. Gialpha and Gsalpha proteins were also detected by Western-blotting and RT-PCR assays. Furthermore, selective A(1)R agonists inhibited forskolin- and GTP-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity and CGS 21680 and NECA stimulated this enzymatic activity in C6 cells. These results suggest that C6 glioma cells endogenously express A(1) and A(2) receptors functionally coupled to adenylyl cyclase inhibition and stimulation, respectively, and suggest these cells as a model to study the role of adenosine receptors in tumoral cells.

  12. Receptor EphA2 activation with ephrinA1 suppresses growth of malignant mesothelioma (MM).

    PubMed

    Nasreen, Najmunnisa; Mohammed, Kamal A; Lai, Yimu; Antony, Veena B

    2007-12-18

    The objective of this study was to understand the possible mechanisms of activation of receptor EphA2 by its ligand ephrinA1 in malignant mesothelioma cell (MMC) growth. Activation of receptor EphA2 by its ligand ephrinA1 triggered the phosphorylation of EphA2. Ligand activation of EphA2 also induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and significantly decreased MMC proliferation. Ligand activated and ephrinA1 vector (pcDNA/EFNA1) transfected MMC demonstrated decreased clonal growth in 3-D matrigels when compared to resting MMC. These studies suggest that EphA2 activation by its ligand ephrinA1 transmits intracellular signals from cell membrane to nucleus via ERK1/2 signaling cascade and inhibits MM growth.

  13. A 1.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation induces EGF receptor clustering and phosphorylation in cultured human amniotic (FL) cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuying; Lu, Dongbo; Fu, Yiti; Lu, Deqiang; Chiang, Huai

    2012-03-01

    Many studies have shown that exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) could activate cellular signal transduction pathways. In the present research, we investigated the effects of exposure to a 1.8-GHz RFR at different intensities on epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor clustering and phosphorylation in human amniotic (FL) cells. Receptor clustering on cellular membrane surface was analyzed using immunofluorescence assessed by confocal microscopy, and phosphorylation of EGF receptors was measured by western blot technology. EGF treatment served as a positive control. The results showed that, compared with sham exposure, exposure to RFR at specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0 W/kg for 15 min significantly induced EGF receptor clustering and enhanced phosphorylation on the tyrosine-1173 residue in FL cells, whereas exposure to a SAR 0.1 W/kg radiation for 15 min did not cause a significant effect. Based on the results of this experiment, we conclude that membrane receptors could be one of the main targets that RFR interacts with cells, and the dose-rate threshold, in the case of EGF receptors, is between SAR of 0.1 and 0.5 W/kg. The results indicate a sigmoid dependence of RFR effects on intensity.

  14. Central activation of the A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) induces a hypothermic, torpor-like state in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tupone, Domenico; Madden, Christopher J; Morrison, Shaun F

    2013-09-04

    Since central activation of A1 adenosine receptors (A1ARs) plays an important role in the induction of the hypothermic and hypometabolic torpid state in hibernating mammals, we investigated the potential for the A1AR agonist N6-cyclohexyladenosine to induce a hypothermic, torpor-like state in the (nonhibernating) rat. Core and brown adipose tissue temperatures, EEG, heart rate, and arterial pressure were recorded in free-behaving rats, and c-fos expression in the brain was analyzed, following central administration of N6-cyclohexyladenosine. Additionally, we recorded the sympathetic nerve activity to brown adipose tissue; expiratory CO2 and skin, core, and brown adipose tissue temperatures; and shivering EMGs in anesthetized rats following central and localized, nucleus of the solitary tract, administration of N6-cyclohexyladenosine. In rats exposed to a cool (15°C) ambient temperature, central A1AR stimulation produced a torpor-like state similar to that in hibernating species and characterized by a marked fall in body temperature due to an inhibition of brown adipose tissue and shivering thermogenesis that is mediated by neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract. During the induced hypothermia, EEG amplitude and heart rate were markedly reduced. Skipped heartbeats and transient bradycardias occurring during the hypothermia were vagally mediated since they were eliminated by systemic muscarinic receptor blockade. These findings demonstrate that a deeply hypothermic, torpor-like state can be pharmacologically induced in a nonhibernating mammal and that recovery of normothermic homeostasis ensues upon rewarming. These results support the potential for central activation of A1ARs to be used in the induction of a hypothermic, therapeutically beneficial state in humans.

  15. An Allosteric Modulator of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Improves Cardiac Function Following Ischaemia in Murine Isolated Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Anna; Scammells, Peter J.; White, Paul J.; Devine, Shane M.; Rose’Meyer, Roselyn B.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of an allosteric modulator of the adenosine A1 receptors was investigated using an ischaemia-reperfusion protocol in murine isolated hearts. Isolated hearts were perfused with Kreb-Henseleit solution gassed with carbogen gas (95% O2 and 5% CO2) in Langendorff mode and electrically paced at 480 bpm. Following 20 min equilibration and 20 min global normothermic ischaemia, the allosteric modulator VCP333 (1 μM) or the adenosine A1 receptor partial agonist VCP102 (10 μM) were infused after 5 min of reperfusion for 15 min. Upon termination of the drug treatment, reperfusion continued for a further 40 min. At the end of 60 min reperfusion, treatment with VCP333 or VCP102 improved the recovery of the left ventricular developed pressure when compared to control group responses (p < 0.05). Neither compound affected end diastolic pressure, coronary flow rates or dP/dtmax values when compared to control tissues during reperfusion (p > 0.05). The infusion of VCP102 or VCP333 during reperfusion reduced cardiac troponin I efflux to 6.7% and 25% respectively of control heart efflux (p < 0.05). This data indicates that the allosteric modulator of the adenosine A1 receptor (VCP333) has similar characteristics to the adenosine receptor partial agonist VCP102 as it improves cardiac function and reduces myocardial cell death following an ischaemic episode. PMID:24276124

  16. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modulation at GPCRs: insight from a binding kinetics study at the human A1 adenosine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Venhorst, Suzanne N; Massink, Arnault; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Vauquelin, Georges; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many GPCRs can be allosterically modulated by small-molecule ligands. This modulation is best understood in terms of the kinetics of the ligand–receptor interaction. However, many current kinetic assays require at least the (radio)labelling of the orthosteric ligand, which is impractical for studying a range of ligands. Here, we describe the application of a so-called competition association assay at the adenosine A1 receptor for this purpose. Experimental Approach We used a competition association assay to examine the binding kinetics of several unlabelled orthosteric agonists of the A1 receptor in the absence or presence of two allosteric modulators. We also tested three bitopic ligands, in which an orthosteric and an allosteric pharmacophore were covalently linked with different spacer lengths. The relevance of the competition association assay for the binding kinetics of the bitopic ligands was also explored by analysing simulated data. Key Results The binding kinetics of an unlabelled orthosteric ligand were affected by the addition of an allosteric modulator and such effects were probe- and concentration-dependent. Covalently linking the orthosteric and allosteric pharmacophores into one bitopic molecule had a substantial effect on the overall on- or off-rate. Conclusion and Implications The competition association assay is a useful tool for exploring the allosteric modulation of the human adenosine A1 receptor. This assay may have general applicability to study allosteric modulation at other GPCRs as well. PMID:25040887

  17. The ephrin-A1 ligand and its receptor, EphA2, are expressed during tumor neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, K; Pasqualini, R; Lindberg, R A; Kain, R; Freeman, A L; Pasquale, E B

    2000-12-07

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ephrin ligands have been implicated in embryonic vascular development and in in vivo models of angiogenesis. Eph proteins may also regulate tumor neovascularization, but this role has not been previously investigated. To screen for Eph proteins expressed in tumor blood vessels, we used tumor xenografts grown in nude mice from MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells or KS1767 human Kaposi's sarcoma cells. By immunohistochemistry, the ephrin-A1 ligand and one of its receptors, EphA2, were detected throughout tumor vasculature. Double-labeling with anti-CD34 antibodies demonstrated that both ephrin-A1 and EphA2 were expressed in xenograft endothelial cells and also tumor cells. Furthermore, EphA2 was tyrosine-phosphorylated in the xenograft tumors, indicating that it was activated, presumably by interacting with ephrin-A1. Ephrin-A1 and EphA2 were also detected in both the vasculature and tumor cells of surgically removed human cancers. In an in vitro angiogenesis model, a dominant negative form of EphA2 inhibited capillary tube-like formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), demonstrating a requirement for EphA receptor signaling. These data suggest that ephrin-A1 and EphA2 play a role in human cancers, at least in part by influencing tumor neovascularization. Eph proteins may represent promising new targets for antiangiogenic cancer treatments.

  18. Theobromine-Induced Changes in A1 Purinergic Receptor Gene Expression and Distribution in a Rat Brain Alzheimer's Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Mendiola-Precoma, Jesus; Padilla, Karla; Rodríguez-Cruz, Alfredo; Berumen, Laura C; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is mainly characterized by accumulation in the brain of extra- and intraneuronal amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins, respectively, which selectively affect specific regions, particularly the neocortex and the hippocampus. Sporadic AD is mainly caused by an increase in apolipoprotein E, a component of chylomicrons, which are cholesterol transporters in the brain. Recent studies have shown that high lipid levels, especially cholesterol, are linked to AD. Adenosine is an atypical neurotransmitter that regulates a wide range of physiological functions by activating four P1 receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) and P2 purinergic receptors that are G protein-coupled. A1 receptors are involved in the inhibition of neurotransmitter release, which could be related to AD. The aim of the present work was to study the effects of a lard-enriched diet (LED) on cognitive and memory processes in adult rats (6 months of age) as well as the effect of theobromine on these processes. The results indicated that the fat-enriched diet resulted in a long-term deterioration in cognitive and memory functions. Increased levels of Aβ protein and IL-1β were also observed in the rats fed with a high-cholesterol diet, which were used to validate the AD animal model. In addition, the results of qPCR and immunohistochemistry indicated a decrease in gene expression and distribution of A1 purinegic receptor, respectively, in the hippocampus of LED-fed rats. Interestingly, theobromine, at both concentrations tested, restored A1 receptor levels and improved cognitive functions and Aβ levels for a dose of 30 mg/L drinking water.

  19. Adenosine A1 receptor activation modulates N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) preconditioning phenotype in the brain.

    PubMed

    Constantino, Leandra C; Pamplona, Fabrício A; Matheus, Filipe C; Ludka, Fabiana K; Gomez-Soler, Maricel; Ciruela, Francisco; Boeck, Carina R; Prediger, Rui D; Tasca, Carla I

    2015-04-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) preconditioning is induced by subtoxic doses of NMDA and it promotes a transient state of resistance against subsequent lethal insults. Interestingly, this mechanism of neuroprotection depends on adenosine A1 receptors (A1R), since blockade of A1R precludes this phenomenon. In this study we evaluated the consequences of NMDA preconditioning on the hippocampal A1R biology (i.e. expression, binding properties and functionality). Accordingly, we measured A1R expression in NMDA preconditioned mice (75mg/kg, i.p.; 24h) and showed that neither the total amount of receptor, nor the A1R levels in the synaptic fraction was altered. In addition, the A1R binding affinity to the antagonist [(3)H] DPCPX was slightly increased in total membrane extracts of hippocampus from preconditioned mice. Next, we evaluated the impact of NMDA preconditioning on A1R functioning by measuring the A1R-mediated regulation of glutamate uptake into hippocampal slices and on behavioral responses in the open field and hot plate tests. NMDA preconditioning increased glutamate uptake into hippocampal slices without altering the expression of glutamate transporter GLT-1. Interestingly, NMDA preconditioning also induced antinociception in the hot plate test and both effects were reversed by post-activation of A1R with the agonist CCPA (0.2mg/kg, i.p.). NMDA preconditioning or A1R modulation did not alter locomotor activity in the open field. Overall, the results described herein provide new evidence that post-activation of A1R modulates NMDA preconditioning-mediated responses, pointing to the importance of the cross-talk between glutamatergic and adenosinergic systems to neuroprotection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, and In Vivo Antinociceptive Effects of Selective A1Adenosine Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Scortichini, Mirko; Belardo, Carmela; Boccella, Serena; Luongo, Livio; Capone, Fabio; Kachler, Sonja; Vita, Patrizia; Del Bello, Fabio; Maione, Sabatino; Lavecchia, Antonio; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Cappellacci, Loredana

    2018-01-11

    Our previous work discovered that combining the appropriate 5'- and N 6 -substitution in adenosine derivatives leads to the highly selective human A 1 adenosine receptor (hA 1 AR) agonists or highly potent dual hA 1 AR agonists and hA 3 AR antagonists. In order to explore novel dual adenosine receptor ligands, a series of N 6 -substituted-5'-pyrazolyl-adenosine and 2-chloro-adenosine derivatives were synthesized and assayed in vitro at all ARs. The N 6 -(±)-endo-norbornyl derivative 12 was the most potent and selective at A 1 AR and effective as an analgesic in formalin test in mice, but none of the 5'-pyrazolyl series compounds showed a dual behavior at hA 1 and hA 3 AR. Molecular modeling studies rationalized the structure-activity relationships and the selectivity profiles of the new series of A 1 AR agonists. Interestingly, an unexpected inverted binding mode of the N 6 -tetrahydrofuranyl derivative 14 was hypothesized to explain its low affinity at A 1 AR.

  1. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of carbamazepine-resistant seizure-like events in human neocortical slices.

    PubMed

    Klaft, Zin-Juan; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Salar, Seda; Calişkan, Gürsel; Schulz, Steffen B; Schneider, Ulf C; Horn, Peter; Koch, Arend; Holtkamp, Martin; Gabriel, Siegrun; Gerevich, Zoltan; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    The need for alternative pharmacologic strategies in treatment of epilepsies is pressing for about 30% of patients with epilepsy who do not experience satisfactory seizure control with present treatments. In temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) even up to 80% of patients are pharmacoresistant, and surgical resection of the ictogenic tissue is only possible for a minority of TLE patients. In this study we investigate purinergic modulation of drug-resistant seizure-like events (SLEs) in human temporal cortex slices. Layer V/VI field potentials from a total of 77 neocortical slices from 17 pharmacoresistant patients were recorded to monitor SLEs induced by application of 8 mM [K(+) ] and 50 μm bicuculline. Activating A1 receptors with a specific agonist completely suppressed SLEs in 73% of human temporal cortex slices. In the remaining slices, incidence of SLEs was markedly reduced. Because a subportion of slices can be pharmacosensitive, we tested effects of an A1 agonist, in slices insensitive to a high dose of carbamazepine (50 μm). Also in these cases the A1 agonist was equally efficient. Moreover, ATP and adenosine blocked or modulated SLEs, an effect mediated not by P2 receptors but rather by adenosine A1 receptors. Selective activation of A1 receptors mediates a strong anticonvulsant action in human neocortical slices from pharmacoresistant patients. We propose that our human slice model of seizure-like activity is a feasible option for future studies investigating new antiepileptic drug (AED) candidates. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Adenosine A1 Receptors in Mouse Pontine Reticular Formation Depress Breathing, Increase Anesthesia Recovery Time, and Decrease Acetylcholine Release

    PubMed Central

    Gettys, George C.; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Methods Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX), or SPA and DPCPX. Results First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (−18%), tidal volume (−12%) and minute ventilation (−16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). DPCPX alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, decrease in RoRR, and decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and DPCPX blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Conclusions Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing. PMID:23263018

  3. Adenosine A(1) receptors in mouse pontine reticular formation depress breathing, increase anesthesia recovery time, and decrease acetylcholine release.

    PubMed

    Gettys, George C; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2013-02-01

    Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and the time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after a PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine, or SPA and 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine. First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (-18%), tidal volume (-12%), and minute ventilation (-16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, a decrease in RoRR, and a decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing.

  4. S100A1 is released from ischemic cardiomyocytes and signals myocardial damage via Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Rohde, David; Schön, Christoph; Boerries, Melanie; Didrihsone, Ieva; Ritterhoff, Julia; Kubatzky, Katharina F; Völkers, Mirko; Herzog, Nicole; Mähler, Mona; Tsoporis, James N; Parker, Thomas G; Linke, Björn; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Gao, Erhe; Peppel, Karsten; Katus, Hugo A; Most, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Members of the S100 protein family have been reported to function as endogenous danger signals (alarmins) playing an active role in tissue inflammation and repair when released from necrotic cells. Here, we investigated the role of S100A1, the S100 isoform with highest abundance in cardiomyocytes, when released from damaged cardiomyocytes during myocardial infarction (MI). Patients with acute MI showed significantly increased S100A1 serum levels. Experimental MI in mice induced comparable S100A1 release. S100A1 internalization was observed in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) adjacent to damaged cardiomyocytes. In vitro analyses revealed exclusive S100A1 endocytosis by CFs, followed by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent activation of MAP kinases and NF-κB. CFs exposed to S100A1 assumed an immunomodulatory and anti-fibrotic phenotype characterized i.e. by enhanced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1) and decreased collagen levels. In mice, intracardiac S100A1 injection recapitulated these transcriptional changes. Moreover, antibody-mediated neutralization of S100A1 enlarged infarct size and worsened left ventricular functional performance post-MI. Our study demonstrates alarmin properties for S100A1 from necrotic cardiomyocytes. However, the potentially beneficial role of extracellular S100A1 in MI-related inflammation and repair warrants further investigation. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  5. Ephrin-A1 expression induced by S100A8 is mediated by the toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Omori, Tsutomu; Komatsu, Akiko; Tomita, Takeshi; Deguchi, Atsuko; Maru, Yoshiro

    2013-11-01

    The deregulation of Eph/ephrin protein expression has been shown to lead to tumor development and progression. Both mRNA and protein expression analyses using clinical samples have demonstrated that ephrin-A1 is over-expressed in various cancers and positively correlates with a poor prognosis for cancer patients. The prognosis of cancer patients depends on metastasis to distant organs. We previously demonstrated that ADAM12 metalloproteinase cleaved ephrin-A1 and ADAM12-cleaved ephrin-A1 enhanced vascular permeability by degrading VE-cadherin and the EphA2 receptor at the plasma membrane. An increase of soluble ephrin-A1 levels in the serum facilitated tumor cell recruitment to the lungs, which resulted in lung metastasis. We also found that ephrin-A1 was overexpressed in 3LL tumors, a highly metastatic tumor, in mice and TNFα, an authentic positive regulator of ephrin-A1, was not elevated in the tumors, whereas S100A8 was. Moreover, S100A8 induced ephrin-A1 expression mediated by the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). S100A8 is known to be an endogenous ligand for TLR4 and its expression was shown to be increased in the lungs at the premetastatic phase. Thus, S100A8 and ephrin-A1 contribute to lung metastasis. Therefore, elucidating the regulation mechanism of ephrin-A1 overexpression is of importance and may lead to the development of therapeutic drugs against tumor growth and metastasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence for deactivation of both ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase by adenosine A1 receptor activation in the rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kitakaze, M; Hori, M; Minamino, T; Takashima, S; Komamura, K; Node, K; Kurihara, T; Morioka, T; Sato, H; Inoue, M

    1994-01-01

    Adenosine, an important regulator of many cardiac functions, is produced by ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. The activity of these enzymes is influenced by several ischemia-sensitive metabolic factors, e.g., ATP, ADP, H+, and inorganic phosphate. However, there is no clear evidence that adenosine itself affects 5'-nucleotidase activity. This study tested whether adenosine decreases the activity of ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from adult male Wistar rats and suspended in the modified Hepes-Tyrode buffer solution. After stabilization, isolated cardiomyocytes were incubated with and without adenosine (10(-9) - 10(-4) M). Ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity was decreased by exogenous adenosine (ectosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity, 20.6 +/- 2.3 vs. 8.6 +/- 1.6 mumol/min per 10(6) cells [P < 0.05]; cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity, 2.47 +/- 0.58 vs. 1.61 +/- 0.54 mumol/min per 10(6) cells [P < 0.05] at 10(-6) M adenosine) after 30 min. The decrease in ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity was inhibited by 8-phenyltheophylline and pertussis toxin, and was mimicked by N6-cyclohexyladenosine, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist. Neither CGS21680C, and A2 receptor agonist, nor cycloheximide deactivated ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. Thus, we conclude that activation of adenosine A1 receptors is coupled to Gi proteins and attenuates ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cardiomyocytes. Images PMID:7989602

  7. Evidence for deactivation of both ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase by adenosine A1 receptor activation in the rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kitakaze, M; Hori, M; Minamino, T; Takashima, S; Komamura, K; Node, K; Kurihara, T; Morioka, T; Sato, H; Inoue, M

    1994-12-01

    Adenosine, an important regulator of many cardiac functions, is produced by ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. The activity of these enzymes is influenced by several ischemia-sensitive metabolic factors, e.g., ATP, ADP, H+, and inorganic phosphate. However, there is no clear evidence that adenosine itself affects 5'-nucleotidase activity. This study tested whether adenosine decreases the activity of ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from adult male Wistar rats and suspended in the modified Hepes-Tyrode buffer solution. After stabilization, isolated cardiomyocytes were incubated with and without adenosine (10(-9) - 10(-4) M). Ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity was decreased by exogenous adenosine (ectosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity, 20.6 +/- 2.3 vs. 8.6 +/- 1.6 mumol/min per 10(6) cells [P < 0.05]; cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity, 2.47 +/- 0.58 vs. 1.61 +/- 0.54 mumol/min per 10(6) cells [P < 0.05] at 10(-6) M adenosine) after 30 min. The decrease in ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity was inhibited by 8-phenyltheophylline and pertussis toxin, and was mimicked by N6-cyclohexyladenosine, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist. Neither CGS21680C, and A2 receptor agonist, nor cycloheximide deactivated ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase. Thus, we conclude that activation of adenosine A1 receptors is coupled to Gi proteins and attenuates ectosolic and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cardiomyocytes.

  8. The EphA2 Receptor and EphrinA1 Ligand in Solid Tumors: Function and Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wykosky, Jill; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands have been studied extensively for their roles in developmental processes. In recent years, Eph receptors and ephrins have been found to be integral players in cancer formation and progression. Among these are EphA2 and ephrinA1, which are involved in the development and maintenance of many different types of solid tumors. The function of EphA2 and ephrinA1 in tumorigenesis and tumor progression is complex and seems to be dependent on cell type and microenvironment. These variables affect the expression of the EphA2 and ephrinA1 proteins, the pathways through which they induce signaling, and the functional consequences of that signaling on the behavior of tumor cells and tumor-associated cells. This review will specifically focus on the roles that EphA2 and ephrinA1 play in the different cell types that contribute to the malignancy of solid tumors, with emphasis on the opportunities for therapeutic targeting. PMID:19074825

  9. The EphA2 receptor and ephrinA1 ligand in solid tumors: function and therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Wykosky, Jill; Debinski, Waldemar

    2008-12-01

    The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands have been studied extensively for their roles in developmental processes. In recent years, Eph receptors and ephrins have been found to be integral players in cancer formation and progression. Among these are EphA2 and ephrinA1, which are involved in the development and maintenance of many different types of solid tumors. The function of EphA2 and ephrinA1 in tumorigenesis and tumor progression is complex and seems to be dependent on cell type and microenvironment. These variables affect the expression of the EphA2 and ephrinA1 proteins, the pathways through which they induce signaling, and the functional consequences of that signaling on the behavior of tumor cells and tumor-associated cells. This review will specifically focus on the roles that EphA2 and ephrinA1 play in the different cell types that contribute to the malignancy of solid tumors, with emphasis on the opportunities for therapeutic targeting.

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated upregulation of human CYP27A1, a potential anti-atherogenic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wanjin; Norlin, Maria; Wikvall, Kjell

    2008-01-01

    Sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) is required for the hepatic conversion of cholesterol into bile acids and for production of 27-hydroxycholesterol which affects cholesterol homeostasis in several ways. Dexamethasone increases hepatic bile acid biosynthesis and CYP27A1-mediated enzyme activity in HepG2 cells. This study examines the mechanism of the dexamethasone-induced effect on the human CYP27A1 promoter. Dexamethasone treatment of HepG2 cells overexpressed with glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GRalpha) increased the CYP27A1 promoter activity more than four-fold as compared with untreated cells. The GR-antagonist mifepristone almost completely abolished the dexamethasone-induced effect on the promoter activity. Progressive deletion analysis of the CYP27A1 promoter indicated that sequences involved in GR-mediated induction by dexamethasone are present in a region between -1094 and -792. Several putative GRE sites could be found in this region and EMSA experiments revealed that two of these could bind GR. Site-directed mutagenesis of GR-binding sequences in the CYP27A1 promoter identified a GRE at -824/-819 important for GR-mediated regulation of the transcriptional activity. Endogenous and pharmacological glucocorticoids may have a strong impact on several aspects of cholesterol homeostasis and other processes related to CYP27A1-mediated metabolism. The glucocorticoid-mediated induction of human CYP27A1 transcription is of particular interest due to the anti-atherogenic properties ascribed to this enzyme.

  11. Structural determinants of a conserved enantiomer-selective carvone binding pocket in the human odorant receptor OR1A1.

    PubMed

    Geithe, Christiane; Protze, Jonas; Kreuchwig, Franziska; Krause, Gerd; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2017-11-01

    Chirality is a common phenomenon within odorants. Most pairs of enantiomers show only moderate differences in odor quality. One example for enantiomers that are easily discriminated by their odor quality is the carvones: humans significantly distinguish between the spearmint-like (R)-(-)-carvone and caraway-like (S)-(+)-carvone enantiomers. Moreover, for the (R)-(-)-carvone, an anosmia is observed in about 8% of the population, suggesting enantioselective odorant receptors (ORs). With only about 15% de-orphaned human ORs, the lack of OR crystal structures, and few comprehensive studies combining in silico and experimental approaches to elucidate structure-function relations of ORs, knowledge on cognate odorant/OR interactions is still sparse. An adjusted homology modeling approach considering OR-specific proline-caused conformations, odorant docking studies, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and subsequent functional studies with recombinant ORs in a cell-based, real-time luminescence assay revealed 11 amino acid positions to constitute an enantioselective binding pocket necessary for a carvone function in human OR1A1 and murine Olfr43, respectively. Here, we identified enantioselective molecular determinants in both ORs that discriminate between minty and caraway odor. Comparison with orthologs from 36 mammalian species demonstrated a hominid-specific carvone binding pocket with about 100% conservation. Moreover, we identified loss-of-function SNPs associated with the carvone binding pocket of OR1A1. Given carvone enantiomer-specific receptor activation patterns including OR1A1, our data suggest OR1A1 as a candidate receptor for constituting a carvone enantioselective phenotype, which may help to explain mechanisms underlying a (R)-(-)-carvone-specific anosmia in humans.

  12. Modulation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in C6 glioma cells during hypoxia: involvement of endogenous adenosine.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Carlos A; León, David; Ruiz, María Angeles; Albasanz, José Luis; Martín, Mairena

    2008-06-01

    During hypoxia, extracellular adenosine levels are increased to prevent cell damage, playing a neuroprotective role mainly through adenosine A(1) receptors. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of hypoxia in both adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors endogenously expressed in C6 glioma cells. Two hours of hypoxia (5% O(2)) caused a significant decrease in adenosine A(1) receptors. The same effect was observed at 6 h and 24 h of hypoxia. However, adenosine A(2A) receptors were significantly increased at the same times. These effects were not due to hypoxia-induced alterations in cells number or viability. Changes in receptor density were not associated with variations in the rate of gene expression. Furthermore, hypoxia did not alter HIF-1alpha expression in C6 cells. However, HIF-3alpha, CREB and CREM were decreased. Adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor density in normoxic C6 cells treated with adenosine for 2, 6 and 24 h was similar to that observed in cells after oxygen deprivation. When C6 cells were subjected to hypoxia in the presence of adenosine deaminase, the density of receptors was not significantly modulated. Moreover, DPCPX, an A(1) receptor antagonist, blocked the effects of hypoxia on these receptors, while ZM241385, an A(2A) receptor antagonist, was unable to prevent these changes. These results suggest that moderate hypoxia modulates adenosine receptors and cAMP response elements in glial cells, through a mechanism in which endogenous adenosine and tonic A(1) receptor activation is involved.

  13. A novel mechanism of renal blood flow autoregulation and the autoregulatory role of A1 adenosine receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Just, Armin; Arendshorst, William J

    2007-11-01

    Autoregulation of renal blood flow (RBF) is mediated by a fast myogenic response (MR; approximately 5 s), a slower tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF; approximately 25 s), and potentially additional mechanisms. A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR) mediate TGF in superficial nephrons and contribute to overall autoregulation, but the impact on the other autoregulatory mechanisms is unknown. We studied dynamic autoregulatory responses of RBF to rapid step increases of renal artery pressure in mice. MR was estimated from autoregulation within the first 5 s, TGF from that at 5-25 s, and a third mechanism from 25-100 s. Genetic deficiency of A1AR (A1AR-/-) reduced autoregulation at 5-25 s by 50%, indicating a residual fourth mechanism resembling TGF kinetics but independent of A1AR. MR and third mechanism were unaltered in A1AR-/-. Autoregulation in A1AR-/- was faster at 5-25 than at 25-100 s suggesting two separate mechanisms. Furosemide in wild-type mice (WT) eliminated the third mechanism and enhanced MR, indicating TGF-MR interaction. In A1AR-/-, furosemide did not further impair autoregulation at 5-25 s, but eliminated the third mechanism and enhanced MR. The resulting time course was the same as during furosemide in WT, indicating that A1AR do not affect autoregulation during furosemide inhibition of TGF. We conclude that at least one novel mechanism complements MR and TGF in RBF autoregulation, that is slower than MR and TGF and sensitive to furosemide, but not mediated by A1AR. A fourth mechanism with kinetics similar to TGF but independent of A1AR and furosemide might also contribute. A1AR mediate classical TGF but not TGF-MR interaction.

  14. Dipyridamole attenuates ischemia reperfusion induced acute kidney injury through adenosinergic A1 and A2A receptor agonism in rats.

    PubMed

    Puri, Nikkita; Mohey, Vinita; Singh, Manjinder; Kaur, Tajpreet; Pathak, Devendra; Buttar, Harpal Singh; Singh, Amrit Pal

    2016-04-01

    Dipyridamole (DYP) is an anti-platelet agent with marked vasodilator, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity. The present study investigated the role of adenosine receptors in DYP-mediated protection against ischemia reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in rats. The rats were subjected to bilateral renal ischemia for 40 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. The renal damage induced by ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) was assessed by measuring creatinine clearance, blood urea nitrogen, uric acid, plasma potassium, fractional excretion of sodium, and microproteinuria in rats. The oxidative stress in renal tissues was assessed by quantification of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, superoxide anion generation, and reduced glutathione level. The hematoxylin-eosin staining was carried out to observe histopathological changes in renal tissues. DYP (10 and 30 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, i.p.) was administered 30 min before subjecting the rats to renal IRI. In separate groups, caffeine (50 mg/kg, i.p.), an adenosinergic A1 and A2A receptor antagonist was administered with and without DYP treatment before subjecting the rats to renal IRI. The ischemia reperfusion-induced AKI was demonstrated by significant changes in serum as well as urinary parameters, enhanced oxidative stress, and histopathological changes in renal tissues. The administration of DYP demonstrated protection against AKI. The prior treatment with caffeine abolished DYP-mediated reno-protection suggesting role of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors in DYP-mediated reno-protection in rats. It is concluded that adenosine receptors find their definite involvement in DYP-mediated anti-oxidative and reno-protective effect against ischemia reperfusion-induced AKI.

  15. PAX3-FOXO1A Expression in Rhabdomyosarcoma Is Driven by the Targetable Nuclear Receptor NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Alexandra; Rodrigues-Hoffman, Aline; Safe, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) is a devastating pediatric disease driven by expression of the oncogenic fusion gene PAX3-FOXO1A. In this study, we report overexpression of the nuclear receptor NR4A1 in rhabdomyosarcomas that is sufficient to drive high expression of PAX3-FOXO1A there. RNAi-mediated silencing of NR4A1 decreased expression of PAX3-FOXO1A and its downstream effector genes. Similarly, cell treatment with the NR4A1 small-molecule antagonists 1,1-bis(3-indolyl)-1-(p-hydroxy or p-carbomethoxyphenyl)methane (C-DIM) decreased PAX3-FOXO1A. Mechanistic investigations revealed a requirement for the NR4A1/Sp4 complex to bind GC-rich promoter regions to elevate transcription of the PAX3-FOXO1A gene. In parallel, NR4A1 also regulated expression of β1-integrin, which with PAX3-FOXO1A, contributed to tumor cell migration that was blocked by C-DIM/NR4A1 antagonists. Taken together, our results provide a preclinical rationale for the use of NR4A1 small-molecule antagonists to treat ARMS and other rhabdomyosarcomas driven by PAX3-FOXO1A. Cancer Res; 77(3); 732-41. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. A novel, potent, and specific ephrinA1-based cytotoxin against EphA2 receptor expressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wykosky, Jill; Gibo, Denise M; Debinski, Waldemar

    2007-12-01

    We have previously shown that the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and represents a novel, attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of brain tumors. Here, we have developed an EphA2-targeted agent, ephrinA1-PE38QQR, a novel cytotoxin composed of ephrinA1, a ligand for EphA2, and PE38QQR, a mutated form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. EphrinA1-PE38QQR showed potent and dose-dependent killing of GBM cells overexpressing the EphA2 receptor in cell viability and clonogenic survival assays, with an average IC(50) of approximately 10(-11) mol/L. The conjugate was also highly effective in killing breast and prostate cancer cells overexpressing EphA2. The cytotoxic effect of ephrinA1-PE38QQR was specific, as it was neutralized by an excess of EphA2 ligands. Moreover, normal human endothelial cells and breast cancer cells that do not overexpress EphA2, as well as GBM cells that have down-regulated EphA2, were not susceptible to the cytotoxin. EphrinA1-PE38QQR-mediated cytotoxicity induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, which was, however, not responsible for cell death in response to the conjugate. In addition, the conjugate elicited no changes in the activity of survival pathways such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase, measured by AKT phosphorylation. This is the first attempt to create a cytotoxic therapy using any of the ephrin ligands of either class (A or B) conjugated to a bacterial toxin. EphrinA1-PE38QQR is very potent and specific, produces cell death that is caspase independent, and forms the basis for the further development of clinically applicable EphA2-targeted cytotoxins.

  17. Prolonged P300 latency in children with the D[sub 2] dopamine receptor A1 allele

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Berman, S.M.; Ozkaragoz, T.Z.

    1994-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated the presence of a hereditary component in the generation of the P300, or P3, a late positive component of the event-related potential. Moreover, the dopaminergic system has been implicated in the P3. In the present study, 98 healthy Caucasian boys, mean age of 12.5 years and of above-average intelligence, were studied. The sample was composed of 32 sons of active alcoholic (SAA) fathers, 36 sons of recovering alcoholic (SRA) fathers, and 30 sons of social drinker (SSD) fathers, with none of them having yet begun to consume alcohol or other drugs. TaqI A D[sub 2] dopaminemore » receptor alleles (A1 and A2) were determined. A significant difference in the frequency of the A1 allele was found among these three groups of boys, with the SAA group having the highest A1 allele frequency (.313), followed by the SRA (.139) and the SSD (.133) groups. The relationship of the A1 and A2 alleles to P3 amplitude and latency was also determined. The results showed no significant difference in P3 amplitude between boys with the A1 and A2 allele. However, P3 latency was significantly longer in the total sample of boys with the A1 allele compared with those carrying the A2 allele. These findings suggest that polymorphism of the D[sub 2] dopamine receptor gene is an important determinant of P3 latency. 84 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  18. Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit impairs recency-dependent object recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, David J.; Hindley, Emma; Smeaton, Emily; Denny, Nick; Taylor, Amy; Barkus, Chris; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H.; Bannerman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit impairs short-term spatial recognition memory. It has been suggested that short-term recognition depends upon memory caused by the recent presentation of a stimulus that is independent of contextual–retrieval processes. The aim of the present set of experiments was to test whether the role of GluA1 extends to nonspatial recognition memory. Wild-type and GluA1 knockout mice were tested on the standard object recognition task and a context-independent recognition task that required recency-dependent memory. In a first set of experiments it was found that GluA1 deletion failed to impair performance on either of the object recognition or recency-dependent tasks. However, GluA1 knockout mice displayed increased levels of exploration of the objects in both the sample and test phases compared to controls. In contrast, when the time that GluA1 knockout mice spent exploring the objects was yoked to control mice during the sample phase, it was found that GluA1 deletion now impaired performance on both the object recognition and the recency-dependent tasks. GluA1 deletion failed to impair performance on a context-dependent recognition task regardless of whether object exposure in knockout mice was yoked to controls or not. These results demonstrate that GluA1 is necessary for nonspatial as well as spatial recognition memory and plays an important role in recency-dependent memory processes. PMID:21378100

  19. Diadenosine tetraphosphate stimulates atrial ANP release via A(1) receptor: involvement of K(ATP) channel and PKC.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kuichang; Cao, Chunhua; Bai, Guang Yi; Kim, Sung Zoo; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2007-07-01

    Diadenosine polyphosphates (APnAs) are endogenous compounds and exert diverse cardiovascular functions. However, the effects of APnAs on atrial ANP release and contractility have not been studied. In this study, the effects of diadenosine tetraphosphate (AP4A) on atrial ANP release and contractility, and their mechanisms were studied using isolated perfused rat atria. Treatment of atria with AP4A resulted in decreases in atrial contractility and extracellular fluid (ECF) translocation whereas ANP secretion and cAMP levels in perfusate were increased in a dose-dependent manner. These effects of AP4A were attenuated by A(1) receptor antagonist but not by A(2A) or A(3) receptor antagonist. Other purinoceptor antagonists also did not show any effects on AP4A-induced ANF release and contractility. The increment of ANP release and negative inotropy induced by AP4A was similar to those induced by AP3A, AP5A, and AP6A. Protein kinase A inhibitors accentuated AP4A-induced ANP secretion. In contrast, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, protein kinase C or sarcolemma K(ATP) channel completely blocked AP4A-induced ANP secretion. However, an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase or mitochondria K(ATP) channel had no significant modification of AP4A effects. These results suggest that AP4A regulates atrial inotropy and ANP release mainly through A(1) receptor signaling involving phospholipase C-protein kinase C and sarcolemmal K(ATP) channel and that protein kinase A negatively modulates the effects of AP4A.

  20. Effects of A1-adenosine receptor antagonists on purinergic transmission in the guinea-pig vas deferens in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Todd A; Brock, James A

    1999-01-01

    Intracellularly recorded excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) were used to study the effects of adenosine receptor antagonists on neurotransmitter release from postganglionic sympathetic nerve terminals in the guinea-pig vas deferens in vitro.The A1 adenosine receptor antagonists, 8-phenyltheophylline (10 μM) and 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (0.1 μM), increased the amplitude of e.j.ps evoked during trains of 20 stimuli at 1 Hz in the presence, but not in the absence, of the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine (1 μM) or the non-selective α-adrenoceptor antagonist, phentolamine (1 μM).Adenosine (100 μM) reduced the amplitude of e.j.ps, both in the presence and in the absence of phentolamine (1 μM). This inhibitory effect of adenosine is most likely caused by a reduction in transmitter release as there was no detectable change in spontaneous e.j.p. amplitudes.In the presence of phentolamine, application of the adenosine uptake inhibitor, S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (0.1 μM), had no effect on e.j.p. amplitudes.The phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (100 μM), significantly increased the amplitudes of all e.j.ps evoked during trains of 20 stimuli at 1 Hz, both in the presence and in the absence of phentolamine (1 μM).These results suggest that endogenous adenosine modulates neurotransmitter release by an action at prejunctional A1 adenosine receptors only when α2-adrenoceptors are blocked. PMID:10372818

  1. Vitamin D receptor activation down-regulates the small heterodimer partner and increases CYP7A1 to lower cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Chow, Edwin C Y; Magomedova, Lilia; Quach, Holly P; Patel, Rucha; Durk, Matthew R; Fan, Jianghong; Maeng, Han-Joo; Irondi, Kamdi; Anakk, Sayeepriyadarshini; Moore, David D; Cummins, Carolyn L; Pang, K Sandy

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) on hepatic activity of human cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and cholesterol metabolism. We studied these processes in mice in vivo and mouse and human hepatocytes. Farnesoid X receptor (Fxr)(-/-), small heterodimer partner (Shp)(-/-), and C57BL/6 (wild-type control) mice were fed normal or Western diets for 3 weeks and were then given intraperitoneal injections of vehicle (corn oil) or 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3; 4 doses, 2.5 μg/kg, every other day). Plasma and tissue samples were collected and levels of Vdr, Shp, Cyp7a1, Cyp24a1, and rodent fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 15 expression, as well as levels of cholesterol, were measured. We studied the regulation of Shp by Vdr using reporter and mobility shift assays in transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells, quantitative polymerase chain reaction with mouse tissues and mouse and human hepatocytes, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with mouse liver. We first confirmed the presence of Vdr mRNA and protein expression in livers of mice. In mice fed normal diets and given injections of 1,25(OH)2D3, liver and plasma concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3 increased and decreased in unison. Changes in hepatic Cyp7a1 messenger RNA (mRNA) correlated with those of Cyp24a1 (a Vdr target gene) and inversely with Shp mRNA, but not ileal Fgf15 mRNA. Similarly, incubation with 1,25(OH)2D3 increased levels of Cyp24a1/CYP24A1 and Cyp7a1/CYP7A1 mRNA in mouse and human hepatocytes, and reduced levels of Shp mRNA in mouse hepatocytes. In Fxr(-/-) and wild-type mice with hypercholesterolemia, injection of 1,25(OH)2D3 consistently reduced levels of plasma and liver cholesterol and Shp mRNA, and increased hepatic Cyp7a1 mRNA and protein; these changes were not observed in Shp(-/-) mice given 1,25(OH)2D3 and fed Western diets. Truncation of the human small heterodimer partner (SHP) promoter and deletion analyses revealed VDR-dependent inhibition of

  2. Adenosine A1 Receptor Protects Against Cisplatin Ototoxicity by Suppressing the NOX3/STAT1 Inflammatory Pathway in the Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Tejbeer; Borse, Vikrant; Sheth, Sandeep; Sheehan, Kelly; Ghosh, Sumana; Tupal, Srinivasan; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used antineoplastic agent that produces ototoxicity that is mediated in part by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via the NOX3 NADPH oxidase pathway in the cochlea. Recent studies implicate ROS generation in mediating inflammatory and apoptotic processes and hearing loss by activating signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1). In this study, we show that the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) protects against cisplatin ototoxicity by suppressing an inflammatory response initiated by ROS generation via NOX3 NADPH oxidase, leading to inhibition of STAT1. Trans-tympanic administration of the A1AR agonist R-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA) inhibited cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, as measured by auditory brainstem responses and scanning electron microscopy in male Wistar rats. This was associated with reduced NOX3 expression, STAT1 activation, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and apoptosis in the cochlea. In vitro studies in UB/OC-1 cells, an organ of Corti immortalized cell line, showed that R-PIA reduced cisplatin-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 Ser727 (but not Tyr701) and STAT1 luciferase activity by suppressing the ERK1/2, p38, and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. R-PIA also decreased the expression of STAT1 target genes, such as TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and reduced cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. These data suggest that the A1AR provides otoprotection by suppressing NOX3 and inflammation in the cochlea and could serve as an ideal target for otoprotective drug therapy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumors. Its use results in significant and permanent hearing loss, for which no US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment is currently available. In this study, we targeted the cochlear adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) by trans-tympanic injections of the agonist R

  3. S100A1 Protein Does Not Compete with Calmodulin for Ryanodine Receptor Binding but Structurally Alters the Ryanodine Receptor·Calmodulin Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Robyn T.; Nitu, Florentin R.; Rohde, David; Most, Patrick; Bers, Donald M.; Thomas, David D.; Cornea, Razvan L.

    2016-01-01

    S100A1 has been suggested as a therapeutic agent to enhance myocyte Ca2+ cycling in heart failure, but its molecular mode of action is poorly understood. Using FRET, we tested the hypothesis that S100A1 directly competes with calmodulin (CaM) for binding to intact, functional ryanodine receptors type I (RyR1) and II (RyR2) from skeletal and cardiac muscle, respectively. Our FRET readout provides an index of acceptor-labeled CaM binding near donor-labeled FKBP (FK506-binding protein 12.6) on the cytoplasmic domain of RyR in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. S100A1 (0.01–400 μm) partially inhibited FRET (i.e. CaM binding), with Ki > 10 μm, for both RyR1 and RyR2. The high [S100A1] required for partial effects on FRET indicates a lack of competition by S100A1 on CaM/RyR binding under normal physiological conditions. High-resolution analysis of time-resolved FRET detects two structural states of RyR-bound CaM, which respond to [Ca2+] and are isoform-specific. The distribution of these structural states was perturbed only by high micromolar [S100A1], which promoted a shift of bound CaM to a lower FRET orientation (without altering the amount of CaM bound to RyR). Thus, high micromolar S100A1 does alter the CaM/RyR interaction, without involving competition. Nevertheless, submicromolar S100A1 can alter RyR function, an effect that is influenced by both [Ca2+] and [CaM]. We conclude that CaM and S100A1 can concurrently bind to and functionally modulate RyR1 and RyR2, but this does not involve direct competition at the RyR CaM binding site. PMID:27226555

  4. Proximal tubule sphingosine kinase-1 has a critical role in A1 adenosine receptor-mediated renal protection from ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Kim, Joo Yun; Brown, Kevin M.; Haase, Volker H.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Renal ischemia reperfusion injury is a major cause of acute kidney injury. We previously found that renal A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) activation attenuated multiple cell death pathways including necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation. Here, we tested whether induction of cytoprotective sphingosine kinase (SK)-1 and sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) synthesis might be the mechanism of protection. A selective A1AR agonist (CCPA) increased the synthesis of S1P and selectively induced SK-1 in mouse kidney and HK-2 cells. This agonist failed to protect SK1-knockout but protected SK2-knockout mice against renal ischemia reperfusion injury indicating a critical role of SK1 in A1AR-mediated renal protection. Inhibition of SK prevented A1AR-mediated defense against necrosis and apoptosis in HK-2 cells. A selective S1P1R antagonist (W146) and global in vivo gene knockdown of S1P1Rs with small interfering RNA completely abolished the renal protection provided by CCPA. Mice selectively deficient in renal proximal tubule S1P1Rs (S1P1Rflox/flox PEPCKCre/−) were not protected against renal ischemia reperfusion injury by CCPA. Mechanistically, CCPA increased nuclear translocation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α in HK-2 cells and selective hypoxia inducible factor-1α inhibition blocked A1AR-mediated induction of SK1. Thus, proximal tubule SK-1 has a critical role in A1AR-mediated protection against renal ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:22695326

  5. Food cravings, food addiction, and a dopamine-resistant (DRD2 A1) receptor polymorphism in Asian American college students.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Joanna; Trang, Amy; Henning, Susanne M; Wilhalme, Holly; Carpenter, Catherine; Heber, David; Li, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    In an era where obesity remains an important public health concern, food addiction has emerged as a possible contributor to obesity. The DRD2 gene is the most studied polymorphism. The aim of this study was to investigate a relationship between food addiction questionnaires, body composition measurements, and a dopamine- resistant receptor polymorphism (DRD2 A1) among Asian Americans. A total of 84 Asian American college students were recruited. Participants underwent body composition measurement via bioelectrical impedance, answered questionnaires (Food Craving Inventory and Power of Food Scale), and had blood drawn for genotyping (PCR). There was no difference in body composition (BMI, percent body fat) between the A1 (A1A1 or A1A2) and A2 (A2A2) groups. There were statistically significant differences in food cravings of carbohydrates and fast food on the Food Craving Inventory between the A1 and A2 groups (p=0.03), but not for sugar or fat. Among Asian college females, there was also a difference on the Power of Food questionnaire (p=0.04), which was not seen among men. 13 out of 55 women also had >30% body fat at a BMI of 21.4 to 28.5 kg/m2. Greater carbohydrate and fast food craving was associated with the DRD2 A1 versus A2 allele among Asian Americans. Further studies examining the ability of dopamine agonists to affect food craving and to reduce body fat in Asian American are warranted. More studies in food addiction among obese Asian Americans are needed with careful definition of obesity, specifically for Asian women.

  6. 7-Dehydrocholesterol metabolites produced by sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) modulate liver X receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Endo-Umeda, Kaori; Yasuda, Kaori; Sugita, Kazuyuki; Honda, Akira; Ohta, Miho; Ishikawa, Minoru; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Sakaki, Toshiyuki; Makishima, Makoto

    2014-03-01

    7-Dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) is a common precursor of vitamin D3 and cholesterol. Although various oxysterols, oxygenated cholesterol derivatives, have been implicated in cellular signaling pathways, 7-DHC metabolism and potential functions of its metabolites remain poorly understood. We examined 7-DHC metabolism by various P450 enzymes and detected three metabolites produced by sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) using high-performance liquid chromatography. Two were further identified as 25-hydroxy-7-DHC and 26/27-hydroxy-7-DHC. These 7-DHC metabolites were detected in serum of a patient with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Luciferase reporter assays showed that 25-hydroxy-7-DHC activates liver X receptor (LXR) α, LXRβ and vitamin D receptor and that 26/27-hydroxy-7-DHC induces activation of LXRα and LXRβ, although the activities of both compounds on LXRs were weak. In a mammalian two-hybrid assay, 25-hydroxy-7-DHC and 26/27-hydroxy-7-DHC induced interaction between LXRα and a coactivator fragment less efficiently than a natural LXR agonist, 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol. These 7-DHC metabolites did not oppose agonist-induced LXR activation and interacted directly to LXRα in a manner distinct from a potent agonist. These findings indicate that the 7-DHC metabolites are partial LXR activators. Interestingly, 25-hydroxy-7-DHC and 26/27-hydroxy-7-DHC suppressed mRNA expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, an LXR target gene, in HepG2 cells and HaCaT cells, while they weakly increased mRNA levels of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, another LXR target, in HaCaT cells. Thus, 7-DHC is catabolized by CYP27A1 to metabolites that act as selective LXR modulators. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-nociceptive properties of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol in mice: role of A1 adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, AP; Böhmer, AE; Antunes, C; Schallenberger, C; Porciúncula, LO; Elisabetsky, E; Lara, DR; Souza, DO

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Allopurinol is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme xanthine oxidase, used primarily in the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. It is well known that purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. We hypothesized that the inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol, thereby reducing purine degradation, could be a valid strategy to enhance purinergic activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-nociceptive profile of allopurinol on chemical and thermal pain models in mice. Experimental approach Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of vehicle (Tween 10%) or allopurinol (10–400 mg kg−1). Anti-nociceptive effects were measured with intraplantar capsaicin, intraplantar glutamate, tail-flick or hot-plate tests. Key results Allopurinol presented dose-dependent anti-nociceptive effects in all models. The opioid antagonist naloxone did not affect these anti-nociceptive effects. The non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist caffeine and the selective A1 adenosine-receptor antagonist, DPCPX, but not the selective A2A adenosine-receptor antagonist, SCH58261, completely prevented allopurinol-induced anti-nociception. No obvious motor deficits were produced by allopurinol, at doses up to 200 mg kg−1. Allopurinol also caused an increase in cerebrospinal fluid levels of purines, including the nucleosides adenosine and guanosine, and decreased cerebrospinal fluid concentration of uric acid. Conclusions and implications Allopurinol-induced anti-nociception may be related to adenosine accumulation. Allopurinol is an old and extensively used compound and seems to be well tolerated with no obvious central nervous system toxic effects at high doses. This drug may be useful to treat pain syndromes in humans. PMID:19133997

  8. Expression profiles of Annexin A1, formylated peptide receptors and cyclooxigenase-2 in gastroesophageal inflammations and neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Rodolfo T C; Sertório, Nathália D; Magalini, Lara P J; Dos Santos, Leandro M; Souza, Helena R; Iyomasa-Pilon, Melina M; Possebon, Lucas; Costa, Sara S; Girol, Ana P

    2018-02-01

    The anti-inflammatory protein Annexin-A1 (ANXA1) is associated to tumor invasion process and its actions can be mediated by formylated peptides receptors (FPRs). Therefore, we evaluated the expression and correlation of ANXA1, FPR and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme in esophageal and stomach inflammations and neoplasias. The study of proteins was performed by immunohistochemistry in biopsies of esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, as well as gastritis, stomach polypus and gastric adenocarcinoma. The intensity of the expressions was evaluated by densitometry. The immunohistochemical and densitometric analyzes showed specificity for the FPR1 receptor and modulation of the ANXA1, COX-2 and FPR1 expressions in the epithelial cells in the different studied conditions. Increased immunoreactivity of these proteins was observed in cases of inflammation and stomach polypus. Interestingly, moderate immunoreactivity for ANXA1 and FPR1 but increased immunolabeling for COX-2 were observed in Barrett́s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinomas. Also, there was reduced expression of ANXA1 and FPR1 in esophageal carcinoma but COX-2 overexpression in this tumor. There was no expression of FPR2 but ANXA1 and FPR1 expressions were positively correlated in all clinical conditions studied. Positive correlation between ANXA1 and COX-2 were also observed in inflammation conditions while negative correlation between ANXA1 and COX-2 was observed in esophageal carcinoma. Our results demonstrate the unregulated expression of ANXA1 and COX-2 in precursor lesions of esophageal and stomach cancers, reinforcing their involvement in gastroesophageal carcinogenesis. In addition, the data show that the actions of ANXA1 in the inflammatory and neoplastic processes of the esophagus and stomach are specifically mediated by the FPR1 receptor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Embryonic Caffeine Exposure Acts via A1 Adenosine Receptors to Alter Adult Cardiac Function and DNA Methylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Victoria; Xue, Huiling; Rivkees, Scott A.; Wendler, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.09% NaCl) i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2–4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8–10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation. PMID:24475304

  10. Persistent reduction of cocaine seeking by pharmacological manipulation of adenosine A1 and A 2A receptors during extinction training in rats.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Casey E; Hobson, Benjamin D; Levis, Sophia C; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2014-08-01

    Adenosine receptor stimulation and blockade have been shown to modulate a variety of cocaine-related behaviors. These studies identify the direct effects of adenosine receptor stimulation on cocaine seeking during extinction training and the persistent effects on subsequent reinstatement to cocaine seeking. Rats self-administered cocaine on a fixed ratio one schedule in daily sessions over 3 weeks. Following a 1-week withdrawal, the direct effects of adenosine receptor modulation were tested by administering the adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg), the adenosine A2A agonist, CGS 21680 (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg), the presynaptic adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, SCH 442416 (0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg), or vehicle prior to each of six daily extinction sessions. The persistent effects of adenosine receptor modulation during extinction training were subsequently tested on reinstatement to cocaine seeking induced by cues, cocaine, and the dopamine D2 receptor agonist, quinpirole. All doses of CPA and CGS 21680 impaired initial extinction responding; however, only CPA treatment during extinction produced persistent impairment in subsequent cocaine- and quinpirole-induced seeking. Dissociating CPA treatment from extinction did not alter extinction responding or subsequent reinstatement. Administration of SCH 442416 had no direct effects on extinction responding but produced dose-dependent persistent impairment of cocaine- and quinpirole-induced seeking. These findings demonstrate that adenosine A1 or A2A receptor stimulation directly impair extinction responding. Interestingly, adenosine A1 receptor stimulation or presynaptic adenosine A2A receptor blockade during extinction produces lasting changes in relapse susceptibility.

  11. [Endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced scavenger receptor A1 upregulation in macrophages].

    PubMed

    Yao, Shu-Tong; Zhao, Li; Miao, Cheng; Tian, Hua; Yang, Na-Na; Guo, Shou-Dong; Zhai, Lei; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yi-Wei; Qin, Shu-Cun

    2014-10-25

    The present study was to investigate whether endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) was involved in oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced scavenger receptor A1 (SR-A1) upregulation in macrophages. RAW264.7 cells were pretreated with 20 mmol/L of 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) for 30 min and then treated with ox-LDL (50 mg/L) for 12 h or stimulated with 2 mg/L tunicamycin (TM) or 2 μmol/L thapsigagin (TG) for 4 h. In addition, RAW264.7 cells were incubated with 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/L TM for 4 h or treated with 2 mg/L TM for 1, 2 and 4 h, respectively. The intracellular total cholesterol (TC) content was measured using a tissue/cell total cholesterol assay kit. The protein and mRNA expressions of SR-A1 and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) were analyzed by Western blot and real-time PCR, respectively. Dil-ox-LDL uptake was detected using a microplate reader. The results showed that ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation in macrophages was attenuated by PBA, an ERS inhibitor. Ox-LDL caused significant SR-A1 upregulation with concomitant activation of ERS as assessed by upregulation of GRP78, whereas PBA significantly inhibited the ox-LDL-induced SR-A1 upregulation (P < 0.05) and slightly decreased GRP78 expression by 39.3% (P = 0.057). TM, an ERS inducer, upregulated SR-A1 protein expression and ox-LDL uptake in dose- and time-dependent manner, but had no significant effect on SR-A1 mRNA level. However, the TM- or TG-induced SR-A1 upregulation and ox-LDL uptake were significantly mitigated by PBA. These data indicate that ERS plays a critical role in ox-LDL-induced SR-A1 upregulation, which in turn enhances the foam cell formation by uptaking more ox-LDL.

  12. A partial agonist of the A(1)-adenosine receptor selectively slows AV conduction in guinea pig hearts.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Belardinelli, L; Zablocki, J A; Palle, V; Shryock, J C

    2001-01-01

    The use of full agonists of the A(1)-adenosine receptor (A(1)-ADOR) as antiarrhythmic agents is limited by their actions to cause high-grade atrioventricular (AV) block, profound bradycardia, atrial fibrillation, and vasodilation. It may be possible to avoid these undesired actions by use of partial agonists. We determined the effects of CVT-2759, a potential partial agonist of A(1)-ADORs, on guinea pig hearts. CVT-2759 (0.1-100 microM) increased the S-H interval of the isolated heart from 45 +/- 1 to 60 +/- 3 ms (P < 0. 01) with a half-maximal effect at 3.1 microM. CVT-2759 did not cause second-degree AV block. CVT-2759 significantly attenuated the actions of the full agonists N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine and adenosine. CVT-2759 caused a moderate slowing of atrial rate by 10 microM. In contrast, CVT-2759 was a full agonist to decrease cAMP content of rat adipocytes and Fischer rat thyroid line 5 cells. Results of radioligand binding assays indicated that CVT-2759 stabilized a high-affinity, G protein-coupled state of the A(1)-ADOR in membranes prepared from rat adipocytes but not in membranes prepared from the guinea pig brain. The results suggest that a weak A(1)-ADOR agonist, such as CVT-2759, may be useful to slow AV nodal conduction and thereby ventricular rate without causing AV block, bradycardia, atrial arrhythmias, or vasodilation.

  13. Chronic Cerebral Ischemia Induces Downregulation of A1 Adenosine Receptors During White Matter Damage in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pengfei; Ren, Yifei; Bai, Shunjie; Wu, Yu; Xu, Yi; Pan, Junxi; Chen, Jin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Qi, Zhiguo; Shao, Weihua; Tang, Weiju; Liu, Meiling; Xie, Peng; Huang, Wen

    2015-11-01

    The role of A1 adenosine receptors (A1ARs) in the white matter under chronic cerebral ischemic conditions remains unclear. Here, we used right unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (rUCCAO) to construct a chronic cerebral ischemic mouse model. A1AR expression and proteolipid protein (PLP, a marker of white matter myelination) in the corpus callosum were observed by immunoreaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels were determined by ELISA. The Morris water maze test was employed to detect cognitive impairment. A1AR expression significantly decreased in the rUCCAO group as compared with the sham control group on weeks 2, 4, and 6, respectively. IL-10 levels in the rUCCAO group significantly declined on week 6, while there was no significant change in IL-1β expression. PLP expression significantly decreased in the rUCCAO group on weeks 2, 4, and 6. Moreover, latency time for the Morris water maze test significantly increased in the rUCCAO group on weeks 4 and 6, while the number of platform location crossing significantly decreased in the rUCCAO group on weeks 2, 4, and 6. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that chronic cerebral ischemia appears to induce A1AR downregulation and inhibition of IL-10 production, which may play key roles in the neuropathological mechanisms of ischemic white matter lesions. These data will facilitate future studies in formulating effective therapeutic strategies for ischemic white matter lesions.

  14. Extracellular ATP differentially affects epileptiform activity via purinergic P2X7 and adenosine A1 receptors in naive and chronic epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Klaft, Zin-Juan; Schulz, Steffen B; Maslarova, Anna; Gabriel, Siegrun; Heinemann, Uwe; Gerevich, Zoltan

    2012-11-01

    Adenosine is considered an endogenous anticonvulsant. However, much less is known about the putative effects of its precursor, ATP, on epilepsy. Therefore, we tested whether ATP and its receptors are able to modulate epileptiform activity in the medial entorhinal cortex of the rat. Recurrent epileptiform discharges (REDs) were induced by elevating extracellular potassium concentration combined with application of bicuculline in brain slices from naive and pilocarpine-treated chronic epileptic rats. Field potentials were recorded from layer V/VI of the medial entorhinal cortex. REDs in slices from naive animals had a higher incidence and a shorter duration than in slices from chronic epileptic animals. Exogenous application of ATP reversibly reduced the incidence of REDs in naive and chronic epileptic slices via activation of adenosine A(1) receptors without discernible P2 receptor effects. This effect was stronger in slices from chronic epileptic rats. In slices from naive rats, the P2X7 receptor antagonist A 740003 slightly but significantly reduced the amplitude of slow field potentials of REDs. In slices from chronic epileptic rats, none of the P2 receptor antagonists affected the parameters of REDs. Our results suggest that endogenously released ATP differentially modulates REDs by activation of A(1) and P2X7 receptors. Although it has a minor proepileptic effect by direct activation of P2X7 receptors, its metabolite adenosine reduces the epileptiform activity via activation of A(1) receptors. The exact effect of ATP on neural activity depends on the actual activity of ectonucleotidases and the expression level of the purinergic receptors, which both alter during epileptogenesis. In addition, our data suggest that P2X7 receptor antagonists have a minor antiepileptic effect. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Adenosine A1 receptor antagonist mitigates deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on adult neurogenesis and spatial reference memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, G; Ray, K; Sahu, S; Roy, K; Jain, V; Wadhwa, M; Panjwani, U; Kishore, K; Singh, S B

    2016-11-19

    Sleep deprivation (SD) upsurges intracellular levels of adenosine, impairs adult neuronal cell proliferation (NCP) and cognition while caffeine, a non-selective adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist improves cognition and adult NCP during SD. We examined the selective antagonistic effects of adenosine A1R using 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (8-CPT) on impairment of spatial reference memory and adult NCP during 48h SD. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were sleep deprived for 48h, using an automatic cage vibrating stimulus based on animal activity. Spatial reference memory was tested as a measure of cognitive performance employing Morris Water Maze. Rats were given 8-CPT dissolved in 50% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), twice daily (10mg/kg, i.p.) along with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) (50mg/kg/day, i.p.). The rats treated with 8-CPT showed significantly short mean latency and path-length to reach the platform compared to the SD rats. Consistent with these findings, 8-CPT-treated group was found to have significantly increased the number of BrdU, Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX) positive cells. However, no significant difference was seen in NeuN expression in the Dentate Gyrus (DG). Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) expression in the DG and CA1 region was observed to decrease significantly after SD and be rescued by 8-CPT treatment. Furthermore, latency to reach platform showed a negative correlation with number of BrdU, DCX type-1 cells and BDNF expression in DG. Thus, it may be concluded that treatment with 8-CPT, an adenosine A1R antagonist during SD mitigates SD induced decline in spatial reference memory and adult NCP possibly via up regulation of BDNF levels in DG and CA1 regions. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A1 adenosine receptors in the striatum play a role in the memory impairment caused by sleep deprivation through downregulation of the PKA pathway.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, S L B; Oliveira, M G M; Hipolide, D C

    2018-03-31

    Sleep deprivation is known to affect memory formation, but how it interacts with different memory systems is not completely understood. Adenosine, a homeostatic regulator of sleep that has an increased extracellular concentration during sleep deprivation, is one of the neuromodulators that may be involved in this interaction. The A 1 adenosine receptor is involved in both sleep regulation and memory formation. Among other pathways, the A 1 receptor decreases cAMP levels in the cytosol and thus also regulates protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) activity. To verify the role of the A 1 receptor in the memory impairment caused by sleep deprivation, we tested the effect of 96 h of sleep deprivation (SD) and the administration of DPCPX, an A 1 receptor antagonist on male Wistar rats prior to the training sessions for two memory tasks that relies on the hippocampal function: the multiple trial inhibitory avoidance (MTIA) task, which also requires the striatum, and the contextual fear conditioning (CFC) task, which does not. We also evaluated the effect of SD, DPCPX and the MTIA training session on the protein expression levels of the A1 receptor, PKA phosphorylation and EPAC activity in both the hippocampus and the striatum. Sleep deprivation impaired the performance in the test sessions of both tasks; DPCPX was able to prevent the impairment in the MTIA test but not in the CFC test. SD increased A 1 receptor protein expression levels in the striatum but not in the hippocampus and also decreased PKA phosphorylation in both structures; DPCPX prevented this decrease in the striatum, but not in the hippocampus. Finally, SD had no effect on EPAC activity in either of the structures. These results indicate that the A 1 adenosine receptors play a role in the memory impairment caused by sleep deprivation in tasks that involve the striatum through modulation of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor activation leads to up-regulation of adenosine A1 receptors and down-regulation of adenosine A2 responses in DDT1 MF-2 smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gerwins, P; Fredholm, B B

    1991-08-01

    The effect of glucocorticoid treatment of DDT1 MF-2 smooth muscle cells on the signaling via two adenosine receptors with opposing actions on cAMP generation was examined. Treatment with dexamethasone caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in the number of adenosine A1 receptors but did not affect the KD or the proportions of receptors in high and low affinity states. The EC50 was 1 nM dexamethasone, and maximal response was achieved after 24 hr. The number of receptors was increased by approximately 50%. Other steroid hormones, including aldosterone, progesterone, testosterone, and estrogen, were much less effective, and addition of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU 486 or the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide prevented the up-regulation, showing that the effect was mediated via a glucocorticoid receptor-specific mechanism that involves protein synthesis. In dexamethasone-treated cells the A1 receptor agonist (-)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine [(R)-PIA] was 3 times more potent as an inhibitor of cAMP formation induced by isoprenaline than in untreated cells. ADP ribosylation of inhibitory GTP-binding proteins by pertussis toxin completely prevented (R)-PIA from inhibiting cAMP accumulation. A further analysis of the different GTP-binding proteins, including the three Gi subtypes (Gi1, Gi2, and Gi3), revealed no quantitative or qualitative change after dexamethasone treatment. In addition, the adenosine A2 receptors were down-regulated, as indicated by the fact that the ability of the A2 receptor agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine to increase cAMP formation was decreased by 20-30% in dexamethasone-treated cells. In summary, we have shown that A1 and A2 receptors on the same cell are differentially regulated by glucocorticoids and that this has functional importance in the regulation of cAMP accumulation.

  18. The novel N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist CGS 19755 prevents ischemia-induced reductions of adenosine A1, NMDA, and PCP receptors in gerbil brain.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, M F; Murphy, D E; Williams, M; Gerhardt, S C; Boast, C A

    1988-01-01

    Transient brain ischemia results in a selective destruction of cell bodies within the hippocampus and cortex. This cellular destruction appears to be mediated through a release of endogenous exictatory amino acids following the ischemic episode, since the neurotoxic effects of ischemia can be attenuated by compounds that have antagonist activity at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. In the present study, the protective effects of a novel NMDA receptor antagonist, CGS 19755, were further evaluated by using quantitative autoradiography to characterize adenosine A1, NMDA, PCP, and benzodiazepine receptors in ischemic gerbil brain. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion (20 minutes) resulted in marked decreases (30-60%) in adenosine A1, NMDA, and PCP, but not benzodiazepine, receptors in gerbil forebrain. Postischemic treatment with CGS 19755 was found to completely block the ischemia-induced decreases in brain adenosine and NMDA receptors. [3H]TCP binding in ischemic gerbil brain was also elevated by CGS 19755 treatment; significant differences remained, however, between the CGS 19755-treated and control gerbils. These results indicate that transient brain ischemia produces significant and selective alterations in gerbil forebrain receptor systems. The observed decreases in radioligand binding are probably reflective of an ischemia-induced destruction of forebrain structures. However, there is some evidence that transient ischemia can also cause long-term changes in the affinity of some receptor systems. The postischemic efficacy of CGS 19755 appears to be due to its ability to block the neurotoxic effects of transient ischemia.

  19. Differential effects of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist adenosine amine congener on renal, femoral and carotid vascular conductance in preterm fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Booth, Lindsea C; Tummers, Leonie; Jensen, Ellen C; Barrett, Carolyn J; Malpas, Simon C; Gunn, Alistair J; Bennet, Laura

    2008-11-01

    1. Adenosine A(1) receptor activation is critical for endogenous neuroprotection from hypoxia-ischaemia, raising the possibility that treatment with A(1) receptor agonists may be an effective physiological protection strategy for vulnerable preterm infants. However, the A(1) receptor can mediate unwanted systemic effects, including vasoconstriction of the afferent glomerular arteriole. There is limited information on whether this occurs at doses that improve cerebral perfusion in the immature brain. 2. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether infusion of the selective A(1) receptor agonist adenosine amine congener (ADAC) is associated with reduced renal perfusion in chronically instrumented preterm (0.7 gestation) fetal sheep. In the present study, ADAC was given in successive doses of 2.5, 5.0 and 15.0 microg, 45 min apart. 3. Treatment with ADAC was associated with a marked reduction in renal vascular conductance (and blood flow), whereas carotid conductance was increased and there was no significant effect on femoral conductance. In contrast with the stable effects of increasing ADAC dose on vascular conductance, there was a significant dose-related fall in fetal heart rate and blood pressure. 4. In conclusion, these short-term data support the concern that A(1) receptor agonist infusion can selectively impair renal perfusion, even at low doses.

  20. Theobromine suppresses adipogenesis through enhancement of CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β degradation by adenosine receptor A1.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Takakazu; Watanabe, Shun; Yoshioka, Yasukiyo; Katayama, Shigeru; Nakamura, Soichiro; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2017-12-01

    Theobromine, a methylxanthine derived from cacao beans, reportedly has various health-promoting properties but molecular mechanism by which effects of theobromine on adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify the molecular mechanisms of the anti-adipogenic effect of theobromine in vitro and in vivo. ICR mice (4week-old) were administered with theobromine (0.1g/kg) for 7days. Theobromine administration attenuated gains in body and epididymal adipose tissue weights in mice and suppressed expression of adipogenic-associated genes in mouse adipose tissue. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, theobromine caused degradation of C/EBPβ protein by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Pull down assay showed that theobromine selectively interacts with adenosine receptor A1 (AR1), and AR1 knockdown inhibited theobromine-induced C/EBPβ degradation. Theobromine increased sumoylation of C/EBPβ at Lys133. Expression of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease 2 (SENP2) gene, coding for a desumoylation enzyme, was suppressed by theobromine. In vivo knockdown studies showed that AR1 knockdown in mice attenuated the anti-adipogenic effects of theobromine in younger mice. Theobromine suppresses adipocyte differentiation and induced C/EBPβ degradation by increasing its sumoylation. Furthermore, the inhibition of AR1 signaling is important for theobromine-induced C/EBPβ degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Homeostatic Changes in GABA and Glutamate Receptors on Excitatory Cortical Neurons during Sleep Deprivation and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    del Cid-Pellitero, Esther; Plavski, Anton; Mainville, Lynda; Jones, Barbara E.

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal activity is regulated in a homeostatic manner through changes in inhibitory GABA and excitatory glutamate (Glu) AMPA (A) receptors (GluARs). Using immunofluorescent staining, we examined whether calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα)-labeled (+) excitatory neurons in the barrel cortex undergo such homeostatic regulation following enforced waking with associated cortical activation during the day when mice normally sleep the majority of the time. Sleep deprived mice were prevented from falling asleep by unilateral whisker stimulation and sleep recovery (SR) mice allowed to sleep freely following deprivation. In parallel with changes in c-Fos reflecting changes in activity, (β2-3 subunits of) GABAA Rs were increased on the membrane of CaMKIIα+ neurons with enforced waking and returned to baseline levels with SR in barrel cortex on sides both contra- and ipsilateral to the whisker stimulation. The GABAAR increase was correlated with increased gamma electroencephalographic (EEG) activity across conditions. On the other hand, (GluA1 subunits of) AMPA Rs were progressively removed from the membrane of CaMKIIα+ neurons by (Rab5+) early endosomes during enforced waking and returned to the membrane by (Rab11+) recycling endosomes during SR. The internalization of the GluA1Rs paralleled the expression of Arc, which mediates homeostatic regulation of AMPA receptors through an endocytic pathway. The reciprocal changes in GluA1Rs relative to GABAARs suggest homeostatic down-scaling during enforced waking and sensory stimulation and restorative up-scaling during recovery sleep. Such homeostatic changes with sleep-wake states and their associated cortical activities could stabilize excitability and activity in excitatory cortical neurons. PMID:28408870

  2. Odor preference learning and memory modify GluA1 phosphorylation and GluA1 distribution in the neonate rat olfactory bulb: testing the AMPA receptor hypothesis in an appetitive learning model.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wen; Darby-King, Andrea; Grimes, Matthew T; Howland, John G; Wang, Yu Tian; McLean, John H; Harley, Carolyn W

    2011-01-01

    An increase in synaptic AMPA receptors is hypothesized to mediate learning and memory. AMPA receptor increases have been reported in aversive learning models, although it is not clear if they are seen with memory maintenance. Here we examine AMPA receptor changes in a cAMP/PKA/CREB-dependent appetitive learning model: odor preference learning in the neonate rat. Rat pups were given a single pairing of peppermint and 2 mg/kg isoproterenol, which produces a 24-h, but not a 48-h, peppermint preference in the 7-d-old rat pup. GluA1 PKA-dependent phosphorylation peaked 10 min after the 10-min training trial and returned to baseline within 90 min. At 24 h, GluA1 subunits did not change overall but were significantly increased in synaptoneurosomes, consistent with increased membrane insertion. Immunohistochemistry revealed a significant increase in GluA1 subunits in olfactory bulb glomeruli, the targets of olfactory nerve axons. Glomerular increases were seen at 3 and 24 h after odor exposure in trained pups, but not in control pups. GluA1 increases were not seen as early as 10 min after training and were no longer observed 48 h after training when odor preference is no longer expressed behaviorally. Thus, the pattern of increased GluA1 membrane expression closely follows the memory timeline. Further, blocking GluA1 insertion using an interference peptide derived from the carboxyl tail of the GluA1 subunit inhibited 24 h odor preference memory providing causative support for our hypothesis. PKA-mediated GluA1 phosphorylation and later GluA1 insertion could, conjointly, provide increased AMPA function to support both short-term and long-term appetitive memory.

  3. Transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 activated currents in TRPV1 and cholecystokinin-sensitive cranial visceral afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Jin; Jin, Zhenhua; Park, Yong Seek; Rhee, Young Kyoung; Jin, Young-Ho

    2011-04-06

    Culinary use of the pungent spices has potential health benefits including a reduction in food intake. Pungent spices often contain ingredients that activate members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family A1 and evoke pain from capsaicin-sensitive somatosensory neurons. TRPA1 channel have also been identified on cranial visceral afferent neurons but their distribution and functional contributions are poorly understood. Visceral vagal neurons transduce mechanical and chemical signals from peripheral organs to the nucleus tractus solitarii. Many capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents participate in peripheral satiety signaling that includes cholecystokinin (CCK) sensitive neurons. To assess signaling, the TRPA1 selective agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) was tested together with CCK and capsaicin (200nM), a TRPV1 specific agonist. In isolated nodose neurons, AITC (0.05-0.2mM) evoked concentration-dependent inward currents in 38% of the tested neurons. The TRPA1 specific antagonist HC-030031 (10μM) blocked AITC responses. TRPA1 responses were mixed across neurons that were capsaicin-sensitive and -insensitive. However CCK evoked inward currents only on capsaicin-sensitive neurons and 28% of the CCK-sensitive neurons expressed TRPA1. Our results indicate that TRPA1 is co-expressed with TRPV1 in CCK-sensitive nodose neurons. The findings indicate a potential mechanism by which spices can act within cranial visceral afferent pathways mediating satiety and contribute to the reduction of the food intake associated with spiced diets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression and the effects of systemic theophylline administration on respiratory function 4 months after C2 hemisection.

    PubMed

    Nantwi, Kwaku D; Basura, Gregory J; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that in an animal model of acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), respiratory function can be restored by theophylline. We also have shown that respiratory recovery occurs spontaneously after prolonged postinjury survival periods when a hemidiaphragm is paralyzed by an ipsilateral upper cervical (C2) spinal cord hemisection. Theophylline mediates functional recovery by central nervous system adenosine A1 receptor antagonism; however, it is unclear whether adenosine receptors are altered after prolonged postinjury periods and whether theophylline can further enhance restored respiratory function that occurs spontaneously. To assess putative effects of systemic theophylline administration on further enhancing spontaneous respiratory muscle recovery 4 months after C2 hemisection in rats and to determine whether adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression is altered in these animals. Electrophysiologic assessment of respiratory activity in the phrenic nerves was conducted in C2 hemisected rats 4 months after hemisection under standardized conditions. Immediately thereafter, rats were killed and the cervical spinal cords were prepared for adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression by in situ hybridization. Spontaneous recovery of respiratory activity in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve was detected in a majority (15/20) of C2 hemisected animals and amounted to 44.06% +/- 2.38% when expressed as a percentage of activity in the homolateral phrenic nerve in noninjured animals. At the optimal dosage used in the acute studies, theophylline (15 mg/kg) did not enhance, but rather unexpectedly blocked, recovered respiratory activity in 4 out of 5 animals tested. At dosages of 5 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg, the drug blocked recovered respiratory activity in 3 out of 4 and 3 out of 5 animals tested, respectively. Quantitative analysis of adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression did not reveal a significant difference between experimental animals

  5. Profound hypothermia after adenosine kinase inhibition in A1AR-deficient mice suggests a receptor-independent effect of intracellular adenosine.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Christoph; Kim, SooMi; Grill, Alexandra; Qin, Yan; Hoerl, Marion; Briggs, Josephine; Castrop, Hayo; Thiel, Manfred; Schnermann, Jurgen

    2017-02-01

    Administration of the nucleoside adenosine has been shown to induce hypothermia in a number of species, an effect mediated predominantly by the adenosine 1 receptor (A1AR) subtype. The present experiments were performed to explore the possibility that the rise of intracellular adenosine levels expected to accompany adenosine administration may contribute to the hypothermic effect of adenosine independent of A1AR activation. Since phosphorylation of adenosine by adenosine kinase (ADK) is causal in the maintenance of low intracellular adenosine, we have examined the effect of ADK inhibition on core body temperature (CBT). Our data show that inhibition of ADK by A-134974 causes a long-lasting deep hypothermia in wild-type mice. Since there was an about 4-fold increase of adenosine plasma levels, experiments were repeated in A1AR-/- mice. ADK inhibition caused deep hypothermia despite the absence of A1AR, although the effect was significantly reduced compared to WT. Furthermore, the dose-dependent hypothermia caused by adenosine administration in WT mice was found to be reduced, but not abolished in A1AR-/- mice. To assess the possible role of A2AR and A3AR activation in our experimental setting, we compared the effects of the agonists CPA (A1AR), CGS21680 (A2AR), and IB-MECA (A3AR) on CBT. Hypothermia induced by CPA was much greater than that caused by CGS21680 or IB-MECA indicating that A1AR activation is the major receptor-dependent pathway for adenosine-induced hypothermia under our experimental conditions. Induction of deep hypothermia by inhibition of ADK, maintenance of this effect in A1AR-/- mice, and maintenance of adenosine-induced hypothermia in A1AR-deficient mice suggest that a receptor-independent action of adenosine requiring intact function of adenosine kinase contributes importantly to the hypothermia induced by adenosine.

  6. Soluble monomeric EphrinA1 is released from tumor cells and is a functional ligand for the EphA2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wykosky, J; Palma, E; Gibo, DM; Ringler, S; Turner, CP; Debinski, W

    2013-01-01

    The ephrinA1 ligand exerts antioncogenic effects in tumor cells through activation and downregulation of the EphA2 receptor and has been described as a membrane-anchored protein requiring clustering for function. However, while investigating the ephrinA1/EphA2 system in the pathobiology of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we uncovered that ephrinA1 is released from GBM and breast adenocarcinoma cells as a soluble, monomeric protein and is a functional form of the ligand in this state. Conditioned media containing a soluble monomer of ephrinA1 caused EphA2 internalization and downregulation, dramatic alteration of cell morphology and suppression of the Ras–MAPK pathway. Moreover, soluble monomeric ephrinA1 was functional in a physiological context, eliciting collapse of embryonic neuronal growth cones. We also found that ephrinA1 is cleaved from the plasma membrane of GBM cells, an event which involves the action of a metalloprotease. Thus, the ephrinA1 ligand can, indeed, function as a soluble monomer and may act in a paracrine manner on the EphA2 receptor without the need for juxtacrine interactions. These findings have important implications for further deciphering the function of these proteins in pathology and physiology, as well as for the design of ephrinA1-based EphA2-targeted antitumor therapeutics. PMID:18794797

  7. Soluble monomeric EphrinA1 is released from tumor cells and is a functional ligand for the EphA2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Wykosky, J; Palma, E; Gibo, D M; Ringler, S; Turner, C P; Debinski, W

    2008-12-11

    The ephrinA1 ligand exerts antioncogenic effects in tumor cells through activation and downregulation of the EphA2 receptor and has been described as a membrane-anchored protein requiring clustering for function. However, while investigating the ephrinA1/EphA2 system in the pathobiology of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we uncovered that ephrinA1 is released from GBM and breast adenocarcinoma cells as a soluble, monomeric protein and is a functional form of the ligand in this state. Conditioned media containing a soluble monomer of ephrinA1 caused EphA2 internalization and downregulation, dramatic alteration of cell morphology and suppression of the Ras-MAPK pathway. Moreover, soluble monomeric ephrinA1 was functional in a physiological context, eliciting collapse of embryonic neuronal growth cones. We also found that ephrinA1 is cleaved from the plasma membrane of GBM cells, an event which involves the action of a metalloprotease. Thus, the ephrinA1 ligand can, indeed, function as a soluble monomer and may act in a paracrine manner on the EphA2 receptor without the need for juxtacrine interactions. These findings have important implications for further deciphering the function of these proteins in pathology and physiology, as well as for the design of ephrinA1-based EphA2-targeted antitumor therapeutics.

  8. Superposition of an incoherent magnetic field inhibited EGF receptor clustering and phosphorylation induced by a 1.8 GHz pulse-modulated radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuying; Lu, Dongbo; Lu, Deqiang; Chiang, Huai

    2013-05-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of a temporally incoherent ('noise') magnetic field (MF) on radiofrequency radiation (RFR)-induced epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor clustering and phosporylation in cultured cells. Human amniotic epithelial (FL) cells were exposed for 15 min to either a 1.8 GHz RFR (modulated at 217 Hz), a 2 μT incoherent MF, or concurrently to the RFR and incoherent MF. Epidermal growth factor treatment severed as the positive control. Epidermal growth factor receptor clustering on cellular membrane surface was analyzed using confocal microscopy after indirect immunofluorescence staining, and phosphorylation of EGF receptors was measured by western blot technology. Exposure of FL cells to the 1.8 GHz RFR at SAR (specific absorption rate) of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0 W/kg for 15 min induced EGF receptor clustering and enhanced phosphorylation on tyrosine-1173 residue, whereas exposure to RFR at SAR of 0.1 W/kg for 15 min did not significantly cause these effects. Exposure to a 2 μT incoherent MF for 15 min did not significantly affect clustering and phosphorylation of EGF receptor in FL cells. When superimposed, the incoherent MF completely inhibited EGF receptor clustering and phosphorylation induced by RFR at SAR of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 W/kg, but did not inhibit the effects induced at SAR of 4.0 W/kg. Based on the data of the experiment, it is suggested that membrane receptors could be one of the main targets by which RFR interacts with cells. An incoherent MF could block the interaction to a certain extent.

  9. β-Cell deletion of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 nuclear receptors impedes mitochondrial respiration and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Merrick S; Hancock, Chad R; Ray, Jason D; Kener, Kyle B; Draney, Carrie; Garland, Kevin; Hardman, Jeremy; Bikman, Benjamin T; Tessem, Jeffery S

    2016-07-01

    β-Cell insulin secretion is dependent on proper mitochondrial function. Various studies have clearly shown that the Nr4a family of orphan nuclear receptors is essential for fuel utilization and mitochondrial function in liver, muscle, and adipose. Previously, we have demonstrated that overexpression of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 is sufficient to induce proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined whether Nr4a expression impacts pancreatic β-cell mitochondrial function. Here, we show that β-cell mitochondrial respiration is dependent on the nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized cells was significantly decreased in β-cells lacking Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Furthermore, respiration rates of intact cells deficient for Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 in the presence of 16 mM glucose resulted in decreased glucose mediated oxygen consumption. Consistent with this reduction in respiration, a significant decrease in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion rates is observed with deletion of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Interestingly, the changes in respiration and insulin secretion occur without a reduction in mitochondrial content, suggesting decreased mitochondrial function. We establish that knockdown of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 results in decreased expression of the mitochondrial dehydrogenase subunits Idh3g and Sdhb. We demonstrate that loss of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 impedes production of ATP and ultimately inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that the orphan nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 are critical for β-cell mitochondrial function and insulin secretion. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Importance of Receptor Usage, Fli1 Activation, and Mouse Strain for the Stem Cell Specificity of 10A1 Murine Leukemia Virus Leukemogenicity▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Michaela; Fischer, Meike; Engelmann, Afra; Harbers, Stephanie O.; Ziegler, Marion; Löhler, Jürgen; Stocking, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) induce leukemia through a multistage process, a critical step being the activation of oncogenes through provirus integration. Transcription elements within the long terminal repeats (LTR) are prime determinants of cell lineage specificity; however, the influence of other factors, including the Env protein that modulates cell tropism through receptor recognition, has not been rigorously addressed. The ability of 10A1-MuLV to use both PiT1 and PiT2 receptors has been implicated in its induction of blast cell leukemia. Here we show that restricting receptor usage of 10A1-MuLV to PiT2 results in loss of blast cell transformation capacity. However, the pathogenicity was unaltered when the env gene is exchanged with Moloney MuLV, which uses the Cat1 receptor. Significantly, the leukemic blasts express erythroid markers and consistently contain proviral integrations in the Fli1 locus, a target of Friend MuLV (F-MuLV) during erythroleukemia induction. Furthermore, an NB-tropic variant of 10A1 was unable to induce blast cell leukemia in C57BL/6 mice, which are also resistant to F-MuLV transformation. We propose that 10A1- and F-MuLV actually induce identical (erythro)blastic leukemia by a mechanism involving Fli1 activation and cooperation with inherent genetic mutations in susceptible mouse strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate that deletion of the Icsbp tumor suppressor gene in C57BL/6 mice is sufficient to confer susceptibility to 10A1-MuLV leukemia induction but with altered specificity. In summary, we validate the significance of the env gene in leukemia specificity and underline the importance of a complex interplay of cooperating oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors in determining the pathogenicity of MuLV variants. PMID:17079317

  11. Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen; Zhou, Tianyan

    2013-04-15

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expressionmore » of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ► Liver X receptor α mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ► LXRα and RXRα dimerization further activated this induction. ► Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ► LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ► ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.« less

  12. Insulin requires A1 adenosine receptors expression to reverse gestational diabetes-increased L-arginine transport in human umbilical vein endothelium.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Armella, Axel; Toledo, Fernando; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) associates with increased L-arginine transport and extracellular concentration of adenosine in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In this study we aim to determine whether insulin reverses GDM-increased L-arginine transport requiring adenosine receptors expression in HUVECs. Primary cultured HUVECs from full-term normal (n = 38) and diet-treated GDM (n = 38) pregnancies were used. Insulin effect was assayed on human cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT1) expression (protein, mRNA, SLC7A1 promoter activity) and activity (initial rates of L-arginine transport) in the absence or presence of adenosine receptors agonists or antagonists. A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR) and A2AAR expression (Western blot, quantitative PCR) was determined. Experiments were done in cells expressing or siRNA-suppressed expression of A1AR or A2AAR. HUVECs from GDM exhibit higher maximal transport capacity (maximal velocity (V max)/apparent Michaelis Menten constant (K m), V max/K m), which is blocked by insulin by reducing the V max to values in cells from normal pregnancies. Insulin also reversed the GDM-associated increase in hCAT-1 protein abundance and mRNA expression, and SLC7A1 promoter activity for the fragment -606 bp from the transcription start point. Insulin effects required A1AR, but not A2AAR expression and activity in this cell type. In the absence of insulin, GDM-increased hCAT-1 expression and activity required A2AAR expression and activity. HUVECs from GDM pregnancies exhibit a differential requirement of A1AR or A2AAR depending on the level of insulin, a phenomenon that represent a condition where adenosine or analogues of this nucleoside could be acting as helpers of insulin biological effects in GDM.

  13. Inosine reduces pain-related behavior in mice: involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptor subtypes and protein kinase C pathways.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Francisney P; Figueredo, Sonia M; Marcon, Rodrigo; Martins, Daniel F; Macedo, Sérgio J; Lima, Denise A N; Almeida, Rúbia C; Ostroski, Rosana M; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares

    2010-08-01

    Inosine, an endogenous purine, is the first metabolite of adenosine in a reaction catalyzed by adenosine deaminase. This study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive effects of inosine against several models of pain in mice and rats. In mice, inosine given by systemic or central routes inhibited acetic acid-induced nociception. Furthermore, inosine also decreased the late phase of formalin-induced licking and the nociception induced by glutamate. Inosine produced inhibition (for up to 4 h) of mechanical allodynia induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injected into the mouse's paw. Given chronically for 21 days, inosine reversed the mechanical allodynia caused by CFA. Moreover, inosine also reduced the thermal (cold stimuli) and mechanical allodynia caused by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) for 4 h; when inosine was chronically administered, it decreased the mechanical allodynia induced by PSNL for 22 days. Antinociception caused by inosine in the acetic acid test was attenuated by treatment of mice with 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX; a selective adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist), 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT; a nonselective adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist), and 4-{2- [7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo-[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl- amino]ethyl}phenol (ZM241385; a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist). In rats, inosine inhibited the mechanical and heat hyperalgesia induced by bradykinin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, without affecting similar responses caused by prostaglandin E(2) or forskolin. These results indicate that inosine induces antinociceptive, antiallodynic, and antihyperalgesic effects in rodents. The precise mechanisms through which inosine produces antinociception are currently under investigation, but involvement of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors and blockade of the protein kinase C pathway seem to largely account for inosine's antinociceptive effect.

  14. The effects of vitamin D receptor silencing on the expression of LVSCC-A1C and LVSCC-A1D and the release of NGF in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Gezen-Ak, Duygu; Dursun, Erdinç; Yilmazer, Selma

    2011-03-03

    Recent studies have suggested that vitamin D can act on cells in the nervous system. Associations between polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor (VDR), age-dependent cognitive decline, and insufficient serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D(3) levels in Alzheimer's patients and elderly people with cognitive decline have been reported. We have previously shown that amyloid β (Aβ) treatment eliminates VDR protein in cortical neurons. These results suggest a potential role for vitamin D and vitamin D-mediated mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and neurodegeneration. Vitamin D has been shown to down-regulate the L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, LVSCC-A1C and LVSCC-A1D, and up-regulate nerve growth factor (NGF). However, expression of these proteins when VDR is repressed is unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate LVSCC-A1C, LVSCC-A1D expression levels and NGF release in VDR-silenced primary cortical neurons prepared from Sprague-Dawley rat embryos. qRT-PCR and western blots were performed to determine VDR, LVSCC-A1C and -A1D expression levels. NGF and cytotoxicity levels were determined by ELISA. Apoptosis was determined by TUNEL. Our findings illustrate that LVSCC-A1C mRNA and protein levels increased rapidly in cortical neurons when VDR is down-regulated, whereas, LVSCC-A1D mRNA and protein levels did not change and NGF release decreased in response to VDR down-regulation. Although vitamin D regulates LVSCC-A1C through VDR, it may not regulate LVSCC-A1D through VDR. Our results indicate that suppression of VDR disrupts LVSCC-A1C and NGF production. In addition, when VDR is suppressed, neurons could be vulnerable to aging and neurodegeneration, and when combined with Aβ toxicity, it is possible to explain some of the events that occur during neurodegeneration.

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis Shows Decreased Cortical Expression of NR4A1, NR4A2 and RXRB in Schizophrenia and Provides Evidence for Nuclear Receptor Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Corley, Susan M; Tsai, Shan-Yuan; Wilkins, Marc R; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are differentially expressed in the cortex of people with schizophrenia, implicating factors that control transcription more generally. Hormone nuclear receptors dimerize to coordinate context-dependent changes in gene expression. We hypothesized that members of two families of nuclear receptors (NR4As), and retinoid receptors (RARs and RXRs), are altered in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of people with schizophrenia. We used next generation sequencing and then qPCR analysis to test for changes in mRNA levels for transcripts encoding nuclear receptors: orphan nuclear receptors (3 in the NR4A, 3 in the RAR, 3 in the RXR families and KLF4) in total RNA extracted from the DLPFC from people with schizophrenia compared to controls (n = 74). We also correlated mRNA levels with demographic factors and with estimates of antipsychotic drug exposure (schizophrenia group only). We tested for correlations between levels of transcription factor family members and levels of genes putatively regulated by these transcription factors. We found significantly down regulated expression of NR4A1 (Nurr 77) and KLF4 mRNAs in people with schizophrenia compared to controls, by both NGS and qPCR (p = or <0.01). We also detected decreases in NR4A2 (Nurr1) and RXRB mRNAs by using qPCR in the larger cohort (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). We detected decreased expression of RARG and NR4A2 mRNAs in females with schizophrenia (p<0.05). The mRNA levels of NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3 were all negative correlated with lifetime estimates of antipsychotic exposure. These novel findings, which may be influenced by antipsychotic drug exposure, implicate the orphan and retinoid nuclear receptors in the cortical pathology found in schizophrenia. Genes down stream of these receptors can be dysregulated as well, but the direction of change is not immediately predictable based on the putative transcription factor changes.

  16. Individual phases of contextual fear conditioning differentially modulate dorsal and ventral hippocampal GluA1-3, GluN1-containing receptor complexes and subunits.

    PubMed

    Sase, Sunetra; Sase, Ajinkya; Sialana, Fernando J; Gröger, Marion; Bennett, Keiryn L; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2015-12-01

    In contextual fear conditioning (CFC), the use of pharmacological and lesion approaches has helped to understand that there are differential roles for the dorsal hippocampus (DH) and the ventral hippocampus (VH) in the acquisition, consolidation and retrieval phases. Concomitant analysis of the DH and the VH in individual phases with respect to α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subtype N1 (GluN1)-containing complexes (RCC) and subunits has not been reported so far. Herein, CFC was performed in mice that were euthanized at different time points. DH and VH samples were taken for the determination of RCC and subunit levels using BN- and SDS-PAGE, respectively, with subsequent Western blotting. Evaluation of spine densities, morphology, and immunohistochemistry of GluA1 and GluA2 was performed. In the acquisition phase levels of GluA1-RCC and subunits in VH were increased. In the consolidation phase GluA1- and GluA2-RCC levels were increased in DH and VH, while both receptor subunit levels were increased in the VH only. In the retrieval phase GluA1-RCC, subunits thereof and GluA2-RCC were increased in DH and VH, whereas GluA2 subunits were increased in the VH only. GluN1-RCC levels were increased in acquisition and consolidation phase, while subunit levels in the acquisition phase were increased only in the DH. The immunohistochemical studies in the individual phases in subareas of hippocampus supported immunochemical changes of GluA1 and GluA2 RCC's. Dendritic spine densities and the prevalence of thin spines in the acquisition phase of VH and mushroom spines in the retrieval phase of the VH and DH were increased. The findings from the current study suggest different receptor and receptor complex patterns in the individual phases in CFC and in DH and VH. The results propose that different RCCs are formed in the individual phases and that VH and DH may be involved in CFC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The antinociceptive effect of 2-chloro-2'-C-methyl-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (2'-Me-CCPA), a highly selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist, in the rat.

    PubMed

    Maione, S; de Novellis, V; Cappellacci, L; Palazzo, E; Vita, D; Luongo, L; Stella, L; Franchetti, P; Marabese, I; Rossi, F; Grifantini, M

    2007-10-01

    This study was undertaken in order to investigate the effect of 2-chloro-2'-C-methyl-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (2'-Me-CCPA), a potent and highly selective adenosine A(1) receptor agonist, on nociceptive responses and on the ongoing or tail flick-related changes of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) ON- and OFF-cell activities. Systemic administrations of 2'-Me-CCPA (2.5-5 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the nociceptive response in the plantar and formalin tests, in a way prevented by DPCPX (3 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective A(1) receptor antagonist. Similarly, intra-periaqueductal grey (PAG) 2'-Me-CCPA (0.5-1-2 nmol/rat) reduced pain behaviour in the plantar and formalin tests, in a way inhibited by DPCPX (0.5 nmol/rat). Moreover, when administered systemically (2.5-5 mg/kg, i.p.) or intra-PAG (0.5-1 nmol/rat) 2'-Me-CCPA increased the tail flick latencies, delayed the tail flick-related onset of the ON-cell burst and decreased the duration of the OFF-cell pause in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, it decreased RVM ON-cell and increased OFF-cell ongoing activities. The in vivo electrophysiological effects were all prevented by DPCPX (0.5 nmol/rat). This study confirms the role of adenosine A(1) receptors in modulating pain and suggests a critical involvement of these receptors within PAG-RVM descending pathway for the processing of pain.

  18. Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) as a new approach to determine a ligand's kinetic profile. A case in point for the adenosine A1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lizi; de Vries, Henk; IJzerman, Ad P; Heitman, Laura H

    2016-03-01

    Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) is a radio-isotopic technology format used to measure a wide range of biological interactions, including drug-target binding affinity studies. The assay is homogeneous in nature, as it relies on a "mix and measure" format. It does not involve a filtration step to separate bound from free ligand as is the case in a traditional receptor-binding assay. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), it has been shown that optimal binding kinetics, next to a high affinity of a ligand, can result in more desirable pharmacological profiles. However, traditional techniques to assess kinetic parameters tend to be cumbersome and laborious. We thus aimed to evaluate whether SPA can be an alternative platform for real-time receptor-binding kinetic measurements on GPCRs. To do so, we first validated the SPA technology for equilibrium binding studies on a prototypic class A GPCR, the human adenosine A1 receptor (hA1R). Differently to classic kinetic studies, the SPA technology allowed us to study binding kinetic processes almost real time, which is impossible in the filtration assay. To demonstrate the reliability of this technology for kinetic purposes, we performed the so-called competition association experiments. The association and dissociation rate constants (k on and k off) of unlabeled hA1R ligands were reliably and quickly determined and agreed very well with the same parameters from a traditional filtration assay performed simultaneously. In conclusion, SPA is a very promising technique to determine the kinetic profile of the drug-target interaction. Its robustness and potential for high-throughput may render this technology a preferred choice for further kinetic studies.

  19. Caffeine reverses age-related deficits in olfactory discrimination and social recognition memory in rats. Involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Prediger, Rui D S; Batista, Luciano C; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2005-06-01

    Caffeine, a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, has been suggested as a potential drug to counteract age-related cognitive decline since critical changes in adenosinergic neurotransmission occur with aging. In the present study, olfactory discrimination and short-term social memory of 3, 6, 12 and 18 month-old rats were assessed with the olfactory discrimination and social recognition tasks, respectively. The actions of caffeine (3.0, 10.0 and 30.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and the A2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) in relation to age-related effects on olfactory functions were also studied. The 12 and 18 month-old rats exhibited significantly impaired performance in both models, demonstrating deficits in their odor discrimination and in their ability to recognize a juvenile rat after a short period of time. Acute treatment with caffeine or ZM241385, but not with DPCPX, reversed these age-related olfactory deficits. The present results suggest the participation of adenosine receptors in the control of olfactory functions and confirm the potential of caffeine for the treatment of aged-related cognitive decline.

  20. Metformin suppresses CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong

    2014-10-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1B1 by environmental xenobiotic chemicals or endogenous ligands through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes related to cancer, such as transformation and tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of the anti-diabetes drug metformin on expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and inducible conditions. Our results indicated that metformin down-regulated the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced conditions. Down-regulation of AhR expression was required for metformin-mediated decreases in CYP1A1 andmore » CYP1B1 expression, and the metformin-mediated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 reduction is irrelevant to estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling. Furthermore, we found that metformin markedly down-regulated Sp1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. The use of genetic and pharmacological tools revealed that metformin-mediated down-regulation of AhR expression was mediated through the reduction of Sp1 protein. Metformin inhibited endogenous AhR ligand-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression by suppressing tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) expression in MCF-7 cells. Finally, metformin inhibits TDO expression through a down-regulation of Sp1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels. Our findings demonstrate that metformin reduces CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating AhR signaling. Metformin would be able to act as a potential chemopreventive agent against CYP1A1 and CYP1B1-mediated carcinogenesis and development of cancer. - Graphical abstract: Schematic of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene regulation by metformin. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. • Metformin down-regulates the AhR signaling. • Metformin reduces Sp1 protein expression. • Metformin suppresses TDO

  1. Inhibition of renal Na+-ATPase activity by inosine is mediated by A1 receptor-induced inhibition of the cAMP signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Assaife-Lopes, Natália; Wengert, Mira; de Sá Pinheiro, Ana Acacia; Leão-Ferreira, Luiz Roberto; Caruso-Neves, Celso

    2009-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that adenosine is deaminated to inosine in the isolated basolateral membrane (BLM) of kidney proximal tubules. This work investigates the possible effect of inosine on proximal tubule Na(+)-ATPase activity. Inosine reduced Na(+)-ATPase activity by 70%. This effect of inosine was completely attenuated by 10(-8) M DPCPX, an A(1) receptor-selective antagonist, but it was not affected by either 10(-8) M DMPX or 10(-7) M MRS1523, A(2) and A(3) receptor-selective antagonists, respectively. The inhibitory effect of inosine was blocked by: (1) 10(-6) M GDPbetaS, a trimeric G protein inhibitor; (2) 1microg/ml pertussis toxin, a Gi protein inhibitor; (3) 10(-6) M forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator; (4) 10(-9) M cholera toxin, a Gs protein activator; (5) 10(-6)M cAMP. Our results demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of inosine on the sodium pump is mediated by the A(1) receptor/Gi/cAMP pathway.

  2. The Influence of Standardized Valeriana officinalis Extract on the CYP3A1 Gene Expression by Nuclear Receptors in In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Mrozikiewicz, Przemyslaw M.; Karasiewicz, Monika; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L.; Ozarowski, Marcin; Grzeskowiak, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Valeriana officinalis is one of the most popular medicinal plants commonly used as a sedative and sleep aid. It is suggested that its pharmacologically active compounds derived from the root may modulate the CYP3A4 gene expression by activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and lead to pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of valerian on the expression level of CYP3A1 (homologue to human CYP3A4) as well as nuclear receptors PXR, CAR, RXR, GR, and HNF-4α. Male Wistar rats were given standardized valerian extract (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 3 and 10 days. The expression in liver tissue was analyzed by using real-time PCR. Our result showed a decrease of CYP3A1 expression level by 35% (P = 0.248) and 37% (P < 0.001), respectively. Moreover, Valeriana exhibited statistically significant reduction in RXR (approximately 28%) only after 3-day treatment. We also demonstrated a decrease in the amount HNF-4α by 22% (P = 0.005) and 32% (P = 0.012), respectively. In case of CAR, the increase of expression level by 46% (P = 0.023) was noted. These findings suggest that Valeriana officinalis extract can decrease the CYP3A4 expression and therefore may lead to interactions with synthetic drugs metabolized by this enzyme. PMID:25302309

  3. The influence of standardized Valeriana officinalis extract on the CYP3A1 gene expression by nuclear receptors in in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Bogacz, Anna; Mrozikiewicz, Przemyslaw M; Karasiewicz, Monika; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Majchrzycki, Marian; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L; Ozarowski, Marcin; Grzeskowiak, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Valeriana officinalis is one of the most popular medicinal plants commonly used as a sedative and sleep aid. It is suggested that its pharmacologically active compounds derived from the root may modulate the CYP3A4 gene expression by activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and lead to pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of valerian on the expression level of CYP3A1 (homologue to human CYP3A4) as well as nuclear receptors PXR, CAR, RXR, GR, and HNF-4α. Male Wistar rats were given standardized valerian extract (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 3 and 10 days. The expression in liver tissue was analyzed by using real-time PCR. Our result showed a decrease of CYP3A1 expression level by 35% (P = 0.248) and 37% (P < 0.001), respectively. Moreover, Valeriana exhibited statistically significant reduction in RXR (approximately 28%) only after 3-day treatment. We also demonstrated a decrease in the amount HNF-4α by 22% (P = 0.005) and 32% (P = 0.012), respectively. In case of CAR, the increase of expression level by 46% (P = 0.023) was noted. These findings suggest that Valeriana officinalis extract can decrease the CYP3A4 expression and therefore may lead to interactions with synthetic drugs metabolized by this enzyme.

  4. Modulation of postsynaptic potentials in rat cortical neurons by valerian extracts macerated with different alcohols: involvement of adenosine A(1)- and GABA(A)-receptors.

    PubMed

    Sichardt, K; Vissiennon, Z; Koetter, U; Brattström, A; Nieber, K

    2007-10-01

    Valeriana officinalis (valerian) is used traditionally as a mild sedative. Research into valerian is sparse, and studies differ greatly with respect to design, measures and preparations used. This study compares the action of a methanol (M-E), ethanol (E-E) and an extract macerated with ethylacetate (EA-E) from roots of valerian (Valeriana officinalis L., Valerianaceae) on postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) in cortical neurons. Intracellular recordings were performed in rat brain slice preparations containing pyramidal cells of the cingulate cortex. PSPs were induced by electrical field stimulation. The M-E induced strong inhibition in the concentration range 0.1-15 mg/mL, whereas the E-E (1-10 mg/mL) did not influence significantly the PSPs. The maximum inhibition induced by the M-E was completely antagonized by 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.1 microm), an antagonist on the adenosine A(1) receptor. Contrary to the M-E, the EA-E (10 mg/mL) induced an increase of the PSPs, which was completely blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonist picrotoxin (100 microm). The data suggest that activation of adenosine A(1) and GABA(A) receptors is mediated by different components within the valerian extract. The two mechanisms may contribute independently to the sleep-inducing effect of valerian.

  5. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    SciTech Connect

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina; Petrini, Stefania

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify amore » new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1.« less

  6. Androgen receptor-mediated regulation of the anti-atherogenic enzyme CYP27A1 involves the JNK/c-jun pathway.

    PubMed

    Norlin, Maria; Pettersson, Hanna; Tang, Wanjin; Wikvall, Kjell

    2011-02-15

    CYP27A1, an enzyme with several important roles in cholesterol homeostasis and vitamin D₃ metabolism, has been ascribed anti-atherogenic properties. This study addresses an important problem regarding how this enzyme, involved in cholesterol metabolism in the liver and peripheral tissues, is regulated. Our results identify the human CYP27A1 gene as a new target for the JNK/c-jun pathway. Initial experiments showed that an inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) downregulated basal CYP27A1 promoter activity whereas overexpression of JNK slightly enhanced promoter activity. Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated upregulation of mRNA levels and endogenous enzyme activity was recently reported. In the present study, the AR antagonist nilutamide blocked the androgen induction of CYP27A1. The present data revealed that inhibition of the JNK/c-jun pathway abolishes the AR-mediated effect on CYP27A1 transcription and enzyme activity, whereas overexpression of JNK markedly increased androgenic upregulation of CYP27A1. In conclusion, the current results indicate involvement of the JNK/c-jun pathway in AR-mediated upregulation of human CYP27A1. The link to JNK signaling is interesting since inflammatory processes may upregulate CYP27A1 to clear cholesterol from peripheral tissues. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Crystal structure of murine coronavirus receptor sCEACAM1a[1,4],a member of the carcinoembtyonic antigen family

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Zelus, B. D.; Meijers, R.

    2002-05-01

    CEACAM1 is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family. Isoforms of murine CEACAM1 serve as receptors for mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a murine coronavirus. Here we report the crystal structure of soluble murine sCEACAM1a[1,4], which is composed of two Ig-like domains and has MHV neutralizing activity. Its N-terminal domain has a uniquely folded CC' loop that encompasses key virus-binding residues. This is the first atomic structure of any member of the CEA family, and provides a prototypic architecture for functional exploration of CEA family members. We discuss the structural basis of virus receptor activities of murine CEACAM1 proteins, bindingmore » of Neisseria to human CEACAM1, and other homophilic and heterophilic interactions of CEA family members.« less

  8. Propranolol decreases retention of fear memory by modulating the stability of surface glutamate receptor GluA1 subunits in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Luo, Yi; Zhang, Jie-Ting; Li, Ming-Xing; Wang, Can-Ming; Guan, Xin-Lei; Wu, Peng-Fei; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Jin, You; Ni, Lan; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2015-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder with enhanced retention of fear memory and has profound impact on quality of life for millions of people worldwide. The β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol has been used in preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of PTSD, but the mechanisms underlying its potential efficacy on fear memory retention remain to be elucidated. We investigated the action of propranolol on the retention of conditioned fear memory, the surface expression of glutamate receptor GluA1 subunits of AMPA receptors and synaptic adaptation in the lateral amygdala (LA) of rats. Propranolol attenuated reactivation-induced strengthening of fear retention while reducing enhanced surface expression of GluA1 subunits and restoring the impaired long-term depression in LA. These effects of propranolol were mediated by antagonizing reactivation-induced enhancement of adrenergic signalling, which activates PKA and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and then regulates the trafficking of AMPA receptors via phosphorylation of GluA1 subunits at the C-terminus. Both i.p. injection and intra-amygdala infusion of propranolol attenuated reactivation-induced enhancement of fear retention. Reactivation strengthens fear retention by increasing the level of noradrenaline and promotes the surface expression of GluA1 subunits and the excitatory synaptic transmission in LA. These findings uncover one mechanism underlying the efficiency of propranolol on retention of fear memories and suggest that β-adrenoceptor antagonists, which act centrally, may be more suitable for the treatment of PTSD. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Adenosine A1 receptors link to smooth muscle contraction via CYP4a, PKC-α, and ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Kunduri, SS; Mustafa, SJ; Ponnoth, DS; Dick, GM; Nayeem, MA

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) activation contracts smooth muscle, although signaling mechanisms aren’t thoroughly understood. Activation of A1AR leads to metabolism of arachidonic acid, including the production of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) by cytochrome P4504a (CYP4a). 20-HETE can activate protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) which crosstalks with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) pathway. Both these pathways can regulate smooth muscle contraction, we tested the hypothesis that A1AR contracts smooth muscle through a pathway involving CYP4a, PKC-α, and ERK1/2. Experiments included isometric tension recordings of aortic contraction and Western blots of signaling molecules in wild type (WT) and A1AR knockout (A1KO) mice. Contraction to the A1-selective agonist CCPA was absent in A1KO mice aortae, indicating the contractile role of A1AR. Inhibition of CYP4a (HET0016) abolished CCPA-induced contraction in WT aortae, indicating a critical role for 20-HETE. Both WT and A1KO mice aortae contracted in response to exogenous 20-HETE. Inhibition of PKC-α (Gö6976) or ERK1/2 (PD98059) attenuated 20-HETE-induced contraction equally, suggesting that ERK1/2 is downstream of PKC-α. Contractions to exogenous 20-HETE were significantly less in A1KO mice; reduced protein levels of PKC-α, p-ERK1/2, and total ERK1/2 supported this observation. Our data indicate that A1AR mediates smooth muscle contraction via CYP4a and a PKC-α-ERK1/2 pathway. PMID:23519140

  10. Rats fed soy protein isolate (SPI) have impaired hepatic CYP1A1 induction by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as a result of interference with aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Rohit; Badger, Thomas M.; Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center, Little Rock, AR 72202

    2008-03-01

    Consumption of soy diets has been found to reduce cancer incidence in animals and is associated with reduced cancer risk in humans. Previously, we have demonstrated that female Sprague-Dawley rats fed purified AIN-93G diets with soy protein isolate (SPI) as the sole protein source had reduced CYP1A1 induction and basal aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) levels relative to those fed the same diet containing casein (CAS). In the present study, the molecular mechanisms underlying reduced AhR expression have been studied. The SPI-effect on AhR was not observed after feeding diets containing the purified soy isoflavones genistein or daidzein. Rat hepatoma FGC-4more » cells were treated with the serum obtained from rats fed CAS- or SPI-containing diets. Reduced AhR levels (P < 0.05) were observed after 24 h exposure to SPI-serum without any changes in the overall expression of chaperone proteins-HSP90 and XAP2. SPI-serum-stimulated AhR degradation was inhibited by treating the cells with the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, and was observed to be preceded by ubiquitination of the receptor. A reduced association of XAP2 with the immunoprecipitated AhR complex was observed. SPI-serum-mediated AhR degradation was preceded by nuclear translocation of the receptor. However, the translocated receptor was found to be unable to heterodimerize with ARNT or to bind to XRE elements on the CYP1A1 enhancer. These data suggest that feeding SPI-containing diets antagonizes AhR signaling by a novel mechanism which differs from those established for known AhR antagonists.« less

  11. Residues in the pore region of Drosophila transient receptor potential A1 dictate sensitivity to thermal stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Schupp, Melanie; Zurborg, Sandra; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The capacity to sense temperature is essential for the survival of all animals. At the molecular level, ion channels belonging to the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of channels function as temperature sensors in animals across several phyla. TRP channels are opened directly by changes in temperature and show pronounced sensitivity at their activation range. To determine how temperature activates these channels, we analysed channels belonging to the TRPA family, which detect heat in insects and cold in mammals. By constructing chimeric proteins consisting of human and Drosophila TRPA1 channels, we mapped regions that regulate thermal activation and identified residues in the pore helix that invert temperature sensitivity of TRPA1. From analysis of individual channels we defined the gating reaction of Drosophila TRPA1 and determined how mutagenesis alters the energy landscape for channel opening. Our results reveal specific molecular requirements for thermal activation of TRPA1 and provide mechanistic insight into this process. PMID:23027824

  12. Cytoplasmic ankyrin repeats of transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) dictate sensitivity to thermal and chemical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Morales, Julio F; Gracheva, Elena O; Julius, David

    2011-11-15

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are polymodal signal detectors that respond to a wide array of physical and chemical stimuli, making them important components of sensory systems in both vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Mammalian TRPA1 channels are activated by chemically reactive irritants, whereas snake and Drosophila TRPA1 orthologs are preferentially activated by heat. By comparing human and rattlesnake TRPA1 channels, we have identified two portable heat-sensitive modules within the ankyrin repeat-rich aminoterminal cytoplasmic domain of the snake ortholog. Chimeric channel studies further demonstrate that sensitivity to chemical stimuli and modulation by intracellular calcium also localize to the N-terminal ankyrin repeat-rich domain, identifying this region as an integrator of diverse physiological signals that regulate sensory neuron excitability. These findings provide a framework for understanding how restricted changes in TRPA1 sequence account for evolution of physiologically diverse channels, also identifying portable modules that specify thermosensitivity.

  13. Residues in the pore region of Drosophila transient receptor potential A1 dictate sensitivity to thermal stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Schupp, Melanie; Zurborg, Sandra; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The capacity to sense temperature is essential for the survival of all animals. At the molecular level, ion channels belonging to the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of channels function as temperature sensors in animals across several phyla. TRP channels are opened directly by changes in temperature and show pronounced sensitivity at their activation range. To determine how temperature activates these channels, we analysed channels belonging to the TRPA family, which detect heat in insects and cold in mammals. By constructing chimeric proteins consisting of human and Drosophila TRPA1 channels, we mapped regions that regulate thermal activation and identified residues in the pore helix that invert temperature sensitivity of TRPA1. From analysis of individual channels we defined the gating reaction of Drosophila TRPA1 and determined how mutagenesis alters the energy landscape for channel opening. Our results reveal specific molecular requirements for thermal activation of TRPA1 and provide mechanistic insight into this process.

  14. Lack of ghrelin secretion in response to fasting in cholecystokinin-A (-1), -B (-2) receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Chihiro; Ohta, Minoru; Kanai, Setsuko; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Miyasaka, Kyoko

    2006-12-01

    Cholecystokinin receptors (CCK-Rs) have been classified into two subtypes: CCK-AR (1R) and -BR (2R). We generated CCK-AR(-/-), CCK-BR(-/-), and CCK-AR(-/-)BR(-/-) mice and found that the gastric emptying of a liquid meal was increased in CCK-BR(-/-) and AR(-/-)BR(-/-) mice, compared with wild-type and CCK-AR(-/-) mice. Given that enhanced gastric emptying leads to eating, food intake after overnight fasting was examined, as was the effect of CCK-8S on food intake. Male mice 6-8 months of age were deprived of food for 16 h with free access to water, after which they were injected intraperitoneally (0.1 ml/mouse) with either vehicle or CCK-8 (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 nmol/mouse), and their food intake was monitored for 4 h. CCK-8S inhibited food intake in wild-type and CCK-BR(-/-) mice, but not in CCK-AR(-/-) or AR(-/-)BR(-/-) mice. Unexpectedly, we observed a lower food intake in CCK-AR(-/-)BR (-/-) mice treated with vehicle than in mice of the other genotypes. To examine the mechanism of decrease in food intake in CCK-AR(-/-)BR(-/-) mice, the involvement of ghrelin was determined in wild-type and CCK-AR(-/-)BR(-/-) mice. Fasting plasma ghrelin levels were significantly lower in CCK-AR (-/-)BR(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice, and no increase in response to fasting was observed in CCK-AR(-/-)BR(-/-) mice. An administration of acyl-ghrelin produced a small increase in food intake in CCK-AR(-/-)BR(-/-) mice, but not to the levels of wild-type mice. In conclusion, CCK-AR(-/-)BR(-/-) mice showed lower food intake as well as lower response to exogenous ghrelin, and a lower plasma ghrelin level after fasting, though which receptor is more important is unknown.

  15. 5-HT1A/1B receptors as targets for optimizing pigmentary responses in C57BL/6 mouse skin to stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua-Li; Pang, Si-Lin; Liu, Qiong-Zhen; Wang, Qian; Cai, Min-Xuan; Shang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Stress has been reported to induce alterations of skin pigmentary response. Acute stress is associated with increased turnover of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) whereas chronic stress causes a decrease. 5-HT receptors have been detected in pigment cells, indicating their role in skin pigmentation. To ascertain the precise role of 5-HT in stress-induced pigmentary responses, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to chronic restraint stress and chronic unpredictable mild stress (CRS and CUMS, two models of chronic stress) for 21 days, finally resulting in abnormal pigmentary responses. Subsequently, stressed mice were characterized by the absence of a black pigment in dorsal coat. The down-regulation of tyrosinase (TYR) and tyrosinase-related proteins (TRP1 and TRP2) expression in stressed skin was accompanied by reduced levels of 5-HT and decreased expression of 5-HT receptor (5-HTR) system. In both murine B16F10 melanoma cells and normal human melanocytes (NHMCs), 5-HT had a stimulatory effect on melanin production, dendricity and migration. When treated with 5-HT in cultured hair follicles (HFs), the increased expression of melanogenesis-related genes and the activation of 5-HT1A, 1B and 7 receptors also occurred. The serum obtained from stressed mice showed significantly decreased tyrosinase activity in NHMCs compared to that from nonstressed mice. The decrease in tyrosinase activity was further augmented in the presence of 5-HTR1A, 1B and 7 antagonists, WAY100635, SB216641 and SB269970. In vivo, stressed mice received 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP), a member of the class of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine; FX) and 5-HTR1A/1B agonists (8-OH-DPAT/CP94253), finally contributing to the normalization of pigmentary responses. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the serotoninergic system plays an important role in the regulation of stress-induced depigmentation, which can be mediated by 5-HT1A/1B receptors. 5-HT and 5-HTR1A

  16. Genetic disruption of the nuclear receptor Nur77 (Nr4a1) in rat reduces dopamine cell loss and l-Dopa-induced dyskinesia in experimental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rouillard, Claude; Baillargeon, Joanie; Paquet, Brigitte; St-Hilaire, Michel; Maheux, Jérôme; Lévesque, Catherine; Darlix, Noémie; Majeur, Simon; Lévesque, Daniel

    2018-03-09

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an idiopathic progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of midbrain dopamine neurons. Levodopa (l-dopa) is the main pharmacological approach to relieve PD motor symptoms. However, chronic treatment with l-Dopa is inevitably associated with the generation of abnormal involuntary movements (l-Dopa-induced dyskinesia). We have previously shown that Nr4a1 (Nur77), a transcription factor of the nuclear receptor family, is closely associated with dopamine neurotransmission in the mature brain. However, the role of Nr4a1 in the etiology of PD and its treatment remain elusive. We report here that the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine in rat lead to a rapid up-regulation of Nr4a1 in the substantia nigra. Genetic disruption of Nr4a1 in rat reduced neurotoxin-induced dopamine cell loss and l-Dopa-induced dyskinesia, whereas virally-driven striatal overexpression of Nr4a1 enhanced or partially restored involuntary movements induced by chronic l-Dopa in wild type and Nr4a1-deficient rats, respectively. Collectively, these results suggest that Nr4a1 is involved in dopamine cell loss and l-Dopa-induced dyskinesia in experimental PD. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Effects of Long-Term Caffeine Consumption on the Adenosine A1 Receptor in the Rat Brain: an In Vivo PET Study with [18F]CPFPX.

    PubMed

    Nabbi-Schroeter, Danje; Elmenhorst, David; Oskamp, Angela; Laskowski, Stefanie; Bauer, Andreas; Kroll, Tina

    2018-04-01

    Caffeine, a nonselective antagonist of adenosine receptors, is the most popular psychostimulant worldwide. Recently, a protective role of moderate chronic caffeine consumption against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease has been discussed. Thus, aim of the present study was an in vivo investigation of effects of long-term caffeine consumption on the adenosine A 1 receptor (A 1 AR) in the rat brain. Sixteen adult, male rats underwent five positron emission tomography (PET) scans with the highly selective A 1 AR radioligand [ 18 F]CPFPX in order to determine A 1 AR availability. After the first baseline PET scan, the animals were assigned to two groups: Caffeine treatment and control group. The caffeine-treated animals received caffeinated tap water (30 mg/kg bodyweight/day, corresponding to 4-5 cups of coffee per day in humans) for 12 weeks. Subsequently, caffeine was withdrawn and repeated PET measurements were performed on day 1, 2, 4, and 7 of caffeine withdrawal. The control animals were measured according to the same time schedule. At day 1, after 4.4 h of caffeine withdrawal, a significant decrease (- 34.5%, p < 0.001) of whole brain A 1 AR availability was observed. Unlike all other investigated brain regions in caffeine-treated rats, the hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens showed no significant intraindividual differences between baseline and first withdrawal PET scan. After approximately 27 h of caffeine withdrawal, the region- and group-specific effects disappeared and A 1 AR availability settled around baseline. The present study provides evidence that chronic caffeine consumption does not lead to persistent changes in functional availability of cerebral A 1 ARs which have previously been associated with neuroprotective effects of caffeine. The acute and region-specific decrease in cerebral A 1 AR availability directly after caffeine withdrawal is most likely caused by residual amounts of caffeine metabolites

  18. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) inhibits growth and invasion by up-regulating nuclear receptors and 25-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Erik J; Webber, Mukta M

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests an inverse relationship between prostate cancer and serum vitamin D levels. We examined the ability of cholecalciferol (vitamin D(3)), a calcitriol precursor, to inhibit or reverse cellular changes associated with malignant transformation and invasion and explored its mechanisms of action. The RWPE2-W99 human prostate epithelial cell line, which forms slow-growing tumors in nude mice, was used because it mimics the behavior of the majority of primary human prostate cancers. Cholecalciferol, at physiological levels: (i) inhibited anchorage-dependent and -independent growth; (ii) induced differentiation by decreasing vimentin expression with a concomitant decrease in motility/chemotaxis; (iii) decreased MMP-9 and MMP-2 activity with concomitant decrease in invasion; and (iv) exerted its effects by up-regulating vitamin D receptor (VDR), retinoid-X receptor-alpha (RXR-alpha), and androgen receptor (AR) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that RWPE2-W99 prostate cancer cells, similar to RWPE-1 cells (Tokar and Webber. Clin Exp Metast 2005; 22: 265-73), constitutively express the enzyme 25-hydroxylase CYP27A1 which is markedly up-regulated by cholecalciferol. Cholecalciferol has effects similar to those of calcitriol on growth, MMP activity, and VDR. The ability of CYP27A1 to catalyze the conversion of cholecalciferol to 25(OH)D(3) and of 25(OH)D(3) to calcitriol has been reported. RWPE2-W99 cells, similar to RWPE-1 cells, appear to have the rare ability to locally convert cholecalciferol to the active hormone calcitriol. Because it can inhibit cellular changes associated with malignant transformation and invasion, we propose that cholecalciferol may be an effective agent for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  19. The antidepressant-like effect of inosine in the FST is associated with both adenosine A1 and A 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella P; Budni, Josiane; Gazal, Marta; Cunha, Mauricio P; Santos, Adair R S; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2013-09-01

    Inosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside, which is formed during the breakdown of adenosine. The adenosinergic system was already described as capable of modulating mood in preclinical models; we now explored the effects of inosine in two predictive models of depression: the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). Mice treated with inosine displayed higher anti-immobility in the FST (5 and 50 mg/kg, intraperitoneal route (i.p.)) and in the TST (1 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) when compared to vehicle-treated groups. These antidepressant-like effects started 30 min and lasted for 2 h after intraperitoneal administration of inosine and were not accompanied by any changes in the ambulatory activity in the open-field test. Both adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonists prevented the antidepressant-like effect of inosine in the FST. In addition, the administration of an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (1 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) also caused an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. These results indicate that inosine possesses an antidepressant-like effect in the FST and TST probably through the activation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, further reinforcing the potential of targeting the purinergic system to the management of mood disorders.

  20. Lack of association between TaqI A1 Allele of dopamine D2 receptor gene and alcohol-use disorders in Atayal natives of Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chia-Hsiang Chen; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Hai-Gwo Hwu

    1996-09-20

    Association studies between the A1 allele of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene TaqI A polymorphism and alcoholism remain controversial. A recent study from Japan demonstrated that the A1 allele is associated with severe alcoholism in the Japanese population. We were interested in knowing if this association also exists in the Atayals of Taiwan, who were found to have a higher prevalence of alcohol-use disorders than the Han Chinese in Taiwan. Genotype and allele frequencies were determined in alcohol-abusing, alcohol-dependent, and nonalcoholic control Atayal natives in Taiwan. A1 allele frequencies in alcohol-dependent, alcohol-abusing, and normal control Atayals were 0.39, 0.42,more » and 0.39, respectively. No difference in A1 allele frequency was found among these three groups. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the A1 allele of the TaqI A polymorphism of the DRD2 gene increases susceptibility to alcohol-use disorders in the Atayals of Taiwan. 18 refs., 1 tab.« less

  1. No neural evidence for dynamic auditory tuning of the A1 receptor in the ear of the noctuid moth, Noctua pronuba.

    PubMed

    Asi, Navdeep S; Fullard, James Howard; Whitehead, Scott; Dawson, Jeff W

    2009-10-01

    By examining the mechanical properties of the tympanum of the noctuid moth, Noctua pronuba, Windmill et al. (2006) suggested that this insect increases (up-tunes) the frequencies of its best hearing when exposed to high intensity sounds (HIS) resembling the echolocation calls of attacking bats. We tested whether this biophysical phenomenon was encoded in the neural responses of this moth's most sensitive auditory receptor (A1 cell) before and after exposure to HIS. We measured: (1) the number of A1 action potentials (spikes) per stimulus pulse; (2) the proportion of A1 spike periods below that determined to elicit evasive flight maneuvers and, (3) the change in A1 cell firing (spike number, interspike interval, stimulus/spike latency) over a duration of time similar to that in which up-tuning lasts. We observed no significant spiking response changes in the predicted direction to any of the frequencies tested following exposure to HIS and we observed only two of the 24 predicted time-dependent changes to A1 firing. These results indicate that tympanal up-tuning does not result in a change to this moth's auditory frequency sensitivity and we suggest either sensillar resonances or increases in thoracic muscle tension following exposure to HIS as alternative explanations.

  2. GluA1 subunit ubiquitination mediates amyloid-β-induced loss of surface α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors.

    PubMed

    Guntupalli, Sumasri; Jang, Se Eun; Zhu, Tianyi; Huganir, Richard L; Widagdo, Jocelyn; Anggono, Victor

    2017-05-19

    The accumulation of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides produces profound neuronal changes in the brain during the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Excessive levels of Aβ disrupt excitatory synaptic transmission by promoting the removal of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs), dendritic spine loss, and synaptic depression. Recently, activity-dependent ubiquitination of the GluA1 subunit has been shown to regulate the intracellular sorting of AMPARs toward late endosomes for degradation. However, whether this ubiquitin signaling pathway mediates Aβ-induced loss of surface AMPARs is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that acute exposure of cultured neurons to soluble Aβ oligomers induces AMPAR ubiquitination concomitant with the removal of AMPARs from the plasma membrane. Importantly, expression of the GluA1 ubiquitin-deficient mutants inhibited the adverse effects of Aβ on the surface expression of AMPARs in neurons. Furthermore, we revealed the cross-talk between GluA1 ubiquitination and phosphorylation, in particular phosphorylation at Ser-845, which is crucial for AMPAR recycling and is known to be dephosphorylated in the presence of Aβ. Our data showed that the GluA1 ubiquitin-deficient mutant enhances GluA1 phosphorylation on Ser-845. Conversely, the GluA1 S845D phosphomimetic mutant reduced binding with Nedd4-1 and hence the ubiquitination of AMPARs. Importantly, the GluA1 S845D mutant also prevented Aβ-induced removal of surface AMPARs. Taken together, these findings provide the first demonstration of the dynamic cross-modulation of GluA1 ubiquitination and phosphorylation, a process that is perturbed by Aβ, in regulating the membrane sorting decision that ultimately determines the number of AMPARs on the cell surface. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Cardiac‐Restricted Overexpression of the A2A‐Adenosine Receptor in FVB Mice Transiently Increases Contractile Performance and Rescues the Heart Failure Phenotype in Mice Overexpressing the A1‐Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tung O.; Funakoshi, Hajime; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue‐Qian; Wang, JuFang; Chung, Paul H.; DeGeorge, Jr, Brent R.; Li, Xue; Zhang, Jin; Herrmann, David E.; Diamond, Maura; Hamad, Eman; Houser, Steven R.; Koch, Walter J.; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Feldman, Arthur M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract In the heart, adenosine binds to pharmacologically distinct G‐protein‐coupled receptors (A1‐R, A2A‐R, and A3‐R). While the role of A1‐and A3‐Rs in the heart has been clarifed, the effect of genetically manipulating the A2A‐R has not been defned. Thus, we created mice overexpressing a cardiac‐restricted A2A‐R transgene. Mice with both low (Lo) and high (Hi) levels of A2A‐R overexpression demonstrated an increase in cardiac contractility at 12 weeks. These changes were associated with a signifcantly higher systolic but not diastolic [Ca2+]i, higher maximal contraction amplitudes, and a signifcantly enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake activity. At 20 weeks, the effects of A2A‐R overexpression on cardiac contractility diminished. The positive effects elicited by A2A‐R overexpression differ from the heart failure phenotype we observed with A1‐R overexpresson. Interestingly, coexpression of A2A‐R TGHi, but not A2A‐R TGLo, enhanced survival, prevented the development of left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure, and improved Ca2+ handling in mice overexpressing the A1‐R. These results suggest that adenosine‐mediated signaling in the heart requires a balance between A1‐ and A2A‐Rs—a fnding that may have important implications for the ongoing clinical evaluation of adenosine receptor subtype‐specifc agonists and antagonists for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20354569

  4. Odor Preference Learning and Memory Modify GluA1 Phosphorylation and GluA1 Distribution in the Neonate Rat Olfactory Bulb: Testing the AMPA Receptor Hypothesis in an Appetitive Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cui, Wen; Darby-King, Andrea; Grimes, Matthew T.; Howland, John G.; Wang, Yu Tian; McLean, John H.; Harley, Carolyn W.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in synaptic AMPA receptors is hypothesized to mediate learning and memory. AMPA receptor increases have been reported in aversive learning models, although it is not clear if they are seen with memory maintenance. Here we examine AMPA receptor changes in a cAMP/PKA/CREB-dependent appetitive learning model: odor preference learning in…

  5. 5'-C-Ethyl-tetrazolyl-N(6)-substituted adenosine and 2-chloro-adenosine derivatives as highly potent dual acting A1 adenosine receptor agonists and A3 adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Torquati, Ilaria; Kachler, Sonja; Luongo, Livio; Maione, Sabatino; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Grifantini, Mario; Novellino, Ettore; Lavecchia, Antonio; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Cappellacci, Loredana

    2015-03-12

    A series of N(6)-substituted-5'-C-(2-ethyl-2H-tetrazol-5-yl)-adenosine and 2-chloro-adenosine derivatives was synthesized as novel, highly potent dual acting hA1AR agonists and hA3AR antagonists, potentially useful in the treatment of glaucoma and other diseases. The best affinity and selectivity profiles were achieved by N(6)-substitution with a 2-fluoro-4-chloro-phenyl- or a methyl- group. Through an in silico receptor-driven approach, the molecular bases of the hA1- and hA3AR recognition and activation of this series of 5'-C-ethyl-tetrazolyl derivatives were explained.

  6. Adenosine A1-receptor blockade impairs the ability of rat pups to autoresuscitate from primary apnea during repeated exposure to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Fewell, James E; Lun, Rongzhi

    2015-01-01

    Failure of gasping to bring about autoresuscitation from hypoxia-induced apnea has been suggested to play a role in sudden unexpected infant death. Little is known, however, about factors that influence the ability of gasping to restore life during severe hypoxia in newborns. Given that adenosine modulates cardiac function during hypoxia-induced apnea and that cardiac dysfunction plays a role in mediating autoresuscitation failure, the present experiments were carried out on 34, 5- to 6-, and 10- to 11-day-old rat pups to investigate their ability to autoresuscitate from hypoxia-induced apnea during repeated exposure to hypoxia after adenosine A1-receptor blockade. Each pup was placed into a temperature-controlled chamber regulated to 37 ± 1°C and repeatedly exposed to an anoxic gas mixture (97% N2 and 3% CO2) until the occurrence of autoresuscitation failure. One group was studied following administration of the selective adenosine A1-receptor antagonist 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3,-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) and one group was studied following vehicle. DPCPX significantly attenuated bradycardia during hypoxia-induced apnea and impaired the ability of both age groups of pups to autoresuscitate during repeated exposure to hypoxia (5–6 days tolerated – vehicle 17 ± 4 vs. DPCPX 10 ± 2 hypoxia exposures [P < 0.05]; 10–11 days tolerated – vehicle 10 ± 2 vs. DPCPX 7 ± 2 hypoxia exposures [P < 0.05]). Death in all pups resulted from the inability of gasping to restore cardiovascular function during hypoxia-induced apnea although the mechanism of cardiovascular dysfunction/failure was influenced and the occurrence hastened by DPCPX. Thus, our data provide evidence that adenosine acting via adenosine A1-receptors enhances the ability of rat pups to tolerate repeated exposure to severe hypoxia during early postnatal maturation. PMID:26272732

  7. No association between the TaqI A1 RFLP of the D2 receptor gene and alcoholism in a Mexican population

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Fuentes, C.; Carmarena, B.; Eroza, V.

    1994-09-01

    The suggested association of the A1 allele of the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) human gene with alcoholism was studied by comparing the DRD2/TaqI genotypes of 36 healthy controls and 38 individuals who met the DSM-III-R diagnostic criteria for alcohol dependence. All subjects were unrelated, with parents and grandparents of Mexican origin. The alcoholics in our sample suffered one of the following conditions: delirium tremens (16.6%), alcohol hallucinosis (56.6%) or uncomplicated alcohol withdrawal (26.4%). Eight-eight percent of the controls carried the A1 allele. The frequency of the DRD2 A1 allele in the Mexican urban sample (pA1 = 0.61) was 2 tomore » 3-fold higher than reported in Caucasian populations from the USA and Europe, but similar to the allele frequencies found in defined Amerindian populations. There were not significant differences in the prevalence or allele frequency between alcoholics (pA1 = 0.64) and controls, regardless if the alcoholics were subtyped accordingly to severity, age of onset or positive family history. Alcoholics had higher scores than controls in the neuroticism (N) and psychoticism (P) subscales on the Eysenck personality test: alcoholics P = 6.2 {+-} 2.9, N = 16.0 {+-} 4.2 vs. controls P = 2.5 {+-} 2.3, N = 5.7 {+-} 5.1; p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. However, no relationship between personality traits and genotypes was found. Our results do not support a consistent association between the TaqI A1 RFLP for the DRD2 gene and alcoholism.« less

  8. Concurrent expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and CYP1A1 but not CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism is correlated with gastric cancers raised in Dalian, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing-Xin; Zhang, Kai-Li; Liu, Xu; Ma, Yan-Lu; Pei, Li-Na; Zhu, Yi-Fang; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Kong, Qing-You; Li, Hong; Liu, Jia

    2006-08-28

    The frequency of cancer-associated m2m2- (C-) genotype of CYP1A1 and the factors contributing to the increased CYP1A1 expression in gastric cancers (GCs) are largely unknown. To address theses issues, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to elucidate the MspI polymorphism in 60 GC cases and 57 normal donor samples. The frequencies of m1m1-, m1m2- and m2m2-genotype were 43.3, 45 and 11.7% among GC patients and 45.6, 49.1 and 5.3% among the normal donors respectively, demonstrating no significant difference of them between cancer and control groups (chi(2)=0.343, P=0.558). The correlation of Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) with the frequent CYP1A1 expression in stepwise gastrocarcinogenesis was determined by RT-PCR, immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and Western blotting, using GC samples as well as their pre-malignant and non-cancerous counterparts. RT-PCR revealed that the AhR detection rates were 100, 94.12 and 85.17% in GC, pre-malignant and non-cancerous mucosa (P>0.05) respectively but the level of AhR expression in GCs was much higher than that of non-cancerous tissues. IHC showed that the frequencies of AhR detection were 94.87% (37/39) in GCs, 94.12% (16/17) in pre-malignant lesions and 50% (3/6) in non-cancerous mucosa, revealing significant difference in frequencies of AhR detection and levels of AhR expression between GC or pre-malignant group and non-cancerous one (P<0.05). The frequency of AhR nucleus translocation was significantly high in GCs (94.87%; 37/39) than that in pre-malignant (70.59%; 12/17) and especially in non-cancerous group (16.67%; 1/6). Co-existence of AhR nuclear translocation and CYP1A1 expressions were found in 82.70% (43/52) of GCs (r(s)=0.437, P<0.01). Our results suggest (1) that CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism may not contribute to the high gastric cancer risk in Dalian region and (2) that enhanced AhR expression and especially its nuclear translocation may be a favorable factor for GC formation

  9. Liver X Receptor β (LXRβ) Interacts Directly with ATP-binding Cassette A1 (ABCA1) to Promote High Density Lipoprotein Formation during Acute Cholesterol Accumulation*

    PubMed Central

    Hozoji-Inada, Masako; Munehira, Youichi; Nagao, Kohjiro; Kioka, Noriyuki; Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2011-01-01

    Cells have evolved multiple mechanisms for maintaining cholesterol homeostasis, and, among these, ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1)-mediated cholesterol efflux is highly regulated at the transcriptional level through the activity of the nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR). Here, we show that in addition to its well defined role in transcription, LXRβ directly binds to the C-terminal region (2247LTSFL2251) of ABCA1 to mediate its post-translational regulation. In the absence of cholesterol accumulation in the macrophage-like cell line THP-1, the ABCA1-LXRβ complex stably localizes to the plasma membrane, but apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) binding or cholesterol efflux does not occur. Exogenously added LXR ligands, which mimic cholesterol accumulation, cause LXRβ to dissociate from ABCA1, thus freeing ABCA1 for apoA-I binding and subsequent cholesterol efflux. Photoaffinity labeling experiments with 8-azido-[α-32P]ATP showed that the interaction of LXRβ with ABCA1 inhibits ATP binding by ABCA1. This is the first study to show that a protein-protein interaction with the endogenous protein suppresses the function of ABC proteins by inhibiting ATP binding. LXRβ can cause a post-translational response by binding directly to ABCA1, as well as a transcriptional response, to maintain cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:21507939

  10. Ecto-5′-Nucleotidase (CD73)-Mediated Formation of Adenosine Is Critical for the Striatal Adenosine A2A Receptor Functions

    PubMed Central

    Augusto, Elisabete; Matos, Marco; Sévigny, Jean; El-Tayeb, Ali; Bynoe, Margaret S.; Müller, Christa E.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator acting through inhibitory A1 receptors (A1Rs) and facilitatory A2ARs, which have similar affinities for adenosine. It has been shown that the activity of intracellular adenosine kinase preferentially controls the activation of A1Rs, but the source of the adenosine activating A2ARs is unknown. We now show that ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73), the major enzyme able to convert extracellular AMP into adenosine, colocalizes with A2ARs in the basal ganglia. In addition to astrocytes, striatal CD73 is prominently localized to postsynaptic sites. Notably, CD73 coimmunoprecipitated with A2ARs and proximity ligation assays confirmed the close proximity of CD73 and A2ARs in the striatum. Accordingly, the cAMP formation in synaptosomes as well as the hypolocomotion induced by a novel A2AR prodrug that requires CD73 metabolization to activate A2ARs were observed in wild-type mice, but not in CD73 knock-out (KO) mice or A2AR KO mice. Moreover, CD73 KO mice displayed increased working memory performance and a blunted amphetamine-induced sensitization, mimicking the phenotype of global or forebrain-A2AR KO mice, as well as upon pharmacological A2AR blockade. These results show that CD73-mediated formation of extracellular adenosine is responsible for the activation of striatal A2AR function. This study points to CD73 as a new target that can fine-tune A2AR activity, and a novel therapeutic target to manipulate A2AR-mediated control of striatal function and neurodegeneration. PMID:23843511

  11. Alcoholism, ALDH2*2 allele and the A1 allele of the dopamine D2 receptor gene: an association study.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, S; Muramatsu, T; Murayama, M; Nakane, J; Higuchi, S

    2001-10-10

    The inactive form of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) is regarded as a protective factor against the development of alcoholism, and alcoholics with inactive ALDH2 are considered to be relatively homogeneous. This examination of a possible allelic association of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene TaqI A polymorphism failed to detect significant differences between 583 Japanese alcoholics and 295 unrelated Japanese controls, or between alcoholic subjects with different ALDH2 genotypes. Despite the significantly higher frequency of the DRD2 A1 allele in the 207 alcoholics with inactive ALDH2 than in the 376 alcoholics with active ALDH2, multiple logistic regression analysis (controlled for the ALDH2 genotype) revealed no association between the TaqI A polymorphism and alcoholism. Nor did the frequency of the DRD2 TaqI A polymorphism differ in alcoholic subjects grouped by several pertinent clinical characteristics, including severity of alcoholism. Although there remains a possibility that the DRD2 TaqI A polymorphism plays some role in modifying the phenotype of the disease, these results suggest that neither the A1 allele nor the homozygous A1 genotype is associated with alcoholism.

  12. Functional interaction and cross-tolerance between ethanol and Δ9-THC: possible modulation by mouse cerebellar adenosinergic A1/GABAergic-A receptors.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2014-08-15

    We have previously shown a functional motor interaction between ethanol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) that involved cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAergic A receptor modulation. We now report the development of cross-tolerance between intracerebellar Δ(9)-THC and intraperitoneal ethanol using ataxia as the test response in male CD-1 mice. The drugs [Δ(9)-THC (20 μg), N(6)-cyclohexyladenosine, CHA (12 ng), muscimol (20 ng)] used in the study were directly microinfused stereotaxically via guide cannulas into the cerebellum except ethanol. Δ(9)-THC, infused once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last infusion by acute ethanol (2g/kg) and Rotorod evaluation, virtually abolished ethanol ataxia indicating development of cross-tolerance. The cross-tolerance was also observed when the order of ethanol and Δ(9)-THC treatment was reversed, i.e., ethanol injected once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last ethanol injection by Δ(9)-THC infusion. The cross-tolerance appeared within 24-48 h, lasted over 72 h and was maximal in 5-day ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-treated animals. Finally, tolerance in chronic ethanol/Δ(9)-THC/-treated animals developed not only to ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-induced ataxia, respectively, but also to the ataxia potentiating effect of CHA and muscimol, indicating modulation by cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAA receptors. A practical implication of these results could be that marijuana smokers may experience little or no negative effects such as ataxia following alcohol consumption. Clinically, such antagonism of ethanol-induced ataxia can be observed in marijuana users thereby encouraging more alcohol consumption and thus may represent a risk factor for the development of alcoholism in this segment of population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ephrin receptor (Eph) -A1, -A2, -A4 and -A7 expression in mobile tongue squamous cell carcinoma: associations with clinicopathological parameters and patients survival.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Stamatios; Klijanienko, Jerzy; Giaginis, Constantinos; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Patsouris, Efstratios; Sastre-Garau, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    Ephrin receptors (Ephs) are frequently overexpressed in a wide variety of human malignant tumors, being associated with tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of Eph-A1, -A2, -A4 and -A7 protein expression in mobile tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Eph-A1, -A2, -A4 and -A7 protein expression was assessed immunohistochemically on 37 mobile tongue SCC tissue samples and was analyzed in relation with clinicopathological characteristics, overall and disease-free patients' survival. All the examined mobile tongue SCC cases were found positive for Eph-A1, -A2, -A4 and -A7. Significant associations were noted between high Eph-A1, -A4 and -A7 expression and absence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0263, p = 0.0461 and p = 0.0461, respectively). High Eph-A1, -A2 and -A7 expression was significantly more frequently observed in patients presenting absence of vascular invasion (p = 0.0444), dense stromal inflammatory reaction (p = 0.0063) and female gender (p = 0.0327), respectively. Mobile tongue SCC patients with high Eph-A7 expression presented longer overall and disease-free survival compared to those with low Eph-A7 expression (log-rank test, p = 0.0093 and p = 0.0164, respectively). In multivariate analysis, Eph-A7 expression was identified as independent prognostic factor of overall survival (Cox-regression analysis, p = 0.0426). The present study supported evidence that Ephs may participate in the malignant transformation of mobile tongue SCC, reinforcing their utility as clinical markers for patients' management and prognosis, as also as targets for potential therapeutic intervention in tongue chemoprevention.

  14. Involvement of CD73, equilibrative nucleoside transporters and inosine in rhythm and conduction disturbances mediated by adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Robin, Elodie; Sabourin, Jessica; Marcillac, Fabrice; Raddatz, Eric

    2013-10-01

    We previously established that exogenous adenosine (ADO) induces transient arrhythmias in the developing heart via the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) and downstream activation of NADPH oxidase/ERK and PLC/PKC pathways. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which accumulation of endogenous ADO and its derived compound inosine (INO) in the interstitial compartment induce rhythm and conduction troubles. The validated model of the spontaneously beating heart obtained from 4-day-old chick embryos was used. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that enzymes involved in ADO and INO metabolism (CD39, CD73 and eADA) as well as equilibrative (ENT1, -3, -4) and concentrative (CNT3) nucleoside transporters were differentially expressed in atria, ventricle and outflow tract. Inactivation of ENTs by dipyridamole, 1) increased myocardial ADO level, 2) provoked atrial arrhythmias and atrio-ventricular blocks (AVB) in 70% of the hearts, 3) prolonged P wave and QT interval without altering contractility, and 4) increased ERK2 phosphorylation. Blockade of CD73-mediated phosphohydrolysis of AMP to ADO, MEK/ERK pathway inhibition or A1AR inhibition prevented these arrhythmias. Exposure to exogenous INO also caused atrial ectopy associated with AVB and ERK2 phosphorylation which were prevented by A1AR or A2AAR antagonists exclusively or by MEK/ERK inhibitor. Inhibition of ADA-mediated conversion of ADO to INO increased myocardial ADO and decreased INO as expected, but slightly augmented heart rate variability without provoking AVB. Thus, during cardiogenesis, disturbances of nucleosides metabolism and transport, can lead to interstitial accumulation of ADO and INO and provoke arrhythmias in an autocrine/paracrine manner through A1AR and A2AAR stimulation and ERK2 activation. © 2013.

  15. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Vorrink, Sabine U.; Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Severson, Paul L.

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degreesmore » of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O{sub 2} prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity. - Highlights: • Significant crosstalk exists between AhR and HIF-1α signaling. • Hypoxia perturbs PCB 126 induced Ah

  16. Pharmacological evidence for different populations of postsynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in the rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Orrú, Marco; Quiroz, César; Guitart, Xavier; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly concentrated in the striatum. Two pharmacological different functional populations of A2ARs have been recently described based on their different affinities for the A2AR antagonist SCH-442416. This compound has high affinity for A2ARs not forming heteromers or forming heteromers with adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) while showing very low affinity for A2ARs forming heteromers with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). It has been widely described that striatal A1R-A2AR heteromers are preferentially localized presynaptically in the glutamatergic terminals that contact GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons, and that A2AR-D2R heteromers are localized postsynaptically in GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons. In the present study we provide evidence suggesting that SCH-442416 also targets postsynaptic A2AR not forming heteromers with D2R, which are involved in the motor depressant effects induced by D2R antagonists. SCH-442416 counteracted motor depression in rats induced by the D2R antagonist raclopride at a dose that did not produce motor activation or that blocked motor depression induced by an A2AR agonist. Furthermore, we re-evaluated the recently suggested key role of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) in the effects of A2AR antagonists acting at postsynaptic A2ARs. By recording locomotor activity and monitoring striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation in rats after administration of A2AR and CB1R antagonists, we did not find evidence for any significant role of endocannabinoids in the post- or presynaptic effects of A2AR antagonists. The present results further suggest the existence of at least two functionally and pharmacologically different populations of striatal postsynaptic A2ARs. PMID:21752341

  17. Ion Fluxes through KCa2 (SK) and Cav1 (L-type) Channels Contribute to Chronoselectivity of Adenosine A1 Receptor-Mediated Actions in Spontaneously Beating Rat Atria

    PubMed Central

    Bragança, Bruno; Oliveira-Monteiro, Nádia; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Lima, Pedro A.; Faria, Miguel; Fontes-Sousa, Ana P.; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Impulse generation in supraventricular tissue is inhibited by adenosine and acetylcholine via the activation of A1 and M2 receptors coupled to inwardly rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels, respectively. Unlike M2 receptors, bradycardia produced by A1 receptors activation predominates over negative inotropy. Such difference suggests that other ion currents may contribute to adenosine chronoselectivity. In isolated spontaneously beating rat atria, blockade of KCa2/SK channels with apamin and Cav1 (L-type) channels with nifedipine or verapamil, sensitized atria to the negative inotropic action of the A1 agonist, R-PIA, without affecting the nucleoside negative chronotropy. Patch-clamp experiments in the whole-cell configuration mode demonstrate that adenosine, via A1 receptors, activates the inwardly-rectifying GIRK/KIR3.1/KIR3.4 current resulting in hyperpolarization of atrial cardiomyocytes, which may slow down heart rate. Conversely, the nucleoside inactivates a small conductance Ca2+-activated KCa2/SK outward current, which eventually reduces the repolarizing force and thereby prolong action potentials duration and Ca2+ influx into cardiomyocytes. Immunolocalization studies showed that differences in A1 receptors distribution between the sinoatrial node and surrounding cardiomyocytes do not afford a rationale for adenosine chronoselectivity. Immunolabelling of KIR3.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3, and Cav1 was also observed throughout the right atrium. Functional data indicate that while both A1 and M2 receptors favor the opening of GIRK/KIR3.1/3.4 channels modulating atrial chronotropy, A1 receptors may additionally restrain KCa2/SK activation thereby compensating atrial inotropic depression by increasing the time available for Ca2+ influx through Cav1 (L-type) channels. PMID:27014060

  18. Glucocorticoid receptor regulates organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1, SLC22A1) expression via HNF4α upregulation in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rulcova, Alice; Krausova, Lucie; Smutny, Tomas; Vrzal, Radim; Dvorak, Zdenek; Jover, Ramiro; Pavek, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1, SLC22A1) is a membrane transporter that is important for therapeutic effect of the antidiabetic drug metformin. Its liver-specific expression in hepatocytes is strongly controlled by hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF4α). HNF4α expression and transcriptional activity have been demonstrated to be augmented by glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in human hepatocytes and rodent livers. It was examined whether GR activation indirectly induces OCT1 gene expression via HNF4α up-regulation in primary human hepatocytes. We also examined which other transcription factors are involved in OCT1 gene expression and whether they are regulated by dexamethasone using qRT-PCR and gene reporter assays. We found that dexamethasone significantly up-regulates OCT1 mRNA and protein in normal primary human hepatocytes, but not in hepatocyte-derived tumor cell lines HepG2 and MZ-Hep1. Consistently, we observed that HNF4α is induced by dexamethasone in primary human hepatocytes, but not in hepatocyte tumor-derived cell lines. Viral transduction of MZ-Hep1 cells with the expression constructs for HNF4α, CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) demonstrated significant roles of the transcription factors in OCT1 gene regulation. We found that expression of OCT1 mRNA in human livers significantly correlates with C/EBPβ and HNF4α mRNAs expression and that C/EBPβ co-transfection stimulates OCT1 gene reporter construct in HepG2 cells. Nevertheless, neither C/EBPβ nor PGC1α were upregulated in human hepatocytes by dexamethasone. We can conclude that GR-induced expression of HNF4α may contribute to indirect OCT1 gene up-regulation by dexamethasone in primary human hepatocytes, but not in hepatocyte-derived tumor cell lines.

  19. Swertisin, a C-glucosylflavone, ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice with its adenosine A1 receptor antagonistic property.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Eun; Jeon, Se Jin; Ryu, Byeol; Park, Se Jin; Ko, Sang Yoon; Lee, Younghwan; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Sunhee; Kim, Haneul; Jang, Dae Sik; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2016-06-01

    Swertisin, a C-glucosylflavone isolated from Swertia japonica, has been known to have anti-inflammatory or antidiabetic activities. Until yet, however, its cognitive function is not investigated. In the present study, we endeavored to elucidate the effects of swertisin on cholinergic blockade-induced memory impairment. Swertisin (5 or 10mg/kg, p.o.) significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in the several behavioral tasks. Also, single administration of swertisin (10mg/kg, p.o.) in normal naïve mice enhanced the latency time in the passive avoidance task. In addition, the ameliorating effect of swertisin on scopolamine-induced memory impairment was significantly antagonized by a sub-effective dose of N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 0.1mg/kg, i.p). The adenosine A1 receptor antagonistic property of swertisin was confirmed by receptor binding assay. Furthermore, the administration of swertisin significantly increased the phosphorylation levels of hippocampal or cortical protein kinase A (PKA, 5 or 10mg/kg) and CREB (10mg/kg), and co-administration of CPA (0.1mg/kg, i.p) blocked the increased phosphorylated levels of PKA and CREB in the both cortex and hippocampus. Taken together, these results indicate that the memory-ameliorating effects of swertisin may be, in part, mediated through the adenosinergic neurotransmitter system, and that swertisin may be useful for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction observed in several diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhanced Long-Term and Impaired Short-Term Spatial Memory in GluA1 AMPA Receptor Subunit Knockout Mice: Evidence for a Dual-Process Memory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, David J.; Good, Mark A.; Skelton, Kathryn; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas P.; Bannerman, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit is a key mediator of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and is especially important for a rapidly-induced, short-lasting form of potentiation. GluA1 gene deletion impairs hippocampus-dependent, spatial working memory, but spares hippocampus-dependent spatial reference memory. These findings may reflect the necessity of…

  1. The Broadly Tuned Odorant Receptor OR1A1 is Highly Selective for 3-Methyl-2,4-nonanedione, a Key Food Odorant in Aged Wines, Tea, and Other Foods.

    PubMed

    Geithe, Christiane; Noe, Franziska; Kreissl, Johanna; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2017-03-01

    Key food odorants are the most relevant determinants by which we detect, recognize, and hedonically evaluate the aroma of foods and beverages. Odorants are detected by our chemical sense of olfaction, comprising a set of approximately 400 different odorant receptor types. However, the specific receptor activity patterns representing the aroma percepts of foods or beverages, as well as the key food odorant agonist profiles of single-odorant receptors, are largely unknown. We aimed to establish comprehensive key food odorant agonist profiles of 2 unrelated, broadly tuned receptors, OR1A1 and OR2W1, that had been associated thus far with mostly non-key food odorants and shared some of these agonists. By screening both receptors against 190 key food odorants in a cell-based luminescence assay, we identified 14 and 18 new key food odorant agonists for OR1A1 and OR2W1, respectively, with 3-methyl-2,4-nonanedione emerging as the most potent agonist for OR1A1 by 3 orders of magnitude, with a submicromolar half maximal effective concentration. 3-Methyl-2,4-nonanedione has been associated with a prune note in oxidized wine and is an aroma determinant in tea and apricots. Further screening against the entire set of 391 human odorant receptors revealed that 30 or 300 μmol/L 3-methyl-2,4-nonanedione activated only 1 receptor, OR1A1, suggesting a unique role of OR1A1 for the most sensitive detection of this key food odorant in wine, tea, and other food matrices. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor/cytochrome P450 1A1 pathway mediates breast cancer stem cells expansion through PTEN inhibition and β-Catenin and Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Al-Dhfyan, Abdullah; Alhoshani, Ali; Korashy, Hesham M

    2017-01-19

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) are small sub-type of the whole cancer cells that drive tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. Recent studies have demonstrated a role for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)/cytochrome P4501A1 pathway in CSCs expansion. However, the exact molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The current study was designed to a) determine the effect of AhR activation and inhibition on breast CSCs development, maintenance, self-renewal, and chemoresistance at the in vitro and in vivo levels and b) explore the role of β-Catenin, PI3K/Akt, and PTEN signaling pathways. To test this hypothesis, CSC characteristics of five human breast cancer cells; SKBR-3, MCF-7, and MDA-MB231, HS587T, and T47D treated with AhR activators or inhibitor were determined using Aldefluor assay, side population, and mammosphere formation. The mRNA, protein expression, cellular content and localization of the target genes were determined by RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and Immunofluorescence, respectively. At the in vivo level, female Balb/c mice were treated with AhR/CYP1A1 inducer and histopathology changes and Immunohistochemistry examination for target proteins were determined. The constitutive mRNA expression and cellular content of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, AhR-regulated genes, were markedly higher in CSCs more than differentiating non-CSCs of five different human breast cancer cells. Activation of AhR/CYP1A1 in MCF-7 cells by TCDD and DMBA, strong AhR activators, significantly increased CSC-specific markers, mammosphere formation, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, and percentage of side population (SP) cells, whereas inactivation of AhR/CYP1A1 using chemical inhibitor, α-naphthoflavone (α-NF), or by genetic shRNA knockdown, significantly inhibited the upregulation of ALDH activity and SP cells. Importantly, inactivation of the AhR/CYP1A1 significantly increased sensitization of CSCs to the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. Mechanistically, Induction of Ah

  3. The Associations of Novel Vitamin D3 Metabolic Gene CYP27A1 Polymorphism, Adiponectin/Leptin Ratio, and Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-Aged Taiwanese Males.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Hung; Hsi, Edward; Liu, Chia-Chu; Huang, Chun-Nung; Lee, Yung-Chin; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Bao, Bo-Ying; Chang, Chu-Fen; Huang, Shu-Pin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) confers increased risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Both vitamin D3 and adipocytokines (especially adiponectin and leptin) have a great impact on CVD and MetS. In vitamin D3 metabolism, the vitamin D3 25-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) are two key enzymes. This study aimed to examine the influence of vitamin D3 CYP27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on adipocytokines and MetS. Cross-sectional data and DNA samples were collected from male volunteers (n = 649, age: 55.7 ± 4.7 years). Two tagging SNPs, CYP27A1 rs4674344 and CYP27B1 rs10877012, were selected from the HapMap project. MetS was significantly associated with the CYP27A1 rs4674344 SNP (P = 0.04) and the ratio of adiponectin/leptin (A/L ratio) was most correlated to the CYP27A1 rs4674344 SNP, appearing to be significantly lower in T-carriers than in AA subjects (3.7 ± 4.0 versus 5.1 ± 6.0, P = 0.001) and significantly negatively associated after adjustment. For each MetS component associated with the CYP27A1 rs4674344 SNP, the A/L ratios were significantly negative in preclinical stage (condition not meeting the individual criteria), except the blood pressure. In conclusion, CYP27A1 rs4674344 SNP, A/L ratio, and MetS are significantly associated and T-carriers might have a higher risk of developing MetS due to low A/L ratios in the preclinical stage.

  4. The Associations of Novel Vitamin D3 Metabolic Gene CYP27A1 Polymorphism, Adiponectin/Leptin Ratio, and Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-Aged Taiwanese Males

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Chu; Huang, Chun-Nung; Lee, Yung-Chin; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Chang, Chu-Fen; Kuo, Po-Lin; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) confers increased risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Both vitamin D3 and adipocytokines (especially adiponectin and leptin) have a great impact on CVD and MetS. In vitamin D3 metabolism, the vitamin D3 25-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) are two key enzymes. This study aimed to examine the influence of vitamin D3 CYP27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on adipocytokines and MetS. Cross-sectional data and DNA samples were collected from male volunteers (n = 649, age: 55.7 ± 4.7 years). Two tagging SNPs, CYP27A1 rs4674344 and CYP27B1 rs10877012, were selected from the HapMap project. MetS was significantly associated with the CYP27A1 rs4674344 SNP (P = 0.04) and the ratio of adiponectin/leptin (A/L ratio) was most correlated to the CYP27A1 rs4674344 SNP, appearing to be significantly lower in T-carriers than in AA subjects (3.7 ± 4.0 versus 5.1 ± 6.0, P = 0.001) and significantly negatively associated after adjustment. For each MetS component associated with the CYP27A1 rs4674344 SNP, the A/L ratios were significantly negative in preclinical stage (condition not meeting the individual criteria), except the blood pressure. In conclusion, CYP27A1 rs4674344 SNP, A/L ratio, and MetS are significantly associated and T-carriers might have a higher risk of developing MetS due to low A/L ratios in the preclinical stage. PMID:25628655

  5. Ligand-, structure- and pharmacophore-based molecular fingerprints: a case study on adenosine A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirci, Francesco; Goracci, Laura; Rodríguez, David; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Mannhold, Raimund

    2012-11-01

    FLAP fingerprints are applied in the ligand-, structure- and pharmacophore-based mode in a case study on antagonists of all four adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes. Structurally diverse antagonist collections with respect to the different ARs were constructed by including binding data to human species only. FLAP models well discriminate "active" (=highly potent) from "inactive" (=weakly potent) AR antagonists, as indicated by enrichment curves, numbers of false positives, and AUC values. For all FLAP modes, model predictivity slightly decreases as follows: A2BR > A2AR > A3R > A1R antagonists. General performance of FLAP modes in this study is: ligand- > structure- > pharmacophore- based mode. We also compared the FLAP performance with other common ligand- and structure-based fingerprints. Concerning the ligand-based mode, FLAP model performance is superior to ECFP4 and ROCS for all AR subtypes. Although focusing on the early first part of the A2A, A2B and A3 enrichment curves, ECFP4 and ROCS still retain a satisfactory retrieval of actives. FLAP is also superior when comparing the structure-based mode with PLANTS and GOLD. In this study we applied for the first time the novel FLAPPharm tool for pharmacophore generation. Pharmacophore hypotheses, generated with this tool, convincingly match with formerly published data. Finally, we could demonstrate the capability of FLAP models to uncover selectivity aspects although single AR subtype models were not trained for this purpose.

  6. Safety and Tolerability of Neladenoson Bialanate, a Novel Oral Partial Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist, in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Voors, Adriaan Alexander; Düngen, Hans-Dirk; Senni, Michele; Nodari, Savina; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Ponikowski, Piotr; Bax, Jeroen J; Butler, Javed; Kim, Raymond J; Dorhout, Bernard; Dinh, Wilfried; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2017-04-01

    We studied safety and tolerability of neladenoson bialanate, a novel oral selective partial adenosine A1 receptor agonist that maintains the cardioprotective effects of adenosine without the undesired side effects of a full agonist, in 2 pilot studies in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The β-blocker interaction study was a single-blind, placebo-controlled study on the effects of a 30-mg single dose of neladenoson bialanate on atrioventricular (AV) conduction in 11 patients with HFrEF treated with β-blockers. The PARSiFAL pilot study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on the effects of a 7-day treatment with 10 or 20 mg neladenoson bialanate or placebo in 31 patients with HFrEF on β-blocker therapy. In the β-blocker interaction study with 11 HFrEF patients, no second- or third-degree AV block was detected on 48-hour Holter monitoring. In the 31 HFrEF patients included in the PARSiFAL pilot study, no second- or third-degree AV blocks were observed during 24-hour Holter monitoring, and no effects were seen on heart rate and blood pressure. Median absolute changes in LVEF, measured by cardiac magnetic resonance, were 1.9% (interquartile range -1.1 to 4.3), 0.3% (-1.4 to 2.7), and 2.2% (0.4 to 4.5), in the placebo, 10-mg, and 20-mg groups, respectively. Treatment of HFrEF patients with the novel partial adenosine A1 agonist neladenoson bialanate appeared to be safe in 2 small pilot studies, and no atrioventricular conduction disorders or neurological side effects were observed. No significant early changes in cardiac function were detected. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. Persistent inflammation-induced up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes synaptic delivery of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor GluA1 subunits in descending pain modulatory circuits.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wenjuan; Chen, Quan; Zhou, Wenjie; Wang, Yunping; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Zhi

    2014-08-08

    The enhanced AMPA receptor phosphorylation at GluA1 serine 831 sites in the central pain-modulating system plays a pivotal role in descending pain facilitation after inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We show here that, in the rat brain stem, in the nucleus raphe magnus, which is a critical relay in the descending pain-modulating system of the brain, persistent inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) can enhance AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents and the GluA2-lacking AMPA receptor-mediated rectification index. Western blot analysis showed an increase in GluA1 phosphorylation at Ser-831 but not at Ser-845. This was accompanied by an increase in distribution of the synaptic GluA1 subunit. In parallel, the level of histone H3 acetylation at bdnf gene promoter regions was reduced significantly 3 days after CFA injection, as indicated by ChIP assays. This was correlated with an increase in BDNF mRNA levels and BDNF protein levels. Sequestering endogenous extracellular BDNF with TrkB-IgG in the nucleus raphe magnus decreased AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and GluA1 phosphorylation at Ser-831 3 days after CFA injection. Under the same conditions, blockade of TrkB receptor functions, phospholipase C, or PKC impaired GluA1 phosphorylation at Ser-831 and decreased excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that epigenetic up-regulation of BDNF by peripheral inflammation induces GluR1 phosphorylation at Ser-831 sites through activation of the phospholipase C-PKC signaling cascade, leading to the trafficking of GluA1 to pain-modulating neuronal synapses. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Three cysteine residues of SLC52A1, a receptor for the porcine endogenous retrovirus-A (PERV-A), play a critical role in cell surface expression and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Colon-Moran, Winston; Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A

    2017-07-01

    Porcine endogenous retrovirus-A (PERV-A), a gammaretrovirus, infects human cells in vitro, thus raising the potential risk of cross-species transmission in xenotransplantation. Two members of the solute carrier family 52 (SLC52A1 and SLC52A2) are PERV-A receptors. Site-directed mutagenesis of the cDNA encoding SLC52A1 identified that only one of two putative glycosylation signals is occupied by glycans. In addition, we showed that glycosylation of SLC52A1 is not necessary for PERV-A receptor function. We also identified that at a minimum, three cysteine residues are sufficient for SLC52A1 cell surface expression. Mutation of cysteine at position 365 and either of the two cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail at positions 442 or 446 reduced SLC52A1 surface expression and PERV-A infection suggesting that these residues may contribute to overall structural stability and receptor function. Understanding interactions between PERV-A and its cellular receptor may provide novel strategies to prevent zoonotic infection in the setting of xenotransplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, L-97-1, improves survival and protects the kidney in a rat model of cecal ligation and puncture induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Constance N; Vance, Constance O; Lechner, Melissa G; Matuschak, George M; Lechner, Andrew J

    2014-10-05

    Previously it was reported that combining antibiotics with L-97-1, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, significantly improves survival and blocks acute lung injury induced by Yersinia pestis CO 99 in a rat model of pneumonic plague. In the current studies using a conscious rat model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis, L-97-1 was administered in daily intravenous infusions in combination with antibiotics to simulate the use of L-97-1 as an anti-sepsis therapeutic in the clinical setting. In these studies, when administered at 12 h following CLP, in combination with broad spectrum antibiotics, ceftriaxone and clindamycin, L-97-1 improves 7 day (d) survival [25%, 35%, and 75% for L-97-1 (10 mg/kg/h, 12.5 mg/kg/h, and 15 mg/kg/h, respectively) versus (vs.) 25% for antibiotics alone] in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of L-97-1, 15 mg/kg/h to antibiotics significantly increased 7 d survival following CLP compared to therapy with either antibiotics alone (P=0.002) or L-97-1 at 15 mg/kg/h alone (P<0.001) and was not significantly different than survival in sham CLP animals (Log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test with Bonferroni׳s correction for multiple comparisons). Moreover, in these studies, in combination with antibiotics L-97-1 dose-dependently protects the kidney, significantly improving renal function at 24 h post CLP at 10 mg/kg/h (P<0.001), 12.5 mg/kg/h (P<0.0001), and 15 mg/kg/h (P<0.0001) vs. antibiotics alone (ANOVA followed by Tukey׳s post-hoc test for pair-wise comparisons). The results of these studies support efficacy for L-97-1 as an anti-sepsis therapeutic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, L-97-1, improves survival and protects the kidney in a rat model of cecal ligation and puncture induced sepsis☆

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Constance N.; Vance, Constance O.; Lechner, Melissa G.; Matuschak, George M.; Lechner, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Previously it was reported that combining antibiotics with L-97-1, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, significantly improves survival and blocks acute lung injury induced by Yersinia pestis CO 99 in a rat model of pneumonic plague. In the current studies using a conscious rat model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis, L-97-1 was administered in daily intravenous infusions in combination with antibiotics to simulate the use of L-97-1 as an anti-sepsis therapeutic in the clinical setting. In these studies, when administered at 12 hours (h) following CLP, in combination with broad spectrum antibiotics, ceftriaxone and clindamycin, L-97-1 improves 7 day (d) survival [25%, 35%, and 75%, respectively for L-97-1 (10 mg/kg/h, 12.5 mg/kg/h, and 15 mg/kg/h) versus (vs.) 25% for antibiotics alone] in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of L-97-1, 15 mg/kg/h to antibiotics significantly increased 7 d survival following CLP compared to therapy with either antibiotics alone (P = 0.002) or L-97-1 at 15 mg/kg/h alone (P < 0.001) and was not significantly different than survival in sham CLP animals (Log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test with Bonferroni’s correction for multiple comparisons). Moreover, in these studies, in combination with antibiotics L-97-1 dose-dependently protects the kidney, significantly improving renal function at 24 h post CLP at 10 mg/kg/h (P < 0.001), 12.5 mg/kg/h (P < 0.0001), and 15 mg/kg/h (P < 0.0001) vs. antibiotics alone (ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post-hoc test for pair-wise comparisons). The results of these studies support efficacy for L-97-1 as an anti-sepsis therapeutic. PMID:25041842

  11. Adenosine A1 receptor activation increases myocardial protein S-nitrosothiols and elicits protection from ischemia-reperfusion injury in male and female hearts

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qin; Casin, Kevin M.; Mackowski, Nathan; Murphy, Elizabeth; Steenbergen, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in cardioprotection, and recent work from our group and others has implicated protein S-nitrosylation (SNO) as a critical component of NO-mediated protection in different models, including ischemic pre- and post-conditioning and sex-dependent cardioprotection. However, studies have yet to examine whether protein SNO levels are similarly increased with pharmacologic preconditioning in male and female hearts, and whether an increase in protein SNO levels, which is protective in male hearts, is sufficient to increase baseline protection in female hearts. Therefore, we pharmacologically preconditioned male and female hearts with the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclohexyl adenosine (CHA). CHA administration prior to ischemia significantly improved functional recovery in both male and female hearts compared to baseline in a Langendorff-perfused heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury (% of preischemic function ± SE: male baseline: 37.5±3.4% vs. male CHA: 55.3±3.2%; female baseline: 61.4±5.7% vs. female CHA: 76.0±6.2%). In a separate set of hearts, we found that CHA increased p-Akt and p-eNOS levels. We also used SNO-resin-assisted capture with LC-MS/MS to identify SNO proteins in male and female hearts, and determined that CHA perfusion induced a modest increase in protein SNO levels in both male (11.4%) and female (12.3%) hearts compared to baseline. These findings support a potential role for protein SNO in a model of pharmacologic preconditioning, and provide evidence to suggest that a modest increase in protein SNO levels is sufficient to protect both male and female hearts from ischemic injury. In addition, a number of the SNO proteins identified with CHA treatment were also observed with other forms of cardioprotective stimuli in prior studies, further supporting a role for protein SNO in cardioprotection. PMID:28493997

  12. α-Lipoic acid ameliorates foam cell formation via liver X receptor α-dependent upregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Ching; Su, Kuo-Hui; Kou, Yu Ru; Shyue, Song-Kun; Ching, Li-Chieh; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Wu, Yuh-Lin; Pan, Ching-Chian; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2011-01-01

    α-Lipoic acid (α-LA), a key cofactor in cellular energy metabolism, has protective activities in atherosclerosis, yet the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we examined whether α-LA affects foam cell formation and its underlying molecular mechanisms in murine macrophages. Treatment with α-LA markedly attenuated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-mediated cholesterol accumulation in macrophages, which was due to increased cholesterol efflux. Additionally, α-LA treatment dose-dependently increased protein levels of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ABCG1 but had no effect on the protein expression of SR-A, CD36, or SR-BI involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Furthermore, α-LA increased the mRNA expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1. The upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 by α-LA depended on liver X receptor α (LXRα), as evidenced by an increase in the nuclear levels of LXRα and LXRE-mediated luciferase activity and its prevention of the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 after inhibition of LXRα activity by the pharmacological inhibitor geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) or knockdown of LXRα expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA). Consistently, α-LA-mediated suppression of oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation was abolished by GGPP or LXRα siRNA treatment. In conclusion, LXRα-dependent upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 may mediate the beneficial effect of α-LA on foam cell formation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The expression of ferritin, lactoferrin, transferrin receptor and solute carrier family 11A1 in the host response to BCG-vaccination and Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge.

    PubMed

    Thom, R E; Elmore, M J; Williams, A; Andrews, S C; Drobniewski, F; Marsh, P D; Tree, J A

    2012-05-02

    Iron is an essential cofactor for both mycobacterial growth during infection and for a successful protective immune response by the host. The immune response partly depends on the regulation of iron by the host, including the tight control of expression of the iron-storage protein, ferritin. BCG vaccination can protect against disease following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, but the mechanisms of protection remain unclear. To further explore these mechanisms, splenocytes from BCG-vaccinated guinea pigs were stimulated ex vivo with purified protein derivative from M. tuberculosis and a significant down-regulation of ferritin light- and heavy-chain was measured by reverse-transcription quantitative-PCR (P≤0.05 and ≤0.01, respectively). The mechanisms of this down-regulation were shown to involve TNFα and nitric oxide. A more in depth analysis of the mRNA expression profiles, including genes involved in iron metabolism, was performed using a guinea pig specific immunological microarray following ex vivo infection with M. tuberculosis of splenocytes from BCG-vaccinated and naïve guinea pigs. M. tuberculosis infection induced a pro-inflammatory response in splenocytes from both groups, resulting in down-regulation of ferritin (P≤0.05). In addition, lactoferrin (P≤0.002), transferrin receptor (P≤0.05) and solute carrier family 11A1 (P≤0.05), were only significantly down-regulated after infection of the splenocytes from BCG-vaccinated animals. The results show that expression of iron-metabolism genes is tightly regulated as part of the host response to M. tuberculosis infection and that BCG-vaccination enhances the ability of the host to mount an iron-restriction response which may in turn help to combat invasion by mycobacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 5'-Chloro-5'-deoxy-(±)-ENBA, a potent and selective adenosine A(1) receptor agonist, alleviates neuropathic pain in mice through functional glial and microglial changes without affecting motor or cardiovascular functions.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Livio; Petrelli, Riccardo; Gatta, Luisa; Giordano, Catia; Guida, Francesca; Vita, Patrizia; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Grifantini, Mario; de Novellis, Vito; Cappellacci, Loredana; Maione, Sabatino

    2012-11-22

    This study was undertaken in order to investigate the effect of chronic treatment with 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA, a potent and highly selective agonist of human adenosine A(1) receptor, on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain, the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) of the sciatic nerve. Chronic systemic administration of 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia 3 and 7 days post-SNI, in a way prevented by DPCPX (3 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective A(1) adenosine receptor antagonist, without exerting any significant change on the motor coordination or arterial blood pressure. In addition, a single intraperitoneal injection of 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 7 days post-SNI also reduced both symptoms for at least two hours. SNI was associated with spinal changes in microglial activation ipsilaterally to the nerve injury. Activated, hypertrophic microglia were significantly reduced by 5′-chloro-5′-deoxy-(±)-ENBA chronic treatment. Our results demonstrated an involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor in the amplified nociceptive thresholds and in spinal glial and microglial changes occurred in neuropathic pain, without affecting motor coordination or blood pressure. Our data suggest a possible use of adenosine A(1) receptor agonist in neuropathic pain symptoms.

  15. Are single nucleotide polymorphisms in the oxytocin and vasopressin 1A/1B receptor genes likely candidates for variation in ejaculatory function?

    PubMed

    Jern, Patrick; Westberg, Lars; Johansson, Ada; Jonsson, Lina; Corander, Jukka; Sandnabba, N Kenneth; Santtila, Pekka

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? There is also evidence that the etiology of premature ejaculation is partially genetic. So far, all molecular genetic studies of premature ejaculation have focused on serotonergic and dopaminergic genes. Serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission aside, studies on both animals and humans have shown that both oxytocin and vasopressin are also involved in ejaculatory function. The present study is, to our knowledge, the first to investigate effects of polymorphisms in oxytocin and vasopressin receptor genes on ejaculatory function. Although a large sample (1517 men) was available for the present study, we could not detect any clear-cut effects of any gene variant on ejaculatory function. We detected a heterozygote effect of one polymorphism (rs75775) in the oxytocin receptor gene. Rare variants of the vasopressin receptor 1A gene may theoretically have a stronger impact on ejaculatory function, but would need a very large sample in order to be established. Based on our results, we conclude that the oxytocin and vasopressin receptor genes are unlikely targets for successful pharmacogenetic interventions. • To investigate associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) linked to the oxytocin, and arginine vasopressin 1A and 1B receptor genes and ejaculatory function. • To investigate these associations in a large, population-based sample. • In all, 1517 male twins and non-twin brothers of twins aged 18-45 years (mean = 26.43; sd = 4.87) provided questionnaire data regarding ejaculatory function and relevant covariates and saliva samples for genotyping. • A Bayesian linear mixed-effects model, which appropriately controls for between-subjects dependence, was used to estimate genotype associations. • We corrected for multiple testing using a linkage disequilibrium correlation measure. • We found a heterozygote effect on one SNP in the oxytocin receptor gene (rs75775), so that

  16. Ligand Recognition by A-Class Eph Receptors: Crystal Structures of the EphA2 Ligand-Binding Domain and the EphA2/ephrin-A1 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Himanen, J.; Goldgur, Y; Miao, H

    2009-01-01

    Ephrin (Eph) receptor tyrosine kinases fall into two subclasses (A and B) according to preferences for their ephrin ligands. All published structural studies of Eph receptor/ephrin complexes involve B-class receptors. Here, we present the crystal structures of an A-class complex between EphA2 and ephrin-A1 and of unbound EphA2. Although these structures are similar overall to their B-class counterparts, they reveal important differences that define subclass specificity. The structures suggest that the A-class Eph receptor/ephrin interactions involve smaller rearrangements in the interacting partners, better described by a 'lock-and-key'-type binding mechanism, in contrast to the 'induced fit' mechanism defining the B-class molecules.more » This model is supported by structure-based mutagenesis and by differential requirements for ligand oligomerization by the two subclasses in cell-based Eph receptor activation assays. Finally, the structure of the unligated receptor reveals a homodimer assembly that might represent EphA2-specific homotypic cell adhesion interactions.« less

  17. Serotonin 1A, 1B, and 7 receptors of the rat medial nucleus accumbens differentially regulate feeding, water intake, and locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Clissold, Kara A; Choi, Eugene; Pratt, Wayne E

    2013-11-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) signaling has been widely implicated in the regulation of feeding behaviors in both humans and animal models. Recently, we reported that co-stimulation of 5-HT1&7 receptors of the anterior medial nucleus accumbens with the drug 5-CT caused a dose-dependent decrease in food intake, water intake, and locomotion in rats (Pratt et al., 2009). The current experiments sought to determine which of three serotonin receptor subtypes (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, or 5-HT7) might be responsible for these consummatory and locomotor effects. Food-deprived rats were given 2-h access to rat chow after stimulation of nucleus accumbens 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, or 5-HT7 receptors, or blockade of the 5-HT1A or 5-HT1B receptors. Stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors with 8-OH-DPAT (at 0.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 μg/0.5 μl/side) caused a dose-dependent decrease in food and water intake, and reduced rearing behavior but not ambulation. In contrast, rats that received the 5-HT1B agonist CP 93129 (at 0.0, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 μg/0.5 μl/side) showed a significant dose-dependent decrease in water intake only; stimulation of 5-HT7 receptors (AS 19; at 0.0, 1.0, and 5.0 μg/0.5 μl/side) decreased ambulatory activity but did not affect food or water consumption. Blockade of 5-HT1A or 5-HT1B receptors had no lasting effects on measures of food consumption. These data suggest that the food intake, water intake, and locomotor effects seen after medial nucleus accumbens injections of 5-CT are due to actions on separate serotonin receptor subtypes, and contribute to growing evidence for selective roles of individual serotonin receptors within the nucleus accumbens on motivated behavior. © 2013.

  18. N6-Cycloalkyl- and N6-bicycloalkyl-C5'(C2')-modified adenosine derivatives as high-affinity and selective agonists at the human A1 adenosine receptor with antinociceptive effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Franchetti, Palmarisa; Cappellacci, Loredana; Vita, Patrizia; Petrelli, Riccardo; Lavecchia, Antonio; Kachler, Sonja; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Marabese, Ida; Luongo, Livio; Maione, Sabatino; Grifantini, Mario

    2009-04-23

    To further investigate new potent and selective human A(1) adenosine receptor agonists, we have synthesized a series of 5'-chloro-5'-deoxy- and 5'-(2-fluorophenylthio)-5'-deoxy-N(6)-cycloalkyl(bicycloalkyl)-substituted adenosine and 2'-C-methyladenosine derivatives. These compounds were evaluated for affinity and efficacy at human A(1), A(2A), A(2B), and A(3) adenosine receptors. In the series of N(6)-cyclopentyl- and N(6)-(endo-norborn-2-yl)adenosine derivatives, 5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-CPA (1) and 5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-(+/-)-ENBA (3) displayed the highest affinity in the subnanomolar range and relevant selectivity for hA(1) vs the other human receptor subtypes. The higher affinity and selectivity of 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyribonucleoside derivatives 1 and 3 for hA(1) AR vs hA(3) AR compared to that of the parent 5'-hydroxy compounds CPA and (+/-)-ENBA was rationalized by a molecular modeling analysis. 5'-Chloro-5'-deoxy-(+/-)-ENBA, evaluated for analgesic activity in the formalin test in mice, was found to inhibit the first or the second phases of the nocifensive response induced by intrapaw injection of formalin at doses ranging between 1 and 2 mg/kg i.p.

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in CETP, SLC46A1, SLC19A1, CD36, BCMO1, APOA5, and ABCA1 are significant predictors of plasma HDL in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In a marker-trait association study we estimated the statistical significance of 65 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 23 candidate genes on HDL levels of two independent Caucasian populations. Each population consisted of men and women and their HDL levels were adjusted for gender and body weight. We used a linear regression model. Selected genes corresponded to folate metabolism, vitamins B-12, A, and E, and cholesterol pathways or lipid metabolism. Methods Extracted DNA from both the Sacramento and Beltsville populations was analyzed using an allele discrimination assay with a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry platform. The adjusted phenotype, y, was HDL levels adjusted for gender and body weight only statistical analyses were performed using the genotype association and regression modules from the SNP Variation Suite v7. Results Statistically significant SNP (where P values were adjusted for false discovery rate) included: CETP (rs7499892 and rs5882); SLC46A1 (rs37514694; rs739439); SLC19A1 (rs3788199); CD36 (rs3211956); BCMO1 (rs6564851), APOA5 (rs662799), and ABCA1 (rs4149267). Many prior association trends of the SNP with HDL were replicated in our cross-validation study. Significantly, the association of SNP in folate transporters (SLC46A1 rs37514694 and rs739439; SLC19A1 rs3788199) with HDL was identified in our study. Conclusions Given recent literature on the role of niacin in the biogenesis of HDL, focus on status and metabolism of B-vitamins and metabolites of eccentric cleavage of β-carotene with lipid metabolism is exciting for future study. PMID:23656756

  20. The Leu33/Pro polymorphism (PlA1/PlA2) of the glycoprotein IIIa (GPIIIa) receptor is not related to myocardial infarction in the ECTIM Study. Etude Cas-Temoins de l'Infarctus du Myocarde.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, S M; Poirier, O; Marques-Vidal, P; Evans, A; Arveiler, D; Luc, G; Emmerich, J; Cambien, F

    1997-06-01

    The GPIIb/IIIa receptor complex may contribute to acute coronary syndromes by mediating platelet aggregation. The Leu33/Pro polymorphism (PlA1/PlA2) of the GPIIIa has recently been shown to be associated with CHD in a small case-control study. We have investigated this polymorphism in a large multicenter study of patients with myocardial infarction and controls and found no difference in the distribution of allele and genotype frequencies between cases and controls.

  1. EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction-mediated apoptosis and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 receptor ligand-induced immunotherapy inhibit tumor growth in a breast cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Manish; Vemula, Sai V; Sharma, Anurag; Ahi, Yadvinder S; Mittal, Shalini; Bangari, Dinesh S; Mittal, Suresh K

    2012-02-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 is overexpressed in several types of cancers and is currently being pursued as a target for breast cancer therapeutics. The EphA2 ligand EphrinA1 induces EphA2 phosphorylation and intracellular internalization and degradation, thus inhibiting tumor progression. The hematopoietic growth factor, FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 receptor ligand (Flt3L), promotes expansion and mobilization of functional dendritic cells. We tested the EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells focusing on the receptor-ligand-mediated apoptosis of breast cancer cells. To determine whether EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction-associated apoptosis and Flt3L-mediated immunotherapy would have an additive effect in inhibiting tumor growth, we used an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer to evaluate intratumoral (i.t.) inoculation strategies with human adenovirus (HAd) vectors expressing either EphrinA1 (HAd-EphrinA1-Fc), Flt3L (HAd-Flt3L) or a combination of EphrinA1-Fc + Flt3L (HAd-EphrinA1-Fc + HAd-Flt3L). In vitro analysis demonstrated that an EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction led to apoptosis-related changes in breast cancer cells. In vivo, three i.t. inoculations of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc showed potent inhibition of tumor growth. Furthermore, increased inhibition in tumor growth was observed with the combination of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc and HAd-Flt3L accompanied by the generation of an anti-tumor adaptive immune response. The results obtained in the present study, indicating the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of mammary tumor growth, show the potential therapeutic benefits of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc. In combination with HAd-Flt3L, this represents a promising strategy for effectively inducing mammary tumor regression by HAd vector-based therapy. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Activation of A1-Adenosine Receptors Promotes Leukocyte Recruitment to the Lung and Attenuates Acute Lung Injury in Mice Infected with Influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) Virus

    PubMed Central

    Aeffner, Famke; Woods, Parker S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have shown that bronchoalveolar epithelial A1-adenosine receptors (A1-AdoR) are activated in influenza A virus-infected mice. Alveolar macrophages and neutrophils also express A1-AdoRs, and we hypothesized that activation of A1-AdoRs on these cells will promote macrophage and neutrophil chemotaxis and activation and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of influenza virus-induced acute lung injury. Wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, congenic A1-AdoR knockout (A1-KO) mice, and mice that had undergone reciprocal bone marrow transfer were inoculated intranasally with 10,000 PFU/mouse influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus. Alternatively, WT mice underwent daily treatment with the A1-AdoR antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) from 1 day prior to inoculation. Infection increased bronchoalveolar lining fluid (BALF) adenosine comparably in WT and A1-KO mice. Infection of WT mice resulted in reduced carotid arterial O2 saturation (hypoxemia), lung pathology, pulmonary edema, reduced lung compliance, increased basal airway resistance, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. These effects were absent or significantly attenuated in A1-KO mice. Levels of BALF leukocytes, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and interleukin 10 (IL-10) were significantly reduced in infected A1-KO mice, but levels of KC, IP-10, and MCP-1 were increased. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer resulted in WT-like lung injury severity, but BALF leukocyte levels increased only in WT and A1-KO mice with WT bone barrow. Hypoxemia, pulmonary edema, and levels of BALF alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, IFN-γ, and IL-10 were reduced in DPCPX-treated WT mice. Levels of viral replication did not differ between mouse strains or treatment groups. These findings indicate that adenosine activation of leukocyte A1-AdoRs plays a significant role in their recruitment to the infected lung and contributes to influenza pathogenesis. A1-AdoR inhibitor therapy may therefore be beneficial in patients with influenza

  3. EphrinA1 stimulates cell attachment and inhibits cell aggregation through the EphA receptor pathway in human endometrial carcinoma-derived Ishikawa cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Haruko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Horie, Akihito; Suginami, Ko; Sato, Yukiyasu; Konishi, Ikuo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, the Eph-ephrinA system was proposed to contribute to the initial interaction between the maternal endometrial epithelium and embryonic trophectoderm. Since the Eph-ephrin interaction can induce adhesive and/or repulsive forces into the cells, we examined the possible role of this system in functional changes in endometrial epithelial cells using endometrial carcinoma-derived Ishikawa cells. The expressions of EphA1, A2 and A4 on Ishikawa cells were examined by RT-PCR and western blotting analyses. The effects of recombinant ephrinA1 on Ishikawa cells were also examined by western blot analysis and cell attachment and aggregation assays. EphA1, A2 and A4 were expressed on Ishikawa cells. Recombinant ephrinA1 bound to the surfaces of Ishikawa cells and induced phosphorylation of EphA2 and A4. In bovine serum albumin-blocked nitrocellulose-coated dishes, Ishikawa cells remained floating and aggregated with each other. Under these conditions, immobilized ephrinA1 promoted Ishikawa cell attachment with increased tyrosine phosphorylation in focal adhesion kinase. In addition, immobilized ephrinA1 reversibly inhibited Ishikawa cell aggregation. Gene-reduction of EphA1, A2 and A4 by siRNAs attenuated the inhibitory effects of ephrinA1 on cell aggregation, confirming that ephrinA1 affects Ishikawa cell functions through Eph-ephrinA interaction. This study demonstrated that the Eph-ephrinA system can promote cell attachment along with intercellular dissociation in Ishikawa cells. These findings suggest that this system can induce functional changes in endometrial epithelial cells.

  4. Polymorphic Human Sulfotransferase 2A1 Mediates the Formation of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3-3-O-Sulfate, a Major Circulating Vitamin D Metabolite in Humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Timothy; Wang, Zhican; Chapron, Brian D; Suzuki, Mizuki; Claw, Katrina G; Gao, Chunying; Foti, Robert S; Prasad, Bhagwat; Chapron, Alenka; Calamia, Justina; Chaudhry, Amarjit; Schuetz, Erin G; Horst, Ronald L; Mao, Qingcheng; de Boer, Ian H; Thornton, Timothy A; Thummel, Kenneth E

    2018-04-01

    Metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 (25OHD 3 ) plays a central role in regulating the biologic effects of vitamin D in the body. Although cytochrome P450-dependent hydroxylation of 25OHD 3 has been extensively investigated, limited information is available on the conjugation of 25OHD 3 In this study, we report that 25OHD 3 is selectively conjugated to 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate by human sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1) and that the liver is a primary site of metabolite formation. At a low (50 nM) concentration of 25OHD 3 , 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate was the most abundant metabolite, with an intrinsic clearance approximately 8-fold higher than the next most efficient metabolic route. In addition, 25OHD 3 sulfonation was not inducible by the potent human pregnane X receptor agonist, rifampicin. The 25OHD 3 sulfonation rates in a bank of 258 different human liver cytosols were highly variable but correlated with the rates of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfonation. Further analysis revealed a significant association between a common single nucleotide variant within intron 1 of SULT2A1 (rs296361; minor allele frequency = 15% in whites) and liver cytosolic SULT2A1 content as well as 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate formation rate, suggesting that variation in the SULT2A1 gene contributes importantly to interindividual differences in vitamin D homeostasis. Finally, 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate exhibited high affinity for the vitamin D binding protein and was detectable in human plasma and bile but not in urine samples. Thus, circulating concentrations of 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate appear to be protected from rapid renal elimination, raising the possibility that the sulfate metabolite may serve as a reservoir of 25OHD 3 in vivo, and contribute indirectly to the biologic effects of vitamin D. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Influence of Genetic Ancestry on INDEL Markers of NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1, IL4 and CYP19A1 Genes in Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Pablo; Salgado, Claudio; Santos, Ney Pereira Carneiro; Santos, Sidney; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Leprosy is an insidious infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular bacteria Mycobacterium leprae, and host genetic factors can modulate the immune response and generate distinct categories of leprosy susceptibility that are also influenced by genetic ancestry. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the possible effects of CYP19A1 [rs11575899], NFKβ1 [rs28362491], IL1α [rs3783553], CASP8 [rs3834129], UGT1A1 [rs8175347], PAR1 [rs11267092], CYP2E1 [INDEL 96pb] and IL4 [rs79071878] genes in a group of 141 leprosy patients and 180 healthy individuals. The INDELs were typed by PCR Multiplex in ABI PRISM 3130 and analyzed with GeneMapper ID v3.2. The NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1 and IL4 INDELs were associated with leprosy susceptibility, while NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1 and CYP19A1 were associated with the MB (Multibacilary) clinical form of leprosy. Conclusions/Significance NFKβ1 [rs28362491], CASP8 [rs3834129], PAR1 [rs11267092] and IL4 [rs79071878] genes are potential markers for susceptibility to leprosy development, while the INDELs in NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1 and CYP19A1 (rs11575899) are potential markers for the severe clinical form MB. Moreover, all of these markers are influenced by genetic ancestry, and European contribution increases the risk to leprosy development, in other hand an increase in African contribution generates protection against leprosy. PMID:26367014

  6. Genetic polymorphisms of vitamin D3 metabolizing CYP24A1 and CYP2R1 enzymes in Turkish patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Türkanoğlu Özçelik, Aysun; Öner, Tuğçe; Can Demirdöğen, Birsen; Bek, Vedat Semai; Demirkaya, Şeref; Adalı, Orhan

    2018-03-12

    Objective Vitamin D deficiency is known as an important risk factor in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, which contributes to stroke development. Genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in enzymes involved in vitamin D metabolism can affect susceptibility to the development of stroke. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the association between polymorphisms of vitamin D metabolizing enzymes (rs927650 SNP in CYP24A1, and rs10741657 SNP in CYP2R1 genes,) and ischemic stroke risk in Turkish population. Materials and methods To test this hypothesis, we designed a case-control study which consisted of 256 ischemic stroke patients and 132 controls. Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP technique. Results No significant differences were found between patients and controls in terms of CYP24A1 rs927650 and CYP2R1 rs10741657 genotype frequencies. Polymorphic allele frequencies of CYP24A1 rs927650 and CYP2R1 rs10741657 were 0.414 and 0.660 in stroke patients, respectively. Conclusion This is the first study conducted regarding the association of CYP24A1 rs927650 and CYP2R1 rs10741657 genetic polymorphisms and ischemic stroke risk. The polymorphic genotypes of these polymorphisms, together with hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and obesity, were found as significant risk factors for ischemic stroke.

  7. COL6A1 gene and Ironman triathlon performance.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, K; Posthumus, M; Collins, M

    2011-11-01

    Mutations in the type VI collagen gene ( COL6A1) cause myopathy and muscle weakness. In addition, COL6A1 knockout mice were shown to have impaired running performance and reduced muscle strength. The COL6A1 rs35796750 polymorphism (IVS32-29 T/C) has been associated with complex phenotypes. The aim of this study was therefore to determine if this polymorphism is associated with performance during the 226 km Ironman triathlon. Participants (n=661) were recruited during 4 South African Ironman triathlons. Finishing times for the 3.8 km swim, 180 km bike, 42.2 km run, and overall race were provided by the race organisers. All participants were genotyped for the COL6A1 rs35796750 polymorphism. Participants with the COL6A1 TT genotype were significantly faster during the bike (p=0.014) and overall race (p=0.030). When participants were grouped into fast, middle and slow bike finishing time tertiles, there was a significant linear trend for the TT genotype (Fast: TT=35.7%; Middle: TT=29.0%; Slow: TT=23.8%; p=0.008). No significant genotype frequency differences were observed for the swim or run of the triathlon. In conclusion, the COL6A1 gene is therefore a potential marker for endurance cycling performance. These effects may be mediated through changes to the composition of type VI collagen containing tissues, such as muscle and tendon. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Adenosine-Induced Atrial Fibrillation: Localized Reentrant Drivers in Lateral Right Atria due to Heterogeneous Expression of Adenosine A1 Receptors and GIRK4 Subunits in the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Csepe, Thomas A; Hansen, Brian J; Sul, Lidiya V; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Zakharkin, Stanislav O; Zhao, Jichao; Guha, Avirup; Van Wagoner, David R; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Hummel, John D; Weiss, Raul; Fedorov, Vadim V

    2016-08-09

    Adenosine provokes atrial fibrillation (AF) with a higher activation frequency in right atria (RA) versus left atria (LA) in patients, but the underlying molecular and functional substrates are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that adenosine-induced AF is driven by localized reentry in RA areas with highest expression of adenosine A1 receptor and its downstream GIRK (G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels) channels (IK,Ado). We applied biatrial optical mapping and immunoblot mapping of various atrial regions to reveal the mechanism of adenosine-induced AF in explanted failing and nonfailing human hearts (n=37). Optical mapping of coronary-perfused atria (n=24) revealed that adenosine perfusion (10-100 µmol/L) produced more significant shortening of action potential durations in RA (from 290±45 to 239±41 ms, 17.3±10.4%; P<0.01) than LA (from 307±24 to 286±23 ms, 6.7±6.6%; P<0.01). In 10 hearts, adenosine induced AF (317±116 s) that, when sustained (≥2 minutes), was primarily maintained by 1 to 2 localized reentrant drivers in lateral RA. Tertiapin (10-100 nmol/L), a selective GIRK channel blocker, counteracted adenosine-induced action potential duration shortening and prevented AF induction. Immunoblotting showed that the superior/middle lateral RA had significantly higher adenosine A1 receptor (2.7±1.7-fold; P<0.01) and GIRK4 (1.7±0.8-fold; P<0.05) protein expression than lateral/posterior LA. This study revealed a 3-fold RA-to-LA adenosine A1 receptor protein expression gradient in the human heart, leading to significantly greater RA versus LA repolarization sensitivity in response to adenosine. Sustained adenosine-induced AF is maintained by reentrant drivers localized in lateral RA regions with the highest adenosine A1 receptor/GIRK4 expression. Selective atrial GIRK channel blockade may effectively treat AF during conditions with increased endogenous adenosine. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) is required for dioxin-induced hepatotoxicity but not for the induction of the Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 genes.

    PubMed

    Nukaya, Manabu; Lin, Bernice C; Glover, Edward; Moran, Susan M; Kennedy, Gregory D; Bradfield, Christopher A

    2010-11-12

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) plays an essential role in the toxic response to environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin), in the adaptive up-regulation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, and in hepatic vascular development. In our model of AHR signaling, the receptor is found in a cytosolic complex with a number of molecular chaperones, including Hsp90, p23, and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP), also known as ARA9 and XAP2. To understand the role of AIP in adaptive and toxic aspects of AHR signaling, we generated a conditional mouse model where the Aip locus can be deleted in hepatocytes. Using this model, we demonstrate two important roles for the AIP protein in AHR biology. (i) The expression of AIP in hepatocytes is essential to maintain high levels of functional cytosolic AHR protein in the mammalian liver. (ii) Expression of the AIP protein is essential for dioxin-induced hepatotoxicity. Interestingly, classical AHR-driven genes show differential dependence on AIP expression. The Cyp1b1 and Ahrr genes require AIP expression for normal up-regulation by dioxin, whereas Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 do not. This differential dependence on AIP provides evidence that the mammalian genome contains more than one class of AHR-responsive genes and suggests that a search for AIP-dependent, AHR-responsive genes may guide us to the targets of the dioxin-induced hepatotoxicity.

  10. 5-HT1A/1B, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 serotonergic receptors recruitment in tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception: role of dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Ferreira, Célio Marcos dos Reis; Urbina, Maria Angélica Castiblanco; Mariño, Andrés Uribe; Carvalho, Andressa Daiane; Butera, Giuseppe; de Oliveira, Ana Maria; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2009-05-01

    Pharmacological studies have been focused on the involvement of different neural pathways in the organization of antinociception that follows tonic-clonic seizures, including 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-, norepinephrine-, acetylcholine- and endogenous opioid peptide-mediated mechanisms, giving rise to more in-depth comprehension of this interesting post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. The present work investigated the involvement of 5-HT(1A/1B), 5-HT(6), and 5-HT(7) serotonergic receptors through peripheral pretreatment with methiothepin at doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg in the organization of the post-ictal antinociception elicited by pharmacologically (with pentylenetetrazole at 64 mg/kg)-induced tonic-clonic seizures. Methiothepin at 1.0 mg/kg blocked the post-ictal antinociception recorded after the end of seizures, whereas doses of 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg potentiated the post-ictal antinociception. The nociceptive thresholds were kept higher than those of the control group. However, when the same 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors antagonist was microinjected (at 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 microg/0.2 microL) in the dorsal raphe nucleus, a mesencephalic structure rich in serotonergic neurons and 5-HT receptors, the post-ictal hypo-analgesia was consistently antagonized. The present findings suggest a dual effect of methiothepin, characterized by a disinhibitory effect on the post-ictal antinociception when peripherally administered (possibly due to an antagonism of pre-synaptic 5-HT(1A) serotonergic autoreceptors in the pain endogenous inhibitory system) and an inhibitory effect (possibly due to a DRN post-synaptic 5-HT(1B), 5-HT(6), and 5-HT(7) serotonergic receptors blockade) when centrally administered. The present data also suggest that serotonin-mediated mechanisms of the dorsal raphe nucleus exert a key-role in the modulation of the post-ictal antinociception.

  11. Striatal Pre- and Postsynaptic Profile of Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Beaumont, Vahri; Goldberg, Steven R.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Striatal adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). A2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261) showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A2AR-D2R and A1R-A2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A2AR when co-expressed with D2R than with A1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A2AR co-expressed with D2R than co-expressed with A1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile. On the basis of their preferential

  12. Triclosan activates aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent apoptosis and affects Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1 expression in mouse neocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Szychowski, Konrad A; Wnuk, Agnieszka; Kajta, Małgorzata; Wójtowicz, Anna K

    2016-11-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial agent that is used extensively in personal care and in sanitizing products, such as soaps, toothpastes, and hair products. A number of studies have revealed the presence of TCS in human tissues, such as fat, liver and brain, in addition to blood and breast milk. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of TCS on AhR and Cyp1a1/Cyp1b1 signaling in mouse neocortical neurons in primary cultures. In addition to the use of selective ligands and siRNAs, expression levels of mRNA and proteins as well as caspase-3 activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release have been measured. We also studied the involvement of the AhR in TCS-induced LDH release and caspase-3 activation as well as the effect of TCS on ROS generation. Cultures of neocortical neurons were prepared from Swiss mouse embryos on day 15/16 of gestation. The cells were cultured in phenol red-free Neurobasal medium with B27 and glutamine, and the neurons were exposed to 1 and 10µM TCS. Our experiments showed that the expression of AhR and Cyp1a1 mRNA decreased in cells exposed to 10µM TCS for 3 or 6h. In the case of Cyp1b1, mRNA expression remained unchanged compared with the control group following 3h of exposure to TCS, but after 6h, the mRNA expression of Cyp1b1 was decreased. Our results confirmed that the AhR is involved in the TCS mechanism of action, and our data demonstrated that after the cells were transfected with AhR siRNA, the cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic properties of TCS were decreased. The decrease in Cyp1a1 mRNA and protein expression levels accompanied by a decrease in its activity. The stimulation of Cyp1a1 activity produced by the application of an AhR agonist (βNF) was attenuated by TCS, whereas the addition of AhR antagonist (αNF) reversed the inhibitory effects of TCS. In our experiments, TCS diminished Cyp1b1 mRNA and enhanced its protein expression. In case of Cyp1a1 we observed

  13. The 5-HT1A/1B-receptor agonist eltoprazine increases both catecholamine release in the prefrontal cortex and dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and decreases motivation for reward and "waiting" impulsivity, but increases "stopping" impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Korte, S Mechiel; Prins, Jolanda; Van den Bergh, Filip S; Oosting, Ronald S; Dupree, Rudy; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Westphal, Koen G C; Olivier, Berend; Denys, Damiaan A; Garland, Alexis; Güntürkün, Onur

    2017-01-05

    The 5-HT 1A/1B -receptor agonist eltoprazine has a behavioral drug signature that resembles that of a variety of psychostimulant drugs, despite the differences in receptor binding profile. These psychostimulants are effective in treating impulsivity disorders, most likely because they increase norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) levels in the prefrontal cortex. Both amphetamine and methylphenidate, however, also increase dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which has a significant role in motivation, pleasure, and reward. How eltoprazine affects monoamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and the NAc is unknown. It is also unknown whether eltoprazine affects different forms of impulsivity and brain reward mechanisms. Therefore, in the present study, we investigate the effects of eltoprazine in rats in the following sequence: 1) the activity of the monoaminergic systems using in vivo microdialysis, 2) motivation for reward measured using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure, and finally, 3) "waiting" impulsivity in the delay-aversion task, and the "stopping" impulsivity in the stop-signal task. The microdialysis studies clearly showed that eltoprazine increased DA and NE release in both the mPFC and OFC, but only increased DA concentration in the NAc. In contrast, eltoprazine decreased 5-HT release in the mPFC and NAc (undetectable in the OFC). Remarkably, eltoprazine decreased impulsive choice, but increased impulsive action. Furthermore, brain stimulation was less rewarding following eltoprazine treatment. These results further support the long-standing hypothesis that "waiting" and "stopping" impulsivity are regulated by distinct neural circuits, because 5-HT 1A/1B -receptor activation decreases impulsive choice, but increases impulsive action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bile acid-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) activity underlies circadian expression of intestinal peptide absorption transporter PepT1/Slc15a1.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-09-05

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Bile Acid-regulated Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-α (PPARα) Activity Underlies Circadian Expression of Intestinal Peptide Absorption Transporter PepT1/Slc15a1*

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter. PMID:25016014

  16. Enhanced long-term and impaired short-term spatial memory in GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit knockout mice: evidence for a dual-process memory model.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, David J; Good, Mark A; Skelton, Kathryn; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H; Rawlins, J Nicholas P; Bannerman, David M

    2009-06-01

    The GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit is a key mediator of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and is especially important for a rapidly-induced, short-lasting form of potentiation. GluA1 gene deletion impairs hippocampus-dependent, spatial working memory, but spares hippocampus-dependent spatial reference memory. These findings may reflect the necessity of GluA1-dependent synaptic plasticity for short-term memory of recently visited places, but not for the ability to form long-term associations between a particular spatial location and an outcome. This hypothesis is in concordance with the theory that short-term and long-term memory depend on dissociable psychological processes. In this study we tested GluA1-/- mice on both short-term and long-term spatial memory using a simple novelty preference task. Mice were given a series of repeated exposures to a particular spatial location (the arm of a Y-maze) before their preference for a novel spatial location (the unvisited arm of the maze) over the familiar spatial location was assessed. GluA1-/- mice were impaired if the interval between the trials was short (1 min), but showed enhanced spatial memory if the interval between the trials was long (24 h). This enhancement was caused by the interval between the exposure trials rather than the interval prior to the test, thus demonstrating enhanced learning and not simply enhanced performance or expression of memory. This seemingly paradoxical enhancement of hippocampus-dependent spatial learning may be caused by GluA1 gene deletion reducing the detrimental effects of short-term memory on subsequent long-term learning. Thus, these results support a dual-process model of memory in which short-term and long-term memory are separate and sometimes competitive processes.

  17. Novel Regulation of the Synthesis of α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Subunit GluA1 by Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C) in the Hippocampus*

    PubMed Central

    Fadó, Rut; Soto, David; Miñano-Molina, Alfredo J.; Pozo, Macarena; Carrasco, Patricia; Yefimenko, Natalia; Rodríguez-Álvarez, José; Casals, Núria

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of AMPA-type receptor (AMPAR) abundance in the postsynaptic membrane is an important mechanism involved in learning and memory formation. Recent data suggest that one of the constituents of the AMPAR complex is carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific isoform located in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurons. Previous results had demonstrated that CPT1C deficiency disrupted spine maturation in hippocampal neurons and impaired spatial learning, but the role of CPT1C in AMPAR physiology had remained mostly unknown. In the present study, we show that CPT1C binds GluA1 and GluA2 and that the three proteins have the same expression profile during neuronal maturation. Moreover, in hippocampal neurons of CPT1C KO mice, AMPAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and synaptic levels of AMPAR subunits GluA1 and GluA2 are significantly reduced. We show that AMPAR expression is dependent on CPT1C levels because total protein levels of GluA1 and GluA2 are decreased in CPT1C KO neurons and are increased in CPT1C-overexpressing neurons, whereas other synaptic proteins remain unaltered. Notably, mRNA levels of AMPARs remained unchanged in those cultures, indicating that CPT1C is post-transcriptionally involved. We demonstrate that CPT1C is directly involved in the de novo synthesis of GluA1 and not in protein degradation. Moreover, in CPT1C KO cultured neurons, GluA1 synthesis after chemical long term depression was clearly diminished, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor treatment was unable to phosphorylate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and stimulate GluA1 protein synthesis. These data newly identify CPT1C as a regulator of AMPAR translation efficiency and therefore also synaptic function in the hippocampus. PMID:26338711

  18. Sex- and Obesity-specific Association of Aromatase (CYP19A1) Gene Variant with Apolipoprotein B and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Coban, Neslihan; Onat, Altan; Guclu-Geyik, Filiz; Can, Gunay; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan

    2015-10-01

    Gender differences in cardiovascular disease risk have been attributed to sex hormones. The CYP19A1 protein (aromatase) plays a critical role in estrogen biosynthesis and thus affects body fat distribution and regulation. We examined the relationship between polymorphism of the CYP19A1 gene and lipoproteins, body mass index (BMI), insulin levels and HOMA index. Randomly selected 2250 Turkish adults (aged 49.7 ± 11.9 years; 48.6% males) were genotyped for CYP19A1 rs10046 polymorphism using hybridization probes in Real-Time PCR LC480 device. Distribution of the CYP19A1 rs10046 polymorphism was 28% (n = 630), 48.3 % (n = 1085) and 23.7% (n = 535) for the CC, CT and TT genotypes, respectively, and the T allele frequency was 0.48. In relation to apolipoprotein (apo)B levels, C homozygosity was associated with higher apoB in non-obese females, contrasting to being so in obese males only, and further in postmenopausal females. CC genotype in females was associated in linear regression analysis by 7.2 ± 3.3 mg/dL higher apoB than CT + TT genotypes, independent of age and BMI. Among premenopausal females, insulin levels (p = 0.007), BMI (p = 0.05) and HOMA index (p = 0.034) were higher in C homozygotes than in T-allele carriers. However, CYP19A1 TT genotype contributed to hypertension at an OR 1.80 (95% CI 1.12-2.91), independently of age, BMI and other confounders, in males alone. The CYP19A1 rs10046 polymorphism is associated with cardiovascular risk factors such as circulating apoB, insulin resistance and hypertension in a sex- and obesity-specific manner. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. New insight into the central benzodiazepine receptor-ligand interactions: design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular modeling of 3-substituted 6-phenyl-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepines and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Anzini, Maurizio; Valenti, Salvatore; Braile, Carlo; Cappelli, Andrea; Vomero, Salvatore; Alcaro, Stefano; Ortuso, Francesco; Marinelli, Luciana; Limongelli, Vittorio; Novellino, Ettore; Betti, Laura; Giannaccini, Gino; Lucacchini, Antonio; Daniele, Simona; Martini, Claudia; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Giorgi, Gianluca; Mascia, Maria Paola; Biggio, Giovanni

    2011-08-25

    3-Substituted 6-phenyl-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepines and related compounds were synthesized as central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR) ligands. Most of the compounds showed high affinity for bovine and human CBR, their K(i) values spanning from the low nanomolar to the submicromolar range. In particular, imidazoester 5f was able to promote a massive flow of (36)Cl(-) in rat cerebrocortical synaptoneurosomes overlapping its efficacy profile with that of a typical full agonist. Compound 5f was then examined in mice for its pharmacological effects where it proved to be a safe anxiolytic agent devoid of the unpleasant myorelaxant and amnesic effects of the classical 1,4-benzodiazepines. Moreover, the selectivity of some selected compounds has been assessed in recombinant α(1)β(2)γ(2)L, α(2)β(1)γ(2)L, and α(5)β(2)γ(2)L human GABA(A) receptors. Finally, some compounds were submitted to molecular docking calculations along with molecular dynamics simulations in the Cromer's GABA(A) homology model. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. The Frog Skin-Derived Antimicrobial Peptide Esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 Promotes the Migration of Human HaCaT Keratinocytes in an EGF Receptor-Dependent Manner: A Novel Promoter of Human Skin Wound Healing?

    PubMed Central

    Di Grazia, Antonio; Cappiello, Floriana; Imanishi, Akiko; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Picardo, Mauro; Paus, Ralf; Mangoni, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    One of the many functions of skin is to protect the organism against a wide range of pathogens. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the skin epithelium provide an effective chemical shield against microbial pathogens. However, whereas antibacterial/antifungal activities of AMPs have been extensively characterized, much less is known regarding their wound healing-modulatory properties. By using an in vitro re-epithelialisation assay employing special cell-culture inserts, we detected that a derivative of the frog-skin AMP esculentin-1a, named esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2, significantly stimulates migration of immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) over a wide range of peptide concentrations (0.025–4 μM), and this notably more efficiently than human cathelicidin (LL-37). This activity is preserved in primary human epidermal keratinocytes. By using appropriate inhibitors and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we found that the peptide-induced cell migration involves activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and STAT3 protein. These results suggest that esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 now deserves to be tested in standard wound healing assays as a novel candidate promoter of skin re-epithelialisation. The established ability of esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 to kill microbes without harming mammalian cells, namely its high anti-Pseudomonal activity, makes this AMP a particularly attractive candidate wound healing promoter, especially in the management of chronic, often Pseudomonas-infected, skin ulcers. PMID:26068861

  1. The effect of aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands on the expression of AhR, AhRR, ARNT, Hif1alpha, CYP1A1 and NQO1 genes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Brauze, Damian; Widerak, Magdalena; Cwykiel, Joanna; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2006-12-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates a variety of biological responses to ubiquitous environmental pollutants. AhR together with ARNT, AhRR, HIF1alpha represent a novel basic helix-loop-helix/PAS family of transcriptional regulators. Their interplay may affect the xenobiotic response. In this study, the effect of i.p. administration of different AhR ligands on the expression of AhR, AhRR, ARNT, HIF1alpha and CYP1A1 and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), the enzymes controlled by AhR were examined in Sprague-Dawley rat liver. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed no changes in the mRNA expression of ARNT and HIF1alpha following 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) treatment. AhRR expression was affected by TCDD but not by BNF and 3-MC. Expression of AhR mRNA and of the markers of its activation, CYP1A1 and NQO1, was significantly increased by administration of TCDD, 3-MC and, to lower extent, BNF. These results indicate that binding of the ligands to AhR up-regulates the mRNA transcription not only of CYP1A1 and NQO1, but also of AhR itself. The level of AhR induction depends on the potency of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes inducer.

  2. Genetic variation in the CYP1A1 gene is related to circulating PCB118 levels in a population-based sample

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Lars; Penell, Johanna; Syvänen, Anne-Christine

    2014-08-15

    Several of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), i.e. the dioxin-like PCBs, are known to induce the P450 enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 by activating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah)-receptor. We evaluated if circulating levels of PCBs in a population sample were related to genetic variation in the genes encoding these CYPs. In the population-based Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (1016 subjects all aged 70), 21 SNPs in the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genes were genotyped. Sixteen PCB congeners were analysed by high-resolution chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/ HRMS). Of the investigated relationships between SNPsmore » in the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 and six PCBs (congeners 118, 126, 156, 169, 170 and 206) that captures >80% of the variation of all PCBs measured, only the relationship between CYP1A1 rs2470893 was significantly related to PCB118 levels following strict adjustment for multiple testing (p=0.00011). However, there were several additional SNPs in the CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 that showed nominally significant associations with PCB118 levels (p-values in the 0.003–0.05 range). Further, several SNPs in the CYP1B1 gene were related to both PCB156 and PCB206 with p-values in the 0.005–0.05 range. Very few associations with p<0.05 were seen for PCB126, PCB169 or PCB170. Genetic variation in the CYP1A1 was related to circulating PCB118 levels in the general elderly population. Genetic variation in CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 might also be associated with other PCBs. - Highlights: • We studied the relationship between PCBs and the genetic variation in the CYP genes. • Cross sectional data from a cohort of elderly were analysed. • The PCB levels were evaluated versus 21 SNPs in three CYP genes. • PCB 118 was related to variation in the CYP1A1 gene.« less

  3. [Genetic association between the reduced amplitude of the P300 and the allele A1 of the gene which codifies the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) as possible biological markers for alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Nácher, V

    Over the last twenty years much work has been done to study the P300 in alcoholism. A systematically reduced amplitude, both in patients and in populations at risk (children of alcoholics) was found. Besides, studies on twins indicate that the waves of the evoked potentials are under genetic control. Furthermore, advances in molecular genetic techniques have clarified the part played by the allele A1 of the gene which codifies the D2 dopamine receptor in alcoholism. Only in recent years have studies been published relating them and in these they are considered to be risk markers for alcoholism. However, contradictory results have been obtained. The objective of this study is to review part of the literature and find evidence for and against the characteristics observed in the P300 and the possible part played by the DRD2 gene in the aetiology of alcoholism and the relationship between them. At the same time we consider the most relevant theoretical aspects of the role played by dopamine in the central nervous system, since some studies have shown that it is involved in the generation of P300 and reinforcement due to alcohol consumptions. Finally, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages that should be taken into account when considering the low amplitude of P300 and the presence of the A1 allele as diagnostic markers to identify populations at risk and thus avoid appearance of the disorder.

  4. Metformin inhibits 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced breast carcinogenesis and adduct formation in human breast cells by inhibiting the cytochrome P4501A1/aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Maayah, Zaid H.; Ghebeh, Hazem; Alhaider, Abdulqader A.

    2015-04-15

    Recent studies have established that metformin (MET), an oral anti-diabetic drug, possesses antioxidant activity and is effective against different types of cancer in several carcinogen-induced animal models and cell lines. However, whether MET can protect against breast cancer has not been reported before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential chemopreventive effect of MET in non-cancerous human breast MCF10A cells and explore the underlying mechanism involved, specifically the role of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1)/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. Transformation of the MCF10A cells into initiated breast cancer cells with DNA adduct formation was conducted usingmore » 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), an AhR ligand. The chemopreventive effect of MET against DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was evidenced by the capability of MET to restore the induction of the mRNA levels of basic excision repair genes, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1), and the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Interestingly, the inhibition of DMBA-induced DNA adduct formation was associated with proportional decrease in CYP1A1 and in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene expression. Mechanistically, the involvements of AhR and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the MET-mediated inhibition of DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and NQO1 gene expression were evidenced by the ability of MET to inhibit DMBA-induced xenobiotic responsive element and antioxidant responsive element luciferase reporter gene expression which suggests an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent transcriptional control. However, the inability of MET to bind to AhR suggests that MET is not an AhR ligand. In conclusion, the present work shows a strong evidence that MET inhibits the DMBA-mediated carcinogenicity and adduct formation by inhibiting the expression of CYP1A1 through an AhR ligand

  5. Ephrin (Eph) receptor A1, A4, A5 and A7 expression in human non-small cell lung carcinoma: associations with clinicopathological parameters, tumor proliferative capacity and patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Bournakis, Evangelos; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2014-02-04

    Ephrin (Eph) receptors are frequently overexpressed in a wide variety of human malignant tumors, being associated with tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of EphA1, A4, A5 and A7 protein expression in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). EphA1, A4, A5 and A7 protein expression was assessed immunohistochemically in tissue microarrays of 88 surgically resected NSCLC and was analyzed in relation with clinicopathological characteristics and patients' survival. Elevated EphA4 expression was significantly associated with low histopathological stage and presence of inflammation (p = 0.047 and p = 0.026, respectively). Elevated EphA7 expression was significantly associated with older patients' age, presence of fibrosis and smaller tumor size (p = 0.036, p = 0.029 and p = 0.018, respectively). EphA1, A5 and A7 expression were positively associated with tumor proliferative capacity (p = 0.047, p = 0.002 and p = 0.046, respectively). Elevated EphA4, A5 and A7 expression were identified as predictors of favourable patients' survival at both univariate (Log-rank test, 0 = 0.019, p = 0.006 and p = 0.012, respectively) and multivariate levels (Cox-regression analysis, p = 0.029, p = 0.068 and p = 0.044, respectively). The present study supported evidence that Ephs may be involved in lung cancer progression, reinforcing their utility as clinical biomarkers for patients' management and prognosis, as also as potential targets for future therapeutic interventions.

  6. Upregulation of Adenosine A1 Receptors Facilitates Sinoatrial Node Dysfunction in Chronic Canine Heart Failure by Exacerbating Nodal Conduction Abnormalities Revealed by Novel Dual-Sided Intramural Optical Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Qing; Hansen, Brian J.; Fedorenko, Olga; Csepe, Thomas A.; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Li, Ning; Hage, Lori T.; Glukhov, Alexey V.; Billman, George E.; Weiss, Raul; Mohler, Peter J; Györke, Sándor; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Carnes, Cynthia A.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Background While sinoatrial node (SAN) dysfunction is a hallmark of human heart failure (HF), the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We aimed to examine the role of adenosine in SAN dysfunction and tachy-brady arrhythmias in chronic HF. Methods and Results We applied multiple approaches to characterize SAN structure, function and adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) expression in control (n=17) and four month tachypacing-induced chronic HF (n=18) dogs. Novel intramural optical mapping of coronary-perfused right atrial preparations revealed that adenosine (10μM) markedly prolonged post-pacing SAN conduction time in HF by 206±99ms (vs. 66±21ms in control, p=0.02). Adenosine induced SAN intra-nodal conduction block and/or micro-reentry in 6/8 HF vs. 0/7 controls (p=0.007). Adenosine-induced SAN conduction abnormalities and automaticity depression caused post-pacing atrial pauses in HF vs. control (17.1±28.9s vs. 1.5±1.3s, p<0.001). Furthermore, 10μM adenosine shortened atrial repolarization and led to pacing-induced atrial fibrillation (AF) in 6/7 HF vs. 0/7 control (p=0.002). Adenosine-induced SAN dysfunction and AF were abolished/prevented by A1R antagonists (50μM Theophylline/1μM DPCPX). A1R protein expression was significantly upregulated during HF in the SAN (by 47±19%) and surrounding atrial myocardium (by 90±40%). Interstitial fibrosis was significantly increased within the SAN in HF vs. control (38±4% vs. 23±4%, p<0.001). Conclusions In chronic HF, A1R upregulation in SAN pacemaker and atrial cardiomyocytes may increase cardiac sensitivity to adenosine. This effect may exacerbate conduction abnormalities in the structurally impaired SAN leading to SAN dysfunction, and potentiate atrial repolarization shortening thereby facilitating AF. AF may further depress SAN function and lead to tachy-brady arrhythmias in HF. PMID:24838362

  7. Adenosine-Induced Atrial Fibrillation: Localized Reentrant Drivers in Lateral Right Atria due to Heterogeneous Expression of Adenosine A1 Receptors and GIRK4 Subunits in the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Csepe, Thomas A.; Hansen, Brian J.; Sul, Lidiya V.; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Zakharkin, Stanislav O.; Zhao, Jichao; Guha, Avirup; Van Wagoner, David R.; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul ML; Biesiadecki, Brandon; Hummel, John D; Weiss, Raul; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adenosine provokes atrial fibrillation (AF) with a higher activation frequency in right atria (RA) versus left atria (LA) in patients, but the underlying molecular and functional substrates are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that adenosine-induced AF is driven by localized reentry in RA areas with highest expression of adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) and its downstream GIRK channels (IK,Ado). Methods We applied bi-atrial optical mapping and immunoblot mapping of various atrial regions to reveal the mechanism of adenosine-induced AF in explanted failing and non-failing human hearts (n=37). Results Optical mapping of coronary-perfused atria (n=24) revealed that adenosine perfusion (10–100μM) produced more significant shortening of action potential durations (APD80) in RA (from 290±45ms to 239±41ms, 17.3±10.4%; p<0.01) than LA (from 307±24ms to 286±23ms, 6.7±6.6%; p<0.01). In ten hearts, adenosine induced AF (317±116 sec) that, when sustained (≥2 min), was primarily maintained by one/two localized reentrant drivers in lateral RA. Tertiapin (10–100nM), a selective GIRK channel blocker, counteracted adenosine-induced APD shortening and prevented AF induction. Immunoblotting showed that the superior/middle lateral RA had significantly higher A1R (2.7±1.7 fold; p<0.01) and GIRK4 (1.7±0.8 fold; p<0.05) protein expression than lateral/posterior LA. Conclusions This study revealed a three-fold RA-to-LA A1R protein expression gradient in the human heart, leading to significantly greater RA vs. LA repolarization sensitivity in response to adenosine. Sustained adenosine-induced AF is maintained by reentrant drivers localized in lateral RA regions with the highest A1R/GIRK4 expression. Selective atrial GIRK channel blockade may effectively treat AF during conditions with increased endogenous adenosine. PMID:27462069

  8. Angiotensin-(1-7) upregulates expression of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G1 through the Mas receptor through the liver X receptor alpha signalling pathway in THP-1 macrophages treated with angiotensin-II.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Wang, Xin; Bian, Yunfei; Yang, Huiyu; Liu, Ming; Bai, Rui; Yang, Zhiming; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2014-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ABCG1 play crucial roles in reverse cholesterol transport, and have anti-atherosclerosis effects, and liver X receptor alpha (LXRα) can stimulate cholesterol efflux through these transporters. Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) can protect endothelial cells, inhibit smooth muscle cell growth, ameliorate inflammation and exert anti-atherosclerotic effects. In the present study, we attempted to clarify the effect of Ang-(1-7) on expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1, and explored the role of LXRα in the regulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 in THP-1 macrophages that had been incubated with angiotensin-II (AngII). Ang-(1-7) increased ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein levels, promoted cholesterol efflux, and decreased cholesterol content in THP-1 macrophages treated with AngII. Furthermore, Ang-(1-7) upregulated the expression of LXRα in a concentration-dependent manner in these cells. LXRα small interfering RNA, as well as the Mas receptor antagonist A-779, completely abolished these effects of Ang-(1-7). In summary, Ang-(1-7) upregulates ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in THP-1 macrophages treated with AngII through the Mas receptor, via the LXRα pathway. This novel insight into the molecular mechanism underlying Ang-(1-7) and AngII interaction could prove useful for developing new strategies for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. The Vγ9Vδ2 T Cell Antigen Receptor and Butyrophilin-3 A1: Models of Interaction, the Possibility of Co-Evolution, and the Case of Dendritic Epidermal T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Mohindar M.; Herrmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Most circulating human gamma delta T cells are Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Their hallmark is the expression of T cell antigen receptors (TCR) whose γ-chains show a Vγ9-JP (Vγ2-Jγ1.2) rearrangement and are paired with Vδ2-containing δ-chains, a dominant TCR configuration, which until recently seemed to occur in primates only. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells respond to phosphoantigens (PAg) such as (E)-4-Hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), which is produced by many pathogens and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), which accumulates in certain tumors or cells treated with aminobisphosphonates such as zoledronate. A prerequisite for PAg-induced activation is the contact of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells with cells expressing butyrophilin-3 A1 (BTN3A1). We will first critically review models of how BTN3 might act in PAg-mediated Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation and then address putative co-evolution of Vγ9, Vδ2, and BTN3 genes. In those rodent and lagomorphs used as animal models, all three genes are lost but a data-base analysis showed that they emerged together with placental mammals. A strong concomitant conservation of functional Vγ9, Vδ2, and BTN3 genes in other species suggests co-evolution of these three genes. A detailed analysis was performed for the new world camelid alpaca (Vicugna pacos). It provides an excellent candidate for a non-primate species with presumably functional Vγ9Vδ2 T cells since TCR rearrangements share features characteristic for PAg-reactive primate Vγ9Vδ2 TCR and proposed PAg-binding sites of BTN3A1 have been conserved. Finally, we analyze the possible functional relationship between the butyrophilin-family member Skint1 and the γδ TCR-V genes used by murine dendritic epithelial T cells (DETC). Among placental mammals, we identify five rodents, the cow, a bat, and the cape golden mole as the only species concomitantly possessing potentially functional homologs of murine Vγ3, Vδ4 genes, and Skint1 gene and suggest to search for DETC like cells in these

  10. Liver vitamin D receptor, CYP2R1, and CYP27A1 expression: relationship with liver histology and vitamin D3 levels in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Barchetta, Ilaria; Carotti, Simone; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Gentilucci, Umberto Vespasiani; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Angelico, Francesco; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Leonetti, Frida; Fraioli, Antonio; Picardi, Antonio; Morini, Sergio; Cavallo, Maria Gisella

    2012-12-01

    Evidence suggests an association between low serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D(3) [25(OH)D(3) ] levels and the presence and prognosis of liver disease. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) has been widely detected in the liver, but its expression in the course of liver disease has never been investigated. We evaluated the hepatic expression of VDR along with that of vitamin D 25-hydroxylases in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) or chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and its relationship with hepatic histological features and serum 25(OH)D(3) levels. We evaluated 61 patients (25 NASH and 36 CHC) who had undergone liver biopsy for clinical purposes and 20 subjects without liver disease. Serum 25(OH)D(3) was measured via colorimetric assay. Expression of VDR, CYP2R1, and CYP27A1 was evaluated via immunohistochemistry in hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, and liver inflammatory cells. Parenchymal and inflammatory cells from liver biopsies of patients with NASH and CHC expressed VDR, CYP2R1, and CYP27A1. In NASH patients, VDR expression on cholangiocytes was inversely correlated with steatosis severity (P < 0.02), lobular inflammation (P < 0.01), and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease score (P < 0.03). Moreover, expression of CYP2R1 in hepatocytes correlated strongly with VDR positivity on liver inflammatory cells. In CHC subjects, fibrosis stage was associated with low hepatic CYP27A1 expression, whereas portal inflammation was significantly higher in patients with VDR-negative inflammatory cells (P < 0.009) and low VDR expression in hepatocytes (P < 0.03). VDR is widely expressed in the liver and inflammatory cells of chronic liver disease patients and its expression is negatively associated with the severity of liver histology in both NASH and CHC patients. These data suggest that vitamin D/VDR system may play a role in the progression of metabolic and viral chronic liver damage. (HEPATOLOGY 2012;56:2180-2187). Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  11. Links Between Insulin Resistance, Adenosine A2B Receptors, and Inflammatory Markers in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Figler, Robert A.; Wang, Guoquan; Srinivasan, Susseela; Jung, Dae Young; Zhang, Zhiyou; Pankow, James S.; Ravid, Katya; Fredholm, Bertil; Hedrick, Catherine C.; Rich, Stephen S.; Kim, Jason K.; LaNoue, Kathryn F.; Linden, Joel

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the mechanisms by which blockade of adenosine A2B receptors (A2BRs) reduces insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated the effects of deleting or blocking the A2BR on insulin sensitivity using glucose tolerance tests (GTTs) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in mouse models of type 2 diabetes. The effects of diabetes on A2BR transcription and signaling were measured in human and mouse macrophages and mouse endothelial cells. In addition, tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ∼42 kb encompassing the A2BR gene, ADORA2B, were evaluated for associations with markers of diabetes and inflammation. RESULTS Treatment of mice with the nonselective adenosine receptor agonist 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadensoine (NECA) increased fasting blood glucose and slowed glucose disposal during GTTs. These responses were inhibited by A2BR deletion or blockade and minimally affected by deletion of A1Rs or A2ARs. During hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp of diabetic KKAY mice, A2BR antagonism increased glucose infusion rate, reduced hepatic glucose production, and increased glucose uptake into skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue. Diabetes caused a four- to sixfold increase in A2BR mRNA in endothelial cells and macrophages and resulted in enhanced interleukin (IL)-6 production in response to NECA due to activation of protein kinases A and C. Five consecutive tag SNPs in ADORA2B were highly correlated with IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP). Diabetes had a highly significant independent effect on variation in inflammatory markers. The strength of associations between several ADORA2B SNPs and inflammatory markers was increased when accounting for diabetes status. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes affects the production of adenosine and the expression of A2BRs that stimulate IL-6 and CRP production, insulin resistance, and the association between ADORA2B SNPs and inflammatory markers. We hypothesize that increased A2BR signaling in diabetes

  12. Genetic variants in the regulatory region of SLC10A1 are not associated with the risk of hepatitis B virus infection and clearance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueqin; Wang, Ying; Chen, Xiaohua; Cheng, Kailiang; Li, Jiaoyuan; Lou, Jiao; Ke, Juntao; Yang, Yang; Gong, Yajie; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Li; Zhong, Rong

    2016-10-01

    The Na/taurocholate cotransporter NTCP (encoded by SLC10A1) was identified as a cellular entry receptor for the human hepatitis B virus (HBV), advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanism of HBV infection. An alternative hypothesis was put forward that regulatory variants in SLC10A1 might play an important role in HBV susceptibility by potentially influencing expression levels of NTCP. The three regulatory SNPs (rs8011311, rs7154439, rs111409076) were genotyped in 1023 HBV-persistent carriers, 735 subjects with HBV natural clearance and 732 HBV marker-negative subjects in a Han Chinese population. Real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis and luciferase assays have been performed to dissect the potential functionality. In logistic regression analysis, when subjects with HBV natural clearance were compared with HBV marker-negative subjects, no significant associations with the risk of HBV infection were observed for any of the three SNPs after adjusting for age, sex, smoking status and alcohol consumption (P>0.05). Similar negative results were also found for the three SNPs when HBV-persistent carriers were compared with HBV marker-negative subjects. Likewise, no significant associations with the risk of HBV clearance were observed when HBV-persistent carriers were compared with subjects with HBV natural clearance (P>0.05). Quantitative RT/PCR showed no significant difference in NTCP expression levels in normal liver tissue amongst individuals with different rs111409076 genotypes (P=0.317 for the general linear model). Moreover, no evident effect of the SLC10A1 rs111409076 AACA/- polymorphism on transcriptional activity was found by luciferase assay in either HepG2 (P=0.161) or Hep3b (P=0.129) cell lines. The present study indicated that the common variants in the regulatory region of SLC10A1 may not influence the expression of NTCP at the level of transcriptional regulation, and ultimately may not be associated with HBV susceptibility in this Chinese

  13. Genetic and environmental predictors, endogenous hormones and growth factors, and risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Nobuyasu; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Toyama, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Satoru; Shiraki, Norio; Sugiura, Hiroshi; Endo, Yumi; Iwasa, Mai; Fujii, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiroko

    2011-11-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in Japanese women has doubled in all age groups over the past two decades. We have recently shown that this marked increase is mostly due to an increase in the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive subtype. It is necessary to establish risk factors capable of predicting the risk of ER-positive breast cancer that will enable the efficient selection of candidates for preventive therapy. We analyzed genetic factors, including 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), environmental risk factors (body mass index, age at menarche, pregnancy, age at first birth, breastfeeding, family history of breast cancer, age at menopause, use of hormone replacement therapy, alcohol intake, and smoking), serum hormones and growth factors (estradiol, testosterone, prolactin, insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF1] and IGF binding protein 3 [IGFBP3]), and mammographic density in 913 women with breast cancer and 278 disease-free controls. To identify important risk factors, risk prediction models for ER-positive breast cancer in both pre- and postmenopausal women were created by logistic regression analysis. In premenopausal women, one SNP (CYP19A1-rs10046), age, pregnancy, breastfeeding, alcohol intake, serum levels of prolactin, testosterone, and IGFBP3 were considered to be risk predictors. In postmenopausal women, one SNP (TP53-rs1042522), age, body mass index, age at menopause, serum levels of testosterone, and IGF1 were identified as risk predictors. Risk factors may differ between women of different menopausal status, and inclusion of common genetic variants and serum hormone measurements as well as environmental factors might improve risk assessment models. Further validation studies will clarify appropriate risk groups for preventive therapy. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Camel Milk Modulates the Expression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Regulated Genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in Murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korashy, Hesham M.; El Gendy, Mohamed A. M.; Alhaider, Abdulqader A.; El-Kadi, Ayman O.

    2012-01-01

    There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that camel milk may aid in prevention and treatment of numerous cases of cancer yet, the exact mechanism was not investigated. Therefore, we examined the ability of camel milk to modulate the expression of a well-known cancer-activating gene, Cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), and cancer-protective genes, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1), in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. Our results showed that camel milk significantly inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most potent Cyp1a1 inducer and known carcinogenic chemical, at mRNA, protein, and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, camel milk significantly decreased the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE)-dependent luciferase activity, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism is involved. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of camel milk was associated with a proportional increase in heme oxygenase 1. On the other hand, camel milk significantly induced Nqo1 and Gsta1 mRNA expression level in a concentration-dependent fashion. The RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely blocked the induction of Nqo1 mRNA by camel milk suggesting the requirement of de novo RNA synthesis through a transcriptional mechanism. In conclusion, camel milk modulates the expression of Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1 at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. PMID:22570534

  15. Camel milk modulates the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Korashy, Hesham M; El Gendy, Mohamed A M; Alhaider, Abdulqader A; El-Kadi, Ayman O

    2012-01-01

    There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that camel milk may aid in prevention and treatment of numerous cases of cancer yet, the exact mechanism was not investigated. Therefore, we examined the ability of camel milk to modulate the expression of a well-known cancer-activating gene, Cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), and cancer-protective genes, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1), in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. Our results showed that camel milk significantly inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most potent Cyp1a1 inducer and known carcinogenic chemical, at mRNA, protein, and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, camel milk significantly decreased the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE)-dependent luciferase activity, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism is involved. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of camel milk was associated with a proportional increase in heme oxygenase 1. On the other hand, camel milk significantly induced Nqo1 and Gsta1 mRNA expression level in a concentration-dependent fashion. The RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely blocked the induction of Nqo1 mRNA by camel milk suggesting the requirement of de novo RNA synthesis through a transcriptional mechanism. In conclusion, camel milk modulates the expression of Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1 at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  16. Vector-averaged gravity-induced changes in cell signaling and vitamin D receptor activity in MG-63 cells are reversed by a 1,25-(OH)2D3 analog, EB1089

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.; Smith, C. L.; Weigel, N. L.

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading in an animal hindlimb suspension model and microgravity experienced by astronauts or as a result of prolonged bed rest causes site-specific losses in bone mineral density of 1%-2% per month. This is accompanied by reductions in circulating levels of 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3), the active metabolite of vitamin D. 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3), the ligand for the vitamin D receptor (VDR), is important for calcium absorption and plays a role in differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. To examine the responses of cells to activators of the VDR in a simulated microgravity environment, we used slow-turning lateral vessels (STLVs) in a rotating cell culture system. We found that, similar to cells grown in microgravity, MG-63 cells grown in the STLVs produce less osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and collagen Ialpha1 mRNA and are less responsive to 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3). In addition, expression of VDR was reduced. Moreover, growth in the STLV caused activation of the stress-activated protein kinase pathway (SAPK), a kinase that inhibits VDR activity. In contrast, the 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) analog, EB1089, was able to compensate for some of the STLV-associated responses by reducing SAPK activity, elevating VDR levels, and increasing expression of osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase. These studies suggest that, not only does simulated microgravity reduce differentiation of MG-63 cells, but the activity of the VDR, an important regulator of bone metabolism, is reduced. Use of potent, less calcemic analogs of 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) may aid in overcoming this defect. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  17. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Waldhoer, Maria; Bartlett, Selena E; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2004-01-01

    Opioid receptors belong to the large superfamily of seven transmembrane-spanning (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As a class, GPCRs are of fundamental physiological importance mediating the actions of the majority of known neurotransmitters and hormones. Opioid receptors are particularly intriguing members of this receptor family. They are activated both by endogenously produced opioid peptides and by exogenously administered opiate compounds, some of which are not only among the most effective analgesics known but also highly addictive drugs of abuse. A fundamental question in addiction biology is why exogenous opioid drugs, such as morphine and heroin, have a high liability for inducing tolerance, dependence, and addiction. This review focuses on many aspects of opioid receptors with the aim of gaining a greater insight into mechanisms of opioid tolerance and dependence.

  19. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    HbA1C test; Glycated hemoglobin test; Glycohemoglobin test; Hemoglobin A1C; Diabetes - A1C; Diabetic - A1C ... gov/pubmed/26696680 . Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb, glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, HbA1a, HbA1b, HbA1c - blood. ...

  20. [CYP7A1 gene polymorphism and the characteristics of dyslipidemias in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease concurrent with hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Zhaldak, D A; Melekhovets, O K; Orlovskyi, V F

    To investigate the association of the polymorphic variants -204A > C (rs 3808607) in the CYP7A1 gene with the development of dyslipidemias in healthy individuals, in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and in those with NAFLD concurrent with hypothyroidism. DNA samples and lipidograms were examined in 180 patients, including 60 healthy individuals (Group 1), 60 patients with hypothyroidism concurrent with NAFLD (Group 2), and 60 patients with NAFLD (Group 3). All the patients underwent ultrasound examination of the thyroid gland and abdominal cavity organs; FibroMax scores were calculated. All the study groups most frequently showed a homozygous AA genotype (86.6% of cases in Group 1, 80% in Group 2, and 83.3% in Group 3). The development of NAFLD in CC genotype carriers is characterized by the most pronounced changes in lipid metabolism (atherogenic index (AI), 7.32 in Group 3) compared to the genotypes AA (AI, 4.56 in Group 2 and 1.73 in Group 1) and CC (AI, 6.43 in Group 2 and 2.52 in Group 1) in functional insufficiency of thyroid hormones and relative normal conditions. The analysis of the relationship of polymorphic variants CYP7A1 rs 38088607 to lipid metabolic disturbances in the study groups showed that the significantly higher levels of atherogenic cholesterol fractions were determined in the CC genotype compared to AA genotype carriers and they did not depend on the presence of NAFLD and hypothyroidism. The findings make it possible to consider the AA homozygous genotype of variant mutation CYP7A1 rs 38088607 as protective against dyslipidemia. However, in functional insufficiency of thyroid hormones, the level of triglycerides is significantly higher in both genotypes, which suggests that hypothyroidism plays an essential role in the development of dyslipidemia and NAFLD.

  1. The two-state dimer receptor model: a general model for receptor dimers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antoni; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2006-06-01

    Nonlinear Scatchard plots are often found for agonist binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. Because there is clear evidence of receptor dimerization, these nonlinear Scatchard plots can reflect cooperativity on agonist binding to the two binding sites in the dimer. According to this, the "two-state dimer receptor model" has been recently derived. In this article, the performance of the model has been analyzed in fitting data of agonist binding to A(1) adenosine receptors, which are an example of receptor displaying concave downward Scatchard plots. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition data for dopamine D(1) receptors using the two-state dimer receptor model has also been performed. Although fitting to the two-state dimer receptor model was similar to the fitting to the "two-independent-site receptor model", the former is simpler, and a discrimination test selects the two-state dimer receptor model as the best. This model was also very robust in fitting data of estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor, for which Scatchard plots are concave upward. On the one hand, the model would predict the already demonstrated existence of estrogen receptor dimers. On the other hand, the model would predict that concave upward Scatchard plots reflect positive cooperativity, which can be neither predicted nor explained by assuming the existence of two different affinity states. In summary, the two-state dimer receptor model is good for fitting data of binding to dimeric receptors displaying either linear, concave upward, or concave downward Scatchard plots.

  2. [Polymorphisms of SLC17A1 gene and their interaction with alcohol drinking among Uygur patients with hyperuricemia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Su, Yinxia; Wang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Qi; Yao, Hua

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the correlation between polymorphisms of uric acid transporter related gene SLC17A1 and hyperuricemia (HUA) among ethnic Uygur patients from Xinjiang. A case-control study was carried out, which enrolled 1036 patients with hyperuricemia and 1031 healthy controls. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the SLC17A1 gene were determined with Sequenom MassARRAY. Crossover analysis was used to assess the effect of interaction between above SNPs and alcohol drinking on uric acid level. Genotypic and allelic frequencies of the SLC17A1 gene at the two loci in the two groups were compared. The CT genotype of the rs9467596 locus and TC genotype of the rs2096386 locus showed a higher risk for hyperuricemia (OR=1.334, 95%CI:1.082-1.644; OR=1.242, 95%CI:1.015-1.519, respectively). Crossover analysis also revealed that the SLC17A1 rs2096386 polymorphism has a positive interaction with alcohol drinking in a multiplication model (ORint=1.21, P<0.05, OR>1). SNP rs9467596 and rs2096386 of the SLC17A1 gene may have a correlation between hyperuricemia and alcohol drinking among Uygur patients.

  3. Effects of genetic variants in UGT1A1, SLCO1B3, ABCB1, ABCC2, ABCG2, ORM1 on PK/PD of telmisartan in Chinese patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension
.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qi; Yang, Liu; Tan, Hong-Yi; Liu, Shi-Kun; Liu, Yang; Huang, Lu; Li, Rong-Hui; Wan, Qian; Huang, Jie; Guo, Cheng-Xian; Zuo, Xiao-Cong; Li, Jingle; Yang, Guo-Ping

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to understand the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in UGT1A1, SLCO1B3, ABCB1, ABCC2, ABCG2, and ORM1 on the pharmacokinetics (PK) (plasma concentration) and pharmacodynamics (PD) (blood pressure) of telmisartan in Chinese patients. 58 Han Chinese patients (aged 45 - 72 years) with mild to moderate essential hypertension were included and received 80 mg/day telmisartan for 4 weeks. The plasma concentration and genetic variants were determined by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Multivariable linear analysis was used to examine the relationships between PK/PD and genetic variants. Females showed a significantly higher AUClast than males (n = 22, 4,879.48 ± 3,449.33 h×ng/mL vs. n = 36, 2,715.59 ± 2,223.77 h×ng/mL, p = 0.047). Amongst all genetic variants investigated, the patients with UGT1A1 rs4124874 AA (n = 11, 1,730.51 ± 1,325.79 h×ng/mL) had a significantly lower AUClast compared with patients with UGT1A1 rs4124874 CC+AC (n = 19 + 28, 4,177.44 ± 3,222.11 h×ng/mL and 3,810.82 ± 2,960.43 h×ng/mL, p = 0.027). None of the SNPs investigated was associated with the PD responses to telmisartan. Variation of UGT1A1 (rs4124874) affects PK of telmisartan in Chinese patients, highlighting the value of genetic testing in precision medicine as the telmisartan dose could be adjusted based on UGT1A1 genetic variations.
.

  4. Alcohol-related breast cancer in postmenopausal women - effect of CYP19A1, PPARG and PPARGC1A polymorphisms on female sex-hormone levels and interaction with alcohol consumption and NSAID usage in a nested case-control study and a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Tine Iskov; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Cohen, Arieh; Sommer, Helle Molgaard; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Tjonneland, Anne; Hougaard, David Michael; Vogel, Ulla

    2016-04-21

    Alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of breast cancer (BC), and the underlying mechanism is thought to be sex-hormone driven. In vitro and observational studies suggest a mechanism involving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in a complex with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α) and interaction with aromatase (encoded by CYP19A1). Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) may also affect circulating sex-hormone levels by modifying PPARγ activity. In the present study we assessed whether genetic variation in CYP19A1 is associated with risk of BC in a case-control study group nested within the Danish "Diet, Cancer and Health" cohort (ncases = 687 and ncontrols = 687) and searched for gene-gene interaction between CYP19A1 and PPARGC1A, and CYP19A1 and PPARG, and gene-alcohol and gene-NSAID interactions. Association between the CYP19A1 polymorphisms and hormone levels was also examined among 339 non-HRT users. Incidence rate ratios were calculated based on Cox' proportional hazards model. Furthermore, we performed a pilot randomised controlled trial to determine the effect of the PPARG Pro(12)Ala polymorphism and the PPARγ stimulator Ibuprofen on sex-hormone levels following alcohol intake in postmenopausal women (n = 25) using linear regression. Genetic variations in CYP19A1 were associated with hormone levels (estrone: P rs11070844 = 0.009, estrone sulphate: P rs11070844 = 0.01, P rs749292 = 0.004, P rs1062033 = 0.007 and P rs10519297 = 0.03, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG): P rs3751591 = 0.03) and interacted with alcohol intake in relation to hormone levels (estrone sulphate: P interaction/rs2008691 = 0.02 and P interaction/rs1062033= 0.03, and SHBG: P interaction/rs11070844 = 0.03). CYP19A1/rs3751591 was both associated with SHBG levels (P = 0.03) and with risk of BC (Incidence Rate Ratio = 2.12; 95 % Confidence Interval: 1.02-4.43) such that homozygous variant

  5. A1C

    MedlinePlus

    A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 ... A1C alone or in combination with other diabetes tests to make a diagnosis. They also use the ...

  6. Hydrodynamic properties of rat hepatic prolactin receptors.

    PubMed

    Rae-Venter, B; Dao, T L

    1983-04-01

    The hydrodynamic properties of rat hepatic prolactin receptors have been determined by a combination of gel chromatography and ultracentrifugation. Prolactin receptors were detergent extracted from partially purified plasma membranes prepared from female rat livers. Fifteen different nonionic detergents were tested for solubilizing prolactin receptors, including Triton X-100, Polyoxyethylene W-1, Lubrol WX, detergents of the Tween and Brij series, and digitonin. When the receptors were detergent solubilized after ligand was bound to the receptor, 1% Triton X-100 had the highest efficacy of solubilization. However, if the receptors were solubilized prior to exposure to ligand, maximum binding was to receptors solubilized with 0.25% Triton X-100. The Kd of 43.2-74.5 pM for binding to the soluble receptor was three- to fivefold lower than the Kd for the membrane receptor. Gel chromatography (Bio-Gel A-1.5m, 2.5 x 50 cm) of the soluble receptor indicated a Stokes radius (Rs) of 5.0 nm for the hormone-receptor-detergent complex. The hydrodynamic properties of the receptor-detergent-ligand complex were determined by centrifugation in 5-20% sucrose gradients in H2O and in D2O. They are v = 0.7; S20,w = 4.7; f/f0 = 1.49; Mr = 118,000 for the complex, 73,000 for the receptor alone. Approximately 0.22 mg of Triton X-100 is estimated bound per milligram of protein. This represents about 25 mol detergent/mol receptor.

  7. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional Resources Mayo Clinic FDA What are GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines? GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines, ... diabetes medicines. What are the benefits of GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines? They help keep your blood ...

  8. SLC29A1 polymorphism and prediction of anaemia severity in patients with chronic hepatitis C receiving triple therapy with telaprevir.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Laura; Peri, Anna Maria; Mazzali, Cristina; Magni, Carlo; Calvi, Elisa; De Nicolò, Amedeo; Clementi, Emilio; Cheli, Stefania; D'Avolio, Antonio; Antinori, Spinello; Falvella, Felicia Stefania

    2015-04-01

    The equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) is the main protein involved in ribavirin cellular uptake. Polymorphisms at the SLC29A1 gene, encoding ENT1, may influence ribavirin-associated anaemia, which is observed at a higher incidence with telaprevir in combination with pegylated-IFNα and ribavirin than with pegylated-IFNα and ribavirin alone. In this study, we investigated the role of the rs760370 SLC29A1 variant in ribavirin-induced anaemia in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with telaprevir-based triple therapy. Forty patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 and starting anti-HCV therapy with telaprevir in combination with pegylated-IFN/ribavirin were prospectively evaluated for SNPs at the SLC29A1 gene and inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) genes using a real-time PCR system. 40% of patients developed severe anaemia with a haemoglobin (Hb) decline ≥ 5 g/dL from the pretreatment value. The SLC29A1 rs760370 GG genotype was associated with the severity of Hb decrease as expressed by the median (IQR) Hb nadir change from baseline [-5.4 (-5.6; -5.0) g/dL in GG versus -4.2 (-5.1; -3.4) in AA/AG genotype; P=0.05] and by the Hb decrease ≥ 5 g/dL by week 12 (77.8% of GG carriers versus 24% of AA/AG; P<0.01). In multivariate analysis, older age (P=0.03), lower baseline Hb concentration (P=0.02) and SLC29A1 rs760370 GG (P=0.02) were associated with the development of severe anaemia during treatment, whereas no association was found with ITPA SNPs in our population receiving telaprevir-based therapy. In patients with chronic hepatitis C receiving telaprevir-based therapy, SNP rs760370A>G at the SLC29A1 gene influences the severity of ribavirin-induced anaemia, possibly mirroring the erythrocyte uptake of ribavirin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd wasmore » significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.« less

  10. A-1 to Constellation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-11-09

    The A-1 Test Stand at NASA Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss., was the focus of a ceremony held Thursday to transition the storied facility to a new program of work: testing the J-2X engines that will power the agency's next generation spacecraft, Ares I & V. Standing before the historic structure, with a plaque commemorating the change, are (from left) SSC Center Director Richard Gilbrech; NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems Scott Horowitz; and NASA Space Operations Deputy Associate Administrator for Program Integration Michael Hawes. Ares vehicles are the crew and cargo launch vehicles being developed under NASA's Constellation Program.

  11. Involvement of direct inhibition of NMDA receptors in the effects of sigma-receptor ligands on glutamate neurotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, H; Hashino, A; Kume, T; Katsuki, H; Kaneko, S; Akaike, A

    2000-09-15

    This study was performed to examine the roles of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor/phencyclidine (PCP) channel complex in the protective effects of sigma-receptor ligands against glutamate neurotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons derived from fetal rats. A 1-h exposure of cultures to glutamate caused a marked loss of viability, as determined by Trypan blue exclusion. This acute neurotoxicity of glutamate was prevented by NMDA receptor antagonists. Expression of sigma(1) receptor mRNA in cortical cultures was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). sigma Receptor ligands with affinity for NMDA receptor channels including the PCP site, such as (+)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)-SKF10,047), haloperidol, and R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane ((-)-PPAP), prevented glutamate neurotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, other sigma-receptor ligands without affinity for NMDA receptors, such as carbetapentane and R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine ((+)-3-PPP), did not show neuroprotective effects. Putative endogenous sigma receptor ligands such as pregnenolone, progesterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone did not affect glutamate neurotoxicity. The protective effects of (+)-SKF10,047, haloperidol, and (-)-PPAP were not affected by the sigma(1) receptor antagonist rimcazole. These results suggested that a direct interaction with NMDA receptors but not with sigma receptors plays a crucial role in the neuroprotective effects of sigma receptor ligands with affinity for NMDA receptors.

  12. Role of adenosine receptor subtypes in methamphetamine reward and reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kevin A; Schreiner, Drew C; Levis, Sophia C; O'Neill, Casey E; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2015-02-01

    The neurobiology of methamphetamine (MA) remains largely unknown despite its high abuse liability. The present series of studies explored the role of adenosine receptors on MA reward and reinforcement and identified alterations in the expression of adenosine receptors in dopamine terminal areas following MA administration in rats. We tested whether stimulating adenosine A1 or A2A receptor subtypes would influence MA-induced place preference or MA self-administration on fixed and progressive ratio schedules in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Stimulation of either adenosine A1 or A2A receptors significantly reduced the development of MA-induced place preference. Stimulating adenosine A1, but not A2A, receptors reduced MA self-administration responding. We next tested whether repeated experimenter-delivered MA administration would alter the expression of adenosine receptors in the striatal areas using immunoblotting. We observed no change in the expression of adenosine receptors. Lastly, rats were trained to self-administer MA or saline for 14 days and we detected changes in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor expression using immunoblotting. MA self-administration significantly increased adenosine A1 in the nucleus accumbens shell, caudate-putamen and prefrontal cortex. MA self-administration significantly decreased adenosine A2A receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens shell, but increased A2A receptor expression in the amygdala. These findings demonstrate that MA self-administration produces selective alterations in adenosine receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens shell and that stimulation of adenosine receptors reduces several behavioral indices of MA addiction. Together, these studies shed light onto the neurobiological alterations incurred through chronic MA use that may aid in the development of treatments for MA addiction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Purines and Neuronal Excitability: Links to the Ketogenic Diet

    PubMed Central

    Masino, SA; Kawamura, M; Ruskin, DN; Geiger, JD; Boison, D

    2011-01-01

    ATP and adenosine are purines that play dual roles in cell metabolism and neuronal signaling. Acting at the A1 receptor (A1R) subtype, adenosine acts directly on neurons to inhibit excitability and is a powerful endogenous neuroprotective and anticonvulsant molecule. Previous research showed an increase in ATP and other cell energy parameters when an animal is administered a ketogenic diet, an established metabolic therapy to reduce epileptic seizures, but the relationship among purines, neuronal excitability and the ketogenic diet was unclear. Recent work in vivo and in vitro tested the specific hypothesis that adenosine acting at A1Rs is a key mechanism underlying the success of ketogenic diet therapy and yielded direct evidence linking A1Rs to the antiepileptic effects of a ketogenic diet. Specifically, an in vitro mimic of a ketogenic diet revealed an A1R-dependent metabolic autocrine hyperpolarization of hippocampal neurons. In parallel, applying the ketogenic diet in vivo to transgenic mouse models with spontaneous electrographic seizures revealed that intact A1Rs are necessary for the seizure-suppressing effects of the diet. This is the first direct in vivo evidence linking A1Rs to the antiepileptic effects of a ketogenic diet. Other predictions of the relationship between purines and the ketogenic diet are discussed. Taken together, recent research on the role of purines may offer new opportunities for metabolic therapy and insight into its underlying mechanisms. PMID:21880467

  14. Sucrose Ingestion Induces Rapid AMPA Receptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Tukey, David S.; Ferreira, Jainne M.; Antoine, Shannon O.; D’amour, James A.; Ninan, Ipe; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Incontro, Salvatore; Wincott, Charlotte; Horwitz, Julian K.; Hartner, Diana T.; Guarini, Carlo B.; Khatri, Latika; Goffer, Yossef; Xu, Duo; Titcombe, Roseann F.; Khatri, Megna; Marzan, Dave S.; Mahajan, Shahana S.; Wang, Jing; Froemke, Robert C.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Aoki, Chiye; Ziff, Edward B.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which natural rewards such as sugar affect synaptic transmission and behavior are largely unexplored. Here, we investigate regulation of nucleus accumbens synapses by sucrose intake. Previous studies have shown that AMPA receptor trafficking is a major mechanism for regulating synaptic strength, and that in vitro, trafficking of AMPA receptors containing the GluA1 subunit takes place by a two-step mechanism involving extrasynaptic and then synaptic receptor transport. We report that in rat, repeated daily ingestion of a 25% sucrose solution transiently elevated spontaneous locomotion and potentiated accumbens core synapses through incorporation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CPARs), which are GluA1-containing, GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological, biochemical and quantitative electron microscopy studies revealed that sucrose training (7 days) induced a stable (>24 hr) intraspinous GluA1 population, and that in these rats a single sucrose stimulus rapidly (5 min) but transiently (<24 hr) elevated GluA1 at extrasynaptic sites. CPARs and dopamine D1 receptors were required in vivo for elevated locomotion after sucrose ingestion. Significantly, a 7-day protocol of daily ingestion of a 3% solution of saccharin, a non-caloric sweetener, induced synaptic GluA1 similarly to 25% sucrose ingestion. These findings identify multi-step GluA1 trafficking, previously described in vitro, as a mechanism for acute regulation of synaptic transmission in vivo by a natural orosensory reward. Trafficking is stimulated by a chemosensory pathway that is not dependent on the caloric value of sucrose. PMID:23554493

  15. [Nucleotide receptors in learning and neuronal plasticity].

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide signalling plays an important role in neuronal plasticity and learning. Nucleotides are released at the synaptic terminals and may act pre- and postsynaptically by activating Pland P2 receptors. The A1 receptor, activated tonically by resting concentration of adenosine regulates basal neurotransmission. The A2A receptor is activated by increased adenosine levels and participates in plastic changes. ATP may act as an independent neurotransmitter on the P2X1 receptor, or via P2X3 subtype as a neuromodulator that affects NMDA receptor signalling. The G protein coupled P2Y receptors also evoke neuromodulatory effect on the neuronal plasticity, inhibiting LTD in prefrontal cortex. P2X7 receptor is responsible for communication between astrocytes and for synchronizing their activity. ATP and adenosine released by astrocytes act as neuromodulators both at the release site and heterosynaptically. Taken together, these multiple actions of nucleotides constitute a mechanism regulating homeostatic processes that are necessary for proper brain functioning: synaptic scaling and metaplasticity.

  16. A1-A1 mutant with improved binding and inhibition of beta2GPI/antibody complexes in antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kolyada, Alexey; Karageorgos, Ioannis; Mahlawat, Pardeep; Beglova, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Beta2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) is the most common antigen for autoimmune antibodies in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Thrombosis is a clinical feature of APS. We made a molecule (A1-A1) that consists of two identical β2GPI-binding modules from ApoE receptor 2. A1-A1 binds to β2GPI/anti-β2GPI antibody complexes preventing their association with ApoER2 and anionic phospholipids, and reducing thrombus size in the mouse model of APS. Here, we describe a mutant of A1-A1 (mA1-A1ND) with improved affinity for β2GPI. mA1-A1ND inhibits the binding of β2GPI to cardiolipin in the presence of anti-β2GPI antibodies and inhibits β2GPI/antibody complexes in plasma samples of APS patients affecting the clotting time. Inhibition of the clotting time demonstrates the presence of soluble β2GPI/anti-β2GPI antibody complexes in patients’ plasma. These complexes either already exist in patients’ plasma or form rapidly in the vicinity of phospholipids. All members of the LDL receptor family can bind β2GPI. Modelling studies of A1 in a complex with domain V of β2GPI (β2GPI-DV) revealed two possible orientations of a ligand-binding module from lipoprotein receptors on β2GPI-DV. In both orientations, the ligand-binding module interferes with the binding of β2GPI to anionic phospholipids, however it interacts with two different though overlapping sets of lysine residues in β2GPI-DV, depending on the orientation. PMID:25546421

  17. Growth hormone receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Birzniece, Vita; Sata, Akira; Ho, Ken K Y

    2009-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates somatic growth, substrate metabolism and body composition. Its actions are elaborated through the GH receptor (GHR). GHR signalling involves the role of at least three major pathways, STATs, MAPK, and PI3-kinase/Akt. GH receptor function can be modulated by changes to the ligand, to the receptor or by factors regulating signal transduction. Insights on the physico-chemical basis of the binding of GH to its receptor and the stoichiometry required for activation of the GH receptor-dimer has led to the development of novel GH agonists and antagonists. Owing to the fact that GH has short half-life, several approaches have been taken to create long-acting GHR agonists. This includes the pegylation, sustained release formulations, and ligand-receptor fusion proteins. Pegylation of a GH analogue (pegvisomant) which binds but not activate signal transduction forms the basis of a new successful approach to the treatment of acromegaly. GH receptors can be regulated at a number of levels, by modifying receptor expression, surface availability and signalling. Insulin, thyroid hormones and sex hormones are among hormones that modulate GHR through some of these mechanisms. Estrogens inhibit GH signalling by stimulating the expression of SOCS proteins which are negative regulators of cytokine receptor signalling. This review of GHR modulators will cover the effects of ligand modification, and of factors regulating receptor expression and signalling.

  18. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P.

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity ofmore » caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.« less

  19. Adenosine receptor agonists modulate visceral hyperalgesia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Chong-Il; Park, Hyo Jin; Gebhart, G F

    2008-06-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous modulator of nociception. Its role in visceral nociception, particularly in visceral hyperalgesia, has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of adenosine receptor agonists in a model of visceral hyperalgesia. The visceromotor response (VMR) in rats to colorectal distension (CRD; 80 mmHg, 20 seconds) was quantified by electromyographic recordings from the abdominal musculature. Three hours after the intracolonic administration of zymosan (25 mg/mL, 1 mL), VMRs to CRD were measured before and after either subcutaneous or intrathecal administration of an adenosine receptor agonist. Subcutaneous injection of 5'-N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine (NECA; an A1 and A2 receptor agonist), R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine (R-PIA; a selective A1 receptor agonist), or CGS-21680 hydrochloride (a selective A2a receptor agonist) dose-dependently (10-100 mg/kg) attenuated the VMR to CRD, although hindlimb weakness occurred at the higher doses tested. Intrathecal administration of NECA or R-PIA dose-dependently (0.1-1.0 microg/kg) decreased the VMR, whereas CGS-21680 hydrochloride was ineffective over the same concentration range. Higher intrathecal doses of the A1/A2 receptor agonist NECA produced motor weakness. Adenosine receptor agonists are antihyperalgesic, but also produce motor weakness at high doses. However, activation of the spinal A1 receptor significantly attenuates the VMR to CRD without producing motor weakness.

  20. A rare variant in CYP27A1 and its association with atopic dermatitis with high serum total IgE.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Makino, Y; Nagata, M; Furuta, J; Enomoto, H; Hirota, T; Tamari, M; Noguchi, E

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated rare variants associated with atopic dermatitis. We performed exome analyses on 37 patients who were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis by board-certified dermatologists and had total serum IgE levels greater than 1000 IU/ml. The exome analysis identified seven variants with <1% allele frequency in Asian (ASN) population of 1000 Genomes Project phase 1 data and >5% allele frequency in the atopic dermatitis exome samples. We then conducted a replication study using 469 atopic dermatitis patients with total serum IgE ≥1000 IU/ml and 935 Japanese controls to assess the presence of these 7 candidate variants. The replication study confirmed that CYP27A1 rs199691576 (A/G) was associated with atopic dermatitis with high serum IgE levels (P = 0.012, odds ratio = 2.1). CYP27A1 is involved in the metabolism of vitamin D3, which plays important roles in modulating immune function. Previous studies have reported polymorphisms in vitamin D pathway genes that are associated with allergy-related phenotypes. Our data confirm the importance of genes regulating the vitamin D pathway in the development of atopic dermatitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Association of polymorphisms rs1800012 in COL1A1 with sports-related tendon and ligament injuries: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunguang; Li, Hao; Chen, Kang; Wu, Bing; Liu, Haifeng

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1800012 in COL1A1 might be associated with the susceptibility to sports-related tendon and ligament injuries such as ACL injuries, Achilles tendon injuries, shoulder dislocations and tennis elbow. But the data from different studies have been conflicting. Here we attempted to systematically summarize and clarify the association between the SNP and sports-related tendon and ligament injuries risk. Six eligible studies including 933 cases and 1,381 controls were acquired from PubMed, Web Of Science and Cochrane library databases. Significant association was identified in homozygote model (TT versus GG: OR=0.17, 95%CI 0.08-0.35, PH=0.00) and recessive model (TT versus GT/GG: OR=0.21, 95%CI 0.10-0.44, PH=0.00). Our results indicated that COL1A1 rs1800012 polymorphism may be associated with the reduced risk of sports-related tendon or ligament injuries, especially in ACL injuries, and that rare TT may played as a protective role. PMID:28206959

  2. Allosteric Modulation of Purine and Pyrimidine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Göblyös, Anikó; IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2011-01-01

    Among the purine and pyrimidine receptors, the discovery of small molecular allosteric modulators has been most highly advanced for the A1 and A3 ARs. These AR modulators have allosteric effects that are structurally separated from the orthosteric effects in SAR studies. The benzoylthiophene derivatives tend to act as allosteric agonists, as well as selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the A1 AR. A 2-amino-3-aroylthiophene derivative T-62 has been under development as a PAM of the A1 AR for the treatment of chronic pain. Several structurally distinct classes of allosteric modulators of the human A3 AR have been reported: 3-(2-pyridinyl)isoquinolines, 2,4-disubstituted quinolines, 1H-imidazo-[4,5-c]quinolin-4-amines, endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol and the food dye Brilliant Black BN. Site-directed mutagenesis of A1 and A3 ARs has identified residues associated with the allosteric effect, distinct from those that affect orthosteric binding. A few small molecular allosteric modulators have been reported for several of the P2X ligand-gated ion channels and the G protein-coupled P2Y receptor nucleotides. Metal ion modulation of the P2X receptors has been extensively explored. The allosteric approach to modulation of purine and pyrimidine receptors looks promising for development of drugs that are event-specific and site-specific in action. PMID:21586360

  3. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Gargi; Hurst, Christopher H.; Waxman, David J.

    2009-07-15

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptionalmore » activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC{sub 50} for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by {approx} 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.« less

  4. Glutamate differently modulates excitatory and inhibitory adenosine receptors in neuronal and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Carlos Alberto; León, David Agustín; Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Albasanz, José Luis; Martín, Mairena

    2010-08-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator which acts through adenosine receptors regulating functions such as inhibition of glutamate release. Adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor activations most often regulate opposing actions. Primary rat cortical neurons and rat C6 cells, an astrocytic derived cell line, were exposed to 100muM l-glutamate, and cell viability and transduction pathways mediated by both A(1) and A(2A) receptors were analyzed. Glutamate-induced excitotoxic damage was found only in cortical neurons, with C6 cells preserved. In C6 cells, adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors were increased and decreased, respectively. Consequently, A(1)-mediated adenylyl cyclase inhibition and A(2A)-mediated adenylyl cyclase stimulation were, respectively, increased and decreased after glutamate exposure. In cortical neurons, glutamate treatment increased both A(1) and A(2A) receptors. Moreover, adenylyl cyclase responsiveness to A(1) or A(2A) receptor agonists was heightened in these cells, in which pharmacological activation of AC induced cell death. Finally, activation of A(1) receptor or blockade of A(2A) receptor during glutamate treatment partially prevented the glutamate-induced cell death detected in cultured cortical neurons. Results show that adenosine receptors are regulated by glutamate, and that this regulation is dependent on the cell type, suggesting that adenosine receptors might be promising targets in the therapy against excitotoxic cell death.

  5. P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    North, R Alan

    2016-08-05

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2X receptors have a widespread tissue distribution. On some smooth muscle cells, P2X receptors mediate the fast excitatory junction potential that leads to depolarization and contraction. In the central nervous system, activation of P2X receptors allows calcium to enter neurons and this can evoke slower neuromodulatory responses such as the trafficking of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. In primary afferent nerves, P2X receptors are critical for the initiation of action potentials when they respond to ATP released from sensory cells such as taste buds, chemoreceptors or urothelium. In immune cells, activation of P2X receptors triggers the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β. The development of selective blockers of different P2X receptors has led to clinical trials of their effectiveness in the management of cough, pain, inflammation and certain neurodegenerative diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Pain-relieving prospects for adenosine receptors and ectonucleotidases

    PubMed Central

    Zylka, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptor agonists have potent antinociceptive effects in diverse preclinical models of chronic pain. In contrast, the efficacy of adenosine or adenosine receptor agonists at treating pain in humans is unclear. Two ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine in nociceptive neurons were recently identified. When injected spinally, these enzymes have long-lasting adenosine A1 receptor (A1R)-dependent antinociceptive effects in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. Furthermore, recent findings indicate that spinal adenosine A2A receptor activation can enduringly inhibit neuropathic pain symptoms. Collectively, these studies suggest the possibility of treating chronic pain in humans by targeting specific adenosine receptor subtypes in anatomically defined regions with agonists or with ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine. PMID:21236731

  7. Pharmacophore and receptor models for neurokinin receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, Anders; Bjørnholm, Berith; Gundertofte, Klaus; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Liljefors, Tommy

    2003-11-01

    Three neurokinin (NK) antagonist pharmacophore models (Models 1-3) accounting for hydrogen bonding groups in the `head' and `tail' of NK receptor ligands have been developed by use of a new procedure for treatment of hydrogen bonds during superimposition. Instead of modelling the hydrogen bond acceptor vector in the strict direction of the lone pair, an angle is allowed between the hydrogen bond acceptor direction and the ideal lone pair direction. This approach adds flexibility to hydrogen bond directions and produces more realistic RMS values. By using this approach, two novel pharmacophore models were derived (Models 2 and 3) and a hydrogen bond acceptor was added to a previously published NK2 pharmacophore model [Poulsen et al., J. Comput.-Aided Mol. Design, 16 (2002) 273] (Model 1). Model 2 as well as Model 3 are described by seven pharmacophore elements: three hydrophobic groups, three hydrogen bond acceptors and a hydrogen bond donor. Model 1 contains the same hydrophobic groups and hydrogen bond donor as Models 2 and 3, but only one hydrogen bond acceptor. The hydrogen bond acceptors and donor are represented as vectors. Two of the hydrophobic groups are always aromatic rings whereas the other hydrophobic group can be either aromatic or aliphatic. In Model 1 the antagonists bind in an extended conformation with two aromatic rings in a parallel displaced and tilted conformation. Model 2 has the same two aromatic rings in a parallel displaced conformation whereas Model 3 has the rings in an edge to face conformation. The pharmacophore models were evaluated using both a structure (NK receptor homology models) and a ligand based approach. By use of exhaustive conformational analysis (MMFFs force field and the GB/SA hydration model) and least-squares molecular superimposition studies, 21 non-peptide antagonists from several structurally diverse classes were fitted to the pharmacophore models. More antagonists could be fitted to Model 2 with a low RMS and a low

  8. EphB4 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    prostate cancer cells. I have shown that ephrin-A1 stimulation of EphA2 , another Eph receptor widely expressed in cancer, triggers inactivation of the...the other hand, the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex Cul4B-DDB1-DCAF5 identified by mass spectrometry as a possible ephrin-A1/ EphA2 binding partner, may...regulate EphA2 stability. Preventing Eph receptor degradation, for example by inhibiting ubiquitin ligases, should enhance Eph receptor-dependent anti

  9. A novel C-terminal truncating NR5A1 mutation in dizygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Atsushi; Zukeran, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Maki; Toguchi, Suzuka; Toubaru, Yuji; Inoue, Takanobu; Katoh-Fukui, Yuko; Fukami, Maki

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 1 (NR5A1) is a nuclear receptor involved in gonadal and adrenal development. We identified a novel C-terminally truncating NR5A1 mutation, p.Leu423Trpfs*7, in dizygotic twins with 46,XY disorders of sex development. Our results highlight the functional importance of C-terminal region of NR5A1 and indicate that NR5A1 mutations can be associated with intrafamilial phenotypic variations, progressive testicular dysfunction, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and borderline adrenal dysfunction. PMID:28326187

  10. A Quinoline Based bis-Urea Receptor for Anions: A Selective Receptor for Hydrogen Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Tiffany H.; Pramanik, Avijit; Khansari, Maryam E.; Wong, Bryan M.; Hossain, Md. Alamgir

    2012-01-01

    A dipodal bis-urea receptor has been synthesized from the reaction of 8-amino quinoline and 1,4-phenylene diisocyanate in dichloromethane, and the anion binding ability of the receptor has been studied using fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, perchlorate, nitrate, dihydrogen phosphate and hydrogen sulfate by UV-Vis titrations in DMSO. The results show that the receptor binds each of the anions with a 1:1 stoichiometry, showing high affinity, and moderate selectivity for hydrogen sulfate among the anions studied. Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) suggest that an anion (X−) is bonded within the cleft formed by the two arms of the receptor through two NH…X− and two aromatic CH…X− interactions. The results from solution and theoretical studies suggest that binding is predominately influenced by hydrogen bonding interactions and the basicity of anions. PMID:22545400

  11. Hibernation, Hypothermia and a Possible Therapeutic "Shifted Homeostasis" Induced by Central Activation of A1 Adenosine Receptor (A1AR).

    PubMed

    Tupone, Domenico; Cetas, Justin S; Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-04-01

    The positive outcome that hypothermia contributes to brain and cardiac protection following ischemia has stimulated research in the development of pharmacological approaches to induce a hypothermic/hypometabolic state. Pharmacological manipulation of central autonomic thermoregulatory circuits could represent a potential target for the induction of a hypothermic state. Here we present a brief description of the CNS thermoregulatory centers and how the manipulation of these circuits can be useful in the treatment of pathological conditions such as stroke or brain hemorrhage.

  12. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  13. Pharmacological modulation of AMPA receptor phosphorylation by dopamine and muscarinic receptor agents in the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bing; Mao, Li-Min; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Wang, John Q

    2018-02-05

    Two key transmitters in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), dopamine and acetylcholine, are believed to interact with each other to modulate local glutamatergic transmission, although molecular mechanisms underlying their crosstalk are poorly understood. Here we investigated effects of pharmacological manipulations of dopamine and muscarinic receptors on phosphorylation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in the adult rat mPFC in vivo. We found that an agonist selective for G αs -coupled dopamine D 1 receptors, SKF81297, increased AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit phosphorylation at a protein kinase A-sensitive site (S845), while SKF81297 had no effect on GluA1 phosphorylation at S831. An agonist for G αi/o -coupled dopamine D 2 receptors, quinpirole, also increased S845 but not S831 phosphorylation. When coinjected, the two agonists induced an additive increase in S845 phosphorylation. The D 1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 blocked the SKF81297/quinpirole-stimulated S845 phosphorylation. The D 2 antagonist eticlopride also partially blocked S845 responses to SKF81297/quinpirole. VU0152100, a positive allosteric modulator selective for G αi/o -coupled muscarinic M 4 receptors, reduced the S845 phosphorylation induced by SKF81297 and quinpirole injected alone or together. In contrast, coinjection of subthreshold doses of tropicamide, an M 4 antagonist, and SKF81297 facilitated S845 phosphorylation. Additionally, coadministered SFK81297 and quinpirole increased the abundance of mPFC GluA1 at extrasynaptic sites. These data reveal that both D 1 and D 2 receptors upregulate GluA1 phosphorylation in mPFC neurons probably via a direct and indirect mechanism, respectively. The indirect mechanism involves M 4 receptors which generally counteract the effect of dopamine on GluA1 phosphorylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A-1 Test Stand modifications

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-14

    Team members check the progress of a liquid nitrogen cold shock test on the A-1 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center on Sept. 15. The cold shock test is used to confirm the test stand's support system can withstand test conditions, when super-cold rocket engine propellant is piped. The A-1 Test Stand is preparing to conduct tests on the powerpack component of the J-2X rocket engine, beginning in early 2012.

  15. Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    De Bosscher, Karolien

    2010-05-31

    The ancient two-faced Roman god Janus is often used as a metaphor to describe the characteristics of the Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1), which exhibits both a beneficial side, that serves to halt inflammation, and a detrimental side responsible for undesirable effects. However, recent developments suggest that the Glucocorticoid Receptor has many more faces with the potential to express a range of different functionalities, depending on factors that include the tissue type, ligand type, receptor variants, cofactor surroundings and target gene promoters. This behavior of the receptor has made the development of safer ligands, that trigger the expression program of only a desirable subset of genes, a real challenge. Thus more knowledge-based fundamental research is needed to ensure the design and development of selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators capable of reaching the clinic. Recent advances in the characterization of novel selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators, specifically in the context of anti-inflammatory strategies, will be described in this review. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetics of Taste Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Bosak, Natalia P.; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R.; Nelson, Theodore M.

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical “tastes” as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  17. Sugar receptors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Slone, Jesse; Daniels, Joseph; Amrein, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Detection and discrimination of chemical compounds in potential foods are essential sensory processes when animals feed. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster employs 68 different gustatory receptors (GRs) for the detection of mostly non-volatile chemicals that include sugars, a diverse group of toxic compounds present in many inedible plants and spoiled foods, and pheromones [1–6]. With the exception of a trehalose (GR5a) and a caffeine (GR66a) receptor [7–9], the functions of GRs involved in feeding are unknown. Here, we show that the Gr64 genes encode receptors for numerous sugars. We generated a fly strain that contained a deletion for all six Gr64 genes (ΔGr64) and showed that these flies exhibit no or a significantly diminished proboscis extension reflex (PER) response when stimulated with glucose, maltose, sucrose and several other sugars. The only considerable response was detected when Gr64 mutant flies were stimulated with fructose. Interestingly, response to trehalose is also abolished in these flies, even though they contain a functional Gr5a gene, which has been previously shown to encode a receptor for this sugar [8, 9]. This observation indicates that two or more Gr genes are necessary for trehalose detection, suggesting that GRs function as multimeric receptor complexes. Finally, we present evidence that some members of the Gr64 gene family are transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA, providing a mechanism for co-expression of multiple sugar receptors in the same taste neurons. PMID:17919910

  18. Histamine and its receptors

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Mike E; Ganellin, C Robin

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the development of our knowledge of the actions of histamine which have taken place during the course of the 20th century. Histamine has been shown to have a key physiological role in the control of gastric acid secretion and a pathophysiological role in a range of allergic disorders. The synthesis of, and pharmacological studies on, selective agonists and antagonists has established the existence of four types of histamine receptor and histamine receptor antagonists have found very important therapeutic applications. Thus, in the 1940s, H1-receptor antagonists (‘the antihistamines') yielded and still provide valuable treatment for allergic conditions such as hay fever and rhinitis. In the late 1970s and 1980s, H2-receptor antagonists (in the discovery of which the two authors were personally involved) revolutionised the treatment of peptic ulcer and other gastric acid-related diseases. The H3-receptor antagonists, although available since 1987, have been slower to find a therapeutic role. However, the discovery of nonimidazole derivatives such as brain-penetrating H3 antagonists has provided drugs that are in early-phase clinical trials, possibly for application in obesity, and a variety of central nervous system disorders, such as memory, learning deficits and epilepsy. Finally, the most recently (1999) discovered H4 receptor promises the potential to provide drugs acting on the immunological system with possible applications in asthma and inflammation. PMID:16402096

  19. Disruption of the annexin A1/S100A11 complex increases the migration and clonogenic growth by dysregulating epithelial growth factor (EGF) signaling.

    PubMed

    Poeter, Michaela; Radke, Susanne; Koese, Meryem; Hessner, Florian; Hegemann, Anika; Musiol, Agnes; Gerke, Volker; Grewal, Thomas; Rescher, Ursula

    2013-07-01

    Endocytosis of activated growth factor receptors regulates spatio-temporal cellular signaling. In the case of the EGF receptor, sorting into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) controls signal termination and subsequently leads to receptor degradation in lysosomes. Annexin A1, a Ca(2+)-regulated membrane binding protein often deregulated in human cancers, interacts with the EGF receptor and is phosphorylated by internalized EGF receptor on endosomes. Most relevant for EGF receptor signal termination, annexin A1 is required for the formation of internal vesicles in MVBs that sequester ligand-bound EGF receptor away from the limiting membrane. To elucidate the mechanism underlying annexin A1-dependent EGF receptor trafficking we employed an N-terminally truncated annexin A1 mutant that lacks the EGF receptor phosphorylation site and the site for interaction with its protein ligand S100A11. Overexpression of this dominant-negative mutant induces a delay in EGF-induced EGF receptor transport to the LAMP1-positive late endosomal/lysosomal compartment and impairs ligand-induced EGF receptor degradation. Consistent with these findings, EGF-stimulated EGF receptor and MAP kinase pathway signaling is prolonged. Importantly, depletion of S100A11 also results in a delayed EGF receptor transport and prolonged MAP kinase signaling comparable to the trafficking defect observed in cells expressing the N-terminally truncated annexin A1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that the function of annexin A1 as a regulator of EGF receptor trafficking, degradation and signaling is critically mediated through an N-terminal interaction with S100A11 in the endosomal compartment. This interaction appears to be essential for lysosomal targeting of the EGF receptor, possibly by providing a physical scaffold supporting inward vesiculation in MVBs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 12th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 enzymes and their influence on cardiovascular risk and lipid profile in people who live near a natural gas plant.

    PubMed

    Pašalić, Daria; Marinković, Natalija

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to see whether genetic polymorphisms of the enzymes CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 are associated with higher risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and whether they affect lipid profile in 252 subjects living near a natural gas plant, who are likely to be exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Fasting serum concentrations of biochemical parameters were determined with standard methods. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP 1A1 rs4646903, rs1048943, rs4986883, and rs1799814 were genotyped with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFPL), while GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions were detected with multiplex PCR. Cardiovascular risk was assessed with Framingham risk score, and the subjects divided in two groups: >10% risk and ≤10% risk. The two groups did not differ in the genotype frequencies. MANCOVA analysis, which included lipid parameters, glucose, and BMI with sex, age, hypertension and smoking status as covariates, showed a significant difference between the GSTT1*0 and GSTT1*1 allele carriers (p=0.001). UNIANCOVA with same covariates showed that total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in GSTT1*1 allele carriers than in GSTT1*0 carriers (p<0.001 and p=0.006, respectively). Our findings suggest that CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 polymorphisms are not associated with the higher risk of CAD, but that GSTT1 affects lipid profile.

  1. Identification and Analysis of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    UNO, Yasuhiro; HOSAKA, Shinya; YAMAZAKI, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450) are important for not only drug metabolism and toxicity, but also biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and bile acids, and steroid synthesis. In cynomolgus macaques, widely used in biomedical research, we have characterized P450 cDNAs, which were isolated as expressed sequence tags of cynomolgus macaque liver. In this study, cynomolgus CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 cDNAs were characterized by sequence analysis, phylogenetic analysis and tissue expression pattern. By sequence analysis, these five cynomolgus P450s had high sequence identities (94–99%) to the human orthologs in amino acids. By phylogenetic analysis, each cynomolgus P450 was more closely related to the human ortholog as compared with the dog or rat ortholog. By quantitative polymerase chain reaction, among the 10 tissue types, CYP7A1 and CYP17A1 mRNAs were preferentially expressed in liver and adrenal gland, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 mRNAs were most abundantly expressed in liver and testis, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP20A1 mRNA was expressed in all the tissues, including brain and liver. Tissue expression patterns of each cynomolgus P450 were generally similar to that of the human ortholog. These results suggest the molecular similarities of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 between cynomolgus macaques and humans. PMID:25649950

  2. Identification and analysis of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Hosaka, Shinya; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450) are important for not only drug metabolism and toxicity, but also biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and bile acids, and steroid synthesis. In cynomolgus macaques, widely used in biomedical research, we have characterized P450 cDNAs, which were isolated as expressed sequence tags of cynomolgus macaque liver. In this study, cynomolgus CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 cDNAs were characterized by sequence analysis, phylogenetic analysis and tissue expression pattern. By sequence analysis, these five cynomolgus P450s had high sequence identities (94-99%) to the human orthologs in amino acids. By phylogenetic analysis, each cynomolgus P450 was more closely related to the human ortholog as compared with the dog or rat ortholog. By quantitative polymerase chain reaction, among the 10 tissue types, CYP7A1 and CYP17A1 mRNAs were preferentially expressed in liver and adrenal gland, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 mRNAs were most abundantly expressed in liver and testis, respectively. Cynomolgus CYP20A1 mRNA was expressed in all the tissues, including brain and liver. Tissue expression patterns of each cynomolgus P450 were generally similar to that of the human ortholog. These results suggest the molecular similarities of CYP7A1, CYP17A1, CYP20A1, CYP27A1 and CYP51A1 between cynomolgus macaques and humans.

  3. The A3 adenosine receptor attenuates the calcium rise triggered by NMDA receptors in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Hu, Huiling; Zhang, Xiulan; Lu, Wennan; Lim, Jason; Eysteinsson, Thor; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Laties, Alan M; Mitchell, Claire H

    2010-01-01

    The A(3) adenosine receptor is emerging as an important regulator of neuronal signaling, and in some situations receptor stimulation can limit excitability. As the NMDA receptor frequently contributes to neuronal excitability, this study examined whether A(3) receptor activation could alter the calcium rise accompanying NMDA receptor stimulation. Calcium levels were determined from fura-2 imaging of isolated rat retinal ganglion cells as these neurons possess both receptor types. Brief application of glutamate or NMDA led to repeatable and reversible elevations of intracellular calcium. The A(3) agonist Cl-IB-MECA reduced the response to both glutamate and NMDA. While adenosine mimicked the effect of Cl-IB-MECA, the A(3) receptor antagonist MRS 1191 impeded the block by adenosine, implicating a role for the A(3) receptor in response to the natural agonist. The A(1) receptor antagonist DPCPX provided additional inhibition, implying a contribution from both A(1) and A(3) adenosine receptors. The novel A(3) agonist MRS 3558 (1'S,2'R,3'S,4'R,5'S)-4-(2-chloro-6-(3-chlorobenzylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo [3.1.0] hexane-1-carboxamide and mixed A(1)/A(3) agonist MRS 3630 (1'S,2'R,3'S,4'R,5'S)-4-(2-chloro-6-(cyclopentylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo [3.1.0] hexane-1-carboxamide also inhibited the calcium rise induced by NMDA. Low levels of MRS 3558 were particularly effective, with an IC(50) of 400 pM. In all cases, A(3) receptor stimulation inhibited only 30-50% of the calcium rise. In summary, stimulation of the A(3) adenosine receptor by either endogenous or synthesized agonists can limit the calcium rise accompanying NMDA receptor activation. It remains to be determined if partial block of the calcium rise by A(3) agonists can modify downstream responses to NMDA receptor stimulation. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 8-Azaxanthine derivatives as antagonists of adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Franchetti, P; Messini, L; Cappellacci, L; Grifantini, M; Lucacchini, A; Martini, C; Senatore, G

    1994-09-02

    A series of 1,3-dimethyl- and 1,3-dipropyl-8-azaxanthines, substituted at the N8 or N7 position with substituents which usually increase the affinity of the xanthines for the adenosine receptors, was synthesized and studied in radioligand binding experiments. The substitution of CH with N at the 8-position of both theophylline and caffeine dramatically reduced the affinity, as demonstrated by the fact that 8-azatheophylline and 8-azacaffeine were inert. The introduction of a methyl group at 8-position of 8-azatheophylline restored the antagonistic activity at A2 receptors, while a 8-cycloalkyl substituent increased the affinity for both receptor subtypes. A more favorable effect on affinity was produced by the substitution of the 7-methyl group in 8-azacaffeine with cycloalkyl groups. 7-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethyl-8-azaxanthine was 3 times more potent than caffeine at A1 receptors and 6 times less active at A2 receptors. On the contrary, the 7-cyclohexyl-1,3-dimethyl-8-azaxanthine was more potent than caffeine at A2 receptors. The substitution of 1- and 3-methyl groups with propyl in both 7- and 8-substituted 8-azatheophylline increased remarkably the affinity for A1 receptors. The 7-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropyl-8-azaxanthine appears to be one of the most potent and selective among 7-alkyl-substituted xanthines at A1 receptors so far known. Because the 8-aza analogues of 8-substituted 1,3-dialkylxanthine were in any case less active than the corresponding xanthine derivatives, it was confirmed that the hydrogen atom at the 7-position of xanthines plays an important role in the binding to adenosine receptors.

  5. 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Costall, Brenda; Naylor, Robert J

    2004-02-01

    5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists are highly selective competitive inhibitors of the 5-HT(3)-receptor with negligible affinity for other receptors. They are potent, rapidly absorbed and easily penetrate the blood-brain barrier; metabolized by the cytochrome P450-system with half-life varying from 3-10 hours. The compounds investigated so far do not modify normal behaviour in animals or man and are well tolerated over wide dose ranges, the most common side effects being headache or constipation. Clinical efficacy was first established in chemotherapy-induced emesis (and then in radiotherapy-induced and post-operative emesis), where 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists set a new standard of antiemetic efficacy and tolerability. The 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists, via a central and / or peripheral action, have been shown to reduce secretion and motility in the gut and possess clinical utility in irritable bowel syndrome, and possibly other visceral pain disorders. Their value in fibromyalgia is being evaluated. In preclinical behavioural assays they induce effects consistent with anxiolysis, improved cognition, anti-dopaminergic activity and use in drug abuse and withdrawal. There is some evidence that ondansetron may reduce alcohol consumption in moderate alcohol abusers but overall, 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists seem to be of limited use in psychiatric disorders: where effects have been seen, they seem to be unusually sensitive to dose and stage of disease. Nevertheless, their antiemetic potential has been of great benefit to cancer patients and the possible extension of their use to bowel disorders may yet fulfil their initial exciting promise.

  6. Quantitative autoradiography of adenosine receptors in brains of chronic naltrexone-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexis; Hawkins, Rachel M; Hourani, Susanna M O; Kitchen, Ian

    2003-01-01

    Manipulation of μ opioid receptor expression either by chronic morphine treatment or by deletion of the gene encoding μ opioid receptors leads to changes in adenosine receptor expression. Chronic administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone leads to upregulation of μ receptor binding in the brain. To investigate if there are any compensatory alterations in adenosine systems in the brains of chronic naltrexone-treated mice, we carried out quantitative autoradiographic mapping of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors in the brains of mice treated for 1 week with naltrexone (8 mg−1 kg−1 day−1), administered subcutaneously via osmotic minipump. Adjacent coronal brain sections were cut from chronic saline- and naltrexone-treated mice for the determination of binding of [3H] D-Ala2-MePhe4-Gly-ol5 enkephalin ([3H] DAMGO), [3H]1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine ([3H] DPCPX) or [3H] 2-[p-(2-carbonylethyl)phenylethylamino]-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine ([3H] CGS21680) to μ, A1 and A2A receptors, respectively. A significant increase in μ and A1 receptor binding was detected in chronic naltrexone-treated brains. The changes in μ receptors were significant in several regions, but changes in A1 were relatively smaller but showed significant upregulation collectively. No significant change in A2A receptor binding was detected in chronic naltrexone-treated brains. The results show that blockade of opioid receptors causes upregulation of A1 receptors, but not A2A receptors, by as yet undefined mechanisms. PMID:12871838

  7. Biomimetic Receptors and Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dickert, Franz L.

    2014-01-01

    In biomimetics, living systems are imitated to develop receptors for ions, molecules and bioparticles. The most pertinent idea is self-organization in analogy to evolution in nature, which created the key-lock principle. Today, modern science has been developing host-guest chemistry, a strategy of supramolecular chemistry for designing interactions of analytes with synthetic receptors. This can be realized, e.g., by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) or molecular imprinting. The strategies are used for solid phase extraction (SPE), but preferably in developing recognition layers of chemical sensors. PMID:25436653

  8. CONTAMINANT INTERACTIONS WITH STEROID RECEPTORS: EVIDENCE FOR RECEPTOR BINDING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid receptors are important determinants of endocrine disrupter consequences. As the most frequently proposed mechanism of endocrine-disrupting contaminant (EDC) action, steroid receptors are not only targets of natural steroids but are also commonly sites of nonsteroidal com...

  9. Purinergic receptors in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Novak, I

    2008-09-01

    The pancreas is a complex gland performing both endocrine and exocrine functions. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that both endocrine and exocrine cells possess purinergic receptors, which influence processes such as insulin secretion and epithelial ion transport. Most commonly, these processes have been viewed separately. In beta cells, stimulation of P2Y(1) receptors amplifies secretion of insulin in the presence of glucose. Nucleotides released from secretory granules could also contribute to autocrine/paracrine regulation in pancreatic islets. In addition to P2Y(1) receptors, there is also evidence for other P2 and adenosine receptors in beta cells (P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(6), P2X subtypes and A(1) receptors) and in glucagon-secreting alpha cells (P2X(7), A(2) receptors). In the exocrine pancreas, acini release ATP and ATP-hydrolysing and ATP-generating enzymes. P2 receptors are prominent in pancreatic ducts, and several studies indicate that P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(11), P2X(4) and P2X(7) receptors could regulate secretion, primarily by affecting Cl(-) and K(+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) signalling. In order to understand the physiology of the whole organ, it is necessary to consider the full complement of purinergic receptors on different cells as well as the structural and functional relation between various cells within the whole organ. In addition to the possible physiological function of purinergic receptors, this review analyses whether the receptors could be potential therapeutic targets for drug design aimed at treatment of pancreatic diseases.

  10. Genetic susceptibility to esophageal cancer due to CYP1A1 gene variant rs4646903 in tobacco addicted patients of Pashtun ethnicity: a case control study in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Zakiullah; Saeed, Muhammad; Ali, Sajid; Javed, Nabila; Khisroon, Muhammad; Muhammad, Basir; Khuda, Fazli; Ahmad, Saeed; Ismail, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations of the CYP1A1 gene variant rs4646903 polymorphism with the risk of developing esophageal cancer (EC). A case-control study was carried out in Pashtun population of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan in which 140 hospital based EC cases and 196 population based healthy controls exposed to similar environmental conditions were included. A specific method based on the real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect genotypes in case and control groups and results were then analyzed with SPSS version 20. In our population, individuals with CC and TC genotypes of the CYP1A1 rs4646903 polymorphism had significantly higher risk of EC (adjusted odds (OR): 15.709, 95%CI: 6.065-40.686, OR: 3.256 95%CI: 1.902-5.574 respectively). The 'C' allele was strongly associated with the disease (p< 0.0001). Adjusted OR was higher (1.5 times in C/C) in case of variant alleles that show the contribution of environmental and nutritional factors towards the development of EC. Our findings suggest that presence of the 'C' allele of rs4646903 (T>C) may be one of the risk alleles for EC susceptibility in Pashtun population.

  11. EphrinA1 Is Released in Three Forms from Cancer Cells by Matrix Metalloproteases

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Amanda; Lively, Mark O.; Mintz, Akiva; Gibo, Denise; Wykosky, Jill

    2012-01-01

    EphrinA1 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked ligand for the EphA2 receptor, which is overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM), among other cancers. Activation of the receptor by ephrinA1 leads to a suppression of oncogenic properties of GBM cells. We documented that a monomeric functional form of ephrinA1 is released from cancer cells and thus explored the mechanism of ephrinA1 release and the primary protein sequence. We demonstrate here that multiple metalloproteases (MMPs) are able to cleave ephrinA1, most notably MMP-1, -2, -9, and -13. The proteolytic cleavage that releases ephrinA1 occurs at three positions near the C terminus, producing three forms ending in valine-175, histidine-177, or serine-178. Moreover, deletion of amino acids 174 to 181 or 175 to 181 yields ephrinA1 that is still GPI linked but not released by proteolysis, underlining the necessity of amino acids 175 to 181 for release from the membrane. Furthermore, recombinant ephrinA1 ending at residue 175 retains activity toward the EphA2 receptor. These findings suggest a mechanism of release and provide evidence for the existence of several forms of monomeric ephrinA1. Moreover, ephrinA1 should be truncated at a minimum at amino acid 175 in fusions or conjugates with other molecules in order to prevent likely proteolysis within physiological and pathobiological environments. PMID:22688511

  12. EphrinA1 is released in three forms from cancer cells by matrix metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Amanda; Lively, Mark O; Mintz, Akiva; Gibo, Denise; Wykosky, Jill; Debinski, Waldemar

    2012-08-01

    EphrinA1 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked ligand for the EphA2 receptor, which is overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM), among other cancers. Activation of the receptor by ephrinA1 leads to a suppression of oncogenic properties of GBM cells. We documented that a monomeric functional form of ephrinA1 is released from cancer cells and thus explored the mechanism of ephrinA1 release and the primary protein sequence. We demonstrate here that multiple metalloproteases (MMPs) are able to cleave ephrinA1, most notably MMP-1, -2, -9, and -13. The proteolytic cleavage that releases ephrinA1 occurs at three positions near the C terminus, producing three forms ending in valine-175, histidine-177, or serine-178. Moreover, deletion of amino acids 174 to 181 or 175 to 181 yields ephrinA1 that is still GPI linked but not released by proteolysis, underlining the necessity of amino acids 175 to 181 for release from the membrane. Furthermore, recombinant ephrinA1 ending at residue 175 retains activity toward the EphA2 receptor. These findings suggest a mechanism of release and provide evidence for the existence of several forms of monomeric ephrinA1. Moreover, ephrinA1 should be truncated at a minimum at amino acid 175 in fusions or conjugates with other molecules in order to prevent likely proteolysis within physiological and pathobiological environments.

  13. Synaptic Neurotransmitter-Gated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Trevor G.; Paoletti, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors in the brain, many have deliberated over their likely structures and how these may relate to function. This was initially satisfied by the determination of the first amino acid sequences of the Cys-loop receptors that recognized acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, and glycine, followed later by similar determinations for the glutamate receptors, comprising non-NMDA and NMDA subtypes. The last decade has seen a rapid advance resulting in the first structures of Cys-loop receptors, related bacterial and molluscan homologs, and glutamate receptors, determined down to atomic resolution. This now provides a basis for determining not just the complete structures of these important receptor classes, but also for understanding how various domains and residues interact during agonist binding, receptor activation, and channel opening, including allosteric modulation. This article reviews our current understanding of these mechanisms for the Cys-loop and glutamate receptor families. PMID:22233560

  14. Characterization of erythropoietin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Y.J.; Kung, C.K.H.; Goldwasser, E.

    1987-05-01

    Erythropoietin (epo) affects erythroid progenitor cells by interacting with receptors on the cell. In this study, they have tried to define and identify epo receptors using a binding assay and by covalent cross-linking methods in purified spleen cells of mice infected with the anemia strain of the Friend virus (FVA cells) or, hemolyzed with phenylhydrazine (PHZ cells). Using asialo epo, which has greater activity in vitro than native epo, they found two populations of epo receptors on FVA cells: one with high affinity (K/sub D/ 60-70pM) and about 140-180 molecules per cell. The other with lower affinity (K/sub D/ 1-3nM)more » and about 550-1060 per cell. These results are similar to those reported for native epo. Further investigations were carried out by cross-linking either /sup 125/I epo or /sup 125/I asialo-epo with the intact cell. Two species with apparent molecular weights of 88 K and 105 K Daltons, after substracting epo or asialo epo molecular weight, were found in both FVA cells and PHZ cells. The binding of /sup 125/I epo and /sup 125/I asialo-epo to both kinds of receptors was competed for by unlabelled epo. In nonreducing gels there also seem to be two species: at M/sub r/ = 200 K and M/sub r/ = 280 K. Mouse thymus cell controls showed no specific binding of epo.« less

  15. A-1 Test Stand work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A structural steel beam to support the new thrust measurement system on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center is lifted to waiting employees for installation. The beam is part of the thrust takeout structure needed to support the new measurement system. Four such beams have been installed at the stand in preparation for installation of the system in upcoming weeks. Operators are preparing the stand for testing the next generation of rocket engines for the U.S. space program.

  16. Functional Characterization of Odorant Receptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-07

    94 IFINAL REPORT 9/1/92-11/30/93 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Functional Characterization of Odorant Receptors DAAL03-92-G-0390 6. AUTHOR(S...characterization of odorant receptors have developed in two directions. One direction is concerned with the characterization of the ligand specificity of... receptor have been replaced by the equivalent regions of odorant receptor 1-15 (Buck and Axel, 1991), thus forming a chimaeric seven transmembrane domain

  17. Semisynthetic Neoclerodanes as Kappa Opioid Receptor Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Kimberly M.; Vasiljevik, Tamara; Araya, Juan J.; Lozama, Anthony; Prevatt-Smith, Katherine M.; Day, Victor W.; Dersch, Christina M.; Rothman, Richard B.; Butelman, Eduardo R.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Prisinzano, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Modification of the furan ring of salvinorin A (1), the main active component of Salvia divinorum, has resulted in novel neoclerodane diterpenes with opioid receptor affinity and activity. Conversion of the furan ring to an aldehyde at the C-12 position (5) has allowed for the synthesis of analogues with new carbon-carbon bonds at that position. Previous methods for forming these bonds, such as Grignard and Stille conditions, have met with limited success. We report a palladium catalyzed Liebeskind-Srogl cross-coupling reaction of a thioester and a boronic acid that occurs at neutral pH and ambient temperature to produce ketone analogs at C-12. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported usage of the Liebeskind-Srogl reaction to diversify a natural product scaffold. We also describe a one-step protocol for the conversion of 1 to 12-epi-1 (3) through microwave irradiation. Previously, this synthetically challenging process has required multiple steps. Additionally, we report in this study that alkene 9 and aromatic analogues 12, 19, 23, 25, and 26 were discovered to retain affinity and selectivity at kappa opioid receptors (KOP). Finally, we report that the furan-2-yl analog of 1 (31) has similar affinity to 1. Collectively, these findings suggest that different aromatic groups appended directly to the decalin core may be well tolerated by KOP receptors, and may generate further ligands with affinity and activity at KOP receptors. PMID:22464684

  18. A-1 Test Stand work

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-13

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center work to maneuver a structural steam beam into place on the A-1 Test Stand on Jan. 13. The beam was one of several needed to form the thrust takeout structure that will support a new thrust measurement system being installed on the stand for future rocket engine testing. Once lifted onto the stand, the beams had to be hoisted into place through the center of the test stand, with only two inches of clearance on each side. The new thrust measurement system represents a state-of-the-art upgrade from the equipment installed more than 40 years ago when the test stand was first constructed.

  19. A-1 Test Stand work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center work to maneuver a structural steam beam into place on the A-1 Test Stand on Jan. 13. The beam was one of several needed to form the thrust takeout structure that will support a new thrust measurement system being installed on the stand for future rocket engine testing. Once lifted onto the stand, the beams had to be hoisted into place through the center of the test stand, with only two inches of clearance on each side. The new thrust measurement system represents a state-of-the-art upgrade from the equipment installed more than 40 years ago when the test stand was first constructed.

  20. An A1-A1 mutant with improved binding and inhibition of β2GPI/antibody complexes in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kolyada, Alexey; Karageorgos, Ioannis; Mahlawat, Pardeep; Beglova, Natalia

    2015-03-01

    β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI) is the most common antigen for autoimmune antibodies in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Thrombosis is a clinical feature of APS. We created a molecule (A1-A1) that consists of two identical β2GPI-binding modules from ApoE receptor 2 (ApoER2). A1-A1 binds to β2GPI/antibody complexes, preventing their association with ApoER2 and anionic phospholipids, and reducing thrombus size in the mouse model of APS. Here, we describe a mutant of A1-A1 (mA1-A1ND) with improved affinity for β2GPI. mA1-A1ND inhibits the binding of β2GPI to cardiolipin in the presence of anti-β2GPI antibodies, and inhibits the binding to phospholipids in plasma samples of APS patients, affecting the clotting time. Reduction of the clotting time demonstrates the presence of soluble β2GPI/antibody complexes in patients' plasma. These complexes either already exist in patients' plasma or form rapidly in the proximity to phospholipids. All members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family bind β2GPI. Modeling studies of A1 in a complex with domain V of β2GPI (β2GPI-DV) revealed two possible modes of interaction of a ligand-binding module from lipoprotein receptors with β2GPI-DV. In both orientations, the ligand-binding module interferes with binding of β2GPI to anionic phospholipids; however, it interacts with two different but overlapping sets of lysine residues in β2GPI-DV, depending on the orientation. © 2015 FEBS.

  1. Ephrin-A1/EphA4-mediated adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jellinghaus, Stefanie; Poitz, David M; Ende, Georg; Augstein, Antje; Weinert, Sönke; Stütz, Beryl; Braun-Dullaeus, Rüdiger C; Pasquale, Elena B; Strasser, Ruth H

    2013-10-01

    The Eph receptors represent the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Both Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are cell-surface proteins, and they typically mediate cell-to-cell communication by interacting at sites of intercellular contact. The major aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of EphA4-ephrin-A1 interaction in monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, as this process is a crucial step during the initiation and progression of the atherosclerotic plaque. Immunohistochemical analysis of human atherosclerotic plaques revealed expression of EphA4 receptor and ephrin-A1 ligand in major cell types within the plaque. Short-time stimulation of endothelial cells with the soluble ligand ephrin-A1 leads to a fourfold increase in adhesion of human monocytes to endothelial cells. In addition, ephrin-A1 further increases monocyte adhesion to already inflamed endothelial cells. EphrinA1 mediates its effect on monocyte adhesion via the activated receptor EphA4. This ephrinA1/EphA4 induced process involves the activation of the Rho signaling pathway and does not require active transcription. Rho activation downstream of EphA4 leads to increased polymerization of actin filaments in endothelial cells. This process was shown to be crucial for the proadhesive effect of ephrin-A1. The results of the present study show that ephrin-A1-induced EphA4 forward signaling promotes monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells via activation of RhoA and subsequent stress-fiber formation by a non-transcriptional mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Targeting HER receptors in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ocaña, Alberto; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2013-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases play important roles in animal development and their deregulation has been linked to several pathologies, including cancer or diabetes. In cancer, the ERBB/HER family of receptors has been shown to participate in the pathophysiology of breast, gastric, colorectal, lung and head and neck tumors. Activation of HER receptors occurs by receptor-receptor interactions facilitated by ligand binding, overexpression or molecular alterations of the HER receptors. The best example is the known role of HER2 in the tumorigenesis of a proportion of breast tumors. In this review, we will describe the biological bases that govern HER receptor activation, and this will represent the bases for the explanation of how to target HER receptors in cancer. We will discuss the current therapeutic options to target HER receptors, which are based on anti-receptor antibodies or small molecule kinase inhibitors. We will also describe current clinical applications and future developments of agents which target HER receptors. Finally, we will mention mechanism of resistance to anti-HER therapies, and will describe options to overcome such resistances.

  3. Diversification of TAM receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Zagórska, Anna; Través, Paqui G.; Lew, Erin D.; Dransfield, Ian; Lemke, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance is critical for both tissue homeostasis and the resolution of inflammation. We found that the TAM receptor tyrosine kinases Axl and Mer played distinct roles as phagocytic receptors in these two settings, where they exhibited divergent expression, regulation, and activity. Mer acted as a tolerogenic receptor in resting macrophages and in settings of immune suppression. Conversely, Axl was an inflammatory response receptor whose expression was induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. Axl and Mer displayed distinct ligand specificities, ligand-receptor complex formation in tissues, and receptor shedding upon activation. These differences notwithstanding, phagocytosis by either protein was strictly dependent on receptor activation that was triggered by bridging TAM receptor–ligand complexes to the ‘eat-me’ signal phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cell surfaces. PMID:25194421

  4. Somatostatin and dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferone, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of the new properties of SSRs and DRs has led to a renewed interest in agents targeting these receptors and has opened new perspectives for medical treatment of patients with pituitary and neuroendocrine tumors resistant to the "classical", currently available analogs. Moreover, SSRs and DRs crosstalk at membrane level may trigger alternative intracellular pathways or enhance the signalling for the control of cell growth. New somatostatin analogs and hybrid molecules, which display a broader and different spectrum of activities compared to conventional analogs, seem to be a promising therapeutic alternative for the control of hormone secretion and, hopefully, to reduce tumor burden. Receptor profile characterization is crucial for the accurate selection of patients potentially responsive to a given therapy.

  5. Metformin and insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitromore » to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded.« less

  6. Receptors for enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Yamayoshi, Seiya; Fujii, Ken; Koike, Satoshi

    2014-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Occasionally, EV71 infection is associated with severe neurological diseases, such as acute encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis and cardiopulmonary failure. Several molecules act as cell surface receptors that stimulate EV71 infection, including scavenger receptor B2 (SCARB2), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and annexin II (Anx2). SCARB2 plays critical roles in attachment, viral entry and uncoating, and it can facilitate efficient EV71 infection. The three-dimensional structures of the mature EV71 virion, procapsid and empty capsid, as well as the exofacial domain of SCARB2, have been elucidated. This structural information has greatly increased our understanding of the early steps of EV71 infection. Furthermore, SCARB2 plays essential roles in the development of EV71 neurological disease in vivo. Adult mice are not susceptible to infection by EV71, but transgenic mice that express human SCARB2 become susceptible to EV71 infection and develop similar neurological diseases to those found in humans. This mouse model facilitates the in vivo investigation of many issues related to EV71. PSGL-1, sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and Anx2 are attachment receptors, which enhance viral infection by retaining the virus on the cell surface. These molecules also contribute to viral infection in vitro either by interacting with SCARB2 or independently of SCARB2. However, the cooperative effects of these receptors, and their contribution to EV71 pathogenicity in vivo, remain to be elucidated.

  7. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    PubMed

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  8. Studies Toward the Pharmacophore of Salvinorin A, a Potent Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Thomas A.; Rizzacasa, Mark A.; Roth, Bryan L.; Toth, Beth A.; Yan, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Salvinorin A (1), from the sage Salvia divinorum, is a potent and selective kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonist. We screened other salvinorins and derivatives for binding affinity and functional activity at opioid receptors. Our results suggest that the methyl ester and furan ring are required for activity, but that the lactone and ketone functionalities are not. Other salvinorins showed negligible binding affinity at the KOR. None of the compounds bound to mu or delta opioid receptors. PMID:15658846

  9. Targeting Androgen Receptor-Driven Resistance to CYP17A1 Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of...chemo- and radiotherapies that are efficacious against primary, androgen sensitive (AS)-CaP. CR-CaP progresses to metastatic disease in local lymph... AR ) protein, called AR -V, is directly responsible for malignancy of CR-CaP, and moreover, that ENZ or ABI treatment actually enhances production of AR

  10. Targeting Androgen Receptor-Driven Resistance to CYP17A1 Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Positive enhancer regions will be recombined to a minimal, enhancerless luciferase reporter construct via att Gateway recombination sequences that flank...currently scanning these regions for the possible co-mapping of the recently described small eRNA that are transcribed in enhancer areas ( Science , 347

  11. Flavivirus Entry Receptors: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Meertens, Laurent; Carnec, Xavier; Amara, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Flaviviruses enter host cells by endocytosis initiated when the virus particles interact with cell surface receptors. The current model suggests that flaviviruses use at least two different sets of molecules for infectious entry: attachment factors that concentrate and/or recruit viruses on the cell surface and primary receptor(s) that bind to virions and direct them to the endocytic pathway. Here, we present the currently available knowledge regarding the flavivirus receptors described so far with specific attention to C-type lectin receptors and the phosphatidylserine receptors, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) and TYRO3, AXL and MER (TAM). Their role in flavivirus attachment and entry as well as their implication in the virus biology will be discussed in depth. PMID:24381034

  12. Pgc-1α and Nr4a1 Are Target Genes of Circadian Melatonin and Dopamine Release in Murine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Kunst, Stefanie; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Kelleher, Debra K.; Wolfrum, Uwe; Sargsyan, S. Anna; Iuvone, P. Michael; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Spessert, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The neurohormones melatonin and dopamine mediate clock-dependent/circadian regulation of inner retinal neurons and photoreceptor cells and in this way promote their functional adaptation to time of day and their survival. To fulfill this function they act on melatonin receptor type 1 (MT1 receptors) and dopamine D4 receptors (D4 receptors), respectively. The aim of the present study was to screen transcriptional regulators important for retinal physiology and/or pathology (Dbp, Egr-1, Fos, Nr1d1, Nr2e3, Nr4a1, Pgc-1α, Rorβ) for circadian regulation and dependence on melatonin signaling/MT1 receptors or dopamine signaling/D4 receptors. Methods This was done by gene profiling using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in mice deficient in MT1 or D4 receptors. Results The data obtained determined Pgc-1α and Nr4a1 as transcriptional targets of circadian melatonin and dopamine signaling, respectively. Conclusions The results suggest that Pgc-1α and Nr4a1 represent candidate genes for linking circadian neurohormone release with functional adaptation and healthiness of retina and photoreceptor cells. PMID:26393668

  13. Pgc-1α and Nr4a1 Are Target Genes of Circadian Melatonin and Dopamine Release in Murine Retina.

    PubMed

    Kunst, Stefanie; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Kelleher, Debra K; Wolfrum, Uwe; Sargsyan, S Anna; Iuvone, P Michael; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Spessert, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    The neurohormones melatonin and dopamine mediate clock-dependent/circadian regulation of inner retinal neurons and photoreceptor cells and in this way promote their functional adaptation to time of day and their survival. To fulfill this function they act on melatonin receptor type 1 (MT1 receptors) and dopamine D4 receptors (D4 receptors), respectively. The aim of the present study was to screen transcriptional regulators important for retinal physiology and/or pathology (Dbp, Egr-1, Fos, Nr1d1, Nr2e3, Nr4a1, Pgc-1α, Rorβ) for circadian regulation and dependence on melatonin signaling/MT1 receptors or dopamine signaling/D4 receptors. This was done by gene profiling using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in mice deficient in MT1 or D4 receptors. The data obtained determined Pgc-1α and Nr4a1 as transcriptional targets of circadian melatonin and dopamine signaling, respectively. The results suggest that Pgc-1α and Nr4a1 represent candidate genes for linking circadian neurohormone release with functional adaptation and healthiness of retina and photoreceptor cells.

  14. Nuclear Receptors in Skeletal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hao; Wan, Yihong

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a family of transcription factors that can be activated by lipophilic ligands. They are fundamental regulators of development, reproduction, and energy metabolism. In bone, nuclear receptors enable bone cells, including osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, to sense their dynamic microenvironment and maintain normal bone development and remodeling. Our views of the molecular mechanisms in this process have advanced greatly in the past decade. Drugs targeting nuclear receptors are widely used in the clinic for treating patients with bone disorders such as osteoporosis by modulating bone formation and resorption rates. Deficiency in the natural ligands of certain nuclear receptors can cause bone loss; for example, estrogen loss in postmenopausal women leads to osteoporosis and increases bone fracture risk. In contrast, excessive ligands of other nuclear receptors, such as glucocorticoids, can also be detrimental to bone health. Nonetheless, the ligand-induced osteoprotective effects of many other nuclear receptors, e.g., vitamin D receptor, are still in debate and require further characterizations. This review summarizes previous studies on the roles of nuclear receptors in bone homeostasis and incorporates the most recent findings. The advancement of our understanding in this field will help researchers improve the applications of agonists, antagonists, and selective modulators of nuclear receptors for therapeutic purposes; in particular, determining optimal pharmacological drug doses, preventing side effects, and designing new drugs that are more potent and specific. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1–8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  16. The Multifaceted Mineralocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.

    2015-01-01

    The primary adrenal cortical steroid hormones, aldosterone, and the glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone, act through the structurally similar mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Aldosterone is crucial for fluid, electrolyte, and hemodynamic homeostasis and tissue repair; the significantly more abundant glucocorticoids are indispensable for energy homeostasis, appropriate responses to stress, and limiting inflammation. Steroid receptors initiate gene transcription for proteins that effect their actions as well as rapid non-genomic effects through classical cell signaling pathways. GR and MR are expressed in many tissues types, often in the same cells, where they interact at molecular and functional levels, at times in synergy, others in opposition. Thus the appropriate balance of MR and GR activation is crucial for homeostasis. MR has the same binding affinity for aldosterone, cortisol, and corticosterone. Glucocorticoids activate MR in most tissues at basal levels and GR at stress levels. Inactivation of cortisol and corticosterone by 11β-HSD2 allows aldosterone to activate MR within aldosterone target cells and limits activation of the GR. Under most conditions, 11β-HSD1 acts as a reductase and activates cortisol/corticosterone, amplifying circulating levels. 11β-HSD1 and MR antagonists mitigate inappropriate activation of MR under conditions of oxidative stress that contributes to the pathophysiology of the cardiometabolic syndrome; however, MR antagonists decrease normal MR/GR functional interactions, a particular concern for neurons mediating cognition, memory, and affect. PMID:24944027

  17. Glucocorticoid Regulation of the Vitamin D Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies indicate calcitriol has potent anti-tumor activity in different types of cancers. However, high levels of vitamin D can produce hypercalcemia in some patients. Glucocorticoids are used to ameliorate hypercalcemia and to enhance calcitriol anti-tumor activity. Calcitriol in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) protein levels and ligand binding in squamous cell carcinoma VII (SCC). In this study we found that both calcitriol and Dex induce VDR- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcription respectively, indicating both hormone receptors are active in SCC. Pre-treatment with Dex increases VDR-mediated transcription at the human CYP24A1 promoter. Whereas, pre-treatment with other steroid hormones, including dihydrotestosterone and R1881, has no effect on VDR-mediated transcription. Real-time PCR indicates treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time-dependent manner, suggesting Dex may directly regulate expression of Vdr. Numerous putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) were found in the Vdr gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated GR binding at several putative GREs located within the mouse Vdr gene. However, none of the putative GREs studied increase GR-mediated transcription in luciferase reporter assays. In an attempt to identify the response element responsible for Vdr transcript regulation, future studies will continue to analyze newly identified GREs more distal from the Vdr gene promoter. PMID:20398752

  18. Combining a GLP-1 receptor agonist and basal insulin: study evidence and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Carris, Nicholas W; Taylor, James R; Gums, John G

    2014-12-01

    Most patients with diabetes mellitus require multiple medications to achieve glycemic goals. Considering this and the increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes worldwide, the need for effective combination therapy is pressing. Basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are frequently used to treat type 2 diabetes. Though both classes of medication are exclusively injectable, which may cause initial hesitation from providers, evidence for their combined use is substantial. This review summarizes the theoretical benefit, supporting evidence, and implementation of a combined basal insulin-GLP-1 receptor agonist regimen. Basal insulin added to a GLP-1 receptor agonist reduces hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) without weight gain or significantly increased hypoglycemia. A GLP-1 receptor agonist added to basal insulin reduces HbA1c and body weight. Compared with the addition of meal-time insulin to basal insulin, a GLP-1 receptor agonist produces similar or greater reduction in HbA1c, weight loss instead of weight gain, and less hypoglycemia. Gastrointestinal adverse events are common with GLP-1 receptor agonists, especially during initiation and titration. However, combination with basal insulin is not expected to augment expected adverse events that come with using a GLP-1 receptor agonist. Basal insulin can be added to a GLP-1 receptor agonist with a slow titration to target goal fasting plasma glucose. In patients starting a GLP-1 receptor agonist, the dose of basal insulin should be decreased by 20 % in patients with an HbA1c ≤8 %. The evidence from 15 randomized prospective studies supports the combined use of a GLP-1 receptor agonist with basal insulin in a broad range of patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

  19. NMDA receptor structures reveal subunit arrangement and pore architecture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Lü, Wei; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Goehring, April; Du, Juan; Song, Xianqiang; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are Hebbian-like coincidence detectors, requiring binding of glycine and glutamate in combination with the relief of voltage-dependent magnesium block to open an ion conductive pore across the membrane bilayer. Despite the importance of the NMDA receptor in the development and function of the brain, a molecular structure of an intact receptor has remained elusive. Here we present x-ray crystal structures of the GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptor with the allosteric inhibitor, Ro25-6981, partial agonists and the ion channel blocker, MK-801. Receptor subunits are arranged in a 1-2-1-2 fashion, demonstrating extensive interactions between the amino terminal and ligand binding domains. The transmembrane domains harbor a closed-blocked ion channel, a pyramidal central vestibule lined by residues implicated in binding ion channel blockers and magnesium, and a ~2-fold symmetric arrangement of ion channel pore loops. These structures provide new insights into the architecture, allosteric coupling and ion channel function of NMDA receptors. PMID:25008524

  20. A common model for cytokine receptor activation: combined scissor-like rotation and self-rotation of receptor dimer induced by class I cytokine.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The precise mechanism by which the binding of a class I cytokine to the extracellular domain of its corresponding receptor transmits a signal through the cell membrane remains unclear. Receptor activation involves a cytokine-receptor complex with a 1∶2 stoichiometry. Previously we used our transient-complex theory to calculate the rate constant of the initial cytokine-receptor binding to form a 1∶1 complex. Here we computed the binding pathway leading to the 1∶2 activation complex. Three cytokine systems (growth hormone, erythropoietin, and prolactin) were studied, and the focus was on the binding of the extracellular domain of the second receptor molecule after forming the 1∶1 complex. According to the transient-complex theory, translational and rotation diffusion of the binding entities bring them together to form a transient complex, which has near-native relative separation and orientation but not the short-range specific native interactions. Subsequently conformational rearrangement leads to the formation of the native complex. We found that the changes in relative orientations between the two receptor molecules from the transient complex to the 1∶2 native complex are similar for the three cytokine-receptor systems. We thus propose a common model for receptor activation by class I cytokines, involving combined scissor-like rotation and self-rotation of the two receptor molecules. Both types of rotations seem essential: the scissor-like rotation separates the intracellular domains of the two receptor molecules to make room for the associated Janus kinase molecules, while the self-rotation allows them to orient properly for transphosphorylation. This activation model explains a host of experimental observations. The transient-complex based approach presented here may provide a strategy for designing antagonists and prove useful for elucidating activation mechanisms of other receptors.

  1. A Common Model for Cytokine Receptor Activation: Combined Scissor-Like Rotation and Self-Rotation of Receptor Dimer Induced by Class I Cytokine

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The precise mechanism by which the binding of a class I cytokine to the extracellular domain of its corresponding receptor transmits a signal through the cell membrane remains unclear. Receptor activation involves a cytokine-receptor complex with a 1∶2 stoichiometry. Previously we used our transient-complex theory to calculate the rate constant of the initial cytokine-receptor binding to form a 1∶1 complex. Here we computed the binding pathway leading to the 1∶2 activation complex. Three cytokine systems (growth hormone, erythropoietin, and prolactin) were studied, and the focus was on the binding of the extracellular domain of the second receptor molecule after forming the 1∶1 complex. According to the transient-complex theory, translational and rotation diffusion of the binding entities bring them together to form a transient complex, which has near-native relative separation and orientation but not the short-range specific native interactions. Subsequently conformational rearrangement leads to the formation of the native complex. We found that the changes in relative orientations between the two receptor molecules from the transient complex to the 1∶2 native complex are similar for the three cytokine-receptor systems. We thus propose a common model for receptor activation by class I cytokines, involving combined scissor-like rotation and self-rotation of the two receptor molecules. Both types of rotations seem essential: the scissor-like rotation separates the intracellular domains of the two receptor molecules to make room for the associated Janus kinase molecules, while the self-rotation allows them to orient properly for transphosphorylation. This activation model explains a host of experimental observations. The transient-complex based approach presented here may provide a strategy for designing antagonists and prove useful for elucidating activation mechanisms of other receptors. PMID:22412367

  2. Identification of A3 adenosine receptor agonists as novel non‐narcotic analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Janes, K; Symons‐Liguori, AM; Jacobson, K A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain negatively impacts the quality of life in a variety of patient populations. The current therapeutic repertoire is inadequate in managing patient pain and warrants the development of new therapeutics. Adenosine and its four cognate receptors (A1, A2A, A2B and A3) have important roles in physiological and pathophysiological states, including chronic pain. Preclinical and clinical studies have revealed that while adenosine and agonists of the A1 and A2A receptors have antinociceptive properties, their therapeutic utility is limited by adverse cardiovascular side effects. In contrast, our understanding of the A3 receptor is only in its infancy, but exciting preclinical observations of A3 receptor antinociception, which have been bolstered by clinical trials of A3 receptor agonists in other disease states, suggest pain relief without cardiovascular side effects and with sufficient tolerability. Our goal herein is to briefly discuss adenosine and its receptors in the context of pathological pain and to consider the current data regarding A3 receptor‐mediated antinociception. We will highlight recent findings regarding the impact of the A3 receptor on pain pathways and examine the current state of selective A3 receptor agonists used for these studies. The adenosine‐to‐A3 receptor pathway represents an important endogenous system that can be targeted to provide safe, effective pain relief from chronic pain. PMID:26804983

  3. Adenosine receptor antagonists effect on plasma-enhanced killing.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Gustavo; Moitra, Rituparna; Remick, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that naive plasma has inherent capabilities to enhance bacterial opsonization and phagocyte killing, but not all plasma is equally effective. This raised the question of whether plasma constituents other than opsonins may play a role. Adenosine receptor antagonists have been shown to modulate cytokine response and survival in mice after a bacterial challenge. We investigated whether selective adenosine receptor blockade would influence the ability of naive plasma to effectively control bacterial growth. Colonic bacteria- and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages and neutrophils were obtained from naive mice. Stock murine plasma from naive was purchased and categorized as having high plasma-enhanced bacterial killing capacity using our previously described methods. Bacteria and plasma were incubated to allow for opsonization and then added to macrophages previously exposed to selected adenosine receptor antagonists: ZM 241385: A2A, MRS1754: A2B, DPCPX: A1, and MRS1220: A3. The final mixture was plated on blood agar plates in aerobic and anaerobic conditions and bacterial colony-forming units quantified after 24 h. This study demonstrated that exogenous adenosine was able to significantly decrease phagocyte killing of cecal bacteria. Blocking adenosine receptors with selective antagonists altered the bacterial killing capacity of plasma. Selectively blocking the A1, A2A, or A2B receptors proved most beneficial at reversing the effect of adenosine. Consistent with previous work, only macrophage killing of bacteria could be modulated by adenosine receptor blockade because neutrophils were unaffected. These data demonstrate that adenosine decreases macrophage killing of enteric bacteria and that this effect is mediated through the adenosine receptors.

  4. Characterization of 5-HT(1A/1B)-/- mice: an animal model sensitive to anxiolytic treatments.

    PubMed

    Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; David, Denis J P; Xia, Lin; Nguyen, Hai Thanh; Rainer, Quentin; Guiard, Bruno P; Repérant, Christelle; Deltheil, Thierry; Toth, Miklos; Hen, René; Gardier, Alain M

    2011-09-01

    Selective serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in Humans. However, because only few animal models display overt anxious-like behavior, detailed preclinical studies of the anxiolytic properties of antidepressants are still lacking. Here, we studied the neurochemical and behavioral effects of a double 5-HT(1A/1B) receptor knockout in mice (5-HT(1A/1B)-/-) as compared to their wild-type littermates (5-HT(1A/1B)+/+). It is known that single deletion of either 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(1B) receptor induces behavioral changes that are not correlated with differences in brain serotonergic tone. Deletion of both receptors resulted in (i) higher emotionality of animals, as observed in three unconditioned paradigms of anxiety (open field, elevated plus maze and novelty suppressed feeding tests); (ii) a ≈200% increase in the mean spontaneous firing rate of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) compared to 5-HT(1A/1B)+/+ mice; (iii) elevated basal dialysate levels of 5-HT in the DRN and frontal cortex; (iv) an exaggerated response to acute paroxetine administration in microdialysis experiments, and (v) increased basal core body temperature. These findings suggest that the deletion of both autoreceptors induces a strong anxious-like behavioral state associated with increased 5-HT neurotransmission. Interestingly, 5-HT(1A/1B)-/- mice are still sensitive to the acute administration of diazepam. Moreover, while deletion of both receptors impacted on the response to acute SSRI treatment in the forced swim test, anxiolytic-like effects of a chronic SSRI treatment were still observed in 5-HT(1A/1B)-/- mice. Thus, the 5-HT(1A/1B)-/- mouse model could be of great interest to unveil the mechanisms of action of the anxiolytic effects of SSRIs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ryanodine receptor channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) are intracellular Ca2+-permeable channels that provide the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release required for skeletal and cardiac muscle contractions. RyR1 underlies skeletal muscle contraction, and RyR2 fulfills this role in cardiac muscle. Over the past 20 years, numerous mutations in both RyR isoforms have been identified and linked to skeletal and cardiac diseases. Malignant hyperthermia, central core disease, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia have been genetically linked to mutations in either RyR1 or RyR2. Thus, RyR channelopathies are both of interest because they cause significant human diseases and provide model systems that can be studied to elucidate important structure–function relationships of these ion channels. PMID:20179962

  6. Expression and sequence of CYP1A1 in the camel.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Wageh Sobhy; Morshdy, Alaa Eldin; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Ibrahim, Zein Shaban; Fujita, Shoichi; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we determined a partial sequence of CYP1A1 in the camel and its phylogenetic position. The deduced amino acid sequence of camel CYP1A1 showed the highest identity 94% with those of sheep and cattle CYP1A1. In a phylogenetic analysis, the camel CYP1A1 isoform was located beside sheep and cattle CYP1A1. When we studied the distribution of camel CYP1A1 mRNA in different tissues, we found that this isoform was expressed in all tissues except the hump. Interestingly, the lungs of all the camels and tongues of two of the three animals showed high expressions of CYP1A1 mRNA, and this may indicate exposure to ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptor such as environmental pollutants or flavonoids.

  7. Adenosine A(2A) receptor dynamics studied with the novel fluorescent agonist Alexa488-APEC.

    PubMed

    Brand, Frank; Klutz, Athena M; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Fredholm, Bertil B; Schulte, Gunnar

    2008-08-20

    G protein-coupled receptors, such as the adenosine A(2A) receptor, are dynamic proteins, which undergo agonist-dependent redistribution from the cell surface to intracellular membranous compartments, such as endosomes. In order to study the kinetics of adenosine A(2A) receptor redistribution in living cells, we synthesized a novel fluorescent agonist, Alexa488-APEC. Alexa488-APEC binds to adenosine A(2A) (K(i)=149+/-27 nM) as well as A(3) receptors (K(i)=240+/-160 nM) but not to adenosine A(1) receptors. Further, we characterized the dose-dependent increase in Alexa488-APEC-induced cAMP production as well as cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation, verifying the ligand's functionality at adenosine A(2A) but not A(2B) receptors. In live-cell imaging studies, Alexa488-APEC-induced adenosine A(2A) receptor internalization, which was blocked by the competitive reversible antagonist ZM 241385 and hyperosmolaric sucrose. Further, internalized adenosine A(2A) receptors co-localized with clathrin and Rab5, indicating that agonist stimulation promotes adenosine A(2A) receptor uptake through a clathrin-dependent mechanism to Rab5-positive endosomes. The basic characterization of Alexa488-APEC described here showed that it provides a useful tool for tracing adenosine A(2A) receptors in vitro.

  8. PPAR δ agonist GW0742 interacts weakly with multiple nuclear receptors including the vitamin D receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Yasgar, Adam; Baranowski, Athena M.; Sidhu, Preetpal S.; McCallum, Megan M.; Pawlak, Alan J.; Teske, Kelly; Feleke, Belaynesh; Yuan, Nina Y.; Kevin, Chinedum; Bikle, Daniel D.; Ayers, Steven D.; Webb, Paul; Rai, Ganesha; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Maloney, David; Arnold, Leggy A.

    2013-01-01

    A high throughput screening campaign was conducted to identify small molecules with the ability to inhibit the interaction between the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and steroid receptor coactivator 2. These inhibitors represent novel molecular probes to modulate gene regulation mediated by VDR. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) agonist GW0742 was among the identified VDR-coactivator inhibitors and has been characterized herein as a pan nuclear receptor antagonist at concentrations higher than 12.1 µM. The highest antagonist activity for GW0742 was found for VDR and the androgen receptor (AR). Surprisingly, GW0742 behaved as PPAR agonist/antagonist activating transcription at lower concentration and inhibiting this effect at higher concentrations. A unique spectroscopic property of GW0742 was identified as well. In the presence of rhodamine-derived molecules, GW0742+ increased fluorescence intensity and fluorescence polarization at an excitation wavelength of 595 nm and emission wavelength of 615 nm in a dose dependent manner. The GW0742-inhibited NR-coactivator binding resulted in a reduced expression of five different NR target genes in LNCaP cells in the presence of agonist. Especially VDR target genes CYP24A1, IGFBP-3 and TRPV6 were negatively regulated by GW0742. GW0742 is the first VDR ligand inhibitor lacking the secosteroid structure of VDR ligand antagonists. Nevertheless, the VDR-meditated downstream process of cell differentiation was antagonized by GW0742 in HL-60 cells that were pretreated with the endogenous VDR agonist 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PMID:23713684

  9. GABA and benzodiazepine receptors in the gerbil brain after transient ischemia: demonstration by quantitative receptor autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, H.; Sato, G.; Kogure, K.

    1987-02-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to measure the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and benzodiazepine receptors after ischemia by means of transient occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries in the gerbil. (/sup 3/H)Muscimol was used to label the GABAA receptors and (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam to label central type benzodiazepine receptors. In the superolateral convexities of the frontal cortices, (/sup 3/H)muscimol binding was increased in 60% of the animals killed 3 days after ischemia, and decreased in 67% of the animals killed 27 days after ischemia. Twenty-seven days after ischemia, (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding in the substantia nigra pars reticulata increased to 252%more » of the control, though the increase in (/sup 3/H)muscimol binding was not significant. In the dorsolateral region of the caudate putamen, marked neuronal necrosis and depletion of both (/sup 3/H)muscimol and (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding sites were observed 27 days after ischemia, the ventromedial region being left intact. In spite of the depletion of pyramidal cells in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, both (/sup 3/H)muscimol and (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding sites were preserved 27 days after ischemia. Since our previous study revealed that adenosine A1 binding sites were depleted in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus after ischemia correlating with neuronal damage, GABAA and benzodiazepine receptors may not be distributed predominantly on the pyramidal cells in the CA1 region.« less

  10. Sesquiterpenoids from Atractylodes macrocephala act as farnesoid X receptor and progesterone receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Jui; Liang, Jui-Wei; Lin, Hsiang-Ru

    2012-03-15

    Two sesquiterpenoids, atractylenolide II and III, were isolated and identified from Atractylodes macrocephala (Asteraceae) to be subsequently evaluated for their activity against farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and progesterone receptor (PR) by transient transfection reporter assays. These sesquiterpenoids did not exert significant agonistic effect but antagonized the activity of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), an endogenous FXR agonist, for FXR driven SHP promoter transactivation. Additionally, they transactivated CYP7A1 gene promoter activity by antagonizing FXR. Apart from acting as a FXR antagonist, atractylenolide III also showed agonistic activity against PR. All these results demonstrated that atractylenolide II and III are the active components of Atractylodes macrocephala to exert specific pharmacologic effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    PubMed

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor.

  12. Cleavage of a Recombinant Human Immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 Hybrid Antibody by Certain Bacterial IgA1 Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Bernard W.; Dunlop, James I.; Batten, Margaret R.; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M.

    2000-01-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcα receptors and trigger respiratory bursts in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. sanguis, Neisseria meningitidis types 1 and 2, N. gonorrhoeae types 1 and 2, and Haemophilus influenzae type 2. Thus, for these enzymes the recognition site for IgA1 cleavage is contained within half of the IgA1 hinge region; additional distal elements, if required, are provided by either an IgA1 or an IgA2 framework. In contrast, the IgA2/A1 hybrid appeared to be resistant to cleavage with S. oralis and some H. influenzae type 1 IgA1 proteases, suggesting these enzymes require additional determinants for efficient substrate recognition. PMID:10639405

  13. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration ofmore » 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.« less

  14. Taste receptors for umami: the case for multiple receptors1234

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Umami taste is elicited by many small molecules, including amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) and nucleotides (monophosphates of inosinate or guanylate, inosine 5′-monophosphate and guanosine-5′-monophosphate). Mammalian taste buds respond to these diverse compounds via membrane receptors that bind the umami tastants. Over the past 15 y, several receptors have been proposed to underlie umami detection in taste buds. These receptors include 2 glutamate-selective G protein–coupled receptors, mGluR4 and mGluR1, and the taste bud–expressed heterodimer T1R1+T1R3. Each of these receptors is expressed in small numbers of cells in anterior and posterior taste buds. The mGluRs are activated by glutamate and certain analogs but are not reported to be sensitive to nucleotides. In contrast, T1R1+T1R3 is activated by a broad range of amino acids and displays a strongly potentiated response in the presence of nucleotides. Mice in which the Grm4 gene is knocked out show a greatly enhanced preference for umami tastants. Loss of the Tas1r1 or Tas1R3 genes is reported to depress but not eliminate neural and behavioral responses to umami. When intact mammalian taste buds are apically stimulated with umami tastants, their functional responses to umami tastants do not fully resemble the responses of a single proposed umami receptor. Furthermore, the responses to umami tastants persist in the taste cells of T1R3-knockout mice. Thus, umami taste detection may involve multiple receptors expressed in different subsets of taste cells. This receptor diversity may underlie the complex perception of umami, with different mixtures of amino acids, peptides, and nucleotides yielding subtly distinct taste qualities. PMID:19571230

  15. Taste receptors for umami: the case for multiple receptors.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Nirupa; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-09-01

    Umami taste is elicited by many small molecules, including amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) and nucleotides (monophosphates of inosinate or guanylate, inosine 5'-monophosphate and guanosine-5'-monophosphate). Mammalian taste buds respond to these diverse compounds via membrane receptors that bind the umami tastants. Over the past 15 y, several receptors have been proposed to underlie umami detection in taste buds. These receptors include 2 glutamate-selective G protein-coupled receptors, mGluR4 and mGluR1, and the taste bud-expressed heterodimer T1R1+T1R3. Each of these receptors is expressed in small numbers of cells in anterior and posterior taste buds. The mGluRs are activated by glutamate and certain analogs but are not reported to be sensitive to nucleotides. In contrast, T1R1+T1R3 is activated by a broad range of amino acids and displays a strongly potentiated response in the presence of nucleotides. Mice in which the Grm4 gene is knocked out show a greatly enhanced preference for umami tastants. Loss of the Tas1r1 or Tas1R3 genes is reported to depress but not eliminate neural and behavioral responses to umami. When intact mammalian taste buds are apically stimulated with umami tastants, their functional responses to umami tastants do not fully resemble the responses of a single proposed umami receptor. Furthermore, the responses to umami tastants persist in the taste cells of T1R3-knockout mice. Thus, umami taste detection may involve multiple receptors expressed in different subsets of taste cells. This receptor diversity may underlie the complex perception of umami, with different mixtures of amino acids, peptides, and nucleotides yielding subtly distinct taste qualities.

  16. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by adenosine receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Morton, R A; Davies, C H

    1997-07-01

    1. Intracellular current clamp recordings were made from CA1 pyramidal neurones in rat hippocampal slices. Experiments were performed in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor antagonists to block all fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. A single stimulus, delivered extracellularly in the stratum oriens, caused a reduction in spike frequency adaptation in response to a depolarizing current step delivered 2 s after the stimulus. A 2- to 10-fold increase in stimulus intensity evoked a slow excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) which was associated with a small increase in input resistance. The peak amplitude of the EPSP occurred approximately 2.5 s after the stimulus and its magnitude (up to 30 mV) and duration (10-50 s) increased with increasing stimulus intensity. 2. The slow EPSP was unaffected by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine ((+)-MCPG; 1000 microM) but was greatly enhanced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine (1-5 microM). Both the slow EPSP and the stimulus-evoked reduction in spike frequency adaptation were inhibited by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist atropine (1-5 microM). These results are consistent with these effects being mediated by mAChRs. 3. Both the mAChR-mediated EPSP (EPSPm) and the associated reduction in spike frequency adaptation were reversibly depressed (up to 97%) by either adenosine (100 microM) or its non-hydrolysable analogue 2-chloroadenosine (CADO; 0.1-5.0 microM). These effects were often accompanied by postsynaptic hyperpolarization (up to 8 mV) and a reduction in input resistance (up to 11%). The selective adenosine A1 receptor agonists 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA; 0.1-0.4 microM) and R(-)N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine (R-PIA; 1 microM) both depressed the EPSPm. In contrast, the adenosine A2A receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino-5

  17. 32 CFR 237a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 237a.1 Section 237a.1 National Defense... LIAISON WITH INDUSTRY § 237a.1 Purpose. This part establishes (a) guidance for preparation of the Defense... with industry on (1) public affairs matters in general, (2) industry-sponsored events, and (3...

  18. 18 CFR 3a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 3a.1 Section 3a.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION General § 3a.1 Purpose. This part 3a describes the...

  19. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  20. Thrombopoietin-receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Basciano, Paul A; Bussel, James B

    2012-09-01

    Thrombopoietin-receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) have been approved for use in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) after showing safety and efficacy. There is increasing interest to expand the role of TPO-RAs, both in ITP as well as in other thrombocytopenic disorders. In ITP, more studies are providing evidence of TPO-RA efficacy and safety, as well as their applicability to various patient groups, including children. Use of TPO-RAs in hepatitis C has shown early success in allowing treatments in patients who would otherwise be excluded due to thrombocytopenia. Use in congenital thrombocytopenias has also shown early success. The use of TPO-RAs in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is questionable after reports of increasing blasts and leukemic transformation, whereas in other chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenias (C-ITs) reports are few. Bone marrow fibrosis remains an area of active study, although the data to date suggest this is seen in a small minority of patients, and is reversible and of questionable clinical relevance. Thrombotic complications are also an area of concern and need further close follow-up. The use of TPO-RAs continues to grow as more evidence of safety and efficacy is found. More studies are needed to determine their utility in other diseases as well as to better characterize adverse events observed to date.

  1. 2'-C-Methyl analogues of selective adenosine receptor agonists: synthesis and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Franchetti, P; Cappellacci, L; Marchetti, S; Trincavelli, L; Martini, C; Mazzoni, M R; Lucacchini, A; Grifantini, M

    1998-05-07

    2'-C-Methyl analogues of selective adenosine receptor agonists such as (R)-PIA, CPA, CCPA, NECA, and IB-MECA were synthesized in order to further investigate the subdomain that binds the ribose moiety. Binding affinities of these new compounds at A1 and A2A receptors in bovine brain membranes and at A3 in rat testis membranes were determined and compared. It was found that the 2'-C-methyl modification resulted in a decrease of the affinity, particularly at A2A and A3 receptors. When such modification was combined with N6-substitutions with groups which induce high potency and selectivity at A1 receptors, the high affinity was retained and the selectivity was increased. Thus, 2-chloro-2'-C-methyl-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (2'-Me-CCPA), which displayed a Ki value of 1.8 nM at A1 receptors, was selective for A1 vs A2A and A3 receptors by 2166- and 2777-fold, respectively, resulting in one of the most potent and A1-selective agonists so far known. In functional assay, this compound inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity with an IC50 value of 13.1 nM, acting as a full agonist.

  2. Ligands of histamine receptors modulate acid-sensing ion channels.

    PubMed

    Shteinikov, V Y; Korosteleva, A S; Tikhonova, T B; Potapieva, N N; Tikhonov, D B

    2017-09-02

    Recently we found that synthetic compounds containing amino group linked to hydrophobic or aromatic moiety are potent modulators of the proton-gated channels (ASICs). These structures have clear similarity with ligands of histamine receptors. We have also demonstrated that histamine potentiates homomeric ASIC1a by shifting its activation dependence to less acidic conditions. In the present work the action of a series of histamine receptors ligands on recombinant ASIC1a and ASIC2a was characterized. Two types of action were found for ASIC1a. 1-methylhistamine, N-alpha-methylhistamine, dimaprit and thioperamide caused significant potentiation, which was pH-dependent and voltage-independent. The H4R antagonist A943931 caused inhibition, which is likely due to voltage-dependent pore block. ASIC2a were virtually insensitive to the drugs tested. We conclude that ligands of histamine receptors should also be considered as ASIC modulators. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Autophagy Receptors and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiqiang; Purtell, Kerry; Lachance, Veronik; Wold, Mitchell S; Chen, Shi; Yue, Zhenyu

    2017-07-01

    Previously thought of as a nonselective digestion process, autophagy is now known to specifically degrade aggregated proteins and damaged cellular organelles through the action of autophagy receptors, which provides cellular quality control and maintains homeostasis. Autophagy receptors recognize and recruit specific cargoes to the autophagosome-lysosome pathway for degradation in ubiquitin-dependent and -independent manners, and their functions (in selective autophagy) are regulated by protein modifications, for example, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Growing evidence has linked the genetic variants of autophagy receptors to neurodegenerative diseases and multiple experimental systems have validated their roles in modulating the disease process. Here, we review the recent advances in understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of autophagy receptors in selective autophagy, and discuss their potentials as therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  5. Growth Factor Receptor Fusions Predict Therapeutic Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Rich, Jeremy N

    2015-07-15

    Dysregulated growth factor pathways promote tumor growth in many cancers, but receptor-targeting strategies frequently offer limited benefit despite activation by receptor overexpression or amplification. In contrast, tumors harboring growth factor receptor fusions display exquisite dependence on receptor activity, providing predictive markers for patient response to inform precise oncology treatment. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. [The receptor theory of atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Likhoded, V G; Bondarenko, V M; Gintsburg, A L

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacteria can interact with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and induce atheroma formation. The risk of atherosclerosis is decreased in case of TLR4 mutation. Other bacterial ligands and endogenous ligands of TLRs can also be involved in induction of atherogenesis. The general concept of atherosclerosis pathogentsis is presented. According to this concept atherogenesis can be initiated by some reactions resulting from interaction of exogenous and endogenous microbial ligands with Toll-like receptors.

  7. PXR induces CYP27A1 and regulates cholesterol metabolism in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Chen, Wenling; Chiang, John Y L

    2007-02-01

    Mitochondrial sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) catalyzes oxidative cleavage of the sterol side chain in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway in the liver and 27-hydroxylation of cholesterol in most tissues. Recent studies suggest that 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-HOC) activates liver orphan receptor alpha (LXRalpha) and induces the cholesterol efflux transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 in macrophages. The steroid- and bile acid-activated pregnane X receptor (PXR) plays critical roles in the detoxification of bile acids, cholesterol metabolites, and xenobiotics. The role of CYP27A1 in the intestine is not known. This study investigated PXR and CYP27A1 regulation of cholesterol metabolism in the human intestinal cell lines Caco2 and Ls174T. A human PXR ligand, rifampicin, induced CYP27A1 mRNA expression in intestine cells but not in liver cells. Rifampicin induced CYP27A1 gene transcription, increased intracellular 27-HOC levels, and induced ABCA1 and ABCG1 mRNA expression only in intestine cells. A functional PXR binding site was identified in the human CYP27A1 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that rifampicin induced the PXR recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator 1 to CYP27A1 chromatin. Cholesterol loading markedly increased intracellular 27-HOC levels in intestine cells. Rifampicin, 27-HOC, and a potent LXRalpha agonist, T0901317, induced ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein expression and stimulated cholesterol efflux from intestine cells to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL. This study suggests an intestine-specific PXR/CYP27A1/LXRalpha pathway that regulates intestine cholesterol efflux and HDL assembly.

  8. Expression and functional role of adenosine receptors in regulating inflammatory responses in human synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    Varani, K; Vincenzi, F; Tosi, A; Targa, M; Masieri, FF; Ongaro, A; De Mattei, M; Massari, L; Borea, PA

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adenosine is an endogenous modulator, interacting with four G-protein coupled receptors (A1, A2A, A2B and A3) and acts as a potent inhibitor of inflammatory processes in several tissues. So far, the functional effects modulated by adenosine receptors on human synoviocytes have not been investigated in detail. We evaluated mRNA, the protein levels, the functional role of adenosine receptors and their pharmacological modulation in human synoviocytes. Experimental approach: mRNA, Western blotting, saturation and competition binding experiments, cyclic AMP, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation, tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) release were assessed in human synoviocytes isolated from patients with osteoarthritis. Key results: mRNA and protein for A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors are expressed in human synoviocytes. Standard adenosine agonists and antagonists showed affinity values in the nanomolar range and were coupled to stimulation or inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. Activation of A2A and A3 adenosine receptors inhibited p38 MAPK and NF-κB pathways, an effect abolished by selective adenosine antagonists. A2A and A3 receptor agonists decreased TNF-α and IL-8 production. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase or Gs pathways were involved in the functional responses of A3 or A2A adenosine receptors. Synoviocyte A1 and A2B adenosine receptors were not implicated in the inflammatory process whereas stimulation of A2A and A3 adenosine receptors was closely associated with a down-regulation of the inflammatory status. Conclusions and implications: These results indicate that A2A and A3 adenosine receptors may represent a potential target in therapeutic modulation of joint inflammation. PMID:20331607

  9. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemokine receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Neel, Nicole F.; Schutyser, Evemie; Sai, Jiqing; Fan, Guo-Huang; Richmond, Ann

    2009-01-01

    The internalization and intracellular trafficking of chemokine receptors have important implications for the cellular responses elicited by chemokine receptors. The major pathway by which chemokine receptors internalize is the clathrin-mediated pathway, but some receptors may utilize lipid rafts/caveolae-dependent internalization routes. This review discusses the current knowledge and controversies regarding these two different routes of endocytosis. The functional consequences of internalization and the regulation of chemokine receptor recycling will also be addressed. Modifications of chemokine receptors, such as palmitoylation, ubiquitination, glycosylation, and sulfation, may also impact trafficking, chemotaxis and signaling. Finally, this review will cover the internalization and trafficking of viral and decoy chemokine receptors. PMID:15998596

  11. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Trifunctional Agents as a Design Strategy for Tailoring Ligand Properties: Irreversible Inhibitors of A1 Adenosine Receptors†

    PubMed Central

    Boring, Daniel L.; Ji, Xiao-Duo; Zimmet, Jeff; Taylor, Kirk E.; Stiles, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    The 1,3-phenylene diisothiocyanate conjugate of XAC (8-[4-[[[[(2-aminoethyl)amino]carbonyl]methyl]-oxy]phenyl]-l,3-dipropylxanthine, a potent A1 selective adenosine antagonist) has been characterized as an irreversible inhibitor of A1 adenosine receptors. To further extend this work, a series of analogues were prepared containing a third substituent in the phenyl isothiocyanate ring, incorporated to modify the physiochemical or spectroscopic properties of the conjugate. Symmetrical trifunctional cross-linking reagents bearing two isothiocyanate groups were prepared as general intermediates for cross-linking functionalized congeners and receptors. Xanthine isothiocyanate derivatives containing hydrophilic, fluorescent, or reactive substituents, linked via an amide, thiourea, or methylene group in the 5-position, were synthesized and found to be irreversible inhibitors of A1 adenosine receptors. The effects of the 5-substituent on water solubility and on the A1/A2 selectivity ratio derived from binding assays in rat brain membranes were examined. Inhibition of binding of [3H]-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine and [3H]CGS21680 (2-[[2-[4-(2-carboxyethyl)phenyl]ethyl]amino]adenosine-5′-N-ethylcarboxamide) at central A1 and A2 adenosine receptors, respectively, was measured. A conjugate of XAC and 1,3,5-triisothiocyanatobenzene was 894-fold selective for A1 receptors. Reporter groups, such as fluorescent dyes and a spin-label, were included as chain substituents in the irreversibly binding analogues, which were designed for spectroscopic assays, histochemical characterization, and biochemical characterization of the receptor protein. PMID:1868116

  13. Gene variations in oestrogen pathways, CYP19A1, daily 17β-estradiol and mammographic density phenotypes in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Flote, Vidar G; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; McTiernan, Anne; Frydenberg, Hanne; Ursin, Giske; Iversen, Anita; Lofteroed, Trygve; Ellison, Peter T; Wist, Erik A; Egeland, Thore; Wilsgaard, Tom; Makar, Karen W; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Thune, Inger

    2014-12-19

    High mammographic density is an established breast cancer risk factor, and circulating oestrogen influences oestrogen-regulating gene expression in breast cancer development. However, less is known about the interrelationships of common variants in the CYP19A1 gene, daily levels of oestrogens, mammographic density phenotypes and body mass index (BMI) in premenopausal women. Based on plausible biological mechanisms related to the oestrogen pathway, we investigated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP19A1, 17β-estradiol and mammographic density in 202 premenopausal women. DNA was genotyped using the Illumina Golden Gate platform. Daily salivary 17β-estradiol concentrations were measured throughout an entire menstrual cycle. Mammographic density phenotypes were assessed using a computer-assisted method (Madena). We determined associations using multivariable linear and logistic regression models. The minor alleles of rs749292 were positively (P = 0.026), and the minor alleles of rs7172156 were inversely (P = 0.002) associated with daily 17β-estradiol. We observed an 87% lower level of daily 17β-estradiol throughout a menstrual cycle in heavier women (BMI >23.6 kg/m(2)) of rs7172156 with minor genotype aa compared with major genotype AA. Furthermore, the rs749292 minor alleles were inversely associated with absolute mammographic density (P = 0.032). Lean women with rs749292 minor alleles had 70 to 80% lower risk for high absolute mammographic density (>32.4 cm(2)); Aa: odds ratio (OR) = 0.23 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.75). Lean women with rs7172156 minor homozygous genotype had OR 5.45 for high absolute mammographic density (aa: OR = 5.45 (95% CI 1.13 to 26.3)). Our findings suggest that two SNPs in CYP19A1, rs749292 and rs7172156, are associated with both daily oestrogen levels and mammographic density phenotypes. BMI may modify these associations, but larger studies are needed.

  14. Adenosine receptors and caffeine in retinopathy of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Zhang, Shuya; Zhou, Rong; Lin, Zhenlang; Cai, Xiaohong; Lin, Jing; Huo, Yuqing; Liu, Xiaoling

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a major cause of childhood blindness in the world and is caused by oxygen-induced damage to the developing retinal vasculature, resulting in hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration and subsequent delayed retinal vascularization and hypoxia-induced pathological neovascularization driven by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway in retina. Current anti-VEGF therapy has shown some effective in a clinical trial, but is associated with the unintended effects on delayed eye growth and retinal vasculature development of preterm infants. Notably, cellular responses to hypoxia are characterized by robust increases in extracellular adenosine production and the markedly induced adenosine receptors, which provide a novel target for preferential control of pathological angiogenesis without affecting normal vascular development. Here, we review the experimental evidence in support of adenosine receptor-based therapeutic strategy for ROP, including the aberrant adenosine signaling in oxygen-induced retinopathy and the role of three adenosine receptor subtypes (A1R, A2AR, A2BR) in development and treatment of ROP using oxygen-induced retinopathy models. The clinical and initial animal evidence that implicate the therapeutic effect of caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) in treatment of ROP are highlighted. Lastly, we discussed the translational potential as well therapeutic advantage of adenosine receptor- and caffeine-based therapy for ROR and possibly other proliferative retinopathy. PMID:28088487

  15. Gravity receptors and responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Allan H.

    1989-01-01

    The overall process of gravity sensing and response processes in plants may be divided conveniently into at least four components or stages: Stimulus susception (a physical event, characteristically the input to the G receptor system of environmental information about the G force magnitude, its vector direction, or both); information perception (an influence of susception on some biological structure or process that can be described as the transformation of environmental information into a biologicallly meaningful change); information transport (the export, if required, of an influence (often chemical) to cells and organs other than those at the sensor location); and biological response (almost always (in plants) a growth change of some kind). Some analysts of the process identify, between information perception and information transport, an additional stage, transduction, which would emphasize the importance of a transformation from one form of information to another, for example from mechanical statolith displacement to an electric, chemical, or other alteration that was its indirect result. These four (or five) stages are temporally sequential. Even if all that occurs at each stage can not be confidently identified, it seems evident that during transduction and transport, matters dealt with are found relatively late in the information flow rather than at the perception stage. As more and more is learned about the roles played by plant hormones which condition the G responses, the mechanism(s) of perception which should be are not necessarily better understood. However, if by asking the right questions and being lucky with experiments perhaps the discovery of how some process (such as sedimentation of protoplasmic organelles) dictates what happens down stream in the information flow sequence may be made.

  16. Piperidine derivatives as nonprostanoid IP receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ryoji; Sakagami, Hideki; Koiwa, Masakazu; Ito, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Mitsuko; Isogaya, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of a new class of nonprostanoid prostaglandin I2 receptor (IP receptor) agonists is reported. Among them, the unique piperidine derivative 31b (2-((1-(2-(N-(4-tolyl)benzamido)ethyl)piperidin-4-yl)oxy)acetic acid) was a good IP receptor agonist and was 50-fold more selective for the human IP receptor than for other human prostanoid receptors. This compound showed good pharmacokinetic properties in dog. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Induction and expression of GluA1 (GluR-A)-independent LTP in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Romberg, Carola; Raffel, Joel; Martin, Lucy; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H; Rawlins, J Nicholas P; Bannerman, David M; Paulsen, Ole

    2009-03-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses is thought to be mediated, at least in part, by an increase in the postsynaptic surface expression of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole proprionic acid (AMPA) receptors induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. While this process was originally attributed to the regulated synaptic insertion of GluA1 (GluR-A) subunit-containing AMPA receptors, recent evidence suggests that regulated synaptic trafficking of GluA2 subunits might also contribute to one or several phases of potentiation. However, it has so far been difficult to separate these two mechanisms experimentally. Here we used genetically modified mice lacking the GluA1 subunit (Gria1(-/-) mice) to investigate GluA1-independent mechanisms of LTP at CA3-CA1 synapses in transverse hippocampal slices. An extracellular, paired theta-burst stimulation paradigm induced a robust GluA1-independent form of LTP lacking the early, rapidly decaying component characteristic of LTP in wild-type mice. This GluA1-independent form of LTP was attenuated by inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and protein kinase C (PKC), two enzymes known to regulate GluA2 surface expression. Furthermore, the induction of GluA1-independent potentiation required the activation of GluN2B (NR2B) subunit-containing NMDA receptors. Our findings support and extend the evidence that LTP at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses comprises a rapidly decaying, GluA1-dependent component and a more sustained, GluA1-independent component, induced and expressed via a separate mechanism involving GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, neuronal nitric oxide synthase and PKC.

  18. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hubers, Scott A; Brown, Nancy J

    2016-03-15

    Heart failure affects ≈5.7 million people in the United States alone. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, β-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have improved mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, but mortality remains high. In July 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first of a new class of drugs for the treatment of heart failure: Valsartan/sacubitril (formerly known as LCZ696 and currently marketed by Novartis as Entresto) combines the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug sacubitril in a 1:1 ratio in a sodium supramolecular complex. Sacubitril is converted by esterases to LBQ657, which inhibits neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of the natriuretic peptides and many other vasoactive peptides. Thus, this combined angiotensin receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor addresses 2 of the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure: activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreased sensitivity to natriuretic peptides. In the Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial, valsartan/sacubitril significantly reduced mortality and hospitalization for heart failure, as well as blood pressure, compared with enalapril in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and an elevated circulating level of brain natriuretic peptide or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of valsartan/sacubitril in the treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and hypertension. We review here the mechanisms of action of valsartan/sacubitril, the pharmacological properties of the drug, and its efficacy and safety in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hubers, Scott A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States alone. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have improved mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, but mortality remains high. In July 2015, the FDA approved the first of a new class of drugs for the treatment of heart failure; valsartan/sacubitril (formerly known as LCZ696 and currently marketed by Novartis as Entresto) combines the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug sacubitril in a 1:1 ratio in a sodium supramolecular complex. Sacubitril is converted by esterases to LBQ657, which inhibits neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of the natriuretic peptides and many other vasoactive peptides. Thus, this combined angiotensin receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor addresses two of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of heart failure - activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreased sensitivity to natriuretic peptides. In the Prospective comparison of ARNI with ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial, valsartan/sacubitril significantly reduced mortality and hospitalization for heart failure, as well as blood pressure, compared to enalapril in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and an elevated circulating level of brain natriuretic peptide or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of valsartan/sacubitril in the treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and hypertension. We review here the mechanisms of action of valsartan/sacubitril, the pharmacologic properties of the drug, and its efficacy and safety in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension. PMID:26976916

  20. Interactions between Intracellular Domains as Key Determinants of the Quaternary Structure and Function of Receptor Heteromers*

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Ferré, Sergi; Cordomi, Arnau; Moreno, Estefania; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Hoffmann, Hanne; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Pardo, Leonardo; Franco, Rafael; Woods, Amina S.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers are macromolecular complexes with unique functional properties different from those of its individual protomers. Little is known about what determines the quaternary structure of GPCR heteromers resulting in their unique functional properties. In this study, using resonance energy transfer techniques in experiments with mutated receptors, we provide for the first time clear evidence for a key role of intracellular domains in the determination of the quaternary structure of GPCR heteromers between adenosine A2A, cannabinoid CB1, and dopamine D2 receptors. In these interactions, arginine-rich epitopes form salt bridges with phosphorylated serine or threonine residues from CK1/2 consensus sites. Each receptor (A2A, CB1, and D2) was found to include two evolutionarily conserved intracellular domains to establish selective electrostatic interactions with intracellular domains of the other two receptors, indicating that these particular electrostatic interactions constitute a general mechanism for receptor heteromerization. Mutation experiments indicated that the interactions of the intracellular domains of the CB1 receptor with A2A and D2 receptors are fundamental for the correct formation of the quaternary structure needed for the function (MAPK signaling) of the A2A-CB1-D2 receptor heteromers. Analysis of MAPK signaling in striatal slices of CB1 receptor KO mice and wild-type littermates supported the existence of A1-CB1-D2 receptor heteromer in the brain. These findings allowed us to propose the first molecular model of the quaternary structure of a receptor heteromultimer. PMID:20562103

  1. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (): hyperlinking the nuclear receptor signaling community

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Rainer B.; Jericevic, Zeljko; Zuercher, William J.; Watkins, Chris; Steffen, David L.; Margolis, Ronald; McKenna, Neil J.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear receptor signaling (NRS) field has generated a substantial body of information on nuclear receptors, their ligands and coregulators, with the ultimate goal of constructing coherent models of the biological and clinical significance of these molecules. As a component of the Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)—the development of a functional atlas of nuclear receptor biology—the NURSA Bioinformatics Resource is developing a strategy to organize and integrate legacy and future information on these molecules in a single web-based resource (). This entails parallel efforts of (i) developing an appropriate software framework for handling datasets from NURSA laboratories and (ii) designing strategies for the curation and presentation of public data relevant to NRS. To illustrate our approach, we have described here in detail the development of a web-based interface for the NURSA quantitative PCR nuclear receptor expression dataset, incorporating bioinformatics analysis which provides novel perspectives on functional relationships between these molecules. We anticipate that the free and open access of the community to a platform for data mining and hypothesis generation strategies will be a significant contribution to the progress of research in this field. PMID:16381851

  2. The orphan receptor GPR55 is a novel cannabinoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ryberg, E; Larsson, N; Sjögren, S; Hjorth, S; Hermansson, N-O; Leonova, J; Elebring, T; Nilsson, K; Drmota, T; Greasley, P J

    2007-01-01

    Background: The endocannabinoid system functions through two well characterized receptor systems, the CB1 and CB2 receptors. Work by a number of groups in recent years has provided evidence that the system is more complicated and additional receptor types should exist to explain ligand activity in a number of physiological processes. Experimental approach: Cells transfected with the human cDNA for GPR55 were tested for their ability to bind and to mediate GTPγS binding by cannabinoid ligands. Using an antibody and peptide blocking approach, the nature of the G-protein coupling was determined and further demonstrated by measuring activity of downstream signalling pathways. Key results: We demonstrate that GPR55 binds to and is activated by the cannabinoid ligand CP55940. In addition endocannabinoids including anandamide and virodhamine activate GTPγS binding via GPR55 with nM potencies. Ligands such as cannabidiol and abnormal cannabidiol which exhibit no CB1or CB2 activity and are believed to function at a novel cannabinoid receptor, also showed activity at GPR55. GPR55 couples to Gα13 and can mediate activation of rhoA, cdc42 and rac1. Conclusions: These data suggest that GPR55 is a novel cannabinoid receptor, and its ligand profile with respect to CB1 and CB2 described here will permit delineation of its physiological function(s). PMID:17876302

  3. Metabolic products of linalool and modulation of GABAA receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanos, Sinem; Elsharif, Shaimaa A.; Janzen, Dieter; Buettner, Andrea; Villmann, Carmen

    2017-06-01

    Terpenoids are major subcomponents in aroma substances which harbor sedative physiological potential. We have demonstrated that various monoterpenoids such as the acyclic linalool enhance GABAergic currents in an allosteric manner in vitro upon overexpression of inhibitory a1b2 GABAA receptors in various expression systems. However, in plants or humans, i.e. following intake via inhalation or ingestion, linalool undergoes metabolic modifications including oxygenation and acetylation, which may affect the modulatory efficacy of the generated linalool derivatives. Here, we analyzed the modulatory potential of linalool derivatives at a1b2g2 GABAA receptors upon transient overexpression. Following receptor expression control, electrophysiological recordings in a whole cell configuration were used to determine the chloride influx upon co-application of GABA EC5-10 together with the modulatory substance. Our results show that only oxygenated linalool metabolites at carbon 8 positively affect GABAergic currents whereas derivatives hydroxylated or carboxylated at carbon 8 were rather ineffective. Acetylated linalool derivatives resulted in non-significant changes of GABAergic currents. We can conclude that metabolism of linalool reduces its positive allosteric potential at GABAA receptors compared to the significant potentiation effects of the parent molecule linalool itself.

  4. Reversibility of Intersystem Crossing in the {a}1A1(000) and {a}1A1(010) States of Methylene, CH_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh T.; Sears, Trevor; Hall, Gregory

    2015-06-01

    The lowest energy singlet ( {a}1A1) and triplet ( {X}3B1) electronic states of methylene, CH_2, are only separated by 3150 wn, but differ greatly in chemical reactivity. Overall methylene reaction rates and chemical behavior are therefore strongly dependent on collisionally-mediated singlet-triplet interconversion. Collisions with inert partners tend to depopulate the excited singlet state and populate vibrationally excited triplet levels in CH_2. This process is generally considered as irreversible for large molecules, however, this is not the case for small molecules such as CH_2. An investigation of the decay kinetics of CH_2 in the presence of argon and various amounts of oxygen has been carried out using transient frequency modulation (FM) absorption spectroscopy, to monitor ortho and para rotational levels in both the {a}1A1(000) and {a}1A1(010) states. In the {a}1A1(000) state, all observed rotational levels follow double exponential decay kinetics, a direct consequence of reversible intersystem crossing. The relative amplitude of the slower decay component is an indicator of how quickly the reverse crossing from excited triplet levels becomes significant during the reaction and relaxation of singlet methylene. The para rotational levels show more obvious signs of reversibility than ortho rotational levels. Adding oxygen enhances the visibility of reversibility for both ortho and para levels. However, in the {a}1A1(010) state where the FM signal is 5-10 times smaller than the {a}1A1(000) state, there is no evidence of double exponential decay kinetics. Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 and DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  5. The A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 2 Has Higher Affinity for Ribosomes and Higher Catalytic Activity than the A1 Subunit of Shiga Toxin 1

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Debaleena; Li, Xiao-Ping; Kahn, Jennifer N.; May, Kerrie L.; Kahn, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections can lead to life-threatening complications, including hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in the United States. Stx1 and Stx2 are AB5 toxins consisting of an enzymatically active A subunit associated with a pentamer of receptor binding B subunits. Epidemiological evidence suggests that Stx2-producing E. coli strains are more frequently associated with HUS than Stx1-producing strains. Several studies suggest that the B subunit plays a role in mediating toxicity. However, the role of the A subunits in the increased potency of Stx2 has not been fully investigated. Here, using purified A1 subunits, we show that Stx2A1 has a higher affinity for yeast and mammalian ribosomes than Stx1A1. Biacore analysis indicated that Stx2A1 has faster association and dissociation with ribosomes than Stx1A1. Analysis of ribosome depurination kinetics demonstrated that Stx2A1 depurinates yeast and mammalian ribosomes and an RNA stem-loop mimic of the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) at a higher catalytic rate and is a more efficient enzyme than Stx1A1. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes at a higher level in vivo and was more cytotoxic than Stx1A1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Stx2A1 depurinated ribosomes and inhibited translation at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1 in human cells. These results provide the first direct evidence that the higher affinity for ribosomes in combination with higher catalytic activity toward the SRL allows Stx2A1 to depurinate ribosomes, inhibit translation, and exhibit cytotoxicity at a significantly higher level than Stx1A1. PMID:26483409

  6. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  7. Expression Profile and Role of EphrinA1 Ligand After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Arocho, Luz C.; Figueroa, Johnny D.; Torrado, Aranza I.; Santiago, José M.; Vera, Ariel E.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers the re-expression of inhibitory molecules present in early stages of development, contributing to prevention of axonal regeneration. Upregulation of EphA receptor tyrosine kinases after injury suggest their involvement in the nervous system's response to damage. However, the expression profile of their ephrinA ligands after SCI is unclear. In this study, we determined the expression of ephrinA ligands after contusive SCI. Adult Sprague-Dawley female rats were injured using the MASCIS impactor device at the T10 vertebrae, and levels of ephrinA mRNA and protein determined at different time points. Identification of the cell phenotype expressing the ephrin ligand and colocalization with Eph receptors was performed with immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Behavioral studies were made, after blocking ephrinA1 expression with antisense (AS) oligonucleotides, to assess hindlimb locomotor activity. Real-time PCR demonstrated basal mRNA levels of ephrin (A1, A2, A3, and A5) in the adult spinal cord. Interestingly, ephrinA1 was the only ligand whose mRNA levels were significantly altered after SCI. Although ephrinA1 mRNA levels increased after 2 weeks and remain elevated, we did not observe this pattern at the protein level as revealed by western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical studies showed ephrinA1 expression in reactive astrocytes, axons, and neurons and also their colocalization with EphA4 and A7 receptors. Behavioral studies revealed worsening of locomotor activity when ephrinA1 expression was reduced. This study suggests that ephrinA1 ligands play a role in the pathophysiology of SCI. PMID:21603973

  8. Expression profile and role of EphrinA1 ligand after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Arocho, Luz C; Figueroa, Johnny D; Torrado, Aranza I; Santiago, José M; Vera, Ariel E; Miranda, Jorge D

    2011-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers the re-expression of inhibitory molecules present in early stages of development, contributing to prevention of axonal regeneration. Upregulation of EphA receptor tyrosine kinases after injury suggest their involvement in the nervous system's response to damage. However, the expression profile of their ephrinA ligands after SCI is unclear. In this study, we determined the expression of ephrinA ligands after contusive SCI. Adult Sprague-Dawley female rats were injured using the MASCIS impactor device at the T10 vertebrae, and levels of ephrinA mRNA and protein determined at different time points. Identification of the cell phenotype expressing the ephrin ligand and colocalization with Eph receptors was performed with immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Behavioral studies were made, after blocking ephrinA1 expression with antisense (AS) oligonucleotides, to assess hindlimb locomotor activity. Real-time PCR demonstrated basal mRNA levels of ephrin (A1, A2, A3, and A5) in the adult spinal cord. Interestingly, ephrinA1 was the only ligand whose mRNA levels were significantly altered after SCI. Although ephrinA1 mRNA levels increased after 2 weeks and remain elevated, we did not observe this pattern at the protein level as revealed by western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical studies showed ephrinA1 expression in reactive astrocytes, axons, and neurons and also their colocalization with EphA4 and A7 receptors. Behavioral studies revealed worsening of locomotor activity when ephrinA1 expression was reduced. This study suggests that ephrinA1 ligands play a role in the pathophysiology of SCI.

  9. IL-11 Is Required for A1 Adenosine Receptor–Mediated Protection against Ischemic AKI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yun; Kim, Mihwa; Ham, Ahrom; Brown, Kevin M.; Greene, Robert W.; D’Agati, Vivette D.

    2013-01-01

    A1 adenosine receptor activation ameliorates ischemic AKI through the induction of renal proximal tubular sphingosine kinase-1. However, systemic adverse effects may limit A1 adenosine receptor–based therapy for ischemic AKI, indicating a need to identify alternative therapeutic targets within this pathway. Here, we evaluated the function of renal proximal tubular IL-11, a clinically approved hematopoietic cytokine, in A1 adenosine receptor–mediated induction of sphingosine kinase-1 and renal protection. Treatment of human proximal tubule epithelial (HK-2) cells with a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist, chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), induced the expression of IL-11 mRNA and protein in an extracellular signal–regulated kinase–dependent manner, and administration of CCPA in mice induced renal synthesis of IL-11. Pretreatment with CCPA protected against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in wild-type mice, but not in IL-11 receptor–deficient mice. Administration of an IL-11–neutralizing antibody abolished the renal protection provided by CCPA. Similarly, CCPA did not induce renal IL-11 expression or protect against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice lacking the renal proximal tubular A1 adenosine receptor. Finally, treatment with CCPA induced sphingosine kinase-1 in HK-2 cells and wild-type mice, but not in IL-11 receptor–deficient or renal proximal tubule A1 adenosine receptor–deficient mice. Taken together, these results suggest that induction of renal proximal tubule IL-11 is a critical intermediary in A1 adenosine receptor–mediated renal protection that warrants investigation as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic AKI. PMID:23813214

  10. Cross-communication between Gi and Gs in a G-protein-coupled receptor heterotetramer guided by a receptor C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Gemma; Cordomí, Arnau; Brugarolas, Marc; Moreno, Estefanía; Aguinaga, David; Pérez-Benito, Laura; Ferre, Sergi; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Pardo, Leonardo; McCormick, Peter J; Franco, Rafael

    2018-02-28

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromeric complexes have distinct properties from homomeric GPCRs, giving rise to new receptor functionalities. Adenosine receptors (A 1 R or A 2A R) can form A 1 R-A 2A R heteromers (A 1 -A 2A Het), and their activation leads to canonical G-protein-dependent (adenylate cyclase mediated) and -independent (β-arrestin mediated) signaling. Adenosine has different affinities for A 1 R and A 2A R, allowing the heteromeric receptor to detect its concentration by integrating the downstream G i - and G s -dependent signals. cAMP accumulation and β-arrestin recruitment assays have shown that, within the complex, activation of A 2A R impedes signaling via A 1 R. We examined the mechanism by which A 1 -A 2A Het integrates G i - and G s -dependent signals. A 1 R blockade by A 2A R in the A 1 -A 2A Het is not observed in the absence of A 2A R activation by agonists, in the absence of the C-terminal domain of A 2A R, or in the presence of synthetic peptides that disrupt the heteromer interface of A 1 -A 2A Het, indicating that signaling mediated by A 1 R and A 2A R is controlled by both G i and G s proteins. We identified a new mechanism of signal transduction that implies a cross-communication between G i and G s proteins guided by the C-terminal tail of the A 2A R. This mechanism provides the molecular basis for the operation of the A 1 -A 2A Het as an adenosine concentration-sensing device that modulates the signals originating at both A 1 R and A 2A R.

  11. Purinergic receptors in ocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly "tuned," can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P(1),P(4)-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P(1),P(5)-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  12. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation. PMID:25132732

  13. Flavonoid modulation of GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, Jane R; Chebib, Mary; Johnston, Graham A R

    2011-01-01

    There has been a resurgence of interest in synthetic and plant-derived flavonoids as modulators of γ-amino butyric acid-A (GABAA) receptor function influencing inhibition mediated by the major inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in the brain. Areas of interest include (i) flavonoids that show subtype selectivity in recombinant receptor studies in vitro consistent with their behavioural effects in vivo, (ii) flumazenil-insensitive modulation of GABAA receptor function by flavonoids, (iii) the ability of some flavonoids to act as second-order modulators of first-order modulation by benzodiazepines and (iv) the identification of the different sites of action of flavonoids on GABAA receptor complexes. An emerging area of interest is the activation of GABAA receptors by flavonoids in the absence of GABA. The relatively rigid shape of flavonoids means that they are useful scaffolds for the design of new therapeutic agents. Like steroids, flavonoids have wide-ranging effects on numerous biological targets. The challenge is to understand the structural determinants of flavonoid effects on particular targets and to develop agents specific for these targets. PMID:21244373

  14. Glutamate receptor dysfunction and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Olney, J W; Farber, N B

    1995-12-01

    In this article, we advance a unified hypothesis pertaining to combined dysfunction of dopamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors that highlights N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction as a key mechanism that can help explain major clinical and pathophysiological aspects of schizophrenia. The following fundamental features of schizophrenia are accommodated by this hypothesis: (1) the occurrence of structural brain changes during early development that have the potential for producing subsequent clinical manifestations of schizophrenia, (2) a quiescent period in infancy and adolescence before clinical manifestations are expressed, (3) onset in early adulthood of psychotic symptoms, (4) involvement of dopamine (D2) receptors in some cases but not others that would explain why some but not all patients are responsive to typical neuroleptic therapy, and (5) ongoing neurodegenerative changes and cognitive deterioration in some patients. We propose that since N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction can cause psychosis in humans and corticolimbic neurodegenerative changes in the rat brain, and since these changes are prevented by certain antipsychotic drugs, including atypical neuroleptic agents (clozapine, olanzapine, fluperlapine), a better understanding of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction mechanism and ways of preventing its neurodegenerative consequences in the rat brain may lead to improved pharmacotherapy in schizophrenia.

  15. Receptor-mediated cell mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunfeng; Ju, Lining; Rushdi, Muaz; Ge, Chenghao; Zhu, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Mechanosensing describes the ability of a cell to sense mechanical cues of its microenvironment, including not only all components of force, stress, and strain but also substrate rigidity, topology, and adhesiveness. This ability is crucial for the cell to respond to the surrounding mechanical cues and adapt to the changing environment. Examples of responses and adaptation include (de)activation, proliferation/apoptosis, and (de)differentiation. Receptor-mediated cell mechanosensing is a multistep process that is initiated by binding of cell surface receptors to their ligands on the extracellular matrix or the surface of adjacent cells. Mechanical cues are presented by the ligand and received by the receptor at the binding interface; but their transmission over space and time and their conversion into biochemical signals may involve other domains and additional molecules. In this review, a four-step model is described for the receptor-mediated cell mechanosensing process. Platelet glycoprotein Ib, T-cell receptor, and integrins are used as examples to illustrate the key concepts and players in this process. PMID:28954860

  16. Therapeutic Potential of Kainate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are key mediators of brain communication. Among ionotropic glutamate receptors, kainate receptors (KARs) have been least explored and their relevance to pathophysiology is relatively obscure. This is in part due to the relatively low abundance of KARs, the regulatory function in network activity they play, the lack of specific agonists and antagonists for this receptor subtype, as well as to the absence of striking phenotypes in mice deficient in KAR subunits. Nonetheless, it is now well established that KARs are located presynaptically whereby they regulate glutamate and GABA release, and thus, excitability and participate in short-term plasticity. In turn, KARs are also located postsynaptically and their activation contributes to synaptic integration. The development of specific novel ligands is helping to further investigate the contribution of KARs to health and disease. In this review, I summarize current knowledge about KAR physiology and pharmacology, and discuss their involvement in cell death and disease. In addition, I recapitulate the available data about the use of KAR antagonists and receptor subunit deficient mice in experimental paradigms of brain diseases, as well as the main findings about KAR roles in human CNS disorders. In sum, subunit specific antagonists have therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases as well as in epilepsy and pain. Knowledge about the genetics of KARs will also help to understand the pathophysiology of those and other illnesses. PMID:21129167

  17. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Purpose. 168a.1 Section 168a.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING NATIONAL DEFENSE SCIENCE AND... National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191. (b...

  18. 32 CFR 242a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability. 242a.1 Section 242a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PUBLIC MEETING PROCEDURES OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES...

  19. 32 CFR 242a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability. 242a.1 Section 242a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PUBLIC MEETING PROCEDURES OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES...

  20. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Purpose. 168a.1 Section 168a.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING NATIONAL DEFENSE SCIENCE AND... National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191. (b...

  1. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 168a.1 Section 168a.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING NATIONAL DEFENSE SCIENCE AND... National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191. (b...

  2. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Purpose. 168a.1 Section 168a.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING NATIONAL DEFENSE SCIENCE AND... National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191. (b...

  3. 32 CFR 242a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability. 242a.1 Section 242a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PUBLIC MEETING PROCEDURES OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES...

  4. 32 CFR 242a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability. 242a.1 Section 242a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PUBLIC MEETING PROCEDURES OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES...

  5. 32 CFR 242a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability. 242a.1 Section 242a.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PUBLIC MEETING PROCEDURES OF THE BOARD OF REGENTS, UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIVERSITY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES...

  6. 32 CFR 168a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Purpose. 168a.1 Section 168a.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING NATIONAL DEFENSE SCIENCE AND... National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowships, as required by 10 U.S.C. 2191. (b...

  7. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Test: Hemoglobin ... Análisis de sangre: hemoglobina A1c What Is a Blood Test? A blood test is when a sample of ...

  8. 42 CFR 2a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... research on mental health, including research on the use and effect of alcohol and other psychoactive drugs... engaged in research on mental health including research on the use and effect of alcohol and other... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Applicability. 2a.1 Section 2a.1 Public Health...

  9. 42 CFR 2a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... research on mental health, including research on the use and effect of alcohol and other psychoactive drugs... engaged in research on mental health including research on the use and effect of alcohol and other... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Applicability. 2a.1 Section 2a.1 Public Health...

  10. 42 CFR 2a.1 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... research on mental health, including research on the use and effect of alcohol and other psychoactive drugs... engaged in research on mental health including research on the use and effect of alcohol and other... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Applicability. 2a.1 Section 2a.1 Public Health...

  11. 32 CFR 169a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 2 See footnote 1 to... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Purpose. 169a.1 Section 169a.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM...

  12. 32 CFR 169a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 2 See footnote 1 to... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Purpose. 169a.1 Section 169a.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM...

  13. 32 CFR 169a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 2 See footnote 1 to... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Purpose. 169a.1 Section 169a.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM...

  14. 32 CFR 169a.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 2 See footnote 1 to... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 169a.1 Section 169a.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM...

  15. 15 CFR 4a.1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the United States. Accordingly, security classification shall be applied only to protect the national... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General. 4a.1 Section 4a.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce CLASSIFICATION, DECLASSIFICATION, AND PUBLIC...

  16. 12 CFR 269a.1 - Party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Party. 269a.1 Section 269a.1 Banks and Banking... Party. The term Party means any person, employee, group of employees, labor organization, or bank as... rules and regulations, (b) named as a party in a charge, complaint, petition, application, or request...

  17. 12 CFR 269a.1 - Party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Party. 269a.1 Section 269a.1 Banks and Banking... Party. The term Party means any person, employee, group of employees, labor organization, or bank as... rules and regulations, (b) named as a party in a charge, complaint, petition, application, or request...

  18. Scavenger receptors in homeostasis and immunity.

    PubMed

    Canton, Johnathan; Neculai, Dante; Grinstein, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Scavenger receptors were originally identified by their ability to recognize and to remove modified lipoproteins; however, it is now appreciated that they carry out a striking range of functions, including pathogen clearance, lipid transport, the transport of cargo within the cell and even functioning as taste receptors. The large repertoire of ligands recognized by scavenger receptors and their broad range of functions are not only due to the wide range of receptors that constitute this family but also to their ability to partner with various co-receptors. The ability of individual scavenger receptors to associate with different co-receptors makes their responsiveness extremely versatile. This Review highlights recent insights into the structural features that determine the function of scavenger receptors and the emerging role that these receptors have in immune responses, notably in macrophage polarization and in the pathogenesis of diseases such as atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Photo-antagonism of the GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Martin; Iqbal, Favaad; Pandurangan, Arun P; Hannan, Saad; Huckvale, Rosemary; Topf, Maya; Baker, James R; Smart, Trevor G

    2014-07-29

    Neurotransmitter receptor trafficking is fundamentally important for synaptic transmission and neural network activity. GABAA receptors and inhibitory synapses are vital components of brain function, yet much of our knowledge regarding receptor mobility and function at inhibitory synapses is derived indirectly from using recombinant receptors, antibody-tagged native receptors and pharmacological treatments. Here we describe the use of a set of research tools that can irreversibly bind to and affect the function of recombinant and neuronal GABAA receptors following ultraviolet photoactivation. These compounds are based on the competitive antagonist gabazine and incorporate a variety of photoactive groups. By using site-directed mutagenesis and ligand-docking studies, they reveal new areas of the GABA binding site at the interface between receptor β and α subunits. These compounds enable the selected inactivation of native GABAA receptor populations providing new insight into the function of inhibitory synapses and extrasynaptic receptors in controlling neuronal excitation.

  20. Photo-antagonism of the GABAA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Martin; Iqbal, Favaad; Pandurangan, Arun P.; Hannan, Saad; Huckvale, Rosemary; Topf, Maya; Baker, James R.; Smart, Trevor G.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor trafficking is fundamentally important for synaptic transmission and neural network activity. GABAA receptors and inhibitory synapses are vital components of brain function, yet much of our knowledge regarding receptor mobility and function at inhibitory synapses is derived indirectly from using recombinant receptors, antibody-tagged native receptors and pharmacological treatments. Here we describe the use of a set of research tools that can irreversibly bind to and affect the function of recombinant and neuronal GABAA receptors following ultraviolet photoactivation. These compounds are based on the competitive antagonist gabazine and incorporate a variety of photoactive groups. By using site-directed mutagenesis and ligand-docking studies, they reveal new areas of the GABA binding site at the interface between receptor β and α subunits. These compounds enable the selected inactivation of native GABAA receptor populations providing new insight into the function of inhibitory synapses and extrasynaptic receptors in controlling neuronal excitation. PMID:25072879

  1. Modulation of Xenobiotic Receptors by Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Monimoy; Robbins, Delira; Chen, Taosheng

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate the expression of their target genes. NRs play important roles in many human diseases, including metabolic diseases and cancer, and are therefore a key class of therapeutic targets. Steroids play important roles in regulating nuclear receptors; in addition to being ligands of steroid receptors, steroids (and their metabolites) also regulate other NRs, such as the pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor (termed xenobiotic receptors), which participate in steroid metabolism. Xenobiotic receptors have promiscuous ligand-binding properties, and their structurally diverse ligands include steroids and their metabolites. Therefore, steroids, their metabolism and metabolites, xenobiotic receptors, steroid receptors, and the respective signaling pathways they regulate have functional interactions. This review discusses these functional interactions and their implications for activities mediated by steroid receptors and xenobiotic receptors, focusing on steroids that modulate pathways involving the pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor. The emphasis of the review is on structure-function studies of xenobiotic receptors bound to steroid ligands. PMID:23884115

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation by the Cannabinoid Receptor (CB1) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Induces Differential Responses in Corneal Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by the cannabinoid receptor (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) induces...Available online 7 July 2010 Keywords: cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR...release of endogenous metabolites that are cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) agonists. We determined

  3. 5-Hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor neuroprotection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity is PDGFβ receptor dependent.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the hippocampus. Long-term (2-24 h) activation of 5-HT7 receptors regulates growth factor receptor expression, including the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors. Direct activation of PDGFβ receptors in primary hippocampal and cortical neurons inhibits NMDA receptor activity and attenuates NMDA receptor-induced neurotoxicity. Our objective was to investigate whether the 5-HT7 receptor-induced increase in PDGFβ receptor expression would be similarly neuroprotective. We demonstrate that 5-HT7 receptor agonist treatment in primary hippocampal neurons also increases the expression of phospholipase C (PLC) γ, a downstream effector of PDGFβ receptors associated with the inhibition of NMDA receptor activity. To determine if the up-regulation of PDGFβ receptors is neuroprotective, primary hippocampal neurons were incubated with the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP 12, for 24 h. Indeed, LP 12 treatment prevented NMDA-induced neurotoxicity and this effect was dependent on PDGFβ receptor kinase activity. Treatment of primary neurons with LP 12 also differentially altered NMDA receptor subunit expression, reducing the expression of NR1 and NR2B, but not NR2A. These findings demonstrate the potential for providing growth factor receptor-dependent neuroprotective effects using small-molecule ligands of G protein-coupled receptors. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. EphrinA1-induced cytoskeletal re-organization requires FAK and p130(cas).

    PubMed

    Carter, Nigel; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Hirai, Hisamaru; Hunter, Tony

    2002-08-01

    Ephrins and Eph receptors are involved in axon guidance and cellular morphogenesis. An interaction between ephrin and Eph receptors elicits neuronal growth-cone collapse through cytoskeletal disassembly. When NIH3T3 cells were plated onto an ephrinA1-coated surface, the cells both adhered and spread. Adhesion and spreading proceeded concomitantly with changes in both the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. EphA2, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and p130(cas) were identified as the major ephrin-dependent phosphotyrosyl proteins during the ephrin-induced morphological changes. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from FAK(-/-) and p130(cas-/-) mice had severe defects in ephrinA1-induced cell spreading, which were reversed after re-expression of FAK or p130(cas), respectively. Expression of a constitutively active EphA2 induced NIH3T3 cells to undergo identical, but ligand-independent, morphological changes. These data show that ephrinA1 can induce cell adhesion and actin cytoskeletal changes in fibroblasts in a FAK- and p130(cas)-dependent manner, through activation of the EphA2 receptor. The finding that ephrin Eph signalling can result in actin cytoskeletal assembly, rather than disassembly, has many implications for ephrin Eph responses in other cell types.

  5. History of Discovery: The LDL Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its co-discoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life. PMID:19299327

  6. Angiotensin Receptor-Neprilysin Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Havakuk, Ofer; Elkayam, Uri

    2017-07-01

    The novel combination sacubitril/valsartan represents a new therapeutic approach in the management of heart failure. With the simultaneous blockage of the enzyme neprilysin (by sacubitril) and angiotensin II receptors (by valsartan), this combination reduces the degradation of natriuretic peptides and other counterregulatory peptide systems while avoiding the deleterious effect of angiotensin II receptors activation and thereby encompasses a beneficial impact of 2 important neurohormonal pathways activated in heart failure. As opposed to previously tested neprilysin inhibitors, sacubitril/valsartan represents a more effective method in reducing morbidity and mortality in heart failure, while preserving a safety profile comparable to well-established, standard, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor's therapy.

  7. Physiological role for P2X1 receptors in renal microvascular autoregulatory behavior

    PubMed Central

    Inscho, Edward W.; Cook, Anthony K.; Imig, John D.; Vial, Catherine; Evans, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that P2X1 receptors mediate pressure-induced afferent arteriolar autoregulatory responses. Afferent arterioles from rats and P2X1 KO mice were examined using the juxtamedullary nephron technique. Arteriolar diameter was measured in response to step increases in renal perfusion pressure (RPP). Autoregulatory adjustments in diameter were measured before and during P2X