Science.gov

Sample records for a1 remnant ratio

  1. The utility of the apolipoprotein A1 remnant ratio in predicting incidence coronary heart disease in a primary prevention cohort: The Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    May, Heidi T; Nelson, John R; Lirette, Seth T; Kulkarni, Krishnaji R; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Michael E; Horne, Benjamin D; Correa, Adolfo; Muhlestein, Joseph B

    2016-05-01

    Dyslipidemia plays a significant role in the progression of cardiovascular disease. The apolipoprotein (apo) A1 remnant ratio (apo A1/VLDL3-C + IDL-C) has recently been shown to be a strong predictor of death/myocardial infarction risk among women >50 years undergoing angiography. However, whether this ratio is associated with coronary heart disease risk among other populations is unknown. We evaluated the apo A1 remnant ratio and its components for coronary heart disease incidence. Observational. Participants (N = 4722) of the Jackson Heart Study were evaluated. Baseline clinical characteristics and lipoprotein subfractions (Vertical Auto Profile method) were collected. Cox hazard regression analysis, adjusted by standard cardiovascular risk factors, was utilized to determine associations of lipoproteins with coronary heart disease. Those with new-onset coronary heart disease were older, diabetic, smokers, had less education, used more lipid-lowering medication, and had a more atherogenic lipoprotein profile. After adjustment, the apo A1 remnant ratio (hazard ratio = 0.67 per 1-SD, p = 0.002) was strongly associated with coronary heart disease incidence. This association appears to be driven by the IDL-C denominator (hazard ratio = 1.23 per 1-SD, p = 0.007). Remnants (hazard ratio = 1.21 per 1-SD, p = 0.017), but not apo A1 (hazard ratio = 0.85 per 1-SD, p = 0.121) or VLDL3-C (hazard ratio = 1.13 per 1-SD, p = 0.120) were associated with coronary heart disease. Standard lipids were not associated with coronary heart disease incidence. We found the apo A1 remnant ratio to be strongly associated with coronary heart disease. This ratio appears to better stratify risk than standard lipids, apo A1, and remnants among a primary prevention cohort of African Americans. Its utility requires further study as a lipoprotein management target for risk reduction. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  2. Ratio of remnant to total liver volume or remnant to body weight: which one is more predictive on donor outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Yaprak, Onur; Guler, Necdet; Altaca, Gulum; Dayangac, Murat; Demirbas, Tolga; Akyildiz, Murat; Ulusoy, Levent; Tokat, Yaman; Yuzer, Yildiray

    2012-01-01

    Backround Right lobe donations are known to expose the donors to more surgical risks than left lobe donations. In the present study, the effects of remnant volume on donor outcomes after right lobe living donor hepatectomies were investigated. Methods The data on 262 consecutive living liver donors who had undergone a right hepatectomy from January 2004 to June 2011 were retrospectively analysed. The influence of the remnant on the outcomes was investigated according to the two different definitions. These were: (i) the ratio of the remnant liver volume to total liver volume (RLV/TLV) and (ii) the remnant liver volume to donor body weight ratio (RLV/BWR). For RLV/TLV, the effects of having a percentage of 30% or below and for RLV/BWR, the effects of values lower than 0.6 on the results were investigated. Results Complication and major complication rates were 44.7% and 13.2% for donors with RLV/TLV of ≤30%, and 35.9% and 9.4% for donors with RLV/BWR of < 0.6, respectively. In donors with RLV/TLV of ≤30%, RLV/BWR being below or above 0.6 did not influence the results in terms of liver function tests, complications and hospital stay. The main impact on the outcome was posed by RLV/TLV of ≤30%. Conclusion Remnant volume in a right lobe living donor hepatectomy has adverse effects on donor outcomes when RLV/TLV is ≤30% independent from the rate of RLV/BWR with a cut-off point of 0.6. PMID:22672550

  3. Infrared supernova remnants and their infrared to X-ray flux ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Yeon Seok, Ji; Lee, Jae-Joon; Jeong, Il-Gyo; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are one of prominent objects in infrared (IR) emission, and their Infrared-to-X-ray (IRX) flux ratios are generally thought to indicate the relative importance of dust cooling to gas cooling in hot dusty plasma. But recent high-resolution IR space missions show that SNRs have diverse morphology in IR dust emission often very different from their X-ray appearance, suggesting different origins for the IR dust emission. We explored how the natural and/or environmental properties of SNRs affect the IRX morphology of SNRs and their IRX flux ratios.We first investigated IR and X-ray properties of 20 Galactic SNRs that are relatively well defined in both bands. We found that the observed IRX flux ratios of some SNRs agree with theoretical ratios of SNR shocks in which dust grains are heated and destroyed by collisions with plasma particles. For the majority of SNRs, however, the IRX flux ratios are either significantly smaller or significantly larger than the theoretical ratios. The SNRs with the smallest IRX flux ratios are young SNRs with X-ray emission dominated by metal-rich SN ejecta. There are, however, also evolved SNRs with good IRX morphological correlation but have small IRX flux ratios. For these SNRs, low dust-to-gas ratio (DGR) of the ambient medium seems to be a plausible explanation. On the other hand, the SNRs with the largest IRX flux ratios have anticorrelated IRX morphology and relatively low dust temperatures. We have found that these SNRs are located in dense environment, and their IR emission is probably from dust heated by shock radiation rather than by collisions.We also derived IRX flux ratios of SNRs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using {Spitzer} and {Chandra} SNR survey data and compared them with those of Galactic SNRs. We found that the IRX flux ratios of the LMC SNRs are systematically lower than those of the Galactic SNRs, which appears to be consistent with the low DGR of the LMC. We also confirmed the

  4. Lipolytic remnants of human VLDL produced in vitro. Effect of HDL levels in the lipolysis mixtures on the apoCs to apoE ratio and metabolic properties of VLDL core remnants.

    PubMed

    Chung, B H; Dashti, N

    2000-02-01

    To determine the role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) as an acceptor of lipolytic surface remnants of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) in the metabolism of VLDL core remnants, we examined the effect of HDL levels in the VLDL lipolysis mixture on 1) the morphology and the apoCs to E ratio in VLDL core remnants and 2) the metabolic properties of VLDL core remnants in human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and human hepatocytes in the primary culture. Normolipidemic VLDL was lipolyzed in vitro by purified bovine milk lipoprotein lipase (LpL) in a lipolysis mixture containing a physiologic level of VLDL and albumin (30 mg VLDL-cholesterol (CH)/dl and 6% albumin) in the absence and presence of either a low HDL level (VLDL-CH:HDL-CH = 3:1) or a high HDL level (VLDL-CH:HDL-CH = 1:4). Lipolysis of VLDL in either the absence or presence of HDL resulted in the hydrolysis of >85% of VLDL-triglycerides (TG) and the conversion of VLDL into smaller and denser particles. In the absence of HDL, heterogeneous spherical particles with numerous surface vesicular materials were produced. In the presence of low or high HDL, spherical particles containing some or no detectable vesicular surface components were produced. The apoCs to apoE ratios, as determined by densitometric scanning of the SDS polyacrylamide gradient gel, were 2.89 in control VLDL and 2.27, 0.91, and 0.22 in VLDL core remnants produced in the absence and in the presence of low and high HDL levels, respectively. In vitro lipolysis of VLDL markedly increased binding to HepG2 cells at 4 degrees C and internalization and degradation by human hepatocytes in primary culture at 37 degrees C. However, the HDL-mediated decrease in the apoCs to apoE ratio had a minimal effect on binding, internalization, and degradation of VLDL core remnants by HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes in primary culture. In order to determine whether HepG2 bound VLDL and VLDL core remnants are deficient in apoCs, (125)I-labeled VLDL and VLDL core

  5. A new limit on the time between the nucleosynthesis and the acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova remnants using the Co/Ni ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Gupta, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using new cross section measurements of Ni into Co, data on the Co/Ni ratio in cosmic rays from the HEAO C spacecraft have been reinterpreted in terms of the time between nucleosynthesis and the acceleration of cosmic rays, delta t. The observed Co/Ni ratio is now consistent with interstellar fragmentation only, leading to a small or zero source abundance. In terms of the decay of e-process nucleosynthesis nuclides into Co after a supernova explosion, this permits an estimate of delta t = 4-30,000 yr for the time between nucleosynthesis and the acceleration of cosmic rays if supernovae are the direct progenitors of cosmic rays. These age limits are used in conjunction with models of the expansion of supernova remnants (SNRs), to estimate that cosmic rays are accelerated when the radius of these remnants is between 0.1 and 25 pc.

  6. The critical value of remnant liver volume-to-body weight ratio to estimate posthepatectomy liver failure in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian-Jian; Yang, Jie; Chen, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Ming; Xu, Ming-Qing

    2014-05-15

    The extensive use of major hepatectomy for liver malignancies with cirrhosis increases the risk of posthepatectomy liver failure (PHLF), which is associated with a high frequency of postoperative complications, mortality, and an increased length of hospital stay. Remnant liver volume-to-body weight ratio (RLV-BWR) is more specific than the ratio of RLV-to-total liver volume (RLV-TLV) in predicting postoperative course after major hepatectomy in normal liver. Patients having normal liver with an anticipated RLV-BWR ≤0.5% are at considerable risk for hepatic dysfunction and postoperative mortality. In the present study, the critical value of RLV-BWR after liver resection in cirrhotic liver was investigated. Thirty one patients who underwent hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma in one medical treatment unit of West China Hospital from September 2012 to December 2012 were retrospectively enrolled in study. Volumetric measurements of TLV using computed tomography were obtained before hepatectomy. PHLF was diagnosed by the "50-50 criteria." The influence of RLV-TLV and RLV-BWR on the occurrence of PHLF was investigated, and the critical value of RLV-BWR was concluded. According to the occurrence of PHLF, the patients were retrospectively divided into PHLF group and non-PHLF group. There were no statistical differences of preoperative indicators between the two groups. The intraoperative indicators including the resected liver volume, RLV-TLV, and RLV-BWR were statistically significant (P < 0.05) between the two groups. The postoperative indicators including total bilirubin (TBIL), international normalized ratio, and peritoneal drainage fluid at the third and the fifth day after surgery were statistically significant (P < 0.05) between the two groups. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC curve) predicted by RLV-BWR to the incidence of PHLF was 0.864 (P = 0.019) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI = 0.608-0.819), and the sensitivity

  7. Diced Remnant

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-05

    This MOC image shows blocky remnants of a material that was once more laterally extensive on the floor of an impact crater located northwest of Herschel Crater on Mars. Large ripples of windblown sediment have accumulated around and between the blocks

  8. The nonlinear association between apolipoprotein B to apolipoprotein A1 ratio and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yong; Xu, Yang; Lu, Leihong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The ratio of ApoB/apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) has been found to be associated with type 2 diabetes, and it was proposed as a new biomarker for type 2 diabetes predictions. Previous studies have assumed that the association between apoB/apoA1 and type 2 diabetes was linear. However, the linearity assumption has rarely been examined. In the present study, we aimed to examine whether this association showed a linear trend in a nationally representative population. Participants aged 18 years and over (n = 8220) were selected from the China Health Nutrition Survey (CHNS). We used restricted cubic spline to model the association between ApoB/ApoA1 ratio and type 2 diabetes using logistic regression models. Additionally, we categorized the ApoB/ApoA1 ratio according to quartiles to compare with previous results. Age, gender, education, smoking status, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), lipid, body mass index (BMI), and hypertension were controlled as potential confounders. We found that the association between apoB/apoA1 ratio and type 2 diabetes may be nonlinear after adjusting for multiple potential confounders. Compared with the lowest quartile of apoB/apoA1 ratio, participants in the fourth quartile had a higher odds of type 2 diabetes [odds ratio (OR) = 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01–1.81]. Our results suggest that, higher apoB/apoA1 ratio was associated with higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes. However, the association may be nonlinear. PMID:28072742

  9. Aerodynamic performance of a 1.25-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Steinke, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Aerodynamic design parameters and overall and blade-element performances of a 1.25-pressure-ratio fan stage are reported. Detailed radial surveys were made over the stable operating flow range at rotative speeds from 70 to 120 percent of design speed. At design speed, the measured stage peak efficiency of 0.872 occurred at a weight flow of 34.92 kilograms per second and a pressure ratio of 1.242. Stage stall margin is about 20 percent based on the peak efficiency and stall conditions. The overall peak efficiency for the rotor was 0.911. The overall stage performance showed no significant change when the stators were positioned at 1, 2, or 4 chords downstream of the rotor.

  10. Surgical Reconstruction with the Remnant Ligament Improves Joint Position Sense as well as Functional Ankle Instability: A 1-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Kamizato; Masataka, Deie; Kohei, Fukuhara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic functional instability—characterized by repeated ankle inversion sprains and a subjective sensation of instability—is one of the most common residual disabilities after an inversion sprain. However, whether surgical reconstruction improves sensorimotor control has not been reported to date. The purpose of this study was to assess functional improvement of chronic ankle instability after surgical reconstruction using the remnant ligament. Materials and Methods. We performed 10 cases in the intervention group and 20 healthy individuals as the control group. Before and after surgical reconstruction, we evaluated joint position sense and functional ankle instability by means of a questionnaire. Results and Discussion. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and intervention groups before surgical reconstruction. Three months after surgery in the intervention group, the joint position sense was significantly different from those found preoperatively. Before surgery, the mean score of functional ankle instability in the intervention group was almost twice as low. Three months after surgery, however, the score significantly increased. The results showed that surgical reconstruction using the remnant ligament was effective not only for improving mechanical retensioning but also for ameliorating joint position sense and functional ankle instability. PMID:25401146

  11. The ratio of glycated albumin to hemoglobin A1c measured in IFCC units accurately represents the glycation gap.

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Junya; Mochizuki, Mie; Musha, Ikuma; Ohtake, Akira; Kobayashi, Kisho; Kikuchi, Toru; Kikuchi, Nobuyuki; Kawamura, Tomoyuki; Urakami, Tatsuhiko; Sugihara, Shigetaka; Hoshino, Tadao; Amemiya, Shin

    2015-01-01

    The glycation gap (G-gap: difference between measured hemoglobin A1c [A1C] and the value predicted by its regression on the fructosamine level) is stable and associated with diabetic complications. Measuring A1C level in International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) units (A1C-SI; mmol/mol) and National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program units (A1C-NGSP; %) and using glycated albumin (GA) level instead of fructosamine level for calculating the G-gap, we investigated whether the G-gap is better represented by GA/A1C ratio if expressed in SI units (GA/A1C-SI ratio) rather than in NGSP units (GA/A1C-% ratio). We examined 749 Japanese children with type 1 diabetes using simultaneous GA and A1C measurements. Of these, 369 patients were examined more than five times to assess the consistency of the G-gap and the GA/A1C ratio within individuals. The relationship of GA/A1C-% ratio to the corresponding A1C-NGSP was stronger than that of GA/A1C-SI ratio to A1C-IFCC. At enrollment, the inverse relationship between the GA/A1C-SI ratio and G-gap was highly significant (R(2) = 0.95) compared with that between the GA/A1C-% ratio and G-gap (R(2) = 0.69). A highly significant inverse relationship was also observed between the mean GA/A1C-SI ratio and the mean G-gaps obtained individually over time (R(2) = 0.95) compared with that using the corresponding A1C-NGSP (R(2) = 0.67). We conclude that the G-gap is better represented by the GA/A1C-SI ratio. We propose the use of mean GA/A1C-SI ratios easily obtained individually over time as reference values in Japanese children with type 1 diabetes (6.75 ± 0.60 [means ± SD]).

  12. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  13. Remnant field detector

    DOEpatents

    Visser, Age T.

    1988-01-01

    A method apparatus for qualitatively detecting remnant magnetic fields in matched pairs of magnet cores. Equal magnitude and oppositely oriented magnetic flux is induced in the magnet cores by oppositely wound primary windings and current source. Identically wound secondary windings generate output voltages in response to the induced flux. The output voltages generated should be of equal magnitude and opposite polarity if there is no remnant field in the cores. The output voltages will be unequal which is detected if either core has a remnant field.

  14. Remnant field detector

    DOEpatents

    Visser, Age T.

    1988-05-03

    A method apparatus for qualitatively detecting remnant magnetic fields in matched pairs of magnet cores. Equal magnitude and oppositely oriented magnetic flux is induced in the magnet cores by oppositely wound primary windings and current source. Identically wound secondary windings generate output voltages in response to the induced flux. The output voltages generated should be of equal magnitude and opposite polarity if there is no remnant field in the cores. The output voltages will be unequal which is detected if either core has a remnant field.

  15. The Rediscovery of the Antlia Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchard, Alexander; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gostisha, Martin; Haffner, L. Matthew; Hill, Alex S.; Barger, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    While undertaking a survey of velocity-resolved diffuse optical emission from the [S II] 6716 A line with the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper, we have rediscovered the Antlia Supernova remnant, a 26 degree diameter remmant near the Gum Nebula that was originally detected in SHASSA (Southern H-alpha Sky Survey Atlas) by P. McCullough in 2002. The original discovery showed this remnant was associated with ¼ keV X-ray emission in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, and argued that Antlia was potentially the closest remnant to the Sun. We will present an analysis of the H-alpha and [S II] lines in this direction: the ratio of these lines indicate the shell is consistent with being a supernova remnant and the velocities allow us to constrain its age. We discuss this remnant in the context of the evolution of the entire Gum Nebula region, noting that its proximity and age make it possible to search for geochemical evidence of this remnant on Earth. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881.

  16. Evidence for the 2B1-2A1 electronic transition in chlorine dioxide from resonance Raman depolarization ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Philip J.; Esposito, Anthony P.; Foster, Catherine E.; Beckman, Robert A.

    1997-11-01

    The resonance Raman depolarization ratios of chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in cyclohexane are measured and analyzed to establish the existence of a 2A1 excited state that is nearly degenerate with the optically stronger, 2A2 excited state. The depolarization ratio of the symmetric stretch fundamental transition is measured at several excitation wavelengths spanning the lowest-energy electronic transition centered at ˜360 nm. The depolarization ratio of this transition reaches a maximum value of 0.25±0.04 directly on resonance suggesting that scattered intensity is not derived from a single excited state. The depolarization ratios are modeled utilizing the time-dependent formalism for Raman scattering. This analysis demonstrates that the observed Raman depolarization ratios are derived from contributions of two excited states of 2A1 and 2A2 symmetry to the observed scattering. The results presented here support the emerging picture of OClO excited-state reaction dynamics in which photoexcitation to the 2A2 excited state is followed by internal conversion from this state to the 2A1 surface. Both the role of the 2A1 state in the photochemistry of OClO and the importance of this state in modeling resonance Raman intensities are discussed.

  17. A miniature Rotary Compressor with a 1:10 compression ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Olly; Tabota, Eugene; Arbon EurIng, Ian; FIMechE, CEng

    2015-08-01

    Micro compressors have applications in medical devices, robotics and “nanosatellites”. The problem of active cooling for photo detectors in “nano-satellites” becomes more important because the majority of space missions target Earth observation, and passive cooling does not provide the required temperatures to achieve the desired SNR levels. Reciprocating compressors used in cryocoolers cause vibrations. VERT Rotors has built an ultralow-vibration rotary compressor with 40mm-long screws, and our prototype delivered 1:10 compression ratio. This “nano” compressor is a non-conventional conical type consisting of an Inner conical screw rotor revolving inside an Outer screw rotor.

  18. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  19. Superluminous Extragalactic Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. R.; Chu, Y.-H.

    1998-12-01

    Extragalactic supernova remnants (SNRs) are conventionally surveyed by optical emission-line images, using the [S II]/Hα line ratio to diagnose SNRs. The majority of the optically identified extragalactic SNRs are too faint to be confirmed at X-ray or radio wavelengths. Conversely, extragalactic SNRs that are initially identified by X-ray or radio observations are all superluminous, e.g., the X-ray SNR in NGC 6946 (Blair & Fesen 1994, ApJ, 424, L103) and the radio SNR in NGC 5471 (Skillman 1985, ApJ, 290, 449). NGC 5471 is a giant H II region in M101. Optical echelle observations of the SNR in NGC 5471 have detected high-velocity gas with a FWZI of at least 350 km/s. Decomposing the narrow H II component and the broad SNR component in the Hα velocity profile, Chu & Kennicutt (1986) derived a total mass of 6500+/-3000 M_sun and a kinetic energy of a few *E(50) ergs. Using archival ROSAT X-ray observations, Williams & Chu (1995) measured an X-ray luminosity of ~ 1 x 10(38) ergs/s for NGC 5471. Apparently, the SNR in NGC 5471 is superluminous at all wavelengths. To determine the physical conditions and nature of the superluminous SNR in NGC 5471, we have obtained HST WFPC2 images of NGC 5471 in the Hα and [S II] lines and two continuum bands. These high-resolution images reveal a [S II]-enhanced shell with a diameter of ~ 60 pc. A recent 180-ks ROSAT High Resolution Imager image of M101 shows that the X-ray emission from NGC 5471 peaks at this SNR shell. We are thus confident in the identification of the superluminous SNR in NGC 5471. Are superluminous SNRs produced by particularly powerful supernova explosions? Are they associated with gamma-ray bursters? Are their luminosities caused by dense interstellar environment? We will report the detailed physical properties of the SNR in NGC 5471, compare it to the other superluminous SNRs, and address these questions.

  20. Transfusion of Plasma, Platelets, and Red Blood Cells in a 1:1:1 vs a 1:1:2 Ratio and Mortality in Patients With Severe Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, John B.; Tilley, Barbara C.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Fox, Erin E.; Wade, Charles E.; Podbielski, Jeanette M.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Brasel, Karen J.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Callcut, Rachael A.; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Cotton, Bryan A.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Inaba, Kenji; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Muskat, Peter; O’Keeffe, Terence; Rizoli, Sandro; Robinson, Bryce R. H.; Scalea, Thomas M.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Stein, Deborah M.; Weinberg, Jordan A.; Callum, Jeannie L.; Hess, John R.; Matijevic, Nena; Miller, Christopher N.; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Hoyt, David B.; Pearson, Gail D.; Leroux, Brian; van Belle, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Severely injured patients experiencing hemorrhagic shock often require massive transfusion. Earlier transfusion with higher blood product ratios (plasma, platelets, and red blood cells), defined as damage control resuscitation, has been associated with improved outcomes; however, there have been no large multicenter clinical trials. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness and safety of transfusing patients with severe trauma and major bleeding using plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 ratio compared with a 1:1:2 ratio. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Pragmatic, phase 3, multisite, randomized clinical trial of 680 severely injured patients who arrived at 1 of 12 level I trauma centers in North America directly from the scene and were predicted to require massive transfusion between August 2012 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS Blood product ratios of 1:1:1 (338 patients) vs 1:1:2 (342 patients) during active resuscitation in addition to all local standard-of-care interventions (uncontrolled). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcomes were 24-hour and 30-day all-cause mortality. Prespecified ancillary outcomes included time to hemostasis, blood product volumes transfused, complications, incidence of surgical procedures, and functional status. RESULTS No significant differences were detected in mortality at 24 hours (12.7% in 1:1:1 group vs 17.0% in 1:1:2 group; difference, −4.2% [95% CI, −9.6% to 1.1%]; P = .12) or at 30 days (22.4% vs 26.1%, respectively; difference, −3.7% [95% CI, −10.2% to 2.7%]; P = .26). Exsanguination, which was the predominant cause of death within the first 24 hours, was significantly decreased in the 1:1:1 group (9.2% vs 14.6% in 1:1:2 group; difference, −5.4% [95% CI, −10.4% to −0.5%]; P = .03). More patients in the 1:1:1 group achieved hemostasis than in the 1:1:2 group (86% vs 78%, respectively; P = .006). Despite the 1:1:1 group receiving more plasma (median of 7 U vs 5 U, P < .001) and

  1. Remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Jørgensen, Anders B; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2013-01-29

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol is a causal risk factor for ischemic heart disease independent of reduced high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Elevated remnant cholesterol is associated with elevated levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and with reduced HDL cholesterol, and all are associated with ischemic heart disease. A total of 73,513 subjects from Copenhagen were genotyped, of whom 11,984 had ischemic heart disease diagnosed between 1976 and 2010. Fifteen genetic variants were selected, affecting: 1) nonfasting remnant cholesterol alone; 2) nonfasting remnant cholesterol and HDL cholesterol combined; 3) HDL cholesterol alone; or 4) low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol alone as a positive control. The variants were used in a Mendelian randomization design. The causal odds ratio for a 1 mmol/l (39 mg/dl) genetic increase of nonfasting remnant cholesterol was 2.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9 to 4.2), with a corresponding observational hazard ratio of 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3 to 1.5). For the ratio of nonfasting remnant cholesterol to HDL cholesterol, corresponding values were 2.9 (95% CI: 1.9 to 4.6) causal and 1.2 (95% CI 1.2 to 1.3) observational for a 1-U increase. However, for HDL cholesterol, corresponding values were 0.7 (95% CI: 0.4 to 1.4) causal and 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4 to 1.7) observational for a 1 mmol/l (39 mg/dl) decrease. Finally, for LDL cholesterol, corresponding values were 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3 to 1.6) causal and 1.1 (95% CI: 1.1 to 1.2) observational for a 1 mmol/l (39 mg/dl) increase. A nonfasting remnant cholesterol increase of 1 mmol/l (39 mg/dl) is associated with a 2.8-fold causal risk for ischemic heart disease, independent of reduced HDL cholesterol. This implies that elevated cholesterol content of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles causes ischemic heart disease. However, because pleiotropic effects of the genetic variants studied cannot be totally excluded, these

  2. The Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.

    We wish to obtain both emission and absorption line observations of the Vela Supernova remnant. The filament we wish to study in emission is the brightest filament in the SNR, so it will provide a spectrum twice the quality of any in existence. It is also located at the edge of an unusual bulge in the SNR, and it can be used to test the level of departure from pressure equilibrium in the remnant, which is useful as a test of evaporative models of SNR evolution. The absorption line studies will look for evidence of the drastically unstable behavior of shocks above 150 km/s predicted by Innes and Giddings. Four of the stars studied by Jenkins, Silk and Wallerstein showed marginal evidence for two positive or two negative high velocity components. If these multiple velocity components are confirmed, they support the secondary shock predictions of Innes and Giddings.

  3. Remnants, fuzzballs or wormholes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2014-11-01

    The black hole information paradox has caused enormous confusion over four decades. But in recent years, the theorem of quantum strong-subadditivity has sorted out the possible resolutions into three sharp categories: (i) No new physics at r ≫ lp; this necessarily implies remnants/information loss. A realization of remnants is given by a baby universe attached near r 0. (ii) Violation of the "no-hair" theorem by nontrivial effects at the horizon r M. This possibility is realized by fuzzballs in string theory, and gives unitary evaporation. (iii) Having the vacuum at the horizon, but requiring that Hawking quanta at r M3 be somehow identified with degrees of freedom inside the black hole. A model for this "extreme nonlocality" is realized by conjecturing that wormholes connect the radiation quanta to the hole.

  4. Remnants of Lost Geology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-07

    In this NASA Mars Odyssey image of eastern Arabia Terra, remnants of a once vast layered terrain are evident as isolated buttes, mesas, and deeply-filled craters. The origin of the presumed sediments that created the layers is unknown, but those same sediments, now eroded, may be the source of the thick mantle of dust that covers much of Arabia Terra today. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04400

  5. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  6. Vitamin D Status, Insulin Resistance, Leptin-To-Adiponectin Ratio in Adolescents: Results of a 1-Year Lifestyle Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Rambhojan, Christine; Larifla, Laurent; Clepier, Josiane; Bouaziz-Amar, Elodie; Velayoudom-Cephise, Fritz-Line; Blanchet-Deverly, Anne; Armand, Christophe; Plumasseau, Jean; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Foucan, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    AIM: We aimed to study the relationships between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], insulin resistance and leptin-to-adiponectin (L/A) ratio in Guadeloupean children and adolescents and to analyse the changes in 25(OH)D levels after a 1-year lifestyle intervention program. METHODS: 25(OH)D concentrations were measured via a chemiluminescence assay. Cardiometabolic risk factors, homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and adipokines were measured. The lifestyle intervention included dietary counselling, regular physical activity. RESULTS: Among 117 girls and boys (11–15 years old, 31.6% obese), 40% had vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D levels < 20 ng/mL). With linear regression models where 25(OH)D and HOMA-IR acted as independent variables and age, sex, BMI, L/A ratio as covariates, 25(OH)D was significantly associated with HOMA-IR alone (P = 0.036). HOMA-IR was also associated with BMI z-score ≥ 2, L/A ratio and an interaction term BMI z-score ≥ 2*L/A ratio (P < 0.001 for all). After one year, in 78 children/adolescent, mean serum 25(OH)D increased significantly from 21.4 ± 4.9 ng/mL at baseline to 23.2 ± 6.0 after 1 year; P = 0.003 whereas BMI z-score, HOMA-IR and L/A ratio decreased significantly (P = 0.003, P < 0.001 and P = 0.012; respectively). CONCLUSION: The association between 25(OH)D and HOMA-IR, independently of obesity and the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency should be considered in order to prevent the later incidence of T2DM. A healthy lifestyle including non-sedentary and outdoor activities could be a way for improving vitamin D status. PMID:28028397

  7. What Shapes Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has mounted that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) can have substantial deviations from spherical symmetry; one such piece of evidence is the complex morphologies of supernova remnants (SNRs). However, the relative role of the explosion geometry and the environment in shaping SNRs remains an outstanding question. Recently, we have developed techniques to quantify the morphologies of SNRs, and we have applied these methods to the extensive X-ray and infrared archival images available of Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud SNRs. In this proceeding, we highlight some results from these studies, with particular emphasis on SNR asymmetries and whether they arise from ``nature'' or ``nurture''.

  8. Sedimentary Rock Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    29 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows knobs of remnant, wind-eroded, layered sedimentary rock that once completely covered the floor of a crater located west of the Sinus Meridiani region of Mars. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common throughout the Sinus Meridiani region and its surrounding cratered terrain.

    Location near: 2.2oN, 7.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  9. Supernova remnant morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    1994-04-01

    The morphology of supernova remnants is principally determined by two components, a shell formed by interaction of the supernova ejecta with the surrounding medium, and a nebula which is powered directly by the associated pulsar. This nebula, often called a 'plerion', is usually located within the shell. These two components appear to evolve independently; in many cases there is no detectable plerion and in a few cases, the Crab Nebula being the most notable example, there is no detectable shell. A 'theoretician's supernova remnant' has spherical symmetry, but observers know that this is rarely the case. There are four main possible sources of non-sphericity, namely, the surrounding interstellar medium, the circumstellar medium, the surpernova explosion, and the associated pulsar. Supernovae often occured in active star formation regions and these regions often have complex networks of cavities blown by strong stellar winds. A supernova remnant expanding in this environment can consist of a several shell-like structure. IC443 is a good example (Braun and Strom, 1986, Astron. Astrophys., 1264, 193). The enhancement of Supernova remnant (SNR) shell brightness toward the Galactic plane (Caswell, 1977, Proc. Astron. Soc. Aust., 3, 130) is further evidence of the influence of the large-scale structure of the interstellar medium. One of the most common forms of non-sphericity is a bilateral symmetry attributed to a barrel-shaped enhancement of the shell (Kesteven and Caswell, 1987, Astron. Astrophys., 183, 118). There is good evidence that this and the associated bi-annular structure often obseved (Manchester, 1987, Astron. Astrophys., 171, 205) ar due to structure in the circumstellar material resulting from mass loss from the pre-supernova star (Storey et al., 1992, Astron. Astrophys., 265, 752).

  10. Sedimentary Rock Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    29 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows knobs of remnant, wind-eroded, layered sedimentary rock that once completely covered the floor of a crater located west of the Sinus Meridiani region of Mars. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common throughout the Sinus Meridiani region and its surrounding cratered terrain.

    Location near: 2.2oN, 7.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  11. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  12. Elevated remnant cholesterol causes both low-grade inflammation and ischemic heart disease, whereas elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol causes ischemic heart disease without inflammation.

    PubMed

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2013-09-17

    Elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol are causally associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD), but whether elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol and LDL cholesterol both cause low-grade inflammation is currently unknown. We studied 60 608 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, the Copenhagen City Heart Study, and the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease study, of whom 10 668 had IHD diagnosed between 1977 and 2011. We genotyped for variants affecting levels of nonfasting remnant cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, C-reactive protein by CRP alleles, and C-reactive protein by IL6R alleles. Using a multidirectional mendelian randomization design, we investigated possible causal associations between the lipoproteins and C-reactive protein and between the lipoproteins and IHD. A 1-mmol/L(39 mg/dL) higher level of nonfasting remnant cholesterol was associated observationally with a 37% (95% confidence interval, 35-39) higher C-reactive protein level and causally with a 28% (95% confidence interval, 10-48) higher level. For LDL cholesterol, a 1-mmol/L (39-mg/dL) higher level was associated observationally with a 7% (95% confidence interval, 6-7) higher C-reactive protein level, but we found no causal association. Likewise, higher levels of C-reactive protein did not associate causally with elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol or LDL cholesterol. Finally, the causal risk ratio for IHD for a 1-mmol/L (39-mg/dL) higher level was 3.3 (95% confidence interval, 2.1-5.2) for nonfasting remnant cholesterol and 1.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.5-2.2) for LDL cholesterol. The causal associations for remnant cholesterol were present even in those without diabetes mellitus and obesity. Elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol is causally associated with low-grade inflammation and with IHD, whereas elevated LDL cholesterol is associated causally with IHD without inflammation.

  13. Supernova Remnants And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-11-29

    It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

  14. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  15. Pulsars and supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, R.; Schaudt, K.J.

    1988-02-01

    With the recent discovery of the pulsar PSR 1951 + 22 in CTB 80, four pulsars are now known in supernova remnants (SNRs) of the plerion and composite classes. It is argued that this success rate of pulsar detections implies that young fast pulsars have long fan-beams that enable them to be seen from most directions. Based on calculations that use a pulsar luminosity model and allow for selection effects, it is suggested that the best SNRs for future pulsar searches are 3C 58, MSH 11-62, G24.7 + 0.6, and MSH 15-56. It is also concluded that the failure to detect pulsars in shell SNRs implies either that there are no pulsars in these SNRs or that the pulsars are unusually weak, possibly due to slow rotation or weak magnetic fields. 25 references.

  16. Optical emission-line properties of evolved galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, R. A.; Blair, W. P.; Kirshner, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    New optical spectrophotometric data are presented for the supernova remnants CTB 1, OA 184, VRO 42.05.01, S147, the Monoceros Loop, G206.9 + 2.3, and G65.3 + 5.7. These data are combined with published spectral data to study some of the general properties of evolved galactic supernova remnants. It is found that (1) O I and O II forbidden line strengths, when used in conjunction with the usual H-alpha S II forbidden line ratio test, provide an excellent additional diagnostic for discriminating remnants from H II regions; (2) the line ratios H-alpha forbidden line N II, H-alpha forbidden line S II, and forbidden line S II 6717/6731 A generally do not vary substantially among the filaments of an individual remnant; and (3) the observed correlation of forbidden line N II/H-alpha with S II forbidden line 6717/6731 A in remnants is the result of observational selection rather than of evolutionary effects. A galactic nitrogen abundance gradient of d log (N/H)/dR = -0.088 dex/kpc, which is in agreement with that derived from H II regions. However, no abundance gradients for oxygen or sulfur are indicated from the remnant data.

  17. Iron needles in supernova remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez (née Morgan), Haley L.; Dunne, Loretta; Eales, Stephen A.; Gomez, Edward L.; Edmunds, Michael G.

    2005-08-01

    It has been suggested by Dwek that iron needles could explain the submillimetre emission from the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR) with only a very small total mass. We investigate whether a similar model holds for the Kepler SNR, and find that its emission could indeed be explained by a dust mass of less than 10-2Msolar, dependent on the axial ratio l/a of the needles - which we constrain to be less than 700. But the implied needle model for Kepler is inconsistent with that suggested for Cas A since either the needles would have to have a resistivity one or two orders of magnitude greater than those in Cas A or the electron density in Kepler's shocked plasma must be 40 times greater than suggested by X-ray observations. An additional problem with the needle model is that the implied thickness of the needles seems to be implausibly small, if the emission properties are calculated under the usual approximations.

  18. Dust in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, H.

    In this Review, I will discuss our changing view on supernovae as interstellar dust sources. In particular I will focus on infrared and submillimetre studies of the historical supernova remnants Cassiopeia A, the Crab Nebula, SN 1987A, Tycho and Kepler. In the last decade (and particularly in recent years), SCUBA, Herschel and ALMA have now demonstrated that core-collapse supernovae are prolific dust factories, with evidence of 0.1 - 0.7 M⊙ of dust formed in the ejecta, though there is little evidence (as yet) for significant dust production in Type Ia supernova ejecta. There is no longer any question that dust (and molecule) formation is efficient after some supernova events, though it is not clear how much of this will survive over longer timescales. Current and future instruments will allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of dust within corecollapse ejecta, and whether this component contributes a significant amount to the dust content of the Universe or if supernovae ultimately provide a net loss once dust destruction by shocks is taken into account.

  19. Further Analysis of Micrometeoroid Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, J.; Bibring, J.-P.; Bunch, T. E.; Radicati di Brozolo, F.; Vassent, B.

    1992-07-01

    suggest an extraterrestrial origin for the impacting particles. The main elements we identified are usually referred to as "chondritic" elements (Na, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Fe); intrinsic Al is masked by the Al target and Ni is not observed. Furthermore, C and O are present in 90% of the cases, the C/O peak height ratio varying from 0.1 to 3. These extraterrestrial events are now being subjected to an imagery and analytical protocol that includes FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) for high resolution imagery and LIMS (laser ionization mass spectrometry) for molecular identification. Our first results clearly indicate that such small events show crater features analogous to what is observed at larger sizes; they suggest that N can be present in the IDP remnants in which C and O have been identified by EDS analysis (Borg et al. 1992). More results concerning FRECOPA and COMET-1 analysis will be presented, that could imply that the existence of CHON particles could be a general characteristic of cometary material present in the solar cavity, as this signature is found in the environment of P/Halley (PUMA and PIA experiments), in remnants identified on LDEF collectors and in grains from the Giacobinni-Zinner meteor stream. References Bibring J.-P., Borg J., Katchanov A., Langevin Y., Salvetat P., Surkhov Y.A., and Vassent B. (1988) Lunar Planet. Sci. 19, 73-74. Borg J., Bibring J.-P., and Vassent B. (1991) Meteoritics, 26, 4,321. Borg J., Bunch T. and Radicati di Brozolo F. (1992) To be presented at the LDEF 2 meeting.

  20. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-01-06

    For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several NASA telescopes.

  1. Remnants of Lost Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In eastern Arabia Terra, remnants of a once vast layered terrain are evident as isolated buttes, mesas, and deeply-filled craters. The origin of the presumed sediments that created the layers is unknown, but those same sediments, now eroded, may be the source of the thick mantle of dust that covers much of Arabia Terra today.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 20.5, Longitude 50 East (310 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  2. Remnants of Lost Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In eastern Arabia Terra, remnants of a once vast layered terrain are evident as isolated buttes, mesas, and deeply-filled craters. The origin of the presumed sediments that created the layers is unknown, but those same sediments, now eroded, may be the source of the thick mantle of dust that covers much of Arabia Terra today.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 20.5, Longitude 50 East (310 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  3. Properties of optically selected supernova remnant candidates in M33

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/Hα and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted Hα and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, α = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/Hα) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/Hα ∼ 0.55 and ∼0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L {sub X} (and L {sub 20cm}) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  4. Postprandial Hyperlipidemia and Remnant Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Shizuya

    2017-01-01

    Fasting hypertriglyceridemia is positively associated with the morbidity of coronary heart disease (CHD), and postprandial (non-fasting) hypertriglyceridemia is also correlated with the risk status for CHD, which is related to the increase in chylomicron (CM) remnant lipoproteins produced from the intestine. CM remnant particles, as well as oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants, are highly atherogenic and act by enhancing systemic inflammation, platelet activation, coagulation, thrombus formation, and macrophage foam cell formation. The cholesterol levels of remnant lipoproteins significantly correlate with small, dense LDL; impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and CHD prevalence. We have developed an assay of apolipoprotein (apo)B-48 levels to evaluate the accumulation of CM remnants. Fasting apoB-48 levels correlate with the morbidity of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, obesity, type III hyperlipoproteinemia, the metabolic syndrome, hypothyroidism, chronic kidney disease, and IGT. Fasting apoB-48 levels also correlate with carotid intima-media thickening and CHD prevalence, and a high apoB-48 level is a significant predictor of CHD risk, independent of the fasting TG level. Diet interventions, such as dietary fibers, polyphenols, medium-chain fatty acids, diacylglycerol, and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), ameliorate postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, moreover, drugs for dyslipidemia (n-3 PUFA, statins, fibrates or ezetimibe) and diabetes concerning incretins (dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitor or glucagon like peptide-1 analogue) may improve postprandial hypertriglyceridemia. Since the accumulation of CM remnants correlates to impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and atherosclerotic cardiovascular events, further studies are required to investigate the characteristics, physiological activities, and functions of CM remnants for the development of new interventions to reduce atherogenicity. PMID

  5. Postprandial Hyperlipidemia and Remnant Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Daisaku; Yamashita, Shizuya

    2017-02-01

    Fasting hypertriglyceridemia is positively associated with the morbidity of coronary heart disease (CHD), and postprandial (non-fasting) hypertriglyceridemia is also correlated with the risk status for CHD, which is related to the increase in chylomicron (CM) remnant lipoproteins produced from the intestine. CM remnant particles, as well as oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants, are highly atherogenic and act by enhancing systemic inflammation, platelet activation, coagulation, thrombus formation, and macrophage foam cell formation. The cholesterol levels of remnant lipoproteins significantly correlate with small, dense LDL; impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and CHD prevalence. We have developed an assay of apolipoprotein (apo)B-48 levels to evaluate the accumulation of CM remnants. Fasting apoB-48 levels correlate with the morbidity of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, obesity, type III hyperlipoproteinemia, the metabolic syndrome, hypothyroidism, chronic kidney disease, and IGT. Fasting apoB-48 levels also correlate with carotid intima-media thickening and CHD prevalence, and a high apoB-48 level is a significant predictor of CHD risk, independent of the fasting TG level. Diet interventions, such as dietary fibers, polyphenols, medium-chain fatty acids, diacylglycerol, and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), ameliorate postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, moreover, drugs for dyslipidemia (n-3 PUFA, statins, fibrates or ezetimibe) and diabetes concerning incretins (dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitor or glucagon like peptide-1 analogue) may improve postprandial hypertriglyceridemia. Since the accumulation of CM remnants correlates to impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and atherosclerotic cardiovascular events, further studies are required to investigate the characteristics, physiological activities, and functions of CM remnants for the development of new interventions to reduce atherogenicity.

  6. G29.7-0.3: another supernova remnant with an identity crisis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Helfand, D. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    New radio and X-ray observations of the galactic supernova remnant G29.7-0.3 show that it is composed of two spectrally distinct components: a steep-spectrum, incomplete shell 3 arcmin in extent enclosing a flat-spectrum, X-ray emitting region 30 arcsec across. Thus, G29.7-0.3 joins the ranks of supernova remnants which exhibit a combination of Crab-like and shell remnant attributes. The Crab-like core has the highest ratio of X-ray radio luminosity of all the Crab-like remnants observed to date, suggesting that it is an extremely young object.

  7. G29.7-0.3: another supernova remnant with an identity crisis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Helfand, D. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    New radio and X-ray observations of the galactic supernova remnant G29.7-0.3 show that it is composed of two spectrally distinct components: a steep-spectrum, incomplete shell 3 arcmin in extent enclosing a flat-spectrum, X-ray emitting region 30 arcsec across. Thus, G29.7-0.3 joins the ranks of supernova remnants which exhibit a combination of Crab-like and shell remnant attributes. The Crab-like core has the highest ratio of X-ray radio luminosity of all the Crab-like remnants observed to date, suggesting that it is an extremely young object.

  8. Distribution of apoB/apoA-1 ratio and blood lipids in Sami, Kven and Norwegian populations: the SAMINOR study.

    PubMed

    Nystod, Tove; Utsi, Egil; Selmer, Randi; Brox, Jan; Melhus, Marita; Lund, Eiliv

    2008-02-01

    To assess the distribution of blood lipids, lipoprotein and apoB/apoA-1 ratio in a multi-ethnic population of Sami, Kvens and Norwegians in Norway. Study design. A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 2003-2004 in an area with a mixed Sami, Kvens/Finns and Norwegian population, the SAMINOR study. A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed and total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apoB and apoA-1 counts were analysed in 6461 women and 5772 men between the ages of 36 and 79. In 36-64 age group, Sami men and women had the highest apoB/apoA-1 ratio of the ethnic groups. The ethnic differences remained after adjustment for waist hip ratio, cigarette smoking, systolic and diastolic pressures, alcohol consumption, physical activity during leisure time and family history of myocardial infarction (MI). There were no significant ethnic differences in apoB/apoA-1 ratio in the older age group. Total cholesterol was significantly lower among Sami men and women, aged 65-79 years, than among the Norwegian. The opposite occurred in the 36-49 age group, with higher levels in the Sami population. We found no ethnic differences in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Middle-aged Sami women and men have increased levels of apoB/apoA-1 ratio and total cholesterol compared with Norwegians.

  9. The glycated albumin to HbA1c ratio is elevated in patients with fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus with onset during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Masafumi; Shimizu, Ikki; Murai, Jun; Saito, Hiroshi; Kasayama, Soji; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Imagawa, Akihisa; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus (FT1DM) develops as a result of very rapid and almost complete destruction of pancreatic β cell. The most common form of type 1 diabetes mellitus with onset during pregnancy has been shown to be FT1DM at least in Japan. We previously reported that the ratio of glycated albumin (GA) to HbA1c (GA/HbA1c ratio) is elevated in FT1DM patients at the diagnosis. In the present study, we investigated whether the GA/HbA1c ratio is also elevated in FT1DM with onset during pregnancy (P-FT1DM). The study subjects consisted of 7 patients with P-FT1DM. Ten patients with untreated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) discovered during pregnancy (P-T2DM) and 9 non-pregnant women with untreated T2DM (NP-T2DM) were used as controls. All study patients satisfied HbA1c < 8.7%, the diagnostic criteria for FT1DM. The GA/HbA1c ratio in the P-FT1DM patients at the diagnosis was significantly higher than that in the P-T2DM patients and the NP-T2DM patients. The GA/HbA1c ratio was ≥ 3.0 in all P-FT1DM patients, whereas it was < 3.0 in 8 of 10 P-T2DM patients and all NP-T2DM patients. The GA/HbA1c ratio was also elevated in P-FT1DM patients at the diagnosis compared with T2DM with or without pregnancy.

  10. Determinants of ApoB, ApoA1, and the ApoB/ApoA1 ratio in healthy schoolgirls, prospectively studied from mean ages 10 to 19 years: the Cincinnati National Growth and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John A; Glueck, Charles J; Daniels, Stephen R; Horn, Paul S; Wang, Ping

    2012-10-01

    The objectives were to prospectively assess determinants of apolipoproteins B (ApoB), A1 (ApoA1), and the ApoB/ApoA1 ratio in 797 healthy black and white schoolgirls from mean ages 10 to 19. There was prospective 9-year follow-up, with measures of ApoB at mean ages 10, 12, 14, 16 and 19, ApoA1 at mean ages 12, 14, 16, and 19, and assessment of annual reports of delayed menstrual cyclicity (≥42 days) from ages 14 to 19. Studies of 402 black and 395 white healthy schoolgirls were done in public and private schools, in urban and suburban Cincinnati. Black girls had lower ApoB, higher ApoA1, and lower ApoB/ApoA1. SHBG at age 14 in white and black girls was inversely correlated with the ApoB/ApoA1. At age 19, ≥3 annual reports of menstrual delay ≥42 days and metabolic syndrome were associated with higher ApoB and a higher ApoB/ApoA1 ratio. From ages 14 to 19, BMI and TG were independently positively associated with ApoB. Menstrual cyclicity ≥42 days, metabolic syndrome, BMI, and TG were independently positively associated with ApoB/ApoA1 ratios, while black race was negatively associated. The atherogenic ApoB/ApoA1 ratio from ages 14 to 19 is lower in black girls, and positively associated with hyperandrogenism, menstrual cyclicity ≥42 days, BMI, TG, and the metabolic syndrome, facilitating an adolescent approach to primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  11. SNRPy: Supernova remnant evolution modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-03-01

    SNRPy (Super Nova Remnant Python) models supernova remnant (SNR) evolution and is useful for understanding SNR evolution and to model observations of SNR for obtaining good estimates of SNR properties. It includes all phases for the standard path of evolution for spherically symmetric SNRs and includes alternate evolutionary models, including evolution in a cloudy ISM, the fractional energy loss model, and evolution in a hot low-density ISM. The graphical interface takes in various parameters and produces outputs such as shock radius and velocity vs. time, SNR surface brightness profile and spectrum.

  12. Impact of corpulence parameters and haemoglobin A1c on metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients: comparison of apolipoprotein B/A-I ratio with fasting and postprandial conventional lipid ratios

    PubMed Central

    Diaf, Mustapha; Khaled, Boumediene M.; Sellam, Fériel

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective The incidence of diabetes co-morbidities could probably be better assessed by studying its associations with major corpulence parameters and glycaemic control indicators. We assessed the utility of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in metabolic control for type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Fasting and postprandial blood samples were collected from 238 type 2 diabetic patients aged 57.4±11.9 years. The sera were analysed for glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), and apolipoproteins (apoA-I and apoB). Ratios of lipids and apolipoproteins were calculated and their associations with BMI, WC, and HbA1c levels were analysed. Results Our investigation showed increases in most fasting and postprandial lipid parameters according to BMI and WC. In men, postprandial HDL-c and TG levels were significantly higher (p<0.05) in overweight and obese patients, respectively, as well as in patients with abdominal obesity. Contrariwise, postprandial TC levels were significantly higher (p<0.01) in overweight and abdominal obese women. However, elevations of apoA-I and apoB levels were according to BMI and WC in both genders. There was a strong influence of BMI, WC, and HbA1c levels on the apoB/apoA-I ratio compared to traditional fasting and postprandial lipid ratios in both men and women. The apoB/apoA-I ratio was more correlated with postprandial TC/HDL and LDL-c/HDL-c ratios in men and with postprandial TG/HDL-c in women. Conclusion The apoB/apoA-I ratio is helpful in assessing metabolic risk caused by overall obesity, abdominal obesity and impaired glycaemia in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:25959906

  13. Combined use of apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol before routine clinical lipid measurement in predicting coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liting; Lu, Guoping; Chen, Zhenyue

    2014-08-01

    Our aim was to examine whether the combined use of apolipoprotein B (apoB)/apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) was useful before routine clinical lipid measurement in predicting coronary heart disease (CHD). In total, 826 patients were enrolled and they were classified into a CHD group (532 cases) and a normal group (294 cases) according to the results of coronary angiography. Laboratory data including fasting lipid profile were obtained after an overnight fast. Serum apoB/apoA1 ratio and non-HDL-C were calculated. Logistic regression was applied to estimate the cross-sectional association between the apoB/apoA1 ratio, non-HDL-C, and CHD. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis was used to determine the value of apoB/apoA1 ratio and non-HDL-C in the diagnosis of CHD. The associations with an increased risk of CHD were much stronger for the apoB/apoA1 ratio [odds ratio (OR)=8.941, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.363-18.323] than for non-HDL-C (OR=1.373, 95% CI 1.163-1.622). The patients in the top quartile of the apoB/apoA1 distribution had an OR of 7.321 (95% CI 3.891-13.771) compared with those in the bottom quartile. Patients with combined high levels of apoB/apoA1 and non-HDL-C (N=92, 79.31%) had the highest risk of CHD. The combined use of apoB/apoA1 ratio and non-HDL-C (0.762; 95% CI 0.677-0.847) showed greater receiver operating characteristics area than its individual components or other lipid profiles. The combination of apoB/apoA1 and non-HDL-C had even greater predictive value than its individual components or other lipid profiles.

  14. Apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio is a good predictive marker of metabolic syndrome and pre-metabolic syndrome in Chinese adolescent women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qianqian; Chen, Xiaoli; Li, Lin; Zhou, Ran; Huang, Jia; Yang, Dongzi

    2013-01-01

    The apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 (ApoB/ApoA1) ratio is well known to be related to metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components in adults of different races. There is low prevalence of MS but high occurrence of various metabolic disorders in Chinese adolescent women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We sought to assess if the ApoB/ApoA1 ratio can be used as a predictive marker of MS and pre-MS in Chinese adolescent women with PCOS. This cross-sectional study included 160 Chinese adolescent women. Based on International Diabetes Federation criteria for MS, patients who had no less than two components of MS but did not meet the criteria for the diagnosis of MS were considered as having pre-MS. The ApoB/ApoA1 ratio was higher in obese subjects with high free androgen index (FAI). The ApoB/ApoA1 ratio increased significantly as the number of MS components increased and provided 87.5% of sensitivity and 78.9% of specificity with a threshold value of 0.63 for MS, 86.2% of sensitivity and 79.4% of specificity with a threshold value of 0.58 for pre-MS in Chinese adolescent women with PCOS. The ApoB/ApoA1 ratio was a good predictive marker of MS and pre-MS in Chinese adolescent women with PCOS. FAI could be involved in obesity-related metabolic abnormalities. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Leptin and adiponectin in relation to body fat percentage, waist to hip ratio and the apoB/apoA1 ratio in Asian Indian and Caucasian men and women.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica; Al-Amri, Maha; Sniderman, Allan; Cianflone, Katherine

    2006-04-10

    Asian Indian immigrants have an increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, there is very little data examining how the adipokines leptin and adiponectin relate to CVD risk factors such as body fat percentage (BF%), waist to hip ratio (WHR) and the apoB/apoA1 ratio in Asian Indian men and women living in Canada. A cross-sectional study comparing leptin, adiponectin, lipoproteins and anthropometric parameters in Asian Indian men and women to Caucasian men and women (4 groups). Anthropometric data (BMI, BF%, WHR), circulating lipids (apoA1, apoB, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol), leptin and adiponectin were measured. Asian Indian men and women had higher leptin and lower adiponectin concentrations then Caucasian men and women, respectively. Leptin (positively) and adiponectin (negatively) correlated with anthropometric parameters and lipoproteins in all four groups. Using stepwise forward multiple regression, a model including TC/HDL-C ratio, WHR, BF%, hip circumference and waist circumference predicted 74.2% of leptin concentration in men. In women, apoB, BF%, waist circumference and age predicted 77.5% of leptin concentration. Adiponectin concentrations in men were predicted (30.2%) by HDL-C, total cholesterol, hip circumference and BF% while in women 41.2% of adiponectin concentration was predicted by the apoB/apoA1 ratio, WHR and age. As is evident from our data, there is a strong relationship between leptin, adiponectin, and abdominal obesity with increased CVD risk, as assessed by the apoB/apoA1 ratio. Dysregulation of these parameters may account for the increased risk of CVD in Asian Indians.

  16. Constraints on black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, S.B. )

    1994-01-15

    One possible fate of information lost to black holes is its preservation in black hole remnants. It is argued that a type of effective field theory describes such remnants (generically referred to as informons). The general structure of such a theory is investigated and the infinite pair production problem is revisited. A toy model for remnants clarifies some of the basic issues; in particular, infinite remnant production is not suppressed simply by the large internal volumes as proposed in cornucopion scenarios. Criteria for avoiding infinite production are stated in terms of couplings in the effective theory. Such instabilities remain a problem barring what would be described in that theory as a strong coupling conspiracy. The relation to Euclidean calculations of cornucopion production is sketched, and potential flaws in that analysis are outlined. However, it is quite plausible that pair production of ordinary black holes (e.g., Reissner-Noerdstrom or others) is suppressed due to strong effective couplings. It also remains an open possibility that a microsopic dynamics can be found yielding an appropriate strongly coupled effective theory of neutral informons without infinite pair production.

  17. The Supernova Remnant CTA 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1996-01-01

    The supernova remnants G327.1-1.1 and G327.4+0.4 (Kes 27) are located 1.5 deg apart in the constellation Norma. In 1980, Einstein IPC observations discovered that both were irregular filled-center X-ray sources with possible point sources superposed. This paper describes new ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations which both map the diffuse structure and clearly show several unresolved sources in each field. Both remnants have bright emitting regions inside the limb which might indicate the presence of high energy electrons accelerated by a pulsar. The interior region is more prominent in G327.1-1.1 than in Kes 27. The spectra are relatively strongly absorbed, as expected from distant remnants close to the galactic plane. Comparison of the X-ray and radio maps of each remnant allows us to attribute some emission to a shell and some to the interior. With this information, a blast-wave model is used to derive approximate ages and energy release. Indications are that the Kes 27 supernova deposited approximately 10(exp 51) ergs in the surrounding medium. The G327.1-1.1 event probably deposited a factor of 3-10 less.

  18. Shock Heated Dust in Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.; Strom, R. G.; van der Laan, H.; Greidanus, H.

    Infrared emission in young supernova remnants is interpreted as coming from shock-heated dust. Using models and data from other wavelength regimes, many physical parameters of the remnants can accurately be derived.

  19. Tautomeric ratio and prototropic equilibrium constants of tenoxicam, a 1H and 13C NMR theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Moya-Hernández, Rosario; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto; Gutiérrez, Atilano; Gómez-Balderas, Rodolfo

    2011-11-24

    The determination of the micro-equilibrium prototropic constants is often a tough task when the tautomeric ratio favors one of the species or when the chemical exchange is not slow enough to allow the quantitative detection of the tautomeric species. There are just few experimental methods available to reveal the constants of the tautomeric micro-equilibriums; its applicability depends on the nature of the tautomeric system. A combination of experimental and quantum chemistry calculated (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts is presented here to estimate the population of the species participating in the tautomeric equilibriums of the tenoxicam, an important anti-inflammatory drug. A multivariate fitting of a fraction-mol-weighted contribution model, for the NMR chemical shifts of the species in solution, was used to find the populations of the tautomers of tenoxicam. To consider and evaluate the effect of the solvent polarity on the tautomers' populations, experimental determinations were carried out in DMSO-d(6), in an equimolar DMSO-H(2)O mixture of deuterated solvents and in D(2)O. Additionally, by employing HYPNMR, it has been possible to refine the acid-base macroscopic constants of tenoxicam.

  20. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  1. Apolipoprotein A1, B levels, and their ratio and the risk of a first stroke: a meta-analysis and case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongli; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xiangyu; Pi, Fuhua; Wu, Yubin; Pang, Shaojie; Xie, Yuqing; Xia, Fangfang; Zhang, Qingying

    2015-12-01

    The associations of levels of apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and apolipoprotein B and ApoB/A1 ratio and risk of a first stroke have not been reliably documented. We performed a meta-analysis to summarize the relationships and confirmed them in a case-control study. We identified relevant publications in PubMed and Embase databases up to June 1, 2015. A Dersimonian-Laird random effects model was used to compute summary relative risks (RRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). A case-control study was conducted in a southern Chinese population. We included 8 cohort and 4 case-control studies (222,774 subjects; 10,032 first stroke events) in the meta-analysis. Reduced ApoA1 level and increased ApoB level and ApoB/A1 ratio was associated with a first stroke in cohort studies (RR 0.86 [95 % CI 0.79-0.94], 1.66 [1.62-1.69], and 1.66 [1.63-1.70], respectively) and reduced ApoA1 level and increased ApoB/A1 ratio in case-control studies (0.68 [0.47-0.99] and 1.76 [1.50-2.06], respectively). When stratified by stroke type in cohort studies, the RR for ischemic stroke was 0.83 (0.76-0.90), 1.36 (1.32-1.40), and 1.38 (1.35-1.42) for the 3 factors, respectively. In our case-control study (1013 cases; 1029 controls), the OR for a first ischemic stroke was 0.83 (0.74-0.92), 1.33 (1.18-1.48) and 2.10 (1.76-2.51), respectively, with increased ApoA1 level associated with hemorrhagic stroke (1.37 [1.06-1.78]). Meta-analysis suggests that reduced ApoA1 level and increased ApoB level and ApoB/A1 ratio are risk factors for a first ischemic but not hemorrhagic stroke. Elevated ApoA1 level may be a risk factor for a first hemorrhagic stroke.

  2. Impact of transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma and packed red blood cells in a 1:1 ratio on survival of emergency department patients with severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Zehtabchi, Shahriar; Nishijima, Daniel K

    2009-05-01

    Coagulopathy is common after severe trauma and occurs very early after the initial insult. Some investigators have suggested early and aggressive treatment of the trauma-induced coagulopathy by transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and packed red blood cells (PRBC) in a 1:1 ratio. This evidence-based emergency medicine (EBM) review evaluates the evidence regarding the impact of 1:1 ratio of FFP:PRBC transfusion on survival of emergency department (ED) patients with severe trauma. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and other databases were searched. Studies were selected for inclusion if they included trauma patients who required blood transfusion. The outcome measures of interest included mortality and adverse effects of high FFP:PRBC ratios. For comparison, the patients were classified into high ratio (1:1, defined as a ratio of 1:< or =1.5) and low ratio (1:>1.5) groups. The authors did not identify any randomized controlled trials (RCT), but included four observational studies (three retrospective registry and one prospective cohort studies), which enrolled 1,511 patients cumulatively. One study found a statistically significant difference in mortality rate, favoring high FFP:PRBC ratio (relative risk = 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.59 to 0.89), while three studies showed no benefits. One study reported higher rates of sepsis and single/multiorgan failure (MOF), and another study revealed a higher risk of nosocomial infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the high FFP:PRBC ratio group. Three retrospective registry reviews with suboptimal methodologies and one prospective cohort study provide inadequate evidence to support or refute the use of a high FFP:PRBC ratio in patients with severe trauma.

  3. HI Absorption in Merger Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veileux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) pass through a luminous starburst phase, followed by a dust-enshrouded AGN phase, and finally evolve into optically bright "naked" quasars once they shed their gas/dust reservoirs through powerful wind events. We present the results of our recent 21- cm HI survey of 21 merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. These remnants were selected from the QUEST (Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study) sample of ULIRGs and PG quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by AGN and sample all phases of the proposed ULIRG -> IR-excess quasar -> optical quasar sequence. We explore whether there is an evolutionary connection between ULIRGs and quasars by looking for the occurrence of HI absorption tracing neutral gas outflows; our results will allow us to identify where along the sequence the majority of a merger's gas reservoir is expelled.

  4. Radio emision from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies have been discovered through radio observations, and only a very small number of the SNRs catalogued in the Milky Way have not been detected in the radio band, or are poorly defined by current radio observations. The study of the radio emission from SNRs is an excellent tool to investigate morphological characteristics, marking the location of shock fronts and contact discontinuities; the presence, orientation and intensity of the magnetic field; the energy spectrum of the emitting particles; and the dynamical consequences of the interaction with the circumstellar and interstellar medium. I will review the present knowledge of different important aspects of radio remnants and their impact on the interstellar gas. Also, new radio studies of the Crab Nebula carried out with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 3 GHz and with ALMA at 100 GHz, will be presented.

  5. Ruprecht 3: An old star cluster remnant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavani, D. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2003-02-01

    2MASS J and H photometry and integrated spectroscopy are employed to study the nature of the poorly populated compact concentration of stars Ruprecht 3, which was previously catalogued as an open cluster. The integrated spectrum remarkably resembles that of a moderately metal-rich globular cluster. The distribution of the object stars in the colour-magnitude diagram is compatible with that of a 1.5 +/- 0.5 Gyr open cluster or older, depending on whether the bluer stars are interpreted as turnoff stars or blue stragglers, respectively. We derive for the object a distance from the Sun dsun = 0.72 +0.04-0.03 kpc and a colour excess E(B-V) = 0.04. Although a globular cluster remnant cannot be ruled out, the integrated spectrum resemblance to that of a globular cluster probably reflects a stochastic effect owing to the few brighter stars. The structural and photometric properties of Ruprecht 3 are compatible with what would be expected for an intermediate-age open cluster remnant. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  6. A kinematic study of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.; Sato, T.

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to its confirmed nature as the remnant of a standard Type Ia supernova from spectroscopy of its light echo, Tycho's supernova remnant is a unique object that can provide a new perspective into thermonuclear supernova explosions. More than 400 years after its discovery as a supernova in November 1572, the remnant is now spread out over an 8 arcminute diameter region in a fairly symmetric, but patchy, shell-like morphology. The remnant's thermal X-ray emission is dominated by a strong Si Kalpha line and also shows line emission from other species such as S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. Existing proper motion and X-ray line width measurements indicate that Tycho's Si-rich ejecta shell is expanding at ~4700 km/s. We have taken advantage of the huge number of Si line photons in the 750-ks Chandra ACIS observation from 2009 to make the first direct velocity measurements of ejecta in Tycho. The patchy nature of the ejecta shell allows for identification of red- and blue-shifted clumps of emission from the receding and approaching hemispheres. We use nonequilibrium ionization thermal models to jointly fit both ACIS-S and ACIS-I observations to determine the radial expansion velocity of individual clumps and associated systematic uncertainty. Red-shifted clumps have speeds of 3500-7800 km/s and blue-shifted clumps 1600--5000 km/s with a systematic uncertainty of 500-2000 km/s determined by intercomparison of the ACIS-S and ACIS-I spectral results. From our Chandra radial analysis of surface brightness, centroid energy, and line width, we have confirmed previous line width measurements from Suzaku, but are able to utilize finer radial bins that reveal additional structure in the kinematics of Tycho. In particular the Si and S line widths reach a deep minimum at the position of the peak surface brightness near the remnant's edge and where Doppler broadening from the shell expansion is minimum. From the measured line widths and assuming that Doppler and turbulent broadening can be

  7. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-08-01

    To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins) as a contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and IHD. Observational studies show association between elevated remnant cholesterol and IHD, and mechanistic studies show remnant cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall like LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) accumulation. Furthermore, large genetic studies show evidence of remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for IHD independent of HDL-cholesterol levels. Genetic studies also show that elevated remnant cholesterol is associated with low-grade inflammation, whereas elevated LDL-C is not. There are several pharmacologic ways of lowering remnant cholesterol levels; however, it remains to be seen in large randomized clinical intervention trials if lowering of remnant cholesterol, in individuals with elevated levels, will reduce the risk of IHD. Evidence is emerging for elevated remnant cholesterol being a causal risk factor for IHD. Elevated remnant cholesterol levels likely are part of the explanation of the residual risk of IHD observed after LDL-C has been lowered to recommended levels.

  8. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  9. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  10. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1999-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO (Collaboration of Australia and Nippon Gamma Ray Observatory at Outback) experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  11. Cooling and evolution of a supernova remnant.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the structure, evolution, and cooling of an old supernova remnant, aimed at providing a theoretical framework for relating remnants with similar energies and environments but of different ages. Discussed evolution details include the Sedov-Taylor blast wave, the electron-ion equipartition and thermal conduction, the temperature sag and the dynamics in the process of transition to a dense shell, and the history of remnant luminosity.

  12. DUST COOLING IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Seok, Ji Yeon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    The infrared-to-X-ray (IRX) flux ratio traces the relative importance of dust cooling to gas cooling in astrophysical plasma such as supernova remnants (SNRs). We derive IRX ratios of SNRs in the LMC using Spitzer and Chandra SNR survey data and compare them with those of Galactic SNRs. IRX ratios of all the SNRs in the sample are found to be moderately greater than unity, indicating that dust grains are a more efficient coolant than gas although gas cooling may not be negligible. The IRX ratios of the LMC SNRs are systematically lower than those of the Galactic SNRs. As both dust cooling and gas cooling pertain to the properties of the interstellar medium, the lower IRX ratios of the LMC SNRs may reflect the characteristics of the LMC, and the lower dust-to-gas ratio (a quarter of the Galactic value) is likely to be the most significant factor. The observed IRX ratios are compared with theoretical predictions that yield IRX ratios an order of magnitude larger. This discrepancy may originate from the dearth of dust in the remnants due to either the local variation of the dust abundance in the preshock medium with respect to the canonical abundance or the dust destruction in the postshock medium. The non-equilibrium ionization cooling of hot gas, in particular for young SNRs, may also cause the discrepancy. Finally, we discuss implications for the dominant cooling mechanism of SNRs in low-metallicity galaxies.

  13. 16 CFR 303.13 - Sale of remnants and products made of remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE TEXTILE FIBER PRODUCTS IDENTIFICATION ACT § 303.13... “remnants of undetermined fiber content.” (3) Where textile fiber products are made of such remnants,...

  14. The skewer technique for anterior capsule remnants.

    PubMed

    Hecht, S D; McCarthy, E F

    1984-07-01

    A technique has been developed which enables the removal of a narrow, long remnant of anterior capsule which is connected inferiorly and inadvertently left during planned extracapsular cataract surgery. The technique is especially useful when the wound has already been partly or completely closed. A partial thickness incision is made at the limbus and a short 30-gauge needle is inserted through the incision into the anterior chamber. The needle then skewers the remnant, tearing it along its edge. The end of the capsular remnant is put on stretch by grasping its edge with a small forceps. This results in a transverse tear, with amputation of the remnant.

  15. Pacific Ocean–Wide Profile of CYP1A1 Expression, Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios, and Organic Contaminant Burden in Sperm Whale Skin Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Godard-Codding, Céline A.J.; Clark, Rebecca; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Maltese, Silvia; West, Adam G.; Valenzuela, Luciano; Rowntree, Victoria; Polyak, Ildiko; Cannon, John C.; Pinkerton, Kim; Rubio-Cisneros, Nadia; Mesnick, Sarah L.; Cox, Stephen B.; Kerr, Iain; Payne, Roger; Stegeman, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ocean pollution affects marine organisms and ecosystems as well as humans. The International Oceanographic Commission recommends ocean health monitoring programs to investigate the presence of marine contaminants and the health of threatened species and the use of multiple and early-warning biomarker approaches. Objective We explored the hypothesis that biomarker and contaminant analyses in skin biopsies of the threatened sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) could reveal geographical trends in exposure on an oceanwide scale. Methods We analyzed cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression (by immunohistochemistry), stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (as general indicators of trophic position and latitude, respectively), and contaminant burdens in skin biopsies to explore regional trends in the Pacific Ocean. Results Biomarker analyses revealed significant regional differences within the Pacific Ocean. CYP1A1 expression was highest in whales from the Galapagos, a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization World Heritage marine reserve, and was lowest in the sampling sites farthest away from continents. We examined the possible influence of the whales’ sex, diet, or range and other parameters on regional variation in CYP1A1 expression, but data were inconclusive. In general, CYP1A1 expression was not significantly correlated with contaminant burdens in blubber. However, small sample sizes precluded detailed chemical analyses, and power to detect significant associations was limited. Conclusions Our large-scale monitoring study was successful at identifying regional differences in CYP1A1 expression, providing a baseline for this known biomarker of exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists. However, we could not identify factors that explained this variation. Future oceanwide CYP1A1 expression profiles in cetacean skin biopsies are warranted and could reveal whether globally distributed chemicals occur at biochemically

  16. Pacific Ocean-wide profile of CYP1A1 expression, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios, and organic contaminant burden in sperm whale skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Godard-Codding, Céline A J; Clark, Rebecca; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Maltese, Silvia; West, Adam G; Valenzuela, Luciano; Rowntree, Victoria; Polyak, Ildiko; Cannon, John C; Pinkerton, Kim; Rubio-Cisneros, Nadia; Mesnick, Sarah L; Cox, Stephen B; Kerr, Iain; Payne, Roger; Stegeman, John J

    2011-03-01

    Ocean pollution affects marine organisms and ecosystems as well as humans. The International Oceanographic Commission recommends ocean health monitoring programs to investigate the presence of marine contaminants and the health of threatened species and the use of multiple and early-warning biomarker approaches. We explored the hypothesis that biomarker and contaminant analyses in skin biopsies of the threatened sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) could reveal geographical trends in exposure on an oceanwide scale. We analyzed cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression (by immunohistochemistry), stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (as general indicators of trophic position and latitude, respectively), and contaminant burdens in skin biopsies to explore regional trends in the Pacific Ocean. Biomarker analyses revealed significant regional differences within the Pacific Ocean. CYP1A1 expression was highest in whales from the Galapagos, a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization World Heritage marine reserve, and was lowest in the sampling sites farthest away from continents. We examined the possible influence of the whales' sex, diet, or range and other parameters on regional variation in CYP1A1 expression, but data were inconclusive. In general, CYP1A1 expression was not significantly correlated with contaminant burdens in blubber. However, small sample sizes precluded detailed chemical analyses, and power to detect significant associations was limited. Our large-scale monitoring study was successful at identifying regional differences in CYP1A1 expression, providing a baseline for this known biomarker of exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists. However, we could not identify factors that explained this variation. Future oceanwide CYP1A1 expression profiles in cetacean skin biopsies are warranted and could reveal whether globally distributed chemicals occur at biochemically relevant concentrations on a global basis, which may

  17. Supernova Remnants in High Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick; Badenes, Carles; Freyer, Chris; Hughes, Jack; Lee, Herman Shiu-Hang; Lopez, Laura; Patnaude, Daniel; Reynolds, Steve; Temim, Tea; Williams, Brian; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2015-10-01

    As the observable products of explosive stellar death, supernova remnants reveal some of the most direct information on the physics of the explosions, the properties of the progenitor systems, and the demographics of compact objects formed in the supernova events. High sensitivity X-ray observations have allowed us to probe the properties of the shocked plasma, providing constraints on abundances and ionization states that connect directly progenitor masses and metallicities, the nature of the explosions (core-collapse vs. thermonuclear), and the physics of shock heating and particle acceleration in fast shocks. Studies of SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds have provided information on source demographics in a low metallicity environment, and deep searches for point sources in Galactic SNRs imply that many remnants contain rapidly cooling neutron stars or black holes. Based on Chandra observations, we know that crucial measurements required to advance our knowledge in these areas are possible only with much more sensitive observations at high angular resolution. From identifying the effects of particle acceleration on the post-shock gas in young SNRs like Tycho to obtaining spatially resolved spectra - and identifying compact objects - for young SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, the capabilities of a facility like the X-ray Surveyor are required. Here I present a summary of recent advances brought about by spectral investigations of SNRs, and discuss particular examples of new advances that will be enabled by X-ray Surveyor capabilities.

  18. Measurement of the branching ratios for the standard model Higgs decays into muon pairs and into Z boson pairs at a 1.4 TeV CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Milutinović-Dumbelović, Gordana Božović-Jelisavčić, Ivanka; Kačarević, Goran; Lukić, Strahinja; Pandurović, Mila; Smiljanić, Ivan; Grefe, Christian; Roloff, Philipp

    2016-03-25

    The measurement of the Higgs production cross-section times the branching ratios for its decays into μ{sup +}μ{sup −} and ZZ* pairs at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider is investigated in this paper. The Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass of 126 GeV is dominantly produced via WW fusion in e{sup +}e{sup −} collisions at 1.4 TeV centre-of-mass energy. Analyses of both decay channels are based on a full simulation of the CLIC-ILD detector. All relevant physics and beam-induced background processes are taken into account. An integrated luminosity of 1.5 ab{sup −1} and unpolarised beams are assumed. For the H→ZZ* decay, the purely hadronic final state (ZZ* → qq̄qq̄) is considered as well as ZZ* decays into two jets and two leptons (ZZ* → qql{sup +}l{sup −}). It is shown that the branching ratio for the Higgs decay into a muon pair times the Higgs production cross-section can be measured with 38% statistical uncertainty. It is also shown that the statistical uncertainty of the Higgs branching ratio for decay into a Z boson pair times the Higgs production cross-section can be measured with a precision of 18.3% and 5.6% for the hadronic and semi-leptonic ZZ* decays, respectively.

  19. Effect of aerobic exercise on risk factors of cardiovascular disease and the apolipoprotein B / apolipoprotein a-1 ratio in obese woman.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Young; Jung, Sun-Young

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to confirm whether consistent aerobic exercise has an effect on the apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-1 ratio or reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease in obese women. [Subjects and Methods] The participants included 32 obese women between the ages of 40 and 49. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups (n = 16 in each group): the control group and the exercise group. The exercise program in this study corresponded to an intensity of 50 to 60% of the maximum volume of minute oxygen consumption and was performed three times per week over 12 weeks. Physical measurements, measurement of cardiorespiratory fitness and blood pressure, and blood collection were done before and after the 12 weeks of exercise at the same time and under the same conditions. [Results] Based on the results of this study, there were significant interaction effects in both time and group weight, for body mass index, percent body fat, maximum volume of minute oxygen consumption, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-1 ratio. Moreover, waist circumference, total cholesterol, and the atherogenic index decreased significantly after 12 weeks of aerobic exercise. [Conclusion] Regular aerobic exercise effectively improved cardiovascular risk factors and decreased the obesity index in obese women.

  20. Transfusion of plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 vs a 1:1:2 ratio and mortality in patients with severe trauma: the PROPPR randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, John B; Tilley, Barbara C; Baraniuk, Sarah; Fox, Erin E; Wade, Charles E; Podbielski, Jeanette M; del Junco, Deborah J; Brasel, Karen J; Bulger, Eileen M; Callcut, Rachael A; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Cotton, Bryan A; Fabian, Timothy C; Inaba, Kenji; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Muskat, Peter; O'Keeffe, Terence; Rizoli, Sandro; Robinson, Bryce R H; Scalea, Thomas M; Schreiber, Martin A; Stein, Deborah M; Weinberg, Jordan A; Callum, Jeannie L; Hess, John R; Matijevic, Nena; Miller, Christopher N; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Hoyt, David B; Pearson, Gail D; Leroux, Brian; van Belle, Gerald

    2015-02-03

    Severely injured patients experiencing hemorrhagic shock often require massive transfusion. Earlier transfusion with higher blood product ratios (plasma, platelets, and red blood cells), defined as damage control resuscitation, has been associated with improved outcomes; however, there have been no large multicenter clinical trials. To determine the effectiveness and safety of transfusing patients with severe trauma and major bleeding using plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 ratio compared with a 1:1:2 ratio. Pragmatic, phase 3, multisite, randomized clinical trial of 680 severely injured patients who arrived at 1 of 12 level I trauma centers in North America directly from the scene and were predicted to require massive transfusion between August 2012 and December 2013. Blood product ratios of 1:1:1 (338 patients) vs 1:1:2 (342 patients) during active resuscitation in addition to all local standard-of-care interventions (uncontrolled). Primary outcomes were 24-hour and 30-day all-cause mortality. Prespecified ancillary outcomes included time to hemostasis, blood product volumes transfused, complications, incidence of surgical procedures, and functional status. No significant differences were detected in mortality at 24 hours (12.7% in 1:1:1 group vs 17.0% in 1:1:2 group; difference, -4.2% [95% CI, -9.6% to 1.1%]; P = .12) or at 30 days (22.4% vs 26.1%, respectively; difference, -3.7% [95% CI, -10.2% to 2.7%]; P = .26). Exsanguination, which was the predominant cause of death within the first 24 hours, was significantly decreased in the 1:1:1 group (9.2% vs 14.6% in 1:1:2 group; difference, -5.4% [95% CI, -10.4% to -0.5%]; P = .03). More patients in the 1:1:1 group achieved hemostasis than in the 1:1:2 group (86% vs 78%, respectively; P = .006). Despite the 1:1:1 group receiving more plasma (median of 7 U vs 5 U, P < .001) and platelets (12 U vs 6 U, P < .001) and similar amounts of red blood cells (9 U) over the first 24 hours

  1. A search for stellar remnants of supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, R. A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Winkler, P. F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The slitless spectra of the stars in the central regions of six galactic supernova remnants Cas A, Kepler, Tycho, SN 1006, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop were obtained with the prime focus transmission gratings at the 4M telescopes on Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo. It was found that no stellar remnant with an unusually blue or peculiar spectrum is present in any of the remnants down to the limit of m sub pg of 18.5. Except for the Cygnus Loop, the area searched in each remnant is large enough that objects with transverse velocities of 1000 km/s would be well within the field. The results are also compared with a computation of emission from gas near a neutron star and with the unpulsed emission from the Crab pulsar; in both cases upper limits were set which place constraints on a possible condensed stellar remnant.

  2. Glycated hemoglobin A1c level is associated with high urinary albumin/creatinine ratio in non-diabetic adult population.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok Hui; Park, Jong Won; Do, Jun Young; Cho, Kyu Hyang

    2016-09-01

    Regarding the association between glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels and microvascular complications, high HbA1c level in participants without diabetes mellitus (DM) may be associated with a high urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). Twelve thousand seven hundred and seventy four participants without DM were included in this study. The participants were divided into three groups according to HbA1c levels: a Low group (<5.7%), Middle group (5.7-6.0%), and High group (>6.0%). A high UACR was defined as UACR ≥3.9 mg/g for men and UACR ≥7.5 mg/g for women. The proportions of participants with a high UACR in the Low, Middle, and High groups were 22.4%, 27.9%, and 38.1%, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that logUACR was greatest in the High group compared to the other groups. For participants without metabolic syndrome (MetS), the proportions of participants with high UACR and logUACR values were greatest in the High group compared to the other groups. For participants with MetS, no differences were found for proportions of participants with high UACR and logUACR values in the Low, Middle, and High groups. Non-DM participants with relatively high HbA1c levels should be closely monitored for UACR, especially if participants do not have MetS. KEY MESSAGES HbA1c level was positively associated with the proportion of participants with a high UACR and logUACR in participants without DM. For participants without MetS, the proportion of participants with a high UACR was greater in the High group than in the other groups and logUACR was greatest in the High group compared to the other groups. For participants with MetS, there were significant associations between HbA1c and the proportion of participants with a high UACR as a categorical variable or logUACR as a continuous variable, but the statistical significance of this finding was weak. No differences were found for proportions of participants with high UACR and logUACR values

  3. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.83 meter (6 foot) diameter 1.2 pressure ratio fan (QF-6). [for short takeoff aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1974-01-01

    A 1.2-pressure-ratio, 1.83-meter-(6-ft-) diameter experimental fan stage with characteristics suitable for use in STOL aircraft engines was tested for acoustic and aerodynamic performance. The design incorporated features for low noise, including absence of inlet guide vanes, low rotor-blade-tip speed, low aerodynamic blade loading, and long axial spacing between the rotor and stator rows. The stage was run with four nozzles of different area. The perceived noise along a 152.4 meter (500-ft) sideline was rear-quadrant dominated with a maximum design-point level of 103.9 PNdb. The acoustic 1/3-octave results were analytically separated into broadband and pure-tone components. It was found that the stage noise levels generally increase with a decrease in nozzle area, with this increase observed primarily in the broadband noise component. A stall condition was documented acoustically with a 90-percent-of-design-area nozzle.

  4. Separating Binary Stars and Supernova Remnants at Three Sigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, K. K.

    2002-12-01

    High spatial resolution X-ray observations are revealing a population of point-like nonvariable sources in a host of nearby galaxies. These are normally identified as supernova remnants or X-ray binaries. However, in general these detections do not have enough counts to fully populate a spectrum, leaving identifications extremely speculative. I will present simulated spectra from models and data from well studied Galactic remnants and binary systems in order to demonstrate the uncertainty inherent in identifying sources with only few hundred counts. I will also explore the efficacy of using a hardness ratio to distinguish between source types and the role of optical and radio observations in clearing up ambiguities.

  5. Separating Binary Stars and Supernova Remnants at Three Sigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, K. K.

    2003-03-01

    High spatial resolution X-ray observations are revealing a population of point-like nonvariable sources in a host of nearby galaxies. These are normally identified as supernova remnants or X-ray binaries. However, in general these detections do not have enough counts to fully populate a spectrum, leaving identifications extremely speculative. I will present simulated spectra from models and data from well studied Galactic remnants and binary systems in order to demonstrate the uncertainty inherent in identifying sources with only few hundred counts. I will also explore the efficacy of using a hardness ratio to distinguish between source types and the role of optical and radio observations in clearing up ambiguities.

  6. Remnant Cholesterol Elicits Arterial Wall Inflammation and a Multilevel Cellular Immune Response in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bernelot Moens, Sophie J; Verweij, Simone L; Schnitzler, Johan G; Stiekema, Lotte C A; Bos, Merijn; Langsted, Anne; Kuijk, Carlijn; Bekkering, Siroon; Voermans, Carlijn; Verberne, Hein J; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Stroes, Erik S G; Kroon, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Mendelian randomization studies revealed a causal role for remnant cholesterol in cardiovascular disease. Remnant particles accumulate in the arterial wall, potentially propagating local and systemic inflammation. We evaluated the impact of remnant cholesterol on arterial wall inflammation, circulating monocytes, and bone marrow in patients with familial dysbetalipoproteinemia (FD). Arterial wall inflammation and bone marrow activity were measured using (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Monocyte phenotype was assessed with flow cytometry. The correlation between remnant levels and hematopoietic activity was validated in the CGPS (Copenhagen General Population Study). We found a 1.2-fold increase of (18)F-FDG uptake in the arterial wall in patients with FD (n=17, age 60±8 years, remnant cholesterol: 3.26 [2.07-5.71]) compared with controls (n=17, age 61±8 years, remnant cholesterol 0.29 [0.27-0.40]; P<0.001). Monocytes from patients with FD showed increased lipid accumulation (lipid-positive monocytes: Patients with FD 92% [86-95], controls 76% [66-81], P=0.001, with an increase in lipid droplets per monocyte), and a higher expression of surface integrins (CD11b, CD11c, and CD18). Patients with FD also exhibited monocytosis and leukocytosis, accompanied by a 1.2-fold increase of (18)F-FDG uptake in bone marrow. In addition, we found a strong correlation between remnant levels and leukocyte counts in the CGPS (n=103 953, P for trend 5×10-276). In vitro experiments substantiated that remnant cholesterol accumulates in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells coinciding with myeloid skewing. Patients with FD have increased arterial wall and cellular inflammation. These findings imply an important inflammatory component to the atherogenicity of remnant cholesterol, contributing to the increased cardiovascular disease risk in patients with FD. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Global Properties of Multiple Merger Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Melinda L.; Hernquist, Lars

    1996-03-01

    Not all the observed properties of elliptical galaxies are reproduced by simulations that seek the origins of early-type galaxies by merging. Here, the merger remnants of small groups of galaxies are contrasted with relics of mergers of pairs of galaxies to determine which process produces objects that best compare to real ellipticals. In both cases, the progenitors consist of self-gravitating disks, halos, and, sometimes, bulges. Pairs of galaxies merge from orbits that initially have zero energy. The systems that produce multiple merger remnants are dense, six- member groups in virial equilibrium with low velocity dispersions. Multiple and pair mergers produce remnants that differ in both their spatial and kinematic properties. Multiple merger remnants have small triaxialities and are most likely to appear nearly round from many viewing angles. They possess cores, with sizes of a few tenths of an effective radius, that are more extended than pair remnant cores, even when bulges are included in the progenitors. In multiple mergers, the spin of all components-halo, disk, and bulge-increases, and, while velocity dispersion dominates in the central regions, υ_r_/σ ~1 outside an effective radius in some projections. The angular momentum and minor axis vectors are aligned for multiple merger remnants. This is unlike the remnants of pair mergers. During merging of multiple progenitors, about half of the orbital angular momentum in each luminous component is converted into internal rotation in that component. Material is prevented from accumulating in the center of multiple merger remnants as efficiently as it does in pair mergers. In previous simulations of pair mergers that include gas, unrealistically steep surface brightness profiles have been produced in the center of the remnants; in multiple mergers, the formation of overdense nuclei may be impeded, thus allowing more successful comparison with real elliptical galaxies.

  8. Supernova remnants in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathewson, D. S.; Ford, V. L.; Dopita, M. A.; Tuohy, I. R.; Long, K. S.; Helfand, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The present updated catalog of SNRs in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) incorporates remnants recently discovered as a result of coordinated X-ray, optical, and radio surveys, and contains 25 confirmed SNRs in the LMC and six in the SMC. Optical images are included for all of the new SNRs, together with X-ray isophotes for 24 of the SNRs in the LMC which have been obtained with the high resolution imager and imaging proportional counter of the Einstein Observatory. The cumulative number-diameter relation for Type II SNRs with D smaller than 50 pc in the LMC is N(D)= 0.36 D exp 1.0 + or 0.2, suggesting that the SNRs have evolved much faster than expected from Sedov theory and that the free expansion phase dominates their evolution up to diameters of 30-40 pc. SNR production frequencies in the LMC and SMC are calculated to be 1/275 and 1/800 years, respectively, or nearly equal to the galaxies' luminosity ratios.

  9. Progenitor's Signatures in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.

    2013-01-01

    The remnants of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can provide important clues about their progenitor histories. We discuss two well-observed supernova remnants (SNRs) that are believed to have resulted from SNe Ia, and use various tools to shed light on the possible progenitor histories. We find that Kepler's SNR is consistent with a symbiotic binary progenitor consisting of a white dwarf and an AGB star. Our hydrosimulations can reproduce the observed kinematic and morphological properties. For Tycho's remnant we use the characteristics of the X-ray spectrum and kinematics to show that the ejecta has likely interacted with dense circumstellar gas.

  10. Further analysis of LDEF FRECOPA micrometeroid remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, J.; Bunch, T. E.; Radicatidibrozolo, Filippo

    1992-06-01

    Experiments dedicated to the detection of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) were exposed within the FRECOPA payload, installed on the face of the LDEF directly opposed to the velocity vector (west facing direction, location B3). We were mainly interested in the analysis of hypervelocity impact features of sizes less than or = 10 microns, found in thick Al targets devoted to the research of impact features. In the 15 craters found in the scanned area (approximately 4 sq. cm), the chemical analysis suggests an extraterrestrial origin for the impacting particles. The main elements we identified are usually refered to as chondrite elements: Na, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Fe are found in various proportions, intrinsic Al being masked by the Al target; we notice a strong depletion in Ni, never observed in our samples. Furthermore, C and O are present in 90 percent of the cases; the C/O peak height ratio varies from 0.1 to 3. Impactor simulations by light gas gun hypervelocity impact experiments have shown that meaningful biogenic element and compound information maybe obtained from IDP residues below impacts of critical velocities, that are less than or = 4 km/sec for particles larger than 100 microns in diameter. Our results obtained for the smaller size fraction IDP's suggest that at such sizes, the critical velocity could be higher by a factor of 2 or 3, as chemical analysis of the remnants were possible in all the identified impact craters, performed on targets possibly hit at velocities greater than or = 7.5 km/s, which is the spacecraft velocity. These samples are now subjected to an imagery and analytical protocol that includes FESEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) and LIMS (laser ionization mass spectrometry). The LIMS analyses were performed using the LIMA-ZA instrument. Results are presented, clearly indicating that such small events show crater features analogous to what is observed at larger sizes; our first analytical results, obtained for 2 events

  11. Isophote shapes of merger remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima-Neto, G. B.; Combes, F.

    1995-02-01

    We analyze the end-states of galaxy mergers between 2 and 15 equal mass disk galaxies, as well as a dissipationless collapse, obtained in N-body simulations. The isophote shapes can appear boxy depending on the viewing angle, and the frequency of observed boxiness depends on the initial conditions. We show that a collapsed object presents the highest degree of boxiness. Mergers of 2 galaxies show only a moderate degree of boxiness, depending on the initial relative orientation of the progenitor galaxies. The cannibal galaxies (galaxies formed by a series of mergers) display irregular isophotes and small or no sign of boxiness. Therefore, dissipationless mergers tend to wash out any disky or boxy isophotes instead of creating them. A statistical analysis of the end state distribution of the particles angular momentum indicates that the boxy shapes does not appear to be related to the tumbling or bending instabilities, and are not specific to merger remnants. These results are analyzed in regard to a possible scenario of elliptical galaxy formation.

  12. Runaway Stars in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannicke, Anna; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Dinçel, Baha

    2016-07-01

    Half of all stars and in particular 70 % of the massive stars are a part of a multiple system. A possible development for the system after the core collapse supernova (SN) of the more massive component is as follows: The binary is disrupted by the SN. The formed neutron star is ejected by the SN kick whereas the companion star either remains within the system and is gravitationally bounded to the neutron star, or is ejected with a spatial velocity comparable to its former orbital velocity (up to 500 km/s). Such stars with a large peculiar space velocity are called runaway stars. We present our observational results of the supernova remnants (SNRs) G184.6-5.8, G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2. The focus of this project lies on the detection of low mass runaway stars. We analyze the spectra of a number of candidates and discuss their possibility of being the former companions of the SN progenitor stars. The spectra were obtained with INT in Tenerife, Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory and the University Observatory Jena. Also we investigate the field stars in the neighborhood of the SNRs G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2 and calculate more precise distances for these SNRs.

  13. Runaway Stars in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannicke, A.; Dincel, B.; Neuhauser, R.

    2016-06-01

    Half of all stars and in particular 70 percent of the massive stars are part of a multiple system. A possible development for the system after the core collapse supernova (SN) of the more massive component is as follows: The binary is disrupted by the SN. The formed neutron star is ejected by the SN kick whereas the companion star either remains within the system and is gravitationally bounded to the neutron star, or is ejected with a spatial velocity comparable to its former orbital velocity (up to 500 km/s). Such stars with a large peculiar space velocity are called runaway stars. We present our observational results of the supernova remnants (SNRs) G184.6-5.8, G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2. The focus of this project lies on the detection of low mass runaway stars. We analyze the spectra of a number of candidates and discuss their possibility of being the former companions of the SN progenitor stars. The spectra were obtained with INT in Tenerife, Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory and the University Observatory Jena. Also, we investigate the field stars in the neighborhood of the SNRs G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2 and calculate more precise distances for these SNRs.

  14. [Atherogenic lipoprotein remnants in humans].

    PubMed

    Wikinski, Regina; Schreier, Laura E; Berg, Gabriela A; Brites, Fernando D; López, Graciela; González, Ana I; Zago, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Remnant lipoproteins (RLPs) are the lipolytic product of triglycerides transported by very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) of hepatic and intestinal origin and intestinal chylomicrons. Lipoprotein lipase activity hydrolyse triglycerides in several steps, producing heterogeneous particles. Fasting plasma concentration in normolipidemic subjects is low, but it increases in post-prandial states. Genetic alterations in Apo-E subtypes increases RLPs plasma concentration and produce dyslipoproteinemia phenotype. RLPs atherogenicity depends on their role as endothelial injuring factors, their impaired recognition by lipoprotein receptors, and their susceptibility to oxidative stress. They also promote the circulation of molecular adhesion molecules, the internalization in subendothelial macrophages via scavenger receptors and the accumulation in foam cells, all of them early mechanisms of atheromatosis. RLPs metabolism has been a subject of controversial studies. Their origin from different lipoproteins may explain their structural heterogeneity, therefore increasing the methodological difficulties to include RLPs in the atherogenic lipoprotein profile in the epidemiological studies of the field. Last advances on metabolism of RLPs and their emergent clinical role justifies an up dated revision of RLPs.

  15. The First Reported Infrared Emission from the SN1006 Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    We report results of infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the SN 1006 remnant, carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 24 m image from MIPS clearly shows faint filamentary emission along the northwest rim of the remnant shell, nearly coincident with the Balmer filaments that delineate the present position of the expanding shock. The 24 m emission traces the Balmer filaments almost perfectly, but lies a few arcsec within, indicating an origin in interstellar dust heated by the shock. Subsequent decline in the IR behind the shock is presumably due largely to grain destruction through sputtering. The emission drops far more rapidly than current models predict, however, even for a higher proportion of small grains than would be found closer to the Galactic plane. The rapid drop may result in part from a grain density that has always been lowera relic effect from an earlier epoch when the shock was encountering a lower densitybut higher grain destruction rates still seem to be required. Spectra from three positions along the NW filament from the IRS instrument all show only a featureless continuum, consistent with thermal emission from warm dust. The dust-to-gas mass ratio in the pre-shock interstellar medium is lower than that expected for the Galactic ISM-as has also been observed in the analysis of IR emission from other SNRs but whose cause remains unclear. As with other SNIa remnants, SN1006 shows no evidence for dust grain formation in the supernova ejecta.

  16. What Produced the Ultraluminous Supernova Remnant in NGC 6946?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, B. C.; Gruendl, R. A.; Chu, Y.-H.

    1999-05-01

    The ultra-luminous supernova remnant (SNR) in NGC 6946 is the brightest X-ray SNR known, ~ 1000 times as luminous as Cas A. However, high-velocity gas with Vexp > 600 km/s has not been detected, as expected for a young remnant. HST WFPC2 images of this SNR show multiple loops. This morphology has been used as evidence of colliding SNRs of different ages, in order to explain the X-ray luminosity (Blair, Fesen, & Schlegel 1997), We have obtained high-dispersion echelle spectra of this SNR with the KPNO 4-m telescope. The SNR is detected in Hα , [N II]lambda 6584, and [O III]lambda 5007 lines. The emission lines show a narrow component (FWHM ~ 40 km/s) superposed on a broad component (FWZI ~ 360 km/s). The total [N II] flux is comparable to the Hα flux. The broad component contains ~ 1.5 times as much flux as the narrow component, and the broad component has slightly higher [N II]/Hα ratio than the narrow component. These spectral properties are qualitatively similar to some small SNRs in M33. The strong [N II] line in the narrow component suggests an anomalous nitrogen abundance usually associated with circumstellar material. The nitrogen abundance and small remnant size imply that the supernova progenitor was a WN star and the supernova exploded in a dense circumstellar bubble.

  17. What Produced the Ultraluminous Supernova Remnant in NGC 6946?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Bryan C.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Chu, You-Hua

    2000-03-01

    The ultraluminous supernova remnant (SNR) in NGC 6946 is the brightest known SNR in X-rays, about 1000 times brighter than Cas A. To probe the nature of this remnant and its progenitor, we have obtained high-dispersion optical echelle spectra. The echelle spectra detect Hα, [N II], and [O III] lines and resolve these lines into a narrow (FWHM ~20-40 km s-1) component from unshocked material and a broad (FWHM ~250 km s-1) component from shocked material. Both narrow and broad components have unusually high [N II]/Hα ratios, about 1. Using the echelle observation, archival Hubble Space Telescope images, and archival ROSAT X-ray observations, we conclude that the SNR was produced by a normal supernova whose progenitor was a massive star, either a WN star or a luminous blue variable. The high luminosity of the remnant is caused by the supernova ejecta expanding into a dense, nitrogen-rich circumstellar nebula created by the progenitor.

  18. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  19. Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Make Cosmic Rays

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The husks of exploded stars produce some of the fastest particles in the cosmos. New findings by NASA's Fermi show that two supernova remnants accelerate protons to near the speed of light. The pro...

  20. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with casing tip bleed (QEP Fan B scale model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Minzner, W. R.; Paas, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a rotor tip casing bleed slot to determine its effects on noise generation. The bleed slot was located 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) upstream of the rotor leading edge and was configured to be a continuous opening around the circumference. The bleed manifold system was operated over a range of bleed rates corresponding to as much as 6% of the fan flow at approach thrust and 4.25% of the fan flow at takeoff thrust. Acoustic results indicate that a bleed rate of 4% of the fan flow reduces the fan maximum approach 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL 0.5 PNdB and the corresponding takeoff thrust noise 1.1 PNdB below the level with zero bleed. However, comparison of the standard casing (no bleed slot) and the slotted bleed casing with zero bleed shows that the bleed slot itself caused a noise increase.

  1. Fan Performance From Duct Rake Instrumentation on a 1.294 Pressure Ratio, 725 ft/sec Tip Speed Turbofan Simulator Using Vaned Passage Casing Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian

    2006-01-01

    A 1.294 pressure ratio, 725 ft/sec tip speed, variable pitch low noise fan was designed and tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Wind Tunnel. The design included a casing treatment that used recirculation to extend the fan stall line and provide an acceptable operating range. Overall aerodynamic experimental results are presented for this low tip speed, low noise fan without casing treatment as well as using several variants of the casing treatment that moved the air extraction and insertion axial locations. Measurements were made to assess effects on performance, operability, and noise. An unusual instability was discovered near the design operating line and is documented in the fan operating range. Measurements were made to compare stall margin improvements as well as measure the performance impact of the casing treatments. Experimental results in the presence of simulated inlet distortion, via screens, are presented for the baseline and recirculation casing treatment configurations. Estimates are made for the quantity of recirculation weight flow based on limited instrumentation in the recirculation system along with discussion of results and conclusions

  2. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  3. Acoustic and aerodynamic performance of a 1.83-meter (6-ft) diameter 1.25-pressure-ratio fan (QF-8)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Lucas, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    A 1.25-pressure-ratio 1.83-meter (6-ft) tip diameter experimental fan stage with characteristics suitable for engine application on STOL aircraft was tested for acoustic and aerodynamic performance. The design incorporated proven features for low noise, including absence of inlet guide vanes, low rotor blade tip speed, low aerodynamic blade loading, and long axial spacing between the rotor and stator blade rows. The fan was operated with five exhaust nozzle areas. The stage noise levels generally increased with a decrease in nozzle area. Separation of the acoustic one-third octave results into broadband and pure-tone components showed the broadband noise to be greater than the corresponding pure-tone components. The sideline perceived noise was highest in the rear quadrants. The acoustic results of QF-8 were compared with those of two similar STOL application fans in the test series. The QF-8 had somewhat higher relative noise levels than those of the other two fans. The aerodynamic results of QF-8 and the other two fans were compared with corresponding results from 50.8-cm (20-in.) diam scale models of these fans and design values. Although the results for the full-scale and scale models of the other two fans were in reasonable agreement for each design, the full-scale fan QF-8 results showed poor performance compared with corresponding model results and design expectations. Facility effects of the full-scale fan QF-8 installation were considered in analyzing this discrepancy.

  4. THE FIRST REPORTED INFRARED EMISSION FROM THE SN 1006 REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, P. Frank; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Raymond, John C. E-mail: brian.j.williams@nasa.gov E-mail: kborkow@ncsu.edu E-mail: pghavamian@towson.edu E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-02-20

    We report results of infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the SN 1006 remnant, carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 24 {mu}m image from Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer clearly shows faint filamentary emission along the northwest rim of the remnant shell, nearly coincident with the Balmer filaments that delineate the present position of the expanding shock. The 24 {mu}m emission traces the Balmer filaments almost perfectly but lies a few arcsec within, indicating an origin in interstellar dust heated by the shock. Subsequent decline in the IR behind the shock is presumably due largely to grain destruction through sputtering. The emission drops far more rapidly than current models predict, however, even for a higher proportion of small grains than would be found closer to the Galactic plane. The rapid drop may result in part from a grain density that has always been lower-a relic effect from an earlier epoch when the shock was encountering a lower density-but higher grain destruction rates still seem to be required. Spectra from three positions along the NW filament from the Infrared Spectrometer instrument all show only a featureless continuum, consistent with thermal emission from warm dust. The dust-to-gas mass ratio in the pre-shock interstellar medium (ISM) is lower than that expected for the Galactic ISM-as has also been observed in the analysis of IR emission from other supernova remnants, but whose cause remains unclear. As with other Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) remnants, SN 1006 shows no evidence for dust grain formation in the SN ejecta.

  5. Predictive value of non-fasting remnant cholesterol for short-term outcome of diabetics with new-onset stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Li-Feng; Yan, Xiao-Ni; Lu, Zhen-Hua; Fan, Ying; Ye, Fei; Wu, Qiong; Luo, Song-Hui; Yang, Bo; Li, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-13

    The relationship between non-fasting remnant cholesterol and cardiovascular outcome in the era of potent statin therapy remained to be elucidated. A cohort study of three hundred and twenty eight diabetics diagnosed with new-onset stable coronary artery disease (CAD) by coronary angiography were enrolled. All cases were followed up for an average duration of twelve months. The association between baseline remnant cholesterol levels and major cardiovascular outcomes were evaluated using the receivers operating characteristic (ROC) curves and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. During a period of 12-month's follow-up, 14.3% patients (47/328) underwent pre-specified adverse outcomes. The remnant cholesterol associated with high sensitivity C-reactive protein, neutrophil count and fibrinogen (R (2) = 0.20, 0.12 and 0.14; P = 0.000, 0.036 and 0.010 respectively). Area under the ROC curves (AUC) indicated discriminatory power of the remnant cholesterol to predict the adverse outcomes for this population (AUC = 0.64, P < 0.005). Kaplan-Meier curve suggested that the lower levels of remnant cholesterol showed relatively lower cardiac events for diabetic patients with stable CAD (Log rank X (2) = 8.94, P = 0.04). However, according to multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression, apart from hemoglobin A1C (Hazard ratio [H.R.] =1.38, 95% CI: 1.14-1.66, P = 0.001) and Gensini scores (H.R. = 1.00, 95% CI: 1.00-1.02; P = 0.035), remnant cholesterol did not qualify as an independent predictor of adverse prognosis in these settings (H.R. = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.46-2.37, P = 0.909). Non-fasting remnant cholesterol was associated with inflammatory biomarkers and high incidence of revascularization, but not qualified as an independent predictor for short-term prognosis of diabetics with new-onset stable coronary artery disease.

  6. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  7. Observation of Crab-Like Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to observe the supernova remnants 3C58 and G21.5-0.9 and to search for pulsed emission. If a pulsar were to be found, the period derivative and inferred magnetic field would have extreme values if pulsar evolution had followed the standard model. If this is not the case, the standard model must be revised. We also sought to obtain very accurate measurement of the synchrotron emission spectrum of each remnant.

  8. Performance of a 1.15-pressure-ratio axial-flow fan stage with a blade tip solidity of 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, W. M.; Steinke, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The overall and blade-element performance of a low-solidity, low-pressure-ratio, low-tip-speed fan stage is presented over the stable operating range at rotative speeds from 90 to 120 percent of design speed. At design speed a stage peak efficiency of 0.836 was obtained at a weight flow of 30.27 kilograms per second and a pressure ratio of 1.111. The pressure ratio was less than design pressure ratio, and the design energy input into the rotor was not achieved. A mismatch of the rotor and stator blade elements resulted due to the lower than design pressure ratio of the rotor.

  9. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie

    For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays.

    Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images.

    To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer

  10. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the movie

    For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This stunning visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several telescopes: X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, infrared data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and optical data from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak, Ariz., and the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 2.4-meter telescope, also at Kitt Peak. In this visualization, the green region is mostly iron observed in X-rays. The yellow region is a combination of argon and silicon seen in X-rays, optical, and infrared including jets of silicon plus outer debris seen in the optical. The red region is cold debris seen in the infrared. Finally, the blue reveals the outer blast wave, most prominently detected in X-rays.

    Most of the material shown in this visualization is debris from the explosion that has been heated by a shock moving inwards. The red material interior to the yellow/orange ring has not yet encountered the inward moving shock and so has not yet been heated. These unshocked debris were known to exist because they absorb background radio light, but they were only recently discovered in infrared emission with Spitzer. The blue region is composed of gas surrounding the explosion that was heated when it was struck by the outgoing blast wave, as clearly seen in Chandra images.

    To create this visualization, scientists took advantage of both a previously known phenomenon the Doppler effect and a new technology that bridges astronomy and medicine. When elements created inside a supernova, such as iron, silicon and argon, are heated they emit light at certain wavelengths. Material moving towards the observer will have shorter wavelengths and material moving away will have longer

  11. Potential effects on clinical management of treatment algorithms on the basis of apolipoprotein-B/A-1 and total/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratios.

    PubMed

    Vodnala, Deepthi; Bard, Robert L; Krishnan, Sangeetha M; Jackson, Elizabeth A; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein-B/A-1 (apoB/A-R) and total/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratios (TC/HDL-R) outperform non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (non-HDL-C) suggested by Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III guidelines for predicting cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. To evaluate the potential effects that implementing our proposed apoB/A-R and TC/HDL-R treatment algorithms would have on clinical management. We performed a chart review of all patients referred to the University of Michigan Lipid Clinic from January 2004 to June 2010. ATP III guidelines, including Framingham Risk Scores, were used to determine whether patients met non-HDL-C goals upon referral. Next, we evaluated whether subsequent management would differ if algorithms based upon potential apoB/A-R or TC/HDL-R targets derived from the literature were followed. Among patients (n = 692), mean non-HDL-C, apoB/A-R, and TC/HDL-R were 192.2 ± 85.8 mg/dL, 0.92 ± 0.64, and 6.7 ± 8.0, respectively. Although moderately well correlated with apoB (r = 0.56, P < .01), non-HDL-C was less related to apoB/A-R (r = 0.20, P < .01) and TC/HDL-R (r = 0.39, P < .01). Most low-risk patients (<2 risk factors; n = 207) at non-HDL-C goal (<190 mg/dL) also met apoB/A-R <0.9 (79%) and TC/HDL-R <6.0 (92%) targets. However, a minority of high-risk patients (Framingham Risk Score >20%, cardiovascular disease or risk equivalent; n = 307) meeting non-HDL-C goal (<130 mg/dL) achieved targets for apoB/A-R <0.5 (21%) or TC/HDL-C <3.5 (42%). The percentages of intermediate-risk patients meeting both non-HDL-C and ratio goals varied; nonetheless, few met an aggressive apoB/A-R <0.6 (36%-50%) target. Most high- and many intermediate-risk patients at non-HDL-C goals would require more aggressive treatment to reach the suggested apoB/A-R or TC/HDL-R targets. Whether this strategy yields superior outcomes merits future investigation. Copyright © 2011 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The combined effects of remnant vegetation and tree planting on farmland birds.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Ross B; Lindenmayer, David B; Crane, Mason; Michael, Damian; MacGregor, Christopher; Montague-Drake, Rebecca; Fischer, Joern

    2008-06-01

    Biodiversity conservation on agricultural land is a major issue worldwide. We estimated separate and joint effects of remnant native woodland vegetation and recent tree plantings on birds on farms (approximately 500-1000 ha) in the heavily cleared wheat and sheep belt of southern Australia. Much of the variation (>70%) in bird responses was explained by 3 factors: remnant native-vegetation attributes (native grassland, scattered paddock trees, patches of remnant native woodland); presence or absence of planted native trees; and the size and shape of tree plantings. In terms of the number of species, remnant native vegetation was more important than tree planting, in a 3:1 ratio, approximately. Farms with high values for remnant native vegetation were those most likely to support declining or vulnerable species, although some individual species of conservation concern occurred on farms with large plantings. Farm management for improved bird conservation should account for the cumulative and complementary contributions of many components of remnant native-vegetation cover (e.g., scattered paddock trees and fallen timber) as well as areas of restored native vegetation.

  13. Measuring the Symmetry of Supernova Remnants in the Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Jennifer; Lopez, Laura A.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly 300 supernova remnants (SNRs) are known in the MIlky Way galaxy, and they offer an important means to study the explosions and interactions of supernovae at sub-pc scales. In this poster, we present analysis of the morphology of Galactic SNRs at radio wavelengths. Specifically, we measure the symmetry of several tens of SNRs in 6- and 20-cm Very Large Array images using a multipole expansion technique, the power-ratio method. We explore how the SNRs' morphology changes as a function of their size and estimated dynamical ages, with the aim of probing how SNR shapes evolve with time.

  14. High-energy antiprotons from old supernova remnants.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Pasquale; Serpico, Pasquale D

    2009-08-21

    A recently proposed model explains the rise in energy of the positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite in terms of hadronic production of positrons in aged supernova remnants, and acceleration therein. Here we present a preliminary calculation of the antiproton flux produced by the same mechanism. While the model is consistent with present data, a rise of the antiproton to proton ratio is predicted at high energy, which strikingly distinguishes this scenario from other astrophysical explanations of the positron fraction (such as pulsars). We briefly discuss important implications for dark matter searches via antimatter.

  15. BchJ and BchM interact in a 1 : 1 ratio with the magnesium chelatase BchH subunit of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Artur; Willows, Robert D

    2010-11-01

    Substrate channeling between the enzymatic steps in the (bacterio)chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway catalyzed by magnesium chelatase (BchI/ChlI, BchD/ChlD and BchH/ChlH subunits) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine:magnesium-protoporphyrin IX O-methyltransferase (BchM/ChlM) has been suggested. This involves delivery of magnesium-protoporphyrin IX from the BchH/ChlH subunit of magnesium chelatase to BchM/ChlM. Stimulation of BchM/ChlM activity by BchH/ChlH has previously been shown, and physical interaction of the two proteins has been demonstrated. In plants and cyanobacteria, there is an added layer of complexity, as Gun4 serves as a porphyrin (protoporphyrin IX and magnesium-protoporphyrin IX) carrier, but this protein does not exist in anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. BchJ may play a similar role to Gun4 in Rhodobacter, as it has no currently assigned function in the established pathway. Purified recombinant Rhodobacter capsulatus BchJ and BchM were found to cause a shift in the equilibrium amount of Mg-protoporphyrin IX formed in a magnesium chelatase assay. Analysis of this shift revealed that it was always in a 1 : 1 ratio with either of these proteins and the BchH subunit of the magnesium chelatase. The establishment of the new equilibrium was faster with BchM than with BchJ in a coupled magnesium chelatase assay. BchJ bound magnesium-protoporphyrin IX or formed a ternary complex with BchH and magnesium-protoporphyrin IX. These results suggest that BchJ may play a role as a general magnesium porphyrin carrier, similar to one of the roles of GUN4 in oxygenic organisms.

  16. Structure of merger remnants. 4: Isophotal shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyl, Jeremy S.; Hernquist, Lars; Spergel, David N.

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines the shapes of isophotes of galaxy merger remnants. More specifically, we perform a series of numerical experiments to study galaxy mergers. The simulations explore a variety of encounter geometries, types of progenitor galaxies, and particle numbers. We 'observe' each of the remnants from 64 viewpoints to estimate how the isophotal shapes vary with the orientation of the remnant. Also, by comparing the results from the various simulations, we learn how encounter geometry and the structure of the progenitors can affect the shape of the remnants. The encounter geometry, the structure of the progenitors, and the orientation of the remnant play deciding roles in the shape of the 'observed' isophotes, so much so that these simulated merger remnants have both 'boxy' and 'disky' isophotes and ellipticities ranging from E0 to E7. Thus, the shapes seen in our merger simulation remnants span a similar range to observed isophotal shapes of real galaxies. Furthermore, to estimate the errors in this analysis, we introduce the statistical bootstrap. Bootstrapping is used rather widely in observational astronomy when dealing with small samples; however, its use is practically unheard of for tackling theoretical problems. We believe that bootstrapping can be extremely useful for dealing with the small samples found in numerical simulations; therefore, we present the rudiments and basis of the technique with emphasis on its use in N-body calculations. Also, by comparing the errors for the smaller simulations with those of the larger ones, we speculate on the number of particles required to accurately explore isophotal shapes in simulations.

  17. Radioiodine Remnant Ablation: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chandra Sekhar; Padhy, Ajit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) is considered a safe and effective method for eliminating residual thyroid tissue, as well as microscopic disease if at all present in thyroid bed following thyroidectomy. The rationale of RRA is that in the absence of thyroid tissue, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement can be used as an excellent tumor marker. Other considerations are like the presence of significant remnant thyroid tissue makes detection and treatment of nodal or distant metastases difficult. Rarely, microscopic disease in the thyroid bed if not ablated, in the future, could be a source of anaplastic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic tumor emboli in distant sites could be the cause of distant metastasis too. The ablation of remnant tissue would in all probability eliminate these theoretical risks. It may be noted that all these are unproven contentious issues except postablation serum Tg estimation that could be a good tumor marker for detecting early biochemical recurrence in long-term follow-up strategy. Radioactive iodine is administered as a form of “adjuvant therapy” for remnant ablation. There have been several reports with regard to the administered dose for remnant ablation. The first report of a prospective randomized clinical trial was published from India by a prospective randomized study conducted at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in the year 1996. The study reported that increasing the empirical 131I initial dose to more than 50 mCi results in plateauing of the dose-response curve and thus, conventional high-dose remnant ablation needs critical evaluation. Recently, two important studies were published: One from French group and the other from UK on a similar line. Interestingly, all three studies conducted in three different geographical regions of the world showed exactly similar conclusion. The new era of low-dose remnant ablation has taken a firm scientific footing across the continents. PMID:26420983

  18. Structure of merger remnants. 4: Isophotal shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyl, Jeremy S.; Hernquist, Lars; Spergel, David N.

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines the shapes of isophotes of galaxy merger remnants. More specifically, we perform a series of numerical experiments to study galaxy mergers. The simulations explore a variety of encounter geometries, types of progenitor galaxies, and particle numbers. We 'observe' each of the remnants from 64 viewpoints to estimate how the isophotal shapes vary with the orientation of the remnant. Also, by comparing the results from the various simulations, we learn how encounter geometry and the structure of the progenitors can affect the shape of the remnants. The encounter geometry, the structure of the progenitors, and the orientation of the remnant play deciding roles in the shape of the 'observed' isophotes, so much so that these simulated merger remnants have both 'boxy' and 'disky' isophotes and ellipticities ranging from E0 to E7. Thus, the shapes seen in our merger simulation remnants span a similar range to observed isophotal shapes of real galaxies. Furthermore, to estimate the errors in this analysis, we introduce the statistical bootstrap. Bootstrapping is used rather widely in observational astronomy when dealing with small samples; however, its use is practically unheard of for tackling theoretical problems. We believe that bootstrapping can be extremely useful for dealing with the small samples found in numerical simulations; therefore, we present the rudiments and basis of the technique with emphasis on its use in N-body calculations. Also, by comparing the errors for the smaller simulations with those of the larger ones, we speculate on the number of particles required to accurately explore isophotal shapes in simulations.

  19. THE MIPSGAL VIEW OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN THE GALACTIC PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Pinheiro Goncalves, D.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R.; Carey, S. J.; Martin, P. G.

    2011-08-15

    We report the detection of Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) in the mid-infrared (at 24 and 70 {mu}m), in the coordinate ranges 10{sup 0} < l < 65{sup 0} and 285{sup 0} < l < 350{sup 0}, |b| < 1{sup 0}, using MIPS aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. We search for infrared counterparts to SNRs in Green's catalog and identify 39 out of 121, i.e., a detection rate of about 32%. Such a relatively low detection fraction is mainly due to confusion with nearby foreground/background sources and diffuse emission. The SNRs in our sample show a linear trend in [F{sub 8}/F{sub 24}] versus [F{sub 70}/F{sub 24}]. We compare their infrared fluxes with their corresponding radio flux at 1.4 GHz and find that most remnants have a ratio of 70 {mu}m to 1.4 GHz which is similar to those found in previous studies of SNRs (with the exception of a few that have ratios closer to those of H II regions). Furthermore, we retrieve a slope close to unity when correlating infrared (24 and 70 {mu}m) with 1.4 GHz emission. Our survey is more successful in detecting remnants with bright X-ray emission, which we find is well correlated with the 24 {mu}m morphology. Moreover, by comparing the power emitted in the X-ray, infrared, and radio, we conclude that the energy released in the infrared is comparable to the cooling in the X-ray range.

  20. Mars habitability: epochs, processes, remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibring, J.; Omega, T.

    2008-12-01

    Following the OMEGA/Mars Express pioneering discovery of hydrated phyllosilicates in a variety of sites spread over the ancient terrains, an impressive set of results, combining refined observations by OMEGA/Mars Express and CRISM/MRO, relevant contextual images by HRSC/Mars Express and HiRiSe/MRO, modeling and simulations, has been acquired. They confirm the initial hypothesis that these minerals record an ancient era during which water might have remained liquid over extended durations, which led to naming this era: phyllosian. It is remarkable that 30 years after the Mariner and Viking images of Mars as a desolated and inhospitable world, a new vision is emerging, for Mars to have possibly hosted environmental conditions favoring the presence of a key ingredient of potential astrobiological relevance. If ever Mars was habitable, it happened during the phyllosian. A variety of coupled information, from compositional, geomorphological and magnetic data, enables to assess the processes that took place, and their chronology. The observations that we will discuss include the specific composition identified, in relation to the stratification observed; the scarcity of phyllosilicates within the cratered terrains where mafics dominate; the large depth of deposits in a variety of sites, in particular within Mawrth Vallis; the distribution of remnant magnetization, with almost none within the large impacts and along the volcanic features. As a consequence, it will be shown that this era is tightly limited in time. It seems to have ended prior to the heavy bombardment to have ceased: the Noachian expanded long after the phyllosian ended. This habitable era could have been enabled by the maintenance of an active dynamo: its drop triggered its end, given the properties of the early Sun, by the lost of suitable atmospheric conditions for surface water to remain stable as a liquid. Up to now, neither with the Moon or any other body, we did not have means to study the complex

  1. Low-dose paclitaxel ameliorates fibrosis in the remnant kidney model by down-regulating miR-192.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Zhang, Dongshan; Liu, Fuyou; Xiang, Xudong; Ling, Guanghui; Xiao, Li; Liu, Yinghong; Zhu, Xuejing; Zhan, Ming; Yang, Yeyi; Kondeti, Vinay K; Kanwar, Yashpal S

    2011-11-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β has been shown to play a central role in the development of tubulointerstitial fibrosis, which can be corrected via treatment with paclitaxel. The biology of microRNA (miR) can be modulated by paclitaxel. We hypothesized that paclitaxel may attenuate renal fibrosis in a rat model of remnant kidney disease by inhibiting TGF-β induced-miRs. Rats in groups of 12 were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy and received low-dose intraperitoneal injection of paclitaxel. Renal functions were assessed at 8 weeks. The TGF-β signalling cascade and ECM proteins were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (TRT-PCR) and immunofluorescence microscopy. Animals with remnant kidneys developed hypertension, which was not relieved with paclitaxel treatment. However, paclitaxel treatment resulted in dampening the proteinuric response, reduction in serum BUN, creatinine levels and urine protein : creatinine ratio and normalization of creatinine clearance. These effects were accompanied by the inhibition of Smad2/3 activation, attenuation of renal fibrosis and normalization of integrin-linked kinase (ILK), COL(I)A1, COL(IV)A2 and α-SMA expression. Also, paclitaxel down-regulated the expression of miR-192, miR-217 and miR -377, while miR-15 was up-regulated in the remnant kidney. In vitro, in tubular epithelial cells (NRK-52E), paclitaxel also inhibited TGF-β1-induced Smad2/3 activation and normalized ILK, COL(I)A1, COL(IV)A2 and α-SMA expression. Furthermore, ChIP analyses indicated that Taxol suppressed Smad3-mediated miR-192 transcriptional activity. Over-expression of miR-192 in NRK-52E mimicked the changes seen in the remnant kidney, while inclusion of miR-192 inhibitor in the culture medium blocked TGF-β1-induced COL(I)A1 and COL(IV)A2 expression, while ILK and α-SMA were unaffected. These data suggest that low-dose paclitaxel ameliorates renal fibrosis via modulating miR-192 pathobiology and TGF-β/Smad signalling. Copyright © 2011

  2. Low-dose paclitaxel ameliorates fibrosis in the remnant kidney model by down-regulating miR-192

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lin; Zhang, Dongshan; Liu, Fuyou; Xiang, Xudong; Ling, Guanghui; Xiao, Li; Liu, Yinghong; Zhu, Xuejing; Zhan, Ming; Yang, Yeyi; Kondeti, Vinay K; Kanwar, Yashpal S

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β has been shown to play a central role in the development of tubulointerstitial fibrosis, which can be corrected via treatment with paclitaxel. The biology of microRNA (miR) can be modulated by paclitaxel. We hypothesized that paclitaxel may attenuate renal fibrosis in a rat model of remnant kidney disease by inhibiting TGF-β induced-miRs. Rats in groups of 12 were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy and received low-dose intraperitoneal injection of paclitaxel. Renal functions were assessed at 8 weeks. The TGF-β signalling cascade and ECM proteins were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (TRT–PCR) and immunofluorescence microscopy. Animals with remnant kidneys developed hypertension, which was not relieved with paclitaxel treatment. However, paclitaxel treatment resulted in dampening the proteinuric response, reduction in serum BUN, creatinine levels and urine protein : creatinine ratio and normalization of creatinine clearance. These effects were accompanied by the inhibition of Smad2/3 activation, attenuation of renal fibrosis and normalization of integrin-linked kinase (ILK), COL(I)A1, COL(IV)A2 and α-SMA expression. Also, paclitaxel down-regulated the expression of miR-192, miR-217 and miR -377, while miR-15 was up-regulated in the remnant kidney. In vitro, in tubular epithelial cells (NRK-52E), paclitaxel also inhibited TGF-β1-induced Smad2/3 activation and normalized ILK, COL(I)A1, COL(IV)A2 and α-SMA expression. Furthermore, ChIP analyses indicated that Taxol suppressed Smad3-mediated miR-192 transcriptional activity. Over-expression of miR-192 in NRK-52E mimicked the changes seen in the remnant kidney, while inclusion of miR-192 inhibitor in the culture medium blocked TGF-β1-induced COL(I)A1 and COL(IV)A2 expression, while ILK and α-SMA were unaffected. These data suggest that low-dose paclitaxel ameliorates renal fibrosis via modulating miR-192 pathobiology and TGF-β/Smad signalling. Copyright © 2011

  3. Isothermal blast wave model of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solinger, A.; Buff, J.; Rappaport, S.

    1975-01-01

    The validity of the 'adiabatic' assumption in supernova-remnant calculations is examined, and the alternative extreme of an isothermal blast wave is explored. It is concluded that, because of thermal conductivity, the large temperature gradients predicted by the adiabatic model probably are not maintained in nature. Self-similar solutions to the hydrodynamic equations for an isothermal blast wave have been found and studied. These solutions are then used to determine the relationship between X-ray observations and inferred parameters of supernova remnants. A comparison of the present results with those for the adiabatic model indicates differences which are less than present observational uncertainties. It is concluded that most parameters of supernova remnants inferred from X-ray measurements are relatively insensitive to the specifics of the blast-wave model.

  4. Autopsy of the Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional kinematic reconstructions of optically emitting ejecta in the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) are discussed. The reconstructions encompass the remnant's faint outlying ejecta knots, including the exceptionally high-velocity NE and SW streams of debris often referred to as `jets'. The bulk of Cas A's ejecta are arranged in several circular rings with diameters between approximately 30'' (0.5 pc) and 2' (2 pc). We suggest that similar large-scale ejecta rings may be a common phenomenon of young core-collapse remnants and may explain lumpy emission line profile substructure sometimes observed in spectra of extragalactic core-collapse supernovae years after explosion. A likely origin for these large ejecta rings is post-explosion input of energy from plumes of radioactive 56Ni-rich ejecta that rise, expand, and compress non-radioactive material to form bubble-like structures.

  5. REMNANTS OF BINARY WHITE DWARF MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Raskin, Cody; Scannapieco, Evan; Timmes, F. X.; Fryer, Chris; Rockefeller, Gabriel

    2012-02-10

    We carry out a comprehensive smooth particle hydrodynamics simulation survey of double-degenerate white dwarf binary mergers of varying mass combinations in order to establish correspondence between initial conditions and remnant configurations. We find that all but one of our simulation remnants share general properties such as a cold, degenerate core surrounded by a hot disk, while our least massive pair of stars forms only a hot disk. We characterize our remnant configurations by the core mass, the rotational velocity of the core, and the half-mass radius of the disk. We also find that some of our simulations with very massive constituent stars exhibit helium detonations on the surface of the primary star before complete disruption of the secondary. However, these helium detonations are insufficiently energetic to ignite carbon, and so do not lead to prompt carbon detonations.

  6. Observation of stellar remnants from recent supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.; Becker, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The current observational situation regarding the presence or absence of collapsed stellar objects associated with supernova remnants is reviewed. The theoretical expectations and observational evidence for the various possible classes of stellar remnants are discussed. The results of searches for these objects in the radio, optical, X-ray and gamma-ray regions of the spectrum are outlined with the conclusion that nine bona fide candidates are currently known. The implications of these results for the origin and evolution of compact objects are summarized.

  7. AZIMUTHAL DENSITY VARIATIONS AROUND THE RIM OF TYCHO's SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian J.; Hewitt, John W.; Petre, Robert; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Alwin Mao, S.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Blondin, John M.; Ghavamian, Parviz

    2013-06-20

    Spitzer images of Tycho's supernova remnant in the mid-infrared reveal limb-brightened emission from the entire periphery of the shell and faint filamentary structures in the interior. As with other young remnants, this emission is produced by dust grains, warmed to {approx}100 K in the post-shock environment by collisions with energetic electrons and ions. The ratio of the 70 to 24 {mu}m fluxes is a diagnostic of the dust temperature, which in turn is a sensitive function of the plasma density. We find significant variations in the 70/24 flux ratio around the periphery of Tycho's forward shock, implying order-of-magnitude variations in density. While some of these are likely localized interactions with dense clumps of the interstellar medium (ISM), we find an overall gradient in the ambient density surrounding Tycho, with densities 3-10 times higher in the northeast than in the southwest. This large density gradient is qualitatively consistent with the variations in the proper motion of the shock observed in radio and X-ray studies. Overall, the mean ISM density around Tycho is quite low ({approx}0.1-0.2 cm{sup -3}), consistent with the lack of thermal X-ray emission observed at the forward shock. We perform two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of a Type Ia supernova expanding into a density gradient in the ISM, and find that the overall round shape of the remnant is still easily achievable, even for explosions into significant gradients. However, this leads to an offset of the center of the explosion from the geometric center of the remnant of up to 20%, although lower values of 10% are preferred. The best match with hydrodynamical simulations is achieved if Tycho is located at a large (3-4 kpc) distance in a medium with a mean preshock density of {approx}0.2 cm{sup -3}. Such preshock densities are obtained for highly ({approx}> 50%) porous ISM grains.

  8. Geonic black holes and remnants in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.; Sanchis-Alepuz, Helios

    2014-03-01

    We show that electrically charged solutions within the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld theory of gravity replace the central singularity by a wormhole supported by the electric field. As a result, the total energy associated with the electric field is finite and similar to that found in the Born-Infeld electromagnetic theory. When a certain charge-to-mass ratio is satisfied, in the lowest part of the mass and charge spectrum the event horizon disappears, yielding stable remnants. We argue that quantum effects in the matter sector can lower the mass of these remnants from the Planck scale down to the TeV scale.

  9. Geonic black holes and remnants in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity.

    PubMed

    Olmo, Gonzalo J; Rubiera-Garcia, D; Sanchis-Alepuz, Helios

    We show that electrically charged solutions within the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld theory of gravity replace the central singularity by a wormhole supported by the electric field. As a result, the total energy associated with the electric field is finite and similar to that found in the Born-Infeld electromagnetic theory. When a certain charge-to-mass ratio is satisfied, in the lowest part of the mass and charge spectrum the event horizon disappears, yielding stable remnants. We argue that quantum effects in the matter sector can lower the mass of these remnants from the Planck scale down to the TeV scale.

  10. Thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow of a low Prandtl number binary mixture with a -1 capillary ratio in an annular pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia-Jia; Wu, Chun-Mei; Li, You-Rong; Chen, Jie-Chao

    2016-08-01

    A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations on thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow in an annular pool were carried out. The pool was filled with silicon-germanium melt with an initial silicon mass fraction of 1.99%. The Prandtl number and the Lewis number of the working fluid are 6.37 × 10-3 and 2197.8, respectively. Both the radial temperature gradient and the solute concentration gradient were applied to the annular pool. The capillary ratio was assumed to be -1, which means that the solutal and thermal capillary effects were equal and opposite. Results show that the thermal-solutal capillary-buoyancy flow always occurs at this special case with the capillary ratio of -1, and even in a shallow annular pool with an aspect ratio of 0.05. With the increase of the thermal Marangoni number, four kinds of flow patterns appear orderly, including concentric rolls, petal-like, spoke, and rosebud-like patterns. These flow patterns are strongly influenced by the local interaction between the solutal and thermal capillary effects and the vertical solute concentration gradient near the outer cylinder. A small vortex driven by the dominant solutal capillary effect emerges near the inner cylinder, which is different from the flow pattern in a pure fluid. In addition, the critical thermal Marangoni number of the initial three-dimensional flow decreases with the increase of the aspect ratio of the annular pool.

  11. Phosphorus in the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Moon, Dae-Sik; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Raymond, John C

    2013-12-13

    Phosphorus ((31)P), which is essential for life, is thought to be synthesized in massive stars and dispersed into interstellar space when these stars explode as supernovae (SNe). Here, we report on near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the young SN remnant Cassiopeia A, which show that the abundance ratio of phosphorus to the major nucleosynthetic product iron ((56)Fe) in SN material is up to 100 times the average ratio of the Milky Way, confirming that phosphorus is produced in SNe. The observed range is compatible with predictions from SN nucleosynthetic models but not with the scenario in which the chemical elements in the inner SN layers are completely mixed by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion.

  12. Spitzer Space Telescope Spectroscopy of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T. L.; Onaka, T.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope was used for observations of the Kepler supernova remnant, with all four instrument modules targeted on the bright infrared knot located at 17h30m35.80s,-21d28m54.0s (J2000). The low spectral resolution modules data show a dust continuum spectrum consistent with dust grains heated by high-energy electrons, while the high resolution modules data show atomic emission line ratios consistent with excitation by a high velocity shock of greater than 100 kilometers per second and electron densities of approximately 1,000 per centimeter. The abundance ratios for the six detected elements show signs of heavy-element enhancement. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. Support for this work was provided by NASA's Office of Space Science.

  13. The Cygnus Loop: An Older Supernova Remnant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, William

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Cygnus Loop, one of brightest and most easily studied of the older "remnant nebulae" of supernova outbursts. Discusses some of the historical events surrounding the discovery and measurement of the Cygnus Loop and makes some projections on its future. (TW)

  14. Spectral Mapping of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen; Blair, William; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox; Sankrit, Ravi; Williams, Brian

    2008-03-01

    We propose to leverage our extensive previous multi-wavelength investigations of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN 1604) by obtaining IRS spectral maps of this premier example of a 'massive Type Ia' remnant. Of particular interest is the dense circumstellar medium (CSM) evidently surrounding Kepler. This material is best investigated in infrared, where shock-heated dust reveals the thermal-gas density and possible composition clues such as the 10-micron silicate feature. Full LL coverage (14-38 um) will permit detailed mapping of continuum shape changes with spatial position that are only hinted at from our previous MIPS 24 and 70 um imaging. SL mapping of selected regions will permit detailed studies of changes in the silicate feature with position, suggested by two slit positions in earlier observations. Combined with our deep Chandra observation (750 ks), these data will permit a detailed study of dust destruction in fast shocks. Kepler also shows regions near the remnant edge dominated by synchrotron X-ray emission, indicating electron acceleration to energies of order 100 TeV. However, the dominance of synchrotron continuum means that properties of the thermal medium, important for understanding shock-acceleration physics, cannot be diagnosed with X-rays. Our IRS spectra should allow such diagnosis. Kepler's unique position among Type Ia supernova remnants makes it a critical target for the understanding of the Type Ia phenomenon.

  15. The Cygnus Loop: An Older Supernova Remnant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, William

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Cygnus Loop, one of brightest and most easily studied of the older "remnant nebulae" of supernova outbursts. Discusses some of the historical events surrounding the discovery and measurement of the Cygnus Loop and makes some projections on its future. (TW)

  16. 27 CFR 19.359 - Remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remnants. 19.359 Section 19.359 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for...

  17. 27 CFR 19.389 - Remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remnants. 19.389 Section 19.389 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing Operations Other Than Denaturation...

  18. 27 CFR 19.359 - Remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remnants. 19.359 Section 19.359 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for...

  19. 27 CFR 19.359 - Remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remnants. 19.359 Section 19.359 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for...

  20. 27 CFR 19.359 - Remnants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Remnants. 19.359 Section 19.359 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Processing of Distilled Spirits Rules for...

  1. X-ray evidence for electron-ion equilibrium and ionization nonequilibrium in young supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Smith, B. W.

    1979-01-01

    The A-2 spectroscopy experiment on HEAO 1 detected X-ray emission up to 25 keV from the supernova remnants Cas A and Tycho. The spectra must include continuum components with effective temperature equivalent or 10 to the 8th power K which could arise from optically thin plasmas in the collisionless shock fronts. This is the first indication of electron-ion temperature equilibrium in the expanding shell of young remnants. Measurements of the equivalent widths of the K alpha and K beta iron line blends in Cas A, show that their ratio is not compatible with the measured X-ray temperature in the collisional ionization equilibrium model. The search for hard X-ray pulsars in both remnants was unsuccessful.

  2. Effects of a 1:1 inspiratory to expiratory ratio on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation during one-lung ventilation in the lateral decubitus position.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Choi, Y S; Lee, J G; Park, I H; Oh, Y J

    2012-11-01

    Prolonged inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ratio ventilation may have both positive and negative effects on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation during one-lung ventilation (OLV), but definitive information is currently lacking. We therefore compared the effects of volume-controlled ventilation with I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation during OLV. Fifty-six patients undergoing thoracoscopic lobectomy were randomly assigned volume-controlled ventilation with an I:E ratio of 1:1 (group 1:1, n=28) or 1:2 (group 1:2, n=28) during OLV. Arterial and central venous blood gas analyses and respiratory variables were recorded 15 minutes into two-lung ventilation, at 30 and 60 minutes during OLV, and 15 minutes after two-lung ventilation was re-initiated. Peak and plateau airway pressures in cmH2O [standard deviation] during OLV were significantly lower in group 1:1 than in group 1:2 (P <0.01) (19 [3] and 23 [4]; 16 [3] and 19 [5], respectively). The arterial to end-tidal carbon dioxide tension difference was significantly lower in group 1:1 than in group 1:2 (P <0.01), (0.5 [0.3] and 1.1 [0.5]). There were no significant differences in PaO2 during OLV between the two groups (OLV30, P=0.856; OLV60, P=0.473). In summary, volume-controlled ventilation with an I:E ratio of 1:1 reduced peak and plateau airway pressures improved dynamic compliance and efficiency of alveolar ventilation, but it did not improve arterial oxygenation in a substantial manner. Furthermore, the associated increase in mean airway pressure might have reduced cardiac output, resulting in a lower central venous oxygen saturation.

  3. Galactic supernova remnant candidates discovered by THOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Wang, Y.; Bihr, S.; Rugel, M.; Beuther, H.; Bigiel, F.; Churchwell, E.; Glover, S. C. O.; Goodman, A. A.; Henning, Th.; Heyer, M.; Klessen, R. S.; Linz, H.; Longmore, S. N.; Menten, K. M.; Ott, J.; Roy, N.; Soler, J. D.; Stil, J. M.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Context. There is a considerable deficiency in the number of known supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Galaxy compared to that expected. This deficiency is thought to be caused by a lack of sensitive radio continuum data. Searches for extended low-surface brightness radio sources may find new Galactic SNRs, but confusion with the much larger population of H ii regions makes identifying such features challenging. SNRs can, however, be separated from H ii regions using their significantly lower mid-infrared (MIR) to radio continuum intensity ratios. Aims: Our goal is to find missing SNR candidates in the Galactic disk by locating extended radio continuum sources that lack MIR counterparts. Methods: We use the combination of high-resolution 1-2 GHz continuum data from The HI, OH, Recombination line survey of the Milky Way (THOR) and lower-resolution VLA 1.4 GHz Galactic Plane Survey (VGPS) continuum data, together with MIR data from the Spitzer GLIMPSE, Spitzer MIPSGAL, and WISE surveys to identify SNR candidates. To ensure that the candidates are not being confused with H ii regions, we exclude radio continuum sources from the WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions, which contains all known and candidate H ii regions in the Galaxy. Results: We locate 76 new Galactic SNR candidates in the THOR and VGPS combined survey area of 67.4° > ℓ > 17.5°, | b | ≤ 1.25° and measure the radio flux density for 52 previously-known SNRs. The candidate SNRs have a similar spatial distribution to the known SNRs, although we note a large number of new candidates near ℓ ≃ 30°, the tangent point of the Scutum spiral arm. The candidates are on average smaller in angle compared to the known regions, 6.4' ± 4.7' versus 11.0' ± 7.8', and have lower integrated flux densities. Conclusions: The THOR survey shows that sensitive radio continuum data can discover a large number of SNR candidates, and that these candidates can be efficiently identified using the combination of radio and

  4. Imagery and spectroscopy of supernova remnants and H-2 regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Research activities relating to supernova remnants were summarized. The topics reviewed include: progenitor stars of supernova remnants, UV/optical/radio/X-ray imagery of selected regions in the Cygnus Loop, UV/optical spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop spur, and extragalactic supernova remnant spectra.

  5. Shocks in Dense Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant: FUSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have obtained 8 LWRS FUSE spectra to study a recently identified interaction of the Vela supernova remnant with a dense cloud region along its western edge. The goal is to quantify the temperature, ionization, density, and abundance characteristics associated with this shock/dense cloud interface by means of UV absorption line studies. Our detection of high-velocity absorption line C I at +90 to +130 km/s with IUE toward a narrow region interior to the Vela SNR strongly suggests the Vela supernova remnant is interacting with a dense ISM or molecular cloud. The shock/dense cloud interface is suggested by (1) the rarity of detection of high-velocity C I seen in IUE spectra, (2) its very limited spatial distribution in the remnant, and (3) a marked decrease in X-ray emission in the region immediately west of the position of these stars where one also finds a 100 micron emission ridge in IRAS images. We have investigated the shock physics and general properties of this interaction region through a focussed UV absorption line study using FUSE spectra. We have FUSE data on OVI absorption lines observed toward 8 stars behind the Vela supernova remnant (SNR). We compare the OVI observations with IUE observations of CIV absorption toward the same stars. Most of the stars, which are all B stars, have complex continua making the extraction of absorption lines difficult. Three of the stars, HD 72088, HD 72089 and HD 72350, however, are rapid rotators (v sin i less than 100 km/s) making the derivation of absorption column densities much easier. We have measured OVI and CIV column densities for the "main component" (i.e. the low velocity component) for these stars. In addition, by removing the H2 line at 1032.35A (121.6 km/s relative to OVI), we find high velocity components of OVI at approximately 150 km/s that we attribute to the shock in the Vela SNR. The column density ratios and magnitudes are compared to both steady shock models and results of hydrodynamical SNR

  6. Nonlinear Shock Acceleration and Photon Emission in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Berezhko, Evgeny G.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    We have extended a simple model of nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (Berezhko & Ellison 1999: Ellison &, Berezhko 1999a) to include the injection and acceleration of electrons and the production of photons from bremsstrahlung, synchrotron, inverse Compton, and pion-decay processes. We argue that, the results of this model, which is simpler to use than more elaborate ones, offer a significant improvement, over test-particle, power-law spectra which are often used in astrophysical applications of diffusive shock acceleration. With an evolutionary supernova remnant (SNR) model to obtain shock parameters as functions of ambient interstellar medium parameters and time, we predict broad-band continuum photon emission from supernova remnants in general, and SN1006 in particular, showing that our results compare well with the more complete time-dependent and spherically symmetric nonlinear model of Berezhko, Ksenofontov, & Petukhov (1999a). We discuss the implications nonlinear shock acceleration has for X-ray line emission, and use our model to describe how ambient conditions determine the TeV/radio flux ratio, an important parameter for gamma-ray observations of radio SNRs.

  7. The structure of common-envelope remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Philip D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the structure and evolution of the remnants of common-envelope evolution in binary star systems. In a common-envelope phase, two stars become engulfed in a gaseous envelope and, under the influence of drag forces, spiral to smaller separations. They may merge to form a single star or the envelope may be ejected to leave the stars in a shorter period orbit. This process explains the short orbital periods of many observed binary systems, such as cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binary systems. Despite the importance of these systems, and of common-envelope evolution to their formation, it remains poorly understood. Specifically, we are unable to confidently predict the outcome of a common-envelope phase from the properties at its onset. After presenting a review of work on stellar evolution, binary systems, common-envelope evolution and the computer programs used, we describe the results of three computational projects on common-envelope evolution. Our work specifically relates to the methods and prescriptions which are used for predicting the outcome. We use the Cambridge stellar-evolution code STARS to produce detailed models of the structure and evolution of remnants of common-envelope evolution. We compare different assumptions about the uncertain end-of-common envelope structure and envelope mass of remnants which successfully eject their common envelopes. In the first project, we use detailed remnant models to investigate whether planetary nebulae are predicted after common-envelope phases initiated by low-mass red giants. We focus on the requirement that a remnant evolves rapidly enough to photoionize the nebula and compare the predictions for different ideas about the structure at the end of a common-envelope phase. We find that planetary nebulae are possible for some prescriptions for the end-of-common envelope structure. In our second contribution, we compute a large set of single-star models and fit new formulae to the core radii of

  8. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  9. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  10. Feasibility of Preoperative FDG PET/CT Total Hepatic Glycolysis in the Remnant Liver for the Prediction of Postoperative Liver Function.

    PubMed

    Cho, Arthur; Chung, Yong Eun; Choi, Jin Sub; Kim, Kyung Sik; Choi, Gi Hong; Park, Young Nyun; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2017-03-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate the prognostic value of total glycolysis of the remnant liver, which reflects both metabolic and anatomic liver function, for predicting postoperative hepatic insufficiency. Patients who underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT and abdominal CT within 1 month of major hepatectomy were retrospectively analyzed. Total liver volume, remnant liver volume, the ratio of the remnant hepatic volume to the preoperative hepatic volume (RFRHV), and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) were measured, and total glycolysis of the remnant liver was calculated. Clinical hepatic function reserve values, including the indocyanine green retention rate at 15 minutes, the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, and aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI), were calculated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed, and an optimal model for predicting hepatic insufficiency was developed. ROC curves were used to compare diagnostic performance. Of 149 patients, seven patients had hepatic insufficiency. The SUVmean showed the highest sensitivity (100%; specificity, 31.7%) for predicting hepatic insufficiency, and total glycolysis of the remnant liver showed the highest specificity (96.5%; sensitivity, 57.1%) for predicting hepatic insufficiency. On multivariate analysis, the odds ratio of APRI (> 5.4) and total glycolysis of the remnant liver (≤ 625.6) was 46.3 and 82.9, respectively, for predicting hepatic insufficiency. On ROC curve analysis, a new model composed of APRI and total glycolysis of the remnant liver showed a higher area under the ROC curve (Az) value (Az = 0.899) than SUVmean (0.659), MELD score (0.618), APRI (0.693), RFRHV (0.797), and remnant liver volume (0.762). The total glycolysis of the remnant liver has moderate sensitivity and high specificity for predicting hepatic insufficiency. Combining the total glycolysis of the remnant liver and APRI yielded the best diagnostic performance for predicting

  11. Structure of merger remnants. I - Bulgeless progenitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars

    1992-01-01

    The study examines mergers of identical galaxies consisting of self-gravitating disks and halos in the context of the suggestion that such events may form elliptical galaxies. It is shown that the luminous remnants of such mergers do indeed share many common properties with observed ellipticals. Specifically, the end states of the simulations considered rotate slowly in regions of relatively high surface density, having typical values of less than about 0.2 there. Morphologically, the remnants display a variety of structures, including shells and loops comprising loosely bound material and boxy and disky isophotes. The luminous matter is well-fitted by ellipsoidal generalizations of Hernquists's (1990, 1992) model for elliptical galaxies, implying that the surface brightness profiles are essentially de Vaucouleurs-like over a large radial interval. It is proposed that mergers of pure stellar disks do not represent an attractive mechanism for the production of massive elliptical galaxies.

  12. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  13. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  14. Mangement of dyspareunia secondary to hymenal remnants.

    PubMed

    Grillo, L; Grillo, D

    1980-10-01

    At the Sexual Dysfunction Clinic at Keesler USAF Medical Center, 17 women complaining of dyspareunia with painful hymen and demonstrable vaginismus were managed by surgical removal of hymenal remnants followed by directive sexual therapy and progressive vaginal dilatation. All patients were pain free within 8 weeks of the surgical procedures. It is believed that a combined approach is best to break the cycle of pain, fear, vaginismus, and more pain that these women have established.

  15. Subpubic sinus: a remnant of cloaca.

    PubMed

    Chou, T D; Chu, C C; Diau, G Y; Chiang, J H

    1995-05-01

    A 14-month-old girl had purulent discharge from a sinus over the subpubic region for 2 weeks. Radiography and voiding cystourethrography revealed a 4.5 cm. long fistula extending to the retropubic region without any connection to the lower urinary tract. The fistula was excised. Histological findings revealed that the fistula had 3 different types of epithelium: stratified squamous, transitional and columnar. Clinical and pathological findings indicated that the sinus was most likely a remnant of the cloaca.

  16. Supernova Remnants associated with high energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvidovich, L.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Dubner, G.

    2017-10-01

    We carried out a study of the distribution and kinematic of the molecular gas in the direction of the Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) G40.5-0.5 and G298.6-0.0, which have been associated with the gamma-ray sources MGRO J1908+06 and 3FGL J1214.0-6236, respectively. The aim of the present work is to establish the origin of the very high energy (VHE).

  17. Young supernova remnants: Issues and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.

    2001-05-01

    The dynamical evolution of young supernova remnants (YSNRs) is governed by the density distribution in the ejecta and in the ambient medium. Analytic solutions are available for spherically symmetric expansion, including the transition from the ejecta-dominated stage to the Sedov-Taylor stage. YSNRs serve as valuable physics laboratories, in which we can study nucleosynthesis, the early evolution of compact objects, pulsar physics, particle acceleration, the formation and destruction of dust, hydrodynamics at high Reynolds numbers, shock physics at high Mach numbers, and the effects of thermal conduction in interstellar plasmas. There are several challenges in YSNR research: (1) Where are the very young remnants in the Galaxy? We expect 5-10 to have occurred since Cas A, but with the possible exception of a remnant reported at this conference, none have been seen. (2) Can very young SNRs produce gamma-ray bursts? The acceleration of a shock in the outer layers of a supernova, first suggested by Colgate, can account for gamma-ray bursts such as that believed to be associated with SN 1998bw, and more powerful explosions can account for the energies seen in many cosmological bursts. (3) The Connections Challenge: Can one infer the nature of the supernova and its progenitor star from observations of the YSNR? .

  18. The First Fermi LAT Supernova Remnant Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reposeur, T.; Rousseau, R.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wells, B.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, we demonstrate the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. We model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  19. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    DOE PAGES

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidatesmore » falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.« less

  20. A compressed cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Silk, J.; Leep, E. M.; Wallerstein, G.

    1981-01-01

    Strong interstellar absorption lines of C I, arising from the two excited fine-structure levels, are found in IUE observations of HD 72350 (type B4 III). An analysis of the excited-level populations of C I gives local temperature and pressure limits, and auxiliary data on the limit of column density for excited O I and the carbon ionization help to establish that (1) the local temperature is within the limits of 25-100 K, and (2) the pressure/Boltzmann's constant ratio is at least 10 to the 4.3/cu cm K, despite its small size. This high-pressure cloud is discussed in terms of shock compression by the Vela supernova blast wave, along with the relationship of this kind of cloud compression to star formation and to the origin of the characteristic filamentary emission arcs seen in Vela and other supernova remnants

  1. A compressed cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Silk, J.; Leep, E. M.; Wallerstein, G.

    1981-01-01

    Strong interstellar absorption lines of C I, arising from the two excited fine-structure levels, are found in IUE observations of HD 72350 (type B4 III). An analysis of the excited-level populations of C I gives local temperature and pressure limits, and auxiliary data on the limit of column density for excited O I and the carbon ionization help to establish that (1) the local temperature is within the limits of 25-100 K, and (2) the pressure/Boltzmann's constant ratio is at least 10 to the 4.3/cu cm K, despite its small size. This high-pressure cloud is discussed in terms of shock compression by the Vela supernova blast wave, along with the relationship of this kind of cloud compression to star formation and to the origin of the characteristic filamentary emission arcs seen in Vela and other supernova remnants

  2. REVERSE-SHOCK IN TYCHO’S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, F. J.; Ge, M. Y.; Zheng, S. J.; Zhang, S. N.; Long, X.; Aschenbach, B. E-mail: gemy@ihep.ac.cn

    2015-06-01

    Thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) is usually dominated by the emission lines of the supernova ejecta, which are widely believed to be crossed and thus heated by the inward-propagating reverse shock (RS). Previous works using X-ray imaging data have shown that the ejecta are heated by the RS by locating the peak emission region of the most recently ionized matter, which is found to be well separated toward the inside from the outermost boundary. Here we report the discovery of a systematic increase of the Sulfur (S) to Silicon (Si) Kα line flux ratio with radius in Tycho’s SNR. This allows us, for the first time, to present continuous radial profiles of the ionization age and, furthermore, the elapsed ionization time since the onset of the ionization, which gives the history of the propagation of the ionization front into the SNR ejecta.

  3. Remnant amount and cleanup for 3 adhesives after debracketing.

    PubMed

    David, Valerie A; Staley, Robert N; Bigelow, Harold F; Jakobsen, Jane R

    2002-03-01

    The cleanup of remnant bonding adhesive from the enamel surface after debonding is an important factor for clinicians. The purposes of this study were to compare the weight, the surface area, and the cleanup times of remnant adhesive for a composite resin, Transbond (TB); a resin-modified glass ionomer, Fuji ORTHO LC bonded to enamel both conditioned (FOC) and nonconditioned (FONC); and a fluoride-releasing composite resin, Advance (ADV), bonded to nonetched enamel. In addition, 2 qualitative methods for scoring remnant adhesive were compared with the quantitative weight and area data. Forty extracted human incisors were weighed, bonded with brackets, debonded, weighed, and photographed. Area was measured from the photographs with a sonic digitizer. Mean adhesive remnant weights differed between groups (analysis of variance [ANOVA], P =.02): The remnants from ADV and FOC were equal and both significantly heavier than the remnants from FONC; the weights of the TB remnants were intermediate between the heavier ADV and FOC remnants and the lighter FONC remnants. Mean remnant areas differed between groups (ANOVA, P =.03): The remnants from ADV were significantly larger than the remnants from TB and FONC, which were equal; the areas of the FOC remnants were intermediate between the larger ADV remnants and the smaller remnants from TB and FONC. Mean cleanup times also differed between groups (ANOVA, P <.001): TB and FOC had equal times that were significantly longer than the times for ADV and FONC, which were equal. Adhesives bonded to acid-etched or conditioned enamel took about 1 and a half times longer to clean up than did those bonded to nonetched enamel. When bonded to conditioned enamel, the resin-modified glass ionomer had mean remnant adhesive weights, areas, and cleanup times statistically equivalent to TB. ADV had the fastest mean cleanup time per amount of remnant (ANOVA, P <.002). The graphs of scores for 2 qualitative methods used for scoring remnant amount

  4. Noise data from tests of a 1.83 meter (6-ft-) diameter variable-pitch 1.2-pressure-ratio fan (QF-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, F. W.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Friedman, R.

    1975-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic data for a 1.83-meter (6-ft.) diameter fan suitable for a quiet engine for short-takeoff-and-landing (STOL) aircraft are documented. The QF-9 rotor blades had an adjustable pitch feature which provided a means for testing at several rotor blade setting angles, including one for reverse thrust. The fan stage incorporated features for low noise. Far-field noise around the fan was measured without acoustic suppression over a range of operating conditions for six different rotor blade setting angles in the forward thrust configuration, and for one in the reverse configuration. Complete results of one-third-octave band analysis of the data are presented in tabular form. Also included are power spectra, data referred to the source, and sideline perceived noise levels.

  5. Diploid endosperm formation in Tulipa spp. and identification of a 1:1 maternal-to-paternal genome ratio in endosperms of T. gesneriana L.

    PubMed

    Mizuochi, Hitoshi; Matsuzaki, Hironori; Moue, Takehiko; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2009-03-01

    Most Liliaceae plants have the tetrasporic Fritillaria-type embryo sac and normally form diploid embryos and pentaploid endosperms derived from a 4:1 maternal-to-paternal genome ratio (4m:1p) after double fertilization. Here we characterize embryo sac and endosperm formation in Tulipa spp. of Liliaceae. Chromosome analysis using seeds derived from 2x x 2x crosses of Tulipa gesneriana (2n = 2x = 24) identified diploid chromosome number in the endosperm. Similarly, flow cytometric analysis confirmed diploid endosperm formation in T. gesneriana, T. fosteriana (2n = 2x = 24) and T. greigii (2n = 2x = 24). To further study the possible mechanism of diploid endosperm formation, we made interploidy crosses of triploid (2n = 3x = 36) x diploid in which aneuploid seeds with various chromosome numbers (2n = 25-36) were produced. Again, flow cytometric analysis confirmed the same ploidy level in both embryos and endosperms at all aneuploidy levels, suggesting that only a single haploid polar nucleus contributes to endosperm formation at fertilization. Histological observation further confirmed the physical separation of two polar nuclei by a large vacuole in the Fritillaria-type embryo sac of T. gesneriana that appeared to prevent the fusion of the two polar nuclei that originated at the micropylar and chalazal ends before fertilization. Taken together, these results indicate that diploid endosperms (1m:1p) are normally formed in Tulipa spp. by fusion of the micropylar polar nucleus (n) and a spermatid (n) but not by normal triple fusion. We also show that tulip endosperm partially overcomes the triploid block mechanism that occurs in interploidy crosses. Based on these observations, the possible role of triple nuclear fusion in double fertilization is discussed.

  6. Supernova Remnants in the Most Fertile Galaxy: NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.

    2014-08-01

    As the host to more recorded supernovae (nine in the past century) than any other galaxy, ngal is a unique venue for studying young (and old) supernova remnants (SNRs). Using deep emission-line images of ngal we obtained from WIYN, we have identified 148 new emission nebulae through their high S II:Hα ratios, indicating that they are strong SNR candidates. This is over 5 times as many as have previously been identified; yet of the 175 total objects, only 6 have been spectroscopically confirmed. We propose multislit spectroscopy from GMOS-N to study the majority of those with no spectra to date. Some 26 are essentially unresolved in our images (diameters ≲ 1 arcsec=27 pc at ngal) and hence probably are relatively young. Several are also coincident with soft X-ray sources (a further indicator of youthful vigor) and have strong O III emission. Some may be rare, ejecta- dominated core-collapse SNRs akin to Cas A, where ``fresh" nucleosynthesis products can be seen. Only spectroscopy, to look for broad emission lines from fast-moving ejecta, can confirm this. We will include spectra of two of the nine recorded SNe in ngal-the first late-time spectrum of SN 2004et, and the first of SN 1980K with high signal-to-noise-adding to the extremely small number of spectra for SNRs only a few decades old. Finally we will use the H II:Hα ratio in a large number of ISM-dominated SNRs to map the N abundance and its gradient across the disk of ngal, and we will use archival HST images to identify the stellar environments that produced the SNe whose remnants we see today.

  7. Shocked Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    Unusually strong high-excitation C I has been detected in eleven lines of sight through the Vela supernova remnant by means of UV absorption-line studies of IUE data. Most of these lines of sight lie near the western edge of the X-ray bright region of the supernova remnant in a spatially distinct band approximately 1deg by 4deg oriented approximately north/south. The high-excitation C I (denoted C I*) is interpreted as evidence of a complex of shocked dense clouds inside the supernova remnant, due to the high pressures indicated in this region. To further analyze the properties of this region of C I*, we present new HIRES-processed IRAS data of the entire Vela SNR. A temperature map calculated from the HIRES IRAS data, based on a two-component dust model, reveals the signature of hot dust at several locations in the SNR. The hot dust is anti-correlated spatially with X-ray emission as revealed by ROSAT, as would be expected for a dusty medium interacting with a shock wave. The regions of hot dust are strongly correlated with optical filaments, supporting a scenario of dense clouds interior to the SNR that have been shocked and are now cooling behind the supernova blast wave. With few exceptions, the lines of sight to the strong C I* pass through regions of hot dust and optical filaments. Possible mechanisms for the production of the anomalously large columns of C I and C I* are discussed. Dense clouds on the back western hemisphere of the remnant may explain the relatively low X-ray emission in the western portion of the Vela supernova remnant due to the slower forward shock velocity in regions where the shock has encountered the dense clouds. An alternate explanation for the presence of neutral, excited state, and ionized species along the same line of sight may be a magnetic precusor that heats and compresses the gas ahead of the shock.

  8. Correlation between plasma concentration ratios of SN-38 glucuronide and SN-38 and neutropenia induction in patients with colorectal cancer and wild-type UGT1A1 gene

    PubMed Central

    HIROSE, KOICHI; KOZU, CHIHIRO; YAMASHITA, KOSHIRO; MARUO, EIJI; KITAMURA, MIZUHO; HASEGAWA, JUNICHI; OMODA, KEI; MURAKAMI, TERUO; MAEDA, YORINOBU

    2011-01-01

    In irinotecan (CPT-11)-based chemotherapy, neutropenia and diarrhea are often induced. In the present study, the clinical significance of the concentration ratios of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38) glucuronide (SN-38G) and SN-38 in the plasma in predicting CPT-11-induced neutropenia was examined. A total of 17 patients with colorectal cancer and wild-type UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A1 gene were enrolled and treated with CPT-11 as part of the FOLFIRI regimen [CPT-11 and fluorouracil (5-FU)]. Blood was taken exactly 15 min following a 2-h continuous infusion of CPT-11. Plasma concentrations of SN-38, SN-38G and CPT-11 were determined by a modified high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The median, maximum and minimum values of plasma SN-38G/SN-38 ratios were 4.25, 7.09 and 1.03, respectively, indicating that UGT activities are variable among patients with the wild-type UGT1A1 gene. The plasma SN-38G/SN-38 ratios decreased with an increase in the trial numbers of chemotherapy (r=0.741, p=0.000669), suggesting that CPT-11 treatment suppresses UGT activity, and the low plasma SN-38G/SN-38 ratios resulted in the induction of greater neutropenia. However, in this analysis, 2 clearly separated regression lines were observed between plasma SN-38G/SN-38 ratios and neutropenia induction. In conclusion, UGT activity involved in SN-38 metabolism is variable among patients with the wild-type UGT1A1 gene, and each CPT-11 treatment suppresses UGT activity. One-point determination of the plasma SN-38G/SN-38 ratio may provide indications for the prediction of CPT-11-induced neutropenia and adjustment of the optimal dose, although further studies are required. PMID:22740978

  9. Carcinoma in the Remnant Stomach During Long-Term Follow-up After Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: Analysis of Cumulative Incidence and Associated Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Hanyu, Takaaki; Wakai, Atsuhiro; Ishikawa, Takashi; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2017-09-18

    The number of patients with remnant gastric cancer following resection of gastric cancer may increase. The aims of this study were to investigate the development of remnant gastric cancer after distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer and to examine its cumulative incidence, clinicopathological characteristics, and risk factors. We examined 437 patients with relapse-free survival for 5 years or more after distal gastrectomy with Billroth I reconstruction for gastric cancer performed between 1985 and 2005. A total of 17 patients suffered from remnant gastric cancer. The cumulative incidence was 3.7% at 10 years and 5.4% at 20 years. The median time until development of remnant gastric cancer was 79 months (range 30-209 months). The presence of synchronous multiple gastric cancers was a significant independent risk factor for remnant gastric cancer (hazard ratio 4.036; 95% confidence interval 1.478-11.02; P = 0.006). Of the 17 patients, the 13 whose remnant gastric cancer was detected via regular endoscopy showed better prognoses than the patients detected by other means (P < 0.001). The cumulative incidence of remnant gastric cancer was 5.4% at 20 years. In particular, patients who had multiple gastric cancers at initial gastrectomy were at higher risk for remnant gastric cancer. Therefore, long-term endoscopic surveillance is important.

  10. An X-ray study of five supernova remnants in the Carina spiral arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Markert, Thomas H.

    1994-01-01

    The ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) is used to perform an exploratory study of four fields in the Carina spiral arm containing five radio supernova remnants, only one of which has previously been studied in X-rays. We present upper limits for the detection in X-rays of G298.5 - 0.3, G298.6 - 0.0, and G299.0+0.2, and report a 4 sigma detection of G296.8-0.3. In addition, we present detailed spatial and spectral analysis of the bright X-ray remnant G296.1-0.7, which has previously been studied by both the Einstein IPC and EXOSAT LE/CMA. We detect relatively slight, but statistically significant, variations in the spectrum across the remnant via spatially resolved spectral fits and a study of the spatial variation of hardness ratios. In general, the spectrum is characteristic of a thermal plasma with kT about 0.2 keV and N(sub H) about 1.5 x 10(exp 21/sq. cm). The total X-ray emitting mass is estimated to be about 250 solar mass for an optically estimated distance of 4 kpc to the remnant. At this distance, the linear dimensions of the remnant are roughly 35 - 50 pc, implying an age on the order of 20,000 yr. Assuming that X-ray and radio brightnesses are related by SIGMA(sub R) proportional to SIGMA(exp 0.69)(sub X) and that the four radio remnants have X-ray spectral characteristics similar to G296.1-0.7, we find that the column densities to these sources must be several times 10(exp 22)/sq cm in order to explain their low X-ray count rates. This column density is considerably in excess of the X-ray fitted column density to G296.1-0.7, but is comparable to the total column densities in H I measured via the 21 cm line in the directions to all five remnants. This implies that G296.1 - 0.7 is at a significantly smaller distance than the other remnants.

  11. Does the tibial remnant of the anterior cruciate ligament promote ligamentization?

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Ill; Kim, Byoung Min; Kho, Duk Hwan; Kwon, Sai Won; Kim, Hyeung June; Hwang, Hyun Ryong

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference in ligamentization between the remnant-preserving (RP) and remnant-sacrificing (RS) techniques in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A retrospective comparative study was carried out on 98 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction using either an RP (n=56) or RS (n=42) technique. MRI was performed at one of four time points postoperatively, and the signal intensity of the ACL graft was analyzed using the signal to noise quotient (SNQ) ratio and inter-bundle high signal intensity, along with an analysis of the survival rate of remnant tissue. The mean SNQ ratio of grafted tendons in the RP group was significantly higher than that seen in the RS group in the proximal and middle regions two to four months after surgery (P<0.05) and was significantly lower than that seen in the RS group in all regions at 12 -18months (P<0.05). The inter-bundle high signal intensity was observed more frequently in the RP group (73.7%) at two to four months. Tibial remnants were observed on postoperative MRI regardless of when MRI was conducted. The ACL graft of the RP group showed higher signal intensity in the early stage and lower signal intensity in the late stage compared to that of the RS group. The ligamentization of grafts in the RP group proceeded more quickly. Preserving the remnant in ACL reconstruction appears to have a positive effect on ligamentization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparing Neutron Star Kicks to Supernova Remnant Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland-Ashford, Tyler; Lopez, Laura A.; Auchettl, Katie; Temim, Tea; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-07-01

    Supernova explosions are inherently asymmetric and can accelerate new-born neutron stars (NSs) to hundreds of km s-1. Two prevailing theories to explain NS kicks are ejecta asymmetries (e.g., conservation of momentum between NS and ejecta) and anisotropic neutrino emission. Observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) can give us insights into the mechanism that generates these NS kicks. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between NS kick velocities and the X-ray morphologies of 18 SNRs observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Röntgen Satellite (ROSAT). We measure SNR asymmetries using the power-ratio method (a multipole expansion technique), focusing on the dipole, quadrupole, and octupole power ratios. Our results show no correlation between the magnitude of the power ratios and NS kick velocities, but we find that for Cas A and G292.0+1.8, whose emission traces the ejecta distribution, their NSs are preferentially moving opposite to the bulk of the X-ray emission. In addition, we find a similar result for PKS 1209-51, CTB 109, and Puppis A; however, their emission is dominated by circumstellar/interstellar material, so their asymmetries may not reflect their ejecta distributions. Our results are consistent with the theory that NS kicks are a consequence of ejecta asymmetries as opposed to anisotropic neutrino emission. In the future, additional observations to measure NS proper motions within ejecta-dominated SNRs are necessary to robustly constrain the NS kick mechanism.

  13. Grammage of cosmic rays around Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Marta; Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena

    2016-10-01

    The residence time of cosmic rays (CRs) in the Galaxy is usually inferred from the measurement of the ratio of secondary-to-primary nuclei, for instance the boron (B)/carbon (C) ratio, which provides an estimate of the amount of matter traversed by CRs during their propagation, the so-called CR grammage. However, after being released by their parent sources, for instance, supernova remnants, CRs must cross the disc of the Galaxy, before entering the much lower density halo, in which they are believed to spend most of their time before eventually escaping the Galaxy. In the near-source region, the CR propagation is shown to be dominated by the nonlinear self-generation of waves. Here we show that due to this effect, the time that CRs with energies up to ˜10 TeV spend within a distance Lc˜100 pc from the sources is much larger than naive estimates would suggest. Depending on the level of ionization of the medium surrounding the source, the grammage accumulated in the source vicinity may be a non-negligible fraction of the total grammage traversed throughout the whole Galaxy. Moreover, there is an irreducible grammage that CRs traverse while trapped downstream of the shock that accelerated them, though this contribution is rather uncertain. We conclude that some caution should be used in inferring parameters of Galactic CR propagation from measurements of the B/C ratio.

  14. Comparing Neutron Star Kicks to Supernova Remnant Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland-Ashford, Tyler; Lopez, Laura A.; Auchettl, Katie Amanda; Temim, Tea; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-08-01

    Supernova explosions are inherently asymmetric and can accelerate new-born neutron stars (NSs) to hundreds of km/s. Two prevailing theories to explain NS kicks are ejecta asymmetries (e.g., conservation of momentum between NS and ejecta) and anisotropic neutrino emission. Observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) can give us insights into the mechanism that generates these NS kicks. In this presentation, we investigate the relationship between NS kick velocities and the X-ray morphologies of 18 SNRs observed with Chandra and ROSAT. We measure SNR asymmetries using the power-ratio method (a multipole expansion technique), focusing on the dipole, quadrupole, and octupole power-ratios. Our results show no correlation between the magnitude of the power-ratios and NS kick velocities, but we find that for Cas A and G292.0+1.8, whose emission traces the ejecta distribution, their NSs are preferentially moving opposite to the bulk of the X-ray emission. In addition, we find a similar result for PKS 1209-51, CTB 109, and Puppis A; however their emission is dominated by circumstellar/interstellar material, so their asymmetries may not reflect their ejecta distributions. Our results are consistent with the theory that NS kicks are a consequence of ejecta asymmetries as opposed to anisotropic neutrino emission. In the future, additional observations to measure NS proper motions within ejecta-dominated SNRs are necessary to constrain robustly the NS kick mechanism.

  15. VHE Gamma-ray Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-01-22

    Increasing observational evidence gathered especially in X-rays and {gamma}-rays during the course of the last few years support the notion that Supernova remnants (SNRs) are Galactic particle accelerators up to energies close to the ''knee'' in the energy spectrum of Cosmic rays. This review summarizes the current status of {gamma}-ray observations of SNRs. Shell-type as well as plerionic type SNRs are addressed and prospect for observations of these two source classes with the upcoming GLAST satellite in the energy regime above 100 MeV are given.

  16. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, A. M.; Plastino, A.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt-Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit.

  17. Supernova Remnants with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caragiulo, M.; Di Venere, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on-board the Fermi satellite, proved to be, after 8 years of data taking, an excellent instrument to detect and observe Supernova Remnants (SNRs) in a range of energies running from few hundred MeV up to few hundred GeV. It provides essential information on physical processes that occur at the source, involving both accelerated leptons and hadrons, in order to understand the mechanisms responsible for the primary Cosmic Ray (CR) acceleration. We show the latest results in the observation of Galactic SNRs by Fermi-LAT.

  18. (abstract) Supernova Remnant and Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1993-01-01

    Upon impact of the shockwaves generated by a supernova remnant, molecular gas and the associated dust grains are substantially excited and become prominent sources of infrared emission. Recent studies of such interactions, utilizing the infrared data and information from other wavelengths, have revealed many details of the physical processes in the interstellar medium. In particluar, the understanding of the temperature and ionization structures in the postshock material is helpful in modeling the star-gas cycles in the Galaxy, and probing the circumstances of star formation.

  19. ASCA observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnant sample: Typing supernovae from their remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John P.; Hayashi, Ichizo; Helfand, David; Hwang, Una; Itoh, Masayuki; Kirshner, Robert; Koyama, Katsuji; Markert, Thomas; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Woo, Jonathan

    1995-01-01

    We present our first results from a study of the supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using data from ASCA. The three remnants we have analyzed to date, 0509-67.5, 0519-69.0, and N103B, are among the smallest, and presumably also the youngest, in the Cloud. The X-ray spectra of these SNRs show strong K alpha emission lines of silicon, sulfur, argon, and calcium with no evidence for corresponding lines of oxygen, neon, or magnesium. The dominant feature in the spectra is a broad blend of emission lines around 1 keV which we attribute to L-shell emission lines of iron. Model calculations (Nomoto, Thielemann, & Yokoi 1984) show that the major products of nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae (SNs) are the elements from silicon to iron, as observed here. The calculated nucleosynthetic yields from Type Ib and II SNs are shown to be qualitatively inconsistent with the data. We conclude that the SNs which produced these remnants were of Type Ia. This finding also confirms earlier suggestions that the class of Balmer-dominated remnants arise from Type Ia SN explosions. Based on these early results from the LMC SNR sample, we find that roughly one-half of the SNRs produced in the LMC within the last approximately 1500 yr came from Type Ia SNs.

  20. On the X-ray spectrum of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Blondin, John M.

    1994-01-01

    We have devised a method to do nonequilibrium ionization calculations on the results of two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, based on the algorithm of Hughes & Helfand (1985). We have calculated the ionization structure and X-ray emission for a two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamical simulation for the remnant of Kepler's supernova (SN); the hydrodynamical model was presented in a previous paper. In this model, the progenitor of Kepler's SN is assumed to have been a massive runaway star ejected from the Galactic plane. In its red supergiant stage, its dense stellar wind was distorted and compressed into a bow shock by the ram pressure of the tenuous interstellar medium. The subsequent interaction of the supernova ejecta with this asymmetric circumstellar matter produced a strongly asymmetric supernova remnant (SNR). In this paper, we present calculated X-ray spectra for this hydrodynamical model. A comparison with observations implies a moderate overabundance of Fe in Kepler's SNR (only 50% larger than its cosmic value), in contrast to a large (6 to 15) Fe overabundance derived previously. However, we confirm earlier conclusions that Si and S abundances are 2 to 3 times solar. These modest enhancements of Si, S, and Fe may be attributed either to heavy-element enriched SN ejecta or to the initial chemical abundances of the SN progenitor, which originated in the metal-rich inner Galaxy. The comparison of our models with the observed spectra confirm theoretical predictions that moderate electron heating occurs at strong collisionless shock fronts, with the implied electron/mean temperature ratio of approximately 0.5.

  1. On the X-ray spectrum of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Blondin, John M.

    1994-01-01

    We have devised a method to do nonequilibrium ionization calculations on the results of two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, based on the algorithm of Hughes & Helfand (1985). We have calculated the ionization structure and X-ray emission for a two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamical simulation for the remnant of Kepler's supernova (SN); the hydrodynamical model was presented in a previous paper. In this model, the progenitor of Kepler's SN is assumed to have been a massive runaway star ejected from the Galactic plane. In its red supergiant stage, its dense stellar wind was distorted and compressed into a bow shock by the ram pressure of the tenuous interstellar medium. The subsequent interaction of the supernova ejecta with this asymmetric circumstellar matter produced a strongly asymmetric supernova remnant (SNR). In this paper, we present calculated X-ray spectra for this hydrodynamical model. A comparison with observations implies a moderate overabundance of Fe in Kepler's SNR (only 50% larger than its cosmic value), in contrast to a large (6 to 15) Fe overabundance derived previously. However, we confirm earlier conclusions that Si and S abundances are 2 to 3 times solar. These modest enhancements of Si, S, and Fe may be attributed either to heavy-element enriched SN ejecta or to the initial chemical abundances of the SN progenitor, which originated in the metal-rich inner Galaxy. The comparison of our models with the observed spectra confirm theoretical predictions that moderate electron heating occurs at strong collisionless shock fronts, with the implied electron/mean temperature ratio of approximately 0.5.

  2. Possible evidence for the stochastic acceleration of secondary antiprotons by supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2017-06-01

    The antiproton-to-proton ratio in the cosmic-ray spectrum is a sensitive probe of new physics. Using recent measurements of the cosmic-ray antiproton and proton fluxes in the energy range of 1-1000 GeV, we study the contribution to the p ¯ /p ratio from secondary antiprotons that are produced and subsequently accelerated within individual supernova remnants. We consider several well-motivated models for cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar medium and marginalize our results over the uncertainties related to the antiproton production cross section and the time-, charge-, and energy-dependent effects of solar modulation. We find that the increase in the p ¯/p ratio observed at rigidities above ˜100 GV cannot be accounted for within the context of conventional cosmic-ray propagation models, but is consistent with scenarios in which cosmic-ray antiprotons are produced and subsequently accelerated by shocks within a given supernova remnant. In light of this, the acceleration of secondary cosmic rays in supernova remnants is predicted to substantially contribute to the cosmic-ray positron spectrum, accounting for a significant fraction of the observed positron excess.

  3. Tachyonic Cherenkov radiation from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2015-12-01

    The subexponential decay observed in the γ-ray spectral maps of supernova remnants is explained in terms of tachyonic Cherenkov emission from a relativistic electron population. The tachyonic radiation densities of an electronic spinor current are derived, the total density as well as the transversal and longitudinal polarization components, taking account of electron recoil. Tachyonic flux quantization subject to dispersive and dissipative permeabilities is discussed, the matrix elements of the transversal and longitudinal Poynting vectors of the Maxwell-Proca field are obtained, Cherenkov emission angles and radiation conditions are derived. The spectral energy flux of an ultra-relativistic electron plasma is calculated, a tachyonic Cherenkov fit to the high-energy (1 GeV to 30 TeV) γ-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula is performed, and estimates of the linear polarization degree are given. The spectral tail shows subexponential Weibull decay, which can be modeled with a frequency-dependent tachyon mass in the dispersion relations. Tachyonic flux densities interpolate between exponential and power-law spectral decay, which is further illustrated by Cherenkov fits to the γ-ray spectra of the supernova remnants IC 443 and W44. Subexponential spectral decay is manifested in double-logarithmic spectral maps as curved Weibull or straight power-law slope.

  4. Color Composite Image of the Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image is a color composite of the supernova remnant E0102-72: x-ray (blue), optical (green), and radio (red). E0102-72 is the remnant of a star that exploded in a nearby galaxy known as the Small Magellanic Cloud. The star exploded outward at speeds in excess of 20 million kilometers per hour (12 million mph) and collided with surrounding gas. This collision produced two shock waves, or cosmic sonic booms, one traveling outward, and the other rebounding back into the material ejected by the explosion. The radio image, shown in red, was made using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The radio waves are due to extremely high-energy electrons spiraling around magnetic field lines in the gas and trace the outward moving shock wave. The Chandra X-ray Observatory image, shown in blue, shows gas that has been heated to millions of degrees by the rebounding, or reverse shock wave. The x-ray data show that this gas is rich in oxygen and neon. These elements were created by nuclear reactions inside the star and hurled into space by the supernova. The Hubble Space Telescope optical image, shown in green, shows dense clumps of oxygen gas that have 'cooled' to about 30,000 degrees. Photo Credit: X-ray (NASA/CXC/SAO); optical (NASA/HST): radio: (ACTA)

  5. Exploring Supernova Remnants with the SPIES Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Dwarkadas, Vikram

    2017-01-01

    X-ray observations provide a key window into supernova remnants, providing measurements of a plethora of physical properties that are critical for understanding SNRs, their environments, their progenitors, and the SNe that created them. However, characterizing the entire volume of shocked plasma in a SNR is difficult, due to their complicated three dimensional morphologies and spectra. The SPIES project aims to address this problem by applying a novel X-ray analysis method, Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI), to XMM observations of 12 SNRs. SPI is a Bayesian modeling process that fits a population of gas blobs ("smoothed particles") such that their superposed emission reproduces the observed spatial and spectral distribution of photons. Emission-weighted distributions and maps of plasma properties, such as abundances and temperatures, are then extracted from the properties of the individual blobs. Additionally, because the collection of blobs is a multi-dimensional representation of the shocked plasma, we can carry out a more detailed exploration of plasma properties by extracting any subset of the blobs (e.g. those with the highest temperatures) and investigating its properties (e.g. map the abundances). Here we present preliminary results from SPI analyses of the first 6 remnants in the SPIES project.

  6. Color Composite Image of the Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image is a color composite of the supernova remnant E0102-72: x-ray (blue), optical (green), and radio (red). E0102-72 is the remnant of a star that exploded in a nearby galaxy known as the Small Magellanic Cloud. The star exploded outward at speeds in excess of 20 million kilometers per hour (12 million mph) and collided with surrounding gas. This collision produced two shock waves, or cosmic sonic booms, one traveling outward, and the other rebounding back into the material ejected by the explosion. The radio image, shown in red, was made using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The radio waves are due to extremely high-energy electrons spiraling around magnetic field lines in the gas and trace the outward moving shock wave. The Chandra X-ray Observatory image, shown in blue, shows gas that has been heated to millions of degrees by the rebounding, or reverse shock wave. The x-ray data show that this gas is rich in oxygen and neon. These elements were created by nuclear reactions inside the star and hurled into space by the supernova. The Hubble Space Telescope optical image, shown in green, shows dense clumps of oxygen gas that have 'cooled' to about 30,000 degrees. Photo Credit: X-ray (NASA/CXC/SAO); optical (NASA/HST): radio: (ACTA)

  7. Large-field CO (1-0) observations toward the Galactic historical supernova remnants: a large cavity around Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Xiong, F.; Yang, J.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The investigation of the interaction between the supernova remnants (SNRs) and interstellar gas is not only necessary to improve our knowledge of SNRs, but also to understand the nature of the progenitor systems. Aims: As a part of the Milky Way Imaging Scroll Painting CO line survey, the aim is to study the interstellar gas surrounding the Galactic historical SNRs. In this work, we present the CO results of Tycho's SNR. Methods: Using the 3 × 3 Superconducting Spectroscopic Array Receiver (SSAR) at the PMO 13.7-m telescope, we performed large-field (3° × 2°) and high-sensitivity CO (1-0) molecular line observations toward Tycho's SNR. Results: The CO observations reveal large molecular clouds, stream-like structures, and an inner rim around the remnant. We derived the basic properties (column density, mass, and kinematics) of these objects based on the CO observations. The large molecular clouds individually show an arc toward the remnant center, outlining a large cavity with radii of 0.3° × 0.6° (or 13 pc × 27 pc at a distance of 2.5 kpc) around the remnant. The CO line broadenings and asymmetries detected in the surrounding clouds, the observed expansion of the cavity, in concert with enhanced 12CO (2-1)/(1-0) intensity ratio detected in previous studies, suggest the interaction of the large cavity with a wind in the region. After excluding the scenario of a large bubble produced by bright massive stars, we suggest that the large cavity could be explained by accretion wind from the progenitor system of Tycho's supernova. Nevertheless, the possibility of the random distribution of a large cavity around Tycho's SNR cannot be ruled out thus far. Further observations are needed to confirm the physical association of the large cavity with Tycho's SNR.

  8. An Investigation into PAH Destruction in Nearby Supernova Remnants, North Polar Spur and Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Sarah M.; Witt, Adolf N.

    2015-01-01

    Our goal in conducting this research was to look at the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)/large dust grain emission intensity ratio in nearby supernova remnants to find evidence for selective PAH destruction by hot gas and high velocity shock waves within these regions, as predicted by the models of Arendt et al. (2010) and Micelotta et al. (2010a,b). Two supernova remnants were studied- the North Polar Spur (NPS) and the Cygnus Loop. The data for PAHs were obtained from the WISE W3 12 micron all-sky map processed by Meisner & Finkbeiner (2014), and the data for the larger grains come from the IRAS 100 micron all-sky map processed by Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis (1998). After obtaining a control PAH/large grain intensity ratio of ~2.8 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr) from two high latitude clouds, MBM 30 and MBM 32, we found that the intensity ratios across the NPS and Cygnus Loop were not far off- ~2.7 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr) and ~3.1 (DN/px)/(MJy/sr), respectively- showing no evidence of selective large-scale PAH destruction in supernova remnants. The individual intensities for both PAHs and large grains do decrease inside the Cygnus Loop, however, suggesting a decrease in abundances of both grain types, which could mean total dust grain destruction with the normal ratios coming from foreground and background dust located in the line of sight of the remnant. In addition, temperature and E(B-V) measurements taken from calibrated IRAS images show that while the dust column density increases in the Eastern Veil of the Cygnus Loop, the dust temperature reaches a local maximum, indicating the heating of large grains by interaction with the hot gas in the remnant. The PAH/large grain ratio in the Eastern Veil does decrease and could be indicative of currently ongoing active grain destruction there, with the PAHs being destroyed on a more rapid timescale than the large grains.We are grateful for financial support from the NSF REU Program grant to the Department of Physics & Astronomy at

  9. Limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol assay for diagnostic use

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    I wish to comment on the limitations of automated remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RemL-C) assay reported in Clinical Chemistry. Remnants are lipoprotein particles produced after newly formed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) of either hepatic or intestinal origin enter the plasma space and unde...

  10. Vivid View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This composite image of the Tycho supernova remnant combines infrared and X-ray observations obtained with NASA's Spitzer and Chandra space observatories, respectively, and the Calar Alto observatory, Spain. It shows the scene more than four centuries after the brilliant star explosion witnessed by Tycho Brahe and other astronomers of that era.

    The explosion has left a blazing hot cloud of expanding debris (green and yellow). The location of the blast's outer shock wave can be seen as a blue sphere of ultra-energetic electrons. Newly synthesized dust in the ejected material and heated pre-existing dust from the area around the supernova radiate at infrared wavelengths of 24 microns (red). Foreground and background stars in the image are white.

  11. A Python Calculator for Supernova Remnant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, D. A.; Williams, J. E.

    2017-05-01

    A freely available Python code for modeling supernova remnant (SNR) evolution has been created. This software is intended for two purposes: to understand SNR evolution and to use in modeling observations of SNR for obtaining good estimates of SNR properties. It includes all phases for the standard path of evolution for spherically symmetric SNRs. In addition, alternate evolutionary models are available, including evolution in a cloudy ISM, the fractional energy-loss model, and evolution in a hot low-density ISM. The graphical interface takes in various parameters and produces outputs such as shock radius and velocity versus time, as well as SNR surface brightness profile and spectrum. Some interesting properties of SNR evolution are demonstrated using the program.

  12. Uncovering the Explosions of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura

    2012-03-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs), the objects leftover hundreds to thousands of years after supernovae, are excellent laboratories to study the debris of these explosions and its interaction with the interstellar medium. Nearly 300 SNRs have been identified in the Milky Way galaxy, and more than 100 of these have been observed with modern X-ray telescopes. However, the complex and heterogeneous nature of SNRs has hindered the characterization of their properties, precluding comparison of observations with theoretical predictions. In this talk, I will highlight results from the first large-scale, systematic study of X-ray observations of SNRs. This work provides insights regarding the nature of explosions, the efficiency of hydrodynamical instabilities in ejecta mixing, and the role of environment in SNR evolution.

  13. Erratum: Evolution of Nonradiative Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truelove, J. Kelly; McKee, Christopher F.

    2000-05-01

    In the paper ``Evolution of Nonradiative Supernova Remnants'' by J. Kelly Truelove and Christopher F. McKee (ApJS, 120, 299 [1999]), there are several errors in Table 4. The factor 0.202 in v*b(R*b) should be replaced by 0.349; the factor 2.29 in t*(R*r) should be replaced by 0.762; the factor 0.762(3-n) in ṽ*r(R*r) should be replaced by 0.762(3-n)1/2 the factor 2.02 in R*r(t*) should be replaced by 1.56[(5-n)/(3-n)]1/2 and a factor n should be inserted after 0.0819 in the expression for R*r(t*). The corrected table is presented below. We thank Don Ellison for bringing this problem to our attention.

  14. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  15. Semiclassical geons as solitonic black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S.N.; Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D. E-mail: gonzalo.olmo@csic.es

    2013-07-01

    We find that the end state of black hole evaporation could be represented by non-singular and without event horizon stable solitonic remnants with masses of the order the Planck scale and up to ∼ 16 units of charge. Though these objects are locally indistinguishable from spherically symmetric, massive electric (or magnetic) charges, they turn out to be sourceless geons containing a wormhole generated by the electromagnetic field. Our results are obtained by interpreting semiclassical corrections to Einstein's theory in the first-order (Palatini) formalism, which yields second-order equations and avoids the instabilities of the usual (metric) formulation of quadratic gravity. We also discuss the potential relevance of these solutions for primordial black holes and the dark matter problem.

  16. Tongue abscess induced by embedded remnant fishbone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-L; Chiang, C-W; Shiao, C-C

    2015-12-01

    The authors reported a 56-year-old man with progressive pain over left bottom of oral cavity involving tongue for 3 days. He had a puncture history of tongue by fishbone, which was immediately removed 3 weeks ago. The subsequent contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of neck disclosed an abscess formation with a faint linear radiopaque material inside, consisting with remnant fishbone retention. The patient was treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics, followed by an uneventful course during subsequent follow-up for more than 9 months until now. Tongue abscess is a rare but potentially life threatening clinical entity. Foreign body puncture-related tongue abscess should be listed as a differential diagnosis in cases with acute tongue swelling.

  17. Tongue abscess induced by embedded remnant fishbone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-Lien; Chiang, Ching-Wen; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2015-07-22

    The authors reported a 56-year-old man with progressive pain over left bottom of oral cavity involving tongue for 3 days. He had a puncture history of tongue by fishbone, which was immediately removed 3 weeks ago. The subsequent contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of neck disclosed an abscess formation with a faint linear radiopaque material inside, consisting with remnant fishbone retention. The patient was treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics, followed by an uneventful course during subsequent follow-up for more than 9 months until now. Tongue abscess is a rare but potentially life threatening clinical entity. Foreign body puncture-related tongue abscess should be listed as a differential diagnosis in cases with acute tongue swelling.

  18. Benner's remnants: culture, tradition and everyday understanding.

    PubMed

    Paley, John

    2002-06-01

    Benner's account of meaning and embodiment in nursing depends on a theory which she has never fully articulated, although she makes numerous allusions to it. Behind the background of shared meanings hovers something called 'culture', which provides each individual with meaning, determines what counts as real for her, and actively hands down interpretation-laden practices. This view is based, Benner claims, on the Heideggerian assumption that the meaning and organization of a culture precedes individual meaning-giving activity. I explore Benner's implicit view of culture, drawing on her published work over 15 years, and offer an appraisal of it. In doing so, I attempt to make sense of some rather strange remarks Benner has recently made about 'remnants' of Cartesian and Kantian thinking being found in the everyday understandings of people with asthma. The concept of culture is developed with reference to both Benner's own work and that of the anthropologist, Clifford Geertz, whose work she frequently cites. Having identified the principal tenets of what we might conveniently call the Benner-Geertz theory, I proceed to interrogate the theory, using the recent anthropological literature -- and, in particular, materialist attacks on the idea of culture as a system of meanings -- in order to cast doubt on it. I also review, very briefly, an alternative way of understanding 'culture', which is not vulnerable to the same criticisms. Benner's implicit theory of culture is revealed, somewhat ironically, as an inverted form of Cartesian dualism. Its intellectual provenance is not Heidegger, who appears to reject it, but the sort of American sociology associated with Talcott Parsons. As a corollary, it is suggested that Benner's 'remnants' analogy cannot be justified, and that the idea of Cartesian and Kantian concepts permeating Western culture, infecting both the providers and receivers of health care, is a myth.

  19. The Remnant of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes

    2016-09-01

    Although it has faded by a factor of ˜107, SN 1987A is still bright enough to be observed in almost every band of the electromagnetic spectrum. Today, the bolometric luminosity of the debris is dominated by a far-infrared (˜200μm) continuum from ˜0.5 M⊙ of dust grains in the interior debris. The dust is heated by UV, optical, and near-infrared (NIR) emission resulting from radioactive energy deposition by 44Ti. The optical light of the supernova debris is now dominated by illumination of the debris by X-rays resulting from the impact of the outer supernova envelope with an equatorial ring (ER) of gas that was expelled some 20,000 years before the supernova explosion. X-ray and optical observations trace a complex system of shocks resulting from this impact, whereas radio observations trace synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons accelerated by these shocks. The luminosity of the remnant is dominated by an NIR (˜20μm) continuum from dust grains in the ER heated by collisions with ions in the X-ray emitting gas. With the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), we can observe the interior debris at millimeter/submillimeter wavelengths, which are not absorbed by the interior dust. The ALMA observations reveal bright emission lines from rotational transitions of CO and SiO lines that provide a new window into the interior structure of the supernova debris. Optical, NIR, and ALMA observations all indicate strongly asymmetric ejecta. Intensive searches have failed to yield any evidence for the compact object expected to reside at the center of the remnant. The current upper limit to the luminosity of such an object is a few tens of solar luminosities.

  20. The Origin of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Badenes, Carles; Park, Sangwook; Laming, J. Martin

    2012-09-01

    It is now well established that Kepler's supernova remnant (SNR) is the result of a Type Ia explosion. With an age of 407 yr and an angular diameter of ~4', Kepler is estimated to be between 3.0 and 7.0 kpc distant. Unlike other Galactic Type Ia SNRs such as Tycho and SN 1006, and SNR 0509-67.5 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, Kepler shows evidence for a strong circumstellar interaction. A bowshock structure in the north is thought to originate from the motion of a mass-losing system through the interstellar medium prior to the supernova. We present results of hydrodynamical and spectral modeling aimed at constraining the circumstellar environment of the system and the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion. Using models that contain either 0.3 M ⊙ (subenergetic) or 1.0 M ⊙ (energetic) of 56Ni, we simulate the interaction between supernova Ia ejecta and various circumstellar density models. Based on dynamical considerations alone, we find that the subenergetic models favor a distance to the SNR of <6.4 kpc, while the model that produces 1 M ⊙ of 56Ni requires a distance to the SNR of >7 kpc. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with an explosion that produced ~1 M ⊙ of 56Ni, ruling out the subenergetic models, and suggesting that Kepler's SNR was an SN 1991T-like event. Additionally, the X-ray spectrum rules out a pure r -2 wind profile expected from isotropic mass loss up to the time of the supernova. Introducing a small cavity around the progenitor system results in modeled X-ray spectra that are consistent with the observed spectrum. If a wind-shaped circumstellar environment is necessary to explain the dynamics and X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta in Kepler's SNR, then we require that the distance to the remnant be greater than 7 kpc.

  1. AN ATTEMPT AT A UNIFIED MODEL FOR THE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Qiang; Bi Xiaojun; Liu Siming

    2012-12-20

    Shocks of supernova remnants (SNRs) are important (and perhaps the dominant) agents for the production of the Galactic cosmic rays. Recent {gamma}-ray observations of several SNRs have made this case more compelling. However, these broadband high-energy measurements also reveal a variety of spectral shapes demanding more comprehensive modeling of emissions from SNRs. According to the locally observed fluxes of cosmic-ray protons and electrons, the electron-to-proton number ratio is known to be about 1%. Assuming such a ratio is universal for all SNRs and identical spectral shape for all kinds of accelerated particles, we propose a unified model that ascribes the distinct {gamma}-ray spectra of different SNRs to variations of the medium density and the spectral difference between cosmic-ray electrons and protons observed from Earth to transport effects. For low-density environments, the {gamma}-ray emission is inverse-Compton dominated. For high-density environments like systems of high-energy particles interacting with molecular clouds, the {gamma}-ray emission is {pi}{sup 0}-decay dominated. The model predicts a hadronic origin of {gamma}-ray emission from very old remnants interacting mostly with molecular clouds and a leptonic origin for intermediate-age remnants whose shocks propagate in a low-density environment created by their progenitors via, e.g., strong stellar winds. These results can be regarded as evidence in support of the SNR origin of Galactic cosmic rays.

  2. Remnant of binary black-hole mergers: New simulations and peak luminosity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, James; Lousto, Carlos O.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of 61 new simulations of nonprecessing spinning black hole binaries with mass ratios q =m1/m2 in the range 1 /3 ≤q ≤1 and individual spins covering the parameter space -0.85 ≤α1 ,2≤0.85 . We additionally perform ten new simulations of nonspinning black hole binaries with mass ratios covering the range 1 /6 ≤q <1 . We follow the evolution for typically the last ten orbits before merger down to the formation of the final remnant black hole. This allows for assessment of the accuracy of our previous empirical formulas for relating the binary parameters to the remnant final black hole mass, spin and recoil. We use the new simulation to improve the fit to the above remnant formulas and add a formula for the peak luminosity of gravitational waves, produced around the merger of the two horizons into one. We find excellent agreement (typical errors ˜0.1 %- 0.2 % ) for the mass and spin, and within ˜5 % for the recoil and peak luminosity. These formulas have direct application to parameter estimation techniques applied to LIGO observations of gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers.

  3. Interstellar and Ejecta Dust in the Cas A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jonghee; Hwang, Una

    2013-01-01

    The ejecta of the Cas A supernova remnant has a complex morphology, consisting of dense fast-moving line emitting knots and diffuse X-ray emitting regions that have encountered the reverse shock, as well as more slowly expanding, unshocked regions of the ejecta. Using the Spitzer 5-35 micron IRS data cube, and Herschel 70, 100, and 160 micron PACS data, we decompose the infrared emission from the remnant into distinct spectral components associated with the different regions of the ejecta. Such decomposition allows the association of different dust species with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories, and determination of the dust heating mechanisms. Our decomposition identified three characteristic dust spectra. The first, most luminous one, exhibits strong emission features at approx. 9 and 21 micron, and a weaker 12 micron feature, and is closely associated with the ejecta knots that have strong [Ar II] 6.99 micron and [Ar III] 8.99 micron emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low MgO-to-SiO2 ratios. A second, very different dust spectrum that has no indication of any silicate features, is best fit by Al2O3 dust and is found in association with ejecta having strong [Ne II] 12.8 micron and [Ne III] 15.6 micron emission lines. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that best matched by magnesium silicates with relatively high MgO-to-SiO2 ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray emitting shocked ejecta and the shocked interstellar/circumstellar material. All three spectral components include an additional featureless cold dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with [Si II] 34.8 micron emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. The dust mass giving rise to the warm dust component is about approx. 0.1solar M. However, most of the dust mass

  4. Giant remnant of fetal circulation leading to cyanosis: pseudo-cor triatriatum dexter.

    PubMed

    Yerebakan, Can; Valeske, Klaus; Esmaeili, Anoosh; Akintuerk, Hakan

    2014-05-01

    Remnants of the right valve of the sinus venosus, which fail to regress may present as an obstructing membrane within the right atrium as a very rare congenital anomaly. When associated with an atrial septal defect, primary cyanosis may occur due to a large right-to-left shunt. We report on a 1-week old girl with a pseudo-cor triatriatum dexter and immediate cyanosis after an uncomplicated birth. She was successfully treated with surgical excision of the obstructing membrane.

  5. Secular Decrease the Flux of Supernova Remnant CAS a on Monitoring Results to Radiotelescope "URAN-4" Ira Nasu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbynov, A. A.; Ryabov, M. I.; Panishko, S. K.

    This work is dedicated to the study of secular decrease of the flux of young supernova remnant Cas A according to observations by radio- telescope "URAN-4" of Odessa Observatory IRA NASU from 1987 to 2001 years on frequency of 25 MHz. On the investigation base there is a relationship analysis of flux CasA to the "stable" source - radio-galaxy Cyg A (CasA/Cyg A) which is located on a small angular distance. Results of the observations held on RT "URAN-4" show that there is no noticeable decrease of fluxes in the period 1987-1993, with the relationship ratio (CasA/Cyg A) = 1.5. While considering data from 1987 to 2001 manifested a slight decrease trend in flux equal to 8.4% for the all period. At the same time, according to various investigations the average value flux of Cas A in the interval of frequencies 38-2924 MHz is 0.8% per year. At the meantime in this frequency the range ratio (CasA/Cyg A) has become less than one. Thus, there is a noticable contradiction of secular decrease of the flux Cas A on this radio frequencies in comparison with the predictions of the theory in 1.7% per year.

  6. Three Great Eyes on Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chandra X-Ray Data (blue) Chandra X-Ray Data (green)Hubble Telescope (visible-light)Spitzer Telescope (infrared)

    NASA's three Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- joined forces to probe the expanding remains of a supernova, called Kepler's supernova remnant, first seen 400 years ago by sky watchers, including astronomer Johannes Kepler.

    The combined image unveils a bubble-shaped shroud of gas and dust that is 14 light-years wide and is expanding at 4 million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second). Observations from each telescope highlight distinct features of the supernova remnant, a fast-moving shell of iron-rich material from the exploded star, surrounded by an expanding shock wave that is sweeping up interstellar gas and dust.

    Each color in this image represents a different region of the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. These diverse colors are shown in the panel of photographs below the composite image. The X-ray and infrared data cannot be seen with the human eye. By color-coding those data and combining them with Hubble's visible-light view, astronomers are presenting a more complete picture of the supernova remnant.

    Visible-light images from the Hubble telescope (colored yellow) reveal where the supernova shock wave is slamming into the densest regions of surrounding gas. The bright glowing knots are dense clumps from instabilities that form behind the shock wave. The Hubble data also show thin filaments of gas that look like rippled sheets seen edge-on. These filaments reveal where the shock wave is encountering lower-density, more uniform interstellar material.

    The Spitzer telescope shows microscopic dust particles (colored red) that have been heated by the

  7. Three Great Eyes on Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chandra X-Ray Data (blue) Chandra X-Ray Data (green)Hubble Telescope (visible-light)Spitzer Telescope (infrared)

    NASA's three Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- joined forces to probe the expanding remains of a supernova, called Kepler's supernova remnant, first seen 400 years ago by sky watchers, including astronomer Johannes Kepler.

    The combined image unveils a bubble-shaped shroud of gas and dust that is 14 light-years wide and is expanding at 4 million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second). Observations from each telescope highlight distinct features of the supernova remnant, a fast-moving shell of iron-rich material from the exploded star, surrounded by an expanding shock wave that is sweeping up interstellar gas and dust.

    Each color in this image represents a different region of the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. These diverse colors are shown in the panel of photographs below the composite image. The X-ray and infrared data cannot be seen with the human eye. By color-coding those data and combining them with Hubble's visible-light view, astronomers are presenting a more complete picture of the supernova remnant.

    Visible-light images from the Hubble telescope (colored yellow) reveal where the supernova shock wave is slamming into the densest regions of surrounding gas. The bright glowing knots are dense clumps from instabilities that form behind the shock wave. The Hubble data also show thin filaments of gas that look like rippled sheets seen edge-on. These filaments reveal where the shock wave is encountering lower-density, more uniform interstellar material.

    The Spitzer telescope shows microscopic dust particles (colored red) that have been heated by the

  8. Three Great Eyes on Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-10-06

    NASA's three Great Observatories -- the Hubble Space Telescope, the SpitzerSpace Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory -- joined forces to probe theexpanding remains of a supernova, called Kepler's supernova remnant, first seen 400 years ago by sky watchers, including astronomer Johannes Kepler. The combined image unveils a bubble-shaped shroud of gas and dust that is 14light-years wide and is expanding at 4 million miles per hour (2,000 kilometersper second). Observations from each telescope highlight distinct features of thesupernova remnant, a fast-moving shell of iron-rich material from the explodedstar, surrounded by an expanding shock wave that is sweeping up interstellar gasand dust. Each color in this image represents a different region of the electromagneticspectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. These diverse colors are shown in thepanel of photographs below the composite image. The X-ray and infrared datacannot be seen with the human eye. By color-coding those data and combining themwith Hubble's visible-light view, astronomers are presenting a more completepicture of the supernova remnant. Visible-light images from the Hubble telescope (colored yellow) reveal where the supernova shock wave is slamming into the densest regions of surrounding gas.The bright glowing knots are dense clumps from instabilities that form behindthe shock wave. The Hubble data also show thin filaments of gas that look likerippled sheets seen edge-on. These filaments reveal where the shock wave isencountering lower-density, more uniform interstellar material. The Spitzer telescope shows microscopic dust particles (colored red) that havebeen heated by the supernova shock wave. The dust re-radiates the shock wave'senergy as infrared light. The Spitzer data are brightest in the regionssurrounding those seen in detail by the Hubble telescope. The Chandra X-ray data show regions of very hot gas, and extremely high-energyparticles. The hottest gas (higher-energy X-rays, colored

  9. HST/ACS Narrowband Imaging of the Kepler Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Frattare, Lisa M.; Rudnick, Lawrence; DeLaney, Tracey; Harrus, Ilana M.; Ennis, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    We present narrowband images of the Kepler supernova remnant obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The images, with an angular resolution of 0.05" reveal the structure of the emitting gas in unprecedented detail. Radiative and nonradiative shocks are found in close proximity, unresolvable in gromd-based spectra, indicating that the pre-shock medium is highly clumped. The ionization structure, traced by differences in the [0 111] to [N 11] flux ratio, varies on subarcsecond scales. The variation is due to 110th differences in shock velocity as well as gradients in the evolutionary stage of the shocks. A prollinent complex of knots protruding beyond the boundary of the rennallt in the northwest is found to consist of bright radiative knots, collected by arcuate nonradiative filaments. Based on the coincidence of the optical emission with a bright isolated knot of X-ray emission, we infer that this feature is due to a Rayleigh-Taylor finger that formed at the contact discontinuity and overtook the primary blast wave.

  10. Confirmation of three candidate Galactic supernova remnants from GMRT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Sanjay

    2000-09-01

    We report 327-MHz observations of three large (>15arcmin) candidate supernova remnants (SNRs) at high Galactic latitudes using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). These objects were proposed by Duncan et al. as candidate SNRs in the Parkes 2.4-GHz survey. We detect extended 327-MHz emission in all three fields. G356.2+4.5 has a well-resolved shell of emission. This field also contains a 32-mJy pulsar situated at a distance of 1.4kpc as derived from the dispersion measure of the pulsar. The field of G358.0+3.8 is highly confused and, although we confirm the presence of a partial ring, it has a lower signal-to-noise ratio detection. G004.8+6.2 (formerly G4.5+6.2) is located approximately 40arcmin away from Kepler's SNR. Apart from GMRT observations of this field, this SNR lies in the field of view of a Very Large Array (VLA) D-array observation at 325MHz and we detect a 17×18arcmin SNR, possibly of shell morphology. All these fields show clear, well-resolved shells in the National Radio Astronomy Observatory/VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) maps, which are also presented.

  11. EFFECTS OF NEUTRAL PARTICLES ON MODIFIED SHOCKS AT SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-09-20

    H{alpha} emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) implies the existence of neutral hydrogens in the ambient medium. In the precursor of an SNR shock modified by cosmic rays (CRs), upstream plasmas are pushed by the CR pressure, but neutral particles are not, so that the relative velocity appears and some neutral particles become pickup ions by the charge exchange process in the precursor. We investigate how the pickup ions generated in the precursor affect the shock structure and the particle acceleration. If the CR pressure is larger than 20% of the shock ram pressure, the compression of the subshock becomes smaller than that without pickup ions because of the pressure of the pickup ions. Moreover, even if the shock is modified by CRs, the total compression ratio can be smaller than 4. In addition, the pickup ions play an important role for the injection into the particle acceleration. If the shock is a quasi-perpendicular shock and if the multiply reflected ion acceleration occurs, the CR spectrum can be harder than that of the test particle diffusive shock acceleration below GeV.

  12. The Population of Supernova Remnants in M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Kuntz, K. D.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2017-08-01

    The nearby, actively star-forming, nearly face-on spiral galaxy, M51 (NGC 5194/5), has been the site of four supernovae since 1941. As a result it should have a rich population of young supernova remnants (SNRs). Here we describe a search for optical SNRs in M51 among the 298 X-ray sources discovered inside the D25 contour in deep Chandra observations. The search uses interference filter images obtained with the WFC3 on Hubble Space Telescope and more recent images from GMOS on Gemini North. Of 80 emission nebulae identified in the HST images as SNR candidates based on elevated [SII]: Ha ratios compared to HII regions, 40 have X-ray counterparts. The diameters of the SNRs and SNR candidates detected with HST are systematically smaller than seen in SNR populations of other galaxies at comparable distances. However, this is most likely an instrumental effect, which our ongoing analysis of the new GMOS images will correct. At that point, we will be able to make of fair multi-wavelength comparison of the SNR population in M51 with other nearby, actively star-forming spiral galaxies, such as M83 and NGC6946.

  13. Radioactive Iodine Remnant Ablation: The Beta-knife Completion Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Seza; Kuker, Russ

    2017-01-01

    The rationale and objectives for radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation remain perplexing to many. This review addresses the meaning, clinical context and the goals of “ablation”: the RAI treatment after a total thyroidectomy. This article also aims to clarify the definition of a total thyroidectomy and how a thyroid remnant can introduce a confounding factor in the postoperative management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. The implications of an existing thyroid remnant on RAI diagnostic imaging and serum thyroglobulin levels are discussed. This review provides a rational approach validating the utility of RAI remnant ablation regardless of the patient’s risk stratification. PMID:28117286

  14. Virtual black holes, remnants and the information paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmet, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the question of the contributions of Planckian quantum black holes in general and of remnants in particular to low-energy physics observables. As long as quantum gravity preserves the symmetries of the low-energy effective field theory, we find that the bounds on the number of quantum black holes or remnants are very weak. Typically, we rule out using data on the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon that there are more than 1032 quantum black holes coupled to the standard model particles gravitationally. Remnants thus remain a viable option as a solution to the information paradox of black holes.

  15. Electron acceleration by young supernova remnant blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandford, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Some general considerations regarding relativistic particle acceleration by young supernova remnants are reviewed. Recent radio observations of supernova remnants apparently locate the bounding shock and exhibit large electron density gradients which verify the presence of strong particle scattering. The radio 'rim' in Tycho's remnant has been found to contain a predominantly radial magnetic field. This may be attributable to an instability of the shock surface and a progress report on an investigation of the stability of strong shocks in partially ionized media is presented.

  16. Supernova remnants and the physics of strong shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Chevalier, Roger; Cox, Donald P.; Dickel, John R.; Pisarski, Ryszard; Raymond, John; Spangler, Stephen R.; Volk, Heinrich J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on a Workshop on Supernova Remnants and the Physics of Strong Shock Waves hosted by North Carolina State University at Raleigh, North Carolina, September 16-18, 1993. The workshop brought together observers, shock theorists, cosmic-ray specialists, and simulators to address the role supernova remnants can play in furthering our understanding of the complex plasma physics associated with collisionless shocks and particle acceleration. Over fifty scientists presented papers on various aspects of supernova remnants. In lieu of a proceedings volume, we present here a synopsis of the workshop, in the form of brief summaries of each workshop session.

  17. Supernova remnants and the physics of strong shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Chevalier, Roger; Cox, Donald P.; Dickel, John R.; Pisarski, Ryszard; Raymond, John; Spangler, Stephen R.; Volk, Heinrich J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on a Workshop on Supernova Remnants and the Physics of Strong Shock Waves hosted by North Carolina State University at Raleigh, North Carolina, September 16-18, 1993. The workshop brought together observers, shock theorists, cosmic-ray specialists, and simulators to address the role supernova remnants can play in furthering our understanding of the complex plasma physics associated with collisionless shocks and particle acceleration. Over fifty scientists presented papers on various aspects of supernova remnants. In lieu of a proceedings volume, we present here a synopsis of the workshop, in the form of brief summaries of each workshop session.

  18. High energy survey of supernova remnants with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollough, M. L.; Wilson, C. A.; Zhang, S. N.; Harmon, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    The burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) survey of the high energy emission from supernova remnants is reported on. The ability of BATSE to continuously monitor the entire sky in the 20 keV to 2 MeV energy range enables a large group of remnants to by studied at high energies. Preliminary analysis indicates the likely detection of several supernova remnants other than the Crab nebula. Among these are MSH 15-52, Vela, Cas A and possibly HB 9. The techniques employed are discussed together with the status of the survey and its limitations.

  19. Further analysis of LDEF FRECOPA micrometeoroid remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Janet; Bunch, Ted E.; Radicatidibrozolo, Filippo; Mandeville, Jean Claude

    1993-04-01

    In the Al collectors of experiment A0138-1 of the French Cooperative Payload (FRECOPA) payload, we identified a population of small craters (3-9 microns in diameter) induced by the impacts of micron-sized grains, mainly of extraterrestrial origin. Chemical analyses of the Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) remnants were made in the bottoms and on the rims of the craters, in addition to immediate off-rim areas. So far, the compositional investigation of the craters by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) has shown evidence of an extraterrestrial origin for the impacting grains. The systematic presence of C and O in the residues has been reported and may be compared with the existence of particles showing high proportions of biogenic light elements and detected in the close environment of P-Halley comet nucleus (called CHON particles). An analytical protocol has been established in order to extract molecular and possible isotopic information on these grains, a fraction of which could be of cometary origin. Although these very small craters may show crater features that are typical of the larger Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) population (greater than 50 microns), some show unique morphologies that we have not previously observed. Our initial Laser Induced Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) analytical results show strong signals for nitrogen-bearing ions in craters characterized by high C and O contents; they also suggest that carbon contents in some craters could exceed that known for carbonaceous chondrites.

  20. Further analysis of LDEF FRECOPA micrometeoroid remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, Janet; Bunch, Ted E.; Radicatidibrozolo, Filippo; Mandeville, Jean Claude

    1993-01-01

    In the Al collectors of experiment A0138-1 of the French Cooperative Payload (FRECOPA) payload, we identified a population of small craters (3-9 microns in diameter) induced by the impacts of micron-sized grains, mainly of extraterrestrial origin. Chemical analyses of the Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) remnants were made in the bottoms and on the rims of the craters, in addition to immediate off-rim areas. So far, the compositional investigation of the craters by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) has shown evidence of an extraterrestrial origin for the impacting grains. The systematic presence of C and O in the residues has been reported and may be compared with the existence of particles showing high proportions of biogenic light elements and detected in the close environment of P-Halley comet nucleus (called CHON particles). An analytical protocol has been established in order to extract molecular and possible isotopic information on these grains, a fraction of which could be of cometary origin. Although these very small craters may show crater features that are typical of the larger Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) population (greater than 50 microns), some show unique morphologies that we have not previously observed. Our initial Laser Induced Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) analytical results show strong signals for nitrogen-bearing ions in craters characterized by high C and O contents; they also suggest that carbon contents in some craters could exceed that known for carbonaceous chondrites.

  1. MODIFIED EQUIPARTITION CALCULATION FOR SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Arbutina, B.; Urosevic, D.; Andjelic, M. M.; Pavlovic, M. Z.; Vukotic, B.

    2012-02-10

    Determination of the magnetic field strength in the interstellar medium is one of the more complex tasks of contemporary astrophysics. We can only estimate the order of magnitude of the magnetic field strength by using a few very limited methods. Besides the Zeeman effect and Faraday rotation, the equipartition or minimum-energy calculation is a widespread method for estimating magnetic field strength and energy contained in the magnetic field and cosmic-ray particles by using only the radio synchrotron emission. Despite its approximate character, it remains a useful tool, especially when there are no other data about the magnetic field in a source. In this paper, we give a modified calculation that we think is more appropriate for estimating magnetic field strengths and energetics in supernova remnants (SNRs). We present calculated estimates of the magnetic field strengths for all Galactic SNRs for which the necessary observational data are available. The Web application for calculation of the magnetic field strengths of SNRs is available at http://poincare.matf.bg.ac.rs/{approx}arbo/eqp/.

  2. Low Frequency Observations of Galactic Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogan, C. L.; Kassim, N.; Lacey, C.; Nord, M.; Lazio, J.

    2001-12-01

    We present VLA multi-configuration 330 MHz and 74 MHz observations of three fields centered on the locations of the Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs): G29.7-0.3, G11.2-0.3, and G349.7+0.2. The wide fields of view afforded by the VLA at these frequencies, 4o at 330 MHz and 11o at 74 MHz, allow us to simultaneously study the low frequency properties of a wide range of objects. Our primary goal is to study the SNRs in these fields to accurately characterize their low frequency spectra and to look for foreground or interior thermal free-free absorption, as well as spectral signatures of diffusive shock acceleration of cosmic rays. Additionally, a few Galactic HII regions and extragalactic sources will be discussed. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Basic research in radio astronomy at the Naval Research Laboratory is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  3. Core collapse supernova remnants with ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grichener, Aldana; Soker, Noam

    2017-06-01

    We study the morphologies of core collapse supernova remnants (CCSNRs) and find that about third of CCSNRs in our sample have two opposite 'ears' protruding from their main shell. We assume that the ears are formed by jets, and argue that these properties are compatible with the expectation from the explosion jet feedback mechanism. Based on previous studies of ears in CCSNRs and the similarity of some ears to those found in planetary nebulae, we assume that the ears are inflated by jets that are launched during the explosion, or a short time after it. Under simple geometrical assumptions, we find that the extra kinetic energy of the ears is in the range of 1-10 per cent of the explosion energy. As not all of the kinetic energy of the jets ends in the ears, we estimate that the typical kinetic energy in the jets that inflated the ears, under our assumptions, is about 5-15 per cent of the explosion energy. This study supports a serious consideration of jet-driven core-collapse supernova mechanisms.

  4. A New Galactic Center Composite Supernova Remnant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, G. R.; Hyman, S. D.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Kassim, N. E.

    2001-12-01

    We report the possible radio detection of a new supernova remnant located only 1 degree east of the Galactic center. The SNR candidate has both a shell and a core component on 6, 20, and 90 cm VLA images. Preliminary measurements indicate that both components have steep spectra between 6 and 20 cm, and that the spectra flatten and become inverted between 20 and 90 cm, due likely to significant free-free absorption. The source may be a composite-type SNR, which constitute only 10% of known SNRS, and which consist of a steep-spectrum radio shell corresponding to expanding debris from the supernova and a flatter spectrum, significantly polarized, core component corresponding to a central neutron star. Further radio and X-ray observations are planned in order to definitively identify this source. The detection of additional SNRs in or near the Galactic center will help place constraints on the star formation rate in this region, and may also provide clues about the GC environment. This research is supported by funding from the Sweet Briar College Faculty Grants program. Basic research in radio astronomy at NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  5. A Chandra X-Ray Survey of Ejecta in the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Laming, J. Martin

    2011-01-01

    We present a survey of the X-ray emitting ejecta in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant based on an extensive analysis of over 6000 spectral regions extracted on 2.5-10" angular scales using the Chandra 1 Ms observation. We interpret these results in the context of hydrodynamical models for the evolution of the remnant. The distributions of fitted temperature and ionization age are highly peaked and suggest that the ejecta were subjected to multiple secondary shocks. Based on the fitted emission measure and element abundances, and an estimate of the emitting volume, we derive masses for the X-ray emitting ejecta as well as showing the distribution of the mass of various elements over the remnant. The total shocked Fe mass appears to be roughly 0.14 Solar Mass, which accounts for nearly all of the mass expected in Fe ejecta. We find two populations of Fe ejecta, that associated with normal Si-burning and that associated with alpha-rich freeze-out, with a mass ratio of approximately 2:1. Surprisingly, essentially all of this Fe (both components) is well outside the central regions of the SNR, presumably having been ejected by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion. We discuss this, and its implications for the neutron star kick.

  6. Interstellar and ejecta dust in the cas a supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jeonghee; Hwang, Una

    2014-05-01

    Infrared continuum observations provide a means of investigating the physical composition of the dust in the ejecta and swept up medium of the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR). Using low-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra (5-35 μm), and broad-band Herschel PACS imaging (70, 100, and 160 μm), we identify characteristic dust spectra, associated with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories. The most luminous spectrum exhibits strong emission features at ∼9 and 21 μm and is closely associated with ejecta knots with strong Ar emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low Mg to Si ratios. Another dust spectrum is associated with ejecta having strong Ne emission lines. It has no indication of any silicate features and is best fit by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dust. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that are best matched by magnesium silicates with a relatively high Mg to Si ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray-emitting shocked ejecta, but it is also evident in regions where shocked interstellar or circumstellar material is expected. However, the identification of dust composition is not unique, and each spectrum includes an additional featureless dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. Most of the dust mass in Cas A is associated with this unidentified cold component, which is ≲ 0.1 M {sub ☉}. The mass of warmer dust is only ∼0.04 M {sub ☉}.

  7. Interstellar and Ejecta Dust in the Cas A Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Kober, Gladys; Rho, Jeonghee; Hwang, Una

    2014-05-01

    Infrared continuum observations provide a means of investigating the physical composition of the dust in the ejecta and swept up medium of the Cas A supernova remnant (SNR). Using low-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra (5-35 μm), and broad-band Herschel PACS imaging (70, 100, and 160 μm), we identify characteristic dust spectra, associated with ejecta layers that underwent distinct nuclear burning histories. The most luminous spectrum exhibits strong emission features at ~9 and 21 μm and is closely associated with ejecta knots with strong Ar emission lines. The dust features can be reproduced by magnesium silicate grains with relatively low Mg to Si ratios. Another dust spectrum is associated with ejecta having strong Ne emission lines. It has no indication of any silicate features and is best fit by Al2O3 dust. A third characteristic dust spectrum shows features that are best matched by magnesium silicates with a relatively high Mg to Si ratio. This dust is primarily associated with the X-ray-emitting shocked ejecta, but it is also evident in regions where shocked interstellar or circumstellar material is expected. However, the identification of dust composition is not unique, and each spectrum includes an additional featureless dust component of unknown composition. Colder dust of indeterminate composition is associated with emission from the interior of the SNR, where the reverse shock has not yet swept up and heated the ejecta. Most of the dust mass in Cas A is associated with this unidentified cold component, which is <~ 0.1 M ⊙. The mass of warmer dust is only ~0.04 M ⊙.

  8. Pressure-Distribution Measurements at Large Angles of Pitch on Fins of Different Span-Chord Ratio on a 1/40-Scale Model of the U. S. Airship "Akron."

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, James G

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of pressure-distribution measurements on a 1/40-scale model of the U. S. Airship "Akron" conducted in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel. The measurements were made on the starboard fin of each of four sets of horizontal tail surfaces, all of approximately the same area but differing in span-chord ratio, for five angles of pitch varying from 11.6 degrees to 34 degrees, for four elevator angles, and at air speeds ranging from 56 to 77 miles per hour. Pressures were also measured at 13 stations along the rear half of the port side of the hull at one elevator setting for the same five angles of pitch and at an air speed of approximately 91 miles per hour. The normal force on the fin and the moment of forces about the fin root were determined. The results indicate that, ignoring the effect on drag, it would be advantageous from structural considerations to use a fin of lower span-chord ratio than that used on the "Akron."

  9. Hematite Mineralized Bacterial Remnants: Implications for Martian Hematite Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schelble, Rachel T.; Westall, Frances; Allen, Carlton C.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2001-01-01

    Hematite mineralized bacterial remnants in the Gunflint Formation [early Proterozoic] can be used as an analog for potential microfossils in martian iron deposits. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. 3. HISTORIC ROADWAY 2 WITH MILL REMNANTS TO THE RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. HISTORIC ROADWAY 2 WITH MILL REMNANTS TO THE RIGHT OF TREE. CAMERA POINTED WEST-SOUTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Historic Roadway No. 2, West flank Florida Mountain, East of Rich Gulch Mine & Mill, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  11. 4. View looking north from Office shows remnants of Milwaukee ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View looking north from Office shows remnants of Milwaukee Dock, which had been build specifically for loading railroads ties for the old Milwaukee Railroad. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  12. 330 MHz VLA Observations of 20 Galactic Supernova Remnants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    We present 330 MHz images and integrated flux densities for 20 previously identified 1st quadrant Galactic Supernova Remnants ( SNRs ). The...plerionic emission for SNRs whose intrinsic morphological type is not well established.

  13. FEATURE C. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH REMNANT OF MOUNT, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE C. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH REMNANT OF MOUNT, VIEW FACING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Machine Gun Positions, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Western end of ATSF rail yard with remnant of rail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Western end of ATSF rail yard with remnant of rail spur and dumping location. Concrete vault foundation in foreground. Stone foundation and wood foundation in background. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  15. Detail, corner pilaster remnant, gable return on facade, Our Corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, corner pilaster remnant, gable return on facade, Our Corner Saloon, view to northeast (210mm lens with electronic flash fill) - Our Corner Saloon, 301 First Street, Eureka, Humboldt County, CA

  16. 11. REMNANTS OF FLUME BOX WITHIN CANAL. NOTE THE UPRIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REMNANTS OF FLUME BOX WITHIN CANAL. NOTE THE UPRIGHT SIDE POSTS BOLTED TO BASE STRINGER AND HORIZONTAL BOARD SIDE WALLS. VIEW IS TO THE SOUTHEAST. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  17. 7. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING REMNANT OF ORIGINAL END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING REMNANT OF ORIGINAL END WALL AND SMOOTH DRY-WALL FINISH OF 1965 ADDITION IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  18. Remnant for all black objects due to gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmed Farag; Faizal, Mir; Khalil, Mohammed M.

    2015-05-01

    We argue that a remnant is formed for all black objects in gravity's rainbow. This will be based on the observation that a remnant depends critically on the structure of the rainbow functions, and this dependence is a model independent phenomena. We thus propose general relations for the modified temperature and entropy of all black objects in gravity's rainbow. We explicitly check this to be the case for Kerr, Kerr-Newman-dS, charged-AdS, and higher dimensional Kerr-AdS black holes. We also try to argue that a remnant should form for black saturn in gravity's rainbow. This work extends our previous results on remnants of Schwarzschild black holes [1] and black rings [2].

  19. Remnants of track girder of east roadbed showing detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remnants of track girder of east roadbed showing detail of granite piers at low tide. View north - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  20. Building L, interior, second floor looking northeast, showing remnants of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building L, interior, second floor looking northeast, showing remnants of belt system on the ceiling - Daniel F. Waters Germantown Dye Works, Building L, 37-55 East Wister Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. Measuring Changes in the Vicinity of the Seal Nunataks Ice Shelf Remnant from Imagery and Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, C. A.; Berthier, E.; Scambos, T.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of repeated imagery and ICESat laser altimetry has enabled the ongoing losses from the northern Larsen ice shelf remnant to be assessed in detail. The remnant, the Seal Nunataks ice shelf (SNIS), has four ICESat tracks that cross it as well as adjacent tracks that cross Robertson Island (RI) and its remaining tributary, Rogosh Glacier (RG), on the Antarctic Peninsula. The altimetry data from ICESat (2003-2009) shows that elevation losses increase from west to east across the SNIS. Ice elevation differences suggest mean ice shelf thinning rates of up to 1.6 m a-1 and reveal processes impacting the remaining shelf ice as well. Limited altimetry data across RG suggests elevation losses of almost 1 m a-1 inland from the grounding zone with smaller losses further up the evolving tributary. Farther east, asymmetric elevation changes across RI suggest the magnitude of regional climate impacts vary distinctly depending on slope aspect. Imagery analysis using Landsat 7 and ASTER images from 2001-2013 shows that ice area losses continued on the shelf remnant following the Larsen A break up in 1995 as well as after the Larsen B break up in 2002. The largest losses (~350 km2) occurred on the north side of the remnant in late 2004 into 2005 with smaller losses along the remaining margins. Despite a slight regional cooling recently and more persistent sea ice since early 2008 as seen in MODIS imagery, the SNIS is still losing ice along its margins and appears to be retreating past its pinning nunataks. In contrast to SNIS, RI has experienced minor ice area losses that suggest most of its ice is grounded and thus less directly impacted by ocean interactions. Combining these remote sensing data sets provides additional insights about ongoing ice loss processes in this part of the Antarctic Peninsula.

  2. LIMITS ON THE NUMBER OF GALACTIC YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS EMITTING IN THE DECAY LINES OF {sup 44}Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, François; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2013-09-20

    We revise the assumptions of the parameters involved in predicting the number of supernova remnants detectable in the nuclear lines of the decay chain of {sup 44}Ti. Specifically, we consider the distribution of the supernova progenitors, the supernova rate in the Galaxy, the ratios of supernova types, the Galactic production of {sup 44}Ti, and the {sup 44}Ti yield from supernovae of different types to derive credible bounds on the expected number of detectable remnants. We find that, within 1σ uncertainty, the Galaxy should contain an average of 5.1{sup +2.4}{sub -2.0} remnants detectable to a survey with a {sup 44}Ti decay line flux limit of 10{sup –5} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, with a probability of detecting a single remnant of 2.7{sup +10.0}{sub -2.4}%, and an expected number of detections between two and nine remnants, making the single detection of Cas A unlikely but consistent with our models. Our results show that the probability of detecting the brightest {sup 44}Ti flux source at the high absolute Galactic longitude of Cas A or above is ∼10%. Using the detected flux of Cas A, we attempt to constrain the Galactic supernova rate and Galactic production of {sup 44}Ti, but find the detection to be only weakly informative. We conclude that even future surveys having 200 times more sensitivity than state-of-the-art surveys can be guaranteed to detect only a few new remnants, with an expected number of detections between 8 and 21 at a limiting {sup 44}Ti decay flux of 10{sup –7} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}.

  3. Increased Remnant Cholesterol Explains Part of Residual Risk of All-Cause Mortality in 5414 Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Anne-Marie K; Langsted, Anne; Varbo, Anette; Bang, Lia E; Kamstrup, Pia R; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-04-01

    Increased concentrations of remnant cholesterol are causally associated with increased risk of ischemic heart disease. We tested the hypothesis that increased remnant cholesterol is a risk factor for all-cause mortality in patients with ischemic heart disease. We included 5414 Danish patients diagnosed with ischemic heart disease. Patients on statins were not excluded. Calculated remnant cholesterol was nonfasting total cholesterol minus LDL and HDL cholesterol. During 35836 person-years of follow-up, 1319 patients died. We examined both calculated and directly measured remnant cholesterol; importantly, however, measured remnant cholesterol made up only 9% of calculated remnant cholesterol at nonfasting triglyceride concentrations <1 mmol/L (89 mg/dL) and only 43% at triglycerides >5 mmol/L (443 mg/dL). Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality compared with patients with calculated remnant cholesterol concentrations in the 0 to 60th percentiles were 1.2 (95% CI, 1.1-1.4) for patients in the 61st to 80th percentiles, 1.3 (1.1-1.5) for the 81st to 90th percentiles, 1.5 (1.1-1.8) for the 91st to 95th percentiles, and 1.6 (1.2-2.0) for patients in the 96th to 100th percentiles (trend, P < 0.001). Corresponding values for measured remnant cholesterol were 1.0 (0.8-1.1), 1.2 (1.0-1.4), 1.1 (0.9-1.5), and 1.3 (1.1-1.7) (trend, P = 0.006), and for measured LDL cholesterol 1.0 (0.9-1.1), 1.0 (0.8-1.2), 1.0 (0.8-1.3), and 1.1 (0.8-1.4) (trend, P = 0.88). Cumulative survival was reduced in patients with calculated remnant cholesterol ≥1 mmol/L (39 mg/dL) vs <1 mmol/L [log-rank, P = 9 × 10(-6); hazard ratio 1.3 (1.2-1.5)], but not in patients with measured LDL cholesterol ≥3 mmol/L (116 mg/dL) vs <3 mmol/L [P = 0.76; hazard ratio 1.0 (0.9-1.1)]. Increased concentrations of both calculated and measured remnant cholesterol were associated with increased all-cause mortality in patients with ischemic heart disease, which was not the case for increased

  4. Energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is increasing with time

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, Grigory Isaakovich

    2008-01-01

    It is shown, using the Zeldovich integral relations, that the energy of Tycho's Supernova Remnant is strongly growing with time, approximately as t1/3. This growth can be attributed to the exothermic reactions going inside the remnant. The use of the assumption of the adiabaticity of the motion inside of the shock front, and no losses or gain of energy at the front, seems therefore unjustified. PMID:18202174

  5. Spectroscopic mapping of the physical properties of supernova remnant N 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletti, D.; Copetti, M. V. F.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Physical conditions inside a supernova remnant can vary significantly between different positions. However, typical observational data of supernova remnants are integrated data or contemplate specific portions of the remnant. Aims: We study the spatial variation in the physical properties of the N 49 supernova remnant based on a spectroscopic mapping of the whole nebula. Methods: Long-slit spectra were obtained with the slit (~4' × 1.03″) aligned along the east-west direction from 29 different positions spaced by 2″ in declination. A total of 3248 1D spectra were extracted from sections of 2″ of the 2D spectra. More than 60 emission lines in the range 3550 Å to 8920 Å were measured in these spectra. Maps of the fluxes and of intensity ratios of these emission lines were built with a spatial resolution of 2″ × 2″. Results: An electron density map has been obtained using the [S II] λ6716 /λ6731 line ratio. Values vary from ~500 cm-3 at the northeast region to more than 3500 cm-3 at the southeast border. We calculated the electron temperature using line ratio sensors for the ions S+, O++, O+, and N+. Values are about 3.6 × 104 K for the O++ sensor and about 1.1 × 104 K for other sensors. The Hα/Hβ ratio map presents a ring structure with higher values that may result from collisional excitation of hydrogen. We detected an area with high values of [N II] λ6583/Hα extending from the remnant center to its northeastern border, which may be indicating an overabundance of nitrogen in the area due to contamination by the progenitor star. We found a radial dependence in many line intensity ratio maps. We observed an increase toward the remnant borders of the intensity ratio of any two lines in which the numerator comes before in the sequence [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ4363, [Ar III] λ7136, [Ne III] λ3869, [O II] λ7325, [O II] λ3727, He II λ4686, Hβ λ4861, [N II] λ6583, He I λ6678, [S II] λ6731, [S II] λ6716, [O i] λ6300, [Ca II]

  6. Fluid dynamics nature of supernova remnant (Crab Nebula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estakhr, Ahmad Reza

    2015-04-01

    Supernova remnant (at early phase) is a high temperature fluid of gas and dust. after the explosion of a star in a supernova, the viscousity of supernova remnant changes with temperature. as supernova expand by time its temperature decreases and the viscousity increases, (or alternatively, the fluidity of supernova remnant tends to decreases) and leb to resistance phase of supernova remnant fluid to flow. Uμ = γ (c , u (r-> , t)) denotes four-velocity vector field of supernova. Jμ = ρUμ denotes four-current density of supernova fluid of gas and dust. Estakhr's Material-Geodesic equation is developed analogy of Navier Stokes equation and Einstein Geodesic equation to describe Fluid dynamics nature of supernova remnant (Crab Nebula): DJμ/Dτ =dJμ/Dτ + ΓαβμJαUβ =JνΩμν +∂νTμν + ΓαβμJαUβ Covariant formulation of Fluid dynamics nature of supernova remnant, describe the motion of fluid substances of supernova.

  7. Healing Potential of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant Stump.

    PubMed

    Trocan, Ilie; Ceausu, Raluca A; Jitariu, Andreea A; Haragus, Horia; Damian, Gratian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the microstructural architecture and cellular differentiation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) stumps in different stages after injury, as this could augment graft biointegration. The histological appearance and immunoreaction for cluster of differentiation 34 antigen (CD34) of 54 biopsies from 27 remnants were compared to 10 biopsies from 5 normal cruciate ligaments. CD34 reaction in endothelial cells, fibroblasts and fibrocytes was consistently positive in small synovial vessels. Remnants also exhibited CD34(+) cells among collagen fibers. Blood vessel density varied between specimens. The mean vascular microdensity was 43 per ×200 field in remnants compared to 15.2 in controls. A total of 94.44% of remnant ACL samples had significant hyperplasia of stellate and fusiform stromal cells, CD34(+); 22.4% had developed capillary vessels inside the ligament; 33% exhibited ongoing angiogenesis. Significant differences exist between torn and intact ACL regarding microvascularization. The remnants contain stellate stromal cells and CD34(+) fibrocytes, and display angiogenesis both at synovia as well as in the ligament itself. These findings underline the potential contribution to neoligament healing when remnants are preserved. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Black hole remnants and the information loss paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Ong, Y. C.; Yeom, D.-h.

    2015-11-01

    Forty years after the discovery of Hawking radiation, its exact nature remains elusive. If Hawking radiation does not carry any information out from the ever shrinking black hole, it seems that unitarity is violated once the black hole completely evaporates. On the other hand, attempts to recover information via quantum entanglement lead to the firewall controversy. Amid the confusions, the possibility that black hole evaporation stops with a "remnant" has remained unpopular and is often dismissed due to some "undesired properties" of such an object. Nevertheless, as in any scientific debate, the pros and cons of any proposal must be carefully scrutinized. We fill in the void of the literature by providing a timely review of various types of black hole remnants, and provide some new thoughts regarding the challenges that black hole remnants face in the context of the information loss paradox and its latest incarnation, namely the firewall controversy. The importance of understanding the role of curvature singularity is also emphasized, after all there remains a possibility that the singularity cannot be cured even by quantum gravity. In this context a black hole remnant conveniently serves as a cosmic censor. We conclude that a remnant remains a possible end state of Hawking evaporation, and if it contains large interior geometry, may help to ameliorate the information loss paradox and the firewall controversy. We hope that this will raise some interests in the community to investigate remnants more critically but also more thoroughly.

  9. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the 'knee' energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the 'knee' energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  10. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the "knee" energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the "knee" energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  11. Transport of magnetic turbulence in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brose, R.; Telezhinsky, I.; Dwarkadas, V.; Pohl, M.

    2016-06-01

    Supernova remnants are known as sources of galactic cosmic rays for their non-thermal emission of radio waves, X-rays, and gamma-rays. However, the observed CR spectra are hard to reproduce within the standard acceleration theories based on the assumption of Bohm diffusion and steady-state calculations. We point out that a time-dependent treatment of the acceleration process together with a self-consistent treatment of the scattering turbulence is necessary. Therefore we numerically solve the coupled system of transport equations for cosmic rays and isotropic Alfvénic turbulence. The equations are coupled through the growth rate of the turbulence determined by the cosmicray gradient and the spatial diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays given by the spectral energy density of the turbulence. The system is solved on a co-moving expanding grid extending upstream for dozens of shock radii, allowing for self-consistent study of cosmic-ray diffusion in the vicinity of their acceleration site. The transport equation for cosmic rays is solved in a test-particle approach based on pre-calculated hydro models. We demonstrate that the system is typically not in a steady state. In fact, even after several thousand years of evolution, no equilibrium situation is reached. The resulting time-dependent particle spectra strongly differ from those derived assuming a steady state and Bohm diffusion. The turbulence spectra show that bohmlike diffusion is achieved only in a small energy band. Our results indicate that proper account for the evolution of scattering turbulence is crucial for the formation of the observed soft spectra.

  12. Supernova Remnant Observations with Micro-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Enectali

    Micro-X is a sounding rocket payload that combines an X-ray microcalorimeter with an imaging mirror to offer breakthrough science from high spectral resolution observations of extended X-ray sources. This payload has been in design and development for the last five years and is now completely built and undergoing integration; its first flight will be in November, 2012, as part of our current NASA award. This four-year follow-on proposal seeks funding for: (1) analysis of the first flight data, (2) the second flight and its data analysis, (3) development of payload upgrades and launch of the third flight, and (4) third flight data analysis. The scientific payload consists of a Transition Edge Sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array at the focus of a flight-proven conical imaging mirror. Micro-X capitalizes on three decades of NASA investment in the development of microcalorimeters and X-ray imaging optics. Micro-X offers a unique combination of bandpass, collecting area, and spectral and angular resolution. The spectral resolution goal across the 0.2 - 3.0 keV band is 2 - 4 eV Full-Width at Half Maximum (FWHM). The measured angular resolution of the mirror is 2.4 arcminute Half-Power Diameter (HPD). The effective area of the mirror, 300 square centimeters at 1 keV, is sufficient to provide observations of unprecedented quality of several astrophysical X-ray sources, even in a brief sounding rocket exposure of 300 sec. Our scientific program for this proposal will focus on supernova remnants (SNRs), whose spatial extent has made high-energy resolution observations with grating instruments extremely challenging. X-ray observations of SNRs with microcalorimeters will enable the study of the detailed atomic physics of the plasma; the determination of temperature, turbulence, and elemental abundances; and in conjunction with historical data, full three dimensional mapping of the kinematics of the remnant. These capabilities will open new avenues towards understanding the

  13. AN X-RAY UPPER LIMIT ON THE PRESENCE OF A NEUTRON STAR FOR THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD SUPERNOVA REMNANT 1E0102.2-7219

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, M. J.; Windhorst, R. A.; Schlegel, E. M.; Keohane, J. W.

    2010-06-01

    We present Chandra X-ray Observatory archival observations of the supernova remnant 1E0102.2-7219, a young oxygen-rich remnant in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Combining 28 ObsIDs for 324 ks of total exposure time, we present an Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer image with an unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio (mean S/N {approx_equal}{radical}S{approx} 6; maximum S/N > 35). We search within the remnant, using the source detection software WAVDETECT, for point sources which may indicate a compact object. Despite finding numerous detections of high significance in both broad and narrowband images of the remnant, we are unable to satisfactorily distinguish whether these detections correspond to emission from a compact object. We also present upper limits to the luminosity of an obscured compact stellar object which were derived from an analysis of spectra extracted from the high signal-to-noise image. We are able to further constrain the characteristics of a potential neutron star for this remnant with the results of the analysis presented here, though we cannot confirm the existence of such an object for this remnant.

  14. Radio observations of CTB80: detection of the snowplough in an old supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, D. A.; Ranasinghe, S.

    2012-06-01

    New radio continuum and H I line observations of the old supernova remnant CTB80 are analysed. The radio continuum emission is more extended than previously known. We analyse archival ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter images of CTB80 and find extended X-ray emission associated with CTB80 over a 1°.2 diameter region. A new H I absorption spectrum towards the core of CTB80 yields a kinematic distance of ≃1.5 kpc. An analysis of the H I channel maps confirms the inner shell discovered by Koo et al. In addition, we discover an outer slowly moving shell centred on CTB80's centre, with radius 76 arcmin and velocity 40 km s-1. The shell's size and velocity are inconsistent with a stellar wind origin, but are consistent with what is expected for a cool dense shell in the cooling (snowplough) phase of a supernova remnant. Taking into account deceleration of the shell, its age also agrees with that of CTB80 (˜60 000 yr). The resulting picture of CTB80 is that of a large old supernova remnant, with an H I shell moving out slowly behind the slow outer shock and a hot interior which is still emitting X-rays and visible in the ROSAT images.

  15. Magnetic resonance evaluation of Müllerian remnants in Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Roh-Eul; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Sang Youn; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2013-01-01

    To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Müllerian remnants in young females clinically suspected of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome in a primary amenorrhea workup. Fifteen young females underwent multiplanar T2- and transverse T1-weighted MRI at either a 1.5T or 3.0T MR imager. Two gynecologic radiologists reached consensus decisions for the evaluation of Müllerian remnants, vagina, ovaries, and associated findings. All cases had bilateral uterine buds in the pelvic cavity, with unilateral cavitation in two cases. The buds had an average long-axis diameter of 2.64 ± 0.65 cm. In all cases, bilateral buds were connected with fibrous band-like structures. In 13 cases, the band-like structures converged at the midline or a paramedian triangular soft tissue lying above the bladder dome. The lower one-third of the vagina was identified in 14 cases. Fourteen cases showed bilateral normal ovaries near the uterine buds. One unilateral pelvic kidney, one unilateral renal agenesis, one mild scoliosis, and three lumbar sacralization cases were found as associated findings. Typical Müllerian remnants in MRKH syndrome consist of bilateral uterine buds connected by the fibrous band-like structures, which converge at the midline triangular soft tissue lying above the bladder dome.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Evaluation of Müllerian Remnants in Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Roh-Eul; Kim, Sang Youn; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Müllerian remnants in young females clinically suspected of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome in a primary amenorrhea workup. Materials and Methods Fifteen young females underwent multiplanar T2- and transverse T1-weighted MRI at either a 1.5T or 3.0T MR imager. Two gynecologic radiologists reached consensus decisions for the evaluation of Müllerian remnants, vagina, ovaries, and associated findings. Results All cases had bilateral uterine buds in the pelvic cavity, with unilateral cavitation in two cases. The buds had an average long-axis diameter of 2.64 ± 0.65 cm. In all cases, bilateral buds were connected with fibrous band-like structures. In 13 cases, the band-like structures converged at the midline or a paramedian triangular soft tissue lying above the bladder dome. The lower one-third of the vagina was identified in 14 cases. Fourteen cases showed bilateral normal ovaries near the uterine buds. One unilateral pelvic kidney, one unilateral renal agenesis, one mild scoliosis, and three lumbar sacralization cases were found as associated findings. Conclusion Typical Müllerian remnants in MRKH syndrome consist of bilateral uterine buds connected by the fibrous band-like structures, which converge at the midline triangular soft tissue lying above the bladder dome. PMID:23483587

  17. Laparoscopic Management of Remnant Cystic Duct Calculi: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Palanivelu, Chinnusamy; Rangarajan, Muthukumaran; Jategaonkar, Priyadarshan Anand; Madankumar, Madhupalayam Velusamy; Anand, Natesan Vijay

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Even though cholecystectomy relieves symptoms in the majority of cases, a significant percentage suffer from ‘postcholecystectomy syndrome’. Cystic duct/gall bladder remnant calculi is a causative factor. We present our experience with the laparoscopic management of cystic duct remnant calculi. PATIENTS AND METHODS We managed 15 patients with cystic duct remnant calculi from 1996 to 2007 in our institute. All these patients had earlier undergone laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy at our centre. They were successfully managed by laparoscopic excision of the remnant. RESULTS The mean duration between first and second surgery was 8.35 months (range, 6–10.7 months). The mean operating time was 103.5 min (range, 75–132 min). Duration of hospital stay was 4–12 days. There was a higher incidence of remnant duct calculi following laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy than conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy 13/310 (4.19%) versus 2/9590 (0.02%). The morbidity was 13.33%, while there were no conversions and no mortality. CONCLUSIONS Leaving behind a cystic duct stump for too long predisposes stone formation, while dissecting too close to the common bile duct and right hepatic artery in acute inflammatory conditions is dangerous. We believe that the former is a wiser policy to follow, as cystic duct remnant calculi are easier to manage than common bile duct or vessel injury. Laparoscopic excision of the remnant is effective, especially when performed by experienced laparoscopists. ‘T’-tube is used to canulate the common bile duct in case the tissue is friable. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is the imaging modality of choice, and is mandatory. PMID:18990269

  18. Pyroclastic Flow Remnants at Shiveluch Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image acquired February 25, 2011 Pyroclastic flows are some of the most fearsome hazards posed by erupting volcanoes. These avalanches of superheated ash, gas, and rock are responsible for some of the most famous volcanic disasters in history, including the burial of the ancient Roman city of Pompei and the destruction of Saint-Pierre in 1902. More recently, pyroclastic flows from Mount Merapi in Indonesia caused most of the casualties during the volcano’s 2010 eruption. The intense heat—over 1,000° Celsius (1800° Fahrenheit)—the terrific speed—up to 720 kilometers (450 miles) per hour—and the mixture of toxic gases all contribute to the deadly potential. Pyroclastic flows can incinerate, burn, or asphyxiate people who cannot get out of the flow path. This false-color satellite image from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on the Terra satellite shows the remnants of a large pyroclastic flow on the slopes of Shiveluch Volcano. Fortunately, no one was hurt during the eruption and flow in the sparsely-populated area. ASTER detected heat from the flow during or shortly after an event on January 25, 2011. Note how the heat signatures from January line up with the dark surface deposits visible on February 25; those deposits cover more than 10 square kilometers (4 square miles). Light brown ash covers the snow above the flow deposits, and a tiny plume rises from Shiveluch’s growing lava dome. Vegetation surrounding the volcano is colored dark red. NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using data from the NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Robert Simmon. Instrument: Terra - ASTER Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific

  19. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a

  20. The Shock Structure of Supernova Remnant IC443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Higdon, S. J. U.; Burton, M. G.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We present and discuss ISO observations of IC443, a supernova remnant interacting with a molecular cloud. An SWS spectrum centered on molecular hydrogen clump R10E (RA(2000) = 6 17 7.6, Decl(2000) = 22 25 34.6) is dominated by strong [SiII] (34 microns) emission and the pure rotational transitions of molecular hydrogen ranging from 0-0 S(1) to 0-0 S(13). Fits to these H$-2$ lines imply a large column (approx. 7E19 cm$ {-2)$) of warm (T approx. 700 K) gas and an ortho/para ratio for hydrogen near 3. LWS Fabry-Perot spectra of [OI] (63 microns) and [CII] (158 microns) at positions R10E and C (RA(2000) = 6 17 42.8, Decl(2000) = 22 21 38.1) find broad (approx. 75 km/s), blue-shifted (-40 km/s) line profiles; their similarity strongly suggests a common, shock-generated origin for these two lines. The surprisingly large [CII]/[OI] ratio (approx. 0.1 to 0.2) confirms previous observations with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. These [CII] and [OI] line intensities, the [SiII] intensity (above), and LWS grating measurements of OH (119 microns) and [OI] (145 microns) are all readily fit by a single, fast J-shock model. Although the [OI] (63) emission can alternatively be produced by a slow C-shock, this ensemble of lines can not be produced by such a shock and provides strong evidence for the existence of a J-shock. A 24-arcmin strip map shows that this far-infrared line emission is spatially correlated with the H$-2$ 1-0 S(1) emission, which most likely arises in an associated C-shock. In addition to this spatially correlated shock emission, the strip map identifies extended [CII] and [OI] emission with a significantly larger line ratio (approx. 0.6); this 'background' component is compared with current J-shock, C-shock, photo-dissociation region (PDR), and X-ray dissociation region (XDR) models in an effort to explain its origin.

  1. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A with the XMM-Newton RGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Petre, Robert; Yamada, Shinya; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Konami, Saori; Tamagawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution X-ray spectra of cloud-shock interaction regions in the eastern and northern rims of the Galactic supernova remnant Puppis A, using the Reflection Grating Spectrometer onboard the XMM-Newton satellite. A number of emission lines including K(alpha) triplets of He-like N, O , and Ne are clearly resolved for the first time. Intensity ratios of forbidden to resonance lines in the triplets are found to be higher than predictions by thermal emission models having plausible plasma parameters. The anomalous line ratios cannot be reproduced by effects of resonance scattering, recombination, or inner-shell ionization processes, but could be explained by charge-exchange emission that should arise at interfaces between the cold/warm clouds and the hot plasma. Our observations thus provide observational support for charge-exchange X-ray emission in supernova remnants.

  2. Discovery of optical candidate supernova remnants in Sagittarius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikakos, J.; Boumis, P.; Christopoulou, P. E.; Goudis, C. D.

    2012-08-01

    During an [O III] survey of planetary nebulae, we identified a region in Sagittarius containing several candidate supernova remants (SNRs) and obtained deep optical narrow-band images and spectra to explore their nature. We obtained images of the area of interest by acquiring observations in the emission lines of Hα + [N II], [S II] and [O III]. The resulting mosaic covers an area of 1.4° × 1.0°, where both filamentary and diffuse emission was discovered, suggesting that there is more than one SNR in the area. Deep long-slit spectra were also taken of eight different regions. Both the flux-calibrated images and the spectra show that the emission from the filamentary structures originates from shock-heated gas, while the photo-ionization mechanism is responsible for the diffuse emission. Part of the optical emission is found to be correlated with the radio at 4850 MHz suggesting that they are related, while the infrared emission found in the area at 12 μm and 22 μm marginally correlates with the optical. The presence of the [O III] emission line in one of the candidate SNRs implies that the shock velocities in the interstellar "clouds" are between 120 km s-1 and 200 km s-1, while its absence in the other candidate SNRs indicates that the shock velocities there are slower. For all candidate remnants, the [S II] λλ 6716/6731 ratio indicates that the electron densities are below 240 cm-3, while the Hα emission is measured to be between 0.6 and 41 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. The existence of eight pulsars within 1.5° of the center of the candidate SNRs also implies that there are many SNRs in the area as well as that the detected optical emission could be part of a number of supernovae explosions.

  3. Remnant Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Mortality After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Further Evidence for a Hypercholesterolemia Paradox From the TRIUMPH Registry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Seth S; Faridi, Kamil F; Joshi, Parag H; Blaha, Michael J; Kulkarni, Krishnaji R; Khokhar, Arif A; Maddox, Thomas M; Havranek, Edward P; Toth, Peter P; Tang, Fengming; Spertus, John A; Jones, Steven R

    2015-11-01

    Remnants are partially hydrolyzed, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins that, like other apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, are atherogenic. Prior observational studies suggest paradoxically better outcomes in hypercholesterolemic patients who sustain an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), one of several known recurrent risk paradoxes. To date, the association of directly measured remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RLP-C) with survival after an AMI has not been examined. Higher RLP-C levels may be paradoxically associated with lower mortality. We examined 2465 AMI survivors in a prospective, 24-center US study of AMI outcomes. Lipoprotein cholesterol subfractions were directly measured by ultracentrifugation. RLP-C was defined as intermediate-density lipoprotein cholesterol (IDL-C) + very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol subfraction 3 (VLDL3 -C). Given a linear relationship between RLP-C and mortality, we examined RLP-C by tertiles and continuously. Cox regression hazard ratios (HRs) were adjusted for the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score and 23 other covariates. Participants were age 58 ± 12 years (mean ± SD), and 68% were men. After 2 years of follow-up, 226 (9%) participants died. The mortality proportion was 12.4% in the lowest tertile of RLP-C (0-15 mg/dL), 8.5% in the middle tertile (16-23 mg/dL), and 6.8% in the highest tertile (24-120 mg/dL; P < 0.001). A 1-SD increase in RLP-C (11 mg/dL) predicted a 24% lower adjusted risk of 2-year mortality (HR: 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.64-0.91). Similar results were found for a 1-SD increase in IDL-C (HR per 8 mg/dL: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.67-0.96), VLDL3 -C (HR per 4 mg/dL: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.61-0.89), and very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C; HR per 8 mg/dL: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.55-0.85). Higher RLP-C levels were associated with lower mortality 2 years after AMI despite rigorous adjustment for known confounders. Unknown protective factors or a lead-time bias likely explains the

  4. The End of Amnesia: Measuring the Metallicities of Type Ia SN Progenitors with Manganese Lines in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Hughes, John P.

    2009-05-01

    The Mn to Cr mass ratio in supernova ejecta has recently been proposed as a tracer of Type Ia SN progenitor metallicity. We review the advantages and problems of this observable quantity, and discuss them in the framework of the Tycho Supernova Remnant. The fluxes of the Mn and Cr Kα lines in the X-ray spectra of Tycho observed by the Suzaku satellite suggests a progenitors of supersolar metallicity.

  5. Fermi-LAT observations of supernova remnants Kesteven 79

    SciTech Connect

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we report on the detection of γ-ray emission coincident with the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 79 (Kes 79). We analyzed approximately 52 months of data obtained with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Kes 79 is thought to be interacting with adjacent molecular clouds, based on the presence of strong {sup 12}CO J = 1 → 0 and HCO{sup +} J = 1 → 0 emission and the detection of 1720 MHz line emission toward the east of the remnant. Acceleration of cosmic rays is expected to occur at SNR shocks, and SNRs interacting with dense molecular clouds provide a good testing ground for detecting and analyzing the production of γ-rays from the decay of π{sup 0} into two γ-ray photons. This analysis investigates γ-ray emission coincident with Kes 79, which has a detection significance of ∼7σ. Additionally, we present an investigation of the spatial and spectral characteristics of Kes 79 using multiple archival XMM-Newton observations of this remnant. We determine the global X-ray properties of Kes 79 and estimate the ambient density across the remnant. We also performed a similar analysis for Galactic SNR Kesteven 78 (Kes 78), but due to large uncertainties in the γ-ray background model, no conclusion can be made about an excess of GeV γ-ray associated with the remnant.

  6. Featured Image: A Supernova Remnant in X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    This is a three-color X-ray image taken by Chandra of the supernova remnant RCW 103. This supernova remnant is an unusual system: its young, but unlike other remnants of its age, metal-rich ejecta hadnt previously been discovered in it. In this paper, Kari Frank (Pennsylvania State University) and collaborators analyze the three deepest Chandra observations of RCW 103 and find the first evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. Their analyses also help to constrain the identity of the mysterious compact stellar object powering the remnant. In this image, red = 0.30.85 keV, green = 0.851.70 keV, and blue = 1.73.0 keV; click on the image for the full view. For more information and the original image, see the paper here:Kari A. Frank et al 2015 ApJ 810 113 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/2/113.

  7. Presentation and management of gallbladder remnant after partial cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Jayant, Mayank; Kaushik, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Partial cholecystectomy is usually performed with the aim of preventing bile duct injury and/or vascular injuries in situations where there is difficulty in performing cholecystectomy. Occasionally, such patients can become symptomatic due to recurrence or persistence of disease in the gallbladder remnant and may require further treatment. A case series of various presentations and follow up of seven patients who had undergone open partial cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstone disease in the past. Of 7 patients, 6 were symptomatic, and each of them was found to have a remnant of the gallbladder (with calculi in the remnant in 4 patients). Three patients who presented with recurrent biliary symptoms were re-operated and the gallbladder remnant was removed, with resolution of the symptoms. Two patients refused further operation-one patient with acute pancreatitis who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for removal of common bile duct stones, and another who presented with acute cholecystitis. The other 2 patients (one with transient jaundice and the other who is asymptomatic) remain on follow-up. Although partial cholecystectomy is an accepted, safe option in difficult cases, these patients must be counselled regarding the recurrence of symptoms, and must be kept on follow-up. If symptoms develop, completion of cholecystectomy to remove the remnant provides symptomatic relief.

  8. Extravasation Mucocele Arising from a Lingual Thyroglossal Duct Remnant

    PubMed Central

    Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Nakatani, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although a thyroglossal duct cyst is a congenital anomaly, it can also appear in adults. Despite the presence of embryological remnants, it is still unclear why the cyst should suddenly develop later in life. We report a case of a 46-year-old male with an extravasation mucocele arising from a long-standing lingual thyroglossal duct remnant. MRI demonstrated a lingual cystic lesion near the hyoid bone associated with a suprahyoid tract-like structure masquerading as a thyroglossal duct cyst. However, histopathological examination demonstrated a mucocele secondary to a rupture of a thyroglossal duct remnant with numerous intramural heterotopic salivary glands. We propose a new mechanism of an acquired cystic formation of this congenital disease that excessive production of mucus from heterotopic salivary glands and a physical trauma such as swallowing may lead to extravasation of mucus from the thyroglossal duct. PMID:25861502

  9. The evolution of the radio emission from Kepler's Supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, John R.; Sault, Robert; Arendt, Richard G.; Korista, Kirk T.; Matsui, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution radio maps of Kepler's Supernova remnant (SNR) using all four arrays of the VLA have been obtained at wavelengths of 20 and 6 cm. They show the complete structure of the remnant; all features are resolved with sizes greater than about 2 arcsec, and the relative brightness of the smooth component near the center is about 1/4 the brightness of the rim. The results have been compared with earlier more limited data to measure changes in the remnant over a four-year time span. The SNR is expanding with a mean rate of R proportional to t exp 0.50 with considerable variations around the shell. Values range from R proportional to t exp 0.35 on the bright northern rim to R proportional to t exp 0.65 on the eastern part of the shell. The measurements are consistent with expansion into a variable circumstellar medium.

  10. Neutrino flavor evolution in binary neutron star merger remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frensel, Maik; Wu, Meng-Ru; Volpe, Cristina; Perego, Albino

    2017-01-01

    We study the neutrino flavor evolution in the neutrino-driven wind from a binary neutron star merger remnant consisting of a massive neutron star surrounded by an accretion disk. With the neutrino emission characteristics and the hydrodynamical profile of the remnant consistently extracted from a three-dimensional simulation, we compute the flavor evolution by taking into account neutrino coherent forward scattering off ordinary matter and neutrinos themselves. We employ a "single-trajectory" approach to investigate the dependence of the flavor evolution on the neutrino emission location and angle. We also show that the flavor conversion in the merger remnant can affect the (anti)neutrino absorption rates on free nucleons and may thus impact the r -process nucleosynthesis in the wind. We discuss the sensitivity of such results on the change of neutrino emission characteristics, also from different neutron star merger simulations.

  11. Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-24

    An overview is given of multiwavelength observations of young supernova remnants, with a focus on the observational signatures of efficient cosmic ray acceleration. Some of the effects that may be attributed to efficient cosmic ray acceleration are the radial magnetic fields in young supernova remnants, magnetic field amplification as determined with X-ray imaging spectroscopy, evidence for large post-shock compression factors, and low plasma temperatures, as measured with high resolution optical/UV/X-ray spectroscopy. Special emphasis is given to spectroscopy of post-shock plasma's, which offers an opportunity to directly measure the post-shock temperature. In the presence of efficient cosmic ray acceleration the post-shock temperatures are expected to be lower than according to standard equations for a strong shock. For a number of supernova remnants this seems indeed to be the case.

  12. A HIRES analysis of the FIR emission of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1994-01-01

    The high resolution (HiRes) algorithm has been used to analyze the far infrared emission of shocked gas and dust in supernova remnants. In the case of supernova remnant IC 443, we find a very good match between the resolved features in the deconvolved images and the emissions of shocked gas mapped in other wavelengths (lines of H2, CO, HCO+, and HI). Dust emission is also found to be surrounding hot bubbles of supernova remnants which are seen in soft X-ray maps. Optical spectroscopy on the emission of the shocked gas suggests a close correlation between the FIR color and local shock speed, which is a strong function of the ambient (preshock) gas density. These provide a potentially effective way to identify regions of strong shock interaction, and thus facilitate studies of kinematics and energetics in the interstellar medium.

  13. CAS a: the Remnant of a Massive Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshner, Robert

    1990-12-01

    The remnants of recent supernovae provide the best opportunity to probe the evolution of massive stars and the synthesis of heavy elements. Among the remnants with fast moving, undiluted debris, the best known is Cas A. We have obtained extensive ground-based data on Cas A. The results provide valuable insights into the ages, composition, and kinematics of the remnant, but are imcomplete in tantalizing ways that HST can resolve. While we are confident Cas A results from the violent destruction of a massive star after advanced nuclear burning, essential features of the explosion physics, the excitation of the debris, the chemical composition of the ejecta, and the age, distance, and kinematics still elude our grasp. HST images will allow us to isolate the chemical inhomogeneities in the debris. The images will allow an unprecedented probe of the excitation mechanism, and will provide 10 times the angular resolution for proper motion studies to determine ages.

  14. SPI Analysis of the Supernova Remnant DEM L71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Kari A.; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Burrows, David N.; Aisyah Mansoor, Siti; Crum, Ryan M.

    2017-08-01

    Supernova remnants are complex, three-dimensional objects; properly accounting for this complexity when modeling the resulting X-ray emission presents quite a challenge and makes it difficult to accurately characterize the properties of the full SNR volume. The SPIES (Smoothed Particle Inference Exploration of Supernova Remnants) project aims to address this challenge by applying a fundamentally different approach to analyzing X-ray observations of SNRs. Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI) is a Bayesian modeling process that fits a population of gas blobs ("smoothed particles") such that their superposed emission reproduces the observed spatial and spectral distribution of photons. We present here the results of an SPI analysis of the Type Ia supernova remnant DEM L71. Among other results, we find that despite its regular appearance, the temperature and other parameter maps exhibit irregular substructure.

  15. A multiwavelength investigation of the supernova remnant IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mufson, S. L.; Mccollough, M. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Petre, R.; White, R.

    1986-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the supernova remnant IC 443 at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths are presented. This morphological study of IC 443 presents a detailed picture of an adolescent supernova remnant in a multiphase interstellar medium. Radio observations show that better than 80 percent of the continuum emission at 18 cm is in a large-scale (greater than 18 arcmin) component. Decomposition of the infrared data shows that radiatively heated dust, shocked blackbody dust emission, and infrared line emission are all important components of the observed IRAS fluxes. The morphology of the IC 443 region is consistent with a supernova blast in an interstellar medium with a nonuniform distribution of clouds. The bright northeast rim and the great extent of the remnant to the southwest are most easily explained by a cloud filling factor which is greatest in the northeast and falls off toward the southwest.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of two supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletti, D.; Copetti, M. V. F.

    2014-10-01

    This work presents a study of two supernova remnants belonging to the Large Magellanic Cloud, N49 and N11L, based on the spectroscopic mapping of their physical properties. Long slit spectroscopy was used to collect data from a grid of different positions covering the whole nebula by positioning the slit on different and equally spaced declinations. The data were obtained with the 4.1 m SOAR telescope (Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope), in Chile. The spectral coverage was about 3500-8000 Å. For each object, about 50 emission lines were measured on the spectra, allowing to build maps of many interesting line intensity ratios. The maps of electron density and temperature were obtained using the [S II] λ 6717/λ 6731 and [O III] (λ 5007+λ 4959)/λ 4363 line ratio sensors, respectively. N49 presents a strong density gradient with the density varying from 600 cm^{-3} at the North-West to more than 3000 cm^{-3} at the South-East. The electron temperature distribution shows a rough spherical symmetry with the higher values found at the centre. In N11L the electron density varies from less than 100 cm^{-3} to about 400 cm^{-3}, with the higher values found on the bright filaments. These maps were used to build a picture of the structure of these two supernova remnants.

  17. The Kinematics of Kepler's Supernova Remnant as Revealed by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-01

    I have determined the expansion of the supernova remnant of SN 1604 (Kepler's supernova) based on archival Chandra ACIS-S observations made in 2000 and 2006. The measurements were done in several distinct energy bands, and were made for the remnant as a whole, and for six individual sectors. The average expansion parameter indicates that the remnant expands on average as r propto t0.5, but there are significant differences in different parts of the remnant: the bright northwestern part expands as r propto t0.35, whereas the rest of the remnant's expansion shows an expansion r propto t0.6. The latter is consistent with an explosion in which the outer part of the ejecta has a negative power law slope for density (ρ propto v-n) of n = 7, or with an exponential density profile [ρ propto exp (- v/ve) ]. The expansion parameter in the southern region, in conjunction with the shock radius, indicates a rather low value (<5 × 1050 erg) for the explosion energy of SN 1604 for a distance of 4 kpc. A higher explosion energy is consistent with the results if the distance is larger. The filament in the eastern part of the remnant, which is dominated by X-ray synchrotron radiation, seems to mark a region with a fast shock speed r propto t0.7, corresponding to a shock velocity of v = 4200 km s-1, for a distance to SN 1604 of 4 kpc. This is consistent with the idea that X-ray synchrotron emission requires shock velocities in excess of ~2000 km s-1. The X-ray-based expansion measurements reported are consistent with results based on optical and radio measurements but disagree with previous X-ray measurements based on ROSAT and Einstein observations.

  18. Genetically elevated non-fasting triglycerides and calculated remnant cholesterol as causal risk factors for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Anders Berg; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; West, Anders Sode; Grande, Peer; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2013-06-01

    Elevated non-fasting triglycerides mark elevated levels of remnant cholesterol. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we tested whether genetically increased remnant cholesterol in hypertriglyceridaemia due to genetic variation in the apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) associates with an increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI). We resequenced the core promoter and coding regions of APOA5 in individuals with the lowest 1% (n = 95) and highest 2% (n = 190) triglyceride levels in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS, n = 10 391). Genetic variants which differed in frequency between the two extreme triglyceride groups (c.-1131T > C, S19W, and c.*31C > T; P-value: 0.06 to <0.001), thus suggesting an effect on triglyceride levels, were genotyped in the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS), the CCHS, and the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease Study (CIHDS), comprising a total of 5705 MI cases and 54 408 controls. Genotype combinations of these common variants associated with increases in non-fasting triglycerides and calculated remnant cholesterol of, respectively, up to 68% (1.10 mmol/L) and 56% (0.40 mmol/L) (P < 0.001), and with a corresponding odds ratio for MI of 1.87 (95% confidence interval: 1.25-2.81). Using APOA5 genotypes in instrumental variable analysis, the observational hazard ratio for a doubling in non-fasting triglycerides was 1.57 (1.32-2.68) compared with a causal genetic odds ratio of 1.94 (1.40-1.85) (P for comparison = 0.28). For calculated remnant cholesterol, the corresponding values were 1.67(1.38-2.02) observational and 2.23(1.48-3.35) causal (P for comparison = 0.21). These data are consistent with a causal association between elevated levels of remnant cholesterol in hypertriglyceridaemia and an increased risk of MI. Limitations include that remnants were not measured directly, and that APOA5 genetic variants may influence other lipoprotein parameters.

  19. X-ray Observations of the Tycho Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John P.

    2006-06-01

    In this presentation I summarize some key new findings from recent Chandra and XMM-Newton data on the remnant of the supernova (SN) observed by Tycho Brahe in 1572, which is widely believed to have been of Type Ia origin. Studies of the Tycho supernova remnant (SNR) at the current epoch address aspects of SN Ia physics, the evolution of young SNRs, and cosmic ray acceleration at high Mach-number shocks.Research on the Tycho SNR at Rutgers has been supported by Chandra grants GO3-4066X and AR5-6010X.

  20. a Search for Primordial Vortex Remnants in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Abel; Ong, Zongjin; Chan, Aik Hui

    2014-04-01

    The scalar field cosmology model proposed by Huang et al.1, 2 predicts that the early pre-inflationary universe was a superfluid. This superfluid is likely to have contained quantized vortices, and it is postulated that remnants of these vortices persist in the present-day moderate-redshift galaxy distribution. We attempt to search for remnants of these primordial vortices in the SDSS BOSS galaxy catalogue. We manage to observe hints of a few vortex tubes, which might lend weight to the credibility of the theory.

  1. On the nature of the Monoceros supernova remnant.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebel, W. L.; Shore, S. N.

    1972-01-01

    A dynamical expansion time of 300,000 years and an envelope of 100 km/sec are derived for the filamentary Monoceros Loop supernova remnant. Through arguments connecting three O stars with the supernova remnant, a lower limit of 25-30 solar masses is derived for the progenitor star. A thermal soft X-ray point source is predicted based on the hypothesis of a cooling neutron star. By analogy, we interpret the Cygnus Loop X-ray source as a neutron star.

  2. Relationship between alcohol drinking and aspartate aminotransferase:alanine aminotransferase (AST:ALT) ratio, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and apolipoprotein A1 and B in the U.S. population.

    PubMed

    Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Qi, Rong; Crabb, David W; Witzmann, Frank

    2010-03-01

    The misuse of alcohol, even at levels just above two drinks per day, is a public health problem, but identifying patients with this potentially unhealthy drinking is hindered by the lack of tests. Several blood tests, such as those testing for gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) or mean corpuscular volume (MCV), are among the commonly used markers to identify very heavy drinking, but combinations of these markers have rarely been tested in lighter drinkers. We examined the relationship between alcohol drinking and the levels of these markers in a national population-based study composed primarily of lighter drinkers. Data were analyzed from 8,708 adult participants in the third U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey after excluding subjects with iron overload; with hepatitis B and C; who were pregnant; and who were taking prescription drugs such as phenytoin (Dilantin), barbiturates, and hydroxyurea (Droxia and Hydrea). The relationship between the amount of alcohol drinking and GGT, aspartate aminotransferase:alanine aminotransferase ratio, MCV of erythrocytes, and apolipoprotein A1 and B were analyzed and adjusted for potential liver injury risk factors. The prevalence of unhealthy alcohol drinking (defined as consumption of more than two standard drinks per day) was 6.7%. Heavier drinkers tended to be younger and reported an average of 4.2 drinks per day. When tested alone or in combination, the sensitivity and positive predictive values for these blood tests were too low to be clinically useful in identifying the subjects in the heavier drinking category. In this large, national, population-based study, the markers of heavy drinking studied here, either alone or in combination, did not appear to be useful in identifying unhealthy drinking. More work is needed to find the novel marker(s) associated with risky alcohol drinking.

  3. Intrahepatic paratesticular cyst: unique presentation of vestigial remnants of Wolffian duct.

    PubMed

    Ceccanti, Silvia; Mele, Ermelinda; Masselli, Gabriele; Bosco, Sandro; Cozzi, Denis A

    2012-01-01

    To report on a case of a progressively enlarging intrahepatic cyst in a 1-year-old boy who also presented with bilateral undescended testes. At surgery, the lesion emerged from the anterior surface of the liver but was unexpectedly found to arise from the epididymis of the right testis, which was located intra-abdominally. The histologic findings were consistent with a paratesticular cyst of vestigial remnants derived from the Wolffian duct. Such an unusual event has not been previously reported among the possible location of a paratesticular cyst, nor has it been described in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions of the liver.

  4. MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENT AND AN X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT KESTEVEN 78

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping; Chen Yang

    2011-12-10

    We investigate the molecular environment of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 78 and perform an XMM-Newton X-ray spectroscopic study for the northeastern edge of the remnant. SNR Kes 78 is found to interact with the molecular clouds (MCs) at a systemic local standard of rest velocity of 81 km s{sup -1}. At around this velocity, the SNR appears to contact a long molecular strip in the northeast and a large cloud in the east as revealed in the {sup 13}CO line, which may be responsible for the radio brightness peak and the OH maser, respectively. The {sup 12}CO-line bright region morphologically matches the eastern bright radio shell in general, and the SNR is consistent in extent with a CO cavity. Broadened {sup 12}CO-line profiles discerned in the eastern maser region and the western clumpy molecular arc and the elevated {sup 12}CO (J = 2-1)/(J = 1-0) ratios along the SNR boundary may be signatures of shock perturbation in the molecular gas. The SNR-MC association places the SNR at a kinematic distance of 4.8 kpc. The X-rays arising from the northeastern radio shell are emitted by underionized hot ({approx}1.5 keV), low-density ({approx}0.1 cm{sup -3}) plasma with solar abundance, and the plasma may be of intercloud origin. The age of the remnant is inferred to be about 6 kyr. The size of the molecular cavity in Kes 78 implies an initial mass around 22 M{sub Sun} for the progenitor.

  5. Spitzer IRS observations of the XA region in the cygnus loop supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Bautista, Manuel; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.

    2014-05-20

    We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 μm wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km s{sup –1} shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is matched by a shock of about 150 km s{sup –1} that has cooled and begun to recombine. The post-shock region has a swept-up column density of about 1.3 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}, and the gas has reached a temperature of 7000-8000 K. The spectrum of the Cusp indicates that roughly half of the refractory silicon and iron atoms have been liberated from the grains. Dust emission is not detected at either position.

  6. Terrestrial Carbon Dynamics in Prairie Remnants and Conservation Reserve Program Lands of the Palouse Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-de León, Y.; Johnson-Maynard, J.

    2007-12-01

    Conversion of marginal agricultural lands to perennial grassland vegetation has been proposed as a way to enhance terrestrial carbon sequestration. The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) has facilitated this transition and promoted carbon sequestration in highly erodible agricultural lands of the Palouse Region of northern Idaho and eastern Washington. Currently little is known about the potential of these lands to act as a carbon sinks in this region. We studied terrestrial carbon dynamics in CRP set asides planted with exotic grasses and in native prairie remnants of the Palouse Region. To study plant decomposition, the species Festuca idahoensis and Symphoricarpos albus were used as representatives of the native prairie community and Bromus inermis was used for CRP sites. Above- and belowground net primary productivity (from 170.9 to 216.0 g m-2 yr-1) and litter fall (from 15.6 to 31.0 g m-2 yr-1) were similar between grassland types. However, root biomass, soil macroaggregates and soil carbon were higher in prairie remnants. Decomposition rates of leaf litter were not different among plant species, however root decomposition was slower in S. albus (k = 0.28 yr-1) than in F. idahoensis (k = 0.56 yr-1) or B. inermis (k = 0.64 yr-1). These results demonstrate that aboveground processes and carbon inputs in CRP sites have reached similar levels to native prairies. However, belowground carbon pools (i.e. root biomass and soil carbon) are still higher in prairie remnants. Belowground decomposition rates were related to root chemical composition as S. albus roots had the highest lignin to nitrogen ratio. The results of this study suggest that efforts to promote carbon sequestration in CRP grasslands of the Palouse should be focused on belowground pools and processes. Management practices that could increase the amount of carbon sequestered in these CRP sites include increasing the amount of root biomass production through fertilization and increasing the density of

  7. Spitzer IRS Observations of the XA Region in the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Raymond, John C.; Bautista, Manuel; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.

    2014-05-01

    We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 μm wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km s-1 shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is matched by a shock of about 150 km s-1 that has cooled and begun to recombine. The post-shock region has a swept-up column density of about 1.3 × 1018 cm-2, and the gas has reached a temperature of 7000-8000 K. The spectrum of the Cusp indicates that roughly half of the refractory silicon and iron atoms have been liberated from the grains. Dust emission is not detected at either position. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope.

  8. Meteorological Station, interior with collapsed roof showing remnant wooden equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Meteorological Station, interior with collapsed roof showing remnant wooden equipment switch box on east wall; view southeast - Fort McKinley, Meteorological Station, East side of Weymouth Way, approximately 225 feet south of Cove Side Drive, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  9. Bat use of remnant old-growth redwood stands

    Treesearch

    William J. Zielinski; Steven T. Gellman

    1999-01-01

    Most of the old-growth redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) in Calfornia has been cut; regenerating forests will probably never resemble those that were harvested, and what old growth remains on private land occurs in small, isolated remnant patches. The landscapes in which these stands occur differ so markedly from their original condition that their...

  10. 8. VIEW OF REMNANTS OF COULTERVILLE ROAD BELOW FORESTA. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF REMNANTS OF COULTERVILLE ROAD BELOW FORESTA. NOTE ASPHALT AT LEFT CENTER. NOTE RETAINING WALL AT RIGHT REAR. LOOKING NW. GIS: N-37 42 40.6 / W-119 43 27.6 - Coulterville Road, Between Foresta & All-Weather Highway, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  11. Ultraviolet absorption lines associated with the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Wallerstein, G.; Silk, J.

    1976-01-01

    Two stars behind the Vela supernova remnant and two stars offset from the remnant have been observed with the UV spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. Over 200 interstellar atomic and molecular absorption features between 1000 and 1400 A have been identified and measured for radial velocity and equivalent width. In many cases, additional information was obtained by studying the detailed shapes of the recorded profiles. Most of the stars show several absorption components, with clouds of the highest radial velocity appearing in the spectra of stars behind the remnant. For each component, column densities were derived using velocity dispersion parameters which yielded the most self-consistent results. Qualitatively, the gas toward the remnant exhibits a number of unusual properties, when compared with normal interstellar material. First, abnormally high radial velocities were evident. Second, the degree of ionization of some elements suggested the existence of ionizing processes significantly more potent than those found in general regions of space. Finally, an investigation of electron densities shows that much of the gas, especially that at high velocity, must exist in the form of relatively thin sheets or filaments. If cosmic abundances prevail, the column densities of high-velocity excited material suggest that H-alpha emission measures could be as large as 100 sq cm/cu pc.

  12. A compressed cloud in the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Wallerstein, G.; Leep, E. M.; Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    To elucidate the nature of the interstellar medium in the vicinity of the Vela supernova remnants (SNR) an extensive study with the International Ultraviolet Explorer of interstellar absorption lines toward 35 stars in the vicinity of the Vela SNR was undertaken. Observations of interstellar absorption, in particular of CI, towards one of these stars, HD 72350 (type B4 III), is of particular interest.

  13. Steam or water connection with remnant of concrete basin in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Steam or water connection with remnant of concrete basin in foreground. Pipe connection located approximately 6' east of metal stairs leading to Bright Angel Lodge. Dry laid retaining wall in background. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  14. Hot interstellar tunnels. 1: Simulation of interacting supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. W.

    1976-01-01

    The theory required to build a numerical simulation of interacting supernova remnants is developed. The hot cavities within a population of remnants will become connected, with varying ease and speed, for a variety of assumed conditions in the outer shells of old remnants. Apparently neither radiative cooling nor thermal conduction in a large-scale galactic magnetic field can destroy hot cavity regions, if they grow, faster than they are reheated by supernova shock waves, but interstellar mass motions disrupt the contiguity of extensive cavities necessary for the dispersal of these shocks over a wide volume. Monte Carlo simulations show that a quasi-equilibrium is reached in the test space within 10 million yrs of the first supernova and is characterized by an average cavity filling fraction of the interstellar volume. Aspects of this equilibrium are discussed for a range of supernova rates. Two predictions are not confirmed within this range: critical growth of hot regions to encompass the entire medium, and the efficient quenching of a remnant's expansion by interaction with other cavities.

  15. General exterior view showing remnants of loading dock at three ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General exterior view showing remnants of loading dock at three main doors, view to north - Charlestown Navy Yard, Oxygen Plant, Midway along northern boundary of Charlestown Navy Yard, on Little Mystic Channel, near junction of Eighteenth Street & Fourth Avenue, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  16. 15. VIEW SOUTH, DETAIL OF REMNANTS OF EAST SIDE BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW SOUTH, DETAIL OF REMNANTS OF EAST SIDE BRIDGE ABUTMENT - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  17. Remnant wharf with two bollards at the south end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remnant wharf with two bollards at the south end of row within Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site. View facing south-southeast. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. 22. Detail of remnants of winch and motor on remains ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Detail of remnants of winch and motor on remains of machinery house platform east of drawspan; note cables (still connected to drawspan) coming off the winding drum; view to north. - Summer Street Bridge, Spanning Reserved Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  19. Ultraviolet absorption lines associated with the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Wallerstein, G.; Silk, J.

    1976-01-01

    Two stars behind the Vela supernova remnant and two stars offset from the remnant have been observed with the UV spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. Over 200 interstellar atomic and molecular absorption features between 1000 and 1400 A have been identified and measured for radial velocity and equivalent width. In many cases, additional information was obtained by studying the detailed shapes of the recorded profiles. Most of the stars show several absorption components, with clouds of the highest radial velocity appearing in the spectra of stars behind the remnant. For each component, column densities were derived using velocity dispersion parameters which yielded the most self-consistent results. Qualitatively, the gas toward the remnant exhibits a number of unusual properties, when compared with normal interstellar material. First, abnormally high radial velocities were evident. Second, the degree of ionization of some elements suggested the existence of ionizing processes significantly more potent than those found in general regions of space. Finally, an investigation of electron densities shows that much of the gas, especially that at high velocity, must exist in the form of relatively thin sheets or filaments. If cosmic abundances prevail, the column densities of high-velocity excited material suggest that H-alpha emission measures could be as large as 100 sq cm/cu pc.

  20. Ovarian remnant syndrome: comparison of laparotomy, laparoscopy and robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Zapardiel, Ignacio; Zanagnolo, Vanna; Kho, Rosanne M; Magrina, Javier F; Magtibay, Paul M

    2012-08-01

    To compare laparotomy, laparoscopy and robotic surgery in the management of ovarian remnant syndrome. Retrospective comparative study. Mayo Clinic Arizona and Mayo Clinic Rochester, USA. Women who underwent surgical treatment for ovarian remnant syndrome. The clinical records of 223 patients with histologically documented residual cortical ovarian tissue excised at Mayo Clinic by laparotomy, laparoscopy or a robotic approach, from January 1985 through February 2009, were reviewed. Data collected included the patient's age, body mass index, previous medical and surgical history, symptoms, prior management of ovarian remnant syndrome, preoperative imaging study, intraoperative details, postoperative course, complications and follow-up data. Intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. One hundred and eighty-seven patients (83.9%) were operated by laparotomy, 19 (8.5%) by laparoscopy and 17 (7.6%) by a robotic approach. Estimated blood loss and length of stay were significantly lower in the robotic and laparoscopic groups compared with laparotomy (p < 0.01). After a mean follow-up of 21.1 ± 32.4 months, the rate of pain improvement was 93.1, 94.4 and 71.4% for the laparotomy, laparoscopy and robotic surgery group, respectively. Robotic and laparoscopic surgery for the treatment of ovarian remnant syndrome offer advantages over laparotomy in terms of reduced blood loss, lower postoperative complications and shorter length of stay. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. 15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDRICAL FISH SCALER Remnants of the wire screen remain, through which the fish tumbled as the cylinder revolved. Note geared ring around cylinder, and the small drive shaft by which it was driven. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  2. 6. OLD AND NEW TIOGA ROAD. NOTE REMNANTS OF OLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OLD AND NEW TIOGA ROAD. NOTE REMNANTS OF OLD ROAD ON LEFT. NOTE ROAD CUT ON CANYON WALL IN CENTER REAR. LOOKING NNE. GIS: N-37 56 19.5 / W-119 13 53.3 - Tioga Road, Between Crane Flat & Tioga Pass, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  3. 7. West view of livestock market: west elevation, showing remnants ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. West view of livestock market: west elevation, showing remnants of the 1937 west exterior cattle pens in the center and circa 1970 south exterior pens at the right - Ewing Livestock Market, South side of First Avenue North, 500 feet west of Route 724, Ewing, Lee County, VA

  4. Circumstellar Dust in the Remnant of Kepler's Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Blair, W. P.; Borkowski, K. J.; Ghavamian, P.; Long, K. S.; Reynolds, S. P.; Sankrit, R.

    2012-01-01

    Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the remains of the supernova of 1604, is widely believed to be the result of a Type Ia supernova, and shows IR, optical, and X-ray evidence for an interaction of the blast wave with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM). We present low-resolution 7.5-38 μm IR spectra of selected regions within the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Spectra of those regions where the blast wave is encountering circumstellar material show strong features at 10 and 18 μm. These spectral features are most consistent with various silicate particles, likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution. While it is possible that some features may arise from freshly formed ejecta dust, morphological evidence suggests that it is more likely that they originate from dust in the CSM. We isolate the dust grain absorption efficiencies for several regions in Kepler and compare them to laboratory data for dust particles of various compositions. The hottest dust in the remnant originates in the regions of dense, radiatively shocked clumps of gas, identified in optical images. Models of collisionally heated dust show that such shocks are capable of heating grains to temperatures of > 150 K. We confirm the finding that Kepler's SNR is still interacting with CSM in at least part of the remnant after 400 years. The significant quantities of silicate dust are consistent with a relatively massive progenitor.

  5. Satellite Movie Shows Hurricane Dolores' Remnants Bring Rains to U.S. Southwest

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation of images captured July 17 to 22 from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows Hurricane Dolores' remnants streaming over the southwestern U.S. The remnants dropped heavy rainfall in Califor...

  6. Simulations of Astrophysical Hydrodynamics: Supernova Remnant Evolution and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truelove, John Kelly

    Many problems in astrophysical hydrodynamics are analytically intractable. In such cases, numerical simulation can provide valuable insight into the nature of the solution. We consider two such problems: the interaction of stellar ejecta and ambient gas in an evolving supernova remnant (SNR), and the collapse and fragmentation of molecular clouds to form stars. We first study the dynamics of SNR evolution from the ejecta-dominated stage through the Sedov-Taylor stage, the stages which precede the onset of dynamically significant radiative losses. We emphasize that all nonradiative SNRs of a given power-law structure evolve according to a unified solution, and we discuss this general property in detail. We present 1-D numerical simulations of the flow and use these to aid the development of approximate analytic solutions for the motions of the SNR shocks. We elucidate the dependence of the evolution on the ejecta power-law index n by developing a general trajectory for all n and explaining its relation to the solutions of Chevalier (1982) & Nadyozhin (1985) for n > 5 and Hamilton & Sarazin (1984) for n = 0. These solutions should be valuable in describing relatively young SNRs at intermediate points of nonradiative evolution. We then turn to 3-D simulation of star formation using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We demonstrate that perturbations arising from discretization of the equations of self-gravitational hydrodynamics can grow into artificial fragments. This can be avoided by ensuring the ratio of cell size to Jeans length, which we call the Jeans number, J ≡Δ x/λJ, is kept below 0.25. We refer to the constraint that λJ be resolved as the Jeans condition. We find that it is not possible a priori to have confidence that results of calculations which employ artificial viscosity to halt collapse are relevant to the astrophysical problem. Finally, we describe our new AMR code in detail. This code employs multiple grids at multiple levels of resolution and

  7. Asymmetric supernova remnants generated by Galactic, massive runaway stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Langer, N.; Mackey, J.; Velázquez, P. F.; Gusdorf, A.

    2015-07-01

    After the death of a runaway massive star, its supernova shock wave interacts with the bow shocks produced by its defunct progenitor, and may lose energy, momentum and its spherical symmetry before expanding into the local interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate whether the initial mass and space velocity of these progenitors can be associated with asymmetric supernova remnants. We run hydrodynamical models of supernovae exploding in the pre-shaped medium of moving Galactic core-collapse progenitors. We find that bow shocks that accumulate more than about 1.5 M⊙ generate asymmetric remnants. The shock wave first collides with these bow shocks 160-750 yr after the supernova, and the collision lasts until 830-4900 yr. The shock wave is then located 1.35-5 pc from the centre of the explosion, and it expands freely into the ISM, whereas in the opposite direction it is channelled into the region of undisturbed wind material. This applies to an initially 20 M⊙ progenitor moving with velocity 20 km s-1 and to our initially 40 M⊙ progenitor. These remnants generate mixing of ISM gas, stellar wind and supernova ejecta that is particularly important upstream from the centre of the explosion. Their light curves are dominated by emission from optically thin cooling and by X-ray emission of the shocked ISM gas. We find that these remnants are likely to be observed in the [O III] λ 5007 spectral line emission or in the soft energy-band of X-rays. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of observed Galactic supernova remnants such as 3C 391 and the Cygnus Loop.

  8. GT1_vgeers_1: Tracing Remnant Gas in Planet Forming Debris Disk Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geers, V.

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies of gas emission lines with Spitzer and sub-millimeter telescopes have shown that 10-100 Myr old stars with debris disks have too little gas left to form Jupiter like gas giant planets. Whether enough gas remains in these systems to form ice giant planets is still unanswered. The [OI] emission line at 63 micron is one of the most sensitive tracers of gas mass in the ice-giant region of 10-50 AU in disks, and Herschel PACS is therefore uniquely suited to trace the remnant gas in planet-forming disks. We propose to obtain PACS line spectroscopy of [OI] (63 micron) for two nearby young stars, HR 8799 and HD 15115, which are two systems with detected giant planets or signs of planet formation, while still harbouring prominent debris disks that could be in the process of forming ice giants such as Neptune and Uranus. The proposed observations will probe down to gas masses of 0.01 Earth masses, and allow us to constrain prospects for ice giant formation, measure gas-to-dust ratios in evolved disks to compare with planet formation / disk evolution models, and put constraints on whether the dust dynamics in these systems is driven by the remnant gas or by the radiation. Note: this proposal is submitted under the Swiss part of the HIFI Guaranteed Time program; HIFI PI: Frank Helmich, HIFI Swiss Lead CoI: Arnold Benz.

  9. Studying white dwarf merger remnants with FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenks, Malia

    2017-01-01

    There is still uncertainty as to the progenitor systems of type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Both single and double degenerate systems have been suggested as progenitors. In a double degenerate system a merger between the two white dwarfs, with total mass at or exceeding the Chandrasekhar mass, leads to the supernova. If the explosion occurs during the merging process it is a violent merger. If an explosion doesn't occur while the stars merge the system becomes a white dwarf of unstable mass. For mergers of this type with differing starting masses it has been shown that during the viscous evolution carbon burning starts far from the center and stably converts the star to oxygen and neon. In this case the star will eventually collapse to a neutron star and not produce an SN Ia. The case of similar mass mergers has been much less explored. Using the results of a smooth particle hydrodynamic merger we simulate the viscous evolution of models of different mass ratios with FLASH. These simulations test if a similar mass merger can lead to an SN Ia, and begin to probe where the transition from similar to dissimilar mass occurs.

  10. Second Epoch Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankrit, Ravi; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Long, Knox S.; Patnaude, Daniel; Raymond, John C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Williams, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained new HST/WFC3 images of Kepler's supernova remnant in H-alpha (F656N) and [N II] (F658N) emission line filters. The bright radiative shocks in dense clumps are detected in both filters, while non-radiative shocks are seen as faint filaments only in the H-alpha image. Most of these Balmer filaments lie around the periphery of the remnant where the blast wave encounters partially neutral interstellar gas. We compare the new images with HST/ACS images taken nearly 10 years previously, and find that these filaments tracing the forward shock have moved 0.6"-0.9" between the two epochs. Assuming a distance of 4 kpc to the remnant, these proper motions correspond to shock velocities of 1160-1740 km/s, which are consistent with the published values, 1550-2000 km/s (e.g. Blair et al. 1991, ApJ 366, 484). We also find a few Balmer filaments with highly non-radial proper motions. In one particularly interesting case in the projected interior of the remnant, SE of the center, the shock appears to have wrapped around a sharp density enhancement and moved about 0.3" in the period between the observations.The images allow us to study the evolution of the shock around an ejecta knot, which is punching through the remnant boundary in the northwest. The forward shock, visible as an arcuate Balmer filament, has moved about 1". At the trailing edges, the system of radiative knots formed by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities have undergone significant changes - some knots have disappeared, new ones have appeared, and many have changed in brightness. Elsewhere in the remnant we find changes in the relative intensities of many small, bright knots over the 10 year baseline, indicating the short radiative lifetimes of these features.This work has been supported in part by grant HST-GO-12885 to the Universities Space Research Association.

  11. Asymmetric Circumstellar Matter in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, S. P.; Blondin, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are not well understood, but are likely to be of diverse origin, including single- and double-degenerate binary systems. Among single-degenerate progenitors, substantial amounts of circumstellar material (CSM) are expelled prior to the SN explosions by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) companions to the accreting white dwarfs. A subsequent collision of SN ejecta with the dense AGB wind has been detected among several distant SNe such as SN 2002ic, SN 2008J, and more recently PTF11kx. Dense CSM ejected by an AGB companion is present in the remnant of Kepler's SN of 1604, a Type Ia event. Observations of distant SNe hint at strongly asymmetric CSM distributions. A recent study of the CSM in Kepler's SNR by Burkey et al. indicates a large (factor of 10) density contrast between the dense, disk-like equatorial outflow and the more tenuous AGB wind above the orbital plane. A significant fraction of mature Type Ia SNRs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) shows the presence of dense Fe-rich ejecta in their interiors that cannot be explained by standard models of Type Ia explosions in a uniform ambient interstellar medium. We explore the hypothesis that these remnants originated in Type Ia explosions with strongly asymmetric CSM distributions such as found in Kepler's SNR. We present results of 2-D hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction of SN ejecta with asymmetric, disk-like AGB winds throughout the whole adiabatic stage of SNR evolution. Dense, asymmetric, and highly-ionized Fe-rich ejecta are indeed present in the simulated remnants, while the blast wave assumes a spherical shape shortly after passage through the ambient CSM. We also present simulated X-ray images and spectra and compare them with X-ray observations of selected remnants in the LMC. These remnants include DEM L238 and L249, recently observed by Suzaku, whose X-ray emission is strongly dominated by dense Fe-rich ejecta in their interiors. We contrast these

  12. Kinematic detection of supernova remnants in giant H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1986-12-01

    In a kinematic survey of giant H II regions in M 101, four sources that have large velocity widths at low intensity levels are detected. Two of these large-velocity-width sources (LVWSs) are, within the limit of resolution, coincident with nonthermal radio sources several times as luminous as Cas A. The LVWS in NGC 5471 B is so bright that it is possible to separate its broad profile from the narrower profile of the background H II region. H-alpha CCD photometry, optical spectroscopy, and high-resolution radio data are combined to derive its physical properties, which support Skillman's (1985) identification of the object as a supernova remnant. The other LVWSs might be supernova remnants embedded in giant H II regions, unusually massive wind-driven shells, or the combination of both.

  13. Radio evolution of the remnant of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardo, Giovanna

    Radio supernovae result from the collision between a supernova (SN) shock and the progenitor's circumstellar medium (CSM). Supernova 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud, as the only nearby core-collapse supernova observed with a telescope since its early stages, has allowed unique studies of the SN-CSM interaction and the complex structure of the resulting emission. This thesis investigates the evolution of the remnant of SN 1987A, as the shock wave impacts the dense CSM in the equatorial ring, and the possible presence of a compact object in the remnant interior, using new data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, the Australian Long Baseline Array, and the Parkes telescope.

  14. No cold dust within the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Krause, Oliver; Birkmann, Stephan M; Rieke, George H; Lemke, Dietrich; Klaas, Ulrich; Hines, Dean C; Gordon, Karl D

    2004-12-02

    A large amount (about three solar masses) of cold (18 K) dust in the prototypical type II supernova remnant Cassiopeia A was recently reported. It was concluded that dust production in type II supernovae can explain how the large quantities (approximately 10(8) solar masses) of dust observed in the most distant quasars could have been produced within only 700 million years after the Big Bang. Foreground clouds of interstellar material, however, complicate the interpretation of the earlier submillimetre observations of Cas A. Here we report far-infrared and molecular line observations that demonstrate that most of the detected submillimetre emission originates from interstellar dust in a molecular cloud complex located in the line of sight between the Earth and Cas A, and is therefore not associated with the remnant. The argument that type II supernovae produce copious amounts of dust is not supported by the case of Cas A, which previously appeared to provide the best evidence for this possibility.

  15. Soft x-ray spectroscopy of the Vela supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiger, Benjamin R.

    The CODEX sounding rocket payload was designed and flown to significantly improve spectral resolution of the Vela supernova remnant (SNR) in the soft x-ray (0.1--1.0 keV) bandpass. High spectral resolution (E/Delta E > 40) across its 3.25° x 3.25° field of view would disentangle thermal emission from nonthermal or line emission components to constrain the age when SNRs stop emitting nonthermal x-rays. Relatively recent observations have found significant nonthermal emission from remnants up to several kyr old, but CODEX encountered concurrent problems of higher noise and lower signal than expected, leaving the thermal versus nonthermal question unanswered in the 11 kyr-old Vela SNR. This thesis covers the motivation, design, and post-flight analysis of the CODEX instrument and data from its flight.

  16. Dynamics of the Remnant of Kepler's Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2013-09-01

    The remnant of Kepler's Type Ia SN shows an interaction of SN ejecta with a highly asymmetric ambient circumstellar medium (CSM). This material was ejected by a single-degenerate progenitor prior to the explosion, and its complex spatial distribution contains invaluable information about the progenitor itself. We propose a third-epoch observation of Kepler's SNR that will provide us with much improved expansion rates, allowing for measurements of shock speeds along the whole periphery of the remnant. These measurements will be compared with 3-D hydrodynamic simulations, thus unraveling the true shape of the CSM in a Type Ia progenitor. They will also advance our knowledge of poorly-understood particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification processes in fast SNR shocks.

  17. No cold dust within the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Oliver; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Rieke, George H.; Lemke, Dietrich; Klaas, Ulrich; Hines, Dean C.; Gordon, Karl D.

    2004-12-01

    A large amount (about three solar masses) of cold (18K) dust in the prototypical type II supernova remnant Cassiopeia A was recently reported. It was concluded that dust production in type II supernovae can explain how the large quantities (~ 108 solar masses) of dust observed in the most distant quasars could have been produced within only 700 million years after the Big Bang. Foreground clouds of interstellar material, however, complicate the interpretation of the earlier submillimetre observations of Cas A. Here we report far-infrared and molecular line observations that demonstrate that most of the detected submillimetre emission originates from interstellar dust in a molecular cloud complex located in the line of sight between the Earth and Cas A, and is therefore not associated with the remnant. The argument that type II supernovae produce copious amounts of dust is not supported by the case of Cas A, which previously appeared to provide the best evidence for this possibility.

  18. Recurrent Ectopic Pregnancy in the Tubal Remnant after Salpingectomy

    PubMed Central

    Samiei-Sarir, Bahareh; Diehm, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    We present two cases of ectopic pregnancy located within the remnant tube following ipsilateral salpingectomy. This particular pathology is rare and yet has significant consequences for the patient, with mortality rates 10–15 times higher than other ectopic pregnancies. It demonstrates that salpingectomy does not exclude ectopic pregnancy on the ipsilateral side. We suggest careful clinical consideration and bring attention to the current surgical technique. PMID:24151570

  19. Radio-Quiet Pulsars and Point Sources in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, David

    2002-04-01

    Since Baade and Zwicky made their prescient remark identifying the central blue star in the Crab Nebula as a neutron star, this pulsar's period has increased by 0.9 msec, turning 10^48 ergs of rotational kinetic energy into a relativistic wind that has been deposited in its surroundings. This makes the compact remnant of the supernova of 1054 AD highly conspicuous. It also makes this remnant highly anomalous. Nowhere else in the Galaxy does such a luminous young pulsar exists, despite the fact that at least half a dozen core-collapse supernovae have occurred since the Crab's birth. Indeed, the newly discovered central object in Cas A is four orders of magnitude less luminous in the X-ray band. While the Chandra and XMM-Newton Observatories are discovering an increasing number of Crab-like synchrotron nebulae (albeit, far less luminous than the prototype), they are also revealing X-ray point sources inside supernova remnants that lack detectable radio pulses and show no evidence of a relativistic outflow to power a surrounding nebula. I will provide an inventory of these objects, discuss whether or not truly radio-silent young neutron stars exist, and speculate on the emission mechanisms and power sources which make such objects shine. I will conclude with a commentary on the implications of this population for the distributions of pulsar birth parameters such as spin period, magnetic field strength, and space velocity, as well as offer a glimpse of what future observations might reveal about the demographics of core-collapse remnants.

  20. Cosmic Ray and Tev Gamma Ray Generation by Quasar Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, Elihu; Loewenstein, Michael; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Results from new broadband (radio to X-ray) high-resolution imaging studies of the dormant quasar remnant cores of nearby giant elliptical galaxies are now shown to permit the harboring of compact dynamos capable of generating the highest energy cosmic ray particles and associated curvature radiation of TeV photons. Confirmation would imply a global inflow of interstellar gas all the way to the accretion powered supermassive black hole at the center of the host galaxy.

  1. Excited-State OH Masers and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlström, Ylva M.; Fish, Vincent L.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.; Zschaechner, Laura K.; Lockett, Philip B.; Elitzur, Moshe

    2008-03-01

    The collisionally pumped, ground-state 1720 MHz maser line of OH is widely recognized as a tracer for shocked regions and observed in star-forming regions and supernova remnants. Whereas some lines of excited states of OH have been detected and studied in star-forming regions, the subject of excited-state OH in supernova remnants—where high collision rates are to be expected—is only recently being addressed. Modeling of collisional excitation of OH demonstrates that 1720, 4765, and 6049 MHz masers can occur under similar conditions in regions of shocked gas. In particular, the 6049 and 4765 MHz masers become more significant at increased OH column densities where the 1720 MHz masers begin to be quenched. In supernova remnants, the detection of excited-state OH line maser emission could therefore serve as a probe of regions of higher column densities. Using the Very Large Array, we searched for excited-state OH in the 4.7, 7.8, 8.2, and 23.8 GHz lines in four well-studied supernova remnants with strong 1720 MHz maser emission (Sgr A East, W28, W44 and IC 443). No detections were made, at typical detection limits of around 10 mJy beam-1. The search for the 6 GHz lines were done using Effelsberg since the VLA receivers did not cover those frequencies, and are reported on in an accompanying letter (Fish and coworkers). We also cross-correlated the positions of known supernova remnants with the positions of 1612 MHz maser emission obtained from blind surveys. No probable associations were found, perhaps except in the Sgr A East region. The lack of detections of excited-state OH indicates that the OH column densities suffice for 1720 MHz inversion but not for inversion of excited-state transitions, consistent with the expected results for C-type shocks.

  2. Detection of explosive remnants of war by neutron thermalisation.

    PubMed

    Brooks, F D; Drosg, M; Smit, F D; Wikner, C

    2012-01-01

    The HYDAD-D landmine detector (Brooks and Drosg, 2005) has been modified and field-tested for 17 months in a variety of soil conditions. Test objects containing about the same mass of hydrogen (20g) as small explosive remnants of war, such as antipersonnel landmines, were detected with efficiency 100% when buried at cover depths up to 10cm. The false alarm rate under the same conditions was 9%. Plots of detection efficiency versus false alarm rate are presented.

  3. Supernova remnants and their effects on the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacani, E.

    2017-07-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are one of the main sources of energy injection in galaxies and great modifiers of the dynamics and chemistry of the interstellar medium, constituting a very valuable astrophysical laboratory to study numerous physical processes involved in their evolution and the interaction with the surrounding material. In this contribution I summarize the current state of knowledge of two of the main phenomena associated with these objects: if they are sources of galactic cosmic rays and triggers of formation of new stars.

  4. Radio to Gamma-Ray Emission from Shell-Type Supernova Remnants: Predictions from Non-Linear Shock Acceleration Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Ellison, Donald C.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Grenier, Isabelle A.; Goret, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are widely believed to be the principal source of galactic cosmic rays, produced by diffusive shock acceleration in the environs of the remnant's expanding blast wave. Such energetic particles can produce gamma-rays and lower energy photons via interactions with the ambient plasma. The recently reported observation of TeV gamma-rays from SN1006 by the CANGAROO Collaboration, combined with the fact that several unidentified EGRET sources have been associated with known radio/optical/X-ray-emitting remnants, provides powerful motivation for studying gamma-ray emission from SNRs. In this paper, we present results from a Monte Carlo simulation of non-linear shock structure and acceleration coupled with photon emission in shell-like SNRs. These non-linearities are a by-product of the dynamical influence of the accelerated cosmic rays on the shocked plasma and result in distributions of cosmic rays which deviate from pure power-laws. Such deviations are crucial to acceleration efficiency considerations and impact photon intensities and spectral shapes at all energies, producing GeV/TeV intensity ratios that are quite different from test particle predictions.

  5. Gravitational waves from the remnants of the first stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Tilman; Volonteri, Marta; Bromm, Volker; Klessen, Ralf S.; Barausse, Enrico; Magg, Mattis; Stacy, Athena

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) provide a revolutionary tool to investigate yet unobserved astrophysical objects. Especially the first stars, which are believed to be more massive than present-day stars, might be indirectly observable via the merger of their compact remnants. We develop a self-consistent, cosmologically representative, semi-analytical model to simulate the formation of the first stars. By extrapolating binary stellar-evolution models at 10 per cent solar metallicity to metal-free stars, we track the individual systems until the coalescence of the compact remnants. We estimate the contribution of primordial stars to the merger rate density and to the detection rate of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO). Owing to their higher masses, the remnants of primordial stars produce strong GW signals, even if their contribution in number is relatively small. We find a probability of ≳1 per cent that the current detection GW150914 is of primordial origin. We estimate that aLIGO will detect roughly 1 primordial BH-BH merger per year for the final design sensitivity, although this rate depends sensitively on the primordial initial mass function (IMF). Turning this around, the detection of black hole mergers with a total binary mass of ˜ 300 M⊙ would enable us to constrain the primordial IMF.

  6. CGRO/OSSE observations of the Cassiopeia A Supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    The, L.-S.; Leising, M. D.; Clayton, D. D.; Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.; Jung, G. V.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Purcell, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    Cassipeia A, the youngest known supernova remnant in the Galaxy and a strong radio and X-ray source, was observed by OSSE 1992 July 16-August 6. Its close distance (approximately 3 kpc) and its young age (approximately 300 yr) make Cas A the best candidate among known supernova remnants for detecting Ti-44 gamma-ray lines. We find no evidence of emission at 67.9 keV, 78.4 keV, or 1.157 MeV, the three strongest Ti-44 decay lines. From simultaneous fits to the three lines our 99% confidence upper limit to the flux in each line is 5.5 x 10(exp -5) gamma/sq cm s. We also report upper limits for the 4.44 MeV C-12 nuclear de-excitation line, which could be produced by interactions of acclerated particles in the supernova remnant, and for the hard X-ray continuum.

  7. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT RCW 86

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Siming; Zhang, Bing

    2014-04-20

    Using 5.4 yr Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we report the detection of GeV γ-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 (G315.4-2.3) with a significance of ∼5.1σ. The data slightly favors an extended emission of this supernova remnant. The spectral index of RCW 86 is found to be very hard, Γ ∼ 1.4, in the 0.4-300 GeV range. A one-zone leptonic model can well fit the multi-wavelength data from radio to very high energy γ-rays. The very hard GeV γ-ray spectrum and the inferred low gas density seem to disfavor a hadronic origin for the γ-rays. The γ-ray behavior of RCW 86 is very similar to several other TeV shell-type supernova remnants, e.g., RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622, SN 1006, and HESS J1731-347.

  8. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  9. X-Ray Measured Dynamics of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hayato, Asami; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We present X-ray proper-motion measurements of the forward shock and reverse-shocked ejecta in Tycho's supernova remnant, based on three sets of archival Chandra data taken in 2000, 2003, and 2007. We find that the proper motion of the edge of the remnant (i.e., the forward shock and protruding ejecta knots) varies from 0.''20 yr-1 (expansion index m = 0.33, where R = tm ) to 0.''40 yr-1 (m = 0.65) with azimuthal angle in 2000-2007 measurements, and 0.''14 yr-1 (m = 0.26) to 0.''40 yr-1 (m = 0.65) in 2003-2007 measurements. The azimuthal variation of the proper motion and the average expansion index of [approx]0.5 are consistent with those derived from radio observations. We also find proper motion and expansion index of the reverse-shocked ejecta to be 0.''21-0.''31 yr-1 and 0.43-0.64, respectively. From a comparison of the measured m-value with Type Ia supernova evolutionary models, we find a pre-shock ambient density around the remnant of [less, similar]0.2 cm-3.

  10. Emission and Absorption Study of the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.

    The combination of emission and absorption studies of the shocked gas in a supernova remnant can provide information not available from either study by itself, especially relating to the liberation of refractory elements from interstellar grains in the cooling zone behind the shock and the effects of departures from steady flow. No such combined studies have been attempted due to the need for a hot, bright background star behind supernova remnant nebulosity bright enough for emission line observations. Wallerstein and Balick have discovered a suitable patch of nebulosity in the Vela Supernova Remnant adjacent to the B3 III star HD 72088. IUE spectra of the star show a 94 km/s component in C IV and Si IV in absorption, and the optical spectra of Wallerstein and Balick show strong high excitation emission lines close to the star. We wish to obtain IUE spectra of the nebulosity as close to the star as possible and further high dispersion spectra of the star to improve the signal-tonoise.

  11. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  12. X-RAY MEASURED DYNAMICS OF TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hwang, Una; Hughes, John P.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hayato, Asami; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi E-mail: Robert.Petre-1@nasa.go E-mail: jackph@physics.rutgers.ed E-mail: hayato@crab.riken.j E-mail: tsunemi@ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.j

    2010-02-01

    We present X-ray proper-motion measurements of the forward shock and reverse-shocked ejecta in Tycho's supernova remnant, based on three sets of archival Chandra data taken in 2000, 2003, and 2007. We find that the proper motion of the edge of the remnant (i.e., the forward shock and protruding ejecta knots) varies from 0.''20 yr{sup -1} (expansion index m = 0.33, where R = t{sup m} ) to 0.''40 yr{sup -1} (m = 0.65) with azimuthal angle in 2000-2007 measurements, and 0.''14 yr{sup -1} (m = 0.26) to 0.''40 yr{sup -1} (m = 0.65) in 2003-2007 measurements. The azimuthal variation of the proper motion and the average expansion index of approx0.5 are consistent with those derived from radio observations. We also find proper motion and expansion index of the reverse-shocked ejecta to be 0.''21-0.''31 yr{sup -1} and 0.43-0.64, respectively. From a comparison of the measured m-value with Type Ia supernova evolutionary models, we find a pre-shock ambient density around the remnant of approx<0.2 cm{sup -3}.

  13. Current status in remnant gastric cancer after distal gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Masaichi; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-02-28

    Remnant gastric cancer (RGC) and gastric stump cancer after distal gastrectomy (DG) are recognized as the same clinical entity. In this review, the current knowledges as well as the non-settled issues of RGC are presented. Duodenogastric reflux and denervation of the gastric mucosa are considered as the two main factors responsible for the development of RGC after benign disease. On the other hand, some precancerous circumstances which already have existed at the time of initial surgery, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, are the main factors associated with RGC after gastric cancer. Although eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in remnant stomach is promising, it is still uncertain whether it can reduce the risk of carcinogenesis. Periodic endoscopic surveillance after DG was reported useful in detecting RGC at an early stage, which offers a chance to undergo minimally invasive endoscopic treatment or laparoscopic surgery and leads to an improved prognosis in RGC patients. Future challenges may be expected to elucidate the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in the remnant stomach if it could reduce the risk for RGC, to build an optimal endoscopic surveillance strategy after DG by stratifying the risk for development of RGC, and to develop a specific staging system for RGC for the standardization of the treatment by prospecting the prognosis.

  14. Current status in remnant gastric cancer after distal gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, Masaichi; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    Remnant gastric cancer (RGC) and gastric stump cancer after distal gastrectomy (DG) are recognized as the same clinical entity. In this review, the current knowledges as well as the non-settled issues of RGC are presented. Duodenogastric reflux and denervation of the gastric mucosa are considered as the two main factors responsible for the development of RGC after benign disease. On the other hand, some precancerous circumstances which already have existed at the time of initial surgery, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, are the main factors associated with RGC after gastric cancer. Although eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in remnant stomach is promising, it is still uncertain whether it can reduce the risk of carcinogenesis. Periodic endoscopic surveillance after DG was reported useful in detecting RGC at an early stage, which offers a chance to undergo minimally invasive endoscopic treatment or laparoscopic surgery and leads to an improved prognosis in RGC patients. Future challenges may be expected to elucidate the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in the remnant stomach if it could reduce the risk for RGC, to build an optimal endoscopic surveillance strategy after DG by stratifying the risk for development of RGC, and to develop a specific staging system for RGC for the standardization of the treatment by prospecting the prognosis. PMID:26937131

  15. Urachal remnant diseases: spectrum of CT and US findings.

    PubMed

    Yu, J S; Kim, K W; Lee, H J; Lee, Y J; Yoon, C S; Kim, M J

    2001-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) are ideally suited for demonstrating urachal remnant diseases. A patent urachus is demonstrated at longitudinal US and occasionally at CT as a tubular connection between the anterosuperior aspect of the bladder and the umbilicus. An umbilical-urachal sinus manifests at US as a thickened tubular structure along the midline below the umbilicus. A vesicourachal diverticulum is usually discovered incidentally at axial CT, appearing as a midline cystic lesion just above the anterosuperior aspect of the bladder. At US, it manifests as an extraluminally protruding, fluid-filled sac that does not communicate with the umbilicus. Urachal cysts manifest at both modalities as a noncommunicating, fluid-filled cavity in the midline lower abdominal wall located just beneath the umbilicus or above the bladder. Both infected urachal cysts and urachal carcinomas commonly display increased echogenicity at US and thick-walled cystic or mixed attenuation at CT, making it difficult to differentiate between them. Percutaneous needle biopsy or fluid aspiration is usually needed for diagnosis and therapeutic planning. Nevertheless, CT and US can help identify most disease entities originating from the urachal remnant in the anterior abdominal wall. Understanding the anatomy and the imaging features of urachal remnant diseases is essential for correct diagnosis and proper management.

  16. Search for Nonthermal X-Rays from Supernova Remnant Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, R.; Keohane, J.; Hwang, U.; Allen, G.; Gotthelf, E.

    The demonstration by ASCA that the nonthermal X-ray emission from the rim of SN1006 is synchrotron emission from TeV electrons, produced in the same environment responsible for cosmic ray protons and nuclei (Koyama et al. 1995, Nature 378, 255), has stimulated a search for nonthermal X-rays from other remnants. Nonthermal emission has subsequently been found to arise in the shells of at least two other remnants, Cas A and IC 443. In Cas A, a hard tail is detected using ASCA, XTE, and OSSE to energies exceeding 100 keV; the shape of the spectrum rules out all mechanisms except synchrotron radiation. In IC 443, the previously known hard emission has been shown using ASCA to be isolated to a small region along the rim of the remnant, where the shock is interacting most strongly with a molecular cloud. Nonthermal X-ray emission is thought to arise here by enhanced cosmic ray production associated with the shock/cloud interaction (Keohane et al. 1997, ApJ in press). We describe the properties of the nonthermal emission in SN1006, Cas A, and IC 443, and discuss the status of our search for nonthermal emission associated with the shocks of other Galactic and LMC SNR's.

  17. What We Can Learn From Supernova Remnant Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwood, Benjamin; Murphy, Jeremiah; Diaz, Mariangelly

    2016-01-01

    Previous literature regarding size distributions of supernova remnants generally discuss a uniform distribution for the radius, occasionally considering a Gaussian alternative. We indeed show that these distributions are consistent with log-normal, which can be considered a natural consequence of the Central Limit Theorem and Sedov expansion. Modeling explosion energy, remnant age, and ambient density as independent, random distributions, we show, using simple Monte Carlo simulations, that the size distribution is indistinguishable from log-normal when the SNR sample size is of order three hundred. This implies that these SNR distributions provide only information on the mean and variance, yielding additional information only when the sample size grows large. We then proceed to Bayesian statistical inference to characterize the information provided by the size distributions. In particular, we use the mean and variance of sizes and explosion energies to subsequently estimate the mean and variance of the ambient medium surrounding SNR progenitors. This in turn allows us to characterize potential bias in studies involving samples of supernova remnants.

  18. Supernova remnant rich fields in the Carina spiral arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markert, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of the ROSAT PSPC data on five fields containing supernova remnants several months ago was completed. Dr. Una Hwang, prepared a paper describing our results which was published last August ('An X-ray Study of Five Supernova Remnants in the Carina Spiral Arm', by Hwang and Markert, 1994, Ap. J., 431, p. 819). Hwang's earlier analysis of this data became part of her PhD thesis ( 'X-ray Studies of Supernova Remnants', February 1994, MIT). A copy of the Hwang and Markert paper is appended. The results of the study are well-summarized in the Hwang and Markert paper: the best spatial-spectral X-ray study yet made of the intriguing SNR G296.1-0.7 was obtained. This study showed interesting spectral variations over the surface of the object.It was also determined the gross physical properties of G296 based on its X-ray emission. Four other fields were also examined. For three of these the upper limits to the radio object were determined, and in one case found a weak, but statistically significant X-ray object coincident with the peak of the radio flux.

  19. Kepler Supernova Remnant: A View from Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-10-06

    This Spitzer false-color image is a composite of data from the 24 micron channel of Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer (red), and three channels of its infrared array camera: 8 micron (yellow), 5.6 micron (blue), and 4.8 micron (green). Stars are most prominent in the two shorter wavelengths, causing them to show up as turquoise. The supernova remnant is most prominent at 24 microns, arising from dust that has been heated by the supernova shock wave, and re-radiated in the infrared. The 8 micron data shows infrared emission from regions closely associated with the optically emitting regions. These are the densest regions being encountered by the shock wave, and probably arose from condensations in the surrounding material that was lost by the supernova star before it exploded. The composite above (PIA06908, PIA06909, and PIA06910) represent views of Kepler's supernova remnant taken in X-rays, visible light, and infrared radiation. Each top panel in the composite above shows the entire remnant. Each color in the composite represents a different region of the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. The X-ray and infrared data cannot be seen with the human eye. Astronomers have color-coded those data so they can be seen in these images. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06910

  20. Maternal Diet Supplementation with n-6/n-3 Essential Fatty Acids in a 1.2 : 1.0 Ratio Attenuates Metabolic Dysfunction in MSG-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Josiane Morais; Miranda, Rosiane Aparecida; Palma-Rigo, Kesia; Alves, Vander Silva; Fabricio, Gabriel Sergio; Pavanello, Audrei; Franco, Claudinéia Conationi da Silva; Ribeiro, Tatiane Aparecida; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Banafé, Elton Guntendeorfer; Martin, Clayton Antunes; Mathias, Paulo Cezar de Freitas

    2016-01-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) prevent cardiometabolic diseases. We aimed to study whether a diet supplemented with a mixture of n-6/n-3 PUFAs, during perinatal life, attenuates outcomes of long-term metabolic dysfunction in prediabetic and obese mice. Seventy-day-old virgin female mice were mated. From the conception day, dams were fed a diet supplemented with sunflower oil and flaxseed powder (containing an n-6/n-3 PUFAs ratio of 1.2 : 1.0) throughout pregnancy and lactation, while control dams received a commercial diet. Newborn mice were treated with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG, 4 mg g−1 body weight per day) for the first 5 days of age. A batch of weaned pups was sacrificed to quantify the brain and pancreas total lipids; another batch were fed a commercial diet until 90 days of age, where glucose homeostasis and glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) as well as retroperitoneal fat and Lee index were assessed. MSG-treated mice developed obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, pancreatic islet dysfunction, and higher fat stores. Maternal flaxseed diet-supplementation decreased n-6/n-3 PUFAs ratio in the brain and pancreas and blocked glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, GIIS impairment, and obesity development. The n-6/n-3 essential PUFAs in a ratio of 1.2 : 1.0 supplemented in maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation prevent metabolic dysfunction in MSG-obesity model. PMID:28050167

  1. High-resolution Studies of Charge Exchange in Supernova Remnants with Magellan, XMM-Newton, and Micro-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Sarah N.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Castro, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Charge exchange, the semi-resonant transfer of an electron from a neutral atom to an excited state in an energetic ion, can occur in plasmas where energetic ions are incident on a cold, at least partially neutral gas. Supernova remnants, especially in the immediate shock region, provide conditions conducive to charge exchange. The emission from post charge-exchange ions as the captured electron cascades down to the ground state, can shed light on the physical conditions of the shock and the immediate post-shock material, providing an important tool to understanding supernova explosions and their aftermath.I present a study of charge exchange in the galactic supernova remnant G296.1-0.5 in two bands: the optical and the X-ray. The optical study, performed using both imaging and spectroscopy from the IMACS instrument on the Magellan Baade Telescope at Las Companas Observatory, seeks to identify `Balmer-dominated shocks' in the remnant, which occur when charge exchange occurs between hot, post-shock protons and colder neutral hydrogen in the environment. The X-ray study probes line ratios in dispersed spectral data obtained with XMM-Newton RGS from an X-ray lobe in the NW of the remnant to hunt for signatures of charge exchange. The dispersed data are degraded by the extended nature of the source, blending many of the lines.We are working towards the future of spectroscopic studies in the X-ray for such extended sources with Micro-X: a sounding rocket-borne, high energy resolution X-ray telescope, utilizing an array of microcalorimeters to achieve high energy resolution for extended sources. I describe the design and commissioning of the payload and the steps toward launch, which is anticipated in the summer of 2015.

  2. Extreme nonfasting remnant cholesterol vs extreme LDL cholesterol as contributors to cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in 90000 individuals from the general population.

    PubMed

    Varbo, Anette; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-03-01

    Increased nonfasting remnant cholesterol, like increased LDL cholesterol, is causally associated with increased risk for ischemic heart disease (IHD). We tested the hypothesis that extreme concentrations of nonfasting remnant and LDL cholesterol are equal contributors to the risk of IHD, myocardial infarction (MI), and all-cause mortality. We compared stepwise increasing concentrations of nonfasting remnant and LDL cholesterol for association with risk of IHD, MI, and all-cause mortality in approximately 90 000 individuals from the Danish general population. During up to 22 years of complete follow-up, 4435 participants developed IHD, 1722 developed MI, and 8121 died. Compared with participants with nonfasting remnant cholesterol <0.5 mmol/L (19.3 mg/dL), hazard ratios for IHD ranged from 1.3 (95% CI 1.1-1.5) for remnant cholesterol of 0.5-0.99 mmol/L (19.3-38.2 mg/dL) to 2.4 (1.9-2.9) for remnant cholesterol of ≥1.5 mmol/L (58 mg/dL) (P for trend <0.001). Compared with participants with LDL cholesterol <3.0 mmol/L (115.8 mg/dL), hazard ratios for IHD ranged from 1.3 (1.1-1.5) for LDL cholesterol of 3-3.99 mmol/L (115.8-154 mg/dL) to 2.3 (1.9-2.8) for LDL cholesterol of ≥5 mmol/L (193 mg/dL) (P < 0.001). Corresponding hazard ratios for MI ranged from 1.8 (1.4-2.3) to 3.4 (2.5-4.8) for remnant cholesterol (P < 0.001), and from 1.7 (1.4-2.2) to 4.7 (3.5-6.3) for LDL cholesterol (P < 0.001). Nonfasting remnant cholesterol concentrations were associated stepwise with all-cause mortality ranging from hazard ratio 1.0 (0.9-1.1) to 1.6 (1.4-1.9) (P < 0.001), whereas LDL cholesterol concentrations were associated with decreased all-cause mortality risk in a U-shaped pattern, with hazard ratios from 0.8 (0.7-0.8) to 0.9 (0.8-1.0) (P = 0.002). After mutual adjustment, LDL cholesterol best predicted MI, and remnant cholesterol best predicted all-cause mortality. Both lipoproteins were associated equally with risk of IHD and MI; however, only nonfasting remnant cholesterol

  3. Dance into the fire: dust survival inside supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    Core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are important sources of interstellar dust, potentially capable of producing 1 M_{⊙}) of dust in their explosively expelled ejecta. However, unlike other dust sources, the dust has to survive the passage of the reverse shock, generated by the interaction of the supernova blast wave with its surrounding medium. Knowledge of the net amount of dust produced by CCSNe is crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the local and high-redshift universe. Our goal is to identify the dust destruction mechanisms in the ejecta, and derive the net amount of dust that survives the passage of the reverse shock. To do so, we have developed analytical models for the evolution of a supernova blast wave and of the reverse shock, and the simultaneous processing of the dust inside the cavity of the supernova remnant. We have applied our models to the special case of the clumpy ejecta of the remnant of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), assuming that the dust (silicates and carbon grains) resides in cool oxygen-rich ejecta clumps which are uniformly distributed within the remnant and surrounded by a hot X-ray emitting plasma (smooth ejecta). The passage of the reverse shock through the clumps gives rise to a relative gas-grain motion and also destroys the clumps. While residing in the ejecta clouds, dust is processed via kinetic sputtering, which is terminated either when the grains escape the clumps, or when the clumps are destroyed by the reverse shock. In either case, grain destruction proceeds thereafter by thermal sputtering in the hot shocked smooth ejecta. We find that 12 and 16 percent of silicate and carbon dust, respectively, survive the passage of the reverse shock by the time the shock has reached the center of the remnant. These fractions depend on the morphology of the ejecta and the medium into which the remnant is expanding, as well as the composition and size distribution of the grains that formed in the ejecta. Results will

  4. EVOLUTION OF POST-IMPACT REMNANT HELIUM STARS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS WITHIN THE SINGLE-DEGENERATE SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu

    2013-08-10

    The progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still under debate. Based on recent hydrodynamics simulations, non-degenerate companions in the single-degenerate scenario (SDS) should survive the supernova (SN) impact. One way to distinguish between the SDS and the double-degenerate scenario is to search for the post-impact remnant stars (PIRSs) in SN Ia remnants. Using a technique that combines multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with one-dimensional stellar evolution simulations, we have examined the post-impact evolution of helium-rich binary companions in the SDS. It is found that these helium-rich PIRSs (He PIRSs) dramatically expand and evolve to a luminous phase (L {approx} 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }) about 10 yr after an SN explosion. Subsequently, they contract and evolve to become hot blue-subdwarf-like (sdO-like) stars by releasing gravitational energy, persisting as sdO-like stars for several million years before evolving to the helium red-giant phase. We therefore predict that a luminous OB-like star should be detectable within {approx}30 yr after the SN explosion. Thereafter, it will shrink and become an sdO-like star in the central regions of SN Ia remnants within star-forming regions for SN Ia progenitors evolved via the helium-star channel in the SDS. These He PIRSs are predicted to be rapidly rotating (v{sub rot} {approx}> 50 km s{sup -1}) and to have high spatial velocities (v{sub linear} {approx}> 500 km s{sup -1}). Furthermore, if SN remnants have diffused away and are not recognizable at a later stage, He PIRSs could be an additional source of single sdO stars and/or hypervelocity stars.

  5. The Three-dimensional Structure of the Cassiopeia A Supernova Remnant. I. The Spherical Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jeri E.; Hester, J. Jeff; Fabian, A. C.; Winkler, P. F.

    1995-02-01

    , also support this interpretation. Line ratios suggest that the pressure is higher on the front side of the remnant than on the back. There is a global trend of increasing electron density with radial velocity in this direction, and a stronger trend of increasing [O II]/[S II] from back to front. We suggest that this is due to collisional deexcitation of [S II] on the high-pressure side of the remnant, rather than a real composition trend. We also see evidence for density variations in both the shell and ejecta, concluding that the front face of the composite shell is of higher density than the far face, and that the blueshifted ejecta may be of higher density than that at the far face. However, in this study we see no evidence for any ordered change in abundances of the ejecta across Cas A. The weight of observational evidence suggests that the general form of the Cas A supernova remnant is due to the expansion of ejecta from a displaced center within an approximately spherical shell. We have concluded that there is no optical evidence for a dual-hemisphere model in the velocity structure of Cas A. In particular, we find that the outer radio emission must truly lie outside the inner radio and optical shell. The inner shell is made up of decelerated circumstellar material and the SN material which was ejected at highest velocity. The optical FMKs consist of newly interacting knots of ejecta which are just undergoing deceleration and are distributed in rings on the surface of the sphere.

  6. Mergers of Unequal-mass Galaxies: Supermassive Black Hole Binary Evolution and Structure of Merger Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Fazeel Mahmood; Preto, Miguel; Berczik, Peter; Berentzen, Ingo; Just, Andreas; Spurzem, Rainer

    2012-04-01

    Galaxy centers are residing places for supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Galaxy mergers bring SMBHs close together to form gravitationally bound binary systems, which, if able to coalesce in less than a Hubble time, would be one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs) for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. In spherical galaxy models, SMBH binaries stall at a separation of approximately 1 pc, leading to the "final parsec problem" (FPP). On the other hand, it has been shown that merger-induced triaxiality of the remnant in equal-mass mergers is capable of supporting a constant supply of stars on the so-called centrophilic orbits that interact with the binary and thus avoid the FPP. In this paper, using a set of direct N-body simulations of mergers of initially spherically symmetric galaxies with different mass ratios, we show that the merger-induced triaxiality is also able to drive unequal-mass SMBH binaries to coalescence. The binary hardening rates are high and depend only weakly on the mass ratios of SMBHs for a wide range of mass ratios q. There is, however, an abrupt transition in the hardening rates for mergers with mass ratios somewhere between q ~ 0.05 and 0.1, resulting from the monotonic decrease of merger-induced triaxiality with mass ratio q, as the secondary galaxy becomes too small and light to significantly perturb the primary, i.e., the more massive one. The hardening rates are significantly higher for galaxies having steep cusps in comparison with those having shallow cups at centers. The evolution of the binary SMBH leads to relatively shallower inner slopes at the centers of the merger remnants. The stellar mass displaced by the SMBH binary on its way to coalescence is ~1-5 times the combined mass of binary SMBHs. The coalescence timescales for SMBH binary with mass ~106 M ⊙ are less than 1 Gyr and for those at the upper end of SMBH masses 109 M ⊙ are 1-2 Gyr for less eccentric binaries whereas they are less than 1 Gyr

  7. MERGERS OF UNEQUAL-MASS GALAXIES: SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARY EVOLUTION AND STRUCTURE OF MERGER REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Fazeel Mahmood; Preto, Miguel; Berentzen, Ingo; Just, Andreas; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer

    2012-04-20

    Galaxy centers are residing places for supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Galaxy mergers bring SMBHs close together to form gravitationally bound binary systems, which, if able to coalesce in less than a Hubble time, would be one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs) for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. In spherical galaxy models, SMBH binaries stall at a separation of approximately 1 pc, leading to the 'final parsec problem' (FPP). On the other hand, it has been shown that merger-induced triaxiality of the remnant in equal-mass mergers is capable of supporting a constant supply of stars on the so-called centrophilic orbits that interact with the binary and thus avoid the FPP. In this paper, using a set of direct N-body simulations of mergers of initially spherically symmetric galaxies with different mass ratios, we show that the merger-induced triaxiality is also able to drive unequal-mass SMBH binaries to coalescence. The binary hardening rates are high and depend only weakly on the mass ratios of SMBHs for a wide range of mass ratios q. There is, however, an abrupt transition in the hardening rates for mergers with mass ratios somewhere between q {approx} 0.05 and 0.1, resulting from the monotonic decrease of merger-induced triaxiality with mass ratio q, as the secondary galaxy becomes too small and light to significantly perturb the primary, i.e., the more massive one. The hardening rates are significantly higher for galaxies having steep cusps in comparison with those having shallow cups at centers. The evolution of the binary SMBH leads to relatively shallower inner slopes at the centers of the merger remnants. The stellar mass displaced by the SMBH binary on its way to coalescence is {approx}1-5 times the combined mass of binary SMBHs. The coalescence timescales for SMBH binary with mass {approx}10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} are less than 1 Gyr and for those at the upper end of SMBH masses 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} are 1-2 Gyr for less eccentric

  8. Unexpected changes in the gastric remnant in asymptomatic patients after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass on vertical banded gastroplasty.

    PubMed

    Leuratti, Luca; Di Simone, Massimo Pierluigi; Cariani, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to evaluate the macroscopic and microscopic changes in the remnant stomach at mid-term follow-up of patients who underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass on vertical banded gastroplasty (RYGB-on-VBG). The stomach could be reached through a 1.1-cm gastro-gastrostomy with an endoscope of standard size. From January 2009 to July 2010, 51 asymptomatic patients at 4 and 5 years follow-up after RYGB-on-VBG submitted to upper endoscopy. All of them were examined with standard endoscopy with collection of biopsies in gastric fundus, body, and antrum. The macroscopic and microscopic findings were analyzed according to Sydney Classification. The endoscopy of the remnant stomach was technically easy and already showed on macroscopic examination 90 % cases of gastritis (41.2 % mild, 49 % severe) with tendency of severity in the distal stomach part. Histological analysis detected 39.2 % of active gastritis, 50.6 % of quiescent gastritis, 7.8 % of intestinal metaplasia, and 3.9 % of lymphoma-like gastritis. The results surprised us. We found a very high rate of mucosa abnormalities after RYGB-on-VBG. All of the patients have to be regularly controlled in follow-up and treatment has to be introduced when needed. Again, we would like to ask the question: what is happening with the remnant stomach after standard RYGB, banded gastric bapass, or minigastric bypass? Did we reach the time to answer the question?

  9. OXYGEN-RICH SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the tattered debris of a star that exploded 3,000 years ago as a supernova. This supernova remnant, called N132D, lies 169,000 light-years away in the satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. A Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image of the inner regions of the supernova remnant shows the complex collisions that take place as fast moving ejecta slam into cool, dense interstellar clouds. This level of detail in the expanding filaments could only be seen previously in much closer supernova remnants. Now, Hubble's capabilities extend the detailed study of supernovae out to the distance of a neighboring galaxy. Material thrown out from the interior of the exploded star at velocities of more than four million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second) plows into neighboring clouds to create luminescent shock fronts. The blue-green filaments in the image correspond to oxygen-rich gas ejected from the core of the star. The oxygen-rich filaments glow as they pass through a network of shock fronts reflected off dense interstellar clouds that surrounded the exploded star. These dense clouds, which appear as reddish filaments, also glow as the shock wave from the supernova crushes and heats the clouds. Supernova remnants provide a rare opportunity to observe directly the interiors of stars far more massive than our Sun. The precursor star to this remnant, which was located slightly below and left of center in the image, is estimated to have been 25 times the mass of our Sun. These stars 'cook' heavier elements through nuclear fusion, including oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, iron etc., and the titanic supernova explosions scatter this material back into space where it is used to create new generations of stars. This is the mechanism by which the gas and dust that formed our solar system became enriched with the elements that sustain life on this planet. Hubble spectroscopic observations will be used to determine the exact

  10. OXYGEN-RICH SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the tattered debris of a star that exploded 3,000 years ago as a supernova. This supernova remnant, called N132D, lies 169,000 light-years away in the satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. A Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image of the inner regions of the supernova remnant shows the complex collisions that take place as fast moving ejecta slam into cool, dense interstellar clouds. This level of detail in the expanding filaments could only be seen previously in much closer supernova remnants. Now, Hubble's capabilities extend the detailed study of supernovae out to the distance of a neighboring galaxy. Material thrown out from the interior of the exploded star at velocities of more than four million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second) plows into neighboring clouds to create luminescent shock fronts. The blue-green filaments in the image correspond to oxygen-rich gas ejected from the core of the star. The oxygen-rich filaments glow as they pass through a network of shock fronts reflected off dense interstellar clouds that surrounded the exploded star. These dense clouds, which appear as reddish filaments, also glow as the shock wave from the supernova crushes and heats the clouds. Supernova remnants provide a rare opportunity to observe directly the interiors of stars far more massive than our Sun. The precursor star to this remnant, which was located slightly below and left of center in the image, is estimated to have been 25 times the mass of our Sun. These stars 'cook' heavier elements through nuclear fusion, including oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, iron etc., and the titanic supernova explosions scatter this material back into space where it is used to create new generations of stars. This is the mechanism by which the gas and dust that formed our solar system became enriched with the elements that sustain life on this planet. Hubble spectroscopic observations will be used to determine the exact

  11. Ten years of experience with third and fourth branchial remnants.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Moishe; Kay, Saundra; Emil, Sherif; Flageole, Hélène; Nguyen, Luong T; Tewfik, Ted L; Oudjhane, Kamal; Laberge, Jean-Martin

    2002-05-01

    Third and fourth branchial remnants may result in cysts and abscesses that are in close contact with the thyroid gland. These anomalies are rare and often present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The charts of patients diagnosed with a branchial anomaly between July 1991 and July 2001 at the Montreal Children's Hospital were reviewed. All cases of third and fourth branchial remnants or pyriform sinus fistulae were identified. Clinical presentation, imaging, treatment, and outcome were recorded. Eight patients with a third or fourth branchial anomaly were identified and ranged in age from birth to 13 years. All anomalies were left sided. Presenting symptoms consisted of an asymptomatic cervical mass (n = 1), an infected mass (n = 5), neonatal respiratory distress (n = 1), and 1 incidental cyst found on magnetic resonance imaging. Ultrasonography was useful in suggesting the diagnosis in 7 cases. Barium swallow was performed in 3 patients with 2 positive results. Pharyngoscopy results showed the internal opening in 2 of 7 patients. A portion of the thyroid gland was resected in 6 patients. One patient has not yet undergone a definitive procedure. There was 1 recurrence in a patient whose pathology did not confirm a branchial remnant. The diagnosis and management of pyriform sinus anomalies are challenging. Ultrasound scan, computed tomography scan, barium swallow, and pharyngoscopy are all useful. The portion of thyroid involved in the fistula must be excised en bloc with the inflammatory mass, and the tract should be ligated at the level of the pharynx to minimize recurrence. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  12. A Micropuncture Study of Potassium Excretion by the Remnant Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Bank, Norman; Aynedjian, Hagop S.

    1973-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of enhanced potassium excretion by the remaining nephrons of the remnant kidney, micropuncture and clearance experiments were carried out in rats after surgical ablation of 3/4 of the total renal mass. The potassium intake in all animals was approximately 5 meq/day. Animals were studied 24 h and 10-14 days after 3/4 nephrectomy. Balance measurements in the chronic animals before micropuncture study indicated that 24 h K+ excretion by the remnant kidney was equal to that of the two kidneys before ablation of renal mass. Measurements of distal tubular inulin and potassium concentrations revealed progressive reabsorption of potassium in this segment of the nephron in both the 24-h and chronic 3/4-nephrectomized rats, as well as in normal control rats. A large increase in tubular fluid potassium content occurred between the end of the distal tubule and the final urine in the 3/4-nephrectomized rats, but not in the normal controls. These observations suggest that the segment of the nephron responsible for enhanced potassium excretion by remaining nephrons was the collecting duct. In additional experiments, potassium was completely eliminated from the diet of chronic 3/4-nephrectomized rats before micropuncture study. In these animals, no addition of K+ occurred beyond the distal tubules. Normal rats infused with 0.15 M KCl to acutely elevate serum K+ concentration, demonstrated reabsorption of K+ in the distal tubule and a large addition of K+ to the urine beyond the distal tubule. We conclude that the collecting duct is the major site of regulation of urinary potassium excretion in normal rats and is responsible for the adaptation to nephron loss by the remnant kidney. PMID:4703232

  13. PHYSICAL STRUCTURE AND NATURE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN M101

    SciTech Connect

    Franchetti, Nicholas A.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Chu, You-Hua; Dunne, Bryan C.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Grimes, Caleb K.; Kuntz, Kip D.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Aldridge, Tabitha M. E-mail: gruendl@astro.illinois.edu E-mail: bdunne@astro.illinois.edu E-mail: ckgrim01@moreheadstate.edu E-mail: rchen@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

    2012-04-15

    Supernova remnant (SNR) candidates in the giant spiral galaxy M101 have been previously identified from ground-based H{alpha} and [S II] images. We have used archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) H{alpha} and broadband images as well as stellar photometry of 55 SNR candidates to examine their physical structure, interstellar environment, and underlying stellar population. We have also obtained high-dispersion echelle spectra to search for shocked high-velocity gas in 18 SNR candidates, and identified X-ray counterparts to SNR candidates using data from archival observations made by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Twenty-one of these 55 SNR candidates studied have X-ray counterparts, although one of them is a known ultraluminous X-ray source. The multi-wavelength information has been used to assess the nature of each SNR candidate. We find that within this limited sample, {approx}16% are likely remnants of Type Ia SNe and {approx}45% are remnants of core-collapse SNe. In addition, about {approx}36% are large candidates which we suggest are either superbubbles or OB/H II complexes. Existing radio observations are not sensitive enough to detect the non-thermal emission from these SNR candidates. Several radio sources are coincident with X-ray sources, but they are associated with either giant H II regions in M101 or background galaxies. The archival HST H{alpha} images do not cover the entire galaxy and thus prevents a complete study of M101. Furthermore, the lack of HST [S II] images precludes searches for small SNR candidates which could not be identified by ground-based observations. Such high-resolution images are needed in order to obtain a complete census of SNRs in M101 for a comprehensive investigation of the distribution, population, and rates of SNe in this galaxy.

  14. Statistical Analysis of Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzetto, Luke M.; Filipović, Miroslav D.; Vukotić, Branislav; Pavlović, Marko Z.; Urošević, Dejan; Kavanagh, Patrick J.; Arbutina, Bojan; Maggi, Pierre; Sasaki, Manami; Haberl, Frank; Crawford, Evan J.; Roper, Quentin; Grieve, Kevin; Points, S. D.

    2017-05-01

    We construct the most complete sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) in any galaxy—the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) SNR sample. We study their various properties such as spectral index (α), size, and surface brightness. We suggest an association between the spatial distribution and environment density of LMC SNRs, and their tendency to be located around supergiant shells. We find evidence that the 16 known type Ia LMC SNRs are expanding in a lower density environment compared to the Core-Collapse (CC) type. The mean diameter of our entire population (74) is 41 pc, which is comparable to nearby galaxies. We did not find any correlation between the type of SN explosion, ovality, or age. The N(< D) relationship with slope a = 0.96 implies that the randomized diameters are readily mimicking such an exponent. The rate of SNe occurring in the LMC is estimated to be ˜1 per 200 yr. The mean α of the entire LMC SNR population is -0.52, which is typical of most SNRs. However, our estimates show a clear flattening of the synchrotron α as the remnants age. As predicted, the CC SNRs in our sample are significantly brighter radio emitters than type Ia remnants. We also estimate the {{Σ }}{--}D relation for the LMC to have a slope ˜3.8, which is comparable with other nearby galaxies. We also find the residency time of electrons in the galaxy (4.0-14.3 Myr), implying that SNRs should be the dominant mechanism for the production and acceleration of CRs.

  15. Remnant radio galaxies in the LOFAR Lockman Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brienza, Marisa; Godfrey, Leith; Morganti, Raffaella

    2016-08-01

    I will present recent 150-MHz deep observations performed with the Low-frequency Array (LOFAR) of the well-known extragalactic region of the Lockman Hole. Thanks to its high sensitivity and resolution this data allows us to perform new studies of the radio loud AGN population at low radio frequencies. In particular, we conducted a systematic search of remnant radio galaxies, which represent the final "dying" phase of the radio galaxy evolution, when the jets have switched off. This class of sources is best to investigate the life-cycle of radio loud AGN as well as to quantify the role of radio AGN feedback. Indeed, the modelling of their radio spectrum provides constraints on the time-scales of activity and quiescence of the radio source and on its energy output. For a long time there have been claims that deep low-frequency surveys would have enhanced the detection of this class of sources, which are usually rare in flux limited samples.With our search, we thus intend to provide good statistics on the detection and properties of remnant radio galaxies. To avoid selection biases towards any specific class of objects we used both morphological and spectral selection criteria. To do this we combined the LOFAR data with publicly available surveys at other frequencies as well as dedicated deep observations. We find that the fraction of candidate remnant sources is < 6-8% of the entire radio source population and is dominated by steep spectrum sources. To better understand the observed fraction we developed mock catalogues of the radio sky population based on radio galaxy evolution models. These models are used to constrain the main mechanisms contributing to the source luminosity evolution i.e. adiabatic expansion, radiative losses, as well as to make predictions on their fraction in flux limited samples.

  16. Sites of Relativistic Particle Acceleration in Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. C.; Rudnick, L.

    1996-01-01

    We have determined the synchrotron spectral indices of 304 compact radio knots in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. A comparison of these data with the dynamical and brightness properties of these knots tabulated by Anderson & Rudnick indicates that spectral index shows a significant correlation with projected radius from the center of the remnant. Spectrally flat knots reside in a shell coincident with the bright radio ring, while steeper knots occupy a shell coincident with the diffuse radio plateau surrounding the ring. To a lesser extent, we find spectral index to be correlated also with the radio brightness of the knot, in the sense that brighter knots tend to have steeper spectra. No significant correlation is found between spectral index and knot deceleration or rate of brightness change. As the synchrotron spectral index traces the distribution of energy among relativistic particle populations, we use these results to study the nature of particle acceleration mechanisms active in Cas A. Given the dual- shell nature of the spectral index distribution in Cas A and the lack of strong correlation between spectral index and dynamical properties of the knots, we conclude that radio-bright compact features are not sites of currently active particle acceleration in Cas A. This conclusion is in agreement with models of supersonic gaseous bullets constructed by Jones, Kang, & Tregillis. In these models, the marked synchrotron brightening which accompanies bullet deceleration is due primarily to preexisting relativistic particles radiating in rapidly amplifying shear-layer magnetic fields, rather than a large infusion of new relativistic particles accelerated in situ. Spectral variations between compact features in Cas A are more likely to reflect modulations in the background particle energy spectra within the remnant, perhaps instilled by temperature variations in the underlying thermal material. This interpretation requires that the diffuse synchrotron emission

  17. N157B: X-ray evidence for a Crab-like supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, Eric V.; Wang, Q. Daniel

    1996-01-01

    The X-ray observation of the supernova remnant N 157B is described. The Rosat High Resolution Imager (HRI) X-ray emission from the remnant was decomposed into point-like sources. The spectra showed abundance-enhanced neon and magnesium lines, indicating that the remnant originated in a massive progenitor. The flat and featureless data from the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) confirm the Crab-like nature of the remnant. By interpreting both the thermal spectral component and the shell as representing the remnant's outer shock, the age of the remnant was estimated to be 4 x 10(exp 3) yr and the energy release approximately 2 x 10(exp 50) erg.

  18. Apolipoprotein A-V Deficiency Results in MarkedHypertriglyceridemia Attributable to Decreased Lipolysis ofTriglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Removal of Their Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Grosskopf, Itamar; Baroukh, Nadine; Lee, Sung-Joon; Kamari,Yehuda; Harats, Dror; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Cooper, AllenD.

    2005-09-01

    Objective--ApoAV, a newly discovered apoprotein, affectsplasma triglyceride level. To determine how this occurs, we studiedtriglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) metabolism in mice deficient inapoAV. Methods and Results No significant difference in triglycerideproduction rate was found between apoa5_/_ mice and controls. Thepresence or absence of apoAV affected TRL catabolism. After the injectionof 14C-palmitate and 3H-cholesterol labeled chylomicrons and 125I-labeledchylomicron remnants, the disappearance of 14C, 3H, and 125I wassignificantly slower in apoa5_/_ mice relative to controls. This wasbecause of diminished lipolysis of TRL and the reduced rate of uptake oftheir remnants in apoa5_/_ mice. Observed elevated cholesterol level wascaused by increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol inapoa5_/_ mice. VLDL from apoa5_/_ mice were poor substrate forlipoprotein lipase, and did not bind to the low-density lipoprotein (LDL)receptor as well as normal very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL). LDLreceptor levels were slightly elevated in apoa5_/_ mice consistent withlower remnant uptake rates. These alterations may be the result of thelower apoE-to-apoC ratio found in VLDL isolated from apoa5_/_mice.Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that the absence ofapoAV slows lipolysis of TRL and the removal of their remnants byregulating their apoproteins content after secretion.

  19. THE [O III] NEBULA OF THE MERGER REMNANT NGC 7252: A LIKELY FAINT IONIZATION ECHO

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, Francois; Kelson, Daniel D.; Villanueva, Edward V.; Seitzer, Patrick; Walth, Gregory L.

    2013-08-20

    We present images and spectra of a {approx}10 kpc-sized emission-line nebulosity discovered in the prototypical merger remnant NGC 7252 and dubbed the ''[O III] nebula'' because of its dominant [O III] {lambda}5007 line. This nebula seems to yield the first sign of episodic active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity still occurring in the remnant, {approx}220 Myr after the coalescence of two gas-rich galaxies. Its location and kinematics suggest it belongs to a stream of tidal-tail gas falling back into the remnant. Its integrated [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosity is 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, and its spectrum features some high-excitation lines, including He II {lambda}4686. In diagnostic line-ratio diagrams, the nebula lies in the domain of Seyfert galaxies, suggesting that it is photoionized by a source with a power-law spectrum. Yet, a search for AGN activity in NGC 7252 from X-rays to radio wavelengths yields no detection, with the most stringent upper limit set by X-ray observations. The upper luminosity limit of L{sub 2-10{sub keV,0}}<5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} estimated for the nucleus is {approx}10{sup 3} times lower than the minimum ionizing luminosity of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} necessary to excite the nebula. This large discrepancy suggests that the nebula is a faint ionization echo excited by a mildly active nucleus that has declined by {approx}3 orders of magnitude over the past 20,000-200,000 yr. In many ways this nebula resembles the prototypical ''Hanny's Voorwerp'' near IC 2497, but its size is 3 Multiplication-Sign smaller and its [O III] luminosity {approx}100 Multiplication-Sign lower. We propose that it be classified as an extended emission-line region (EELR). The [O III] nebula is then the lowest-luminosity ionization echo and EELR discovered so far, indicative of recent, probably sputtering AGN activity of Seyfert-like intensity in NGC 7252.

  20. Exploring properties of high-density matter through remnants of neutron-star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauswein, Andreas; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Remnants of neutron-star mergers are essentially massive, hot, differentially rotating neutron stars, which are initially strongly oscillating. As such they represent a unique probe for high-density matter because the oscillations are detectable via gravitational-wave measurements and are strongly dependent on the equation of state. The impact of the equation of state for instance is apparent in the frequency of the dominant oscillation mode of the remnant. For a fixed total binary mass a tight relation between the dominant postmerger oscillation frequency and the radii of nonrotating neutron stars exists. Inferring observationally the dominant postmerger frequency thus determines neutron star radii with high accuracy of the order of a few hundred meters. By considering symmetric and asymmetric binaries of the same chirp mass, we show that the knowledge of the binary mass ratio is not critical for this kind of radius measurements. We perform simulations which show that initial intrinsic neutron star rotation is unlikely to affect this method of constraining the high-density equation of state. We also summarize different possibilities about how the postmerger gravitational-wave emission can be employed to deduce the maximum mass of nonrotating neutron stars. We clarify the nature of the three most prominent features of the postmerger gravitational-wave spectrum and argue that the merger remnant can be considered to be a single, isolated, self-gravitating object that can be described by concepts of asteroseismology. We sketch how the consideration of the strength of secondary gravitational-wave peaks leads to a classification scheme of the gravitational-wave emission and postmerger dynamics. The understanding of the different mechanisms shaping the gravitational-wave signal yields a physically motivated analytic model of the gravitational-wave emission, which may form the basis for template-based gravitational-wave data analysis. We explore the observational

  1. Long term trends of stand transpiration in a remnant forest during wet and dry years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppel, Melanie J. B.; Macinnis-Ng, Catriona M. O.; Yunusa, Isa A. M.; Whitley, Rhys J.; Eamus, Derek

    2008-01-01

    SummaryDaily and annual rates of stand transpiration in a drought year and a non-drought year are compared in order to understand the adaptive responses of a remnant woodland to drought and predict the effect of land use change. Two methods were used to estimate stand transpiration. In the first, the ratio of sap velocity of a few trees measured for several hundred days to the mean sap velocity of many trees measured during brief sampling periods (generally 6-7 trees for 5 or 6 days), called the Esv method is used to scale temporally from the few intensive study periods. The second method used was the Penman-Monteith (P-M) equation (called the EPM method). Weather variables and soil moisture were used to predict canopy conductance, which in turn was used to predict daily and annual stand transpiration. Comparisons of daily transpiration estimated with the two methods showed larger values for the EPM method during a drought year and smaller values for the EPM when the rainfall was above average. Generally, though, annual estimates of stand transpiration were similar using the two methods. The Esv method produced an estimate of 318 mm (61% of rainfall) in the drought year and 443 mm (42%) in the year having above average rainfall. The EPM method estimated stand transpiration as 379 mm (73%) and 398 mm (37%), respectively, for the two years. Both estimates of annual stand transpiration demonstrated that the remnant forest showed resilience to an extreme and long-term drought. More importantly, the annual estimates showed that in dry years a larger proportion of rainfall was used as transpiration, and groundwater recharge was absent but in years with above average rainfall recharge was significantly increased. Changes in leaf area index were minimal between years and changes in stomatal conductance were the dominant mechanism for adapting to the drought. The remnant forest rapidly responded to increased water availability after the drought through a new flush of leaves

  2. Late-time hohlraum pressure dynamics in supernova remnant experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Remington, B. A.; Drake, R. P.; Dannenberg, K. K.

    2001-06-01

    It is shown that laser driven hohlraums obtain significant internal pressures which affect the hydrodynamics of high-energy density shock-tube experiments. By incorporating this previously neglected hohlraum pressure effect (in addition to the usual x-ray drive) into computer simulations which model the NOVA laser driven supernova remnant experiment [R. P. Drake, S. G. Glendinning, K. Estabrook, B. A. Remington, R. McCray, R. J. Williams, L. J. Suter, T. B. Smith, J. J. Carroll III, R. A. London, and E. Liang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2068 (1998)], calculations are able to reproduce the observed structure of hydrodynamic features.

  3. Core-collapse supernova remnants and interactions with their surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantseg, Thomas Felton

    This thesis examines three core-collapse supernova remnants (SNR)---the Cygnus Loop in the Milky Way and 0453-68.5 and 0540-69.3 in the Large Magellanic Cloud---of varying ages and in varying states of interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM), using X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra and supplemental data from other wavelengths. We use results from our analysis to address three main questions. First, we examine the applicability of the common Sedov-Taylor adiabatic blast wave model to core-collapse supernovae. Second, we determine the elemental abundances around the shell of these supernova remnants to determine if the use of SNRs as a gauge of abundances in the ISM is justified. Finally, we examine the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) in 0453-68.5 and 0540-69.3 and search for evidence of interaction between these PWNe and their immediate surroundings. We see highly inhomogeneous ISM surrounding all three surveyed SNRs, contrary to the key assumption in the Sedov-Taylor model of a uniform surrounding medium. In all three studied SNRs, we find that shock speeds are dependent on the density of the surrounding material. As subsidiary results, we also find depleted elemental abundances of oxygen, magnesium, and silicon, relative to typical ISM, around all three studied supernova remnants. Although this subsidiary result is not conclusive, we believe that it merits a followup study. In 0540-69.3 and 0453-68.5, which contain central pulsars, we find that the explosion directionality, which can be inferred from the pulsar's proper motion relative to the SNR, is not related to the morphology of the SNR itself. We conclude from this that the asymmetric shapes common in core-collapse supernova remnants can be more a function of the complex environments surrounding the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae than of the supernova explosions themselves. Finally, we see that the PWN in 0453-68.5 shows signs of having mixed with the surrounding thermal- emitting

  4. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r→0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  5. SPECTRUM OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS ACCELERATED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2010-07-20

    The spectra of high-energy protons and nuclei accelerated by supernova remnant (SNR) shocks are calculated, taking into account magnetic field amplification and Alfvenic drift both upstream and downstream of the shock for different types of SNRs during their evolution. The maximum energy of accelerated particles may reach 5 x 10{sup 18} eV for Fe ions in Type IIb SNRs. The calculated energy spectrum of cosmic rays after propagation through the Galaxy is in good agreement with the spectrum measured at the Earth.

  6. A mechanism for strong shock electron heating in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that collisionless shock waves propagating away from a supernova may be directly responsible for the 10 keV X-ray emission seen in supernova remnants. A sequence of plasma instabilities (Buneman and ion acoustic) between the reflected and/or transmitted ions and the background electrons at the foot of the shock front can give rise to rapid anomalous heating of electrons. Hybrid simulations of a perpendicular collisionless shock are presented to demonstrate that this heating can arise within a self-consistently computed shock structure.

  7. A 3D View of a Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    The outlined regions mark the 57 knots in Tycho selected by the authors for velocity measurements. Magenta regions have redshifted line-of-sight velocities (moving away from us); cyan regions have blueshifted light-of-sight velocities (moving toward us). [Williams et al. 2017]The Tycho supernova remnant was first observed in the year 1572. Nearly 450 years later, astronomers have now used X-ray observations of Tycho to build the first-ever 3D map of a Type Ia supernova remnant.Signs of ExplosionsSupernova remnants are spectacular structures formed by the ejecta of stellar explosions as they expand outwards into the surrounding interstellar medium.One peculiarity of these remnants is that they often exhibit asymmetries in their appearance and motion. Is this because the ejecta are expanding into a nonuniform interstellar medium? Or was the explosion itself asymmetric? The best way we can explore this question is with detailed observations of the remnants.Histograms of the velocity in distribution of the knots in the X (green), Y (blue) and Z (red) directions (+Z is away from the observer). They show no evidence for asymmetric expansion of the knots. [Williams et al. 2017]Enter TychoTo this end, a team of scientists led by Brian Williams (Space Telescope Science Institute and NASA Goddard SFC) has worked to map out the 3D velocities of the ejecta in the Tycho supernova remnant. Tycho is a Type Ia supernova thought to be caused by the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf in a binary system that was destabilized by mass transfer from its companion.After 450 years of expansion, the remnant now has the morphological appearance of a roughly circular cloud of clumpy ejecta. The forward shock wave from the supernova, however, is known to have twice the velocity on one side of the shell as on the other.To better understand this asymmetry, Williams and collaborators selected a total of 57 knots in Tychos ejecta, spread out around the remnant. They then used 12 years of

  8. Caudal appendage derived from a vestigial remnant of the tailgut.

    PubMed

    Tatekawa, Yukihiro; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Toshimichi; Sonobe, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    The presence of smooth muscle at the basal portion of a caudal appendage is very rare. We report a 3-month-old girl in which a caudal appendage is associated with smooth muscle bundles at the perianal region. Immunohistochemistry was performed for NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule) to identify smooth muscle. NCAM immunoreactivity was observed within the presumptive circular and/or longitudinal muscle layers of the muscularis propria. NCAM is expressed by smooth muscle during the early stages of human embryonic gut development, suggesting that the caudal appendage in the present case may be derived from a tailgut remnant.

  9. Remnant percolative disorder in highly-cured networks

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Hance, B.; Martin, J.E. )

    1993-05-24

    The authors have previously reported viscoelastic measurements demonstrating that fully-cured networks and critical gels exhibit similar relaxation spectra, implying that fully-cured networks are somewhat ill- connected. Here, they present restricted valence percolation simulations of networks well beyond the percolation transition that explicitly display remnant disorder over length scales less than the correlation length of the network. They conclude that the topology of highly-cured networks is not well described by a regular three- dimensional tennis net but is ill-connected over length scales that correspond to relaxation modes of practical interest.

  10. Search for gamma ray lines from supernovae and supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Suri, A. N.; Adams, R.; Tsai, C.

    1974-01-01

    A gamma ray monitor with a NaI crystal shielded with a cup-shaped CsI cover was contained in the rotating wheel compartment of the OSO-7 spacecraft for measuring the gamma ray spectra from 0.3 to 10 MeV in search for gamma ray lines from a possible remnant in the Gum Nebula and the apparent Type I supernovae in NGC5253. A brief analysis of data yielded no positive indications for X-rays, gamma ray lines, or continuum from these sources.

  11. Energetics and Birth Rates of Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Published X-ray emission properties for a sample of 50 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) are used as input for SNR evolution modeling calculations. The forward shock emission is modeled to obtain the initial explosion energy, age, and circumstellar medium density for each SNR in the sample. The resulting age distribution yields a SNR birthrate of 1/(500 yr) for the LMC. The explosion energy distribution is well fit by a log-normal distribution, with a most-probable explosion energy of 0.5× {10}51 erg, with a 1σ dispersion by a factor of 3 in energy. The circumstellar medium density distribution is broader than the explosion energy distribution, with a most-probable density of ∼0.1 cm‑3. The shape of the density distribution can be fit with a log-normal distribution, with incompleteness at high density caused by the shorter evolution times of SNRs.

  12. Remnant trees affect species composition but not structure of tropical second-growth forest.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Manette E; Chazdon, Robin L

    2014-01-01

    Remnant trees, spared from cutting when tropical forests are cleared for agriculture or grazing, act as nuclei of forest regeneration following field abandonment. Previous studies on remnant trees were primarily conducted in active pasture or old fields abandoned in the previous 2-3 years, and focused on structure and species richness of regenerating forest, but not species composition. Our study is among the first to investigate the effects of remnant trees on neighborhood forest structure, biodiversity, and species composition 20 years post-abandonment. We compared the woody vegetation around individual remnant trees to nearby plots without remnant trees in the same second-growth forests ("control plots"). Forest structure beneath remnant trees did not differ significantly from control plots. Species richness and species diversity were significantly higher around remnant trees. The species composition around remnant trees differed significantly from control plots and more closely resembled the species composition of nearby old-growth forest. The proportion of old-growth specialists and generalists around remnant trees was significantly greater than in control plots. Although previous studies show that remnant trees may initially accelerate secondary forest growth, we found no evidence that they locally affect stem density, basal area, and seedling density at later stages of regrowth. Remnant trees do, however, have a clear effect on the species diversity, composition, and ecological groups of the surrounding woody vegetation, even after 20 years of forest regeneration. To accelerate the return of diversity and old-growth forest species into regrowing forest on abandoned land, landowners should be encouraged to retain remnant trees in agricultural or pastoral fields.

  13. The Non-Thermal Electron Spectrum of the Supernova Remnant SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Glenn E.; Sturner, Steven J.

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of a spectral analysis of a compilation of X-ray, radio, and gamma-ray data for the supernova remnant SN 1006. The data are used to constrain models of the electron spectrum of the remnant. We present the results for the electron spectrum and review the implications for cosmic-ray acceleration and the strength of the magnetic field in the remnant.

  14. A high sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Bleach, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    A high sensitivity scan of the galactic plane was performed to search for 2-20 keV X-rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 deg and 31 deg longitude, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants, are reported on. Upper limits are presented for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned in this survey.

  15. Spatially Resolved Thermal Continuum Absorption Against Supernova Remnant W49B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    lines : ISM È scattering È supernova remnants 1. INTRODUCTION The integrated radio continuum spectra of Galactic supernova remnants ( SNRs ) are generally...remnants to a ^ [0.1 for plerions, with many presenting blended emission at intermediate indices. However, below 100 MHz, roughly two-thirds of SNRs show...the poor correlation between the presence of a turnover and the albeit poorly constrained distance to an SNR are inconsistent with absorption arising

  16. Remnant Trees Affect Species Composition but Not Structure of Tropical Second-Growth Forest

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, Manette E.; Chazdon, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    Remnant trees, spared from cutting when tropical forests are cleared for agriculture or grazing, act as nuclei of forest regeneration following field abandonment. Previous studies on remnant trees were primarily conducted in active pasture or old fields abandoned in the previous 2–3 years, and focused on structure and species richness of regenerating forest, but not species composition. Our study is among the first to investigate the effects of remnant trees on neighborhood forest structure, biodiversity, and species composition 20 years post-abandonment. We compared the woody vegetation around individual remnant trees to nearby plots without remnant trees in the same second-growth forests (“control plots”). Forest structure beneath remnant trees did not differ significantly from control plots. Species richness and species diversity were significantly higher around remnant trees. The species composition around remnant trees differed significantly from control plots and more closely resembled the species composition of nearby old-growth forest. The proportion of old-growth specialists and generalists around remnant trees was significantly greater than in control plots. Although previous studies show that remnant trees may initially accelerate secondary forest growth, we found no evidence that they locally affect stem density, basal area, and seedling density at later stages of regrowth. Remnant trees do, however, have a clear effect on the species diversity, composition, and ecological groups of the surrounding woody vegetation, even after 20 years of forest regeneration. To accelerate the return of diversity and old-growth forest species into regrowing forest on abandoned land, landowners should be encouraged to retain remnant trees in agricultural or pastoral fields. PMID:24454700

  17. A high-sensitivity search for X-rays from supernova remnants in Aquila.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Bleach, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    A high-sensitivity scan of the galactic plane from 70 to 30 deg was performed to search for 2-20-keV X rays from supernova remnants. The spectra of five X-ray sources detected between 44 and 31 deg longitude are presented, of which only two might be associated with suggested supernova remnants. Upper limits are given for the 19 possible supernova remnants scanned.

  18. Formation of the remnant close to Planck scale and the Schwarzschild black hole with global monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Ling; Chen, Shuai-Ru

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we use the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) and quantum tunneling method to research the formation of the remnant from a Schwarzschild black hole with global monopole. Based on the corrected Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the corrections to the Hawking temperature, heat capacity and entropy are calculated. We not only find the remnant close to Planck scale by employing GUP, but also research the thermodynamic stability of the black hole remnant according to the phase transition and heat capacity.

  19. Spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova 1987A with ALMA and ATCA

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardo, Giovanna; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Indebetouw, Remy; Chevalier, Roger A.; Matsuura, Mikako; Barlow, Michael J.; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter; Manchester, Richard N.; Baes, Maarten; Kamenetzky, Julia R.; Lakićević, Maša; Marcaide, Jon M.; Meixner, Margaret; Ng, C.-Y.; Park, Sangwook; and others

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The non-thermal and thermal components of the radio emission are investigated in images from 94 to 672 GHz (λ 3.2 mm to 450 μm), with the assistance of a high-resolution 44 GHz synchrotron template from the ATCA, and a dust template from ALMA observations at 672 GHz. An analysis of the emission distribution over the equatorial ring in images from 44 to 345 GHz highlights a gradual decrease of the east-to-west asymmetry ratio with frequency. We attribute this to the shorter synchrotron lifetime at high frequencies. Across the transition from radio to far infrared, both the synchrotron/dust-subtracted images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) suggest additional emission beside the main synchrotron component (S {sub ν}∝ν{sup –0.73}) and the thermal component originating from dust grains at T ∼ 22 K. This excess could be due to free-free flux or emission from grains of colder dust. However, a second flat-spectrum synchrotron component appears to better fit the SED, implying that the emission could be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The residual emission is mainly localized west of the SN site, as the spectral analysis yields –0.4 ≲ α ≲ –0.1 across the western regions, with α ∼ 0 around the central region. If there is a PWN in the remnant interior, these data suggest that the pulsar may be offset westward from the SN position.

  20. The Compact Central Object in the RX J0852.0-4622 Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, George G.; Sanwal, Divas; Kızıltan, Bülent; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2001-10-01

    The central region of the recently discovered supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622 was observed with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer detector aboard the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We found only one relatively bright source, about 4' north of the SNR center, with a flux of ~2×10-12 ergs s-1 cm-2 in the 0.5-10 keV band. The position of this pointlike source, CXOU J085201.4-461753, rules out its association with the two bright stars in the field, HD 76060 and Wray 16-30. Observations of the field with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory 0.9 m telescope show a star (R~17, B~19) at about 2.4" from the nominal X-ray position. We consider association of this star with the X-ray source unlikely and estimate a limiting magnitude of the optical counterpart as B>=22.5 and R>=21.0. Based on the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio, we argue that the X-ray source is likely the compact remnant of the supernova explosion that created the RX J0852.0-4622 SNR. The observed X-ray spectrum of the source is softer than spectra of magnetospheric radiation of rotation-powered pulsars, but it is harder than spectra of cooling neutron stars emitting thermal radiation from the entire surface, similar to the central compact source of the Cas A SNR. We suggest that CXOU J085201.4-461753 belongs to the growing family of radio-quiet compact central sources, presumably neutron stars, recently discovered in a number of SNRs.

  1. An X-ray study of the supernova remnant W44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrus, Ilana; Hughes, John P.

    1994-12-01

    We report results from the analysis and modeling of data for the supernova remnant (SNR) W44. Spectral analysis of archival data from the Einstein Solid State Spectrometer, the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter, and the Large Area Counters on Ginga, covering an energy range from 0.3 to 8 keV, indicates that the SNR can be described well using a nonequilibrium ionization model with temperature ~ 0.8 keV, ionization timescale ~ 9000 cm(-3) years, and elemental abundances close to the solar ratios. The column density toward the SNR is high: greater than 10(22) atoms cm(-2) . As has been known for some time, W44 presents a centrally peaked surface brightness distribution in the soft X-ray band while at radio wavelengths it shows a limb-brightened shell morphology, in contradiction to predictions of standard models (e.g., Sedov) for SNR evolution. We have investigated two different evolutionary scenarios which can explain the centered X-ray morphology of the remnant: (1) the White and Long (1991) model involving the slow thermal evaporation of clouds engulfed by the supernova blast wave as it propagates though a clumpy interstellar medium (ISM), and (2) a hydrodynamical simulation of a blast wave propagating through a homogeneous ISM, including the effects of radiative cooling. Both models can have their respective parameters tuned to reproduce approximately the morphology of the SNR. We find that, for the case of the radiative-phase shock model, the best agreement is obtained for an initial explosion energy in the range (0.5 - 0.6) times 10(51) ergs and an ambient ISM density of between 1.5 and 2 cm(-3) .

  2. Discovering and Characterizing the Young Supernova Remnant Population in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William

    2013-10-01

    Young supernova remnants {SNRs}, especially ones like Cas A where heavy elements are still prominent, provide insights into SNe, the stars that produce them, and the galaxies where they reside. Here we propose to leverage and expand on existing Hubble ACS/WFC images of the iconic face-on spiral M101 by obtaining new [O III] data and [S II] images with WFC3 to identify and characterize the SNR population of M101. Deep H-alpha images of M101 already exist for 4 ACS fields, as does an extremely deep {1 Ms Chandra} X-ray study-important since many SNRs, including ALL of the known ejecta-dominated ones, are strong X-ray sources. While existing data have enabled exploration of SNRs previously identified from the ground, they do not allow identifications of new {and especially young} SNRs. We propose to observe these fields in [O III] {strongest line in ejecta-dominated SNRs} and [S II] {to provide the [S II]/H-alpha ratio diagnostic to distinguish SNRs from photoionized nebulae}, plus adding one new field in these lines plus H-alpha. For a modest time investment, all the optical and X-ray diagnostics will be in hand to explore what we expect to be a rich population of young SNRs in the complex inner regions of the galaxy where HST resolution is most needed. Furthermore, ACS images in BVI also exist for these fields, so we will use CMD fitting to constrain the progenitor masses for many of these as we did for the SN 1957D remnant in M83. We will compare to other galaxies, especially M83 where the young SNRs appear to have evolved quickly beyond the ejecta-dominated stage. M101 and M83 differ in mean abundances and star formation rate areal density, providing contrasting conditions.

  3. Uterine remnants and pelvic pain in females with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Courtney A; Will, Matthew A; Smorgick, Noam; Quint, Elisabeth H; Hussain, Hero; Smith, Yolanda R

    2013-06-01

    To assess the association between pelvic pain and uterine remnants and review the management of pelvic pain in females with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome. Retrospective cohort. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at a tertiary referring medical center. Forty-eight females with MRKH presenting from 1997 to 2011 with anatomy confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). None. Prevalence Of uterine remnants and the association of uterine remnants with pelvic pain in females with MRKH. Of the 48 females with MRKH, 23 (48%) had uterine remnants and 22 (46%) had pelvic pain. Presence of endometrium was associated with pelvic pain (RR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.2-4.7) in females with MRKH. Of the females with MKRH and pain, 9/22 had laparoscopy, with endometriosis seen in 5/9 of the uterine remnants at stages higher than are usually seen in teenagers (56%). Nine patients with pain and uterine remnants (8 with endometrium, 1 without) had laparoscopic removal of uterine remnants with resolution of pain. Given the high prevalence of uterine remnants in females with MRKH, anatomic evaluation with MRI should be considered when assessing the etiology of pelvic pain. Presence of endometrium within uterine remnants, and subsequent endometriosis, in females with MRKH may be associated with pelvic pain necessitating surgical or medical management.

  4. Spontaneous Regression of Aneurysm Remnant after Incomplete Surgical Clipping in a Patient with Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hyo Sub; Ahn, JunHyong; Song, Joon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cases of spontaneous regression of cerebral aneurysm remnant after incomplete surgical clipping have been rarely reported. This paper reports the regression of an aneurysm remnant after incomplete surgical clipping during postsurgical follow-up. A 50-year-old male presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage because of rupture of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. An emergency clipping of the aneurysm was performed. A cerebral angiography, which was performed two weeks postoperatively, revealed an aneurysm remnant. The patient refused additional treatment and was discharged without apparent neurological deficit. One-year follow up cerebral angiography demonstrated a partially regressed aneurysm remnant. PMID:28184353

  5. Sparing the anterior cruciate ligament remnant: is it worth the hassle?

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Di Martino, Alberto; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is the most common surgically treated ligament injury. Many efforts have been taken to reconstruct it as anatomically as possible to restore knee stability and, possibly, prevent knee osteoarthritis. A literature search was performed using the isolated or combined keywords 'ACL augmentation remnant', 'ACL reconstruction and remnant and stump', 'ACL reconstruction and remnant and stump preserving and stability' and 'ACL remnant complete tear' with no limit regarding the year of publication. We identified seven published studies. The ACL remnant might accelerate the vascularization and the ligamentization of the graft and contribute to faster graft innervation leading to a better proprioception. The role of the ACL remnant is debated, because, although it may increase the risk of impingement and the formation of cyclops lesion, its preservation can improve proprioception, biomechanical functions and vascularity. However, the current assessment methods to assess proprioception, vascularization and the ligamentization do not lead to hard evidence that preservation of the remnant confers clinically relevant advantages over its excision. The ACL remnant has been demonstrated in experimental studies to have a role in improving revascularization, ligamentization and reinnervation of the graft, but these findings are still not supported by clinical findings. A more direct way to assess proprioceptive function after ACL reconstruction and appropriately conducted powered and rigorously prospective randomized double-blind studies comparing the clinical outcomes of excising the remnant to leaving it in situ are necessary.

  6. A new behind-remnant approach for remnant-preserving double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction compared with a standard approach.

    PubMed

    Muneta, Takeshi; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Tomomasa; Horie, Masafumi; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    To introduce a new behind-remnant approach for double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to compare the femoral tunnel positions of anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bundles between the new and standard procedures by a three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT). During DB ACL reconstruction, two approaches for femoral tunnel creation were consecutively practiced from 2010 to 2012. The patients were evaluated retrospectively as a cohort study. A total of 200 primary ACL reconstructions have been performed using a transtibial approach. One approach was a standard approach from the front in which the ACL remnant was peeled off from the attachment, and two guide wires were inserted based on anatomic bony landmarks (standard group). The other approach was a new behind-remnant approach in which the ACL remnant was kept untouched and two guide wires were inserted at the posterior margin of the direct ACL insertion (behind-remnant group). The position of the AM and PL femoral tunnels was expressed on a 3D-CT reconstructive image using the quadrant method with a statistical analysis. The depth of the AM center was 24 ± 6 % (mean and standard deviation) in the standard group and 22 ± 5 % in the behind-remnant group. The height of the AM tunnel center was 22 ± 8 % in the standard group and 31 ± 8 % in the behind-remnant group. The depth of the PL tunnel center was 32 ± 6 % in the standard group and 35 ± 5 % in the behind-remnant group. The height of the PL tunnel center was 47 ± 9 % in the standard group and 55 ± 7 % in the behind-remnant group. The AM and PL femoral tunnels in both groups were created within the normal anatomic footprint of the previous studies. The behind-remnant approach created a significantly lower femoral tunnel for both AM (p = 0.000) and PL tunnels (p = 0.000). The depth of both AM and PL tunnels was not significantly different between the two groups (n.s.). The new behind-remnant procedure is

  7. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Remnants: Targets for Therapy?

    PubMed

    Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Kroon, Jeffrey; Borén, Jan; Chapman, M John

    2016-07-01

    It is now evident that elevated circulating levels of triglycerides in the non-fasting state, a marker for triglyceride (TG)-rich remnant particles, are associated with increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent findings from basic and clinical studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the atherogenicity of these apoB-containing particles. Here, we review current knowledge of the formation, intravascular remodelling and catabolism of TG-rich lipoproteins and highlight (i) the pivotal players involved in this process, including lipoprotein lipase, glycosylphosphatidylinositol HDL binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1), apolipoprotein (apo) C-II, apoC-III, angiopoietin-like protein (ANGPTL) 3, 4 and 8, apoA-V and cholesteryl ester transfer protein; (ii) key determinants of triglyceride (TG) levels and notably rates of production of very-low-density lipoprotein 1 (VLDL1) particles; and (iii) the mechanisms which underlie the atherogenicity of remnant particles. Finally, we emphasise the polygenic nature of moderate hypertriglyceridemia and briefly discuss modalities for its clinical management. Several new therapeutic strategies to attenuate hypertriglyceridemia have appeared recently, among which those targeted to apoC-III appear to hold considerable promise.

  8. Destruction of Interstellar Dust in Evolving Supernova Remnant Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Dwek, Eli; Jones, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al. (1996), we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities 200 km s(exp -1) for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are increased by a factor of approximately 2 compared to those of Jones et al. (1996), who assumed a hot gas dominated ISM. Recent estimates of supernova rates and ISM mass lead to another factor of approximately 3 increase in the destruction timescales, resulting in a silicate grain destruction timescale of approximately 2-3 Gyr. These increases, while not able resolve the problem of the discrepant timescales for silicate grain destruction and creation, are an important step towards understanding the origin, and evolution of dust in the ISM.

  9. Planck intermediate results: XXXI. Microwave survey of Galactic supernova remnants

    DOE PAGES

    Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; ...

    2016-02-09

    The all-sky Planck survey in 9 frequency bands was used in this paper to search for emission from all 274 known Galactic supernova remnants. Of these, 16 were detected in at least two Planck frequencies. The radio-through-microwave spectral energy distributions were compiled to determine the mechanism for microwave emission. In only one case, IC 443, is there high-frequency emission clearly from dust associated with the supernova remnant. In all cases, the low-frequency emission is from synchrotron radiation. As predicted for a population of relativistic particles with energy distribution that extends continuously to high energies, a single power law is evidentmore » for many sources, including the Crab and PKS 1209-51/52. A decrease in flux density relative to the extrapolation of radio emission is evident in several sources. Their spectral energy distributions can be approximated as broken power laws, Sν ∝ ν-α, with the spectral index, α, increasing by 0.5–1 above a break frequency in the range 10–60 GHz. Finally, the break could be due to synchrotron losses.« less

  10. Future GLAST Observations of Supernova Remnants And Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-09-26

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of 100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range between 30 MeV and 300 GeV and will provide excellent sensitivity, angular and energy resolution in a previously rather poorly explored energy band. We will describe prospects for the investigation of these Galactic particle accelerators with GLAST.

  11. Planck intermediate results. XXXI. Microwave survey of Galactic supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Maino, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pasian, F.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Rho, J.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The all-sky Planck survey in 9 frequency bands was used to search for emission from all 274 known Galactic supernova remnants. Of these, 16 were detected in at least two Planck frequencies. The radio-through-microwave spectral energy distributions were compiled to determine the mechanism for microwave emission. In only one case, IC 443, is there high-frequency emission clearly from dust associated with the supernova remnant. In all cases, the low-frequency emission is from synchrotron radiation. As predicted for a population of relativistic particles with energy distribution that extends continuously to high energies, a single power law is evident for many sources, including the Crab and PKS 1209-51/52. A decrease in flux density relative to the extrapolation of radio emission is evident in several sources. Their spectral energy distributions can be approximated as broken power laws, Sν ∝ ν-α, with the spectral index, α, increasing by 0.5-1 above a break frequency in the range 10-60 GHz. The break could be due to synchrotron losses.

  12. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña na-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10-25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10-7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10-5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  13. Intestinal obstruction associated with ovarian remnant in postmenopausal female

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ridhima; Gupta, Pushpender

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian remnant syndrome (ORS) is a rare condition, in which the ovarian tissue is inadvertently left behind after difficult oophorectomy. The most common preexisting conditions associated for this complication include endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and prior abdominal surgery as in these conditions, removal of ovarian tissue becomes difficult. This is likely due to the presence of the dense fibrotic adhesions between an ovary and the surrounding structures. This residual ovarian tissue can become functional and cystic. A 56-year-old multigravida postmenopausal female was diagnosed with intestinal obstruction. She had multiple abdominal surgeries in the past, including cholecystectomy, appendectomy, hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Patient underwent exploratory laparotomy. Intraoperatively, extensive adhesions and scarring of bowel wall were present and approximately 15 cm proximal to the terminal ileum, a small bowel mesenteric nodule was present. Histopathology of the mesenteric nodule was consistent with the diagnosis of overian remnant. ORS can be prevented with careful resection of the entire ovarian tissue during the difficulty oophorectomy so that no ovarian tissue is left behind. PMID:28096643

  14. NASA's Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Produce Cosmic Rays

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    The W44 supernova remnant is nestled within and interacting with the molecular cloud that formed its parent star. Fermi's LAT detects GeV gamma rays (magenta) produced when the gas is bombarded by cosmic rays, primarily protons. Radio observations (yellow) from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array near Socorro, N.M., and infrared (red) data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope reveal filamentary structures in the remnant's shell. Blue shows X-ray emission mapped by the Germany-led ROSAT mission. To read more go to: 1.usa.gov/14V14qi NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration, NRAO/AUI, JPL-Caltech, ROSAT

  15. Constraining the Progenitor Masses of Core Collapse Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Rodríguez, Mariangelly; Murphy, Jeremiah Wayne; Elwood, Benjamin; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rubin, David

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the progenitor mass distribution of supernova explosions is an important observational constraint of stellar evolution theory. Recently, a novel approach was proposed to significantly increase the number of progenitor masses: characterize the progenitor mass of supernova remnants (SNRs) by age-dating the local stellar population. Preliminary statistical analyses suggested that there is a lack of SNRs around the most massive of massive stars. This suggested that there is a maximum mass for core collapse supernova explosions, or there is a bias against finding SNRs associated with the most massive stars. We test for a bias by considering the distribution of SNRs sizes using a Monte Carlo simulation. We find that the distribution of remnants sizes is the same for low mass progenitors and high mass progenitors. This implies that there is no bias against finding SNRs around the most massive progenitors. Our next step is to apply Bayesian statistical inference and obtain the joint probability for all the parameters involved in the statistical distribution model: the minimum mass, maximum mass, and slope of the mass distribution.

  16. Extremely fast acceleration of cosmic rays in a supernova remnant.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Aharonian, Felix A; Tanaka, Takaaki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Maeda, Yoshitomo

    2007-10-04

    Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) are widely believed to be accelerated by shock waves associated with the expansion of supernova ejecta into the interstellar medium. A key issue in this long-standing conjecture is a theoretical prediction that the interstellar magnetic field can be substantially amplified at the shock of a young supernova remnant (SNR) through magnetohydrodynamic waves generated by cosmic rays. Here we report a discovery of the brightening and decay of X-ray hot spots in the shell of the SNR RX J1713.7-3946 on a one-year timescale. This rapid variability shows that the X-rays are produced by ultrarelativistic electrons through a synchrotron process and that electron acceleration does indeed take place in a strongly magnetized environment, indicating amplification of the magnetic field by a factor of more than 100. The X-ray variability also implies that we have witnessed the ongoing shock-acceleration of electrons in real time. Independently, broadband X-ray spectrometric measurements of RX J1713.7-3946 indicate that electron acceleration proceeds in the most effective ('Bohm-diffusion') regime. Taken together, these two results provide a strong argument for acceleration of protons and nuclei to energies of 1 PeV (10(15) eV) and beyond in young supernova remnants.

  17. On VI Imaging Instrumentation and Spectroscopic Observations in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, M. N.

    2003-12-01

    For my thesis, I designed and built a high resolution imaging spectrograph, the Imaging Spectrograph for Interstellar Shocks (ISIS), that flew on a sub-orbital rocket from White Sands Missile Range on November 18th, 2002. This rocket-borne instrument was designed to image hot plasma at O vi λ λ 1032/1038 Å \\space behind a shock front in the Cygnus Loop. The new type of instrument developed for this application is a novel type of spectrograph that relies on a standard telescope for its optical layout. This layout, in conjunction with aberration-corrected holography, is capable of arcsecond quality imaging in diffracted light while maintaining arcsecond imaging at the telescope focus. The follow-up research is based on observations of N132D, a young, oxygen rich supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. These new spectroscopic observations from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer of emitting O vi in the shocked stellar ejecta were used to distinguish between different models of the ejecta and demonstrate that there is lack of appropriate observations of this type of remnant. This work was supported by NASA grants NAG5-5096, NAG5-7465, NAG5-8955, and NAG5-10319. M. Beasley was supported by a Graduate Student Research Program fellowship NGT5-50340.

  18. On VI imaging instrumentation and spectroscopic observations in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Matthew Nelson

    2003-10-01

    For my thesis project, I designed and built a high resolution imaging spectrograph, the Imaging Spectrograph for Interstellar Shocks (ISIS), that flew on a sub-orbital rocket from White Sands Missile Range on November 18th, 2002. This rocket-borne instrument was designed to image hot plasma at O VI lambdalambda1032/1038 A behind a shock front in the Cygnus Loop. The new type of instrument developed for this application is a novel type of spectrograph that relies on a standard telescope for its optical layout. This layout, in conjunction with aberration-corrected holography, is capable of arcsecond quality imaging in diffracted light while maintaining an arcsecond image at the telescope focus. The follow-up research is based on observations of N132D, a young, oxygen rich supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. These new spectroscopic observations from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer of emitting O VI in the shocked stellar ejecta were used to distinguish between different models of the ejecta and demonstrate that there is lack of appropriate observations of this type of remnant.

  19. Extremely Fast Acceleration of Cosmic Rays in a Supernova Remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Y.; Aharonian, F.A.; Tanaka, T.; Takahashi, T.; Maeda, Y.; /JAERI, Tokai /Dublin Inst. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /SLAC

    2007-10-23

    Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) are widely believed to be accelerated by shock waves associated with the expansion of supernova ejecta into the interstellar medium. A key issue in this long-standing conjecture is a theoretical prediction that the interstellar magnetic field can be substantially amplified at the shock of a young supernova remnant (SNR) through magnetohydrodynamic waves generated by cosmic rays. Here we report a discovery of the brightening and decay of X-ray hot spots in the shell of theSNRRXJ1713.723946 on a one-year timescale. This rapid variability shows that the X-rays are produced by ultrarelativistic electrons through a synchrotron process and that electron acceleration does indeed take place in a strongly magnetized environment, indicating amplification of the magnetic field by a factor of more than 100. The X-ray variability also implies that we have witnessed the ongoing shock-acceleration of electrons in real time. Independently, broadband X-ray spectrometric measurements of RXJ1713.723946 indicate that electron acceleration proceeds in the most effective ('Bohm-diffusion') regime. Taken together, these two results provide a strong argument for acceleration of protons and nuclei to energies of 1 PeV (10{sup 15} eV) and beyond in young supernova remnants.

  20. Tycho's Remnant Provides Shocking Evidence for Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-09-01

    Astronomers have found compelling evidence that a supernova shock wave has produced a large amount of cosmic rays, particles of mysterious origin that constantly bombard the Earth. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, supports theoretical arguments that shock waves from stellar explosions may be a primary source of cosmic rays. This finding is important for understanding the origin of cosmic rays, which are atomic nuclei that strike the Earth's atmosphere with very high energies. Scientists believe that some are produced by flares on the Sun, and others by similar events on other stars, or pulsars or black hole accretion disks. But, one of the prime suspects has been supernova shock waves. Now, a team of astronomers has used Chandra observations of Tycho's supernova remnant to strengthen the case for this explanation. "With only a single object involved we can't state with confidence that supernova shock waves are the primary source of cosmic rays," said John P. Hughes of Rutgers University in Piscataway, New Jersey, and coauthor of a report to be published in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "What we have done is present solid evidence that the shock wave in at least one supernova remnant has accelerated nuclei to cosmic ray energies." In the year 1572, the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe observed and studied the sudden appearance of a bright "new star" in the constellation Cassiopeia. Now known as Tycho's supernova remnant, the event created a sensation in Tycho's time because it exploded the myth that stars never change. Four centuries later, the Chandra results on Tycho's remnant show that some modern ideas of the aftermath of supernova explosions may have to be revised. The report by Hughes and colleagues demonstrates that the shock wave produced by the explosive disruption of the star behaves in a way that cannot be explained by the standard theory. The supernova debris is observed to expand at a speed of about six million

  1. The X-ray surface brightness of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. L.; Long, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The first X-ray images of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN Ophiuchi 1604) are presented, and consequences for SNR models are discussed. Observations made with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter and High Resolution Imager show the remnant to be circular, with a strong shell brighter in the north than in the south. A flux of 1.2 x 10 to the -10th ergs/sq cm per sec was measured in the 0.15-4.5 keV region, which corresponds to an X-ray luminosity of 1.0 x 10 to the 36th ergs/sec at a distance of 5 kpc and an interstellar medium density of 2.8 x 10 to the 21st/sq cm. The X-ray observations do not allow the determination of whether the SNR is in the adiabatic or free expansion phase, but in either case it is shown that the mean ISM density must be greater than about 0.1/cu cm. In addition, the density of the X-ray emitting gas must be high, and its electron temperature must be fairly low. The high ISM densities derived for Kepler's SNR and other SNRs thus suggest an atypical ISM, possibly influenced by mass lost from the pre-supernova star.

  2. Shock evolution in non-radiative supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new analytical approach to derive approximate solutions describing the shock evolution in non-radiative supernova remnants (SNRs). We focus on the study of the forward shock and contact discontinuity while application to the reverse shock is only discussed briefly. The spherical shock evolution of an SNR in both the interstellar medium with a constant density profile and a circumstellar medium with a wind density profile is investigated. We compared our new analytical solution with numerical simulations and found that a few per cent accuracy is achieved. For the evolution of the forward shock, we also compared our new solution to previous analytical models. In a uniform ambient medium, the accuracy of our analytical approximation is comparable to that in Truelove & McKee. In a wind density profile medium, our solution performs better than that in Micelotta, Dwek & Slavin, especially when the ejecta envelope has a steep density profile. The new solution is significantly simplified compared to previous analytical models, as it only depends on the asymptotic behaviours of the remnant during its evolution.

  3. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS IN M81 AND M82

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Sohn, Jubee; Lee, Jong Hwan; Lim, Sungsoon; Jang, In Sung; Ko, Youkyung; Koo, Bon-Chul; Hwang, Narae; Kim, Sang Chul; Park, Byeong-Gon

    2015-05-01

    We present spectroscopy of 28 supernova remnant (SNR) candidates as well as one H ii region in M81 and two SNR candidates in M82. Twenty-six of the M81 candidates turn out to be genuine SNRs, and two in M82 may be shocked condensations in the galactic outflow or SNRs. The distribution of [N ii]/Hα ratios of M81 SNRs is bimodal. M81 SNRs are divided into two groups in the spectral line ratio diagrams: an [O iii]-strong group and an [O iii]-weak group. The latter are larger and may have faster shock velocities. [N ii]/Hα ratios of the SNRs show a strong correlation with [S ii]/Hα ratios. They show a clear radial gradient in their [N ii]/Hα and [S ii]/Hα ratios: dLog ([N ii]/Hα)/dLog R = −0.018 ± 0.008 dex kpc{sup −1} and dLog ([S ii]/Hα)/dLog R = −0.016 ± 0.008 dex kpc{sup −1}, where R is the deprojected galactocentric distance. We estimate the nitrogen and oxygen abundances of the SNRs from comparison with shock-ionization models. We obtain a value for the nitrogen radial gradient of dLog(N/H)/dLog R= −0.023 ± 0.009 dex kpc{sup −1}, and find little evidence for an oxygen gradient. This nitrogen abundance shows a gradient that is a few times flatter than those of the planetary nebulae and H ii regions. We find that five SNRs are matched with X-ray sources. Their X-ray hardness colors are consistent with thermal SNRs.

  4. Discovery of X-Ray-Emitting O-Ne-Mg-Rich Ejecta in the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Park, Sangwook; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We report on the discovery of X-ray-emitting O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta in the middle-aged Galactic O-rich supernova remnant Puppis A with Chandra and XMM-Newton. We use line ratios to identify a low-ionization filament running parallel to the northeastern edge of the remnant that requires super-solar abundances, particularly for O, Ne, and Mg, which we interpret to be from O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta. Abundance ratios of Ne/O, Mg/O, and Fe/O are measured to be [approx]2, [approx]2, and <0.3 times the solar values. Our spatially resolved spectral analysis from the northeastern rim to the western rim otherwise reveals sub-solar abundances consistent with those in the interstellar medium. The filament is coincident with several optically emitting O-rich knots with high velocities. If these are physically related, the filament would be a peculiar fragment of ejecta. On the other hand, the morphology of the filament suggests that it may trace ejecta heated by a shock reflected strongly off the dense ambient clouds near the northeastern rim.

  5. Discovery of X-Ray-Emitting O-Ne-Mg-Rich Ejecta in the Galactic Supernova Remnant Puppis A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Park, Sangwook; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We report on the discovery of X-ray-emitting O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta in the middle-aged Galactic O-rich supernova remnant Puppis A with Chandra and XMM-Newton. We use line ratios to identify a low-ionization filament running parallel to the northeastern edge of the remnant that requires super-solar abundances, particularly for O, Ne, and Mg, which we interpret to be from O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta. Abundance ratios of Ne/O, Mg/O, and Fe/O are measured to be [approx]2, [approx]2, and <0.3 times the solar values. Our spatially resolved spectral analysis from the northeastern rim to the western rim otherwise reveals sub-solar abundances consistent with those in the interstellar medium. The filament is coincident with several optically emitting O-rich knots with high velocities. If these are physically related, the filament would be a peculiar fragment of ejecta. On the other hand, the morphology of the filament suggests that it may trace ejecta heated by a shock reflected strongly off the dense ambient clouds near the northeastern rim.

  6. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY-EMITTING O-Ne-Mg-RICH EJECTA IN THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT PUPPIS A

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuda, Satoru; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Park, Sangwook; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-05-10

    We report on the discovery of X-ray-emitting O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta in the middle-aged Galactic O-rich supernova remnant Puppis A with Chandra and XMM-Newton. We use line ratios to identify a low-ionization filament running parallel to the northeastern edge of the remnant that requires super-solar abundances, particularly for O, Ne, and Mg, which we interpret to be from O-Ne-Mg-rich ejecta. Abundance ratios of Ne/O, Mg/O, and Fe/O are measured to be {approx}2, {approx}2, and <0.3 times the solar values. Our spatially resolved spectral analysis from the northeastern rim to the western rim otherwise reveals sub-solar abundances consistent with those in the interstellar medium. The filament is coincident with several optically emitting O-rich knots with high velocities. If these are physically related, the filament would be a peculiar fragment of ejecta. On the other hand, the morphology of the filament suggests that it may trace ejecta heated by a shock reflected strongly off the dense ambient clouds near the northeastern rim.

  7. The population of X-ray supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, P.; Haberl, F.; Kavanagh, P. J.; Sasaki, M.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Filipović, M. D.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Pietsch, W.; Points, S. D.; Chu, Y.-H.; Dickel, J.; Ehle, M.; Williams, R.; Greiner, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We present a comprehensive X-ray study of the population of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Using primarily XMM-Newton observations, we conduct a systematic spectral analysis of LMC SNRs to gain new insight into their evolution and the interplay with their host galaxy. Methods: We combined all the archival XMM-Newton observations of the LMC with those of our Very Large Programme LMC survey. We produced X-ray images and spectra of 51 SNRs, out of a list of 59 objects compiled from the literature and augmented with newly found objects. Using a careful modelling of the background, we consistently analysed all the X-ray spectra and measure temperatures, luminosities, and chemical compositions. The locations of SNRs are compared to the distributions of stars, cold gas, and warm gas in the LMC, and we investigated the connection between the SNRs and their local environment, characterised by various star formation histories. We tentatively typed all LMC SNRs, in order to constrain the ratio of core-collapse to type Ia SN rates in the LMC. We also compared the column densities derived from X-ray spectra to H i maps, thus probing the three-dimensional structure of the LMC. Results: This work provides the first homogeneous catalogue of the X-ray spectral properties of SNRs in the LMC. It offers a complete census of LMC remnants whose X-ray emission exhibits Fe K lines (13% of the sample), or reveals the contribution from hot supernova ejecta (39%), which both give clues to the progenitor types. The abundances of O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe in the hot phase of the LMC interstellar medium are found to be between 0.2 and 0.5 times the solar values with a lower abundance ratio [α/Fe] than in the Milky Way. The current ratio of core-collapse to type Ia SN rates in the LMC is constrained to NCC/NIa=1.35(-0.24+0.11), which is lower than in local SN surveys and galaxy clusters. Our comparison of the X-ray luminosity functions of SNRs in Local Group

  8. Association of the supernova remnant G 65.3+5.7 with ambient neutral hydrogen and a possible nature of the remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosachinskii, I. V.

    2010-04-01

    The neutral hydrogen at 21 cm has been investigated with the RATAN-600 radio telescope around the supernova remnant G 65.3+5.7, which has the largest angular sizes in the group of shell remnants. An expanding HI shell left after an old supernova explosion with an energy of ˜1051 erg and an age of 440 000 yr coincident in coordinates with the radio and optical remnant has been discovered. Since an X-ray emission from a much younger (27 000 yr) supernova remnant is observed in the same region and the shells detected by nebular lines have probably intermediate ages, we suggest that several successive supernova explosions have occurred here.

  9. SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY PROTONS AND HELIUM PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2013-01-20

    Data obtained in the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC-2), Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM), and Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiments suggest that the elemental interstellar spectra of cosmic rays below the knee at a few times 10{sup 6} GeV are not simple power laws, but that they experience hardening at a magnetic rigidity of about 240 GV. Another essential feature is the difference between proton and helium energy spectra, such that the He/p ratio increases by more than 50% in the energy range from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} GV. We consider the concavity of the particle spectrum resulting from the nonlinear nature of diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible reason for the observed spectrum hardening. The increase of the helium-to-proton ratio with energy can be interpreted as a consequence of cosmic-ray acceleration by forward and reverse shocks in SNRs. The contribution of particles accelerated by reverse shocks makes the concavity of the produced overall cosmic-ray spectrum more pronounced. The spectra of protons and helium nuclei accelerated in SNRs and released into the interstellar medium are calculated. The derived steady-state interstellar spectra are in reasonably good agreement with observations.

  10. The X-Ray Spectrum of the Supernova Remnant 1E 0102-72.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Behar, Ehud; Kahn, Steven M.; denHerder, Jan Willem; vanderHeyden, Kurt

    1997-01-01

    In this letter we present the soft X-ray (5-35A) spectrum of the supernova remnant (SNR) IE 0102-72.3 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, acquired by the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) aboard ESA's XMM-Newton Observatory. This extended-source X-ray spectrum of unprecedented spectral resolution (lambda/Delta(lambda) approx. 300) permits, for the first time, unabiguous identification and measurement of isolated emission lines and line complexes alike. The diagnostic power of performing spectroscopy using groups of emission lines from single ions is exemplified. In particular, the bright Lyman and helium series lines for light elements (C VI, O VII, O VIII, Ne IX, Ne X and possibly Mg XI & Mg XII) show peculiar ratios, where the values [1s - np] / [1s - (n + l)p] are systematically weaker than expected for electron impact excitation. These measured ratios resemble signatures of recombining or charge exchanging plasmas. We argue that charge exchange, given its large cross section and evidence for inhomogeneous media within the SNR, is a likely mechanism for the observed emission. Also. the well known temperature diagnostics G(T(sub e)) = (i + f)/r of helium- like triplets (O VII & Ne IX) indicate high temperatures, well above the maximum emission temperature T(sub m) for each ion, and consistent with a purely ionizing plasma. The density diagnostics R(n(sub e)) = f / i meanwhile, are consistent with the low density limit, as expected.

  11. An Optical Search for Supernova Remnants In NGC 3184 And NGC 2903

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Akyuz, A.; Balman, S.; Cekmecelioglu, E.

    2007-04-01

    In this work, we present the results of an optical search for Supernova Remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxies NGC3184 and NGC2903. The SNR identification technique consisted of constructing continuum-subtracted Hα and [SII] λλ 6716,6731 images and then using [SII] / Hα ratios obtained from the image. The SNR candidates are normally identified as nebulae that have [SII] / Hα ratios >0.4 compared with HII regions <0.2. Our list of candidates contains 29 objects in NGC3184 and 10 objects in NGC2903. We compare our SNR candidate list against the existing X-ray and radio observations of the two galaxies. Knowing the positions of the SNRs, we can compare their distributions relative to HII regions and spiral arms. From these distributions, we can investigate such properties of possible SNR progenitors as their parent stellar populations and supernova types. These observations were performed with the 1.5m Russian-TurkishTelescope (RTT) Spectrograph TFOSC's (TUG Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera) CCD imaging system using narrowband interference filters at Turkish National Observatory (TUG) in March 2006.

  12. Volume changes in remnant thyroid tissue after thyroidectomy in Graves disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yin; Chao, Cheng-Min; Wu, Ta-Jen; Huang, Shih-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Surgery is one of the treatment choices for Graves disease. The residual thyroid tissue may shrink or become larger. The object of this study was trying to find out what factors affect the residual thyroid gland volume change after thyroidectomy in Graves disease. We followed thyroid volume changes by ultrasonography in 101 patients with Graves disease who underwent one side lobectomy and another side subtotal thyroidectomy from 1996 to 2006. These patients were divided into three groups according to the residual thyroid size increasing, no change in size, and shrinking. We checked the factors as follows: age, body weight, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level, TSH-receptor antibody level, anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody level, total thyroid volume before and after thyroidectomy, and degree of lymphocyte infiltration. We found that young age and lower residual volume ratio were the most powerful two factors affecting remnant thyroid gland volume changing. We also found that there is no significant correlation between TSH levels and thyroid volume change, nor TSH-receptor antibody titer or thyroid volume change. Age and residual volume ratio were the most powerful two factors in this study. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser conditions near supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, Bridget C.; Pihlström, Ylva M.; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from calculations of the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of 36.169 (4{sub –1}-3{sub 0} E), 44.070 (7{sub 0}-6{sub 1} A {sup +}), 84.521 (5{sub –1}-4{sub 0} E), and 95.169 (8{sub 0}-7{sub 1} A {sup +}) GHz methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser emission lines near supernova remnants (SNRs), using the MOLPOP-CEP program. The calculations show that given a sufficient methanol abundance, methanol maser emission arises over a wide range of densities and temperatures, with optimal conditions at n ∼ 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} cm{sup –3} and T > 60 K. The 36 GHz and 44 GHz transitions display more significant maser optical depths compared to the 84 GHz and 95 GHz transitions over the majority of physical conditions. It is also shown that line ratios are an important and applicable probe of the gas conditions. The line ratio changes are largely a result of the E-type transitions becoming quenched faster at increasing densities. The modeling results are discussed using recent observations of CH{sub 3}OH and hydroxyl (OH) masers near the SNRs G1.4–0.1, W28, and Sgr A East.

  14. An Optical and X-Ray Examination of Two Radio Supernova Remnant Candidates in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Lazendic, Jasmina S.; Dickel, John R.

    2004-11-01

    The giant H II region 30 Doradus is known for its violent internal motions and bright diffuse X-ray emission, suggesting the existence of supernova remnants (SNRs), but no nonthermal radio emission has been detected. Recently, Lazendic et al. compared the Hα/Hβ and radio/Hα ratios and suggested two small radio sources to be nonthermal and thus SNR candidates; however, no optical or X-ray counterparts were detected. We have used high-resolution optical images and high-dispersion spectra to examine the morphological, spectral, and kinematic properties of these two SNR candidates and still find no optical evidence supporting their identification as SNRs. We have also determined the X-ray luminosities of these SNR candidates and find them 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than those commonly seen in young SNRs. High extinction can obscure optical and X-ray signatures of an SNR, but would prohibit the use of a high radio/Hα ratio to identify nonthermal radio emission. We suggest that the SNR candidate MCRX J053831.8-690620 is associated with a young star-forming region; while the radio emission originates from the obscured star-forming region, the observed optical emission is dominated by the foreground. We suggest that the SNR candidate MCRX J053838.8-690730 is associated with a dust/molecular cloud, which obscures some optical emission but not the radio emission.

  15. Predictive factors for hypertrophy of the future remnant liver after selective portal vein embolization.

    PubMed

    de Baere, Thierry; Teriitehau, Christophe; Deschamps, Frederic; Catherine, Laurence; Rao, Pramod; Hakime, Antoine; Auperin, Anne; Goere, Diane; Elias, Dominique; Hechelhammer, Lukas

    2010-08-01

    To analyze predictive factors of hypertrophy of the nonembolized future remnant liver (FRL) after transhepatic preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) of the liver to be resected. Age, gender, indocyanin green clearance test, chemotherapy before PVE, type of chemotherapy, operators, extent of PVE, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) associated with PVE, time delay between PVE and surgery, and platelet count were retrospectively evaluated as predictive factors for hypertrophy of FRL in 107 patients with malignant disease in noncirrhotic liver. PVE targeted the right liver lobe [n = 70] or the right liver lobe and segment IV [n = 37] when FRL/total liver volume ratio was below 25% in healthy liver or 40% in altered liver. After PVE, FRL volume significantly increased by 69%, from 344 +/- 156 cm(3) to 543 +/- 192 cm(3) (P < .0001). The degree of hypertrophy was negatively correlated with FRL volume (correlation coefficient = -0.55, P < .0001) and FRL/TFL ratio (correlation coefficient = -0.52, P < .0001) before PVE. Patients, who have undergone chemotherapy with platin agents prior to PVE, demonstrated lower hypertrophy (P = .048). Hypertrophy after PVE is inversely correlated to initial FRL volume. Hypertrophy of the liver might be influenced by the systemic chemotherapeutic received before PVE.

  16. Synchrotron X-ray diagnostics of cutoff shape of nonthermal electron spectrum at young supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Ryo; Ohira, Yutaka; Sawada, Makoto; Bamba, Aya

    2014-02-01

    Synchrotron X-rays can be a useful tool to investigate electron acceleration at young supernova remnants (SNRs). At present, since the magnetic field configuration around the shocks of SNRs is uncertain, it is not clear whether electron acceleration is limited by SNR age, synchrotron cooling, or even escape from the acceleration region. We study whether the acceleration mechanism can be constrained by the cutoff shape of the electron spectrum around the maximum energy. We derive analytical formulae of the cutoff shape in each case where the maximum electron energy is determined by SNR age, synchrotron cooling and escape from the shock. They are related to the energy dependence of the electron diffusion coefficient. Next, we discuss whether information on the cutoff shape can be provided by observations in the near future which will simply give the photon indices and the flux ratios in the soft and hard X-ray bands. We find that if the power-law index of the electron spectrum is independently determined by other observations, then we can constrain the cutoff shape by comparing theoretical predictions of the photon indices and/or the flux ratios with observed data which will be measured by NuSTAR and/or ASTRO-H. Such study is helpful in understanding the acceleration mechanism. In particular, it will supply another independent constraint on the magnetic field strength around the shocks of SNRs.

  17. DUST DESTRUCTION IN A NON-RADIATIVE SHOCK IN THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.

    2010-04-01

    We present 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m images of a non-radiative shock in the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The post-shock region is resolved in these images. The ratio of the 70 {mu}m to the 24 {mu}m flux rises from about 14 at a distance 0.'1 behind the shock front to about 22 in a zone 0.'75 further downstream, as grains are destroyed in the hot plasma. Models of dust emission and destruction using post-shock electron temperatures between 0.15 keV and 0.30 keV and post-shock densities, n{sub H}{approx} 2.0 cm{sup -3}, predict flux ratios that match the observations. Non-thermal sputtering (i.e., sputtering due to bulk motion of the grains relative to the gas) contributes significantly to the dust destruction under these shock conditions. From the model calculations, we infer that about 35% by mass of the grains are destroyed over a 0.14 pc region behind the shock front.

  18. Dust Destruction in a Nonradiative Shock in the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Sankrit, Ravi; Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.

    2009-11-11

    We present 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m images of a non-radiative shock in the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The observed emission is from dust grains heated in the post-shock region. The 70 {mu}m to 24 {mu}m flux ratio depends on the dust heating and the dust destruction rates, and thereby it is a sensitive tracer of the gas density and temperature in the shocked plasma. We model the dust emission and grain destruction in the post-shock flow, and find that the observed 70 {mu}m to 24 {mu}m flux ratios are produced for post-shock densities, n{sub H}{approx}2.0 cm{sup -3} and electron temperatures of about 0.20 keV. We find that about 35% of the dust has been destroyed in the shock, and that non-thermal sputtering (i.e. sputtering due to bulk motion of the grains relative to the gas) contributes significantly to the dust destruction.

  19. Supernova remnant masers: Shock interactions with molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John William

    Maser emission from the 1720-MHz transition of hydroxyl(OH) has identified shock interactions in 10% of all supernova remnants(SNRs). Such maser-emitting SNRs are also bright in molecular line emission. Though somewhat rare, SNRs interacting with dense molecular clouds are an important class in which to study cosmic ray acceleration, SNR evolution, and effects on the energetics and chemistry of the interstellar medium. To study molecular shocks via a multiwavelength approach, the VLA, GBT, Spitzer Space Telescope have been used in the following ways: (i) With the GBT widespread OH(1720 MHz) emission and absorption in other OH lines is observed across the interaction site. Observations of all four ground-state transitions at 1720, 1667/5 and 1612 MHz allows us to model OH excitation, yielding the temperature, density and OH abundance in the post-shock gas. Maser emission is found to have a higher flux density with the GBT than with high-resolution VLA observations for 10 of 15 observed remnants, suggesting maser emission is present on large spatial scales. (ii) Sensitive VLA observations of select SNRs (W44, IC 443, Kes 69, 3C 391, G357.7+0.3) reveal the nature of enhanced 1720 MHz emission. Numerous weak compact masers as well as diffuse extended emission are detected tracing the shock-front. Zeeman splitting of masers permits the post-shock magnetic field strength and the line of sight field direction to be directly measured. (iii) Rotational lines of molecular hydrogen are detected at the position of several masers with Spitzer IRS spectroscopy between 5 and 35 mm. Excitation of the hydrogen lines requires the passage of a C-type shock through dense molecular gas, in agreement with the conditions derived from OH excitation. The presence of bright ionic lines requires multiple shocks present at the interaction site. (iv) A new survey for SNR-masers has identified four new interacting SNRs within 10 degrees of the Galactic Center. Maser-emitting SNRs are found to

  20. An X-Ray and Radio Study of the Varying Expansion Velocities in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Chomiuk, Laura; Hewitt, John W.; Blondin, John M.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    We present newly obtained X-ray and radio observations of Tycho's supernova remnant using Chandra and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in 2015 and 2013/14, respectively. When combined with earlier epoch observations by these instruments, we now have time baselines for expansion measurements of the remnant of 12-15 years in the X-rays and 30 years in the radio. The remnant's large angular size allows for proper motion measurements at many locations around the periphery of the blast wave. Consistent with earlier measurements, we find a clear gradient in the expansion velocity of the remnant, despite its round shape. The proper motions on the western and southwestern sides of the remnant are about a factor of two higher than those in the east and northeast. We showed in an earlier work that this is related to an offset of the explosion site from the geometric center of the remnant due to a density gradient in the ISM, and using our refined measurements reported here, we find that this offset is approximately 23? toward the northeast. An explosion center offset in such a circular remnant has implications for searches for progenitor companions in other remnants.

  1. An X-Ray and Radio Study of the Varying Expansion Velocities in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Chomiuk, Laura; Hewitt, John W.; Blondin, John M.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    We present newly obtained X-ray and radio observations of Tycho's supernova remnant using Chandra and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in 2015 and 2013/14, respectively. When combined with earlier epoch observations by these instruments, we now have time baselines for expansion measurements of the remnant of 12-15 year in the X-rays and 30 year in the radio. The remnant's large angular size allows for proper motion measurements at many locations around the periphery of the blast wave. We find, consistent with earlier measurements, a clear gradient in the expansion velocity of the remnant, despite its round shape. The proper motions on the western and southwestern sides of the remnant are about a factor of two higher than those in the east and northeast. We showed in an earlier work that this is related to an offset of the explosion site from the geometric center of the remnant due to a density gradient in the ISM, and using our refined measurements reported here, we find that this offset is approximately 23'' towards the northeast. An explosion center offset in such a circular remnant has implications for searches for progenitor companions in other remnants.

  2. Predicted TeV Gamma-ray Spectra and Images of Shell Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, S. P.

    1999-04-01

    One supernova remnant, SN 1006, is now known to produce synchrotron X-rays (Koyama et al., 1995, Nature, 378, 255), requiring 100 TeV electrons. SN 1006 has also been seen in TeV gamma rays (Tanimori et al., 1998, ApJ, 497, L25), almost certainly due to cosmic-microwave-background photons being upscattered by those same electrons. Other young supernova remnants should also produce high-energy electrons, even if their X-ray synchrotron emission is swamped by conventional thermal X-ray emission. Upper limits to the maximum energy of shock-accelerated electrons can be found for those remnants by requiring that their synchrotron spectrum steepen enough to fall below observed thermal X-rays (Reynolds and Keohane 1999, ApJ, submitted). For those upper-limit spectra, I present predicted TeV inverse-Compton spectra and images for assumed values of the mean remnant magnetic field. Ground-based TeV gamma-ray observations of remnants may be able to put even more severe limits on the presence of highly energetic electrons in remnants, raising problems for conventional theories of galactic cosmic-ray production in supernova remnants. Detections will immediately confirm that SN 1006 is not alone, and will give mean remnant magnetic field strengths.

  3. An X-Ray and Radio Study of the Varying Expansion Velocities in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Chomiuk, Laura; Hewitt, John W.; Blondin, John M.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    We present newly obtained X-ray and radio observations of Tycho's supernova remnant using Chandra and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in 2015 and 2013/14, respectively. When combined with earlier epoch observations by these instruments, we now have time baselines for expansion measurements of the remnant of 12-15 years in the X-rays and 30 years in the radio. The remnant's large angular size allows for proper motion measurements at many locations around the periphery of the blast wave. Consistent with earlier measurements, we find a clear gradient in the expansion velocity of the remnant, despite its round shape. The proper motions on the western and southwestern sides of the remnant are about a factor of two higher than those in the east and northeast. We showed in an earlier work that this is related to an offset of the explosion site from the geometric center of the remnant due to a density gradient in the ISM, and using our refined measurements reported here, we find that this offset is approximately 23? toward the northeast. An explosion center offset in such a circular remnant has implications for searches for progenitor companions in other remnants.

  4. Atherogenic remnant lipoproteins: role for proteoglycans in trapping, transferring, and internalizing

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.; Huang, Yadong

    2007-01-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms controlling remnant lipoprotein clearance is important, as these lipoproteins are highly atherogenic. The most critical molecule in this process is apoE, which mediates high-affinity binding of remnant lipoproteins to members of the LDL receptor (LDLR) family and cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), which have been shown to play major independent as well as cooperative roles in remnant lipoprotein clearance. While all the players may have been identified, our understanding of how they interact and function together continues to evolve. In this issue of the JCI, MacArthur et al. (see the related article beginning on page 153) demonstrated that HSPGs under normal physiological conditions are critically important in the clearance of remnant lipoproteins, independent of LDLR family members. The complexity of VLDL and chylomicron remnant clearance was exemplified by the studies of Jones et al., also in this issue (see the related article beginning on page 165). Despite defective clearance of LDL in mice with a deficiency in the adaptor protein controlling internalization of the LDLR, called autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH), remnant lipoprotein clearance was not grossly abnormal. A likely explanation is that the abnormal LDLRs bind the remnants and then transfer them to another acceptor for internalization. While the studies clearly demonstrate that the LDLR-related protein 1 is not involved and suggest a role for an additional unidentified receptor, it remains a possibility that HSPGs are responsible for remnant uptake by hepatocytes in the presence of defective LDLR internalization. PMID:17200713

  5. SN1987A: The Birth of a Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This grant was intended to support the development of theoretical models needed to interpret and understand the observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray telescope of the rapidly developing remnant of Supernova 1987A. In addition, we carried out a few investigations of related topics. The project was spectacularly successful. The models that we developed provide the definitive framework for predicting and interpreting this phenomenon. Following is a list of publications based on our work. Some of these papers include results of both theoretical modeling supported by this project and also analysis of data supported by the Space Telescope Science Institute and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We first list papers published in refereed journals, then conference proceedings and book chapters, and also an educational web site.

  6. SN1987A: The Birth of a Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCray, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This grant was intended to support the development of theoretical models needed to interpret and understand the observations by the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray telescope of the rapidly developing remnant of Supernova 1987A. In addition, we carried out a few investigations of related topics. The project was spectacularly successful. The models that we developed provide the definitive framework for predicting and interpreting this phenomenon. Following is a list of publications based on our work. Some of these papers include results of both theoretical modeling supported by this project and also analysis of data supported by the Space Telescope Science Institute and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We first list papers published in refereed journals, then conference proceedings and book chapters, and also an educational web site.

  7. Kinematics of Supernova Remnants: Status of X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, Daniel

    2010-12-01

    A supernova (SN) explosion drives stellar debris into the circumstellar material (CSM) filling a region on a scale of parsecs with X-ray emitting plasma. The velocities involved in supernova remnants (SNRs), thousands of km s-1, can be directly measured with medium and high-resolution X-ray spectrometers and add an important dimension to our understanding of the last stages of the progenitor, the explosion mechanism, and the physics of strong shocks. After touching on the ingredients of SNR kinematics, I present a summary of the still-growing measurement results from SNR X-ray observations. Given the advances in 2D/3D hydrodynamics, data analysis techniques, and especially X-ray instrumentation, it is clear that our view of SNRs will continue to deepen in the decades ahead.

  8. High-Resolution Polarimetry of Supernova Remnant Kesteven 69

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. A.; Mufson, S. L.; Dickel, J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Reported here are high-resolution 6 cm measurements of the adolescent supernova remnant (SNR) Kesteven 69 made with the hybrid BnC configuration of the Very Large Array. Several three-field mosaics of the polarized and total intensity have been used to study this SNR. These investigations lead to a coherent picture of this region. The expanding shock defines an outer rim of high total intensity, suggesting the front is running into large dense clouds with random magnetic field directions. The SNR consists of predominantly of two types of regions, those with high total and relatively weak polarized emission and those with relatively weak total and strong polarized emission. This morphology can be generally explained by the number of clouds with organized magnetic field along the line of sight. Within this SNR there are regions where the field is varying from radial to tangential. As the SN shock encounters clouds, magnetic fields within clouds will strongly affect cloud dynamics.

  9. Dialysis-dependency: the reformulated or remnant person.

    PubMed

    Martin-McDonald, Kristine

    Being dependent on dialysis is a potentially overwhelming experience where life as previously known is permanently altered. A dialysis-dependent individual may reformulate their identify or perceive that they are a remnant of their former self. This paper will explore and expand Morse and Penrod's (1999) model as a useful way to understand how a person might reconstruct their identify. Grounded in a narrative methodology, interviews of those on haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis were thematically analysed. It was found that dialysis dependency brings an acknowledgment of a lost past, an inescapable present and an unknowable future, filtered through hope and despair. Nurses need to understand the suffering, wrought by such a struggle, to facilitate the positive re-envisioning of those who are dialysis dependent.

  10. Gamma-Ray Emission From Crushed Clouds in Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Blandford, Roger D.; Funk, Stefan; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Takaaki; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-10-27

    It is shown that the radio and gamma-ray emission observed from newly-found 'GeV-bright' supernova remnants (SNRs) can be explained by a model, in which a shocked cloud and shock-accelerated cosmic rays (CRs) frozen in it are simultaneously compressed by the supernova blastwave as a result of formation of a radiative cloud shock. Simple reacceleration of pre-existing CRs is generally sufficient to power the observed gamma-ray emission through the decays of {pi}{sup 0}-mesons produced in hadronic interactions between high-energy protons (nuclei) and gas in the compressed-cloud layer. This model provides a natural account of the observed synchrotron radiation in SNRs W51C, W44 and IC 443 with flat radio spectral index, which can be ascribed to a combination of secondary and reaccelerated electrons and positrons.

  11. Identifying Hidden Supernova Remnants in M83 with the VLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Bradley; Stockdale, Christopher; Blair, William P.; Cowan, John J.; Godfrey, Leith; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Maddox, Larry A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pritchard, Tyler A.; Soria, Roberto; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2017-01-01

    We present results of our analysis of C and L band observations of the grand design spiral galaxy, M83 made with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). With recent optical (HST) and X-ray (Chandra) observations and utilizing the newly expanded bandwidth of the VLA, we are exploring the radio spectral properties of the historical radio point sources in M83 and have discovered more than 250 discrete radio sources. These observations allow us to probe the evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) and to find previously undiscovered SNRs. These observations represent the fourth epoch of deep VLA observations of M83. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities.

  12. Intermediate-age Globular Clusters in Four Galaxy Merger Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trancho, Gelys; Miller, Bryan W.; Schweizer, François; Burdett, Daniel P.; Palamara, David

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of combining Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry with ground-based Ks -band photometry from the Gemini imagers NIRI and FLAMINGOS-I to study the globular cluster (GC) populations in four early-type galaxies that are candidate remnants of recent mergers (NGC 1700, NGC 2865, NGC 4382, and NGC 7727). These galaxies were chosen based on their blue colors and fine structure, such as shells and ripples that are indicative of past interactions. We fit the combined VIKs GC data with simple toy models of mixed cluster populations that contain three subpopulations of different age and metallicity. The fits, done via chi-squared mapping of the parameter space, yield clear evidence for the presence of intermediate-age clusters in each galaxy. We find that the ages of ~1-2 Gyr for these GC subpopulations are consistent with the previously estimated merger ages for the host galaxies.

  13. Remnant lipoprotein size distribution profiling via dynamic light scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Richa; Mellis, Birgit; Garza, Kyana; Hameed, Samee A; Jurica, James M; Hernandez, Ana V; Nguyen, Mia N; Mittal, Chandra K

    2016-11-01

    Remnant lipoproteins (RLP) are a metabolically derived subpopulation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in human blood that are involved in the metabolism of dietary fats or triglycerides. RLP, the smaller and denser variants of TRL particles, are strongly correlated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and were listed as an emerging atherogenic risk factor by the AHA in 2001. Varying analytical techniques used in clinical studies in the size determination of RLP contribute to conflicting hypotheses in regard to whether larger or smaller RLP particles contribute to CVD progression, though multiple pathways may exist. We demonstrated a unique combinatorial bioanalytical approach involving the preparative immunoseparation of RLP, and dynamic light scattering for size distribution analysis. This is a new facile and robust methodology for the size distribution analysis of RLP that in conjunction with clinical studies may reveal the mechanisms by which RLP cause CVD progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Planck-Size Black Hole Remnants as Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin

    While there exist various candidates, the nature of dark matter remains unresolved. Recently it was argued that the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) may prevent a black hole from evaporating completely, and as a result there should exist a Planck-size black hole remnant (BHR) at the end of its evaporation. If a sufficient amount of small black holes can be produced in the early universe, then the resultant BHRs can be an interesting candidate for DM. We demonstrate that this is indeed the case for the hybrid inflation model. By assuming BHR as DM, our notion imposes a constraint on the hybrid inflation potential. We show that such a constraint is not so fine-tuned. Possible observational signatures are briefly discussed.

  15. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  16. The Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Black Hole Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin

    2001-06-01

    In the current standard viewpoint small black holes are believed to emit black body radiation at the Hawking temperature, at least until they approach Planck size, after which their fate is open to conjecture. A cogent argument against the existence of remnants is that, since no evident quantum number prevents it, black holes should radiate completely away to photons and other ordinary stable particles and vacuum, like any unstable quantum system. Here we argue the contrary, that the generalized uncertainty principle may prevent their total evaporation in exactly the same way that the uncertainty principle prevents the hydrogen atom from total collapse: the collapse is prevented, not by symmetry, but by dynamics, as a minimum size and mass are approached.

  17. Iron Under Pressure: ``Kohn Tweezers'' and Remnant Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monza, A.; Meffre, A.; Baudelet, F.; Rueff, J.-P.; D'Astuto, M.; Munsch, P.; Huotari, S.; Lachaize, S.; Chaudret, B.; Shukla, Abhay

    2011-06-01

    In this work we investigate the magnetic and structural properties of bulk Fe and Fe nanoparticles under pressure with x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies providing answers to two fundamental questions: (a) the chicken-or-egg problem for the magnetic and structural transitions and (b) magnetism in the high pressure hcp phase. The two transitions, inextricably linked in the bulk, are clearly decoupled in the nanoparticles, with the magnetic collapse preceding the structural transition. Ultrafast x-ray emission spectroscopy detects remnant magnetism, probably antiferromagnetic fluctuations, up to pressures of about 40 GPa in the hcp phase. This could be of direct relevance to the superconductivity in ɛ-Fe [K. Shimizu , Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 412, 316 (2001)10.1038/35085536] through the existence of a quantum critical point and associated magnetic fluctuations.

  18. Grain destruction in a supernova remnant shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  19. What Are the Compact Central Objects in Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, James

    2002-04-01

    Recent Chandra observations of the compact central objects in supernova remnants have shown puzzling results that do not seem to be consistent with either black holes or neutron stars. (See e.g. Pavlov, Sanwal, Garmire and Zavlin, astro-ph-0112322.) In particular, the inferred effective emitting surface is too small to be the entire surface of a neutron star, but too bright to be a black hole. We discuss the possibility that these compact objects might be red holes instead of black holes or neutron stars. Red holes, which occur in alternate theories of gravity, naturally predict both the greater brightness of the emissions and the smaller effective size of the emitting surface from a collapsed object of the appropriate mass.

  20. The first few months of a supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabler, M.; Janka, H.-T.; Wongwathanara, A.

    2016-06-01

    We perform long-term, hydrodynamical simulations of supernova remnants in 3 dimensions. Continuing the simulations of A.Wongwathanarat "3D long-time CCSN simulations: from shock revival to shock break-out" we follow the evolution of the shock and the ejecta during the first few months after the explosion. The explosion is simulated with a ray-by-ray gray neutrino transport approximation and the so called Yin-Yang grid (an axis-free spherical polar coordinates grid). For the late phases we investigate here, the neutrino transport is no longer needed. We study the rising bubbles of the ejecta and follow how their morphology changes due to acceleration at the stellar surface. We further include the energy input caused by the decay of nickel and can identify the first traces of the influence of this radioactive heating. The bubbles, which otherwise would expand homologously, start to inflate due to the additional energy source of the nickel decay.

  1. NASA Sees Typhoon Soudelor's Remnants Over Eastern China

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    On August 9 at 03:00 UTC (Aug. 8 at 11 p.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite passed over the remnant clouds of Typhoon Soudelor when it was over eastern China. By 22:35 UTC (6:35 p.m. EDT) on August 8, 2015, Typhoon Soudelor had made landfall in eastern China and was rapidly dissipating. Maximum sustained winds had dropped to 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph) after landfall, making it a tropical storm. Image credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team/Jeff Schmaltz..NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. 1. Remnants of the last lock on the George Washington ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Remnants of the last lock on the George Washington 'Potowmack Canal, just before the barge entered the Potomac River. The latter can be seen through the foliage of the tree which has grown up in the old canal bed. On the left hand side of the photograph, not shown here in its entirety, are the old iron studdings which held the gates, to permit the barges to pass easily into the river. On the right hand side of the photograph is shown the crumbling remains of the lock with their receased oval space clearly shown, into which the lock gate retrieved when the barge was lowered to the next level. The depth from the spot where the individual is shown pointing to the top of the lock, is about 24 or 25 ft., and the canal has been filled up with broken ... - Potowmack Company: Great Falls Canal, Locks No. 3, 4, 5, Great Falls, Fairfax County, VA

  3. Genetic rescue of remnant tropical trees by an alien pollinator.

    PubMed

    Dick, C W

    2001-11-22

    Habitat fragmentation is thought to lower the viability of tropical trees by disrupting their mutualisms with native pollinators. However, in this study, Dinizia excelsa (Fabaceae), a canopy-emergent tree, was found to thrive in Amazonian pastures and forest fragments even in the absence of native pollinators. Canopy observations indicated that African honeybees (Apis mellifera scutellata) were the predominant floral visitors in fragmented habitats and replaced native insects in isolated pasture trees. Trees in habitat fragments produced, on average, over three times as many seeds as trees in continuous forest, and microsatellite assays of seed arrays showed that genetic diversity was maintained across habitats. A paternity analysis further revealed gene flow over as much as 3.2 km of pasture, the most distant pollination precisely recorded for any plant species. Usually considered only as dangerous exotics, African honeybees have become important pollinators in degraded tropical forests, and may alter the genetic structure of remnant populations through frequent long-distance gene flow.

  4. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV (lambda)1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre- shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  5. Intermediate-age globular clusters in four galaxy merger remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Trancho, Gelys; Miller, Bryan W.; Schweizer, François; Burdett, Daniel P.; Palamara, David

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of combining Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry with ground-based K{sub s} -band photometry from the Gemini imagers NIRI and FLAMINGOS-I to study the globular cluster (GC) populations in four early-type galaxies that are candidate remnants of recent mergers (NGC 1700, NGC 2865, NGC 4382, and NGC 7727). These galaxies were chosen based on their blue colors and fine structure, such as shells and ripples that are indicative of past interactions. We fit the combined VIK{sub s} GC data with simple toy models of mixed cluster populations that contain three subpopulations of different age and metallicity. The fits, done via chi-squared mapping of the parameter space, yield clear evidence for the presence of intermediate-age clusters in each galaxy. We find that the ages of ∼1-2 Gyr for these GC subpopulations are consistent with the previously estimated merger ages for the host galaxies.

  6. DESTRUCTION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST IN EVOLVING SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCK WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Dwek, Eli; Jones, Anthony P.

    2015-04-10

    Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however, that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al., we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities ≳200 km s{sup −1} for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are increased by a factor of ∼2 compared to those of Jones et al., who assumed a hot gas dominated ISM. Recent estimates of supernova rates and ISM mass lead to another factor of ∼3 increase in the destruction timescales, resulting in a silicate grain destruction timescale of ∼2–3 Gyr. These increases, while not able to resolve the problem of the discrepant timescales for silicate grain destruction and creation, are an important step toward understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the ISM.

  7. Supernova remnant W49B and its environment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Tian, W. W.; Zuo, P. E-mail: tww@bao.ac.cn

    2014-10-01

    We study gamma-ray supernova remnant (SNR) W49B and its environment using recent radio and infrared data. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph low resolution data of W49B shows shocked excitation lines of H{sub 2} (0,0) S(0)-S(7) from the SNR-molecular cloud interaction. The H{sub 2} gas is composed of two components with temperatures of ∼260 K and ∼1060 K, respectively. Various spectral lines from atomic and ionic particles are detected toward W49B. We suggest that the ionic phase has an electron density of ∼500 cm{sup –3} and a temperature of ∼10{sup 4} K by the spectral line diagnoses. The mid- and far-infrared data from MSX, Spitzer, and Herschel reveal a 151 ± 20 K hot dust component with a mass of 7.5 ± 6.6 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} and a 45 ± 4 K warm dust component with a mass of 6.4 ± 3.2 M {sub ☉}. The hot dust is likely from materials swept up by the shock of W49B. The warm dust may possibly originate from the evaporation of clouds interacting with W49B. We build the H I absorption spectra of W49B and four nearby H II regions (W49A, G42.90+0.58, G42.43-0.26, and G43.19-0.53) and study the relation between W49B and the surrounding molecular clouds by employing the 2.12 μm infrared and CO data. We therefore obtain a kinematic distance of ∼10 kpc for W49B and suggest that the remnant is likely associated with the CO cloud at about 40 km s{sup –1}.

  8. POPULATION III STARS AND REMNANTS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Wise, John H. E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu

    2013-08-20

    Recent simulations of Population III star formation have suggested that some fraction form in binary systems, in addition to having a characteristic mass of tens of solar masses. The deaths of metal-free stars result in the initial chemical enrichment of the universe and the production of the first stellar-mass black holes. Here we present a cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulation of an overdense region that forms a few 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} dark matter halos and over 13,000 Population III stars by redshift 15. We find that most halos do not form Population III stars until they reach M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} because this biased region is quickly enriched from both Population III and galaxies, which also produce high levels of ultraviolet radiation that suppress H{sub 2} formation. Nevertheless, Population III stars continue to form, albeit in more massive halos, at a rate of {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} at redshift 15. The most massive starless halo has a mass of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, which could host massive black hole formation through the direct gaseous collapse scenario. We show that the multiplicity of the Population III remnants grows with halo mass above 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, culminating in 50 remnants located in 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} halos on average. This has implications that high-mass X-ray binaries and intermediate-mass black holes that originate from metal-free stars may be abundant in high-redshift galaxies.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope Image, Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The colorful streamers that float across the sky in this photo taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were created by the universe's biggest firecracker, the titanic supernova explosion of a massive star. The light from the exploding star reached Earth 320 years ago, nearly a century before the United States celebrated its birth with a bang. The dead star's shredded remains are called Cassiopeia A, or 'Cas A' for short. Cas A is the youngest known supernova remnant in our Milky Way Galaxy and resides 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, so the star actually blew up 10,000 years before the light reached Earth in the late 1600s. This HST image of Cas A shows for the first time that the debris is arranged into thousands of small, cooling knots of gas. This material eventually will be recycled into building new generations of stars and planets. Our own Sun and planets are constructed from the debris of supernovae that exploded billions of years ago. This photo shows the upper rim of the super nova remnant's expanding shell. Near the top of the image are dozens of tiny clumps of matter. Each small clump, originally just a small fragment of the star, is tens of times larger than the diameter of our solar system. The colors highlight parts of the debris where chemical elements are glowing. The dark blue fragments, for example, are richest in oxygen; the red material is rich in sulfur. The images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in January 2000 and January 2002. Image Credit: NASA and HST team (Stoics/AURA). Acknowledgment: R. Fesen (Darmouth) and J. Morse ( Univ. of Colorado).

  10. Interaction of Supernova Remnants with a Circumstellar Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.

    1995-12-01

    We are studying the interaction of supernova remnants (SNRs) with circumstellar shells, with an emphasis on Type II supernovae (SNe). These supernovae arise from massive progenitor stars (> 8 Msun), which lose mass during their lifetime, primarily in the form of a stellar wind. Often the stellar wind creates a circumstellar bubble surrounded by a dense shell. When the star explodes as a supernova, the resulting shock wave eventually collides with this dense shell. In a recent paper on SN 1987A (Chevalier & Dwarkadas, ApJL, 452, L45) we have shown that from the radio and X-ray emission, one can infer the presence of a high density region interior to the dense circumstellar shell. This can be explained as an HII region photoionized by the flux from the pre-supernova star. Using the Zeus code and assuming spherical symmetry, we have studied the dynamics of the shock wave interacting first with the HII region and then the circumstellar shell in SN 1987A. Collision with the HII region results in a significant deceleration of the shock wave, forming a high-density shocked region that grows with time, and is primarily responsible for the X-ray emission. X-ray emission from the reflected shock may begin to dominate when the forward shock hits the dense circumstellar shell and is considerably slowed down. Simulations are in progress with parameters suited to other remnants such as Cas A and W44. Radio and X-ray images of Cas A show a shell structure, which may result from interaction with a stellar bubble. W44 also shows a double-shell structure that may have been produced by a SN explosion inside a pre-existing wind bubble. The interaction is subject to instabilities that may give rise to filamentary structure.

  11. Dynamics of Supernova Remnants with Ejecta and Circumstellar Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondin, M. J.; Featherstone, N.; Borkowski, J. K.; Reynolds, P. S.

    2001-09-01

    Progenitors of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) blow bubbles in the ambient medium and sweep it into shells with their powerful stellar winds. After the explosion, SN ejecta initially collide with the stellar wind, then with the wind-blown bubble, and finally with a dense wind-swept shell. This collision is particularly energetic for SNe whose progenitors lost most of their outer envelopes just prior to explosion: the brightest galactic supernova remnant (SNR), Cas A, is a prime example of such an interaction with the circumstellar medium (CSM). The SN ejecta are far from being smooth for such remnants, because of vigorous turbulence and mixing of heavy-element ejecta immediately after the explosion and subsequent growth of Ni-Fe bubbles powered by the radioactive decay. We study the interaction of ``bubbly'' SN ejecta with a CSM bubble and a swept CSM shell, using hydrodynamical simulations in 2 and 3 dimensions with the VH-1 hydrocode. We compare our simulations with analytic self-similar (Chevalier & Liang 1989) solutions and with our previous simulations of interaction of bubbly ejecta with a uniform ambient medium. When compared with these simulations, the impact of bubbly ejecta with the shell results in a more vigorous turbulence and mixing. Dense and cool ejecta at the boundaries of adjacent bubbles may penetrate the shell, leading to plume-like and ring-like features. We examine whether such an interaction is responsible for the observed morphology of Cas A as seen by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope, and for the different expansion rates seen at X-ray and radio wavelengths.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Image, Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The colorful streamers that float across the sky in this photo taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were created by the universe's biggest firecracker, the titanic supernova explosion of a massive star. The light from the exploding star reached Earth 320 years ago, nearly a century before the United States celebrated its birth with a bang. The dead star's shredded remains are called Cassiopeia A, or 'Cas A' for short. Cas A is the youngest known supernova remnant in our Milky Way Galaxy and resides 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, so the star actually blew up 10,000 years before the light reached Earth in the late 1600s. This HST image of Cas A shows for the first time that the debris is arranged into thousands of small, cooling knots of gas. This material eventually will be recycled into building new generations of stars and planets. Our own Sun and planets are constructed from the debris of supernovae that exploded billions of years ago. This photo shows the upper rim of the super nova remnant's expanding shell. Near the top of the image are dozens of tiny clumps of matter. Each small clump, originally just a small fragment of the star, is tens of times larger than the diameter of our solar system. The colors highlight parts of the debris where chemical elements are glowing. The dark blue fragments, for example, are richest in oxygen; the red material is rich in sulfur. The images were taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in January 2000 and January 2002. Image Credit: NASA and HST team (Stoics/AURA). Acknowledgment: R. Fesen (Darmouth) and J. Morse ( Univ. of Colorado).

  13. Supernova Remnant W49B and Its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Tian, W. W.; Zuo, P.

    2014-10-01

    We study gamma-ray supernova remnant (SNR) W49B and its environment using recent radio and infrared data. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph low resolution data of W49B shows shocked excitation lines of H2 (0,0) S(0)-S(7) from the SNR-molecular cloud interaction. The H2 gas is composed of two components with temperatures of ~260 K and ~1060 K, respectively. Various spectral lines from atomic and ionic particles are detected toward W49B. We suggest that the ionic phase has an electron density of ~500 cm-3 and a temperature of ~104 K by the spectral line diagnoses. The mid- and far-infrared data from MSX, Spitzer, and Herschel reveal a 151 ± 20 K hot dust component with a mass of 7.5 ± 6.6 × 10-4 M ⊙ and a 45 ± 4 K warm dust component with a mass of 6.4 ± 3.2 M ⊙. The hot dust is likely from materials swept up by the shock of W49B. The warm dust may possibly originate from the evaporation of clouds interacting with W49B. We build the H I absorption spectra of W49B and four nearby H II regions (W49A, G42.90+0.58, G42.43-0.26, and G43.19-0.53) and study the relation between W49B and the surrounding molecular clouds by employing the 2.12 μm infrared and CO data. We therefore obtain a kinematic distance of ~10 kpc for W49B and suggest that the remnant is likely associated with the CO cloud at about 40 km s-1.

  14. An Expanded HST/WFC3 Survey of M83: Project Overview and Targeted Supernova Remnant Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Chandar, Rupali; Dopita, Michael A.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hammer, Derek; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Soria, Roberto; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Winkler, P. Frank

    2014-06-01

    We present an optical/NIR imaging survey of the face-on spiral galaxy M83, using data from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Seven fields are used to cover a large fraction of the inner disk, with observations in nine broadband and narrowband filters. In conjunction with a deep Chandra survey and other new radio and optical ground-based work, these data enable a broad range of science projects to be pursued. We provide an overview of the WFC3 data and processing and then delve into one topic, the population of young supernova remnants (SNRs). We used a search method targeted toward soft X-ray sources to identify 26 new SNRs. Many compact emission nebulae detected in [Fe II] 1.644 μm align with known remnants and this diagnostic has also been used to identify many new remnants, some of which are hard to find with optical images. We include 37 previously identified SNRs that the data reveal to be <0.''5 in angular size and thus are difficult to characterize from ground-based data. The emission line ratios seen in most of these objects are consistent with shocks in dense interstellar material rather than showing evidence of ejecta. We suggest that the overall high elemental abundances in combination with high interstellar medium pressures in M83 are responsible for this result. Future papers will expand on different aspects of the these data including a more comprehensive analysis of the overall SNR population. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  15. An expanded HST/WFC3 survey of M83: Project overview and targeted supernova remnant search

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, William P.; Kuntz, K. D.; Chandar, Rupali; Dopita, Michael A.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hammer, Derek; Long, Knox S.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Soria, Roberto; Frank Winkler, P. E-mail: kuntz@pha.jhu.edu E-mail: Michael.Dopita@anu.edu.au E-mail: long@stsci.edu E-mail: whitmore@stsci.edu E-mail: winkler@middlebury.edu

    2014-06-10

    We present an optical/NIR imaging survey of the face-on spiral galaxy M83, using data from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Seven fields are used to cover a large fraction of the inner disk, with observations in nine broadband and narrowband filters. In conjunction with a deep Chandra survey and other new radio and optical ground-based work, these data enable a broad range of science projects to be pursued. We provide an overview of the WFC3 data and processing and then delve into one topic, the population of young supernova remnants (SNRs). We used a search method targeted toward soft X-ray sources to identify 26 new SNRs. Many compact emission nebulae detected in [Fe II] 1.644 μm align with known remnants and this diagnostic has also been used to identify many new remnants, some of which are hard to find with optical images. We include 37 previously identified SNRs that the data reveal to be <0.''5 in angular size and thus are difficult to characterize from ground-based data. The emission line ratios seen in most of these objects are consistent with shocks in dense interstellar material rather than showing evidence of ejecta. We suggest that the overall high elemental abundances in combination with high interstellar medium pressures in M83 are responsible for this result. Future papers will expand on different aspects of the these data including a more comprehensive analysis of the overall SNR population.

  16. A Spectroscopic Study of the Rich Supernova Remnant Population in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. Frank; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.

    2017-04-01

    We report the results from a spectrophotometric study sampling the ≳ 300 candidate supernova remnants (SNRs) in M83 identified through optical imaging with Magellan/IMACS and Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3. Of the 118 candidates identified based on a high [S ii] λλ 6716, 6731 to Hα emission ratio, 117 show spectroscopic signatures of shock-heated gas, confirming them as SNRs—the largest uniform set of SNR spectra for any galaxy. Spectra of 22 objects with a high [O iii] λ5007 to Hα emission ratio, selected in an attempt to identify young ejecta-dominated SNRs like Cas A, reveal only one (previously reported) object with the broad (≳ 1000 {km} {{{s}}}-1) emission lines characteristic of ejecta-dominated SNRs, beyond the known SN1957D remnant. The other 20 [O iii]-selected candidates include planetary nebulae, compact H ii regions, and one background QSO. Although our spectroscopic sample includes 22 SNRs smaller than 11 pc, none of the other objects show broad emission lines; instead their spectra stem from relatively slow (˜ 200 {km} {{{s}}}-1) radiative shocks propagating into the metal-rich interstellar medium of M83. With six SNe in the past century, one might expect more of M83's small-diameter SNRs to show evidence of ejecta; this appears not to be the case. We attribute their absence to several factors, including that SNRs expanding into a dense medium evolve quickly to the ISM-dominated phase, and that SNRs expanding into regions already evacuated by earlier SNe are probably very faint. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), and Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil).

  17. Is Remnant Preservation Truly Beneficial to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Healing? Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluations of Remnant-Preserved Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Naraoka, Takuya; Kimura, Yuka; Tsuda, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Yuji; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    2017-04-01

    Remnant-preserved anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction was introduced to improve clinical outcomes and biological healing. However, the effects of remnant preservation and the influence of the delay from injury until reconstruction on the outcomes of this technique are still uncertain. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purposes of this study were to evaluate whether remnant preservation improved the clinical outcomes and graft incorporation of ACL reconstruction and to examine the influence of the delay between ACL injury and reconstruction on the usefulness of remnant preservation. We hypothesized that remnant preservation improves clinical results and accelerates graft incorporation and that its effect is dependent on the delay between ACL injury and reconstruction. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 151 consecutive patients who underwent double-bundle ACL reconstruction using a semitendinosus graft were enrolled in this study: 74 knees underwent ACL reconstruction without a remnant (or the remnant was <25% of the intra-articular portion of the graft; NR group), while 77 knees underwent ACL reconstruction with remnant preservation (RP group). These were divided into 4 subgroups based on the time from injury to surgery: phase 1 was <3 weeks (n = 24), phase 2 was 3 to less than 8 weeks (n = 70), phase 3 was 8 to 20 weeks (n = 32), and phase 4 was >20 weeks (n = 25). Clinical measurements, including KT-1000 arthrometer side-to-side anterior tibial translation measurements, were assessed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after reconstruction. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluations of graft maturation and graft-tunnel integration of the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles were assessed at 3, 6, and 12 months after reconstruction. There was no difference in side-to-side anterior tibial translation between the NR and RP groups. There was also no difference in graft maturation between the 2 groups. Furthermore, the time from ACL injury until reconstruction did

  18. Bile reflux of the remnant stomach following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: an etiology of chronic abdominal pain treated with remnant gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Vella, Erika La; Hovorka, Zach; Yarbrough, Donald E; McQuitty, Elizabeth

    2017-08-01

    Bile reflux gastritis of the remnant stomach following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) causing chronic abdominal pain has not been reported. We report a series of symptomatic patients with remnant gastritis treated effectively with remnant gastrectomy (RG). The objective was to report our experience with bile reflux remnant gastritis after RYGB and our outcomes following RG. Community teaching hospital. All patients undergoing RG were retrospectively reviewed for presenting symptoms, diagnostic workup, pathology, complications, and symptom resolution. Nineteen patients underwent RG for bile reflux gastritis at a mean of 4.4 years (52.3 mo, range 8.5-124 mo) after RYGB. All patients were female and presented with pain, primarily epigastric (18/19; 95%), and described as burning (11/19; 58%), with 10 (53%) reporting nausea. Endoscopy was performed preoperatively on all patients with successful remnant inspection in 13 (68%), using push endoscopy (n = 10) or operative assist (n = 3), with 12 (of 13; 92%) biopsy-positive for reactive gastropathy. Seventeen (90%) completed a hepatobiliary scintigraphy scan with 100% positivity demonstrating bile reflux across the pylorus. Surgical approach was laparoscopic or robotic in 18 (95%) with a hospital length of stay of 2.7 days (range 0-12 d), with no major complications or readmissions. Pathology of the remnant confirmed reactive gastropathy in 90% (n = 17). Ninety percent of patients (n = 17) reported sustained symptom resolution, and 11% of patients (n = 2) remained symptomatic at last follow-up. We followed all patients for a mean of 6.6 years (1-194 mo). Bile reflux gastritis of the remnant stomach is a new consideration for chronic abdominal pain months to years following RYGB. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy imaging and endoscopic biopsy are highly suggestive. RG is safe and effective treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The evolution and fate of super-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf merger remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Josiah; Quataert, Eliot; Kasen, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    We present stellar evolution calculations of the remnant of the merger of two carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs). We focus on cases that have a total mass in excess of the Chandrasekhar mass. After the merger, the remnant manifests as an L ˜ 3× 10^4 L_{⊙} source for ˜104 yr. A dusty wind may develop, leading these sources to be self-obscured and to appear similar to extreme asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Roughly ˜10 such objects should exist in the Milky Way and M31 at any time. As found in previous work, off-centre carbon fusion is ignited within the merger remnant and propagates inwards via a carbon flame, converting the WD to an oxygen-neon (ONe) composition. By following the evolution for longer than previous calculations, we demonstrate that after carbon-burning reaches the centre, neutrino-cooled Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction leads to off-centre neon ignition in remnants with masses ≥ 1.35 M_{⊙}. The resulting neon-oxygen flame converts the core to a silicon WD. Thus, super-Chandrasekhar WD merger remnants do not undergo electron-capture induced collapse as traditionally assumed. Instead, if the remnant mass remains above the Chandrasekhar mass, we expect that it will form a low-mass iron core and collapse to form a neutron star. Remnants that lose sufficient mass will end up as massive, isolated ONe or Si WDs.

  20. X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF POTENTIAL SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Q.; McEntaffer, R. L.; DeRoo, C.; Filipovic, M.; Wong, G. F.; Crawford, E. J.

    2015-04-20

    We examine three supernova remnants in the SMC, IKT 5 (supernova remnant (SNR) 0047-73.5), IKT 25 (SNR 0104-72.3), and DEM S 128 (SNR 0103-72.4), which are designated as Type Ia in the literature due to their spectra and morphology. This is troublesome because of their asymmetry, a trait not usually associated with young Type Ia remnants. We present Chandra X-ray Observatory data on these three remnants and perform a maximum likelihood analysis on their spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by interactions with the interstellar medium. In spite of this, we find a significant Fe overabundance in all three remnants. Through examination of radio, optical, and infrared data, we conclude that these three remnants are likely not Type Ia SNRs. We detect potential point sources that may be members of the progenitor systems of both DEM S 128 and IKT 5, which could suggest these could be Fe-rich core-collapse remnants.

  1. Importance of riparian remnants for frog species diversity in a highly fragmented rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Mendoza, Clara; Pineda, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Tropical forests undergo continuous transformation to other land uses, resulting in landscapes typified by forest fragments surrounded by anthropogenic habitats. Small forest fragments, specifically strip-shaped remnants flanking streams (referred to as riparian remnants), can be particularly important for the maintenance and conservation of biodiversity within highly fragmented forests. We compared frog species diversity between riparian remnants, other forest fragments and cattle pastures in a tropical landscape in Los Tuxtlas, Mexico. We found similar species richness in the three habitats studied and a similar assemblage structure between riparian remnants and forest fragments, although species composition differed by 50 per cent. Frog abundance was halved in riparian remnants compared with forest fragments, but was twice that found in pastures. Our results suggest that riparian remnants play an important role in maintaining a portion of frog species diversity in a highly fragmented forest, particularly during environmentally stressful (hot and dry) periods. In this regard, however, the role of riparian remnants is complementary, rather than substitutive, with respect to the function of other forest fragments within the fragmented forest. PMID:20554561

  2. G65.2+5.7: A Thermal Composite Supernova Remnant with a Cool Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Petre, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents archival ROSAT PSPC observations of the G65.2+5.7 supernova remnant (also known as G65.3+5.7). Little material obscures this remnant and so it was well observed, even at the softest end of ROSATs bandpass (approx. 0.11 to 0.28 keV). These soft X-ray images reveal the remnant s centrally-filled morphology which, in combination with existing radio frequency observations, places G65.2+5.7 in the thermal composite (mixed morphology) class of supernova remnants. Not only might G65.2+5.7 be the oldest known thermal composite supernova remnant, but owing to its optically revealed cool, dense shell, this remnant supports the proposal that thermal composite supernova remnants lack X-ray bright shells because they have evolved beyond the adiabatic phase. These observations also reveal a slightly extended point source centered on RA = l9(sup h) 36(sup m) 46(sup s). dec = 30 deg.40 min.07 sec.and extending 6.5 arc min in radius in the band 67 map. The source of this emission has yet to be discovered, as there is no known pulsar at this location.

  3. X-ray Spectroscopy of Potential Small Magellanic Cloud Type Ia Supernova Remnants and Their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Q.; McEntaffer, R. L.; DeRoo, C.; Filipovic, M.; Wong, G. F.; Crawford, E. J.

    2015-04-01

    We examine three supernova remnants in the SMC, IKT 5 (supernova remnant (SNR) 0047-73.5), IKT 25 (SNR 0104-72.3), and DEM S 128 (SNR 0103-72.4), which are designated as Type Ia in the literature due to their spectra and morphology. This is troublesome because of their asymmetry, a trait not usually associated with young Type Ia remnants. We present Chandra X-ray Observatory data on these three remnants and perform a maximum likelihood analysis on their spectra. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by interactions with the interstellar medium. In spite of this, we find a significant Fe overabundance in all three remnants. Through examination of radio, optical, and infrared data, we conclude that these three remnants are likely not Type Ia SNRs. We detect potential point sources that may be members of the progenitor systems of both DEM S 128 and IKT 5, which could suggest these could be Fe-rich core-collapse remnants.

  4. Cosmic-Ray Acceleration at the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence from Chandra X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Jessica S.; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Ghavamian, Parviz; McKee, Christopher F.; Moffett, David; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Rakowski, Cara; Reynoso, Estela; Slane, Patrick

    2005-11-01

    We present evidence for cosmic-ray acceleration at the forward shock in Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) from three X-ray observables: (1) the proximity of the contact discontinuity to the forward shock, or blast wave, (2) the morphology of the emission from the rim of Tycho, and (3) the spectral nature of the rim emission. We determine the locations of the blast wave (BW), contact discontinuity (CD), and reverse shock (RS) around the rim of Tycho's supernova remnant using a principal component analysis and other methods applied to new Chandra data. The azimuthal-angle-averaged radius of the BW is 251". For the CD and RS we find average radii of 241" and 183", respectively. Taking account of projection effects, we find ratios of 1:0.93:0.70 (BW:CD:RS). We show these values to be inconsistent with adiabatic hydrodynamic models of SNR evolution. The CD:BW ratio can be explained if cosmic-ray acceleration of ions is occurring at the forward shock. The RS:BW ratio, as well as the strong Fe Kα emission from the Tycho ejecta, imply that the RS is not accelerating cosmic rays. We also extract radial profiles from ~34% of the rim of Tycho and compare them to models of surface brightness profiles behind the BW for a purely thermal plasma with an adiabatic shock. The observed morphology of the rim is much more strongly peaked than predicted by the model, indicating that such thermal emission is implausible here. Spectral analysis also implies that the rim emission is nonthermal in nature, lending further support to the idea that Tycho's forward shock is accelerating cosmic rays.

  5. The Origin of the Iron-rich Knot in Tycho’s Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Martínez-Rodríguez, Héctor; Park, Sangwook; Petre, Robert

    2017-01-01

    X-ray observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) allow us to investigate the chemical inhomogeneity of ejecta, offering unique insight into the nucleosynthesis in supernova explosions. Here we present detailed imaging and spectroscopic studies of the “Fe knot” located along the eastern rim of the Type Ia SNR Tycho (SN 1572) using Suzaku and Chandra long-exposure data. Surprisingly, the Suzaku spectrum of this knot shows no emission from Cr, Mn, or Ni, which is unusual for the Fe-rich regions in this SNR. Within the framework of the canonical delayed-detonation models for SN Ia, the observed mass ratios {M}{Cr}/{M}{Fe}< 0.023, {M}{Mn}/{M}{Fe}< 0.012, and {M}{Ni}/{M}{Fe}< 0.029 (at 90% confidence) can only be achieved for a peak temperature of (5.3–5.7) × {10}9 K and a neutron excess of ≲ 2.0× {10}-3. These constraints rule out the deep, dense core of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf as the origin of the Fe knot and favor either incomplete Si burning or an α-rich freeze-out regime, probably close to the boundary. An explosive He burning regime is a possible alternative, although this hypothesis is in conflict with the main properties of this SNR.

  6. Observational Evidence for High Neutronization in Supernova Remnants: Implications for Type Ia Supernova Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Héctor; Badenes, Carles; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Bravo, Eduardo; Timmes, F. X.; Miles, Broxton J.; Townsley, Dean M.; Piro, Anthony L.; Mori, Hideyuki; Andrews, Brett; Park, Sangwook

    2017-07-01

    The physical process whereby a carbon-oxygen white dwarf explodes as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) remains highly uncertain. The degree of neutronization in SN Ia ejecta holds clues to this process because it depends on the mass and the metallicity of the stellar progenitor, and on the thermodynamic history prior to the explosion. We report on a new method to determine ejecta neutronization using Ca and S lines in the X-ray spectra of Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs). Applying this method to Suzaku data of Tycho, Kepler, 3C 397, and G337.2-0.7 in the Milky Way, and N103B in the Large Magellanic Cloud, we find that the neutronization of the ejecta in N103B is comparable to that of Tycho and Kepler, which suggests that progenitor metallicity is not the only source of neutronization in SNe Ia. We then use a grid of SN Ia explosion models to infer the metallicities of the stellar progenitors of our SNRs. The implied metallicities of 3C 397, G337.2-0.7, and N103B are major outliers compared to the local stellar metallicity distribution functions, indicating that progenitor metallicity can be ruled out as the origin of neutronization for these SNRs. Although the relationship between ejecta neutronization and equivalent progenitor metallicity is subject to uncertainties stemming from the 12C + 16O reaction rate, which affects the Ca/S mass ratio, our main results are not sensitive to these details.

  7. The Origin of the Iron-Rich Knot in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Hector; Park, Sangwook; Petre, Robert

    2017-01-01

    X-ray observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) allow us to investigate the chemical inhomogeneity of ejecta, offering unique insight into the nucleosynthesis in supernova explosions. Here we present detailed imaging and spectroscopic studies of the Fe knot located along the eastern rim of the Type Ia SNR Tycho ( SN 1572) using Suzaku and Chandra long-exposure data. Surprisingly, the Suzaku spectrum of this knot shows no emission from Cr, Mn, or Ni, which is unusual for the Fe-rich regions in this SNR. Within the framework of the canonical delayed-detonation models for SN Ia, the observed mass ratios M(sub Cr)/M(sub Fe) is less than 0.023, M(sub Mn)/M(sub Fe) is less than 0.012, and M(sub Ni)/M(sub Fe) is less than 0.029 (at 90% confidence) can only be achieved for a peak temperature of (5.3 - 5.7) x 10(exp. 9) K and a neutron excess of approximately less than 2.0 x 10(exp. -3). These constraints rule out the deep, dense core of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf as the origin of the Fe knot and favor either incomplete Si burning or an Alpha-rich freeze-out regime, probably close to the boundary. An explosive He burning regime is a possible alternative, although this hypothesis is in conflict with the main properties of this SNR.

  8. UNRAVELING THE ORIGIN OF OVERIONIZED PLASMA IN THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT W49B

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Laura A.; Castro, Daniel; Pearson, Sarah; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-11-10

    Recent observations have shown several supernova remnants (SNRs) have overionized plasmas, where ions are stripped of more electrons than they would be if in equilibrium with the electron temperature. Rapid electron cooling is necessary to produce this situation, yet the physical origin of that cooling remains uncertain. To assess the cooling scenario responsible for overionization, in this paper we identify and map the overionized plasma in the Galactic SNR W49B based on a 220 ks Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observation. We performed a spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis, measuring the electron temperature by modeling the continuum and comparing it to the temperature given by the flux ratio of the He-like and H-like lines of sulfur and argon. Using these results, we find that W49B is overionized in the west, with a gradient of overionization increasing from east to west. As the ejecta expansion is impeded by molecular material in the east but not in the west, our overionization maps suggest the dominant cooling mechanism is adiabatic expansion of the hot plasma.

  9. Constraining Explosion Type of Young Supernova Remnants Using 24 μm Emission Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Charee L.; Lopez, Laura A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Stassun, Keivan G.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2013-07-01

    Determination of the explosion type of supernova remnants (SNRs) can be challenging, as SNRs are hundreds to thousands of years old and supernovae are classified based on spectral properties days after explosion. Previous studies of thermal X-ray emission from Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs have shown that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNRs have statistically different symmetries, and thus these sources can be typed based on their X-ray morphologies. In this Letter, we extend the same technique, a multipole expansion technique using power ratios, to infrared (IR) images of SNRs to test whether they can be typed using the symmetry of their warm dust emission as well. We analyzed archival Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer 24 μm observations of the previously used X-ray sample, and we find that the two classes of SNRs separate according to their IR morphologies. The Type Ia SNRs are statistically more circular and mirror symmetric than the CC SNRs, likely due to the different circumstellar environments and explosion geometries of the progenitors. Broadly, our work indicates that the IR emission retains information of the explosive origins of the SNR and offers a new method to type SNRs based on IR morphology.

  10. Thermal and Nonthermal X-ray Emission from the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Una; Decourchelle, Anne; Holt, Stephen S.; Petre, Robert; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present Chandra CCD images of Tycho's supernova remnant that delineate its outer shock, seen as a thin, smooth rim along the straight northeastern edge and most of the circular western half. The images also show that the Si and S ejecta are highly clumpy, and have reached the forward shock at numerous locations. Most of the X-ray spectra that we examine along the rim show line emission from Si and S, which in some cases must come from ejecta; the continuum is well represented by either thermal or nonthermal models. In the case that the continuum is assumed to be thermal, the temperatures at the rim are all similar at about 2 keV, and the ionization ages are very low because of the overall weakness of the line emission. Assuming shock velocities inferred from radio and X-ray expansion measurements, these temperatures are substantially below those expected for equilibration of the electron and ion temperatures; electron to mean temperature ratios of approximately less than 0.1 - 0.2 indicate at most modest collisionless heating of the electrons at the shock. The nonthermal contribution to these spectra may be important, however, and may account for as many as half of the counts in the 4-6 keV energy range, based on an extrapolation of the hard X-ray spectrum above 10 keV.

  11. Mapping of 20 μm emission from the supernova remnant Cas A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, R. G.; Greidanus, H.

    A small region in the bright northern rim of the young supernova remnant Cas A has been mapped at 20 μm with UKIRT. The total flux density detected is 18 Jy, equivalent to 2x10-4Msun of dust radiating at 90K. Structure is detected down to the 5″resolution limit. Although this is a region rich in fast moving optical knots, X-ray structure and small scale radio emission, there is no correlation between any of these and the infrared features. In particular, the detailed correlation between hot (X-ray emitting) gas and shock-heated dust predicted by model calculations is totally absent. A possible anticorrelation between the two may be explained by small-scale pressure differences in the post-shock gas, or by variations in the gas-to-dust ratio. While the origin of the dust remains unclear in that it could be associated with either reverse-shocked ejecta or interstellar clouds, the authors argue that it is unlikely to coincide with the main supernova blast wave.

  12. The X-ray spectrum of the supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, A. P.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.; den Herder, J. W.; van der Heyden, K.

    2001-01-01

    In this letter we present the soft X-ray (5-35 Å) spectrum of the supernova remnant (SNR) 1E 0102.2-7219 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, acquired by the reflection grating spectrometers (RGS) aboard ESA's XMM-Newton Observatory. Because the RGS features a large dispersion angle, spatial-spectral confusion is suppressed even for moderately extended (Delta theta ~ 2arcmin ) sources. Consequently, these data, along with the spectrum of N132d (Behar et al. \\cite{Behar00}), provide what are probably the most detailed soft X-ray spectrum of entire SNRs. The diagnostic power of performing spectroscopy using groups of emission lines from single ions is demonstrated. In particular, the bright Lyman and helium series lines for light elements (C Vi, O Vii, O Viii, Ne Ix & Ne X) show peculiar ratios, where the values [1s-np]/[1s-(n+1)p] are systematically weaker than expected for electron impact excitation close to ionization equilibrium, indicating nonequilibrium ionizing (NEI) conditions in the source. The well known temperature diagnostics {G}(T_e)=(i+f)/r of helium-like triplets (O Vii & Ne Ix) confirm this suggestion, with values that are inconsistent with ionization equilibrium. The temperatures implied are well above the maximum emission temperature Tm for each ion, and consistent with a purely ionizing plasma. The density diagnostics R(ne)=f/i meanwhile, are consistent with the low density limit, as expected.

  13. Modeling the shell type TeV supernove remnant RX J1713-3946

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee; Fan, Zhonghui; Liu, Siming

    2009-01-01

    We simulate the shock waves of shell type supernova remnants with a prototype progenitor of 15 M{sub {circle_dot}} and fit the size and lifetime of SNR RX J1713-3946 with a density of {approx} 1O{sup -26}g cm{sup -3} for the shocked downstream plasma. Such a density is required for efficient stochastic electron acceleration and leads to a thermal X-ray flux more than one order of magnitude lower than the observed featureless X-ray flux. Fast mode waves must be excited to have efficient stochastic electron acceleration. We find that (1) the acceleration efficiency needs to be at least 10 times higher than that through the cyclotron resonances, implying much more efficient acceleration through the transit-time damping process, and (2) the distribution of the accelerated electrons is very sensitive to the ratio of the speed in the downstream to the shock suggesting a dynamo process that can regulate the magnetic field in such a way that the electron distribution doesn't change dramatically throughout the evolution history of the shock waves.

  14. A Deep Chandra Observation of Kepler's Supernova Remnant: A Type Ia Event with Circumstellar Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Hwang, Una; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Laming, J. M.; Blondin, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    We present initial results of a 750 ks Chandra observation of the remnant of Kepler's supernova of AD 1604. The strength and prominence of iron emission, together with the absence of O-rich ejecta, demonstrate that Kepler resulted from a thermonuclear supernova, even though evidence for circumstellar interaction is also strong. We have analyzed spectra of over 100 small regions, and find that they fall into three classes. (1) The vast majority show Fe L emission between 0.7 and 1 keV and Si and S Kα emission; we associate these with shocked ejecta. A few of these are found at or beyond the mean blast wave radius. (2) A very few regions show solar O/Fe abundance ratios; these we associate with shocked circumstellar medium (CSM). Otherwise O is scarce. (3) A few regions are dominated by continuum, probably synchrotron radiation. Finally, we find no central point source, with a limit ~100 times fainter than the central object in Cas A. The evidence that the blast wave is interacting with CSM may indicate a Ia explosion in a more massive progenitor.

  15. The Suzaku Key Project of the Kepler Supernova Remnant: A Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangwook; Badenes, C.; Hughes, J. P.; Slane, P. O.; Burrows, D. N.; Mori, K.

    2010-03-01

    The Kepler supernova remnant (SNR) is a historical (SN 1604) Type Ia SNR with a peculiar progenitor that exploded in the ambient medium modified by stellar winds. We detect atomic emission lines from trace ejecta elements Mn and Cr in the Kepler SNR using our initial 100 ks Suzaku observation. The detection of these low abundant metal species produced by incomplete Si-burning in the Type Ia SN provides a unique opportunity to reveal the progenitor's metallicity. We also detect K line emission from the Ni-rich ejecta which was produced in the nuclear statistical equilibrium at the deepest core of the progenitor. As the start of our Suzaku Key Project of the Kepler SNR to place a tight constraint on the progenitor's metallicity, we performed 220 ks background observations to reduce the systematic errors on the Mn and Cr line flux measurements. We report on the refined measurements of the Mn to Cr line flux ratio using our new background data. Our preliminary results suggest an enhanced metallicity (several times the Solar) for the Kepler SNR's progenitor. The completion of our Suzaku Key Project with the upcoming deep Kepler observation will be essential to pin down the suggested high metallicity of the progenitor by significantly reducing the large statistical uncertainties embedded in the current data.

  16. Chandra Captures Remnant of Star-Shattering Explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a true color image from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) of N132D showing the remnant of an explosion of a massive star in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a nearby galaxy about 180,000 light years from Earth. The colors represent different ranges of X-rays, with red, green, and blue representing low, medium, and higher X-ray energies respectively. The horseshoe shaped remnant is thought to be due to shock waves from the collision of the supernova ejecta with cool giant gas clouds. As the shock wave moves through the gas, it is heated to millions of degrees, producing the glowing x-ray shell. The CXO, formerly the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar in 1999. The CXO is the world's most powerful and most sophisticated x-ray telescope ever built. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers worldwide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-rays such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission.

  17. The surviving companions in type Ia supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Qing; Meng, Xiang-Cun; Han, Zhan-Wen

    2017-08-01

    The single-degenerate (SD) model is one of the most popular progenitor models of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), in which the companion star can survive after an SN Ia explosion and show peculiar properties. Therefore, searching for the surviving companion in type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) is a potential method to verify the SD model. In the SN 1604 remnant (Kepler’s SNR), although Chandra X-ray observation suggests that the progenitor is most likely a WD+AGB system, a the surviving companion has not been found. One possible reason is rapid rotation of the white dwarf (WD), causing explosion of the WD to be delayed for a spin-down timescale, and then the companion evolved into a WD before the supernova explosion, so the companion is too dim to be detected. We aim to verify this possible explanation by carrying out binary evolution calculations. In this paper, we use Eggleton’s stellar evolution code to calculate the evolution of binaries consisting of a WD+red giant (RG). We assume that the rapidly rotating WD can continuously increase its mass when its mass exceeds the Chandrasekhar mass limit ({M}{{Ch}}=1.378 {M}⊙ ) until the mass-transfer rate decreases to be lower than a critical value. Eventually, we obtain the final masses of a WD in the range 1.378 M ⊙ to 2.707 M ⊙. We also show that if the spin-down time is less than 106 yr, the companion star will be very bright and easily observed; but if the spin-down time is as long as ˜ 107 yr, the luminosities of the surviving companion would be lower than the detection limit. Our simulation provides guidance in hunting for the surviving companion stars in SNRs, and the fact that no surviving companion has been found in Kepler’s SNR may not be definite evidence disfavoring the SD origin of Kepler’s SN.

  18. Stellar and planetary remnants in digital sky surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girven, Jonathan

    Large scale digital sky surveys have produced an unprecedented volume of uniform data covering both vast proportions of the sky and a wide range of wavelength, from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. The challenge facing astronomers today is how to use this multitude of information to extract trends, outliers and and rare objects. For example, a large sample of single white dwarf stars has the potential to probe the Galaxy through the luminosity function. The aim of this work was to study stellar and planetary remnants in these surveys. In the last few decades, it has been shown that a handful of white dwarfs have remnants of planetary systems around them, in the form of a dusty disc. These are currently providing the best constraints on the composition of extra-solar planetary systems. Finding significant numbers of dusty discs is only possible in large scale digital sky surveys. I ultilised the SDSS DR7 and colour-colour diagrams to and DA white dwarfs from optical photometry. This nearly doubled the number of spectroscopically confirmed DA white dwarfs in the SDSS compared with DR4 [Eisenstein et al., 2006], and introduced nearly 10; 000 photometric-only DA white dwarf candidates. I further cross-matched our white dwarf catalogue with UKIDSS LAS DR8 to carry out the currently largest and deepest untargeted search for low-mass companions to, and dust discs around, DA white dwarfs. Simultaneously, I analyzed Spitzer observations of 15 white dwarfs with metal-polluted atmospheres, all but one having helium-dominated atmospheres. Three of these stars were found to have an infrared excess consistent with a dusty disc. I used the total sample to estimate a typical disc lifetime of log[tdisc(yr)] = 5:6+1:1, which is compatible with the relatively large range estimated from different theoretical models. Subdwarf population synthesis models predicted a vast population of subdwarfs with F to K-type companions, produced in the effcient RLOF formation channel. I used a

  19. Chandra Captures Remnant of Star-Shattering Explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a true color image from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) of N132D showing the remnant of an explosion of a massive star in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a nearby galaxy about 180,000 light years from Earth. The colors represent different ranges of X-rays, with red, green, and blue representing low, medium, and higher X-ray energies respectively. The horseshoe shaped remnant is thought to be due to shock waves from the collision of the supernova ejecta with cool giant gas clouds. As the shock wave moves through the gas, it is heated to millions of degrees, producing the glowing x-ray shell. The CXO, formerly the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar in 1999. The CXO is the world's most powerful and most sophisticated x-ray telescope ever built. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers worldwide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-rays such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission.

  20. DEM L241, A SUPERNOVA REMNANT CONTAINING A HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, F. D.; Charles, P. A.; Foster, D. L.; Dickel, J. R.; Romero, P. S.; Edwards, Z. I.; Perry, M.; Williams, R. M.

    2012-11-10

    A Chandra observation of the Large Magellanic Cloud supernova remnant DEM L241 reveals an interior unresolved source which is probably an accretion-powered binary. The optical counterpart is an O5III(f) star making this a high-mass X-ray binary with an orbital period likely to be of the order of tens of days. Emission from the remnant interior is thermal and spectral information is used to derive density and mass of the hot material. Elongation of the remnant is unusual and possible causes of this are discussed. The precursor star probably had mass >25 M {sub Sun}.

  1. Gamma-ray emission from young supernova remnants: Hadronic or leptonic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabici, Stefano; Aharonian, Felix

    2016-07-01

    The debate on the nature of the gamma-ray emission from young supernova remnants is still open. Ascribing such emission to hadronic rather than leptonic processes would provide an evidence for the acceleration of protons and nuclei, and this fact would fit with the very popular (but not proven) paradigm that supernova remnants are the sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Here, we discuss this issue with a particular focus on the best studied gamma-ray-bright supernova remnant: RX J1713.7-3946.

  2. A new set of supernova remnant distances for the inner Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Ranasinghe, Sujith

    2017-01-01

    We derive new distances for supernova remnants using 1420 MHz continuum and HI observations from the VGPS survey, supplemented withCO line survey observations. The new distances yield a wide spread in the sigma-D relation, confirming previous studies that hint that the sigma-D relation is not useful for deriving distances. We assess the incompleteness of detection of radio supernova remnants, and compareto the well-measured stellar population measurements in the Galaxy to infer a new value for the supernova rate. We also assess the evolutionary states of the individual supernova remnants.

  3. The hydrodynamics of clouds overtaken by supernova remnants. II - Attrition shocks, condensation and ejection of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozyczka, M.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    1987-04-01

    Hydrodynamical events resulting from interactions of supernova remnants with dense interstellar cloudlets are investigated by means of high-resolution, two dimensional modelling. Three different evolutionary paths of a cloudlet are identified, all of which eventually lead to its strong deformation and expulsion from the remnant. The main factors determining the fate of a cloudlet are the speed and geometry of transmitted and secondary ("attrition") shocks propagating through it. None of the performed calculations leads to structures which could clearly be related to filaments typical of supernova remnants.

  4. A Study of Supernova Remnants with Center-Filled X-Ray Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed study entails use of archival data, primarily from past and active X-ray observatories, to study the properties of a class of supernova remnants (SNRs) which display a centrally-bright X-ray morphology. Several models which have been proposed to explain the morphology are being investigated for comparisons with measured characteristics of several remnants: nonthermal emission from a central synchrotron nebula; thermal emission enhanced by slow evaporation of cool clouds in the hot SNR interior; and relic thermal emission from the SNR interior after the remnant has entered the radiative phase of evolution, thus causing the shell emission to cease.

  5. The x-ray structure of the supernova remnant W49B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, John R.; Murphy, Rosa; Chu, You-Hua; Garcia, Guillermo; Goscha, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of x-ray and radio images of W49B and other supernova remnants (SNR) provides detailed information on the mechanisms responsible for the emission and on the evolution of the remnants. There is faint x-ray emission from all parts of W49B but most of it is concentrated near the center of the remnant, unlike the radio emission which arises in a shell near the periphery. This structure indicates that this SNR is in the adolescent phase of its lifetime.

  6. Investigation of Supernova Remnant Shocks in the Vela-Puppis Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankrit, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Overview: We observed supernova remnant (SNR) shocks at four locations in the Vela- Puppis region. The targets were a bright X-ray knot in the center of the remnant, Knot D on the eastern limb of the remnant, a region overlapping the Puppis A SNR and a region within Vela overlapping the edge of the SNR Rx10852.0-4622. The aim of the observations was to characterize the properties of the shocks and identify separate kinematic components of the emission. The first round of analysis of these data produced significant interesting results as outlined below. Further analyses, in conjunction with other datasets, are planned.

  7. Functional and morphological evolution of remnant pancreas after resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Young; Park, Keun-Myoung; Shin, Woo Young; Choe, Yun-Mee; Hur, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Keon-Young; Ahn, Seung-Ik

    2017-07-01

    Functional and morphological evolution of remnant pancreas after resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma is investigated.The medical records of 45 patients who had undergone radical resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma from March 2010 to September 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. There were 34 patients in the pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) group and 10 patients in the distal pancreatectomy (DP) group. One patient received total pancreatectomy. The endocrine function was measured using the glucose tolerance index (GTI), which was derived by dividing daily maximum serum glucose fluctuation by daily minimum glucose. Remnant pancreas volume (RPV) was estimated by considering pancreas body and tail as a column, and head as an ellipsoid, respectively. The pancreatic atrophic index (PAI) was defined as the ratio of pancreatic duct width to total pancreas width. Representative indices of each patient were compared before and after resection up to 2 years postoperatively.The area under receiver operating characteristic curve of GTI for diagnosing DM was 0.823 (95% confidence interval, 0.699-0.948, P < .001). Overall, GTI increased on postoperative day 1 (POD#1, mean ± standard deviation, 1.79 ± 1.40 vs preoperative, 1.02 ± 1.41; P = .001), and then decreased by day 7 (0.89 ± 1.16 vs POD#1, P < .001). In the PD group, the GTI on POD#14 became lower than preoperative (0.51 ± 0.38 vs 0.96 ± 1.37; P = .03). PAI in the PD group was significantly lower at 1 month postoperatively (0.22 ± 0.12 vs preoperative, 0.38 ± 0.18; P < .001). In the PD group, RPV was significantly lower at 1 month postoperatively (25.3 ± 18.3 cm vs preoperative, 32.4 ± 20.1 cm; P = .02), due to the resolution of pancreatic duct dilatation. RPV of the DP group showed no significant change. GTI was negatively related to RPV preoperatively (r = -0.317, P = .04), but this correlation disappeared postoperatively (r = -0

  8. IS THERE A HIDDEN HOLE IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Senz, D.; Badenes, C.; Serichol, N. E-mail: carles@astro.tau.ac.il

    2012-01-20

    In this paper, we report on the bulk features of the hole carved by the companion star in the material ejected during a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion. In particular we are interested in the long-term evolution of the hole as well as in its fingerprint in the geometry of the supernova remnant (SNR) after several centuries of evolution, which is a hot topic in current SN Ia studies. We use an axisymmetric smoothed particle hydrodynamics code to characterize the geometric properties of the SNR resulting from the interaction of this ejected material with the ambient medium. Our aim is to use SNR observations to constrain the single degenerate scenario for SN Ia progenitors. Our simulations show that the hole will remain open during centuries, although its partial or total closure at later times due to hydrodynamic instabilities is not excluded. Close to the edge of the hole, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability grows faster, leading to plumes that approach the edge of the forward shock. We also discuss other geometrical properties of the simulations, like the evolution of the contact discontinuity.

  9. The likely Fermi detection of the supernova remnant RCW 103

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Yang

    2014-02-01

    We report on the results from our γ-ray analysis of the supernova remnant (SNR) RCW 103 region. The data were taken with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. An extended source is found at a position consistent with that of RCW 103 and its emission was only detected above 1 GeV (10σ significance), with a power-law spectrum with a photon index of 2.0 ± 0.1. We obtain its 1-300 GeV spectrum and the total flux gives a luminosity of 8.3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} at a source distance of 3.3 kpc. Given the positional coincidence and property similarities of this source with other SNRs, we identify it as the likely Fermi γ-ray counterpart to RCW 103. Including radio measurements of RCW 103, the spectral energy distribution (SED) is modeled by considering emission mechanisms based on both hadronic and leptonic scenarios. We find that models in the two scenarios can reproduce the observed SED, while in the hadronic scenario the existence of SNR-molecular cloud interactions is suggested as a high density of the target protons is required.

  10. Acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova-remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfi, E. A.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that supernova-explosions are the dominant source of cosmic rays up to an energy of 10 to the 14th power eV/nucleon. Moreover, these high energy particles provide a major contribution to the energy density of the interstellar medium (ISM) and should therefore be included in calculations of interstellar dynamic phenomena. For the following the first order Fermi mechanism in shock waves are considered to be the main acceleration mechanism. The influence of this process is twofold; first, if the process is efficient (and in fact this is the cas) it will modify the dynamics and evolution of a supernova-remnant (SNR), and secondly, the existence of a significant high energy component changes the overall picture of the ISM. The complexity of the underlying physics prevented detailed investigations of the full non-linear selfconsistent problem. For example, in the context of the energy balance of the ISM it has not been investigated how much energy of a SN-explosion can be transfered to cosmic rays in a time-dependent selfconsistent model. Nevertheless, a lot of progress was made on many aspects of the acceleration mechanism.

  11. Hadronic γ-ray images of Sedov supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshley, V.; Petruk, O.

    2012-01-01

    A number of modern experiments in high-energy astrophysics produce images of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the TeV and GeV γ-rays. Either relativistic electrons (due to the inverse-Compton scattering) or protons (due to the pion decays) may be responsible for this emission. In particular, the broad-band spectra of SNRs may be explained in both leptonic and hadronic scenarios. Another kind of observational data, namely, images of SNRs, is an important part of experimental information. We present a method to model γ-ray images of Sedov SNRs in uniform media and magnetic field due to hadronic emission. These γ-rays are assumed to appear as a consequence of meson decays produced in inelastic collisions of accelerated protons with thermal protons downstream of the shock - a model would be relevant for SNRs without firm confirmations of the shock-cloud interaction, as e.g. SN 1006. Distribution of surface brightness of the shell-like SNR is synthesized numerically for a number of configurations. An approximate analytical formula for azimuthal and radial variation of hadronic γ-ray brightness close to the shock is derived. The properties of images as well as the main factors determining the surface brightness distribution are determined. Some conclusions that would be relevant to SN 1006 are discussed.

  12. Sub-Lyman-alpha observations of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    The first map of O VI lambda 1035 emission of the Cygnus Loop has now been obtained with Voyager. The first good spectra of the sub-Lyman-alpha region in the Cygnus Loop and in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remnant N49 have been obtained with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope. The lines detected below 1200 A include S VI lambda lambda 933,945, C III lambda 977, N III lambda 991, and O VI lambda lambda 1032,1038. The O VI luminosities of the Cygnus Loop and of N49 exceed their soft X-ray luminosities. There is O VI emission at the primary shock front in the Cygnus Loop and from the bright optical filaments. The HUT spectra of the Cygnus Loop can be interpreted in terms of shocks with velocities of 170-190 km/s; the differences between the two spectra are due to the time since the beginning of the shock-cloud encounter.

  13. Fermi-LAT Observation of Supernova Remnant S147

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, J.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Tajima, H.; Bechtol, K.; Funk, S.; Lande, J.; Ballet, J.; Hanabata, Y.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Takahashi, T.; /JAXA, Sagamihara

    2012-08-17

    We present an analysis of gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the region around SNR S147 (G180.0-1.7). A spatially extended gamma-ray source detected in an energy range of 0.2-10 GeV is found to coincide with SNR S147. We confirm its spatial extension at >5{sigma} confidence level. The gamma-ray flux is (3.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, corresponding to a luminosity of 1.3 x 10{sup 34} (d/1.3 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1} in this energy range. The gamma-ray emission exhibits a possible spatial correlation with prominent H{alpha} filaments of S147. There is no indication that the gamma-ray emission comes from the associated pulsar PSR J0538+2817. The gamma-ray spectrum integrated over the remnant is likely dominated by the decay of neutral {pi} mesons produced through the proton-proton collisions in the filaments. Reacceleration of pre-existing CRs and subsequent adiabatic compression in the filaments is sufficient to provide the required energy density of high-energy protons.

  14. Chandra observation of the supernova remnant N11L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Chen, Yang; Chu, You-Hua; Williams, Rosa M.

    2016-06-01

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) N11L in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The X-ray emission is predominantly distributed within the main shell and the northern loop-like filaments traced by the optical narrow band images, with an indistinct extension along the north area. The brightest emission comes from a northeast-southwest ridge, and peaks at two patches at center and southwest. Spectral analysis indicates that the blast wave is propagating in a inhomogenous environment, and the X-ray emission overall is dominated by thermal gas whose composition is consistent with the LMC average abundance. The ionization time of the hot plasma implied by the X-ray spectral analysis is consistent with the Sedov age of the SNR derived from the best-fit parameters and the apparent radius of the SNR based on the optical images, however, the consequent explosion energy is no only at least one order of magnitude less than the canonical value of 10^{51} ergs, but also takes a small portion of the thermal energy of the hot gas. That discrepancy supports the blown-out scenario.

  15. Expectation on Observation of Supernova Remnants with the LHAASO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ye; Cao, Zhen; Chen, Songzhan; Chen, Yang; Cui, Shuwang; He, Huihai; Huang, Xingtao; Ma, Xinhua; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang, Xiao; LHAASO Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the most important acceleration sites for cosmic rays (CRs) below ˜1015 eV in the Galaxy. High-energy photons, either directly from the shocks of the SNRs or indirectly from the interaction between SNRs and the nearby clouds, are crucial probes for the CR acceleration. Big progresses on observations of SNRs have been achieved by space- and ground-based γ-ray facilities. However, whether γ-rays come from accelerated hadrons or not, as well as their connection with the CRs observed at Earth, remains in debate. Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), a next-generation experiment, is designed to survey the northern part of the very high energy γ-ray sky from ˜0.3 TeV to PeV with the sensitivity of ≲1% of the Crab Nebula flux. In this paper, we indicate that LHAASO will be dedicated to enlarging the γ-ray SNR samples and improving the spectral and morphological measurements. These measurements, especially at energies above 30 TeV, will be important for us to finally understand the CR acceleration in SNRs.

  16. Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The original proposal for this LTSA grant was for X-ray studies of pulsars, and especially pulsar wind nebulae and what they could tell us about pulsar properties, especially their space velocities. By any metric, this program has been very successful. No fewer than 14 papers on directly related topics (and several dozen more on related topics) have been published in refereed journals with the PI as lead or co-author, all observational results that have had significant impact on the field. These include the first X-ray detection of the "Duck" pulsar, a clear demonstration that estimated pulsar ages can be off by over an order of magnitude (via observations of the young supernova remnant G11.2-0.3) and the detection of the first pulsar wind nebula around a millisecond pulsar. These publications have also resulted in 4 press releases. Moreover, they also represent the thesis work of two PhD students at MIT (Froney Crawford and Mike Pivovaroff) and one postdoctoral fellow, Bryan Gaensler, now Assistant Professor at Harvard.

  17. Sub-Lyman-alpha observations of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    The first map of O VI lambda 1035 emission of the Cygnus Loop has now been obtained with Voyager. The first good spectra of the sub-Lyman-alpha region in the Cygnus Loop and in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remnant N49 have been obtained with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope. The lines detected below 1200 A include S VI lambda lambda 933,945, C III lambda 977, N III lambda 991, and O VI lambda lambda 1032,1038. The O VI luminosities of the Cygnus Loop and of N49 exceed their soft X-ray luminosities. There is O VI emission at the primary shock front in the Cygnus Loop and from the bright optical filaments. The HUT spectra of the Cygnus Loop can be interpreted in terms of shocks with velocities of 170-190 km/s; the differences between the two spectra are due to the time since the beginning of the shock-cloud encounter.

  18. Asymmetric velocity anisotropies in remnants of collisionless mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Sparre, Martin; Hansen, Steen H. E-mail: hansen@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-07-01

    Dark matter haloes in cosmological N-body simulations are affected by processes such as mergers, accretion and the gravitational interaction with baryonic matter. Typically the analysis of dark matter haloes is performed in spherical or elliptical bins and the velocity distributions are often assumed to be constant within those bins. However, the velocity anisotropy, which describes differences between the radial and tangential velocity dispersion, has recently been show to have a strong dependence on direction in the triaxial halos formed in cosmological simulations. In this study we derive properties of particles in cones parallel or perpendicular to the collision axis of merger remnants. We find that the velocity anisotropy has a strong dependence on direction. The finding that the direction-dependence of the velocity anisotropy of a halo depends on the merger history, explains the existence of such trends in cosmological simulations. It also explains why a large diversity is seen in the velocity anisotropy profiles in the outer parts of high-resolution simulations of cosmological haloes.

  19. Pervasive defaunation of forest remnants in a tropical biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Canale, Gustavo R; Peres, Carlos A; Guidorizzi, Carlos E; Gatto, Cassiano A Ferreira; Kierulff, Maria Cecília M

    2012-01-01

    Tropical deforestation and forest fragmentation are among the most important biodiversity conservation issues worldwide, yet local extinctions of millions of animal and plant populations stranded in unprotected forest remnants remain poorly explained. Here, we report unprecedented rates of local extinctions of medium to large-bodied mammals in one of the world's most important tropical biodiversity hotspots. We scrutinized 8,846 person-years of local knowledge to derive patch occupancy data for 18 mammal species within 196 forest patches across a 252,669-km(2) study region of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We uncovered a staggering rate of local extinctions in the mammal fauna, with only 767 from a possible 3,528 populations still persisting. On average, forest patches retained 3.9 out of 18 potential species occupancies, and geographic ranges had contracted to 0-14.4% of their former distributions, including five large-bodied species that had been extirpated at a regional scale. Forest fragments were highly accessible to hunters and exposed to edge effects and fires, thereby severely diminishing the predictive power of species-area relationships, with the power model explaining only ~9% of the variation in species richness per patch. Hence, conventional species-area curves provided over-optimistic estimates of species persistence in that most forest fragments had lost species at a much faster rate than predicted by habitat loss alone.