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Sample records for a140v mouse model

  1. KRAS Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Rónán C.; Heyer, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    KRAS is a potent oncogene and is mutated in about 30% of all human cancers. However, the biological context of KRAS-dependent oncogenesis is poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models of cancer provide invaluable tools to study the oncogenic process, and insights from KRAS-driven models have significantly increased our understanding of the genetic, cellular, and tissue contexts in which KRAS is competent for oncogenesis. Moreover, variation among tumors arising in mouse models can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying response or resistance to therapy in KRAS-dependent cancers. Hence, it is essential that models of KRAS-driven cancers accurately reflect the genetics of human tumors and recapitulate the complex tumor-stromal intercommunication that is manifest in human cancers. Here, we highlight the progress made in modeling KRAS-dependent cancers and the impact that these models have had on our understanding of cancer biology. In particular, the development of models that recapitulate the complex biology of human cancers enables translational insights into mechanisms of therapeutic intervention in KRAS-dependent cancers. PMID:21779503

  2. Preclinical Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    collaborated closely and have shared expertise and reagents extensively. This NF Consortium is a member of the Moue Models of Human Cancer Consortium...of the National Cancer Institute and is participating fully in the activities of the group. The current award will support these collaborative...studies through 2005. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Neurofibromatosis, cancer , mouse models 48 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 78

  3. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  4. Aging Research Using Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Anderson, Laura; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G.; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in “health-span”, or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, immune function and physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process. PMID:26069080

  5. Head Transplantation in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Ping; Ye, Yi-Jie; Li, Peng-Wei; Shen, Zi-Long; Han, Ke-Cheng; Song, Yang

    2015-08-01

    The mouse model of allo-head and body reconstruction (AHBR) has recently been established to further the clinical development of this strategy for patients who are suffering from mortal bodily trauma or disease, yet whose mind remains healthy. Animal model studies are indispensable for developing such novel surgical practices. The goal of this work was to establish head transplant mouse model, then the next step through the feasible biological model to investigate immune rejection and brain function in next step, thereby promoting the goal of translation of AHBR to the clinic in the future. Our approach involves retaining adequate blood perfusion in the transplanted head throughout the surgical procedure by establishing donor-to-recipient cross-circulation by cannulating and anastomosing the carotid artery on one side of the body and the jugular vein on the other side. Neurological function was preserved by this strategy as indicated by electroencephalogram and intact cranial nerve reflexes. The results of this study support the feasibility of this method for avoiding brain ischemia during transplantation, thereby allowing for the possibility of long-term studies of head transplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Preclinical Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    these tumors became evident 7-33 weeks after injury (average 25 ± 9 weeks), requiring the mice to be euthanized. Tumor histopathology closely mimicked...arose in a K-rasG12D-only mouse following adeno-Cre administration (1/7). However, the histopathology of this tumor differed significantly from that...Arf mice did not develop detectable tumors in this study (0/6). Figure 1. The full spectrum of meningioma histopathology can be modeled by Nf2

  7. Drug discovery in prostate cancer mouse models.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Kenneth C; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    The mouse is an important, though imperfect, organism with which to model human disease and to discover and test novel drugs in a preclinical setting. Many experimental strategies have been used to discover new biological and molecular targets in the mouse, with the hopes of translating these discoveries into novel drugs to treat prostate cancer in humans. Modeling prostate cancer in the mouse, however, has been challenging, and often drugs that work in mice have failed in human trials. The authors discuss the similarities and differences between mice and men; the types of mouse models that exist to model prostate cancer; practical questions one must ask when using a mouse as a model; and potential reasons that drugs do not often translate to humans. They also discuss the current value in using mouse models for drug discovery to treat prostate cancer and what needs are still unmet in field. With proper planning and following practical guidelines by the researcher, the mouse is a powerful experimental tool. The field lacks genetically engineered metastatic models, and xenograft models do not allow for the study of the immune system during the metastatic process. There remain several important limitations to discovering and testing novel drugs in mice for eventual human use, but these can often be overcome. Overall, mouse modeling is an essential part of prostate cancer research and drug discovery. Emerging technologies and better and ever-increasing forms of communication are moving the field in a hopeful direction.

  8. Generation Of A Mouse Model For Schwannomatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    TITLE: Generation of a Mouse Model for Schwannomatosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Long-Sheng Chang, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The...Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Sep 2009 - 31 Aug 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Generation of a Mouse Model for Schwannomatosis 5a. CONTRACT...hypothesis involving inactivation of both the INI1/SNF5 and NF2 tumor suppressor genes in the formation of schwannomatosis -associated tumors. To

  9. Genetically engineered mouse models of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Guijarro, Eva; Day, Chi-Ping; Merlino, Glenn; Zaidi, M Raza

    2017-06-01

    Melanoma is a complex disease that exhibits highly heterogeneous etiological, histopathological, and genetic features, as well as therapeutic responses. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models provide powerful tools to unravel the molecular mechanisms critical for melanoma development and drug resistance. Here, we expound briefly the basis of the mouse modeling design, the available technology for genetic engineering, and the aspects influencing the use of GEMs to model melanoma. Furthermore, we describe in detail the currently available GEM models of melanoma. Cancer 2017;123:2089-103. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  10. Humanized mouse models: Application to human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryoji; Takahashi, Takeshi; Ito, Mamoru

    2018-05-01

    Humanized mice are superior to rodents for preclinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of drug candidates using human cells or tissues. During the past decade, humanized mouse technology has been greatly advanced by the establishment of novel platforms of genetically modified immunodeficient mice. Several human diseases can be recapitulated using humanized mice due to the improved engraftment and differentiation capacity of human cells or tissues. In this review, we discuss current advanced humanized mouse models that recapitulate human diseases including cancer, allergy, and graft-versus-host disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Engineering a new mouse model for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Manga, Prashiela; Orlow, Seth J

    2012-07-01

    Although the precise mechanisms that trigger vitiligo remain elusive, autoimmune responses mediate its progression. The development of therapies has been impeded by a paucity of animal models, since mice lack interfollicular melanocytes, the primary targets in vitiligo. In this issue, Harris et al. describe a mouse model in which interfollicular melanocytes are retained by Kit ligand overexpression and an immune response is initiated by transplanting melanocyte-targeting CD8+ T cells.

  12. Mouse and Guinea Pig Models of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Orme, Ian M; Ordway, Diane J

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the nature of the host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the mouse and guinea pig models of infection. It describes the great wealth of information obtained from the mouse model, reflecting the general availability of immunological reagents, as well as genetic manipulations of the mouse strains themselves. This has led to a good understanding of the nature of the T-cell response to the infection, as well as an appreciation of the complexity of the response involving multiple cytokine- and chemokine-mediated systems. As described here and elsewhere, we have a growing understanding of how multiple CD4-positive T-cell subsets are involved, including regulatory T cells, TH17 cells, as well as the subsequent emergence of effector and central memory T-cell subsets. While, in contrast, our understanding of the host response in the guinea pig model is less advanced, considerable strides have been made in the past decade in terms of defining the basis of the immune response, as well as a better understanding of the immunopathologic process. This model has long been the gold standard for vaccine testing, and more recently is being revisited as a model for testing new drug regimens (bedaquiline being the latest example).

  13. On Models and Mickey Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petherbridge, Deanna

    2005-01-01

    The re-issue of a nineteenth-century French "Drawing Course" is the occasion for an examination of issues of "models of good practice" in current art teaching. These are listed as an expanded set of student-centred pedagogical paradigms, which embrace the forceful popular imagery of electronic games and comic strips. The formalist adaptations of…

  14. Preclinical Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    and NF2-deficient human cells and in cells from Nf1 and Nf2 mutant mice. Genetic analysis of human and murine tumors has provided compelling...lethal myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) characterized by over-production of infiltrative myeloid cells (13). JMML has been modeled in mice by...tumor development for 18 months after exposure. Pathologic analysis was performed on 91% of the Shannon, K.M. 11 study cohort, including 95 of 104

  15. Aging, Breast Cancer and the Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    architecture and function of the of normal human cells in culture ( Hayflick , 1965). This limit surrounding tissue and stimulate (or inhibit) the... LIMITATION 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON OF ABSTRACT OF PAGES USAMRMC a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area U...mammary cancers in the mouse and that these tumors have strikingly similar histology. Nonetheless, several limitations exists to this model system and

  16. Finding mouse models of human lymphomas and leukemia's using the Jackson laboratory mouse tumor biology database.

    PubMed

    Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Krupke, Debra M; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Morse, Herbert C; Ward, Jerrold M

    2015-12-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetics of SLE: evidence from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Morel, Laurence

    2010-06-01

    Great progress has been made in the field of lupus genetics in the past few years, notably with the publication of genome-wide association studies in humans and the identification of susceptibility genes (including Fcgr2b, Ly108, Kallikrein genes and Coronin-1A) in mouse models of spontaneous lupus. This influx of new information has revealed an ever-increasing interdependence between the mouse and human systems for unraveling the genetic basis of lupus susceptibility. Studies in the 1980s and 1990s established that mice prone to spontaneous lupus constitute excellent models of the genetic architecture of human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This notion has been greatly strengthened by the convergence of the functional pathways that are defective in both human and murine lupus. Within these pathways, variants in a number of genes have now been shown to be directly associated with lupus in both species. Consequently, mouse models will continue to serve a pre-eminent role in lupus genetics research, with an increased emphasis on mechanistic and molecular studies of human susceptibility alleles.

  18. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cano, David A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Animal models constitute valuable tools for investigating the pathogenesis of cancer as well as for preclinical testing of novel therapeutics approaches. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of pituitary-tumor formation remain poorly understood, particularly in sporadic adenomas, thus, making it a challenge to model pituitary tumors in mice. Nevertheless, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of pituitary tumors have provided important insight into pituitary tumor biology. In this paper, we review various GEMMs of pituitary tumors, highlighting their contributions and limitations, and discuss opportunities for research in the field. PMID:25136513

  19. Modeling anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Champa, Devora; Di Cristofano, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is the least common form of thyroid cancer; however, it accounts for the majority of deaths associated with this family of malignancies. A number of genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse models recapitulating the genetic and histological features of anaplastic thyroid cancer have been very recently generated and represent an invaluable tool to dissect the mechanisms involved in the progression from indolent, well-differentiated tumors to aggressive, undifferentiated carcinomas and to identify novel therapeutic targets. In this review, we focus on the relevant characteristics associated with these models and on what we have learned in terms of anaplastic thyroid cancer biology, genetics, and response to targeted therapy.

  20. Modeling anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Champa, Devora; Di Cristofano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is the least common form of thyroid cancer; however, it accounts for the majority of deaths associated with this family of malignancies. A number of genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse models recapitulating the genetic and histological features of anaplastic thyroid cancer have been very recently generated and represent an invaluable tool to dissect the mechanisms involved in the progression from indolent, well differentiated tumors to aggressive, undifferentiated carcinomas, and to identify novel therapeutic targets. In this review, we focus on the relevant characteristics associated with these models and on what we have learned in terms of anaplastic thyroid cancer biology, genetics, and response to targeted therapy. PMID:25420535

  1. A mouse model for human anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Marie K; Pitot, Henry C; Liem, Amy; Schweizer, Johannes; Mahoney, Charles; Lambert, Paul F

    2010-12-01

    Human anal cancers are associated with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) that cause other anogenital cancers and head and neck cancers. As with other cancers, HPV16 is the most common high-risk HPV in anal cancers. We describe the generation and characterization of a mouse model for human anal cancer. This model makes use of K14E6 and K14E7 transgenic mice in which the HPV16 E6 and E7 genes are directed in their expression to stratified squamous epithelia. HPV16 E6 and E7 possess oncogenic properties including, but not limited to, their capacity to inactivate the cellular tumor suppressors p53 and pRb, respectively. Both E6 and E7 were found to be functionally expressed in the anal epithelia of K14E6/K14E7 transgenic mice. To assess the susceptibility of these mice to anal cancer, mice were treated topically with dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), a chemical carcinogen that is known to induce squamous cell carcinomas in other sites. Nearly 50% of DMBA-treated HPV16 E6/E7 transgenic mice showed overt signs of tumors, whereas none of the like-treated nontransgenic mice showed tumors. Histopathologic analyses confirmed that the HPV16 transgenic mice were increased in their susceptibility to anal cancers and precancerous lesions. Biomarker analyses demonstrated that these mouse anal cancers exhibit properties that are similar to those observed in HPV-positive precursors to human anal cancer. This is the first mouse model for investigating the contributions of viral and cellular factors in anal carcinogenesis, and should provide a platform for assessing new therapeutic modalities for treating and/or preventing this type of cancer. ©2010 AACR.

  2. A Mouse Model for Human Anal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Marie K.; Pitot, Henry C.; Liem, Amy; Schweizer, Johannes; Mahoney, Charles; Lambert, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    Human anal cancers are associated with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that cause other anogenital cancers and head and neck cancers. As with other cancers, HPV16 is the most common high-risk HPV in anal cancers. We describe the generation and characterization of a mouse model for human anal cancer. This model makes use of K14E6 and K14E7 transgenic mice in which the HPV16 E6 and E7 genes are directed in their expression to stratified squamous epithelia. HPV16 E6 and E7 possess oncogenic properties including but not limited to their capacity to inactivate the cellular tumor suppressors p53 and pRb, respectively. Both E6 and E7 were found to be functionally expressed in the anal epithelia of K14E6/K14E7 transgenic mice. To assess the susceptibility of these mice to anal cancer, mice were treated topically with dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), a chemical carcinogen that is known to induce squamous cell carcinomas in other sites. Nearly 50% of DMBA-treated HPV16 E6/E7 transgenic mice showed overt signs of tumors; whereas, none of the like treated non-transgenic mice showed tumors. Histopathological analyses confirmed that the HPV16 transgenic mice were increased in their susceptibility to anal cancers and precancerous lesions. Biomarker analyses demonstrated that these mouse anal cancers exhibit properties that are similar to those observed in HPV-positive precursors to human anal cancer. This is the first mouse model for investigating the contributions of viral and cellular factors in anal carcinogenesis, and should provide a platform for assessing new therapeutic modalities for treating and/or preventing this type of cancer. PMID:20947489

  3. A humanoid mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Takumi, Toru

    2010-10-01

    Even now fruit of the human genome project is available, we have difficulties to approach neuropsychiatric disorders at the molecular level. Autism is a complex psychiatric illness but has received considerable attention as a developmental brain disorder not only from basic researchers but also from society. Substantial evidence suggests that chromosomal abnormalities contribute to autism risk. The duplication of human chromosome 15q11-13 is known to be the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality in autism. We succeeded to generate mice with a 6.3-Mb-wide interstitial duplication in mouse chromosome 7c that is highly syntenic to human 15q11-13 by using a Cre-loxP-based chromosome-engineering technique. The only paternally duplicated mice display autistic behavioral features such as poor social interaction and stereotypical behavior, and exhibit a developmental abnormality in ultrasonic vocalizations as well as anxiety. The detailed analysis focusing on a non-coding small nucleolar RNA, MBII52, within the duplicated region, revealed that the paternally duplicated mice alter the editing ratio of serotonin (5-HT) 2c receptor pre-mRNA and intracellular calcium responses by a 5-HT2c receptor specific agonist are changed in neurons. This result may explain one of molecular mechanisms of abnormal behaviors in the paternal duplicated mice. The first chromosome-engineered mouse model for human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication fulfills not only face validity of human autistic phenotypes but also construct validity based on human chromosome abnormality. This model will be a founder mouse for forward genetics of autistic disease and an invaluable tool for its therapeutic development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  6. Optimized Mouse Models for Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Ook; Popov, Yury; Schuppan, Detlef

    2017-01-01

    Fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix components due to chronic injury, with collagens as predominant structural components. Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis, which is characterized by a severe distortion of the delicate hepatic vascular architecture, the shunting of the blood supply away from hepatocytes and the resultant functional liver failure. Cirrhosis is associated with a highly increased morbidity and mortality and represents the major hard endpoint in clinical studies of chronic liver diseases. Moreover, cirrhosis is a strong cofactor of primary liver cancer. In vivo models are indispensable tools to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis and to develop specific antifibrotic therapies towards clinical translation. Here, we provide a detailed description of select optimized mouse models of liver fibrosis and state-of-the-art fibrosis readouts.

  7. Mitochondrial transcription: Lessons from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Susana; Wang, Xiao; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a circular double-stranded DNA genome of ∼ 16.5 kilobase pairs (kb) that encodes 13 catalytic proteins of the ATP-producing oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS), and the rRNAs and tRNAs required for the translation of the mtDNA transcripts. All the components needed for transcription and replication of the mtDNA are, therefore, encoded in the nuclear genome, as are the remaining components of the OXPHOS system and the mitochondrial translation machinery. Regulation of mtDNA gene expression is very important for modulating the OXPHOS capacity in response to metabolic requirements and in pathological processes. The combination of in vitro and in vivo studies has allowed the identification of the core machinery required for basal mtDNA transcription in mammals and a few proteins that regulate mtDNA transcription. Specifically, the generation of knockout mouse strains in the last several years, has been key to understanding the basis of mtDNA transcription in vivo. However, it is well accepted that many components of the transcription machinery are still unknown and little is known about mtDNA gene expression regulation under different metabolic requirements or disease processes. In this review we will focus on how the creation of knockout mouse models and the study of their phenotypes have contributed to the understanding of mitochondrial transcription in mammals. PMID:22120174

  8. Applications and Limitations of Mouse Models for Understanding Human Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    von Scheidt, Moritz; Zhao, Yuqi; Kurt, Zeyneb; Pan, Calvin; Zeng, Lingyao; Yang, Xia; Schunkert, Heribert; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2017-01-01

    Most of the biological understanding of mechanisms underlying coronary artery disease (CAD) derives from studies of mouse models. The identification of multiple CAD loci and strong candidate genes in large human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) presented an opportunity to examine the relevance of mouse models for the human disease. We comprehensively reviewed the mouse literature, including 827 literature-derived genes, and compared it to human data. First, we observed striking concordance of risk factors for atherosclerosis in mice and humans. Second, there was highly significant overlap of mouse genes with human genes identified by GWAS. In particular, of the 46 genes with strong association signals in CAD-GWAS that were studied in mouse models all but one exhibited consistent effects on atherosclerosis-related phenotypes. Third, we compared 178 CAD-associated pathways derived from human GWAS with 263 from mouse studies and observed that over 50% were consistent between both species. PMID:27916529

  9. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  10. Three mouse models of human thalassemia.

    PubMed Central

    Martinell, J; Whitney, J B; Popp, R A; Russell, L B; Anderson, W F

    1981-01-01

    Three types of mice with globin gene mutations, called 352HB, 27HB, and Hbath-J, appear to be true animal models of human thalassemia. Expression of the alpha-globin genes in three stocks of mice, each one heterozygous for one of the alpha-globin mutations, was examined at the polypeptide, RNA, and DNA levels. alpha-Globin polypeptide chains, relative to beta-globin chains in heterozygous thalassemic mice, are present at approximately 80% of normal. The ratios of alpha-globin to beta-globin RNA sequences are also 75-80% of normal, exactly reflecting the alpha-globin to beta-globin chain ratios. In the case of mutant 352HB, at least one alpha-globin gene is deleted. Thalassemic mouse erythroid cells appear to compensate partially for the loss of half of their alpha-globin genes. Images PMID:6946454

  11. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe our cumulative experience with the development and preclinical application of several highly fluorescent, clinically-relevant, metastatic orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. These models utilize the human pancreatic cancer cell lines which have been genetically engineered to selectively express high levels of the bioluminescent green fluorescent (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Fluorescent tumors are established subcutaneously in nude mice, and tumor fragments are then surgically transplanted onto the pancreas. Locoregional tumor growth and distant metastasis of these orthotopic implants occurs spontaneously and rapidly throughout the abdomen in a manner consistent with clinical human disease. Highly specific, high-resolution, real-time visualization of tumor growth and metastasis may be achieved in vivo without the need for contrast agents, invasive techniques, or expensive imaging equipment. We have shown a high correlation between florescent optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in these models. Alternatively, transplantation of RFP-expressing tumor fragments onto the pancreas of GFP-expressing transgenic mice may be used to facilitate visualization of tumor-host interaction between the pancreatic tumor fragments and host-derived stroma and vasculature. Such in vivo models have enabled us to serially visualize and acquire images of the progression of pancreatic cancer in the live animal, and to demonstrate the real-time antitumor and antimetastatic effects of several novel therapeutic strategies on pancreatic malignancy. These fluorescent models are therefore powerful and reliable tools with which to investigate human pancreatic cancer and therapeutic strategies directed against it.

  12. Mouse model of plasma cell mastitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-jun; Bao, Shan-lin; Yu, Sheng-lin; Zhang, Da-Qing; Loo, Wings T Y; Chow, Louis W C; Su, Li; Cui, Zhen; Chen, Kai; Ma, Li-Qiong; Zhang, Ning; Yu, Hui; Yang, Yun-Zhen; Dong, Yu; Yip, Adrian Y S; Ng, Elizabeth L Y

    2012-09-19

    female BALB/c mice experience the similar clinical and pathological manifestation. High-dose group can successfully establish a mouse model of plasma cell mastitis.

  13. Generation of transgenic mouse model using PTTG as an oncogene.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Sham S; Kakar, Cohin

    2015-01-01

    The close physiological similarity between the mouse and human has provided tools to understanding the biological function of particular genes in vivo by introduction or deletion of a gene of interest. Using a mouse as a model has provided a wealth of resources, knowledge, and technology, helping scientists to understand the biological functions, translocation, trafficking, and interaction of a candidate gene with other intracellular molecules, transcriptional regulation, posttranslational modification, and discovery of novel signaling pathways for a particular gene. Most importantly, the generation of the mouse model for a specific human disease has provided a powerful tool to understand the etiology of a disease and discovery of novel therapeutics. This chapter describes in detail the step-by-step generation of the transgenic mouse model, which can be helpful in guiding new investigators in developing successful models. For practical purposes, we will describe the generation of a mouse model using pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) as the candidate gene of interest.

  14. Mouse Model for Human Arginase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ramaswamy K.; Yoo, Paul K.; Kern, Rita M.; Rozengurt, Nora; Tsoa, Rosemarie; O'Brien, William E.; Yu, Hong; Grody, Wayne W.; Cederbaum, Stephen D.

    2002-01-01

    Deficiency of liver arginase (AI) causes hyperargininemia (OMIM 207800), a disorder characterized by progressive mental impairment, growth retardation, and spasticity and punctuated by sometimes fatal episodes of hyperammonemia. We constructed a knockout mouse strain carrying a nonfunctional AI gene by homologous recombination. Arginase AI knockout mice completely lacked liver arginase (AI) activity, exhibited severe symptoms of hyperammonemia, and died between postnatal days 10 and 14. During hyperammonemic crisis, plasma ammonia levels of these mice increased >10-fold compared to those for normal animals. Livers of AI-deficient animals showed hepatocyte abnormalities, including cell swelling and inclusions. Plasma amino acid analysis showed the mean arginine level in knockouts to be approximately fourfold greater than that for the wild type and threefold greater than that for heterozygotes; the mean proline level was approximately one-third and the ornithine level was one-half of the proline and ornithine levels, respectively, for wild-type or heterozygote mice—understandable biochemical consequences of arginase deficiency. Glutamic acid, citrulline, and histidine levels were about 1.5-fold higher than those seen in the phenotypically normal animals. Concentrations of the branched-chain amino acids valine, isoleucine, and leucine were 0.4 to 0.5 times the concentrations seen in phenotypically normal animals. In summary, the AI-deficient mouse duplicates several pathobiological aspects of the human condition and should prove to be a useful model for further study of the disease mechanism(s) and to explore treatment options, such as pharmaceutical administration of sodium phenylbutyrate and/or ornithine and development of gene therapy protocols. PMID:12052859

  15. Mouse model for sublethal Leptospira interrogans infection.

    PubMed

    Richer, Luciana; Potula, Hari-Hara; Melo, Rita; Vieira, Ana; Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Although Leptospira can infect a wide range of mammalian species, most studies have been conducted in golden Syrian hamsters, a species particularly sensitive to acute disease. Chronic disease has been well characterized in the rat, one of the natural reservoir hosts. Studies in another asymptomatic reservoir host, the mouse, have occasionally been done and have limited infection to mice younger than 6 weeks of age. We analyzed the outcome of sublethal infection of C3H/HeJ mice older than age 10 weeks with Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni. Infection led to bloodstream dissemination of Leptospira, which was followed by urinary shedding, body weight loss, hypothermia, and colonization of the kidney by live spirochetes 2 weeks after infection. In addition, Leptospira dissemination triggered inflammation in the kidney but not in the liver or lung, as determined by increased levels of mRNA transcripts for the keratinocyte-derived chemokine, RANTES, macrophage inflammatory protein 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6, and gamma interferon in kidney tissue. The acquired humoral response to Leptospira infection led to the production of IgG mainly of the IgG1 subtype. Flow cytometric analysis of splenocytes from infected mice revealed that cellular expansion was primarily due to an increase in the levels of CD4(+) and double-negative T cells (not CD8(+) cells) and that CD4(+) T cells acquired a CD44(high) CD62L(low) effector phenotype not accompanied by increases in memory T cells. A mouse model for sublethal Leptospira infection allows understanding of the bacterial and host factors that lead to immune evasion, which can result in acute or chronic disease or resistance to infection (protection). Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Mouse Models of Rare Craniofacial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Annita; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    A rare disease is defined as a condition that affects less than 1 in 2000 individuals. Currently more than 7000 rare diseases have been documented, and most are thought to be of genetic origin. Rare diseases primarily affect children, and congenital craniofacial syndromes and disorders constitute a significant proportion of rare diseases, with over 700 having been described to date. Modeling craniofacial disorders in animal models has been instrumental in uncovering the etiology and pathogenesis of numerous conditions and in some cases has even led to potential therapeutic avenues for their prevention. In this chapter, we focus primarily on two general classes of rare disorders, ribosomopathies and ciliopathies, and the surprising finding that the disruption of fundamental, global processes can result in tissue-specific craniofacial defects. In addition, we discuss recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of an extremely rare and specific craniofacial condition known as syngnathia, based on the first mouse models for this condition. Approximately 1% of all babies are born with a minor or major developmental anomaly, and individuals suffering from rare diseases deserve the same quality of treatment and care and attention to their disease as other patients. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cockayne syndrome pathogenesis: lessons from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Dick; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by cachectic dwarfism, nervous system abnormalities and features of premature aging. CS symptoms are associated with mutations in 5 genes, CSA, CSB, XPB, XPD and XPG encoding for proteins involved in the transcription-coupled subpathway of nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER). Mutant mice have been generated for all CS-associated genes and provide tools to examine how the cellular defects translate into CS symptoms. Mice deficient for Csa or Csb genetically mimic CS in man, and develop mild CS symptoms including reduced fat tissue, photoreceptor cell loss, and mild, but characteristic, nervous system pathology. These mild CS models are converted into severe CS models with short life span, progressive nervous system degeneration and cachectic dwarfism after simultaneous complete inactivation of global genome NER. A spectrum of mild-to-severe CS-like symptoms occurs in Xpb, Xpd, and Xpg mice that genetically mimic patients with a disorder that combines CS symptoms with another NER syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum. In conclusion, CS mouse models mice develop a range of CS phenotypes and open promising perspectives for testing interventional approaches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anesthetic effects in Alzheimer transgenic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Tang, Junxia X; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F

    2013-12-02

    Research has improved the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, and at earlier stages, but effective therapy continues to be elusive. Current effort is focused on delay. Environmental factors are thought to interact with genetics to modulate the progression of the disease, and one such environmental factor is exposure to general anesthetics. The possibility that some anesthetic effects have long-term consequences is of general interest and concern. The difficulty of studying a chronic, age-related disease in humans combined with the fact that anesthetics are rarely given without surgery, has led to a focus on animal models. Transgenic mouse models have been developed to mimic the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, including amyloid beta accumulation (plaque), neurofibrillary tangles, and cognitive dysfunction. While none of the models recapitulate the human disease with high fidelity, they allow a first look at anesthetic-Alzheimer interactions in a reasonable time frame. In studies found to date, none have concluded that anesthetics alone cause a significant change in cognitive decline, but rather an acceleration in Alzheimer neuropathology. Further studies are required to define the best anesthetic paradigm for our elderly population to mitigate changes in neuropathology and potentially cognition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  20. Mouse Model of Halogenated Platinum Salt Hypersensitivity ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Occupational exposure to halogenated platinum salts can trigger the development of asthma. Concern for increased asthma risk exists for the general population due to the use of platinum (Pt) in catalytic converters and its emerging use as a diesel fuel additive. To investigate airway responses to Pt, we developed a mouse model of Pt hypersensitivity. Previously, we confirmed the dermal sensitizing potency of ammonium hexachloroplatinate (AHCP) using an ex vivo [3H]methyl thymidine labeling version of the local lymph node assay in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the ability of AHCP to induce airway responses in mice sensitized by the dermal route. Mice were sensitized through application of 100 µL 1% AHCP in DMSO to the shaved back on days 0, 5 and 19, and 25 µl to each ear on days 10, 11 and 12. Unsensitized mice received vehicle. On day 24, mice were challenged by oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) with 0 or 100 µg AHCP in saline. Before and immediately after challenge, airway responses were assessed using whole body plethysmography (WBP). On day 26, changes in ventilatory responses to methacholine (Mch) aerosol were assessed by WBP; dose-dependent increases in Mch responsiveness occurred in sensitized mice. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid harvested from sensitized mice contained an average of 7.5% eosinophils compared to less than 0.5% in control mice (p < 0.05). This model will be useful for assessing both relative sensitizing potency and cross-reacti

  1. Mouse Models in Bone Marrow Transplantation and Adoptive Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Arber, Caroline; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Reddy, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models of transplantation have been indispensable to the development of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Their role in the generation of basic science knowledge is invaluable and is subject to discussion below. However, this article focuses on the direct role and relevance of mouse models towards the clinical development and advances in BMT and adoptive T-cell therapy for human diseases. The authors aim to present a thoughtful perspective on the pros and cons of mouse models while noting that despite imperfections these models are obligatory for the development of science-based medicine. PMID:24216170

  2. Mouse models for gastric cancer: Matching models to biological questions

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer‐related mortality worldwide. This is in part due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease, which often results in late‐stage diagnosis, at which point there are limited treatment options. Even when treated successfully, gastric cancer patients have a high risk of tumor recurrence and acquired drug resistance. It is vital to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cancer pathogenesis to facilitate the design of new‐targeted therapies that may improve patient survival. A number of chemically and genetically engineered mouse models of gastric cancer have provided significant insight into the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to disease onset and progression. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of current mouse models of gastric cancer and their relevance to the pre‐clinical development of new therapeutics. PMID:26809278

  3. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database: A Comprehensive Resource for Mouse Models of Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J

    2017-11-01

    Research using laboratory mice has led to fundamental insights into the molecular genetic processes that govern cancer initiation, progression, and treatment response. Although thousands of scientific articles have been published about mouse models of human cancer, collating information and data for a specific model is hampered by the fact that many authors do not adhere to existing annotation standards when describing models. The interpretation of experimental results in mouse models can also be confounded when researchers do not factor in the effect of genetic background on tumor biology. The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) database is an expertly curated, comprehensive compendium of mouse models of human cancer. Through the enforcement of nomenclature and related annotation standards, MTB supports aggregation of data about a cancer model from diverse sources and assessment of how genetic background of a mouse strain influences the biological properties of a specific tumor type and model utility. Cancer Res; 77(21); e67-70. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Optimizing mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders: are therapeutics in sight?

    PubMed

    Lutz, Cathleen M; Osborne, Melissa A

    2013-01-01

    The genomic and biologic conservation between mice and humans, along with our increasing ability to manipulate the mouse genome, places the mouse as a premier model for deciphering disease mechanisms and testing potential new therapies. Despite these advantages, mouse models of neurodegenerative disease are sometimes difficult to generate and can present challenges that must be carefully addressed when used for preclinical studies. For those models that do exist, the standardization and optimization of the models is a critical step in ensuring success in both basic research and preclinical use. This review looks back on the history of model development for neurodegenerative diseases and highlights the key strategies that have been learned in order to improve the design, development and use of mouse models in the study of neurodegenerative disease.

  5. A mouse model of Salmonella typhi infection

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ramkumar; Oh, Hyunju; Zhang, Dekai; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Seo, Jin; Koblansky, Alicia; Hayden, Matthew S.; Ghosh, Sankar

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella spp. are gram-negative flagellated bacteria that can cause food and water-borne gastroenteritis and typhoid fever in humans. We now report that flagellin from Salmonella spp. is recognized in mouse intestine by Toll-like receptor 11 (TLR11). Absence of TLR11 renders mice more susceptible to infection by S. typhimurium, with increased dissemination of the bacteria and enhanced lethality. Unlike S. typhimurium, S. typhi, a human obligatory pathogen that causes typhoid fever, is normally unable to infect mice. TLR11 is expressed in mice but not in humans, and remarkably, we find that tlr11−/− mice are efficiently infected with orally-administered S. typhi. We also find that tlr11−/− mice can be immunized against S. typhi. Therefore, tlr11−/− mice represent the first small animal model for the study of the immune response to S. typhi, and for the development of vaccines against this important human pathogen. PMID:23101627

  6. Mouse Models for Down Syndrome-Associated Developmental Cognitive Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunhong; Belichenko, Pavel V.; Zhang, Li; Fu, Dawei; Kleschevnikov, Alexander M.; Baldini, Antonio; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Mobley, William C.; Yu, Y. Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is mainly caused by the presence of an extra copy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) and is a leading genetic cause for developmental cognitive disabilities in humans. The mouse is a premier model organism for DS because the regions on Hsa21 are syntenically conserved with three regions in the mouse genome, which are located on mouse chromosome 10 (Mmu10), Mmu16 and Mmu17. With the advance of chromosomal manipulation technologies, new mouse mutants have been generated to mimic DS at both the genotypic and phenotypic levels. Further mouse-based molecular genetic studies in the future may lead to the unraveling of the mechanisms underlying DS-associated developmental cognitive disabilities, which would lay the groundwork for developing effective treatments for this phenotypic manifestation. In this review, we will discuss recent progress and future challenges in modeling DS-associated developmental cognitive disability in mice with an emphasis on hippocampus-related phenotypes. PMID:21865664

  7. Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB): a database of mouse models for human cancer.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Sundberg, John P; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) database is a unique online compendium of mouse models for human cancer. MTB provides online access to expertly curated information on diverse mouse models for human cancer and interfaces for searching and visualizing data associated with these models. The information in MTB is designed to facilitate the selection of strains for cancer research and is a platform for mining data on tumor development and patterns of metastases. MTB curators acquire data through manual curation of peer-reviewed scientific literature and from direct submissions by researchers. Data in MTB are also obtained from other bioinformatics resources including PathBase, the Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress. Recent enhancements to MTB improve the association between mouse models and human genes commonly mutated in a variety of cancers as identified in large-scale cancer genomics studies, provide new interfaces for exploring regions of the mouse genome associated with cancer phenotypes and incorporate data and information related to Patient-Derived Xenograft models of human cancers. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases: criteria and general methodology.

    PubMed

    Janus, Christopher; Welzl, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The major symptom of Alzheimer's disease is rapidly progressing dementia, coinciding with the formation of amyloid and tau deposits in the central nervous system, and neuronal death. At present familial cases of dementias provide the most promising foundation for modelling neurodegeneration. We describe the mnemonic and other major behavioral symptoms of tauopathies, briefly outline the genetics underlying familiar cases and discuss the arising implications for modelling the disease in mostly transgenic mouse lines. We then depict to what degree the most recent mouse models replicate pathological and cognitive characteristics observed in patients.There is no universally valid behavioral test battery to evaluate mouse models. The selection of individual tests depends on the behavioral and/or memory system in focus, the type of a model and how well it replicates the pathology of a disease and the amount of control over the genetic background of the mouse model. However it is possible to provide guidelines and criteria for modelling the neurodegeneration, setting up the experiments and choosing relevant tests. One should not adopt a "one (trans)gene, one disease" interpretation, but should try to understand how the mouse genome copes with the protein expression of the transgene in question. Further, it is not possible to recommend some mouse models over others since each model is valuable within its own constraints, and the way experiments are performed often reflects the idiosyncratic reality of specific laboratories. Our purpose is to improve bridging molecular and behavioural approaches in translational research.

  9. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Joel E.; Kadin, James A.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. genesis 53:458–473, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26150326

  10. TRANSGENIC MOUSE MODELS AND PARTICULATE MATTER (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothesis to be tested is that metal catalyzed oxidative stress can contribute to the biological effects of particulate matter. We acquired several transgenic mouse strains to test this hypothesis. Breeding of the mice was accomplished by Duke University. Particles employed ...

  11. Genetically engineered mouse models for studying inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. System parameters for erythropoiesis control model: Comparison of normal values in human and mouse model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The computer model for erythropoietic control was adapted to the mouse system by altering system parameters originally given for the human to those which more realistically represent the mouse. Parameter values were obtained from a variety of literature sources. Using the mouse model, the mouse was studied as a potential experimental model for spaceflight. Simulation studies of dehydration and hypoxia were performed. A comparison of system parameters for the mouse and human models is presented. Aside from the obvious differences expected in fluid volumes, blood flows and metabolic rates, larger differences were observed in the following: erythrocyte life span, erythropoietin half-life, and normal arterial pO2.

  13. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    PubMed

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  14. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, T. M.; Leach, P. T.; Crawley, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. PMID:26403076

  15. Rational Design of Mouse Models for Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Marietta; McGovern, Jacqui A; Friedl, Peter; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2018-03-01

    The laboratory mouse is widely considered as a valid and affordable model organism to study human disease. Attempts to improve the relevance of murine models for the investigation of human pathologies led to the development of various genetically engineered, xenograft and humanized mouse models. Nevertheless, most preclinical studies in mice suffer from insufficient predictive value when compared with cancer biology and therapy response of human patients. We propose an innovative strategy to improve the predictive power of preclinical cancer models. Combining (i) genomic, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches for rational design of mouse models with (ii) rapid prototyping and computational benchmarking against human clinical data will enable fast and nonbiased validation of newly generated models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mouse Models of Hrs Nf2 Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    heterozygotes also showed hepatocellular carcinoma or nuclear hyperplasia, again abnormalities that were not identified in any of the other mouse lines...Lung Liver Kidney Pancreas 4 +/- +/- ND ND ND ND 23 +/- +/- Adenocarcinoma N N N 26 +/- +/- Adenocarcinoma Hepatocellular Carcinoma N N 27...F3-59 wt +/- N Granuloma N N F3-60 wt +/- N N N N F4-16 wt +/- Adenocarcinoma N N N F4-19 wt +/- N Hepatocellular Carcinoma Hydronephrosis Islets

  17. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    constructed and tested. The primary structure of the trypsinogen activation peptide in mouse T7 trypsinogen is shown. Positions mutated are indicated. 1...trypsinogen designed to increase autoactivation (spontaneous conversion to active trypsin). All mutations targeted the so-called activation peptide , a...mutations, as we previously seen in studies on human cationic trypsinogen. A peculiarity of the trypsinogen activation peptide is the 5

  18. Mouse models for human hair loss disorders

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Rebecca M

    2003-01-01

    The outer surface of the hand, limb and body is covered by the epidermis, which is elaborated into a number of specialized appendages, evolved not only to protect and reinforce the skin but also for social signalling. The most prominent of these appendages is the hair follicle. Hair follicles are remarkable because of their prolific growth characteristics and their complexity of differentiation. After initial embryonic morphogenesis, the hair follicle undergoes repeated cycles of regression and regeneration throughout the lifetime of the organism. Studies of mouse mutants with hair loss phenotypes have suggested that the mechanisms controlling the hair cycle probably involve many of the major signalling molecules used elsewhere in development, although the complete pathway of hair follicle growth control is not yet understood. Mouse studies have also led to the discovery of genes underlying several human disorders. Future studies of mouse hair-loss mutants are likely to benefit the understanding of human hair loss as well as increasing our knowledge of mechanisms controlling morphogenesis and tumorigenesis. PMID:12587927

  19. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occurs during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological experiments on animals undergoing space flight is examined. The mouse model developed was an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to one used with rats. The study was divided into two parts. The first involved determination of which immunological parameters should be observed on animals flown during space flight or studied in the suspension model. The second involved suspending mice and determining which of those immunological parameters were altered by the suspension. Rats that were actually flown in Space Shuttle SL-3 were used to test the hypotheses.

  20. A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Sporadic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Betzler, Alexander M; Kochall, Susan; Blickensdörfer, Linda; Garcia, Sebastian A; Thepkaysone, May-Linn; Nanduri, Lahiri K; Muders, Michael H; Weitz, Jürgen; Reissfelder, Christoph; Schölch, Sebastian

    2017-07-06

    Despite the advantages of easy applicability and cost-effectiveness, colorectal cancer mouse models based on tumor cell injection have severe limitations and do not accurately simulate tumor biology and tumor cell dissemination. Genetically engineered mouse models have been introduced to overcome these limitations; however, such models are technically demanding, especially in large organs such as the colon in which only a single tumor is desired. As a result, an immunocompetent, genetically engineered mouse model of colorectal cancer was developed which develops highly uniform tumors and can be used for tumor biology studies as well as therapeutic trials. Tumor development is initiated by surgical, segmental infection of the distal colon with adeno-cre virus in compound conditionally mutant mice. The tumors can be easily detected and monitored via colonoscopy. We here describe the surgical technique of segmental adeno-cre infection of the colon, the surveillance of the tumor via high-resolution colonoscopy and present the resulting colorectal tumors.

  1. Mouse Models as Predictors of Human Responses: Evolutionary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Elizabeth W; Warner, Natalie J

    Mice offer a number of advantages and are extensively used to model human diseases and drug responses. Selective breeding and genetic manipulation of mice have made many different genotypes and phenotypes available for research. However, in many cases, mouse models have failed to be predictive. Important sources of the prediction problem have been the failure to consider the evolutionary basis for species differences, especially in drug metabolism, and disease definitions that do not reflect the complexity of gene expression underlying disease phenotypes. Incorporating evolutionary insights into mouse models allow for unique opportunities to characterize the effects of diet, different gene expression profiles, and microbiomics underlying human drug responses and disease phenotypes.

  2. Application of Mouse Models to Research in Hearing and Balance.

    PubMed

    Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Jones, Sherri M; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2016-12-01

    Laboratory mice (Mus musculus) have become the major model species for inner ear research. The major uses of mice include gene discovery, characterization, and confirmation. Every application of mice is founded on assumptions about what mice represent and how the information gained may be generalized. A host of successes support the continued use of mice to understand hearing and balance. Depending on the research question, however, some mouse models and research designs will be more appropriate than others. Here, we recount some of the history and successes of the use of mice in hearing and vestibular studies and offer guidelines to those considering how to apply mouse models.

  3. A candidate model for Angelman syndrome in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Cattanach, B M; Barr, J A; Beechey, C V; Martin, J; Noebels, J; Jones, J

    1997-07-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are well-recognized examples of imprinting in humans. They occur most commonly with paternal and maternal 15q11-13 deletions, but also with maternal and paternal disomy. Both syndromes have also occurred more rarely in association with smaller deletions seemingly causing abnormal imprinting. A putative mouse model of PWS, occurring with maternal duplication (partial maternal disomy) for the homologous region, has been described in a previous paper but, although a second imprinting effect that could have provided a mouse model of AS was found, it appeared to be associated with a slightly different region of the chromosome. Here, we provide evidence that the same region is in fact involved and further demonstrate that animals with paternal duplication for the region exhibit characteristics of AS patients. A mouse model of AS is, therefore, strongly indicated.

  4. Behavioural phenotyping assays for mouse models of autism

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Jill L.; Yang, Mu; Lord, Catherine; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2011-01-01

    Autism is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder of unknown aetiology that affects 1 in 100–150 individuals. Diagnosis is based on three categories of behavioural criteria: abnormal social interactions, communication deficits and repetitive behaviours. Strong evidence for a genetic basis has prompted the development of mouse models with targeted mutations in candidate genes for autism. As the diagnostic criteria for autism are behavioural, phenotyping these mouse models requires behavioural assays with high relevance to each category of the diagnostic symptoms. Behavioural neuroscientists are generating a comprehensive set of assays for social interaction, communication and repetitive behaviours to test hypotheses about the causes of austism. Robust phenotypes in mouse models hold great promise as translational tools for discovering effective treatments for components of autism spectrum disorders. PMID:20559336

  5. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  6. Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis 1 and 21

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, David H; Giovannini, Marco

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The neurofibromatoses represent two of the most common inherited tumor predisposition syndromes affecting the nervous system. Individuals with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) are prone to the development of astrocytomas and peripheral nerve sheath tumors whereas those affected with neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) develop schwannomas and meningiomas. The development of traditional homozygous knockout mice has provided insights into the roles of the NF1 and NF2 genes during development and in differentiation, but has been less instructive regarding the contribution of NF1 and NF2 dysfunction to the pathogenesis of specific benign and malignant tumors. Recent progress employing novel mouse targeting strategies has begun to illuminate the roles of the NF1 and NF2 gene products in the molecular pathogenesis of NF-associated tumors. PMID:12082543

  7. Investigating Mechanisms of Chronic Kidney Disease in Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Allison A.; Okamura, Daryl M.; Yamaguchi, Ikuyo; López-Guisa, Jesús M.

    2011-01-01

    Animal models of chronic kidney disease (CKD) are important experimental tools that are used to investigate novel mechanistic pathways and to validate potential new therapeutic interventions prior to pre-clinical testing in humans. Over the past several years, mouse CKD models have been extensively used for these purposes. Despite significant limitations, the model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) has essentially become the high throughput in vivo model, as it recapitulates the fundamental pathogenetic mechanisms that typify all forms of CKD in a relatively short time span. In addition, several alternative mouse models are available that can be used to validate new mechanistic paradigms and/or novel therapies. Several models are reviewed – both genetic and experimentally induced – that provide investigators with an opportunity to include renal functional study end-points together with quantitative measures of fibrosis severity, something that is not possible with the UUO model. PMID:21695449

  8. The clinical implications of mouse models of enhanced anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Simone B; Landgraf, Rainer; Singewald, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Mice are increasingly overtaking the rat model organism in important aspects of anxiety research, including drug development. However, translating the results obtained in mouse studies into information that can be applied in clinics remains challenging. One reason may be that most of the studies so far have used animals displaying ‘normal’ anxiety rather than ‘psychopathological’ animal models with abnormal (elevated) anxiety, which more closely reflect core features and sensitivities to therapeutic interventions of human anxiety disorders, and which would, thus, narrow the translational gap. Here, we discuss manipulations aimed at persistently enhancing anxiety-related behavior in the laboratory mouse using phenotypic selection, genetic techniques and/or environmental manipulations. It is hoped that such models with enhanced construct validity will provide improved ways of studying the neurobiology and treatment of pathological anxiety. Examples of findings from mouse models of enhanced anxiety-related behavior will be discussed, as well as their relation to findings in anxiety disorder patients regarding neuroanatomy, neurobiology, genetic involvement and epigenetic modifications. Finally, we highlight novel targets for potential anxiolytic pharmacotherapeutics that have been established with the help of research involving mice. Since the use of psychopathological mouse models is only just beginning to increase, it is still unclear as to the extent to which such approaches will enhance the success rate of drug development in translating identified therapeutic targets into clinical trials and, thus, helping to introduce the next anxiolytic class of drugs. PMID:21901080

  9. A Consensus Definition of Cataplexy in Mouse Models of Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Scammell, Thomas E.; Willie, Jon T.; Guilleminault, Christian; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2009-01-01

    People with narcolepsy often have episodes of cataplexy, brief periods of muscle weakness triggered by strong emotions. Many researchers are now studying mouse models of narcolepsy, but definitions of cataplexy-like behavior in mice differ across labs. To establish a common language, the International Working Group on Rodent Models of Narcolepsy reviewed the literature on cataplexy in people with narcolepsy and in dog and mouse models of narcolepsy and then developed a consensus definition of murine cataplexy. The group concluded that murine cataplexy is an abrupt episode of nuchal atonia lasting at least 10 seconds. In addition, theta activity dominates the EEG during the episode, and video recordings document immobility. To distinguish a cataplexy episode from REM sleep after a brief awakening, at least 40 seconds of wakefulness must precede the episode. Bouts of cataplexy fitting this definition are common in mice with disrupted orexin/hypocretin signaling, but these events almost never occur in wild type mice. It remains unclear whether murine cataplexy is triggered by strong emotions or whether mice remain conscious during the episodes as in people with narcolepsy. This working definition provides helpful insights into murine cataplexy and should allow objective and accurate comparisons of cataplexy in future studies using mouse models of narcolepsy. Citation: Scammell TE; Willie JT; Guilleminault C; Siegel JM. A consensus definition of cataplexy in mouse models of narcolepsy. SLEEP 2009;32(1):111-116. PMID:19189786

  10. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occur during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological flight experiments on animals was discussed. The mouse model is an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to the one used with rats. It is shown that this murine model yield similar results to the rat model of antiorthostatic suspension for simulating some aspects of weightlessness. It is also shown that mice suspended in this model have decreased interferon-alpha/beta production as compared to control, nonsuspended mice or to orthostatically suspended mice. It is suggested that the conditions occuring during space flight could possibly affect interferon production. The regulatory role of interferon in nonviral diseases is demonstrated including several bacterial and protozoan infections indicating the great significance of interferon in resistance to many types of infectious diseases.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROMONAS VIRULENCE USING AN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED MOUSE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An immunocompromised mouse model was used to characterize Aeromonas strains for their ability to cause opportunistic, extraintestinal infections. A total of 34 isolates of Aeromonas (A. hydrophila [n = 12]), A. veronii biotype sobria [n = 7], A. caviae [n = 4], A. enchelia [n = 4...

  12. Genetically Engineered Humanized Mouse Models for Preclinical Antibody Studies

    PubMed Central

    Proetzel, Gabriele; Wiles, Michael V.; Roopenian, Derry C.

    2015-01-01

    The use of genetic engineering has vastly improved our capabilities to create animal models relevant in preclinical research. With the recent advances in gene-editing technologies, it is now possible to very rapidly create highly tunable mouse models as needs arise. Here, we provide an overview of genetic engineering methods, as well as the development of humanized neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) models and their use for monoclonal antibody in vivo studies. PMID:24150980

  13. Technical approaches for mouse models of human disease.

    PubMed

    Justice, Monica J; Siracusa, Linda D; Stewart, A Francis

    2011-05-01

    The mouse is the leading organism for disease research. A rich resource of genetic variation occurs naturally in inbred and special strains owing to spontaneous mutations. However, one can also obtain desired gene mutations by using the following processes: targeted mutations that eliminate function in the whole organism or in a specific tissue; forward genetic screens using chemicals or transposons; or the introduction of exogenous transgenes as DNAs, bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) or reporter constructs. The mouse is the only mammal that provides such a rich resource of genetic diversity coupled with the potential for extensive genome manipulation, and is therefore a powerful application for modeling human disease. This poster review outlines the major genome manipulations available in the mouse that are used to understand human disease: natural variation, reverse genetics, forward genetics, transgenics and transposons. Each of these applications will be essential for understanding the diversity that is being discovered within the human population.

  14. Histologic scoring of gastritis and gastric cancer in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Arlin B

    2012-01-01

    Histopathology is a defining endpoint in mouse models of experimental gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma. Presented here is an overview of the histology of gastritis and gastric cancer in mice experimentally infected with Helicobacter pylori or H. felis. A modular histopathologic scoring scheme is provided that incorporates relevant disease-associated changes. Whereas the guide uses Helicobacter infection as the prototype challenge, features may be applied to chemical and genetically engineered mouse models of stomach cancer as well. Specific criteria included in the combined gastric histologic activity index (HAI) include inflammation, epithelial defects, oxyntic atrophy, hyperplasia, pseudopyloric metaplasia, and dysplasia or neoplasia. Representative photomicrographs accompany descriptions for each lesion grade. Differentiation of genuine tumor invasion from pseudoinvasion is highlighted. A brief comparison of normal rodent versus human stomach anatomy and physiology is accompanied by an introduction to mouse-specific lesions including mucous metaplasia and eosinophilic droplets (hyalinosis). In conjunction with qualified pathology support, this guide is intended to assist research scientists, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and medical professionals from affiliated disciplines in the interpretation and histologic grading of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinoma in mouse models.

  15. An Immunocompetent Mouse Model of Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Matthew J; Caine, Elizabeth A; Zaitsev, Konstantin; Begley, Matthew C; Weger-Lucarelli, James; Uccellini, Melissa B; Tripathi, Shashank; Morrison, Juliet; Yount, Boyd L; Dinnon, Kenneth H; Rückert, Claudia; Young, Michael C; Zhu, Zhe; Robertson, Shelly J; McNally, Kristin L; Ye, Jing; Cao, Bin; Mysorekar, Indira U; Ebel, Gregory D; Baric, Ralph S; Best, Sonja M; Artyomov, Maxim N; Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo; Diamond, Michael S

    2018-05-09

    Progress toward understanding Zika virus (ZIKV) pathogenesis is hindered by lack of immunocompetent small animal models, in part because ZIKV fails to effectively antagonize Stat2-dependent interferon (IFN) responses in mice. To address this limitation, we first passaged an African ZIKV strain (ZIKV-Dak-41525) through Rag1 -/- mice to obtain a mouse-adapted virus (ZIKV-Dak-MA) that was more virulent than ZIKV-Dak-41525 in mice treated with an anti-Ifnar1 antibody. A G18R substitution in NS4B was the genetic basis for the increased replication, and resulted in decreased IFN-β production, diminished IFN-stimulated gene expression, and the greater brain infection observed with ZIKV-Dak-MA. To generate a fully immunocompetent mouse model of ZIKV infection, human STAT2 was introduced into the mouse Stat2 locus (hSTAT2 KI). Subcutaneous inoculation of pregnant hSTAT2 KI mice with ZIKV-Dak-MA resulted in spread to the placenta and fetal brain. An immunocompetent mouse model of ZIKV infection may prove valuable for evaluating countermeasures to limit disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling fragile X syndrome in the Fmr1 knockout mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M.; Leach, Prescott T.; Silverman, Jill L.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and one of the leading genetic causes for autism spectrum disorder. Clinical symptoms of FXS can include impaired cognition, anxiety, hyperactivity, social phobia, and repetitive behaviors. FXS is caused by a CGG repeat mutation which expands a region on the X chromosome containing the FMR1 gene. In FXS, a full mutation (> 200 repeats) leads to hypermethylation of FMR1, an epigenetic mechanism that effectively silences FMR1 gene expression and reduces levels of the FMR1 gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that is important for the regulation of protein expression. In an effort to further understand how loss of FMR1 and FMRP contribute to FXS symptomology, several FXS animal models have been created. The most well characterized rodent model is the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse, which lacks FMRP protein due to a disruption in its Fmr1 gene. Here, we review the behavioral phenotyping of the Fmr1 KO mouse to date, and discuss the clinical relevance of this mouse model to the human FXS condition. While much remains to be learned about FXS, the Fmr1 KO mouse is a valuable tool for understanding the repercussions of functional loss of FMRP and assessing the efficacy of pharmacological compounds in ameliorating the molecular and behavioral phenotypes relevant to FXS. PMID:25606362

  17. Current State of Animal (Mouse) Modeling in Melanoma Research.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Omer F; Nguyen, Felix D; Noory, Mohammad A; Sharma, Arati

    2015-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress in understanding the biology of human cancer and technological advancement in drug discovery, treatment failure remains an inevitable outcome for most cancer patients with advanced diseases, including melanoma. Despite FDA-approved BRAF-targeted therapies for advanced stage melanoma showed a great deal of promise, development of rapid resistance limits the success. Hence, the overall success rate of melanoma therapy still remains to be one of the worst compared to other malignancies. Advancement of next-generation sequencing technology allowed better identification of alterations that trigger melanoma development. As development of successful therapies strongly depends on clinically relevant preclinical models, together with the new findings, more advanced melanoma models have been generated. In this article, besides traditional mouse models of melanoma, we will discuss recent ones, such as patient-derived tumor xenografts, topically inducible BRAF mouse model and RCAS/TVA-based model, and their advantages as well as limitations. Although mouse models of melanoma are often criticized as poor predictors of whether an experimental drug would be an effective treatment, development of new and more relevant models could circumvent this problem in the near future.

  18. Spallanzani's mouse: a model of restoration and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heber-Katz, E; Leferovich, J M; Bedelbaeva, K; Gourevitch, D

    2004-01-01

    The ability to regenerate is thought to be a lost phenotype in mammals, though there are certainly sporadic examples of mammalian regeneration. Our laboratory has identified a strain of mouse, the MRL mouse, which has a unique capacity to heal complex tissue in an epimorphic fashion, i.e., to restore a damaged limb or organ to its normal structure and function. Initial studies using through-and-through ear punches showed rapid full closure of the ear holes with cartilage growth, new hair follicles, and normal tissue architecture reminiscent of regeneration seen in amphibians as opposed to the scarring usually seen in mammals. Since the ear hole closure phenotype is a quantitative trait, this has been used to show-through extensive breeding and backcrossing--that the trait is heritable. Such analysis reveals that there is a complex genetic basis for this trait with multiple loci. One of the major phenotypes of the MRL mouse is a potent remodeling response with the absence or a reduced level of scarring. MRL healing is associated with the upregulation of the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and the downregulation of their inhibitors TIMP-2 and TIMP-3, both present in inflammatory cells such as neutrophils and macrophages. This model has more recently been extended to the heart. In this case, a cryoinjury to the right ventricle leads to near complete scarless healing in the MRL mouse whereas scarring is seen in the control mouse. In the MRL heart, bromodeoxyuridine uptake by cardiomyocytes filling the wound site can be seen 60 days after injury. This does not occur in the control mouse. Function in the MRL heart, as measured by echocardiography, returns to normal.

  19. Discovery of cancer biomarkers through the use of mouse models.

    PubMed

    Kuick, Rork; Misek, David E; Monsma, David J; Webb, Craig P; Wang, Hong; Peterson, Kelli J; Pisano, Michael; Omenn, Gilbert S; Hanash, Samir M

    2007-04-28

    Although our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of common types of cancer has improved considerably, the development of effective strategies for cancer diagnosis and treatment have lagged behind. Mouse models of cancer potentially represent an efficient means for uncovering diagnostic markers as genetic alterations associated with human tumors can be engineered in mice. In addition, defined stages of tumor development, breeding conditions, and blood sampling can all be controlled and standardized to limit heterogeneity. Alternatively human cancer cells can be injected into mice and tumor development monitored in xenotransplants. Mouse-based studies promise to elucidate a repertoire of protein changes that occur in blood and biological fluids during tumor development. This is illustrated in a study in which we have applied a three-dimensional intact protein analysis system (IPAS) to elucidate detectable protein changes in serum from immunodeficient mice with lung xenografts from orthotopically implanted human A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. With sufficiently detailed protein sequence identifications, the observed protein changes can be attributed to either the host mouse or the human tumor cells. It is noteworthy that the majority of increases identified have corresponded to relatively abundant serum proteins, some of which have previously been reported as increased in the sera of cancer patients. Proteomic studies of mouse models of cancer allow assessment of the range of changes in plasma proteins that occur with tumor development and may lead to the identification of potential cancer markers applicable to humans.

  20. Practical use of advanced mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Meuwissen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    To date a variety of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) mouse models have been developed that mimic human lung cancer. Chemically induced or spontaneous lung cancer in susceptible inbred strains has been widely used, but the more recent genetically engineered somatic mouse models recapitulate much better the genotype-phenotype correlations found in human lung cancer. Additionally, improved orthotopic transplantation of primary human cancer tissue fragments or cells into lungs of immune-compromised mice can be valuable tools for preclinical research such as antitumor drug tests. Here we give a short overview of most somatic mouse models for lung cancer that are currently in use. We accompany each different model with a description of its practical use and application for all major lung tumor types, as well as the intratracheal injection or direct injection of fresh or freeze-thawed tumor cells or tumor cell lines into lung parenchyma of recipient mice. All here presented somatic mouse models are based on the ability to (in) activate specific alleles at a time, and in a tissue-specific cell type, of choice. This spatial-temporal controlled induction of genetic lesions allows the selective introduction of main genetic lesions in an adult mouse lung as found in human lung cancer. The resulting conditional somatic mouse models can be used as versatile powerful tools in basic lung cancer research and preclinical translational studies alike. These distinctively advanced lung cancer models permit us to investigate initiation (cell of origin) and progression of lung cancer, along with response and resistance to drug therapy. Cre/lox or FLP/frt recombinase-mediated methods are now well-used techniques to develop tissue-restricted lung cancer in mice with tumor-suppressor gene and/or oncogene (in)activation. Intranasal or intratracheal administration of engineered adenovirus-Cre or lentivirus-Cre has been optimized for introducing Cre

  1. Mouse-based genetic modeling and analysis of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Zhuo; Li, Yichen; Pao, Annie; Bennett, Abigail S.; Tycko, Benjamin; Mobley, William C.; Yu, Y. Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Down syndrome (DS), caused by human trisomy 21 (Ts21), can be considered as a prototypical model for understanding the effects of chromosomal aneuploidies in other diseases. Human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) is syntenically conserved with three regions in the mouse genome. Sources of data A review of recent advances in genetic modeling and analysis of DS. Using Cre/loxP-mediated chromosome engineering, a substantial number of new mouse models of DS have recently been generated, which facilitates better understanding of disease mechanisms in DS. Areas of agreement Based on evolutionary conservation, Ts21 can be modeled by engineered triplication of Hsa21 syntenic regions in mice. The validity of the models is supported by the exhibition of DS-related phenotypes. Areas of controversy Although substantial progress has been made, it remains a challenge to unravel the relative importance of specific candidate genes and molecular mechanisms underlying the various clinical phenotypes. Growing points Further understanding of mechanisms based on data from mouse models, in parallel with human studies, may lead to novel therapies for clinical manifestations of Ts21 and insights to the roles of aneuploidies in other developmental disorders and cancers. PMID:27789459

  2. Mouse models of ciliopathies: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Dominic P.; Grimes, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    The ciliopathies are an apparently disparate group of human diseases that all result from defects in the formation and/or function of cilia. They include disorders such as Meckel-Grüber syndrome (MKS), Joubert syndrome (JBTS), Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) and Alström syndrome (ALS). Reflecting the manifold requirements for cilia in signalling, sensation and motility, different ciliopathies exhibit common elements. The mouse has been used widely as a model organism for the study of ciliopathies. Although many mutant alleles have proved lethal, continued investigations have led to the development of better models. Here, we review current mouse models of a core set of ciliopathies, their utility and future prospects. PMID:22566558

  3. Dissecting Alzheimer disease in Down syndrome using mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Xun Yu; Tosh, Justin L.; Pulford, Laura J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a common genetic condition caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21 (trisomy 21). This greatly increases the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD), but although virtually all people with DS have AD neuropathology by 40 years of age, not all develop dementia. To dissect the genetic contribution of trisomy 21 to DS phenotypes including those relevant to AD, a range of DS mouse models has been generated which are trisomic for chromosome segments syntenic to human chromosome 21. Here, we consider key characteristics of human AD in DS (AD-DS), and our current state of knowledge on related phenotypes in AD and DS mouse models. We go on to review important features needed in future models of AD-DS, to understand this type of dementia and so highlight pathogenic mechanisms relevant to all populations at risk of AD. PMID:26528151

  4. Dissecting Alzheimer disease in Down syndrome using mouse models.

    PubMed

    Choong, Xun Yu; Tosh, Justin L; Pulford, Laura J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a common genetic condition caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21 (trisomy 21). This greatly increases the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD), but although virtually all people with DS have AD neuropathology by 40 years of age, not all develop dementia. To dissect the genetic contribution of trisomy 21 to DS phenotypes including those relevant to AD, a range of DS mouse models has been generated which are trisomic for chromosome segments syntenic to human chromosome 21. Here, we consider key characteristics of human AD in DS (AD-DS), and our current state of knowledge on related phenotypes in AD and DS mouse models. We go on to review important features needed in future models of AD-DS, to understand this type of dementia and so highlight pathogenic mechanisms relevant to all populations at risk of AD.

  5. Establishment of a patient-derived orthotopic osteosarcoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Blattmann, Claudia; Thiemann, Markus; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Roth, Eva K; Dittmar, Anne; Witt, Hendrik; Lehner, Burkhard; Renker, Eva; Jugold, Manfred; Eichwald, Viktoria; Weichert, Wilko; Huber, Peter E; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2015-04-30

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common pediatric primary malignant bone tumor. As the prognosis for patients following standard treatment did not improve for almost three decades, functional preclinical models that closely reflect important clinical cancer characteristics are urgently needed to develop and evaluate new treatment strategies. The objective of this study was to establish an orthotopic xenotransplanted mouse model using patient-derived tumor tissue. Fresh tumor tissue from an adolescent female patient with osteosarcoma after relapse was surgically xenografted into the right tibia of 6 immunodeficient BALB/c Nu/Nu mice as well as cultured into medium. Tumor growth was serially assessed by palpation and with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In parallel, a primary cell line of the same tumor was established. Histology and high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) were used to investigate both phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of different passages of human xenografts and the cell line compared to the tissue of origin. A primary OS cell line and a primary patient-derived orthotopic xenotranplanted mouse model were established. MRI analyses and histopathology demonstrated an identical architecture in the primary tumor and in the xenografts. Array-CGH analyses of the cell line and all xenografts showed highly comparable patterns of genomic progression. So far, three further primary patient-derived orthotopic xenotranplanted mouse models could be established. We report the first orthotopic OS mouse model generated by transplantation of tumor fragments directly harvested from the patient. This model represents the morphologic and genomic identity of the primary tumor and provides a preclinical platform to evaluate new treatment strategies in OS.

  6. A Progressive Translational Mouse Model of Human VCP Disease: The VCP R155H/+ Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nalbandian, Angèle; Llewellyn, Katrina J.; Badadani, Mallikarjun; Yin, Hong Z.; Nguyen, Christopher; Katheria, Veeral; Watts, Giles; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Vesa, Jouni; Caiozzo, Vincent; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Weiss, John H.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene cause hereditary Inclusion Body Myopathy (hIBM) associated with Paget disease of bone (PDB), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). More recently they have been linked to 2% of familial ALS cases. A knock-in mouse model offers the opportunity to study VCP-associated pathogenesis. Methods The VCPR155H/+ knock-in mouse model was assessed for muscle strength, immunohistochemical, Western, apoptosis, autophagy and MicroPET/CT imaging analyses. Results VCPR155H/+ mice developed significant progressive muscle weakness, and the quadriceps and brain developed progressive cytoplasmic accumulation of TDP-43, ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies and increased LC3-II staining. MicroCT analyses revealed Paget-like lesions at the ends of long bones. Spinal cord demonstrated neurodegenerative changes, ubiquitin, and TDP-43 pathology of motor neurons. Discussion VCPR155H/+ knock-in mice represent an excellent pre-clinical model for understanding VCP-associated disease mechanisms and future treatments. PMID:23169451

  7. An Orthotopic Mouse Model of Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Paschall, Amy V; Liu, Kebin

    2016-08-14

    Metastasis is the primary cause of mortality of breast cancer patients. The mechanism underlying cancer cell metastasis, including breast cancer metastasis, is largely unknown and is a focus in cancer research. Various breast cancer spontaneous metastasis mouse models have been established. Here, we report a simplified procedure to establish orthotopic transplanted breast cancer primary tumor and resultant spontaneous metastasis that mimic human breast cancer metastasis. Combined with the bioluminescence live tumor imaging, this mouse model allows tumor growth and progression kinetics to be monitored and quantified. In this model, a low dose (1 x 10(4) cells) of 4T1-Luc breast cancer cells was injected into BALB/c mouse mammary fat pad using a tuberculin syringe. Mice were injected with luciferin and imaged at various time points using a bioluminescent imaging system. When the primary tumors grew to the size limit as in the IACUC-approved protocol (approximately 30 days), mice were anesthetized under constant flow of 2% isoflurane and oxygen. The tumor area was sterilized with 70% ethanol. The mouse skin around the tumor was excised to expose the tumor which was removed with a pair of sterile scissors. Removal of the primary tumor extends the survival of the 4T-1 tumor-bearing mice for one month. The mice were then repeatedly imaged for metastatic tumor spreading to distant organs. Therapeutic agents can be administered to suppress tumor metastasis at this point. This model is simple and yet sensitive in quantifying breast cancer cell growth in the primary site and progression kinetics to distant organs, and thus is an excellent model for studying breast cancer growth and progression, and for testing anti-metastasis therapeutic and immunotherapeutic agents in vivo.

  8. Magnolol inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mouse mastitis model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wang; Dejie, Liang; Xiaojing, Song; Tiancheng, Wang; Yongguo, Cao; Zhengtao, Yang; Naisheng, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Mastitis comprises an inflammation of the mammary gland, which is almost always linked with bacterial infection. The treatment of mastitis concerns antimicrobial substances, but not very successful. On the other hand, anti-inflammatory therapy with Chinese traditional medicine becomes an effective way for treating mastitis. Magnolol is a polyphenolic binaphthalene compound extracted from the stem bark of Magnolia sp., which has been shown to exert a potential for anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of magnolol on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis mouse model in vivo and the mechanism of this protective effects in LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMECs) in vitro. The damage of tissues was determined by histopathology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were determined by Western blot. The results showed that magnolol significantly inhibit the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production both in vivo and vitro. Magnolol declined the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK in LPS-stimulated MMECs. Furthermore, magnolol inhibited the expression of TLR4 in LPS-stimulated MMECs. In vivo study, it was also observed that magnolol attenuated the damage of mastitis tissues in the mouse models. These findings demonstrated that magnolol attenuate LPS-stimulated inflammatory response by suppressing TLR4/NF-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system. Thereby, magnolol may be a therapeutic agent against mastitis.

  9. A consensus definition of cataplexy in mouse models of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Thomas E; Willie, Jon T; Guilleminault, Christian; Siegel, Jerome M

    2009-01-01

    People with narcolepsy often have episodes of cataplexy, brief periods of muscle weakness triggered by strong emotions. Many researchers are now studying mouse models of narcolepsy, but definitions of cataplexy-like behavior in mice differ across labs. To establish a common language, the International Working Group on Rodent Models of Narcolepsy reviewed the literature on cataplexy in people with narcolepsy and in dog and mouse models of narcolepsy and then developed a consensus definition of murine cataplexy. The group concluded that murine cataplexy is an abrupt episode of nuchal atonia lasting at least 10 seconds. In addition, theta activity dominates the EEG during the episode, and video recordings document immobility. To distinguish a cataplexy episode from REM sleep after a brief awakening, at least 40 seconds of wakefulness must precede the episode. Bouts of cataplexy fitting this definition are common in mice with disrupted orexin/hypocretin signaling, but these events almost never occur in wild type mice. It remains unclear whether murine cataplexy is triggered by strong emotions or whether mice remain conscious during the episodes as in people with narcolepsy. This working definition provides helpful insights into murine cataplexy and should allow objective and accurate comparisons of cataplexy in future studies using mouse models of narcolepsy.

  10. Development of Mouse Lung Deposition Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    information on deposition of ultrafine particles in the URT of mice either by measurements or theoretical modeling. Comparison of the nasal structure of... ultrafine particles in rats to be extended to mice. Based on measurements in the nasal casts of rats, Cheng et al. [12] obtained the following...expression for losses of ultrafine particles in the nasal passages of rats by Brownian diffusion during inhalation and exhalation. γβα− − −=η QD

  11. Genetically engineered mouse models and human osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common form of bone cancer. Pivotal insight into the genes involved in human osteosarcoma has been provided by the study of rare familial cancer predisposition syndromes. Three kindreds stand out as predisposing to the development of osteosarcoma: Li-Fraumeni syndrome, familial retinoblastoma and RecQ helicase disorders, which include Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome in particular. These disorders have highlighted the important roles of P53 and RB respectively, in the development of osteosarcoma. The association of OS with RECQL4 mutations is apparent but the relevance of this to OS is uncertain as mutations in RECQL4 are not found in sporadic OS. Application of the knowledge or mutations of P53 and RB in familial and sporadic OS has enabled the development of tractable, highly penetrant murine models of OS. These models share many of the cardinal features associated with human osteosarcoma including, importantly, a high incidence of spontaneous metastasis. The recent development of these models has been a significant advance for efforts to improve our understanding of the genetics of human OS and, more critically, to provide a high-throughput genetically modifiable platform for preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics. PMID:23036272

  12. Circulating Tumor Cell Analysis in Preclinical Mouse Models of Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kitz, Jenna; Lowes, Lori E; Goodale, David; Allan, Alison L

    2018-04-28

    The majority of cancer deaths occur because of metastasis since current therapies are largely non-curative in the metastatic setting. The use of in vivo preclinical mouse models for assessing metastasis is, therefore, critical for developing effective new cancer biomarkers and therapies. Although a number of quantitative tools have been previously developed to study in vivo metastasis, the detection and quantification of rare metastatic events has remained challenging. This review will discuss the use of circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis as an effective means of tracking and characterizing metastatic disease progression in preclinical mouse models of breast and prostate cancer and the resulting lessons learned about CTC and metastasis biology. We will also discuss how the use of clinically-relevant CTC technologies such as the CellSearch ® and Parsortix™ platforms for preclinical CTC studies can serve to enhance the study of cancer biology, new biomarkers, and novel therapies from the bench to the bedside.

  13. Nucleotide excision repair deficient mouse models and neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a highly conserved mechanism to remove helix-distorting DNA base damage. A major substrate for NER is DNA damage caused by environmental genotoxins, most notably ultraviolet radiation. Xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy are three human diseases caused by inherited defects in NER. The symptoms and severity of these diseases vary dramatically, ranging from profound developmental delay to cancer predisposition and accelerated aging. All three syndromes include neurological disease, indicating an important role for NER in protecting against spontaneous DNA damage as well. To study the pathophysiology caused by DNA damage, numerous mouse models of NER deficiency were generated by knocking-out genes required for NER or knocking-in disease-causing human mutations. This review explores the utility of these mouse models to study neurological disease caused by NER deficiency. PMID:18272436

  14. Mouse models for the study of colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Daniel W.; Giardina, Charles; Tanaka, Takuji

    2009-01-01

    The study of experimental colon carcinogenesis in rodents has a long history, dating back almost 80 years. There are many advantages to studying the pathogenesis of carcinogen-induced colon cancer in mouse models, including rapid and reproducible tumor induction and the recapitulation of the adenoma–carcinoma sequence that occurs in humans. The availability of recombinant inbred mouse panels and the existence of transgenic, knock-out and knock-in genetic models further increase the value of these studies. In this review, we discuss the general mechanisms of tumor initiation elicited by commonly used chemical carcinogens and how genetic background influences the extent of disease. We will also describe the general features of lesions formed in response to carcinogen treatment, including the underlying molecular aberrations and how these changes may relate to the pathogenesis of human colorectal cancer. PMID:19037092

  15. Mouse Model for Aerosol Infection of Influenza (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Min, J.-Y., Lamirande, E.W., Santos, C., Jin, H., Kemble, G. and Subbarao , K . (2011) Comparison of a live attenuated 2009 H1N1 vaccine with...AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2012-0010 MOUSE MODEL FOR AEROSOL INFECTION OF INFLUENZA POSTPRINT Rashelle S. McDonald, Brian K . Heimbuch Applied Research...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b . ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 17

  16. A mouse model of androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Judy S; Kilbourne, Edward J; Peano, Bryan J; Chippari, Susan; Kenney, Thomas; McNally, Christopher; Wang, Wei; Harris, Heather A; Winneker, Richard C; Nagpal, Sunil; Thompson, Catherine C

    2010-05-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), commonly known as male pattern baldness, is a form of hair loss that occurs in both males and females. Although the exact cause of AGA is not known, it is associated with genetic predisposition through traits related to androgen synthesis/metabolism and androgen signaling mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Current therapies for AGA show limited efficacy and are often associated with undesirable side effects. A major hurdle to developing new therapies for AGA is the lack of small animal models to support drug discovery research. Here, we report the first rodent model of AGA. Previous work demonstrating that the interaction between androgen-bound AR and beta-catenin can inhibit Wnt signaling led us to test the hypothesis that expression of AR in hair follicle cells could interfere with hair growth in an androgen-dependent manner. Transgenic mice overexpressing human AR in the skin under control of the keratin 5 promoter were generated. Keratin 5-human AR transgenic mice exposed to high levels of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone showed delayed hair regeneration, mimicking the AGA scalp. This effect is AR mediated, because treatment with the AR antagonist hydroxyflutamide inhibited the effect of dihydrotestosterone on hair growth. These results support the hypothesis that androgen-mediated hair loss is AR dependent and suggest that AR and beta-catenin mediate this effect. These mice can now be used to test new therapeutic agents for the treatment of AGA, accelerating the drug discovery process.

  17. Behavioral characterization of mouse models of neuroferritinopathy.

    PubMed

    Capoccia, Sara; Maccarinelli, Federica; Buffoli, Barbara; Rodella, Luigi F; Cremona, Ottavio; Arosio, Paolo; Cirulli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is the main intracellular protein of iron storage with a central role in the regulation of iron metabolism and detoxification. Nucleotide insertions in the last exon of the ferritin light chain cause a neurodegenerative disease known as Neuroferritinopathy, characterized by iron deposition in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum, basal ganglia and motor cortex. The disease progresses relentlessly, leading to dystonia, chorea, motor disability and neuropsychiatry features. The characterization of a good animal model is required to compare and contrast specific features with the human disease, in order to gain new insights on the consequences of chronic iron overload on brain function and behavior. To this aim we studied an animal model expressing the pathogenic human FTL mutant 498InsTC under the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter. Transgenic (Tg) mice showed strong accumulation of the mutated protein in the brain, which increased with age, and this was accompanied by brain accumulation of ferritin/iron bodies, the main pathologic hallmark of human neuroferritinopathy. Tg-mice were tested throughout development and aging at 2-, 8- and 18-months for motor coordination and balance (Beam Walking and Footprint tests). The Tg-mice showed a significant decrease in motor coordination at 8 and 18 months of age, with a shorter latency to fall and abnormal gait. Furthermore, one group of aged naïve subjects was challenged with two herbicides (Paraquat and Maneb) known to cause oxidative damage. The treatment led to a paradoxical increase in behavioral activation in the transgenic mice, suggestive of altered functioning of the dopaminergic system. Overall, data indicate that mice carrying the pathogenic FTL498InsTC mutation show motor deficits with a developmental profile suggestive of a progressive pathology, as in the human disease. These mice could be a powerful tool to study the neurodegenerative mechanisms leading to the disease and help developing

  18. Behavioral Characterization of Mouse Models of Neuroferritinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Buffoli, Barbara; Rodella, Luigi F.; Cremona, Ottavio; Arosio, Paolo; Cirulli, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is the main intracellular protein of iron storage with a central role in the regulation of iron metabolism and detoxification. Nucleotide insertions in the last exon of the ferritin light chain cause a neurodegenerative disease known as Neuroferritinopathy, characterized by iron deposition in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum, basal ganglia and motor cortex. The disease progresses relentlessly, leading to dystonia, chorea, motor disability and neuropsychiatry features. The characterization of a good animal model is required to compare and contrast specific features with the human disease, in order to gain new insights on the consequences of chronic iron overload on brain function and behavior. To this aim we studied an animal model expressing the pathogenic human FTL mutant 498InsTC under the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter. Transgenic (Tg) mice showed strong accumulation of the mutated protein in the brain, which increased with age, and this was accompanied by brain accumulation of ferritin/iron bodies, the main pathologic hallmark of human neuroferritinopathy. Tg-mice were tested throughout development and aging at 2-, 8- and 18-months for motor coordination and balance (Beam Walking and Footprint tests). The Tg-mice showed a significant decrease in motor coordination at 8 and 18 months of age, with a shorter latency to fall and abnormal gait. Furthermore, one group of aged naïve subjects was challenged with two herbicides (Paraquat and Maneb) known to cause oxidative damage. The treatment led to a paradoxical increase in behavioral activation in the transgenic mice, suggestive of altered functioning of the dopaminergic system. Overall, data indicate that mice carrying the pathogenic FTL498InsTC mutation show motor deficits with a developmental profile suggestive of a progressive pathology, as in the human disease. These mice could be a powerful tool to study the neurodegenerative mechanisms leading to the disease and help developing

  19. Mouse models: the ketogenic diet and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Borges, Karin

    2008-11-01

    Literature on the anticonvulsant effects of the ketogenic diet (KD) in mouse seizure models is summarized. Recent data show that a KD balanced in vitamin, mineral, and antioxidant content is anticonvulsant in mice, confirming that the KD's effect in mice can be attributed to the composition of the diet and not other dietary factors. Given that the anticonvulsant mechanism of the KD is still unknown, the anticonvulsant profile of the diet in different seizure models may help to decipher this mechanism. The implications of the findings that the KD is anticonvulsant in electrical seizure models are indicated. Further, the potential involvement of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the KD's anticonvulsant mechanism is discussed.

  20. Evaluation of an in vitro toxicogenetic mouse model for hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Stephanie M.; Bradford, Blair U.; Soldatow, Valerie Y.

    2010-12-15

    Numerous studies support the fact that a genetically diverse mouse population may be useful as an animal model to understand and predict toxicity in humans. We hypothesized that cultures of hepatocytes obtained from a large panel of inbred mouse strains can produce data indicative of inter-individual differences in in vivo responses to hepato-toxicants. In order to test this hypothesis and establish whether in vitro studies using cultured hepatocytes from genetically distinct mouse strains are feasible, we aimed to determine whether viable cells may be isolated from different mouse inbred strains, evaluate the reproducibility of cell yield, viability and functionality overmore » subsequent isolations, and assess the utility of the model for toxicity screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 15 strains of mice (A/J, B6C3F1, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, CAST/EiJ, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, AKR/J, MRL/MpJ, NOD/LtJ, NZW/LacJ, PWD/PhJ and WSB/EiJ males) and cultured for up to 7 days in traditional 2-dimensional culture. Cells from B6C3F1, C57BL/6J, and NOD/LtJ strains were treated with acetaminophen, WY-14,643 or rifampin and concentration-response effects on viability and function were established. Our data suggest that high yield and viability can be achieved across a panel of strains. Cell function and expression of key liver-specific genes of hepatocytes isolated from different strains and cultured under standardized conditions are comparable. Strain-specific responses to toxicant exposure have been observed in cultured hepatocytes and these experiments open new opportunities for further developments of in vitro models of hepatotoxicity in a genetically diverse population.« less

  1. A fully humanized transgenic mouse model of Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Southwell, Amber L.; Warby, Simon C.; Carroll, Jeffrey B.; Doty, Crystal N.; Skotte, Niels H.; Zhang, Weining; Villanueva, Erika B.; Kovalik, Vlad; Xie, Yuanyun; Pouladi, Mahmoud A.; Collins, Jennifer A.; Yang, X. William; Franciosi, Sonia; Hayden, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Silencing the mutant huntingtin gene (muHTT) is a direct and simple therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Huntington disease (HD) in principle. However, targeting the HD mutation presents challenges because it is an expansion of a common genetic element (a CAG tract) that is found throughout the genome. Moreover, the HTT protein is important for neuronal health throughout life, and silencing strategies that also reduce the wild-type HTT allele may not be well tolerated during the long-term treatment of HD. Several HTT silencing strategies are in development that target genetic sites in HTT that are outside of the CAG expansion, including HD mutation-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms and the HTT promoter. Preclinical testing of these genetic therapies has required the development of a new mouse model of HD that carries these human-specific genetic targets. To generate a fully humanized mouse model of HD, we have cross-bred BACHD and YAC18 on the Hdh−/− background. The resulting line, Hu97/18, is the first murine model of HD that fully genetically recapitulates human HD having two human HTT genes, no mouse Hdh genes and heterozygosity of the HD mutation. We find that Hu97/18 mice display many of the behavioral changes associated with HD including motor, psychiatric and cognitive deficits, as well as canonical neuropathological abnormalities. This mouse line will be useful for gaining additional insights into the disease mechanisms of HD as well as for testing genetic therapies targeting human HTT. PMID:23001568

  2. Enzyme replacement therapy on hypophosphatasia mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Montaño, Adriana M.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Sly, William S.

    2013-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP), resulting in a defect of bone mineralization. Natural substrates for this ectoenzyme accumulate extracellulary including inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), an inhibitor of mineralization, and pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP), a co-factor form of vitamin B6. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for HPP by functional TNSALP is one of the therapeutic options. The C-terminal-anchorless human recombinant TNSALP derived from Chinese hamster ovary cell lines was purified. TNSALP-null mice (Akp2−/−), an infantile model of HPP, were treated from birth using TNSALP and vitamin B6 diet. Long-term efficacy studies of ERT consisted of every 3 days subcutaneous or intravenous injections till 28 days old (dose 20 U/g) and subsequently every 3 days intravenous injections for 6 months (dose 10 U/g). We assessed therapeutic effect by growth and survival rates, fertility, skeletal manifestations, and radiographic and pathological finding. Treated Akp2−/− mice grew normally till 4 weeks and appeared well with a minimum skeletal abnormality as well as absence of epilepsy, compared with untreated mice which died by 3 weeks old. The prognosis of TNSALP-treated Akp2−/− mice was improved substantially: 1) prolonged life span over 6 months, 2) improvement of the growth, and 3) normal fertility. After 6 months of treatment, we found moderate hypomineralization with abnormal proliferative chondrocytes in growth plate and articular cartilage. In conclusion, ERT with human native TNSALP improves substantial clinical manifestations in Akp2−/− mice, suggesting that ERT with anchorless TNSALP is also a potential therapy for HPP. PMID:23978959

  3. Preclinical Mouse Cancer Models: A Maze of Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Day, Chi-Ping; Merlino, Glenn; Van Dyke, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in developing novel therapeutics for cancer treatment, and targeted therapies have revolutionized the treatment of some cancers. Despite the promise, only about five percent of new cancer drugs are approved, and most fail due to lack of efficacy. The indication is that current preclinical methods are limited in predicting successful outcomes. Such failure exacts enormous cost, both financial and in the quality of human life. This primer explores the current status, promise and challenges of preclinical evaluation in advanced mouse cancer models and briefly addresses emerging models for early-stage preclinical development. PMID:26406370

  4. Combination radiotherapy in an orthotopic mouse brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kramp, Tamalee R; Camphausen, Kevin

    2012-03-06

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are the most common and aggressive adult primary brain tumors. In recent years there has been substantial progress in the understanding of the mechanics of tumor invasion, and direct intracerebral inoculation of tumor provides the opportunity of observing the invasive process in a physiologically appropriate environment. As far as human brain tumors are concerned, the orthotopic models currently available are established either by stereotaxic injection of cell suspensions or implantation of a solid piece of tumor through a complicated craniotomy procedure. In our technique we harvest cells from tissue culture to create a cell suspension used to implant directly into the brain. The duration of the surgery is approximately 30 minutes, and as the mouse needs to be in a constant surgical plane, an injectable anesthetic is used. The mouse is placed in a stereotaxic jig made by Stoetling (figure 1). After the surgical area is cleaned and prepared, an incision is made; and the bregma is located to determine the location of the craniotomy. The location of the craniotomy is 2 mm to the right and 1 mm rostral to the bregma. The depth is 3 mm from the surface of the skull, and cells are injected at a rate of 2 μl every 2 minutes. The skin is sutured with 5-0 PDS, and the mouse is allowed to wake up on a heating pad. From our experience, depending on the cell line, treatment can take place from 7-10 days after surgery. Drug delivery is dependent on the drug composition. For radiation treatment the mice are anesthetized, and put into a custom made jig. Lead covers the mouse's body and exposes only the brain of the mouse. The study of tumorigenesis and the evaluation of new therapies for GBM require accurate and reproducible brain tumor animal models. Thus we use this orthotopic brain model to study the interaction of the microenvironment of the brain and the tumor, to test the effectiveness of different therapeutic agents with and without

  5. Human immune system mouse models of Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Jessica R; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2017-08-01

    Human immune system (HIS) mice, immunodeficient mice engrafted with human cells (with or without donor-matched tissue), offer a unique opportunity to study pathogens that cause disease predominantly or exclusively in humans. Several HIS mouse models have recently been used to study Ebola virus (EBOV) infection and disease. The results of these studies are encouraging and support further development and use of these models in Ebola research. HIS mice provide a small animal model to study EBOV isolates, investigate early viral interactions with human immune cells, screen vaccines and therapeutics that modulate the immune system, and investigate sequelae in survivors. Here we review existing models, discuss their use in pathogenesis studies and therapeutic screening, and highlight considerations for study design and analysis. Finally, we point out caveats to current models, and recommend future efforts for modeling EBOV infection in HIS mice. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Rpl27a mutation in the sooty foot ataxia mouse phenocopies high p53 mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Terzian, Tamara; Dumble, Melissa; Arbab, Farinaz; Thaller, Christina; Donehower, Lawrence A; Lozano, Guillermina; Justice, Monica J; Roop, Dennis R; Box, Neil F

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal stress is an important, yet poorly understood, mechanism that results in activation of the p53 tumour suppressor. We present a mutation in the ribosomal protein Rpl27a gene (sooty foot ataxia mice), isolated through a sensitized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen for p53 pathway defects, that shares striking phenotypic similarities with high p53 mouse models, including cerebellar ataxia, pancytopenia and epidermal hyperpigmentation. This phenocopy is rescued in a haploinsufficient p53 background. A detailed examination of the bone marrow in these mice identified reduced numbers of haematopoietic stem cells and a p53-dependent c-Kit down-regulation. These studies suggest that reduced Rpl27a increases p53 activity in vivo, further evident with a delay in tumorigenesis in mutant mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Rpl27a plays a crucial role in multiple tissues and that disruption of this ribosomal protein affects both development and transformation. PMID:21674502

  7. A Humanized Mouse Model Generated Using Surplus Neonatal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew E; Zhou, Ying; McIntosh, Brian E; Norman, Ian G; Lou, Hannah E; Biermann, Mitch; Sullivan, Jeremy A; Kamp, Timothy J; Thomson, James A; Anagnostopoulos, Petros V; Burlingham, William J

    2018-04-10

    Here, we describe the NeoThy humanized mouse model created using non-fetal human tissue sources, cryopreserved neonatal thymus and umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Conventional humanized mouse models are made by engrafting human fetal thymus and HSCs into immunocompromised mice. These mice harbor functional human T cells that have matured in the presence of human self-peptides and human leukocyte antigen molecules. Neonatal thymus tissue is more abundant and developmentally mature and allows for creation of up to ∼50-fold more mice per donor compared with fetal tissue models. The NeoThy has equivalent frequencies of engrafted human immune cells compared with fetal tissue humanized mice and exhibits T cell function in assays of ex vivo cell proliferation, interferon γ secretion, and in vivo graft infiltration. The NeoThy model may provide significant advantages for induced pluripotent stem cell immunogenicity studies, while bypassing the requirement for fetal tissue. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of Barmah Forest virus pathogenesis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Lara J; Lidbury, Brett A; Bettadapura, Jayaram; Jian, Peng; Herring, Belinda L; Hey-Cunningham, William J; Sheng, Kuo-Ching; Zakhary, Andrew; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2014-10-01

    Alphaviruses including Barmah Forest virus (BFV) and Ross River virus (RRV) cause arthritis, arthralgia and myalgia in humans. The rheumatic symptoms in human BFV infection are very similar to those of RRV. Although RRV disease has been studied extensively, little is known about the pathogenesis of BFV infection. We sought to establish a mouse model for BFV to facilitate our understanding of BFV infectivity, tropism and pathogenesis, and to identify key pathological and immunological mechanisms of BFV infection that may distinguish between infections with BFV and RRV. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report the first study assessing the virulence and replication of several BFV isolates in a mouse model. We infected newborn Swiss outbred mice with BFV and established that the BFV2193 prototype was the most virulent strain. BFV2193 infection resulted in the highest mortality among all BFV variant isolates, comparable to that of RRV. In comparison with RRV, C57BL/6 mice infected with BFV showed delayed onset, moderate disease scores and early recovery of the disease. BFV replicated poorly in muscle and did not cause the severe myositis seen in RRV-infected mice. The mRNAs for the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2 and arginase-1 were highly upregulated in RRV- but not BFV-infected muscle. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a mouse model of BFV infection, which we have used to demonstrate differences between BFV and RRV infections and to further understand disease pathogenesis. With an increasing number of BFV cases occurring annually, a better understanding of the disease mechanisms is essential for future therapeutic development. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. A new mouse model of metabolic syndrome and associated complications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Zheng, Yue; Nishina, Patsy M; Naggert, Jürgen K.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MS) encompasses a clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. We characterized a new mouse model carrying a dominant mutation, C57BL/6J-Nmf15/+ (B6-Nmf15/+), which develops additional complications of MS such as adipose tissue inflammation and cardiomyopathy. A backcross was used to genetically map the Nmf15 locus. Mice were examined in the CLAMS™ animal monitoring system, and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and blood chemistry analyses were performed. Hypothalamic LepR, SOCS1 and STAT3 phosphorylation were examined. Cardiac function was assessed by Echo- and Electro Cardiography. Adipose tissue inflammation was characterized by in situ hybridization and measurement of Jun kinase activity. The Nmf15 locus mapped to distal mouse chromosome 5 with a LOD score of 13.8. Nmf15 mice developed obesity by 12 weeks of age. Plasma leptin levels were significantly elevated in pre-obese Nmf15 mice at 8 weeks of age and an attenuated STAT3 phosphorylation in the hypothalamus suggests a primary leptin resistance. Adipose tissue from Nmf15 mice showed a remarkable degree of inflammation and macrophage infiltration as indicated by expression of the F4/80 marker and increased phosphorylation of JNK1/2. Lipidosis was observed in tubular epithelial cells and glomeruli of the kidney. Nmf15 mice demonstrate both histological and pathophysiological evidence of cardiomyopathy. The Nmf15 mouse model provides a new entry point into pathways mediating leptin resistance and obesity. It is one of few models that combine many aspects of metabolic syndrome and can be useful for testing new therapeutic approaches for combating obesity complications, particularly cardiomyopathy. PMID:19398498

  10. Dantrolene is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Jun; Lvovskaya, Svetlana; Herndon, Emily; Supnet, Charlene; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2011-11-25

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the Huntingtin protein which results in the selective degeneration of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Our group has previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca2+) signaling is abnormal in MSNs from the yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (YAC128). Moreover, we demonstrated that deranged intracellular Ca2+ signaling sensitizes YAC128 MSNs to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity when compared to wild type (WT) MSNs. In previous studies we also observed abnormal neuronal Ca2+ signaling in neurons from spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) and spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) mouse models and demonstrated that treatment with dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and clinically relevant Ca2+ signaling stabilizer, was neuroprotective in experiments with these mouse models. The aim of the current study was to evaluate potential beneficial effects of dantrolene in experiments with YAC128 HD mouse model. The application of caffeine and glutamate resulted in increased Ca2+ release from intracellular stores in YAC128 MSN cultures when compared to WT MSN cultures. Pre-treatment with dantrolene protected YAC128 MSNs from glutamate excitotoxicty, with an effective concentration of 100 nM and above. Feeding dantrolene (5 mg/kg) twice a week to YAC128 mice between 2 months and 11.5 months of age resulted in significantly improved performance in the beam-walking and gait-walking assays. Neuropathological analysis revealed that long-term dantrolene feeding to YAC128 mice significantly reduced the loss of NeuN-positive striatal neurons and reduced formation of Httexp nuclear aggregates. Our results support the hypothesis that deranged Ca2+ signaling plays an important role in HD pathology. Our data also implicate the RyanRs as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HD and demonstrate that RyanR inhibitors and Ca2+ signaling stabilizers such as

  11. Dantrolene is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the Huntingtin protein which results in the selective degeneration of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Our group has previously demonstrated that calcium (Ca2+) signaling is abnormal in MSNs from the yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of HD (YAC128). Moreover, we demonstrated that deranged intracellular Ca2+ signaling sensitizes YAC128 MSNs to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity when compared to wild type (WT) MSNs. In previous studies we also observed abnormal neuronal Ca2+ signaling in neurons from spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) and spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) mouse models and demonstrated that treatment with dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and clinically relevant Ca2+ signaling stabilizer, was neuroprotective in experiments with these mouse models. The aim of the current study was to evaluate potential beneficial effects of dantrolene in experiments with YAC128 HD mouse model. Results The application of caffeine and glutamate resulted in increased Ca2+ release from intracellular stores in YAC128 MSN cultures when compared to WT MSN cultures. Pre-treatment with dantrolene protected YAC128 MSNs from glutamate excitotoxicty, with an effective concentration of 100 nM and above. Feeding dantrolene (5 mg/kg) twice a week to YAC128 mice between 2 months and 11.5 months of age resulted in significantly improved performance in the beam-walking and gait-walking assays. Neuropathological analysis revealed that long-term dantrolene feeding to YAC128 mice significantly reduced the loss of NeuN-positive striatal neurons and reduced formation of Httexp nuclear aggregates. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that deranged Ca2+ signaling plays an important role in HD pathology. Our data also implicate the RyanRs as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HD and demonstrate that RyanR inhibitors and Ca2

  12. A Mouse Model of Hypospadias Induced by Estradiol Benzoate.

    PubMed

    He, Hou-Guang; Han, Cong-Hui; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    We wished to establish a mouse model of hypospadias using injections of estradiol benzoate for investigating the molecular mechanisms of hypospadias. Fifty timed pregnant mice were randomly divided into five study groups: A, B, C, D, and E. These groups were injected subcutaneously with estradiol benzoate mixed with sesame oil at, respectively, the doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 2.5, or 12.5 mg kg(-1) days(-1) from gestation day (GD) 12 to GD 16. The pups' mortality was recorded on the day of delivery. Urethras and positions of testes were examined on postnatal day 28. The numbers of live pups were significantly lower in the study groups D and E compared to study group A (p < 0.01). Hypospadias was seen in groups C (3.3 %; 1/30), D (18.2 %; 4/22), and E (21.4 %; 3/14), while cryptorchidism was observed in groups C (10 %; 3/30), D (31.8 %; 7/22), and E (57.1 %; 8/14) on postnatal day 28. The experimental model of hypospadias induced by estradiol benzoate in the group D (2.5 mg kg(-1) days(-1)) was more reliable considering high mortality of the study group E. The dose of estradiol benzoate used in the group D is suitable for establishing mouse model of hypospadias.

  13. Genetic mouse models of brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2014-05-01

    Progression of brain ageing is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Analysis of genetically modified animals with uniform genetic backgrounds in a standardised, controlled environment enables the dissection of critical determinants of brain ageing on a molecular level. Human and animal studies suggest that increased load of damaged macromolecules, efficacy of DNA maintenance, mitochondrial activity, and cellular stress defences are critical determinants of brain ageing. Surprisingly, mouse lines with genetic impairment of anti-oxidative capacity generally did not show enhanced cognitive ageing but rather an increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. Mouse lines with impaired mitochondrial activity had critically short life spans or severe and rapidly progressing neurodegeneration. Strains with impaired clearance in damaged macromolecules or defects in the regulation of cellular stress defences showed alterations in the onset and progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling generally increased life span but impaired cognitive functions revealing a complex interaction between ageing of the brain and of the body. Brain ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mouse models expressing high levels of mutant human amyloid precursor protein showed a number of symptoms and pathophysiological processes typical for early phase of Alzheimer's disease. Generally, therapeutic strategies effective against Alzheimer's disease in humans were also active in the Tg2576, APP23, APP/PS1 and 5xFAD lines, but a large number of false positive findings were also reported. The 3xtg AD model likely has the highest face and construct validity but further studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A mouse model with postnatal endolymphatic hydrops and hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Megerian, Cliff A.; Semaan, Maroun T.; Aftab, Saba; Kisley, Lauren B.; Zheng, Qing Yin; Pawlowski, Karen S.; Wright, Charles G.; Alagramam, Kumar N.

    2010-01-01

    Endolymphatic hydrops (ELH), hearing loss and neuronal degeneration occur together in a variety of clinically significant disorders, including Meniere’s disease (MD). However, the sequence of these pathological changes and their relationship to each other are not well understood. In this regard, an animal model that spontaneously develops these features postnatally would be useful for research purposes. A search for such a model led us to the PhexHyp-Duk mouse, a mutant allele of the Phex gene causing X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. The hemizygous male (PhexHyp-Duk/Y) was previously reported to exhibit various abnormalities during adulthood, including thickening of bone, ELH and hearing loss. The reported inner-ear phenotype was suggestive of progressive pathology and spontaneous development of ELH postnatally, but not conclusive. The main focuses of this report are to further characterize the inner ear phenotype in PhexHyp-Duk/Y mice and to test the hypotheses that (a) the PhexHyp-Duk/Y mouse develops ELH and hearing loss postnatally, and (b) the development of ELH in the PhexHyp-Duk/Y mouse is associated with obstruction of the endolymphatic duct (ED) due to thickening of the surrounding bone. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings at various times points and histological analysis of representative temporal bones reveal that PhexHyp-Duk/Y mice typically develop adult onset, asymmetric, progressive hearing loss closely followed by the onset of ELH. ABR and histological data show that functional degeneration precedes structural degeneration. The major degenerative correlate of hearing loss and ELH in the mutants is the primary loss of spiral ganglion cells. Further, PhexHyp-Duk/Y mice develop ELH without evidence of ED obstruction, supporting the idea that ELH can be induced by a mechanism other than the blockade of longitudinal flow of endolymphatic fluid, and occlusion of ED is not a prerequisite for the development of ELH in patients. PMID:18289812

  15. Experimental Mouse Model of Lumbar Ligamentum Flavum Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeyuki; Yokota, Kazuya; Kobayakawa, Kazu; Hara, Masamitsu; Kubota, Kensuke; Harimaya, Katsumi; Kawaguchi, Kenichi; Hayashida, Mitsumasa; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Doi, Toshio; Shiba, Keiichiro; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Okada, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) is one of the most common spinal disorders in elderly people, with the number of LSCS patients increasing due to the aging of the population. The ligamentum flavum (LF) is a spinal ligament located in the interior of the vertebral canal, and hypertrophy of the LF, which causes the direct compression of the nerve roots and/or cauda equine, is a major cause of LSCS. Although there have been previous studies on LF hypertrophy, its pathomechanism remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to establish a relevant mouse model of LF hypertrophy and to examine disease-related factors. First, we focused on mechanical stress and developed a loading device for applying consecutive mechanical flexion-extension stress to the mouse LF. After 12 weeks of mechanical stress loading, we found that the LF thickness in the stress group was significantly increased in comparison to the control group. In addition, there were significant increases in the area of collagen fibers, the number of LF cells, and the gene expression of several fibrosis-related factors. However, in this mecnanical stress model, there was no macrophage infiltration, angiogenesis, or increase in the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), which are characteristic features of LF hypertrophy in LSCS patients. We therefore examined the influence of infiltrating macrophages on LF hypertrophy. After inducing macrophage infiltration by micro-injury to the mouse LF, we found excessive collagen synthesis in the injured site with the increased TGF-β1 expression at 2 weeks after injury, and further confirmed LF hypertrophy at 6 weeks after injury. Our findings demonstrate that mechanical stress is a causative factor for LF hypertrophy and strongly suggest the importance of macrophage infiltration in the progression of LF hypertrophy via the stimulation of collagen production.

  16. Streptozocin-induced diabetic mouse model of urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Rosen, David A; Hung, Chia-Suei; Kline, Kimberly A; Hultgren, Scott J

    2008-09-01

    Diabetics have a higher incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI), are infected with a broader range of uropathogens, and more commonly develop serious UTI sequelae than nondiabetics. To better study UTI in the diabetic host, we created and characterized a murine model of diabetic UTI using the pancreatic islet beta-cell toxin streptozocin in C3H/HeN, C3H/HeJ, and C57BL/6 mouse backgrounds. Intraperitoneal injections of streptozocin were used to initiate diabetes in healthy mouse backgrounds, as defined by consecutive blood glucose levels of >250 mg/dl. UTIs caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UTI89), Klebsiella pneumoniae (TOP52 1721), and Enterococcus faecalis (0852) were studied, and diabetic mice were found to be considerably more susceptible to infection. All three uropathogens produced significantly higher bladder and kidney titers than buffer-treated controls. Uropathogens did not have as large an advantage in the Toll-like receptor 4-defective C3H/HeJ diabetic mouse, arguing that the dramatic increase in colonization seen in C3H/HeN diabetic mice may partially be due to diabetic-induced defects in innate immunity. Competition experiments demonstrated that E. coli had a significant advantage over K. pneumoniae in the bladders of healthy mice and less of an advantage in diabetic bladders. In the kidneys, K. pneumoniae outcompeted E. coli in healthy mice but in diabetic mice E. coli outcompeted K. pneumoniae and caused severe pyelonephritis. Diabetic kidneys contained renal tubules laden with communities of E. coli UTI89 bacteria within an extracellular-matrix material. Diabetic mice also had glucosuria, which may enhance bacterial replication in the urinary tract. These data support that this murine diabetic UTI model is consistent with known characteristics of human diabetic UTI and can provide a powerful tool for dissecting this infection in the multifactorial setting of diabetes.

  17. Genetically Engineered ERα positive breast cancer mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Dabydeen, Sarah A.; Furth, Priscilla A.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of human breast cancers are ER+ but this has proven challenging to model in genetically engineered mice. This review summarizes information on twenty-one mouse models that develop ER+ mammary cancer. Where available, information on cancer pathology and gene expression profiles is referenced to assist in understanding which histological subtype of ER+ human cancer each model might represent. Esr1, Ccdn1, prolactin, TGFα, AIB1, Espl1, and Wnt1 over-expression, Pik3ca gain of function, as well as loss of p53 or loss of Stat1 are associated with ER+ mammary cancer. Treatment with the PPARγ agonist efatutazone in a mouse with Brca1 and p53 deficiency and DMBA exposure in combination with an activated myristoylated form of AKT1 also induce ER+ mammary cancer. A spontaneous mutant in nude mice that develops metastatic ER+ mammary cancer is included. Age of cancer development ranges from three to 26 months and the percentages of cancers that are ER+ vary from 21% to 100%. Not all models are characterized as to their estrogen dependency and/or response to anti-hormonal therapy. Strain backgrounds include C57Bl/6, FVB, BALB/c, 129S6/SvEv, CB6F1 and NIH nude. Most models have only been studied on one strain background. In summary while a range of models is available for studies of pathogenesis and therapy of ER+ breast cancers, many could benefit from further characterization and opportunity for development of new models remains. PMID:24481326

  18. Generation of improved humanized mouse models for human infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Michael A.; Wiles, Michael V.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2014-01-01

    The study of human-specific infectious agents has been hindered by the lack of optimal small animal models. More recently development of novel strains of immunodeficient mice has begun to provide the opportunity to utilize small animal models for the study of many human-specific infectious agents. The introduction of a targeted mutation in the IL2 receptor common gamma chain gene (IL2rgnull) in mice already deficient in T and B cells led to a breakthrough in the ability to engraft hematopoietic stem cells, as well as functional human lymphoid cells and tissues, effectively creating human immune systems in immunodeficient mice. These humanized mice are becoming increasingly important as pre-clinical models for the study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and other human-specific infectious agents. However, there remain a number of opportunities to further improve humanized mouse models for the study of human-specific infectious agents. This is being done by the implementation of innovative technologies, which collectively will accelerate the development of new models of genetically modified mice, including; i) modifications of the host to reduce innate immunity, which impedes human cell engraftment; ii) genetic modification to provide human-specific growth factors and cytokines required for optimal human cell growth and function; iii) and new cell and tissue engraftment protocols. The development of “next generation” humanized mouse models continues to provide exciting opportunities for the establishment of robust small animal models to study the pathogenesis of human-specific infectious agents, as well as for testing the efficacy of therapeutic agents and experimental vaccines. PMID:24607601

  19. Translational Mouse Models of Autism: Advancing Toward Pharmacological Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M.; Leach, Prescott T.; Yang, Mu; Silverman, Jill L.; Solomon, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Animal models provide preclinical tools to investigate the causal role of genetic mutations and environmental factors in the etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Knockout and humanized knock-in mice, and more recently knockout rats, have been generated for many of the de novo single gene mutations and copy number variants (CNVs) detected in ASD and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders. Mouse models incorporating genetic and environmental manipulations have been employed for preclinical testing of hypothesis-driven pharmacological targets, to begin to develop treatments for the diagnostic and associated symptoms of autism. In this review, we summarize rodent behavioral assays relevant to the core features of autism, preclinical and clinical evaluations of pharmacological interventions, and strategies to improve the translational value of rodent models of autism. PMID:27305922

  20. Cerebellar associative sensory learning defects in five mouse autism models

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Alexander D; Badura, Aleksandra; Li, Amy; Cherskov, Adriana; Connolly, Sara G; Giovannucci, Andrea; Bangash, M Ali; Grasselli, Giorgio; Peñagarikano, Olga; Piochon, Claire; Tsai, Peter T; Geschwind, Daniel H; Hansel, Christian; Sahin, Mustafa; Takumi, Toru; Worley, Paul F; Wang, Samuel S-H

    2015-01-01

    Sensory integration difficulties have been reported in autism, but their underlying brain-circuit mechanisms are underexplored. Using five autism-related mouse models, Shank3+/ΔC, Mecp2R308/Y, Cntnap2−/−, L7-Tsc1 (L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+), and patDp(15q11-13)/+, we report specific perturbations in delay eyeblink conditioning, a form of associative sensory learning requiring cerebellar plasticity. By distinguishing perturbations in the probability and characteristics of learned responses, we found that probability was reduced in Cntnap2−/−, patDp(15q11-13)/+, and L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+, which are associated with Purkinje-cell/deep-nuclear gene expression, along with Shank3+/ΔC. Amplitudes were smaller in L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+ as well as Shank3+/ΔC and Mecp2R308/Y, which are associated with granule cell pathway expression. Shank3+/ΔC and Mecp2R308/Y also showed aberrant response timing and reduced Purkinje-cell dendritic spine density. Overall, our observations are potentially accounted for by defects in instructed learning in the olivocerebellar loop and response representation in the granule cell pathway. Our findings indicate that defects in associative temporal binding of sensory events are widespread in autism mouse models. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06085.001 PMID:26158416

  1. A novel minimal invasive mouse model of extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuhua; Tang, Menglin; Du, Lei; Gong, Lina; Xu, Jin; Chen, Youwen; Wang, Yabo; Lin, Ke; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is necessary for conventional cardiac surgery and life support, but it often triggers systemic inflammation that can significantly damage tissue. Studies of ECC have been limited to large animals because of the complexity of the surgical procedures involved, which has hampered detailed understanding of ECC-induced injury. Here we describe a minimally invasive mouse model of ECC that may allow more extensive mechanistic studies. The right carotid artery and external jugular vein of anesthetized adult male C57BL/6 mice were cannulated to allow blood flow through a 1/32-inch external tube. All animals (n = 20) survived 30 min ECC and subsequent 60 min observation. Blood analysis after ECC showed significant increases in levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and neutrophil elastase in plasma, lung, and renal tissues, as well as increases in plasma creatinine and cystatin C and decreases in the oxygenation index. Histopathology showed that ECC induced the expected lung inflammation, which included alveolar congestion, hemorrhage, neutrophil infiltration, and alveolar wall thickening; in renal tissue, ECC induced intracytoplasmic vacuolization, acute tubular necrosis, and epithelial swelling. Our results suggest that this novel, minimally invasive mouse model can recapitulate many of the clinical features of ECC-induced systemic inflammatory response and organ injury.

  2. A Novel Minimal Invasive Mouse Model of Extracorporeal Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuhua; Tang, Menglin; Du, Lei; Gong, Lina; Xu, Jin; Chen, Youwen; Wang, Yabo; Lin, Ke; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) is necessary for conventional cardiac surgery and life support, but it often triggers systemic inflammation that can significantly damage tissue. Studies of ECC have been limited to large animals because of the complexity of the surgical procedures involved, which has hampered detailed understanding of ECC-induced injury. Here we describe a minimally invasive mouse model of ECC that may allow more extensive mechanistic studies. The right carotid artery and external jugular vein of anesthetized adult male C57BL/6 mice were cannulated to allow blood flow through a 1/32-inch external tube. All animals (n = 20) survived 30 min ECC and subsequent 60 min observation. Blood analysis after ECC showed significant increases in levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and neutrophil elastase in plasma, lung, and renal tissues, as well as increases in plasma creatinine and cystatin C and decreases in the oxygenation index. Histopathology showed that ECC induced the expected lung inflammation, which included alveolar congestion, hemorrhage, neutrophil infiltration, and alveolar wall thickening; in renal tissue, ECC induced intracytoplasmic vacuolization, acute tubular necrosis, and epithelial swelling. Our results suggest that this novel, minimally invasive mouse model can recapitulate many of the clinical features of ECC-induced systemic inflammatory response and organ injury. PMID:25705092

  3. Mapping lupus susceptibility genes in the NZM2410 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Morel, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been deployed over the years to decipher the genetic basis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The NZM2410 strain is murine model in which the genetic analysis of SLE is the most advanced. NZM2410 studies have shown that, as in SLE patients, lupus susceptibility is achieved by the coexpression of many susceptibility alleles, each of which with a small contribution to the overall disease phenotype. This mouse model has also revealed the critical role played by gene-gene interactions, which are believed to be an essential contribution to human SLE heritability, although it has been much more difficult to characterize. We have now reached a phase in which NZM2410 susceptibility genes have been identified, all them novel in their association with lupus or even with immune functions. Ongoing studies geared at understanding how these genes impact immune tolerance and interact with each other in the mouse, and their impact on the human immune system or target organs, will undoubtedly lead to important discovery for a better understanding on the disease and potential identification of therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Omics analysis of mouse brain models of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Paban, Véronique; Loriod, Béatrice; Villard, Claude; Buee, Luc; Blum, David; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Cho, Yoon H; Gory-Faure, Sylvie; Mansour, Elodie; Gharbi, Ali; Alescio-Lautier, Béatrice

    2017-02-05

    The identification of common gene/protein profiles related to brain alterations, if they exist, may indicate the convergence of the pathogenic mechanisms driving brain disorders. Six genetically engineered mouse lines modelling neurodegenerative diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders were considered. Omics approaches, including transcriptomic and proteomic methods, were used. The gene/protein lists were used for inter-disease comparisons and further functional and network investigations. When the inter-disease comparison was performed using the gene symbol identifiers, the number of genes/proteins involved in multiple diseases decreased rapidly. Thus, no genes/proteins were shared by all 6 mouse models. Only one gene/protein (Gfap) was shared among 4 disorders, providing strong evidence that a common molecular signature does not exist among brain diseases. The inter-disease comparison of functional processes showed the involvement of a few major biological processes indicating that brain diseases of diverse aetiologies might utilize common biological pathways in the nervous system, without necessarily involving similar molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. PD-1 blockade enhances elotuzumab efficacy in mouse tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Jhatakia, Amy; Kearney, Alper Y.; Brender, Ty; Maurer, Mark; Henning, Karla; Jenkins, Misty R.; Rogers, Amy J.; Neeson, Paul J.; Korman, Alan J.; Robbins, Michael D.; Graziano, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Elotuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human signaling lymphocytic activation molecule F7 (hSLAMF7) on myeloma cells, was developed to treat patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Elotuzumab has a dual mechanism of action that includes the direct activation of natural killer (NK) cells and the induction of NK cell–mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. This study aimed to characterize the effects of elotuzumab on NK cells in vitro and in patients with MM and to determine whether elotuzumab antitumor activity was improved by programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) blockade. Elotuzumab promoted NK cell activation when added to a coculture of human NK cells and SLAMF7-expressing myeloma cells. An increased frequency of activated NK cells was observed in bone marrow aspirates from elotuzumab-treated patients. In mouse tumor models expressing hSLAMF7, maximal antitumor efficacy of a murine immunoglobulin G2a version of elotuzumab (elotuzumab-g2a) required both Fcγ receptor–expressing NK cells and CD8+ T cells and was significantly enhanced by coadministration of anti–PD-1 antibody. In these mouse models, elotuzumab-g2a and anti–PD-1 combination treatment promoted tumor-infiltrating NK and CD8+ T-cell activation, as well as increased intratumoral cytokine and chemokine release. These observations support the rationale for clinical investigation of elotuzumab/anti–PD-1 combination therapy in patients with MM. PMID:29296719

  6. Modeling of optical quadrature microscopy for imaging mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2008-02-01

    Optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) has been shown to provide the optical path difference through a mouse embryo, and has led to a novel method to count the total number of cells further into development than current non-toxic imaging techniques used in the clinic. The cell counting method has the potential to provide an additional quantitative viability marker for blastocyst transfer during in vitro fertilization. OQM uses a 633 nm laser within a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration to measure the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. Four cameras preceded by multiple beamsplitters record the four interferograms that are used within a reconstruction algorithm to produce an image of the complex electric field amplitude. Here we present a model for the electric field through the primary optical components in the imaging configuration and the reconstruction algorithm to calculate the signal to noise ratio when imaging mouse embryos. The model includes magnitude and phase errors in the individual reference and sample paths, fixed pattern noise, and noise within the laser and detectors. This analysis provides the foundation for determining the imaging limitations of OQM and the basis to optimize the cell counting method in order to introduce additional quantitative viability markers.

  7. Dental abnormalities in a mouse model for craniometaphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Dutra, E H; Chen, I-P; Reichenberger, E J

    2013-02-01

    Mice carrying a knock-in mutation (Phe377del) in the Ank gene replicate many skeletal characteristics of human craniometaphyseal dysplasia, including hyperostotic mandibles. Ank (KI/KI) mice have normal morphology of erupted molars and incisors but excessive cementum deposition with increased numbers of Ibsp- and Dmp1-positive cells on root surfaces. The cervical loops of adult Ank (KI/KI) lower incisors are at the level of the third molars, while they are close to the mandibular foramen in Ank (+/+) mice. Furthermore, Ank (KI/KI) incisors show decreased eruption rates, decreased proliferation of odontoblast precursors, and increased cell apoptosis in the stellate reticulum. However, their capability for continuous elongation is not compromised. Quantification of TRAP-positive cells in the apical ends of Ank (KI/KI) incisors revealed decreased osteoclast numbers and osteoclast surfaces. Bisphosphonate injections in Ank (+/+) mice replicate the Ank (KI/KI) incisor phenotype. These results and a comparison with the dental phenotype of Ank loss-of-function mouse models suggest that increased cementum thickness may be caused by decreased extracellular PPi levels and that the incisor phenotype is likely due to hyperostosis of mandibles, which distinguishes Ank (KI/KI) mice from the other Ank mouse models.

  8. A mouse model for Chlamydia suis genital infection.

    PubMed

    Donati, Manuela; Di Paolo, Maria; Favaroni, Alison; Aldini, Rita; Di Francesco, Antonietta; Ostanello, Fabio; Biondi, Roberta; Cremonini, Eleonora; Ginocchietti, Laura; Cevenini, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    A mouse model for Chlamydia suis genital infection was developed. Ninety-nine mice were randomly divided into three groups and intravaginally inoculated with chlamydia: 45 mice (group 1) received C. suis purified elementary bodies (EBs), 27 (group 2) were inoculated with C. trachomatis genotype E EBs and 27 mice (group 3) with C. trachomatis genotype F EBs. Additionally, 10 mice were used as a negative control. At seven days post-infection (dpi) secretory anti-C. suis IgA were recovered from vaginal swabs of all C. suis inoculated mice. Chlamydia suis was isolated from 93, 84, 71 and 33% vaginal swabs at 3, 5, 7 and 12 dpi. Chlamydia trachomatis genotype E and F were isolated from 100% vaginal swabs up to 7 dpi and from 61 and 72%, respectively, at 12 dpi. Viable C. suis and C. trachomatis organisms were isolated from uterus and tubes up to 16 and 28 dpi, respectively. The results of the present study show the susceptibility of mice to intravaginal inoculation with C. suis. A more rapid course and resolution of C. suis infection, in comparison to C. trachomatis, was highlighted. The mouse model could be useful for comparative investigations involving C. suis and C. trachomatis species. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A new mouse model to explore therapies for preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdulwahab; Singh, Jameel; Khan, Ysodra; Seshan, Surya V; Girardi, Guillermina

    2010-10-27

    Pre-eclampsia, a pregnancy-specific multisystemic disorder is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. This syndrome has been known to medical science since ancient times. However, despite considerable research, the cause/s of preeclampsia remain unclear, and there is no effective treatment. Development of an animal model that recapitulates this complex pregnancy-related disorder may help to expand our understanding and may hold great potential for the design and implementation of effective treatment. Here we show that the CBA/J x DBA/2 mouse model of recurrent miscarriage is also a model of immunologically-mediated preeclampsia (PE). DBA/J mated CBA/J females spontaneously develop many features of human PE (primigravidity, albuminuria, endotheliosis, increased sensitivity to angiotensin II and increased plasma leptin levels) that correlates with bad pregnancy outcomes. We previously reported that antagonism of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling by soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1) is involved in placental and fetal injury in CBA/J x DBA/2 mice. Using this animal model that recapitulates many of the features of preeclampsia in women, we found that pravastatin restores angiogenic balance, ameliorates glomerular injury, diminishes hypersensitivity to angiotensin II and protects pregnancies. We described a new mouse model of PE, were the relevant key features of human preeclampsia develop spontaneously. The CBA/J x DBA/2 model, that recapitulates this complex disorder, helped us identify pravastatin as a candidate therapy to prevent preeclampsia and its related complications. We recognize that these studies were conducted in mice and that clinical trials are needed to confirm its application to humans.

  10. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  11. Development of a Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth R.; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiang-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progression remain to be defined. Suitable mouse models should complement the analysis of human tumor tissues and may provide clues to these questions currently perplexing ovarian cancer biology. A potentially useful model is the germ cell-deficient Wv (white spotting variant) mutant mouse line, which may be used to study the impact of menopausal physiology on the increased risk of ovarian cancer. The Wv mice harbor a point mutation in c-Kit that reduces the receptor tyrosine kinase activity to about 1–5% (it is not a null mutation). Homozygous Wv mutant females have a reduced ovarian germ cell reservoir at birth and the follicles are rapidly depleted upon reaching reproductive maturity, but other biological phenotypes are minimal and the mice have a normal life span. The loss of ovarian function precipitates changes in hormonal and metabolic activity that model features of menopause in humans. As a consequence of follicle depletion, the Wv ovaries develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis that mark human ovarian aging. Ongoing work will test the possibility of converting the benign epithelial tubular adenomas into neoplastic tumors by addition of an oncogenic mutation, such as of Tp53, to model the genotype and biology of serous ovarian cancer. Model based on the Wv mice may have the potential to gain biological and etiological insights into ovarian cancer development and prevention. PMID:24616881

  12. Gait analysis in a mouse model resembling Leigh disease.

    PubMed

    de Haas, Ria; Russel, Frans G; Smeitink, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Leigh disease (LD) is one of the clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial OXPHOS disorders and also known as sub-acute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. The disease has an incidence of 1 in 77,000 live births. Symptoms typically begin early in life and prognosis for LD patients is poor. Currently, no clinically effective treatments are available. Suitable animal and cellular models are necessary for the understanding of the neuropathology and the development of successful new therapeutic strategies. In this study we used the Ndufs4 knockout (Ndufs4(-/-)) mouse, a model of mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Ndusf4(-/-) mice exhibit progressive neurodegeneration, which closely resemble the human LD phenotype. When dissecting behavioral abnormalities in animal models it is of great importance to apply translational tools that are clinically relevant. To distinguish gait abnormalities in patients, simple walking tests can be assessed, but in animals this is not easy. This study is the first to demonstrate automated CatWalk gait analysis in the Ndufs4(-/-) mouse model. Marked differences were noted between Ndufs4(-/-) and control mice in dynamic, static, coordination and support parameters. Variation of walking speed was significantly increased in Ndufs4(-/-) mice, suggesting hampered and uncoordinated gait. Furthermore, decreased regularity index, increased base of support and changes in support were noted in the Ndufs4(-/-) mice. Here, we report the ability of the CatWalk system to sensitively assess gait abnormalities in Ndufs4(-/-) mice. This objective gait analysis can be of great value for intervention and drug efficacy studies in animal models for mitochondrial disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A new multiple trauma model of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Fitschen-Oestern, Stefanie; Lippross, Sebastian; Klueter, Tim; Weuster, Matthias; Varoga, Deike; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Pufe, Thomas; Rose-John, Stefan; Andruszkow, Hagen; Hildebrand, Frank; Steubesand, Nadine; Seekamp, Andreas; Neunaber, Claudia

    2017-11-21

    Blunt trauma is the most frequent mechanism of injury in multiple trauma, commonly resulting from road traffic collisions or falls. Two of the most frequent injuries in patients with multiple trauma are chest trauma and extremity fracture. Several trauma mouse models combine chest trauma and head injury, but no trauma mouse model to date includes the combination of long bone fractures and chest trauma. Outcome is essentially determined by the combination of these injuries. In this study, we attempted to establish a reproducible novel multiple trauma model in mice that combines blunt trauma, major injuries and simple practicability. Ninety-six male C57BL/6 N mice (n = 8/group) were subjected to trauma for isolated femur fracture and a combination of femur fracture and chest injury. Serum samples of mice were obtained by heart puncture at defined time points of 0 h (hour), 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 3 d (days), and 7 d. A tendency toward reduced weight and temperature was observed at 24 h after chest trauma and femur fracture. Blood analyses revealed a decrease in hemoglobin during the first 24 h after trauma. Some animals were killed by heart puncture immediately after chest contusion; these animals showed the most severe lung contusion and hemorrhage. The extent of structural lung injury varied in different mice but was evident in all animals. Representative H&E-stained (Haematoxylin and Eosin-stained) paraffin lung sections of mice with multiple trauma revealed hemorrhage and an inflammatory immune response. Plasma samples of mice with chest trauma and femur fracture showed an up-regulation of IL-1β (Interleukin-1β), IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70 and TNF-α (Tumor necrosis factor- α) compared with the control group. Mice with femur fracture and chest trauma showed a significant up-regulation of IL-6 compared to group with isolated femur fracture. The multiple trauma mouse model comprising chest trauma and femur fracture enables many analogies to clinical cases of

  14. Mouse models of ageing and their relevance to disease.

    PubMed

    Kõks, Sulev; Dogan, Soner; Tuna, Bilge Guvenc; González-Navarro, Herminia; Potter, Paul; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E

    2016-12-01

    Ageing is a process that gradually increases the organism's vulnerability to death. It affects different biological pathways, and the underlying cellular mechanisms are complex. In view of the growing disease burden of ageing populations, increasing efforts are being invested in understanding the pathways and mechanisms of ageing. We review some mouse models commonly used in studies on ageing, highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the different strategies, and discuss their relevance to disease susceptibility. In addition to addressing the genetics and phenotypic analysis of mice, we discuss examples of models of delayed or accelerated ageing and their modulation by caloric restriction. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Serotonin neuron abnormalities in the BTBR mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue-Ping; Commons, Kathryn G

    2017-01-01

    The inbred mouse strain BTBR T + Itpr3 tf /J (BTBR) is studied as a model of idiopathic autism because they are less social and more resistant to change than other strains. Forebrain serotonin receptors and the response to serotonin drugs are altered in BTBR mice, yet it remains unknown if serotonin neurons themselves are abnormal. In this study, we found that serotonin tissue content and the density of serotonin axons is reduced in the hippocampus of BTBR mice in comparison to C57BL/6J (C57) mice. This was accompanied by possible compensatory changes in serotonin neurons that were most pronounced in regions known to provide innervation to the hippocampus: the caudal dorsal raphe (B6) and the median raphe. These changes included increased numbers of serotonin neurons and hyperactivation of Fos expression. Metrics of serotonin neurons in the rostral 2/3 of the dorsal raphe and serotonin content of the prefrontal cortex were less impacted. Thus, serotonin neurons exhibit region-dependent abnormalities in the BTBR mouse that may contribute to their altered behavioral profile. Autism Res 2017, 10: 66-77. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Serotonin Neuron Abnormalities in the BTBR Mouse Model of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yue-Ping; Commons, Kathryn G.

    2017-01-01

    The inbred mouse strain BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR) i studied as a model of idiopathic autism because they are less social and more resistant to change than other strains. Forebrain serotonin receptors and the response to serotonin drugs are altered in BTBR mice, yet it remains unknown if serotonin neurons themselves are abnormal. In this study, we found that serotonin tissue content and the density of serotonin axons is reduced in the hippocampus of BTBR mice in comparison to C57BL/6J (C57) mice. This was accompanied by possible compensatory changes in serotonin neurons that were most pronounced in regions known to provide innervation to the hippocampus: the caudal dorsal raphe (B6) and the median raphe. These changes included increased numbers of serotonin neurons and hyperactivation of Fos expression. Metrics of serotonin neurons in the rostral 2/3 of the dorsal raphe and serotonin content of the prefrontal cortex were less impacted. Thus, serotonin neurons exhibit region-dependent abnormalities in the BTBR mouse that may contribute to their altered behavioral profile. PMID:27478061

  17. Genes Critical for Developing Periodontitis: Lessons from Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Teun J; Andreotta, Stefano; Loos, Bruno G; Nicu, Elena A

    2017-01-01

    Since the etiology of periodontitis in humans is not fully understood, genetic mouse models may pinpoint indispensable genes for optimal immunological protection of the periodontium against tissue destruction. This review describes the current knowledge of genes that are involved for a proper maintenance of a healthy periodontium in mice. Null mutations of genes required for leukocyte cell-cell recognition and extravasation (e.g., Icam-1, P-selectin, Beta2-integrin/Cd18 ), for pathogen recognition and killing (e.g., Tlr2, Tlr4, Lamp-2 ), immune modulatory molecules (e.g., Cxcr2, Ccr4, IL-10, Opg, IL1RA, Tnf- α receptor, IL-17 receptor, Socs3, Foxo1 ), and proteolytic enzymes (e.g., Mmp8, Plasmin ) cause periodontitis, most likely due to an inefficient clearance of bacteria and bacterial products. Several mechanisms resulting in periodontitis can be recognized: (1) inefficient bacterial control by the polymorphonuclear neutrophils (defective migration, killing), (2) inadequate antigen presentation by dendritic cells, or (3) exaggerated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In all these cases, the local immune reaction is skewed toward a Th1/Th17 (and insufficient activation of the Th2/Treg) with subsequent osteoclast activation. Finally, genotypes are described that protect the mice from periodontitis: the SCID mouse, and mice lacking Tlr2/Tlr4 , the Ccr1/Ccr5 , the Tnf- α receptor p55 , and Cathepsin K by attenuating the inflammatory reaction and the osteoclastogenic response.

  18. EGFR-specific nanoprobe biodistribution in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fashir, Samia A.; Castilho, Maiara L.; Hupman, Michael A.; Lee, Christopher L. D.; Raniero, Leandro J.; Alwayn, Ian; Hewitt, Kevin C.

    2015-06-01

    Nanotechnology offers a targeted approach to both imaging and treatment of cancer, the leading cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have found nanoparticles with a wide variety of coatings initiate an immune response leading to sequestration in the liver and spleen. In an effort to find a nanoparticle platform which does not elicit an immune response we created 43/44 nm gold or silver nanoparticles coated with biomolecules normally produced by the body, α-lipoic acid and the Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), and have used mass spectroscopy to determine their biodistribution in mouse models, 24 hours following tail vein injection. Relative to controls, mouse EGF (mEGF) coated silver and gold nanoprobes are found at reduced levels in the liver and spleen. mEGF coated gold nanoprobes on the other hand do not appear to elicit any immune response, as they are found at background levels in these organs. As a result they should remain in circulation for longer and accumulate at high levels in tumors by the enhanced permeability retention (EPR) effect.

  19. Disease model curation improvements at Mouse Genome Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Susan M.; Richardson, Joel E.; Davis, Allan P.; Wiegers, Thomas C.; Mattingly, Carolyn J.; Dolan, Mary E.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Blake, Judith A.; Eppig, Janan T.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal curation of human diseases requires an ontology or structured vocabulary that contains terms familiar to end users, is robust enough to support multiple levels of annotation granularity, is limited to disease terms and is stable enough to avoid extensive reannotation following updates. At Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI), we currently use disease terms from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) to curate mouse models of human disease. While OMIM provides highly detailed disease records that are familiar to many in the medical community, it lacks structure to support multilevel annotation. To improve disease annotation at MGI, we evaluated the merged Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and OMIM disease vocabulary created by the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) project. Overlaying MeSH onto OMIM provides hierarchical access to broad disease terms, a feature missing from the OMIM. We created an extended version of the vocabulary to meet the genetic disease-specific curation needs at MGI. Here we describe our evaluation of the CTD application, the extensions made by MGI and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of this approach. Database URL: http://www.informatics.jax.org/ PMID:22434831

  20. Development of a novel mouse glioma model using lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Marumoto, Tomotoshi; Tashiro, Ayumu; Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Scadeng, Miriam; Soda, Yasushi; Gage, Fred H; Verma, Inder M

    2009-01-01

    We report the development of a new method to induce glioblastoma multiforme in adult immunocompetent mice by injecting Cre-loxP–controlled lentiviral vectors expressing oncogenes. Cell type- or region-specific expression of activated forms of the oncoproteins Harvey-Ras and AKT in fewer than 60 glial fibrillary acidic protein–positive cells in the hippocampus, subventricular zone or cortex of mice heterozygous for the gene encoding the tumor suppressor Tp53 were tested. Mice developed glioblastoma multiforme when transduced either in the subventricular zone or the hippocampus. However, tumors were rarely detected when the mice were transduced in the cortex. Transplantation of brain tumor cells into naive recipient mouse brain resulted in the formation of glioblastoma multiforme–like tumors, which contained CD133+ cells, formed tumorspheres and could differentiate into neurons and astrocytes. We suggest that the use of Cre-loxP–controlled lentiviral vectors is a novel way to generate a mouse glioblastoma multiforme model in a region- and cell type-specific manner in adult mice. PMID:19122659

  1. Genes Critical for Developing Periodontitis: Lessons from Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Teun J.; Andreotta, Stefano; Loos, Bruno G.; Nicu, Elena A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the etiology of periodontitis in humans is not fully understood, genetic mouse models may pinpoint indispensable genes for optimal immunological protection of the periodontium against tissue destruction. This review describes the current knowledge of genes that are involved for a proper maintenance of a healthy periodontium in mice. Null mutations of genes required for leukocyte cell–cell recognition and extravasation (e.g., Icam-1, P-selectin, Beta2-integrin/Cd18), for pathogen recognition and killing (e.g., Tlr2, Tlr4, Lamp-2), immune modulatory molecules (e.g., Cxcr2, Ccr4, IL-10, Opg, IL1RA, Tnf-α receptor, IL-17 receptor, Socs3, Foxo1), and proteolytic enzymes (e.g., Mmp8, Plasmin) cause periodontitis, most likely due to an inefficient clearance of bacteria and bacterial products. Several mechanisms resulting in periodontitis can be recognized: (1) inefficient bacterial control by the polymorphonuclear neutrophils (defective migration, killing), (2) inadequate antigen presentation by dendritic cells, or (3) exaggerated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In all these cases, the local immune reaction is skewed toward a Th1/Th17 (and insufficient activation of the Th2/Treg) with subsequent osteoclast activation. Finally, genotypes are described that protect the mice from periodontitis: the SCID mouse, and mice lacking Tlr2/Tlr4, the Ccr1/Ccr5, the Tnf-α receptor p55, and Cathepsin K by attenuating the inflammatory reaction and the osteoclastogenic response. PMID:29163477

  2. Human tissue models in cancer research: looking beyond the mouse.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Samuel J; Thomas, Gareth J

    2017-08-01

    Mouse models, including patient-derived xenograft mice, are widely used to address questions in cancer research. However, there are documented flaws in these models that can result in the misrepresentation of human tumour biology and limit the suitability of the model for translational research. A coordinated effort to promote the more widespread development and use of 'non-animal human tissue' models could provide a clinically relevant platform for many cancer studies, maximising the opportunities presented by human tissue resources such as biobanks. A number of key factors limit the wide adoption of non-animal human tissue models in cancer research, including deficiencies in the infrastructure and the technical tools required to collect, transport, store and maintain human tissue for lab use. Another obstacle is the long-standing cultural reliance on animal models, which can make researchers resistant to change, often because of concerns about historical data compatibility and losing ground in a competitive environment while new approaches are embedded in lab practice. There are a wide range of initiatives that aim to address these issues by facilitating data sharing and promoting collaborations between organisations and researchers who work with human tissue. The importance of coordinating biobanks and introducing quality standards is gaining momentum. There is an exciting opportunity to transform cancer drug discovery by optimising the use of human tissue and reducing the reliance on potentially less predictive animal models. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Transgenic Mouse Models of Childhood Onset Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Holly R.; Feng, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Childhood onset psychiatric disorders, such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Mood Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (OCSD), and Schizophrenia (SZ), affect many school age children leading to a lower quality of life, including difficulties in school and personal relationships that persists into adulthood. Currently, the causes of these psychiatric disorders are poorly understood resulting in difficulty diagnosing affected children, and insufficient treatment options. Family and twin studies implicate a genetic contribution for ADHD, ASD, Mood Disorders, OCSD, and SZ. Identification of candidate genes and chromosomal regions associated with a particular disorder provide targets for directed research, and understanding how these genes influence the disease state will provide valuable insights for improving the diagnosis and treatment of children with psychiatric disorders. Animal models are one important approach in the study of human diseases, allowing for the use of a variety of experimental approaches to dissect the contribution of a specific chromosomal or genetic abnormality in human disorders. While it is impossible to model an entire psychiatric disorder in a single animal model, these models can be extremely valuable in dissecting out the specific role of a gene, pathway, neuron subtype, or brain region in a particular abnormal behavior. In this review we discuss existing transgenic mouse models for childhood onset psychiatric disorders. We compare the strength and weakness of various transgenic animal models proposed for each of the common childhood onset psychiatric disorders, and discuss future directions for the study of these disorders using cutting-edge genetic tools. PMID:21309772

  4. A preclinical mouse model of invasive lobular breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Doornebal, Chris W; Klarenbeek, Sjoerd; Braumuller, Tanya M; Klijn, Christiaan N; Ciampricotti, Metamia; Hau, Cheei-Sing; Hollmann, Markus W; Jonkers, Jos; de Visser, Karin E

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic disease accounts for more than 90% of cancer-related deaths, but the development of effective antimetastatic agents has been hampered by the paucity of clinically relevant preclinical models of human metastatic disease. Here, we report the development of a mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis, which recapitulates key events in its formation and clinical course. Specifically, using the conditional K14cre;Cdh1(F/F);Trp53(F/F) model of de novo mammary tumor formation, we orthotopically transplanted invasive lobular carcinoma (mILC) fragments into mammary glands of wild-type syngeneic hosts. Once primary tumors were established in recipient mice, we mimicked the clinical course of treatment by conducting a mastectomy. After surgery, recipient mice succumbed to widespread overt metastatic disease in lymph nodes, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract. Genomic profiling of paired mammary tumors and distant metastases showed that our model provides a unique tool to further explore the biology of metastatic disease. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant intervention studies using standard-of-care chemotherapeutics showed the value of this model in determining therapeutic agents that can target early- and late-stage metastatic disease. In obtaining a more accurate preclinical model of metastatic lobular breast cancer, our work offers advances supporting the development of more effective treatment strategies for metastatic disease.

  5. Transgenic mouse models enabling photolabeling of individual neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Peter, Manuel; Bathellier, Brice; Fontinha, Bruno; Pliota, Pinelopi; Haubensak, Wulf; Rumpel, Simon

    2013-01-01

    One of the biggest tasks in neuroscience is to explain activity patterns of individual neurons during behavior by their cellular characteristics and their connectivity within the neuronal network. To greatly facilitate linking in vivo experiments with a more detailed molecular or physiological analysis in vitro, we have generated and characterized genetically modified mice expressing photoactivatable GFP (PA-GFP) that allow conditional photolabeling of individual neurons. Repeated photolabeling at the soma reveals basic morphological features due to diffusion of activated PA-GFP into the dendrites. Neurons photolabeled in vivo can be re-identified in acute brain slices and targeted for electrophysiological recordings. We demonstrate the advantages of PA-GFP expressing mice by the correlation of in vivo firing rates of individual neurons with their expression levels of the immediate early gene c-fos. Generally, the mouse models described in this study enable the combination of various analytical approaches to characterize living cells, also beyond the neurosciences.

  6. Mouse Models of Autism: Testing Hypotheses About Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is currently diagnosed by the presence of three behavioral criteria (1) qualitative impairments in reciprocal social interactions, (2) deficits in communication, including delayed language and noninteractive conversation, and (3) motor stereotypies, repetitive behaviors, insistence on sameness, and restricted interests. This chapter describes analogous behavioral assays that have been developed for mice, including tests for social approach, reciprocal social interactions, olfactory communication, ultrasonic vocalizations, repetitive and perseverative behaviors, and motor stereotypies. Examples of assay applications to genetic mouse models of autism are provided. Robust endophenotypes that are highly relevant to the core symptoms of autism are enabling the search for the genetic and environmental causes of autism, and the discovery of effective treatments. PMID:21225409

  7. How Genetically Engineered Mouse Tumor Models Provide Insights Into Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Katerina; Pao, William

    2011-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of human cancer were first created nearly 30 years ago. These early transgenic models demonstrated that mouse cells could be transformed in vivo by expression of an oncogene. A new field emerged, dedicated to generating and using mouse models of human cancer to address a wide variety of questions in cancer biology. The aim of this review is to highlight the contributions of mouse models to the diagnosis and treatment of human cancers. Because of the breadth of the topic, we have selected representative examples of how GEMMs are clinically relevant rather than provided an exhaustive list of experiments. Today, as detailed here, sophisticated mouse models are being created to study many aspects of cancer biology, including but not limited to mechanisms of sensitivity and resistance to drug treatment, oncogene cooperation, early detection, and metastasis. Alternatives to GEMMs, such as chemically induced or spontaneous tumor models, are not discussed in this review. PMID:21263096

  8. Neuroprotection in a Novel Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lidster, Katie; Jackson, Samuel J.; Ahmed, Zubair; Munro, Peter; Coffey, Pete; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, Mark D.; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease that currently lacks any neuroprotective treatments. Innovative neuroprotective trial designs are required to hasten the translational process of drug development. An ideal target to monitor the efficacy of strategies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis is the visual system, which is the most accessible part of the human central nervous system. A novel C57BL/6 mouse line was generated that expressed transgenes for a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific T cell receptor and a retinal ganglion cell restricted-Thy1 promoter-controlled cyan fluorescent protein. This model develops spontaneous or induced optic neuritis, in the absence of paralytic disease normally associated with most rodent autoimmune models of multiple sclerosis. Demyelination and neurodegeneration could be monitored longitudinally in the living animal using electrophysiology, visual sensitivity, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography all of which are relevant to human trials. This model offers many advantages, from a 3Rs, economic and scientific perspective, over classical experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models that are associated with substantial suffering of animals. Optic neuritis in this model led to inflammatory damage of axons in the optic nerve and subsequent loss of retinal ganglion cells in the retina. This was inhibited by the systemic administration of a sodium channel blocker (oxcarbazepine) or intraocular treatment with siRNA targeting caspase-2. These novel approaches have relevance to the future treatment of neurodegeneration of MS, which has so far evaded treatment. PMID:24223903

  9. Optimization of Glioblastoma Mouse Orthotopic Xenograft Models for Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Irtenkauf, Susan M; Sobiechowski, Susan; Hasselbach, Laura A; Nelson, Kevin K; Transou, Andrea D; Carlton, Enoch T; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor predominantly localized to the cerebral cortex. We developed a panel of patient-derived mouse orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) for preclinical drug studies by implanting cancer stem cells (CSC) cultured from fresh surgical specimens intracranially into 8-wk-old female athymic nude mice. Here we optimize the glioblastoma PDOX model by assessing the effect of implantation location on tumor growth, survival, and histologic characteristics. To trace the distribution of intracranial injections, toluidine blue dye was injected at 4 locations with defined mediolateral, anterioposterior, and dorsoventral coordinates within the cerebral cortex. Glioblastoma CSC from 4 patients and a glioblastoma nonstem-cell line were then implanted by using the same coordinates for evaluation of tumor location, growth rate, and morphologic and histologic features. Dye injections into one of the defined locations resulted in dye dissemination throughout the ventricles, whereas tumor cell implantation at the same location resulted in a much higher percentage of small multifocal ventricular tumors than did the other 3 locations tested. Ventricular tumors were associated with a lower tumor growth rate, as measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and decreased survival in 4 of 5 cell lines. In addition, tissue oxygenation, vasculature, and the expression of astrocytic markers were altered in ventricular tumors compared with nonventricular tumors. Based on this information, we identified an optimal implantation location that avoided the ventricles and favored cortical tumor growth. To assess the effects of stress from oral drug administration, mice that underwent daily gavage were compared with stress-positive and -negative control groups. Oral gavage procedures did not significantly affect the survival of the implanted mice or physiologic measurements of stress. Our findings document the importance of optimization of the implantation site for

  10. Optimization of Glioblastoma Mouse Orthotopic Xenograft Models for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Irtenkauf, Susan M; Sobiechowski, Susan; Hasselbach, Laura A; Nelson, Kevin K; Transou, Andrea D; Carlton, Enoch T; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor predominantly localized to the cerebral cortex. We developed a panel of patient-derived mouse orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) for preclinical drug studies by implanting cancer stem cells (CSC) cultured from fresh surgical specimens intracranially into 8-wk-old female athymic nude mice. Here we optimize the glioblastoma PDOX model by assessing the effect of implantation location on tumor growth, survival, and histologic characteristics. To trace the distribution of intracranial injections, toluidine blue dye was injected at 4 locations with defined mediolateral, anterioposterior, and dorsoventral coordinates within the cerebral cortex. Glioblastoma CSC from 4 patients and a glioblastoma nonstem-cell line were then implanted by using the same coordinates for evaluation of tumor location, growth rate, and morphologic and histologic features. Dye injections into one of the defined locations resulted in dye dissemination throughout the ventricles, whereas tumor cell implantation at the same location resulted in a much higher percentage of small multifocal ventricular tumors than did the other 3 locations tested. Ventricular tumors were associated with a lower tumor growth rate, as measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and decreased survival in 4 of 5 cell lines. In addition, tissue oxygenation, vasculature, and the expression of astrocytic markers were altered in ventricular tumors compared with nonventricular tumors. Based on this information, we identified an optimal implantation location that avoided the ventricles and favored cortical tumor growth. To assess the effects of stress from oral drug administration, mice that underwent daily gavage were compared with stress-positive and ‑negative control groups. Oral gavage procedures did not significantly affect the survival of the implanted mice or physiologic measurements of stress. Our findings document the importance of optimization of the implantation site for

  11. Interplay between Endometriosis and Pregnancy in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Bilotas, Mariela Andrea; Olivares, Carla Noemí; Ricci, Analía Gabriela; Baston, Juan Ignacio; Bengochea, Tatiana Soledad; Meresman, Gabriela Fabiana; Barañao, Rosa Inés

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of endometriosis on fertility and the levels of the IL-2 and IFN-γ in the peritoneal fluid in a mouse model; to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on endometriotic lesion growth, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Two month old C57BL/6 female mice underwent either a surgical procedure to induce endometriosis or a sham surgery. Four weeks after surgery mice were mated and sacrificed at day 18 of pregnancy. Number of implantation sites, fetuses and fetal weight were recorded. Endometriotic lesions were counted, measured, excised and fixed. Apoptosis and cell proliferation were evaluated in lesions by TUNEL and immunohistochemistry for PCNA respectively. Levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ were assessed by ELISA in the peritoneal fluid. Pregnancy rate (i.e. pregnant mice/N) decreased in mice with endometriosis. However there were no significant differences in resorption rate, litter size and pup weight between groups. IFN-γ augmented in endometriosis mice independently of pregnancy outcome. Additionally IFN-γ increased in pregnant endometriosis mice compared to pregnant sham animals. While IFN-γ increased in non pregnant versus pregnant mice in the sham group, IL-2 was increased in non pregnant mice in the endometriosis group. The size of endometriotic lesions increased in pregnant mice while apoptosis increased in the stroma and cell proliferation decreased in the epithelium of these lesions. Additionally, leukocyte infiltration, necrosis and decidualization were increased in the same lesions. Pregnancy rate is reduced in this mouse model of endometriosis. Levels of IL-2 are increased in the peritoneal fluid of mice with endometriosis suggesting a role of this cytokine in infertility related to this disease. The size of endometriotic lesions is increased in pregnant mice; however pregnancy has a beneficial effect on lesions by decreasing cell proliferation and by increasing apoptosis, decidualization and necrosis.

  12. Interplay between Endometriosis and Pregnancy in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Bilotas, Mariela Andrea; Olivares, Carla Noemí; Ricci, Analía Gabriela; Baston, Juan Ignacio; Bengochea, Tatiana Soledad; Meresman, Gabriela Fabiana; Barañao, Rosa Inés

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of endometriosis on fertility and the levels of the IL-2 and IFN-γ in the peritoneal fluid in a mouse model; to evaluate the effect of pregnancy on endometriotic lesion growth, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Study Design Two month old C57BL/6 female mice underwent either a surgical procedure to induce endometriosis or a sham surgery. Four weeks after surgery mice were mated and sacrificed at day 18 of pregnancy. Number of implantation sites, fetuses and fetal weight were recorded. Endometriotic lesions were counted, measured, excised and fixed. Apoptosis and cell proliferation were evaluated in lesions by TUNEL and immunohistochemistry for PCNA respectively. Levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ were assessed by ELISA in the peritoneal fluid. Results Pregnancy rate (i.e. pregnant mice/N) decreased in mice with endometriosis. However there were no significant differences in resorption rate, litter size and pup weight between groups. IFN-γ augmented in endometriosis mice independently of pregnancy outcome. Additionally IFN-γ increased in pregnant endometriosis mice compared to pregnant sham animals. While IFN-γ increased in non pregnant versus pregnant mice in the sham group, IL-2 was increased in non pregnant mice in the endometriosis group. The size of endometriotic lesions increased in pregnant mice while apoptosis increased in the stroma and cell proliferation decreased in the epithelium of these lesions. Additionally, leukocyte infiltration, necrosis and decidualization were increased in the same lesions. Conclusions Pregnancy rate is reduced in this mouse model of endometriosis. Levels of IL-2 are increased in the peritoneal fluid of mice with endometriosis suggesting a role of this cytokine in infertility related to this disease. The size of endometriotic lesions is increased in pregnant mice; however pregnancy has a beneficial effect on lesions by decreasing cell proliferation and by increasing apoptosis, decidualization and

  13. Hydroxyproline metabolism in mouse models of primary hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Ross P.; Cramer, Scott D.; Takayama, Tatsuya; Salido, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) and type 2 (PH2) are rare genetic diseases that result from deficiencies in glyoxylate metabolism. The increased oxalate synthesis that occurs can lead to kidney stone formation, deposition of calcium oxalate in the kidney and other tissues, and renal failure. Hydroxyproline (Hyp) catabolism, which occurs mainly in the liver and kidney, is a prominent source of glyoxylate and could account for a significant portion of the oxalate produced in PH. To determine the sensitivity of mouse models of PH1 and PH2 to Hyp-derived oxalate, animals were fed diets containing 1% Hyp. Urinary excretions of glycolate and oxalate were used to monitor Hyp catabolism and the kidneys were examined to assess pathological changes. Both strains of knockout (KO) mice excreted more oxalate than wild-type (WT) animals with Hyp feeding. After 4 wk of Hyp feeding, all mice deficient in glyoxylate reductase/hydroxypyruvate reductase (GRHPR KO) developed severe nephrocalcinosis in contrast to animals deficient in alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGXT KO) where nephrocalcinosis was milder and with a lower frequency. Plasma cystatin C measurements over 4-wk Hyp feeding indicated no significant loss of renal function in WT and AGXT KO animals, and significant and severe loss of renal function in GRHPR KO animals after 2 and 4 wk, respectively. These data suggest that GRHPR activity may be vital in the kidney for limiting the conversion of Hyp-derived glyoxylate to oxalate. As Hyp catabolism may make a major contribution to the oxalate produced in PH patients, Hyp feeding in these mouse models should be useful in understanding the mechanisms associated with calcium oxalate deposition in the kidney. PMID:22189945

  14. Distraction induced enterogenesis: a unique mouse model using polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Okawada, Manabu; Maria, Haytham Mustafa; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the small intestine can be lengthened by applying mechanical forces to the bowel lumen-distraction-induced enterogenesis. However, the mechanisms which account for this growth are unknown, and might be best examined using a mouse model. The purpose of this study is to establish the feasibility of developing distractive-induced small bowel growth in mouse. Twelve-week old C57BL/6J mice had a jejunal segment taken out of continuity, and distended with polyethylene glycol (PEG: 3350 KDa); this group was compared with a control group without stretching. Segment length and diameter were measured intra-operatively and after 5 d. Villus height, crypt depth, and muscle thickness in the isolated segment were assessed. Rate of epithelial cell proliferation (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine: BrdU incorporation) in crypts were also examined. The mucosal mRNA expression of targeted factors was performed to investigate potential mechanisms which might lead to distraction-induced enterogenesis. At harvest, the PEG-stretched group showed a significant increase in length and diameter versus controls. Villus height, crypt depth, and muscular layer thickness increased in the PEG group. The PEG group also showed significantly increased rates of epithelial cell proliferation versus controls. Real-time PCR showed a trend toward higher β-catenin and c-myc mRNA expression in the PEG-stretched group; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Radial distraction-induced enterogenesis with PEG is a viable method for increasing small intestinal length and diameter. This model may provide a new method for studying the mechanisms leading to distraction-induced enterogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Producing a Mouse Model to Explore the Linkages Between Tocopherol Biology and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Edwards, Prostate cancer and supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and beta -carotene: incidence and mortality in a controlled trial. J Natl Cancer ...1-0153 TITLE: Producing a Mouse Model to Explore the Linkages Between Tocopherol Biology and Prostate Cancer ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Producing a Mouse Model to Explore the Linkages Between Tocopherol 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Biology and Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT

  16. A New Model for Hendra Virus Encephalitis in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dups, Johanna; Middleton, Deborah; Yamada, Manabu; Monaghan, Paul; Long, Fenella; Robinson, Rachel; Marsh, Glenn A.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) infection in humans is characterized by an influenza like illness, which may progress to pneumonia or encephalitis and lead to death. The pathogenesis of HeV infection is poorly understood, and the lack of a mouse model has limited the opportunities for pathogenetic research. In this project we reassessed the role of mice as an animal model for HeV infection and found that mice are susceptible to HeV infection after intranasal exposure, with aged mice reliably developing encephalitic disease. We propose an anterograde route of neuroinvasion to the brain, possibly along olfactory nerves. This is supported by evidence for the development of encephalitis in the absence of viremia and the sequential distribution of viral antigen along pathways of olfaction in the brain of intranasally challenged animals. In our studies mice developed transient lower respiratory tract infection without progressing to viremia and systemic vasculitis that is common to other animal models. These studies report a new animal model of HeV encephalitis that will allow more detailed studies of the neuropathogenesis of HeV infection, particularly the mode of viral spread and possible sequestration within the central nervous system; investigation of mechanisms that moderate the development of viremia and systemic disease; and inform the development of improved treatment options for human patients. PMID:22808132

  17. Genetically engineered mouse models in oncology research and cancer medicine.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Kelly; de Visser, Karin E; van Miltenburg, Martine H; Jonkers, Jos

    2017-02-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) have contributed significantly to the field of cancer research. In contrast to cancer cell inoculation models, GEMMs develop de novo tumors in a natural immune-proficient microenvironment. Tumors arising in advanced GEMMs closely mimic the histopathological and molecular features of their human counterparts, display genetic heterogeneity, and are able to spontaneously progress toward metastatic disease. As such, GEMMs are generally superior to cancer cell inoculation models, which show no or limited heterogeneity and are often metastatic from the start. Given that GEMMs capture both tumor cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors that drive de novo tumor initiation and progression toward metastatic disease, these models are indispensable for preclinical research. GEMMs have successfully been used to validate candidate cancer genes and drug targets, assess therapy efficacy, dissect the impact of the tumor microenvironment, and evaluate mechanisms of drug resistance. In vivo validation of candidate cancer genes and therapeutic targets is further accelerated by recent advances in genetic engineering that enable fast-track generation and fine-tuning of GEMMs to more closely resemble human patients. In addition, aligning preclinical tumor intervention studies in advanced GEMMs with clinical studies in patients is expected to accelerate the development of novel therapeutic strategies and their translation into the clinic. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  18. Ibrutinib suppresses alloantibody responses in a mouse model of allosensitization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Irene; Wu, Gordon; Chai, Ning-Ning; Klein, Andrew S; Jordan, Stanley

    2017-12-01

    Ibrutinib is a Bruton's tyrosine Kinase (BTK) antagonist that inhibits B cell receptor (BCR) signaling. Complete BTK deficiency is associated with absence of B-cells. Ibrutinb is currently approved by FDA for treatment of B-cell malignancies, including Waldenström macroglobulinaemia. We recently carried out studies to determine if ibrutinib could modify alloantibody responses. A mouse model of allogenic sensitization using a C57BL/6 mouse as the recipient of a skin allograft from an HLA-A2 transgenic mouse was utilized to examine the effects of ibrutinib on alloantibody responses and B cell effector functions. Donor-specific antibody (DSA) levels were measured in a flow-cytometric antibody binding assay. Splenic T and B cell subsets and plasma cells were analyzed in flow cytometry. Control mice developed peak levels of DSA IgM at day 14 PTx while the ibrutinib treated mice had significantly lower levels of DSA IgM (p=0.0047). Control mice developed HLA.A2-specific IgG antibodies at day 14 (230±60 MFI) and reached peak levels at day 21 (426±61 MFI). In contrast, mice in the treatment group had low levels of HLA.A2-specific IgG at day 14 (109±59 MFI, p=0.004) and day 21 (241±86 MFI, p=0.003). FACS analysis found a reduction of B220 + or CD19 + B cell population (p<0.05). In addition, ibrutinib attenuated recall DSA IgG responses to re-sensitization (p<0.05) and reduced CD38 + CD138 + plasma cells (p<0.05) in the spleens. Ibrutinib is effective in suppressing alloantibody responses through blocking BTK-mediated BCR signaling, leading to reduction of B cells and short-lived plasma cells in the spleens. Use of ibrutinib may provide benefits to HLA-sensitized transplant patients for alloantibody suppression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Indirubin Treatment of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Mastitis in a Mouse Model and Activity in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jin-Lun; Liu, Yu-Hui; Peng, Yong-Chong; Ge, Pan; He, Chen-Fei; Liu, Chang; Chen, Ying-Yu; Guo, Ai-Zhen; Hu, Chang-Min

    2017-01-01

    Indirubin is a Chinese medicine extracted from indigo and known to be effective for treating chronic myelogenous leukemia, neoplasia, and inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of indirubin in a lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced mouse mastitis model. The indirubin mechanism and targets were evaluated in vitro in mouse mammary epithelial cells. In the mouse model, indirubin significantly attenuated the severity of inflammatory lesions, edema, inflammatory hyperemia, milk stasis and local tissue necrosis, and neutrophil infiltration. Indirubin significantly decreased myeloperoxidase activity and downregulated the production of tumor necrosis factor- α , interleukin-1 β (IL-1 β ), and IL-6 caused by LPS. In vitro, indirubin inhibited LPS-stimulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. It also downregulated LPS-induced toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and inhibited phosphorylation of LPS-induced nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF- κ B) P65 protein and inhibitor of kappa B. In addition to its effect on the NF- κ B signaling pathway, indirubin suppressed the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by inhibiting phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), P38, and c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Indirubin improved LPS-induced mouse mastitis by suppressing TLR4 and downstream NF- κ B and MAPK pathway inflammatory signals and might be a potential treatment of mastitis and other inflammatory diseases.

  20. Insights from engraftable immunodeficient mouse models of hyperinsulinaemia.

    PubMed

    Maugham, Michelle L; Thomas, Patrick B; Crisp, Gabrielle J; Philp, Lisa K; Shah, Esha T; Herington, Adrian C; Chen, Chen; Gregory, Laura S; Nelson, Colleen C; Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Chopin, Lisa K

    2017-03-28

    Hyperinsulinaemia, obesity and dyslipidaemia are independent and collective risk factors for many cancers. Here, the long-term effects of a 23% Western high-fat diet (HFD) in two immunodeficient mouse strains (NOD/SCID and Rag1 -/- ) suitable for engraftment with human-derived tissue xenografts, and the effect of diet-induced hyperinsulinaemia on human prostate cancer cell line xenograft growth, were investigated. Rag1 -/- and NOD/SCID HFD-fed mice demonstrated diet-induced impairments in glucose tolerance at 16 and 23 weeks post weaning. Rag1 -/- mice developed significantly higher fasting insulin levels (2.16 ± 1.01 ng/ml, P = 0.01) and increased insulin resistance (6.70 ± 1.68 HOMA-IR, P = 0.01) compared to low-fat chow-fed mice (0.71 ± 0.12 ng/ml and 2.91 ± 0.42 HOMA-IR). This was not observed in the NOD/SCID strain. Hepatic steatosis was more extensive in Rag1 -/- HFD-fed mice compared to NOD/SCID mice. Intramyocellular lipid storage was increased in Rag1 -/- HFD-fed mice, but not in NOD/SCID mice. In Rag1 -/- HFD-fed mice, LNCaP xenograft tumours grew more rapidly compared to low-fat chow-fed mice. This is the first characterisation of the metabolic effects of long-term Western HFD in two mouse strains suitable for xenograft studies. We conclude that Rag1 -/- mice are an appropriate and novel xenograft model for studying the relationship between cancer and hyperinsulinaemia.

  1. High plasticity of axonal pathology in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Valero-Freitag, Susana; Rodrigues, Eva Ferreira; Merchán-Pérez, Ángel; Rodríguez, J Rodrigo; Dorostkar, Mario M; DeFelipe, Javier; Herms, Jochen

    2017-02-07

    Axonal dystrophies (AxDs) are swollen and tortuous neuronal processes that are associated with extracellular depositions of amyloid β (Aβ) and have been observed to contribute to synaptic alterations occurring in Alzheimer's disease. Understanding the temporal course of this axonal pathology is of high relevance to comprehend the progression of the disease over time. We performed a long-term in vivo study (up to 210 days of two-photon imaging) with two transgenic mouse models (dE9xGFP-M and APP-PS1xGFP-M). Interestingly, AxDs were formed only in a quarter of GFP-expressing axons near Aβ-plaques, which indicates a selective vulnerability. AxDs, especially those reaching larger sizes, had long lifetimes and appeared as highly plastic structures with large variations in size and shape and axonal sprouting over time. In the case of the APP-PS1 mouse only, the formation of new long axonal segments in dystrophic axons (re-growth phenomenon) was observed. Moreover, new AxDs could appear at the same point of the axon where a previous AxD had been located before disappearance (re-formation phenomenon). In addition, we observed that most AxDs were formed and developed during the imaging period, and numerous AxDs had already disappeared by the end of this time. This work is the first in vivo study analyzing quantitatively the high plasticity of the axonal pathology around Aβ plaques. We hypothesized that a therapeutically early prevention of Aβ plaque formation or their growth might halt disease progression and promote functional axon regeneration and the recovery of neural circuits.

  2. Iodine Uptake and Prostate Cancer in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Caltzontzin, Paloma; Delgado, Guadalupe; Aceves, Carmen; Anguiano, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Iodine supplementation exerts antitumor effects in several types of cancer. Iodide (I−) and iodine (I2) reduce cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and DU-145). Both chemical species decrease tumor growth in athymic mice xenografted with DU-145 cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the uptake and effects of iodine in a preclinical model of prostate cancer (transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate [TRAMP] mice/SV40-TAG antigens), which develops cancer by 12 wks of age. 125I− and 125I2 uptake was analyzed in prostates from wild-type and TRAMP mice of 12 and 24 wks in the presence of perchlorate (inhibitor of the Na+/I− symporter [NIS]). NIS expression was quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Mice (6 wks old) were supplemented with 0.125 mg I− plus 0.062 mg I2/mouse/day for 12 or 24 wks. The weight of the genitourinary tract (GUT), the number of acini with lesions, cell proliferation (levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA] by immunohistochemistry), p53 and p21 expression (by qPCR) and apoptosis (relative amount of nucleosomes by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were evaluated. In both age-groups, normal and tumoral prostates take up both forms of iodine, but only I− uptake was blocked by perchlorate. Iodine supplementation prevented the overexpression of NIS in the TRAMP mice, but had no effect on the GUT weight, cell phenotype, proliferation or apoptosis. In TRAMP mice, iodine increased p53 expression but had no effect on p21 (a p53-dependent gene). Our data corroborate NIS involvement in I− uptake and support the notion that another transporter mediates I2 uptake. Iodine did not prevent cancer progression. This result could be explained by a strong inactivation of the p53 pathway by TAG antigens. PMID:24306422

  3. Iodine uptake and prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse model.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Caltzontzin, Paloma; Delgado, Guadalupe; Aceves, Carmen; Anguiano, Brenda

    2013-11-08

    Iodine supplementation exerts antitumor effects in several types of cancer. Iodide (I⁻) and iodine (I₂) reduce cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and DU-145). Both chemical species decrease tumor growth in athymic mice xenografted with DU-145 cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the uptake and effects of iodine in a preclinical model of prostate cancer (transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate [TRAMP] mice/SV40-TAG antigens), which develops cancer by 12 wks of age. ¹²⁵I⁻ and ¹²⁵I₂ uptake was analyzed in prostates from wild-type and TRAMP mice of 12 and 24 wks in the presence of perchlorate (inhibitor of the Na⁺/I⁻ symporter [NIS]). NIS expression was quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Mice (6 wks old) were supplemented with 0.125 mg I⁻ plus 0.062 mg I₂/mouse/day for 12 or 24 wks. The weight of the genitourinary tract (GUT), the number of acini with lesions, cell proliferation (levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA] by immunohistochemistry), p53 and p21 expression (by qPCR) and apoptosis (relative amount of nucleosomes by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were evaluated. In both age-groups, normal and tumoral prostates take up both forms of iodine, but only I⁻ uptake was blocked by perchlorate. Iodine supplementation prevented the overexpression of NIS in the TRAMP mice, but had no effect on the GUT weight, cell phenotype, proliferation or apoptosis. In TRAMP mice, iodine increased p53 expression but had no effect on p21 (a p53-dependent gene). Our data corroborate NIS involvement in I⁻ uptake and support the notion that another transporter mediates I₂ uptake. Iodine did not prevent cancer progression. This result could be explained by a strong inactivation of the p53 pathway by TAG antigens.

  4. Increased Glyburide Clearance in the Pregnant Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Hebert, Mary F.; Unadkat, Jashvant D.

    2010-01-01

    Glyburide (GLB) is an oral sulfonylurea, commonly used for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. It has been reported that the clearance of GLB in pregnant women is significantly higher than that in nonpregnant women. The molecular mechanism by which pregnancy increases the clearance of GLB is not known, but it may be caused by increased CYP3A activity. Because liver tissue from pregnant women is not readily available, in the present study, we investigated the mechanism of such pregnancy-related changes in GLB disposition in a mouse model. We demonstrated that the systemic clearance of GLB in pregnant mice was increased approximately 2-fold (p < 0.01) compared with nonpregnant mice, a magnitude of change similar to that observed in the clinical study. Plasma protein binding of GLB in mice was not altered by pregnancy. The half-life of GLB depletion in hepatic S-9 fractions of pregnant mice was significantly shorter than that of nonpregnant mice. Moreover, GLB depletion was markedly inhibited by ketoconazole, a potent inhibitor of mouse Cyp3a, suggesting that GLB metabolism in mice is primarily mediated by hepatic Cyp3a. These data suggest that the increased systemic clearance of GLB in pregnant mice is likely caused by an increase in hepatic Cyp3a activity during pregnancy, and they provide a basis for further mechanistic understanding and analysis of pregnancy-induced alterations in the disposition of GLB and drugs that are predominantly and extensively metabolized by CYP3A/Cyp3a. PMID:20558597

  5. Genome-wide expression profiling of five mouse models identifies similarities and differences with human psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Swindell, William R; Johnston, Andrew; Carbajal, Steve; Han, Gangwen; Wohn, Christian; Lu, Jun; Xing, Xianying; Nair, Rajan P; Voorhees, John J; Elder, James T; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Sano, Shigetoshi; Prens, Errol P; DiGiovanni, John; Pittelkow, Mark R; Ward, Nicole L; Gudjonsson, Johann E

    2011-04-04

    Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1). While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis.

  6. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Five Mouse Models Identifies Similarities and Differences with Human Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, William R.; Johnston, Andrew; Carbajal, Steve; Han, Gangwen; Wohn, Christian; Lu, Jun; Xing, Xianying; Nair, Rajan P.; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Sano, Shigetoshi; Prens, Errol P.; DiGiovanni, John; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Ward, Nicole L.; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1). While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis. PMID:21483750

  7. A mouse model for the human pathogen Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeongmin; Willinger, Tim; Rongvaux, Anthony; Eynon, Elizabeth E.; Stevens, Sean; Manz, Markus G.; Flavell, Richard A.; Galán, Jorge E.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is the cause of typhoid fever, a life-threatening disease of humans. The lack of an animal model due to S. typhi's strict human host specificity has been a significant obstacle in the understanding of its pathogenesis and the development of a safe and effective vaccine against typhoid fever. We report here the development of a mouse model for S. Typhi infection. We showed that immunodeficient Rag2 -/- γc -/- mice engrafted with human fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells were able to support S. Typhi replication and persistent infection. A S. Typhi strain carrying a mutation in a gene required for its virulence in humans was not able to replicate in these humanized mice. In contrast, another mutant strain unable to produce the recently identified typhoid toxin, exhibited increased replication suggesting a potential role for this toxin in the establishment of persistent infection. Furthermore, infected animals mounted a human innate and adaptive immune response to S. Typhi resulting in the production of cytokines and pathogen-specific antibodies. These results therefore indicate that this animal model can be used to study S. Typhi pathogenesis and to evaluate potential vaccine candidates against typhoid fever. PMID:20951970

  8. HUPO BPP Workshop on Mouse Models for Neurodegeneration--Choosing the right models.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Michael; Marcus, Katrin; Stephan, Christian; van Hall, Andre; Meyer, Helmut E

    2005-09-01

    The HUPO Brain Proteome Project met during the 4th Dutch Endo-Neuro-Psycho Meeting in Doorwerth, The Netherlands, on June 1, 2005, in order to discuss appropriate (mouse) models for neurodegenerative diseases as well as to conceptualise sophisticated proteomics analyses strategies. Here, the topics of the meeting are summarised.

  9. Mechanistically Distinct Mouse Models for CRX-Associated Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nicholas M.; Zhang, Alan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Huecker, Julie B.; Hennig, Anne K.; Chen, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (CRX) protein is a “paired-like” homeodomain transcription factor that is essential for regulating rod and cone photoreceptor transcription. Mutations in human CRX are associated with the dominant retinopathies Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), Cone-Rod Dystrophy (CoRD) and Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), with variable severity. Heterozygous Crx Knock-Out (KO) mice (“+/−”) have normal vision as adults and fail to model the dominant human disease. To investigate how different mutant CRX proteins produce distinct disease pathologies, we generated two Crx Knock-IN (K-IN) mouse models: CrxE168d2 (“E168d2”) and CrxR90W (“R90W”). E168d2 mice carry a frameshift mutation in the CRX activation domain, Glu168del2, which is associated with severe dominant CoRD or LCA in humans. R90W mice carry a substitution mutation in the CRX homeodomain, Arg90Trp, which is associated with dominant mild late-onset CoRD and recessive LCA. As seen in human patients, heterozygous E168d2 (“E168d2/+”) but not R90W (“R90W/+”) mice show severely impaired retinal function, while mice homozygous for either mutation are blind and undergo rapid photoreceptor degeneration. E168d2/+ mice also display abnormal rod/cone morphology, greater impairment of CRX target gene expression than R90W/+ or +/− mice, and undergo progressive photoreceptor degeneration. Surprisingly, E168d2/+ mice express more mutant CRX protein than wild-type CRX. E168d2neo/+, a subline of E168d2 with reduced mutant allele expression, displays a much milder retinal phenotype, demonstrating the impact of Crx expression level on disease severity. Both CRX[E168d2] and CRX[R90W] proteins fail to activate transcription in vitro, but CRX[E168d2] interferes more strongly with the function of wild type (WT) CRX, supporting an antimorphic mechanism. E168d2 and R90W are mechanistically distinct mouse models for CRX-associated disease that will allow the elucidation of molecular mechanisms and testing of

  10. Mouse models rarely mimic the transcriptome of human neurodegenerative diseases: A systematic bioinformatics-based critique of preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Burns, Terry C; Li, Matthew D; Mehta, Swapnil; Awad, Ahmed J; Morgan, Alexander A

    2015-07-15

    Translational research for neurodegenerative disease depends intimately upon animal models. Unfortunately, promising therapies developed using mouse models mostly fail in clinical trials, highlighting uncertainty about how well mouse models mimic human neurodegenerative disease at the molecular level. We compared the transcriptional signature of neurodegeneration in mouse models of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD), Parkinson׳s disease (PD), Huntington׳s disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to human disease. In contrast to aging, which demonstrated a conserved transcriptome between humans and mice, only 3 of 19 animal models showed significant enrichment for gene sets comprising the most dysregulated up- and down-regulated human genes. Spearman׳s correlation analysis revealed even healthy human aging to be more closely related to human neurodegeneration than any mouse model of AD, PD, ALS or HD. Remarkably, mouse models frequently upregulated stress response genes that were consistently downregulated in human diseases. Among potential alternate models of neurodegeneration, mouse prion disease outperformed all other disease-specific models. Even among the best available animal models, conserved differences between mouse and human transcriptomes were found across multiple animal model versus human disease comparisons, surprisingly, even including aging. Relative to mouse models, mouse disease signatures demonstrated consistent trends toward preserved mitochondrial function protein catabolism, DNA repair responses, and chromatin maintenance. These findings suggest a more complex and multifactorial pathophysiology in human neurodegeneration than is captured through standard animal models, and suggest that even among conserved physiological processes such as aging, mice are less prone to exhibit neurodegeneration-like changes. This work may help explain the poor track record of mouse-based translational therapies for neurodegeneration and provides a path

  11. Asparaginase Potentiates Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng; Janke, Laura J.; Kawedia, Jitesh D.; Ramsey, Laura B.; Cai, Xiangjun; Mattano, Leonard A.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Funk, Amy J.; Relling, Mary V.

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a common dose-limiting toxicity of glucocorticoids. Data from clinical trials suggest that other medications can increase the risk of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. Here we utilized a mouse model to study the effect of asparaginase treatment on dexamethasone-induced osteonecrosis. Mice receiving asparaginase along with dexamethasone had a higher rate of osteonecrosis than those receiving only dexamethasone after 6 weeks of treatment (44% vs. 10%, P = 0.006). Similarly, epiphyseal arteriopathy, which we have shown to be an initiating event for osteonecrosis, was observed in 58% of mice receiving asparaginase and dexamethasone compared to 17% of mice receiving dexamethasone only (P = 0.007). As in the clinic, greater exposure to asparaginase was associated with greater plasma exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.0001). This model also recapitulated other clinical risk factors for osteonecrosis, including age at start of treatment, and association with the systemic exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.027) and asparaginase (P = 0.036). We conclude that asparaginase can potentiate the osteonecrotic effect of glucocorticoids. PMID:26967741

  12. Asparaginase Potentiates Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengcheng; Janke, Laura J; Kawedia, Jitesh D; Ramsey, Laura B; Cai, Xiangjun; Mattano, Leonard A; Boyd, Kelli L; Funk, Amy J; Relling, Mary V

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a common dose-limiting toxicity of glucocorticoids. Data from clinical trials suggest that other medications can increase the risk of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. Here we utilized a mouse model to study the effect of asparaginase treatment on dexamethasone-induced osteonecrosis. Mice receiving asparaginase along with dexamethasone had a higher rate of osteonecrosis than those receiving only dexamethasone after 6 weeks of treatment (44% vs. 10%, P = 0.006). Similarly, epiphyseal arteriopathy, which we have shown to be an initiating event for osteonecrosis, was observed in 58% of mice receiving asparaginase and dexamethasone compared to 17% of mice receiving dexamethasone only (P = 0.007). As in the clinic, greater exposure to asparaginase was associated with greater plasma exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.0001). This model also recapitulated other clinical risk factors for osteonecrosis, including age at start of treatment, and association with the systemic exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.027) and asparaginase (P = 0.036). We conclude that asparaginase can potentiate the osteonecrotic effect of glucocorticoids.

  13. Effects of Tetrodotoxin in Mouse Models of Visceral Pain

    PubMed Central

    González-Cano, Rafael; Tejada, Miguel Ángel; Artacho-Cordón, Antonia; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; Entrena, José Manuel; Wood, John N.; Cendán, Cruz Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Visceral pain is very common and represents a major unmet clinical need for which current pharmacological treatments are often insufficient. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin that exerts analgesic actions in both humans and rodents under different somatic pain conditions, but its effect has been unexplored in visceral pain. Therefore, we tested the effects of systemic TTX in viscero-specific mouse models of chemical stimulation of the colon (intracolonic instillation of capsaicin and mustard oil) and intraperitoneal cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. The subcutaneous administration of TTX dose-dependently inhibited the number of pain-related behaviors in all evaluated pain models and reversed the referred mechanical hyperalgesia (examined by stimulation of the abdomen with von Frey filaments) induced by capsaicin and cyclophosphamide, but not that induced by mustard oil. Morphine inhibited both pain responses and the referred mechanical hyperalgesia in all tests. Conditional nociceptor‑specific Nav1.7 knockout mice treated with TTX showed the same responses as littermate controls after the administration of the algogens. No motor incoordination after the administration of TTX was observed. These results suggest that blockade of TTX-sensitive sodium channels, but not Nav1.7 subtype alone, by systemic administration of TTX might be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of visceral pain. PMID:28635651

  14. Genetically engineered mouse models of craniopharyngioma: an opportunity for therapy development and understanding of tumor biology

    PubMed Central

    Martinez‐Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP) is the commonest tumor of the sellar region in childhood. Two genetically engineered mouse models have been developed and are giving valuable insights into ACP biology. These models have identified novel pathways activated in tumors, revealed an important function of paracrine signalling and extended conventional theories about the role of organ‐specific stem cells in tumorigenesis. In this review, we summarize these mouse models, what has been learnt, their limitations and open questions for future research. We then discussed how these mouse models may be used to test novel therapeutics against potentially targetable pathways recently identified in human ACP. PMID:28414891

  15. Transgenic mouse models of Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Skaper, Stephen D; Giusti, Pietro

    2010-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by a profound and selective loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Another neurodegenerative disorder, Huntington's disease (HD), is characterized by striking movement abnormalities and the loss of medium-sized spiny neurons in the striatum. Current medications only provide symptomatic relief and fail to halt the death of neurons in these disorders. A major hurdle in the development of neuroprotective therapies is due to limited understanding of disease processes leading to the death of neurons. The etiology of dopaminergic neuronal demise in PD is elusive, but a combination of genetic and environmental factors seems to play a critical role. The majority of PD cases are sporadic; however, the discovery of genes linked to rare familial forms of disease and studies from experimental animal models has provided crucial insights into molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. HD, on the other hand, is one of the few neurodegenerative diseases with a known genetic cause, namely an expanded CAG repeat mutation, extending a polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. One of the most important advances in HD research has been the generation of various mouse models that enable the exploration of early pathological, molecular, and cellular abnormalities produced by the mutation. In addition, these models for both HD and PD have made possible the testing of different pharmacological approaches to delay the onset or slow the progression of disease. This article will provide an overview of the genetics underlying PD and HD, the animal models developed, and their potential utility to the study of disease pathophysiology.

  16. What have we learned from brucellosis in the mouse model?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    tested in mice by determining splenic Brucella numbers after challenging with appropriate virulent brucellae doses at precise post-vaccination times. Since most live or killed Brucella vaccines provide some protection in mice, controls immunized with reference vaccines (S19 or Rev1) are critical. Finally, mice have been successfully used to evaluate brucellosis therapies. It is concluded that, when used properly, the mouse is a valuable brucellosis model. PMID:22500859

  17. Mouse Models of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Baribault, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a fast-growing epidemic in industrialized countries, associated with obesity, lack of physical exercise, aging, family history, and ethnic background. Diagnostic criteria are elevated fasting or postprandial blood glucose levels, a consequence of insulin resistance. Early intervention can help patients to revert the progression of the disease together with lifestyle changes or monotherapy. Systemic glucose toxicity can have devastating effects leading to pancreatic beta cell failure, blindness, nephropathy, and neuropathy, progressing to limb ulceration or even amputation. Existing treatments have numerous side effects and demonstrate variability in individual patient responsiveness. However, several emerging areas of discovery research are showing promises with the development of novel classes of antidiabetic drugs.The mouse has proven to be a reliable model for discovering and validating new treatments for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We review here commonly used methods to measure endpoints relevant to glucose metabolism which show good translatability to the diagnostic of type 2 diabetes in humans: baseline fasting glucose and insulin, glucose tolerance test, insulin sensitivity index, and body type composition. Improvements on these clinical values are essential for the progression of a novel potential therapeutic molecule through a preclinical and clinical pipeline.

  18. Searching for a treatment for Alport syndrome using mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kan; Nomura, Shinsuke; Tryggvason, Karl; Ito, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a hereditary nephritis caused by mutations in COL4A3, COL4A4 or COL4A5 encoding the type IV collagen α3, α4, and α5 chains, which are major components of the glomerular basement membrane. About 20 years have passed since COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5 were identified and the first Alport mouse model was developed using a knockout approach. The phenotype of Alport mice is similar to that of Alport patients, including characteristic thickening and splitting of the glomerular basement membrane. Alport mice have been widely used to study the pathogenesis of AS and to develop effective therapies. In this review, the newer therapies for AS, such as pharmacological interventions, genetic approaches and stem cell therapies, are discussed. Although some stem cell therapies have been demonstrated to slow the renal disease progression in Alport mice, these therapies demand continual refinement as research advances. In terms of the pharmacological drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have been shown to be effective in Alport mice. Novel therapies that can provide a better outcome or lead to a cure are still awaited. PMID:25374816

  19. Searching for a treatment for Alport syndrome using mouse models.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Kan; Nomura, Shinsuke; Tryggvason, Karl; Ito, Masaaki

    2014-11-06

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a hereditary nephritis caused by mutations in COL4A3, COL4A4 or COL4A5 encoding the type IV collagen α3, α4, and α5 chains, which are major components of the glomerular basement membrane. About 20 years have passed since COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5 were identified and the first Alport mouse model was developed using a knockout approach. The phenotype of Alport mice is similar to that of Alport patients, including characteristic thickening and splitting of the glomerular basement membrane. Alport mice have been widely used to study the pathogenesis of AS and to develop effective therapies. In this review, the newer therapies for AS, such as pharmacological interventions, genetic approaches and stem cell therapies, are discussed. Although some stem cell therapies have been demonstrated to slow the renal disease progression in Alport mice, these therapies demand continual refinement as research advances. In terms of the pharmacological drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have been shown to be effective in Alport mice. Novel therapies that can provide a better outcome or lead to a cure are still awaited.

  20. Fundus autofluorescence findings in a mouse model of retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Secondi, Roberta; Kong, Jian; Blonska, Anna M; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Sparrow, Janet R

    2012-08-07

    Fundus autofluorescence (fundus AF) changes were monitored in a mouse model of retinal detachment (RD). RD was induced by transscleral injection of hyaluronic acid (Healon) or sterile balanced salt solution (BSS) into the subretinal space of 4-5-day-old albino Abca4 null mutant and Abca4 wild-type mice. Images acquired by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (Spectralis HRA) were correlated with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), infrared reflectance (IR), fluorescence spectroscopy, and histologic analysis. Results. In the area of detached retina, multiple hyperreflective spots in IR images corresponded to punctate areas of intense autofluorescence visible in fundus AF mode. The puncta exhibited changes in fluorescence intensity with time. SD-OCT disclosed undulations of the neural retina and hyperreflectivity of the photoreceptor layer that likely corresponded to histologically visible photoreceptor cell rosettes. Fluorescence emission spectra generated using flat-mounted retina, and 488 and 561 nm excitation, were similar to that of RPE lipofuscin. With increased excitation wavelength, the emission maximum shifted towards longer wavelengths, a characteristic typical of fundus autofluorescence. In detached retinas, hyper-autofluorescent spots appeared to originate from photoreceptor outer segments that were arranged within retinal folds and rosettes. Consistent with this interpretation is the finding that the autofluorescence was spectroscopically similar to the bisretinoids that constitute RPE lipofuscin. Under the conditions of a RD, abnormal autofluorescence may arise from excessive production of bisretinoid by impaired photoreceptor cells.

  1. Fundus Autofluorescence Findings in a Mouse Model of Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Secondi, Roberta; Kong, Jian; Blonska, Anna M.; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Fundus autofluorescence (fundus AF) changes were monitored in a mouse model of retinal detachment (RD). Methods. RD was induced by transscleral injection of hyaluronic acid (Healon) or sterile balanced salt solution (BSS) into the subretinal space of 4–5-day-old albino Abca4 null mutant and Abca4 wild-type mice. Images acquired by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (Spectralis HRA) were correlated with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), infrared reflectance (IR), fluorescence spectroscopy, and histologic analysis. Results. In the area of detached retina, multiple hyperreflective spots in IR images corresponded to punctate areas of intense autofluorescence visible in fundus AF mode. The puncta exhibited changes in fluorescence intensity with time. SD-OCT disclosed undulations of the neural retina and hyperreflectivity of the photoreceptor layer that likely corresponded to histologically visible photoreceptor cell rosettes. Fluorescence emission spectra generated using flat-mounted retina, and 488 and 561 nm excitation, were similar to that of RPE lipofuscin. With increased excitation wavelength, the emission maximum shifted towards longer wavelengths, a characteristic typical of fundus autofluorescence. Conclusions. In detached retinas, hyper-autofluorescent spots appeared to originate from photoreceptor outer segments that were arranged within retinal folds and rosettes. Consistent with this interpretation is the finding that the autofluorescence was spectroscopically similar to the bisretinoids that constitute RPE lipofuscin. Under the conditions of a RD, abnormal autofluorescence may arise from excessive production of bisretinoid by impaired photoreceptor cells. PMID:22786896

  2. A mouse model for degeneration of the spiral ligament.

    PubMed

    Kada, Shinpei; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Ito, Juichi

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated the importance of the spiral ligament (SL) in the pathogenesis of sensorineural hearing loss. The aim of this study was to establish a mouse model for SL degeneration as the basis for the development of new strategies for SL regeneration. We injected 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, at various concentrations into the posterior semicircular canal of adult C57BL/6 mice. Saline-injected animals were used as controls. Auditory function was monitored by measurements of auditory brain stem responses (ABRs). On postoperative day 14, cochlear specimens were obtained after the measurement of the endocochlear potential (EP). Animals that were injected with 5 or 10 mM 3-NP showed a massive elevation of ABR thresholds along with extensive degeneration of the cochleae. Cochleae injected with 1 mM 3-NP exhibited selective degeneration of the SL fibrocytes but alterations in EP levels and ABR thresholds were not of sufficient magnitude to allow for testing functional recovery after therapeutic interventions. Animals injected with 3 mM 3-NP showed a reduction of around 50% in the EP along with a significant loss of SL fibrocytes, although degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons and hair cells was still present in certain regions. These findings indicate that cochleae injected with 3 mM 3-NP may be useful in investigations designed to test the feasibility of new therapeutic manipulations for functional SL regeneration.

  3. Multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of cartilage development in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Sicong; Xue, Wenqian; Sun, Qiqi; Li, Xuesong; Huang, Jiandong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2017-02-01

    Kinesin-1 is a kind of motor protein responsible for intracellular transportation and has been studied in a variety of tissues. However, its roles in cartilage development are not clear. In this study, a kinesin-1 heavy chain (Kif5b) knockout mouse model is used to study the functions of kinesin-1 in the cartilage development. We developed a multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system integrating stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) to investigate the morphological and biomedical characteristics of fresh tibial cartilage from normal and mutant mice at different developmental stages. The combined forward and backward SHG imaging resolved the fine structure of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix of cartilage. Meanwhile, the chondrocyte morphology in different zones of cartilage was visualized by label-free SRS and TPEF images. The results show that the fibrillar collagen in the superficial zone of cartilage in postnatal day 10 and 15 (P10 and P15) knockout mice was significantly less than that of control mice. Moreover, we observed distorted morphology and disorganization of columnar arrangement of chondrocytes in the growth plate cartilage of mutant mice. This study reveals the significant roles of kinesin-1 in collagen formation and chondrocyte morphogenesis.

  4. Increased Opioid Dependence in a Mouse Model of Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Xavier; Murtra, Patricia; Zamalloa, Teresa; Canals, Josep Maria; Pineda, Joseba; Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Maldonado, Rafael; Dierssen, Mara

    2009-01-01

    Panic disorder is a highly prevalent neuropsychiatric disorder that shows co-occurrence with substance abuse. Here, we demonstrate that TrkC, the high-affinity receptor for neurotrophin-3, is a key molecule involved in panic disorder and opiate dependence, using a transgenic mouse model (TgNTRK3). Constitutive TrkC overexpression in TgNTRK3 mice dramatically alters spontaneous firing rates of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons and the response of the noradrenergic system to chronic opiate exposure, possibly related to the altered regulation of neurotrophic peptides observed. Notably, TgNTRK3 LC neurons showed an increased firing rate in saline-treated conditions and profound abnormalities in their response to met5-enkephalin. Behaviorally, chronic morphine administration induced a significantly increased withdrawal syndrome in TgNTRK3 mice. In conclusion, we show here that the NT-3/TrkC system is an important regulator of neuronal firing in LC and could contribute to the adaptations of the noradrenergic system in response to chronic opiate exposure. Moreover, our results indicate that TrkC is involved in the molecular and cellular changes in noradrenergic neurons underlying both panic attacks and opiate dependence and support a functional endogenous opioid deficit in panic disorder patients. PMID:20204153

  5. Skeletal muscle repair in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sanoudou, Despina; Corbett, Mark A.; Han, Mei; Ghoddusi, Majid; Nguyen, Mai-Anh T.; Vlahovich, Nicole; Hardeman, Edna C.; Beggs, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM), the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, is a variably severe neuromuscular disorder for which no effective treatment is available. Although a number of genes have been identified in which mutations can cause NM, the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to the phenotypes are poorly understood. To address this question, we examined gene expression patterns in an NM mouse model carrying the human Met9Arg mutation of alpha-tropomyosin slow (Tpm3). We assessed five different skeletal muscles from affected mice, which are representative of muscles with differing fiber-type compositions, different physiological specializations and variable degrees of pathology. Although these same muscles in non-affected mice showed marked variation in patterns of gene expression, with diaphragm being the most dissimilar, the presence of the mutant protein in nemaline muscles resulted in a more similar pattern of gene expression among the muscles. This result suggests a common process or mechanism operating in nemaline muscles independent of the variable degrees of pathology. Transcriptional and protein expression data indicate the presence of a repair process and possibly delayed maturation in nemaline muscles. Markers indicative of satellite cell number, activated satellite cells and immature fibers including M-Cadherin, MyoD, desmin, Pax7 and Myf6 were elevated by western-blot analysis or immunohistochemistry. Evidence suggesting elevated focal repair was observed in nemaline muscle in electron micrographs. This analysis reveals that NM is characterized by a novel repair feature operating in multiple different muscles. PMID:16877500

  6. Skeletal muscle repair in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Sanoudou, Despina; Corbett, Mark A; Han, Mei; Ghoddusi, Majid; Nguyen, Mai-Anh T; Vlahovich, Nicole; Hardeman, Edna C; Beggs, Alan H

    2006-09-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM), the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy, is a variably severe neuromuscular disorder for which no effective treatment is available. Although a number of genes have been identified in which mutations can cause NM, the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to the phenotypes are poorly understood. To address this question, we examined gene expression patterns in an NM mouse model carrying the human Met9Arg mutation of alpha-tropomyosin slow (Tpm3). We assessed five different skeletal muscles from affected mice, which are representative of muscles with differing fiber-type compositions, different physiological specializations and variable degrees of pathology. Although these same muscles in non-affected mice showed marked variation in patterns of gene expression, with diaphragm being the most dissimilar, the presence of the mutant protein in nemaline muscles resulted in a more similar pattern of gene expression among the muscles. This result suggests a common process or mechanism operating in nemaline muscles independent of the variable degrees of pathology. Transcriptional and protein expression data indicate the presence of a repair process and possibly delayed maturation in nemaline muscles. Markers indicative of satellite cell number, activated satellite cells and immature fibers including M-Cadherin, MyoD, desmin, Pax7 and Myf6 were elevated by western-blot analysis or immunohistochemistry. Evidence suggesting elevated focal repair was observed in nemaline muscle in electron micrographs. This analysis reveals that NM is characterized by a novel repair feature operating in multiple different muscles.

  7. Hepatitis C Virus-Related Lymphomagenesis in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Kasama, Yuri; Salem, Nagla Elwy; Machida, Keigo; Kohara, Michinori

    2011-01-01

    B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a typical extrahepatic manifestation frequently associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The mechanism by which HCV infection leads to lymphoproliferative disorder remains unclear. Our group established HCV transgenic mice that expressed the full HCV genome in B cells (RzCD19Cre mice). We observed a 25.0% incidence of diffuse large B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (22.2% in male and 29.6% in female mice) within 600 days of birth. Interestingly, RzCD19Cre mice with substantially elevated serum-soluble interleukin-2 receptor α-subunit (sIL-2Rα) levels (>1000 pg/mL) developed B cell lymphomas. Another mouse model of lymphoproliferative disorder was established by persistent expression of HCV structural proteins through disruption of interferon regulatory factor-1 (irf-1_/_/CN2 mice). Irf-1_/_/CN2 mice showed extremely high incidences of lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders. Moreover, these mice showed increased levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10, and Bcl-2 as well as increased Bcl-2 expression, which promoted oncogenic transformation of lymphocytes. PMID:22084693

  8. Efficacy of enrofloxacin in a mouse model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Slate, Andrea R; Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; Francis, Kevin P; Papich, Mark G; Karolewski, Brian; Hod, Eldad A; Prestia, Kevin A

    2014-07-01

    We examined the efficacy of enrofloxacin administered by 2 different routes in a mouse model of sepsis. Male CD1 mice were infected with a bioluminescent strain of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and treated with enrofloxacin either by injection or in drinking water. Peak serum levels were evaluated by using HPLC. Mice were monitored for signs of clinical disease, and infections were monitored by using bioluminescence imaging. Serum levels of enrofloxacin and the active metabolite ciprofloxacin were greater in the group treated by injection than in controls or the groups treated by administration in drinking water. Survival of the group treated with enrofloxacin injection was greater than that of controls and groups treated with enrofloxacin in the drinking water. Bioluminescence in the group treated with enrofloxacin injection was less than that in the groups treated with oral administration at 12 h and in the groups treated orally and the control group at 16 h. According to these findings, we recommend the use of injectable enrofloxacin at 5 mg/kg SC for mice with systemic infections.

  9. Efficacy of Enrofloxacin in a Mouse Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; Francis, Kevin P; Papich, Mark G; Karolewski, Brian; Hod, Eldad A; Prestia, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of enrofloxacin administered by 2 different routes in a mouse model of sepsis. Male CD1 mice were infected with a bioluminescent strain of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and treated with enrofloxacin either by injection or in drinking water. Peak serum levels were evaluated by using HPLC. Mice were monitored for signs of clinical disease, and infections were monitored by using bioluminescence imaging. Serum levels of enrofloxacin and the active metabolite ciprofloxacin were greater in the group treated by injection than in controls or the groups treated by administration in drinking water. Survival of the group treated with enrofloxacin injection was greater than that of controls and groups treated with enrofloxacin in the drinking water. Bioluminescence in the group treated with enrofloxacin injection was less than that in the groups treated with oral administration at 12 h and in the groups treated orally and the control group at 16 h. According to these findings, we recommend the use of injectable enrofloxacin at 5 mg/kg SC for mice with systemic infections. PMID:25199094

  10. RANKL, osteopontin, and osteoclast homeostasis in a hyperocclusion mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Cameron G.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Dangaria, Smit

    2009-10-21

    The biological mechanisms that maintain the position of teeth in their sockets establish a dynamic equilibrium between bone resorption and apposition. In order to reveal some of the dynamics involved in the tissue responses towards occlusal forces on periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone homeostasis, we developed the first mouse model of hyperocclusion. Swiss-Webster mice were kept in hyperocclusion for 0, 3, 6, and 9 d. Morphological and histological changes in the periodontium were assessed using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ground sections with fluorescent detection of vital dye labels. Sections were stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and the expression ofmore » receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and osteopontin (OPN) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Traumatic occlusion resulted in enamel surface abrasion, inhibition of alveolar bone apposition, significant formation of osteoclasts at 3, 6 and 9 d, and upregulation of OPN and RANKL. Data from this study suggest that both OPN and RANKL contribute to the stimulation of bone resorption in the hyperocclusive state. In addition, we propose that the inhibition of alveolar bone apposition by occlusal forces is an important mechanism for the control of occlusal height that might work in synergy with RANKL-induced bone resorption to maintain normal occlusion.« less

  11. Enhanced aggressive behaviour in a mouse model of depression.

    PubMed

    Yang, C R; Bai, Y Y; Ruan, C S; Zhou, H F; Liu, D; Wang, X F; Shen, L J; Zheng, H Y; Zhou, X F

    2015-02-01

    Depression is one of the most common chronic mental disorders, which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients. Depression often leads to offensive and defensive behaviours but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We propose that the aggressive behaviours in depression can be modelled in animal experiments. In this study, we successfully established a mouse model of depression using the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) paradigm and detected aggressive and social dominance behaviours in rodents by resident/intruder test and social dominance tube test (SDTT), respectively. The CUMS-exposed mice showed increased defensive, offensive and aggressive behaviours in the resident-intruder test. In the SDTT, these mice showed enhanced social dominance. These alterations were associated with reduced MAP-2 expression in the hippocampus while no difference in β-tubulin expression was detected. In addition, the treatment of anti-depressant fluoxetine reversed the aggressive behaviours without reducing the social dominance behaviour induced by CUMS. However, fluoxetine did effectively reverted the changes in MAP-2 expression in the hippocampus. In addition, the nonspecific tricyclic antipsychotic drug, clozapine, reversed all symptoms of CUMS-exposed mice including aggressive tendencies, impulsive violence, social dominance behaviour and MAP-2 expression in the hippocampus. The results suggests that social maladjustment such as competition and social dominance are likely related to the dopaminergic system rather than the serotonergic system and the hippocampal dendritic structure protein MAP-2. Thus, dominance can be separated from aggression. This study shows that aggression/hostility and social hierarchy/dominance are increased in the CUMS-exposed mice and thus provide an excellent model for further study in the diagnosis and the treatment of depression-associated aggression.

  12. Impaired peripheral nerve regeneration in type-2 diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pham, Vuong M; Tu, Nguyen Huu; Katano, Tayo; Matsumura, Shinji; Saito, Akira; Yamada, Akihiro; Furue, Hidemasa; Ito, Seiji

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common and serious complications of type-2 diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy is characterized by a distal symmetrical sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and its incidence increases in patients 40 years of age or older. In spite of extensive research over decades, there are few effective treatments for diabetic neuropathy besides glucose control and improved lifestyle. The earliest changes in diabetic neuropathy occur in sensory nerve fibers, with initial degeneration and regeneration resulting in pain. To seek its effective treatment, here we prepared a type-2 diabetic mouse model by giving mice 2 injections of streptozotocin and nicotinamide and examining the ability for nerve regeneration by using a sciatic nerve transection-regeneration model previously established by us. Seventeen weeks after the last injection, the mice exhibited symptoms of type-2 diabetes, that is, impaired glucose tolerance, decreased insulin level, mechanical hyperalgesia, and impaired sensory nerve fibers in the plantar skin. These mice showed delayed functional recovery and nerve regeneration by 2 weeks compared with young healthy mice and by 1 week compared with age-matched non-diabetic mice after axotomy. Furthermore, type-2 diabetic mice displayed increased expression of PTEN in their DRG neurons. Administration of a PTEN inhibitor at the cutting site of the nerve for 4 weeks promoted the axonal transport and functional recovery remarkably. This study demonstrates that peripheral nerve regeneration was impaired in type-2 diabetic model and that its combination with sciatic nerve transection is suitable for the study of the pathogenesis and treatment of early diabetic neuropathy. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. In vivo quantitative bioluminescence tomography using heterogeneous and homogeneous mouse models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junting; Wang, Yabin; Qu, Xiaochao; Li, Xiangsi; Ma, Xiaopeng; Han, Runqiang; Hu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueli; Sun, Dongdong; Zhang, Rongqing; Chen, Duofang; Chen, Dan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liang, Jimin; Cao, Feng; Tian, Jie

    2010-06-07

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is a new optical molecular imaging modality, which can monitor both physiological and pathological processes by using bioluminescent light-emitting probes in small living animal. Especially, this technology possesses great potential in drug development, early detection, and therapy monitoring in preclinical settings. In the present study, we developed a dual modality BLT prototype system with Micro-computed tomography (MicroCT) registration approach, and improved the quantitative reconstruction algorithm based on adaptive hp finite element method (hp-FEM). Detailed comparisons of source reconstruction between the heterogeneous and homogeneous mouse models were performed. The models include mice with implanted luminescence source and tumor-bearing mice with firefly luciferase report gene. Our data suggest that the reconstruction based on heterogeneous mouse model is more accurate in localization and quantification than the homogeneous mouse model with appropriate optical parameters and that BLT allows super-early tumor detection in vivo based on tomographic reconstruction of heterogeneous mouse model signal.

  14. Mouse Model for the Preclinical Study of Metastatic Disease | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative research to co-develop a mouse model that shows preclinical therapeutic response of residual metastatic disease.

  15. Mouse model of necrotic tuberculosis granulomas develops hypoxic lesions.

    PubMed

    Harper, Jamie; Skerry, Ciaran; Davis, Stephanie L; Tasneen, Rokeya; Weir, Mariah; Kramnik, Igor; Bishai, William R; Pomper, Martin G; Nuermberger, Eric L; Jain, Sanjay K

    2012-02-15

    Preclinical evaluation of tuberculosis drugs is generally limited to mice. However, necrosis and hypoxia, key features of human tuberculosis lesions, are lacking in conventional mouse strains. We used C3HeB/FeJ mice, which develop necrotic lesions in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Positron emission tomography in live infected animals, postmortem pimonidazole immunohistochemistry, and bacterial gene expression analyses were used to assess whether tuberculosis lesions in C3HeB/FeJ are hypoxic. Efficacy of combination drug treatment, including PA-824, active against M. tuberculosis under hypoxic conditions, was also evaluated. Tuberculosis lesions in C3HeB/FeJ (but not BALB/c) were found to be hypoxic and associated with up-regulation of known hypoxia-associated bacterial genes (P < .001). Contrary to sustained activity reported elsewhere in BALB/c mice, moxifloxacin and pyrazinamide (MZ) combination was not bactericidal beyond 3 weeks in C3HeB/FeJ. Although PA-824 added significant activity, the novel combination of PA-824 and MZ was less effective than the standard first-line regimen in C3HeB/FeJ. We demonstrate that tuberculosis lesions in C3HeB/FeJ are hypoxic. Activities of some key tuberculosis drug regimens in development are represented differently in C3HeB/FeJ versus BALB/c mice. Because C3HeB/FeJ display key features of human tuberculosis, this strain warrants evaluation as a more pathologically relevant model for preclinical studies.

  16. Metabolic phenotype in the mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Boraschi-Diaz, Iris; Tauer, Josephine T; El-Rifai, Omar; Guillemette, Delphine; Lefebvre, Geneviève; Rauch, Frank; Ferron, Mathieu; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2017-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is the most common heritable bone fragility disorder, usually caused by dominant mutations in genes coding for collagen type I alpha chains, COL1A1 or COL1A2 Osteocalcin (OCN) is now recognized as a bone-derived regulator of insulin secretion and sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. Since OI is associated with increased rates of bone formation and resorption, we hypothesized that the levels of undercarboxylated OCN are increased in OI. The objective of this study was to determine changes in OCN and to elucidate the metabolic phenotype in the Col1a1 Jrt/+ mouse, a model of dominant OI caused by a Col1a1 mutation. Circulating levels of undercarboxylated OCN were higher in 4-week-old OI mice and normal by 8 weeks of age. Young OI animals exhibited a sex-dependent metabolic phenotype, including increased insulin levels in males, improved glucose tolerance in females, lower levels of random glucose and low adiposity in both sexes. The rates of O 2 consumption and CO 2 production, as well as energy expenditure assessed using indirect calorimetry were significantly increased in OI animals of both sexes, whereas respiratory exchange ratio was significantly higher in OI males only. Although OI mice have significant physical impairment that may contribute to metabolic differences, we specifically accounted for movement and compared OI and WT animals during the periods of similar activity levels. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that OI animals have alterations in whole body energy metabolism that are consistent with the action of undercarboxylated osteocalcin. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  17. Oxalobacter formigenes Colonization and Oxalate Dynamics in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingsheng; Ellis, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Animal and human studies have provided compelling evidence that colonization of the intestine with Oxalobacter formigenes reduces urinary oxalate excretion and lowers the risk of forming calcium oxalate kidney stones. The mechanism providing protection appears to be related to the unique ability of O. formigenes to rely on oxalate as a major source of carbon and energy for growth. However, much is not known about the factors that influence colonization and host-bacterium interactions. We have colonized mice with O. formigenes OxCC13 and systematically investigated the impacts of diets with different levels of calcium and oxalate on O. formigenes intestinal densities and urinary and intestinal oxalate levels. Measurement of intestinal oxalate levels in mice colonized or not colonized with O. formigenes demonstrated the highly efficient degradation of soluble oxalate by O. formigenes relative to other microbiota. The ratio of calcium to oxalate in diets was important in determining colonization densities and conditions where urinary oxalate and fecal oxalate excretion were modified, and the results were consistent with those from studies we have performed with colonized and noncolonized humans. The use of low-oxalate purified diets showed that 80% of animals retained O. formigenes colonization after a 1-week dietary oxalate deprivation. Animals not colonized with O. formigenes excreted two times more oxalate in feces than they had ingested. This nondietary source of oxalate may play an important role in the survival of O. formigenes during periods of dietary oxalate deprivation. These studies suggest that the mouse will be a useful model to further characterize interactions between O. formigenes and the host and factors that impact colonization. PMID:25979889

  18. Mouse model for acute Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Tristan; Weber, Timm; Kracker, Sven; Sommermann, Thomas; Rajewsky, Klaus; Yasuda, Tomoharu

    2016-11-29

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infects human B cells and drives them into continuous proliferation. Two key viral factors in this process are the latent membrane proteins LMP1 and LMP2A, which mimic constitutively activated CD40 receptor and B-cell receptor signaling, respectively. EBV-infected B cells elicit a powerful T-cell response that clears the infected B cells and leads to life-long immunity. Insufficient immune surveillance of EBV-infected B cells causes life-threatening lymphoproliferative disorders, including mostly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cell lymphomas. We have modeled acute EBV infection of naive and GC B cells in mice through timed expression of LMP1 and LMP2A. Although lethal when induced in all B cells, induction of LMP1 and LMP2A in just a small fraction of naive B cells initiated a phase of rapid B-cell expansion followed by a proliferative T-cell response, clearing the LMP-expressing B cells. Interfering with T-cell activity prevented clearance of LMP-expressing B cells. This was also true for perforin deficiency, which in the human causes a life-threatening EBV-related immunoproliferative syndrome. LMP expression in GC B cells impeded the GC reaction but, upon loss of T-cell surveillance, led to fatal B-cell expansion. Thus, timed expression of LMP1 together with LMP2A in subsets of mouse B cells allows one to study major clinically relevant features of human EBV infection in vivo, opening the way to new therapeutic approaches.

  19. GARP inhibits allergic airway inflammation in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Martin, H; Hahn, S A; Beckert, H; Belz, C; Heinz, A; Jonuleit, H; Becker, C; Taube, C; Korn, S; Buhl, R; Reuter, S; Tuettenberg, A

    2016-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) represent a promising target for novel treatment strategies in patients with inflammatory/allergic diseases. A soluble derivate of the Treg surface molecule glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (sGARP) has strong anti-inflammatory and regulatory effects on human cells in vitro as well as in vivo through de novo induction of peripheral Treg. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory function of sGARP and its possible role as a new therapeutic option in allergic diseases using a humanized mouse model. To analyze the therapeutic effects of sGARP, adult NOD/Scidγc(-/-) (NSG) mice received peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from allergic patients with sensitization against birch allergen. Subsequently, allergic inflammation was induced in the presence of Treg alone or in combination with sGARP. In comparison with mice that received Treg alone, additional treatment with sGARP reduced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), influx of neutrophils and macrophages into the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and human CD45(+) cells in the lungs. Furthermore, the numbers of mucus-producing goblet cells and inflammatory cell infiltrates were reduced. To elucidate whether the mechanism of action of sGARP involves the TGF-β receptor pathway, mice additionally received anti-TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) antibodies. Blocking the signaling of TGF-β through TGF-βRII abrogated the anti-inflammatory effects of sGARP, confirming its essential role in inhibiting the allergic inflammation. Induction of peripheral tolerance via sGARP is a promising potential approach to treat allergic airway diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma Driven by Mutated ALK and MYCN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0220 TITLE: A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma ...CONTRACT NUMBER A Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Neuroblastoma Driven by Mutated ALK and MYCN 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0220 5c...common ALK mutations in neuroblastoma , F1174L and R1275Q. We have determined that in tumors cells expressing mutated ALK, different downstream

  1. Development and Characterization of a Mouse Model for Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Development and Characterization of a Mouse Model for Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever Kelly L. Warfield,* Steven B...mouse model has hampered an understanding of the pathogenesis and immunity of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), the disease caused by marburgvirus (MARV...cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans and non- human primates (27). The incubation time is estimated to be 3 to 21 days, with human case fatality

  2. A Mouse Model to Investigate Postmenopausal Biology as an Etiology of Ovarian Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Wv mice and genetic alterations such as p53, pten, or p27kip1, which are found in human ovarian cancer. 2. Body: Research Progress In the first year...press (Yang et al., Am. J. Pathology 2007). To collaborate with the mouse model study, we have also examined human ovaries obtained from prophylactic...results in the coming years. Xu, Xiangxi, Ph.D. 8 3. Key Research Accomplishments (1) Further verify the relevance of the Wv mouse model to human

  3. A unified model of the excitability of mouse sensory and motor axons.

    PubMed

    Makker, Preet G S; Matamala, José Manuel; Park, Susanna B; Lees, Justin G; Kiernan, Matthew C; Burke, David; Moalem-Taylor, Gila; Howells, James

    2018-06-19

    Non-invasive nerve excitability techniques have provided valuable insight into the understanding of neurological disorders. The widespread use of mice in translational research on peripheral nerve disorders and by pharmaceutical companies during drug development requires valid and reliable models that can be compared to humans. This study established a novel experimental protocol that enables comparative assessment of the excitability properties of motor and sensory axons at the same site in mouse caudal nerve, compared the mouse data to data for motor and sensory axons in human median nerve at the wrist, and constructed a mathematical model of the excitability of mouse axons. In a separate study, ischaemia was employed as an experimental manoeuvre to test the translational utility of this preparation. The patterns of mouse sensory and motor excitability were qualitatively similar to human studies under normal and ischaemic conditions. The most conspicuous differences between mouse and human studies were observed in the recovery cycle and the response to hyperpolarization. Modelling showed that an increase in temperature in mouse axons could account for most of the differences in the recovery cycle. The modelling also suggested a larger hyperpolarization-activated conductance in mouse axons. The kinetics of this conductance appeared to be much slower raising the possibility that an additional or different hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide gated (HCN) channel isoform underlies the accommodation to hyperpolarization in mouse axons. Given a possible difference in HCN isoforms, caution should be exercised in extrapolating from studies of mouse motor and sensory axons to human nerve disorders. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and function of human innate immune cells in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rongvaux, Anthony; Willinger, Tim; Martinek, Jan; Strowig, Till; Gearty, Sofia V; Teichmann, Lino L; Saito, Yasuyuki; Marches, Florentina; Halene, Stephanie; Palucka, A Karolina; Manz, Markus G; Flavell, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    Mice repopulated with human hematopoietic cells are a powerful tool for the study of human hematopoiesis and immune function in vivo. However, existing humanized mouse models cannot support development of human innate immune cells, including myeloid cells and natural killer (NK) cells. Here we describe two mouse strains called MITRG and MISTRG, in which human versions of four genes encoding cytokines important for innate immune cell development are knocked into their respective mouse loci. The human cytokines support the development and function of monocytes, macrophages and NK cells derived from human fetal liver or adult CD34(+) progenitor cells injected into the mice. Human macrophages infiltrated a human tumor xenograft in MITRG and MISTRG mice in a manner resembling that observed in tumors obtained from human patients. This humanized mouse model may be used to model the human immune system in scenarios of health and pathology, and may enable evaluation of therapeutic candidates in an in vivo setting relevant to human physiology.

  5. A Mouse Model for Binge-Level Methamphetamine Use

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Shkelzen; Houlton, Sydney K.; Hellmuth, Laura; Mojica, Erika; Mootz, John R. K.; Zhu, Zhen; Reed, Cheryl; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2016-01-01

    Binge/crash cycles of methamphetamine (MA) use are frequently reported by individuals suffering from MA use disorders. A MA binge is self-reported as multiple daily doses that commonly accumulate to 800 mg/day (~10 mg/kg/day for a 170 pound human). A genetic animal model with a similar vulnerability to binge-level MA intake is missing. We used selectively bred MA high drinking (MAHDR) and low drinking (MALDR) mouse lines to determine whether several procedural variations would result in binge-level MA intake. Data were also collected in two progenitor populations of the MA drinking lines, the DBA/2J (D2) strain and the F2 cross of the D2 and C57BL/6J strains. The impact of 3 factors was examined: (1) concentration of MA in the two-bottle choice procedure used for selective breeding; (2) ratio of bottles containing MA vs. water, and (3) length of the withdrawal (or abstinence) period between MA drinking sessions. When MA concentration was progressively increased every 4 days in 20 mg/l amounts from 20 to 140 mg/l, maximum intake in MALDR mice was 1.1 mg/kg, whereas MAHDR mice consumed as much as 14.6 mg/kg. When these concentrations were tested in a multiple bottle choice procedure, the highest ratio of MA to water bottles (3:1) was associated with escalated MA intake of up to 29.1 mg/kg in MAHDR mice and 12.0 mg/kg in F2 mice; MALDR mice did not show a ratio-dependent escalation in MA intake. Finally, MAHDR and D2 mice were offered 3 bottles of MA vs. water at increasing concentrations from 20 to 80 mg/l, and tested under an intermittent 6-h withdrawal period, which was lengthened to 30 h (D2 mice) or to 30 or 78 h (MAHDR). D2 and MAHDR mice initially consumed similar amounts of 14–16 mg/kg MA, but D2 mice reduced their MA intake 3-fold after introduction of 30-h abstinence periods, whereas MAHDR mice retained their high level of intake regardless of withdrawal period. MAHDR mice provide a genetic model of binge-level MA intake appropriate for the study of

  6. A novel mouse xenotransplantation model of EBV-T/NK-LPD and the application of the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Imadome, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection (CAEBV), characterized by proliferation of EBV-infected T or NK cells, is a disease of unknown pathogenesis and requires hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for curative treatment. Here we show that intravenous injection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients with CAEBV to NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2R γ(null) (NOG) mice leads to engraftment of EBV-infected T or NK cells. Analysis of TCR repertoire identified an identical predominant EBV-infected T-cell clone both in a patient and a mouse transplanted with his PBMCs. EBV-infected T or NK cells infiltrated to most major organs including the liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, adrenal glands, and intestine, showing histological characteristics of CAEBV. Expression of EBNA1, LMP1, and LMP2A, but not EBNA2, in these cells indicated the latency II program of EBV gene characteristic to CAEBV. High levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and RANTES were detected in the peripheral blood of these mice. EBV-containing fractions of either CD8(+), γδT, or NK cell lineages failed to engraft, once they were isolated from PBMCs ; they could engraft only when CD4(+) cell fraction was transplanted in parallel. Isolated EBV-containing CD4(+) T cells, in contrast, did engraft on their own. This is the first report of an animal model of CAEBV and suggest that EBV-infected T or NK cells in CAEBV are not truly neoplastic but are dependent on CD4(+) T cells for their proliferation in vivo.

  7. Two-Pore Channels: Lessons from Mutant Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Margarida; Galione, Antony; Parrington, John

    2016-01-01

    Recent interest in two-pore channels (TPCs) has resulted in a variety of studies dealing with the functional role and mechanism of action of these endo-lysosomal proteins in diverse physiological processes. With the availability of mouse lines harbouring mutant alleles for Tpcnl and/or Tpcn2 genes, several studies have made use of them to validate, consolidate and discover new roles for these channels not only at the cellular level but, importantly, also at the level of the whole organism. The different mutant mouse lines that have been used were derived from distinct genetic manipulation strategies, with the aim of knocking out expression of TPC proteins. However, the expression of different residual TPC sequences predicted to occur in these mutant mouse lines, together with the varied degree to which the effects on Tpcn expression have been studied, makes it important to assess the true knockout status of some of the lines. In this review we summarize these Tpcn mutant mouse lines with regard to their predicted effect on Tpcn expression and the extent to which they have been characterized. Additionally, we discuss how results derived from studies using these Tpcn mutant mouse lines have consolidated previously proposed roles for TPCs, such as mediators of NAADP signalling, endo-lysosomal functions, and pancreatic β cell physiology. We will also review how they have been instrumental in the assignment of new physiological roles for these cation channels in processes such as membrane electrical excitability, neoangiogenesis, viral infection and brown adipose tissue and heart function, revealing, in some cases, a specific contribution of a particular TPC isoform. PMID:27330869

  8. Use of mouse models to study the mechanisms and consequences of RBC clearance

    PubMed Central

    Hod, E. A.; Arinsburg, S. A.; Francis, R. O.; Hendrickson, J. E.; Zimring, J. C.; Spitalnik, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Mice provide tractable animal models for studying the pathophysiology of various human disorders. This review discusses the use of mouse models for understanding red-blood-cell (RBC) clearance. These models provide important insights into the pathophysiology of various clinically relevant entities, such as autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, haemolytic transfusion reactions, other complications of RBC transfusions and immunomodulation by Rh immune globulin therapy. Mouse models of both antibody- and non-antibody-mediated RBC clearance are reviewed. Approaches for exploring unanswered questions in transfusion medicine using these models are also discussed. PMID:20345515

  9. What do mouse models of muscular dystrophy tell us about the DAPC and its components?

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Charlotte; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    There are over 30 mouse models with mutations or inactivations in the dystrophin-associated protein complex. This complex is thought to play a crucial role in the functioning of muscle, as both a shock absorber and signalling centre, although its role in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy is not fully understood. The first mouse model of muscular dystrophy to be identified with a mutation in a component of the dystrophin-associated complex (dystrophin) was the mdx mouse in 1984. Here, we evaluate the key characteristics of the mdx in comparison with other mouse mutants with inactivations in DAPC components, along with key modifiers of the disease phenotype. By discussing the differences between the individual phenotypes, we show that the functioning of the DAPC and consequently its role in the pathogenesis is more complicated than perhaps currently appreciated. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2014 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  10. Live dynamic imaging and analysis of developmental cardiac defects in mouse models with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew L.; Wang, Shang; Garcia, Monica; Valladolid, Christian; Larin, Kirill V.; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding mouse embryonic development is an invaluable resource for our interpretation of normal human embryology and congenital defects. Our research focuses on developing methods for live imaging and dynamic characterization of early embryonic development in mouse models of human diseases. Using multidisciplinary methods: optical coherence tomography (OCT), live mouse embryo manipulations and static embryo culture, molecular biology, advanced image processing and computational modeling we aim to understand developmental processes. We have developed an OCT based approach to image live early mouse embryos (E8.5 - E9.5) cultured on an imaging stage and visualize developmental events with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers (less than the size of an individual cell) and a frame rate of up to hundreds of frames per second and reconstruct cardiodynamics in 4D (3D+time). We are now using these methods to study how specific embryonic lethal mutations affect cardiac morphology and function during early development.

  11. Lyssavirus infection: 'low dose, multiple exposure' in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Banyard, Ashley C; Healy, Derek M; Brookes, Sharon M; Voller, Katja; Hicks, Daniel J; Núñez, Alejandro; Fooks, Anthony R

    2014-03-06

    The European bat lyssaviruses (EBLV-1 and EBLV-2) are zoonotic pathogens present within bat populations across Europe. The maintenance and transmission of lyssaviruses within bat colonies is poorly understood. Cases of repeated isolation of lyssaviruses from bat roosts have raised questions regarding the maintenance and intraspecies transmissibility of these viruses within colonies. Furthermore, the significance of seropositive bats in colonies remains unclear. Due to the protected nature of European bat species, and hence restrictions to working with the natural host for lyssaviruses, this study analysed the outcome following repeat inoculation of low doses of lyssaviruses in a murine model. A standardized dose of virus, EBLV-1, EBLV-2 or a 'street strain' of rabies (RABV), was administered via a peripheral route to attempt to mimic what is hypothesized as natural infection. Each mouse (n=10/virus/group/dilution) received four inoculations, two doses in each footpad over a period of four months, alternating footpad with each inoculation. Mice were tail bled between inoculations to evaluate antibody responses to infection. Mice succumbed to infection after each inoculation with 26.6% of mice developing clinical disease following the initial exposure across all dilutions (RABV, 32.5% (n=13/40); EBLV-1, 35% (n=13/40); EBLV-2, 12.5% (n=5/40)). Interestingly, the lowest dose caused clinical disease in some mice upon first exposure ((RABV, 20% (n=2/10) after first inoculation; RABV, 12.5% (n=1/8) after second inoculation; EBLV-2, 10% (n=1/10) after primary inoculation). Furthermore, five mice developed clinical disease following the second exposure to live virus (RABV, n=1; EBLV-1, n=1; EBLV-2, n=3) although histopathological examination indicated that the primary inoculation was the most probably cause of death due to levels of inflammation and virus antigen distribution observed. All the remaining mice (RABV, n=26; EBLV-1, n=26; EBLV-2, n=29) survived the tertiary and

  12. Using Genetic Mouse Models to Gain Insight into Glaucoma: Past Results and Future Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Kimberly A.; Harder, Jeffrey M.; Williams, Pete A.; Rausch, Rebecca L.; Kiernan, Amy E.; Nair, K. Saidas; Anderson, Michael G.; John, Simon W.; Howell, Gareth R.; Libby, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    While all forms of glaucoma are characterized by a specific pattern of retinal ganglion cell death, they are clinically divided into several distinct subclasses, including normal tension glaucoma, primary open angle glaucoma, congenital glaucoma, and secondary glaucoma. For each type of glaucoma there are likely numerous molecular pathways that control susceptibility to the disease. Given this complexity, a single animal model will never precisely model all aspects of all the different types of human glaucoma. Therefore, multiple animal models have been utilized to study glaucoma but more are needed. Because of the powerful genetic tools available to use in the laboratory mouse, it has proven to be a highly useful mammalian system for studying the pathophysiology of human disease. The similarity between human and mouse eyes coupled with the ability to use a combination of advanced cell biological and genetic tools in mice have led to a large increase in the number of studies using mice to model specific glaucoma phenotypes. Over the last decade, numerous new mouse models and genetic tools have emerged, providing important insight into the cell biology and genetics of glaucoma. In this review, we describe available mouse genetic models that can be used to study glaucoma-relevant disease/pathobiology. Furthermore, we discuss how these models have been used to gain insights into ocular hypertension (a major risk factor for glaucoma) and glaucomatous retinal ganglion cell death. Finally, the potential for developing new mouse models and using advanced genetic tools and resources for studying glaucoma are discussed. PMID:26116903

  13. [Effect of topical application of a recombinant adenovirus carrying promyelocytic leukemia gene in a psoriasis-like mouse model].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiongyu; Zhang, Aijun; Ma, Huiqun; Wang, Shijie; Ma, Yunyun; Zou, Xingwei; Li, Ruilian

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effects of topical treatment with adenovirus-mediated promyelocytic leukemia gene (PML) gene in a psoriasis-like mouse model. The effect of adenovirus-mediated PML gene on the granular layer of mouse tail scale epidermis and epithelial mitosis were observed on longitudinal histological sections prepared from the tail skin and vaginal epithelium of the mice. Adenovirus-mediated PML gene significantly inhibited mitosis of mouse vaginal epithelial cells and promoted the formation of granular layer in mouse tail scale epidermis. The therapeutic effect of PML gene in the psoriasis-like mouse model may be associated with increased granular cells and suppressed epidemic cell proliferation.

  14. Defining the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis using mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Ignatenko, Natalia A.; Gerner, Eugene W.; Besselsen, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Genetics and diet are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death in the US and worldwide. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models have made a significant contribution to the characterization of colorectal cancer risk factors. Reliable, reproducible, and clinically relevant animal models help in the identification of the molecular events associated with disease progression and in the development of effictive treatment strategies. This review is focused on the use of mouse models for studying the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis. We describe how the available mouse models of colon cancer such as the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mice and knockout genetic models facilitate understanding of the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis and help in the development of a rational strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention. PMID:21712957

  15. Human androgen deficiency: insights gained from androgen receptor knockout mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kesha; Davey, Rachel A; Zajac, Jeffrey D

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of androgen action is complex. Recently, significant advances have been made into our understanding of how androgens act via the androgen receptor (AR) through the use of genetically modified mouse models. A number of global and tissue-specific AR knockout (ARKO) models have been generated using the Cre-loxP system which allows tissue- and/or cell-specific deletion. These ARKO models have examined a number of sites of androgen action including the cardiovascular system, the immune and hemopoetic system, bone, muscle, adipose tissue, the prostate and the brain. This review focuses on the insights that have been gained into human androgen deficiency through the use of ARKO mouse models at each of these sites of action, and highlights the strengths and limitations of these Cre-loxP mouse models that should be considered to ensure accurate interpretation of the phenotype. PMID:24480924

  16. A Physiologically Based Kinetic Model of Rat and Mouse Gestation: Disposition of a Weak Acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic model of gestation in the rat mouse has been developed. The model is superimposed on the normal growth curve for nonpregnant females. It describes the entire gestation period including organogenesis. The model consists of uterus, mammary tiss...

  17. Ultrasonic vocalizations: a tool for behavioural phenotyping of mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Crawley, Jacqueline; Ricceri, Laura

    2009-01-01

    In neonatal mice ultrasonic vocalizations have been studied both as an early communicative behavior of the pup-mother dyad and as a sign of an aversive affective state. Adult mice of both sexes produce complex ultrasonic vocalization patterns in different experimental/social contexts. All these vocalizations are becoming an increasingly valuable assay for behavioral phenotyping throughout the mouse life-span and alterations of the ultrasound patterns have been reported in several mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we also show that the modulation of vocalizations by maternal cues (maternal potentiation paradigm) – originally identified and investigated in rats - can be measured in C57Bl/6 mouse pups with appropriate modifications of the rat protocol and can likely be applied to mouse behavioral phenotyping. In addition we suggest that a detailed qualitative evaluation of neonatal calls together with analysis of adult mouse vocalization patterns in both sexes in social settings, may lead to a greater understanding of the communication value of vocalizations in mice. Importantly, both neonatal and adult USV altered patterns can be determined during the behavioural phenotyping of mouse models of human neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, starting from those in which deficits in communication are a primary symptom. PMID:18771687

  18. Establishment of mouse neuron and microglial cell co-cultured models and its action mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Yunfeng; Tang, Jun; Tao, Yihao; Jiang, Bing; Chen, Zhi; Feng, Hua; Yang, Liming; Zhu, Gang

    2017-06-27

    The objective of this study is to establish a co-culture model of mouse neurons and microglial cells, and to analyze the mechanism of action of oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and transient oxygen glucose deprivation (tOGD) preconditioning cell models. Mouse primary neurons and BV2 microglial cells were successfully cultured, and the OGD and tOGD models were also established. In the co-culture of mouse primary neurons and microglial cells, the cell number of tOGD mouse neurons and microglial cells was larger than the OGD cell number, observed by a microscope. CCK-8 assay result showed that at 1h after treatment, the OD value in the control group is lower compared to all the other three groups (P < 0.05). The treatment group exhibited the highest OD value among the four groups. The results observed at 5h were consistent with the results at 1 h. Flow cytometry results showed that at 1h after treatment the apoptosis percentages is higher in the control group compared to other three groups (P < 0.05). Mouse brain tissues were collected and primary neurons cells were cultured. In the meantime mouse BV2 microglia cells were cultured. Two types of cells were co-cultured, and OGD and tOGD cell models were established. There were four groups in the experiment: control group (OGD), treatment group (tOGD+OGD), placebo group (tOGD+OGD+saline) and minocycline intervention group (tOGD+OGD+minocycline). CCK-8 kit was used to detect cell viability and flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis. In this study, mouse primary neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured. The OGD and tOGD models were established successfully. tOGD was able to effectively protect neurons and microglial cells from damage, and inhibit the apoptosis caused by oxygen glucose deprivation.

  19. Priceless GEMMs: genetically engineered mouse models for colorectal cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Roper, Jatin; Hung, Kenneth E

    2012-08-01

    To establish effective drug development for colorectal cancer (CRC), preclinical models that are robust surrogates for human disease are crucial. Mouse models are an attractive platform because of their relatively low cost, short life span, and ease of use. There are two main categories of mouse CRC models: xenografts derived from implantation of CRC cells or tumors in immunodeficient mice; and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) derived from modification of human cancer predisposition genes, resulting in spontaneous tumor formation. Here, we review xenografts and GEMMs and focus on their potential application in translational research. Furthermore, we describe newer GEMMs for sporadic CRC that are particularly suitable for drug testing. Finally, we discuss recent advances in small-animal imaging, such as optical colonoscopy, which allow in vivo assessment of tumors. With the increasing sophistication of GEMMs, our preclinical armamentarium provides new hope for the ongoing war against CRC. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Genetically engineered mouse models of craniopharyngioma: an opportunity for therapy development and understanding of tumor biology.

    PubMed

    Apps, John Richard; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2017-05-01

    Adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP) is the commonest tumor of the sellar region in childhood. Two genetically engineered mouse models have been developed and are giving valuable insights into ACP biology. These models have identified novel pathways activated in tumors, revealed an important function of paracrine signalling and extended conventional theories about the role of organ-specific stem cells in tumorigenesis. In this review, we summarize these mouse models, what has been learnt, their limitations and open questions for future research. We then discussed how these mouse models may be used to test novel therapeutics against potentially targetable pathways recently identified in human ACP. © 2017 The Authors. Brain Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Neuropathology.

  1. Lack of species-specific difference in pulmonary function when using mouse versus human plasma in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhanglong; Pati, Shibani; Fontaine, Magali J; Hall, Kelly; Herrera, Anthony V; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2016-11-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that the early and empiric use of plasma improves survival after hemorrhagic shock. We have demonstrated in rodent models of hemorrhagic shock that resuscitation with plasma is protective to the lungs compared with lactated Ringer's solution. As our long-term objective is to determine the molecular mechanisms that modulate plasma's protective effects in injured bleeding patients, we have used human plasma in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock. The goal of the current experiments is to determine if there are significant adverse effects on lung injury when using human versus mouse plasma in an established murine model of hemorrhagic shock and laparotomy. Mice underwent laparotomy and 90 minutes of hemorrhagic shock to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 ± 5 mm Hg followed by resuscitation at 1× shed blood using either mouse fresh frozen plasma (FFP), human FFP, or human lyophilized plasma. Mean arterial pressure was recorded during shock and for the first 30 minutes of resuscitation. After 3 hours, animals were killed, and lungs collected for analysis. There was a significant increase in early MAP when mouse FFP was used to resuscitate animals compared with human FFP or human lyophilized plasma. However, despite these differences, analysis of the mouse lungs revealed no significant differences in pulmonary histopathology, lung permeability, or lung edema between all three plasma groups. Analysis of neutrophil infiltration in the lungs revealed that mouse FFP decreased neutrophil influx as measured by neutrophil staining; however, myeloperoxidase immunostaining revealed no significant differences in between groups. The study of human plasma in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock is feasible but does reveal some differences compared with mouse plasma-based resuscitation in physiologic measures such as MAP postresuscitation. Measures of end organ function such as lung injury appear to be comparable in this acute model of hemorrhagic

  2. The pathophysiology of mitochondrial disease as modeled in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Douglas C; Fan, Weiwei

    2009-08-01

    It is now clear that mitochondrial defects are associated with a plethora of clinical phenotypes in man and mouse. This is the result of the mitochondria's central role in energy production, reactive oxygen species (ROS) biology, and apoptosis, and because the mitochondrial genome consists of roughly 1500 genes distributed across the maternal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the Mendelian nuclear DNA (nDNA). While numerous pathogenic mutations in both mtDNA and nDNA mitochondrial genes have been identified in the past 21 years, the causal role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the common metabolic and degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging is still debated. However, the development of mice harboring mitochondrial gene mutations is permitting demonstration of the direct cause-and-effect relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and disease. Mutations in nDNA-encoded mitochondrial genes involved in energy metabolism, antioxidant defenses, apoptosis via the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP), mitochondrial fusion, and mtDNA biogenesis have already demonstrated the phenotypic importance of mitochondrial defects. These studies are being expanded by the recent development of procedures for introducing mtDNA mutations into the mouse. These studies are providing direct proof that mtDNA mutations are sufficient by themselves to generate major clinical phenotypes. As more different mtDNA types and mtDNA gene mutations are introduced into various mouse nDNA backgrounds, the potential functional role of mtDNA variation in permitting humans and mammals to adapt to different environments and in determining their predisposition to a wide array of diseases should be definitively demonstrated.

  3. Overview of genetically engineered mouse models of colorectal carcinoma to enable translational biology and drug development.

    PubMed

    Roper, Jatin; Martin, Eric S; Hung, Kenneth E

    2014-06-16

    Preclinical models for colorectal cancer (CRC) are critical for translational biology and drug development studies to characterize and treat this condition. Mouse models of human cancer are particularly popular because of their relatively low cost, short life span, and ease of use. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of CRC are engineered from germline or somatic modification of critical tumor suppressor genes and/or oncogenes that drive mutations in human disease. Detailed in this overview are the salient features of several useful colorectal cancer GEMMs and their value as tools for translational biology and preclinical drug development. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. ANALYSIS OF TMEFF2 ALLOGRAFTS AND TRANSGENIC MOUSE MODELS REVEALS ROLES IN PROSTATE REGENERATION AND CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, JM.; Overcash, RF.; Wren, JD.; Coburn, A.; Tipton, GJ.; Ezzell, JA.; McNaughton, KK.; Fung, KM; Kosanke, SD.; Ruiz-Echevarria, MJ

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous results from our lab indicate a tumor suppressor role for the transmembrane protein with epidermal growth factor and two follistatin motifs 2 (TMEFF2) in prostate cancer (PCa). Here, we further characterize this role and uncover new functions for TMEFF2 in cancer and adult prostate regeneration. METHODS The role of TMEFF2 was examined in PCa cells using Matrigel™ cultures and allograft models of PCa cells. In addition, we developed a transgenic mouse model that expresses TMEFF2 from a prostate specific promoter. Anatomical, histological and metabolic characterizations of the transgenic mouse prostate were conducted. The effect of TMEFF2 in prostate regeneration was studied by analyzing branching morphogenesis in the TMEFF2-expressing mouse lobes and alterations in branching morphogenesis were correlated with the metabolomic profiles of the mouse lobes. The role of TMEFF2 in prostate tumorigenesis in whole animals was investigated by crossing the TMEFF2 transgenic mice with the TRAMP mouse model of PCa and analyzing the histopathological changes in the progeny. RESULTS Ectopic expression of TMEFF2 impairs growth of PCa cells in Matrigel or allograft models. Surprisingly, while TMEFF2 expression in the TRAMP mouse did not have a significant effect on the glandular prostate epithelial lesions, the double TRAMP/TMEFF2 transgenic mice displayed an increased incidence of neuroendocrine type tumors. In addition, TMEFF2 promoted increased branching specifically in the dorsal lobe of the prostate suggesting a potential role in developmental processes. These results correlated with data indicating an alteration in the metabolic profile of the dorsal lobe of the transgenic TMEFF2 mice. CONCLUSIONS Collectively, our results confirm the tumor suppressor role of TMEFF2 and suggest that ectopic expression of TMEFF2 in mouse prostate leads to additional lobe-specific effects in prostate regeneration and tumorigenesis. This points to a complex and

  5. Analysis of TMEFF2 allografts and transgenic mouse models reveals roles in prostate regeneration and cancer.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Joshua M; Overcash, Ryan F; Wren, Jonathan D; Coburn, Anita; Tipton, Greg J; Ezzell, Jennifer A; McNaughton, Kirk K; Fung, Kar-Ming; Kosanke, Stanley D; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Previous results from our lab indicate a tumor suppressor role for the transmembrane protein with epidermal growth factor and two follistatin motifs 2 (TMEFF2) in prostate cancer (PCa). Here, we further characterize this role and uncover new functions for TMEFF2 in cancer and adult prostate regeneration. The role of TMEFF2 was examined in PCa cells using Matrigel(TM) cultures and allograft models of PCa cells. In addition, we developed a transgenic mouse model that expresses TMEFF2 from a prostate specific promoter. Anatomical, histological, and metabolic characterizations of the transgenic mouse prostate were conducted. The effect of TMEFF2 in prostate regeneration was studied by analyzing branching morphogenesis in the TMEFF2-expressing mouse lobes and alterations in branching morphogenesis were correlated with the metabolomic profiles of the mouse lobes. The role of TMEFF2 in prostate tumorigenesis in whole animals was investigated by crossing the TMEFF2 transgenic mice with the TRAMP mouse model of PCa and analyzing the histopathological changes in the progeny. Ectopic expression of TMEFF2 impairs growth of PCa cells in Matrigel or allograft models. Surprisingly, while TMEFF2 expression in the TRAMP mouse did not have a significant effect on the glandular prostate epithelial lesions, the double TRAMP/TMEFF2 transgenic mice displayed an increased incidence of neuroendocrine type tumors. In addition, TMEFF2 promoted increased branching specifically in the dorsal lobe of the prostate suggesting a potential role in developmental processes. These results correlated with data indicating an alteration in the metabolic profile of the dorsal lobe of the transgenic TMEFF2 mice. Collectively, our results confirm the tumor suppressor role of TMEFF2 and suggest that ectopic expression of TMEFF2 in mouse prostate leads to additional lobe-specific effects in prostate regeneration and tumorigenesis. This points to a complex and multifunctional role for TMEFF2 during PCa

  6. Galantamine improves olfactory learning in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Simoes de Souza, Fabio M.; Busquet, Nicolas; Blatner, Megan; Maclean, Kenneth N.; Restrepo, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common form of congenital intellectual disability. Although DS involves multiple disturbances in various tissues, there is little doubt that in terms of quality of life cognitive impairment is the most serious facet and there is no effective treatment for this aspect of the syndrome. The Ts65Dn mouse model of DS recapitulates multiple aspects of DS including cognitive impairment. Here the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS was evaluated in an associative learning paradigm based on olfactory cues. In contrast to disomic controls, trisomic mice exhibited significant deficits in olfactory learning. Treatment of trisomic mice with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine resulted in a significant improvement in olfactory learning. Collectively, our study indicates that olfactory learning can be a sensitive tool for evaluating deficits in associative learning in mouse models of DS and that galantamine has therapeutic potential for improving cognitive abilities. PMID:22355654

  7. Galantamine improves olfactory learning in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Fabio M Simoes; Busquet, Nicolas; Blatner, Megan; Maclean, Kenneth N; Restrepo, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common form of congenital intellectual disability. Although DS involves multiple disturbances in various tissues, there is little doubt that in terms of quality of life cognitive impairment is the most serious facet and there is no effective treatment for this aspect of the syndrome. The Ts65Dn mouse model of DS recapitulates multiple aspects of DS including cognitive impairment. Here the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS was evaluated in an associative learning paradigm based on olfactory cues. In contrast to disomic controls, trisomic mice exhibited significant deficits in olfactory learning. Treatment of trisomic mice with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine resulted in a significant improvement in olfactory learning. Collectively, our study indicates that olfactory learning can be a sensitive tool for evaluating deficits in associative learning in mouse models of DS and that galantamine has therapeutic potential for improving cognitive abilities.

  8. "Mouse Clone Model" for evaluating the immunogenicity and tumorigenicity of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-18

    To investigate the immune-rejection and tumor-formation potentials of induced pluripotent stem cells and other stem cells, we devised a model-designated the "Mouse Clone Model"-which combined the theory of somatic animal cloning, tetraploid complementation, and induced pluripotent stem cells to demonstrate the applicability of stem cells for transplantation therapy.

  9. The Mouse Lemur, a Genetic Model Organism for Primate Biology, Behavior, and Health

    PubMed Central

    Ezran, Camille; Karanewsky, Caitlin J.; Pendleton, Jozeph L.; Sholtz, Alex; Krasnow, Maya R.; Willick, Jason; Razafindrakoto, Andriamahery; Zohdy, Sarah; Albertelli, Megan A.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Systematic genetic studies of a handful of diverse organisms over the past 50 years have transformed our understanding of biology. However, many aspects of primate biology, behavior, and disease are absent or poorly modeled in any of the current genetic model organisms including mice. We surveyed the animal kingdom to find other animals with advantages similar to mice that might better exemplify primate biology, and identified mouse lemurs (Microcebus spp.) as the outstanding candidate. Mouse lemurs are prosimian primates, roughly half the genetic distance between mice and humans. They are the smallest, fastest developing, and among the most prolific and abundant primates in the world, distributed throughout the island of Madagascar, many in separate breeding populations due to habitat destruction. Their physiology, behavior, and phylogeny have been studied for decades in laboratory colonies in Europe and in field studies in Malagasy rainforests, and a high quality reference genome sequence has recently been completed. To initiate a classical genetic approach, we developed a deep phenotyping protocol and have screened hundreds of laboratory and wild mouse lemurs for interesting phenotypes and begun mapping the underlying mutations, in collaboration with leading mouse lemur biologists. We also seek to establish a mouse lemur gene “knockout” library by sequencing the genomes of thousands of mouse lemurs to identify null alleles in most genes from the large pool of natural genetic variants. As part of this effort, we have begun a citizen science project in which students across Madagascar explore the remarkable biology around their schools, including longitudinal studies of the local mouse lemurs. We hope this work spawns a new model organism and cultivates a deep genetic understanding of primate biology and health. We also hope it establishes a new and ethical method of genetics that bridges biological, behavioral, medical, and conservation disciplines, while

  10. The Mouse Lemur, a Genetic Model Organism for Primate Biology, Behavior, and Health.

    PubMed

    Ezran, Camille; Karanewsky, Caitlin J; Pendleton, Jozeph L; Sholtz, Alex; Krasnow, Maya R; Willick, Jason; Razafindrakoto, Andriamahery; Zohdy, Sarah; Albertelli, Megan A; Krasnow, Mark A

    2017-06-01

    Systematic genetic studies of a handful of diverse organisms over the past 50 years have transformed our understanding of biology. However, many aspects of primate biology, behavior, and disease are absent or poorly modeled in any of the current genetic model organisms including mice. We surveyed the animal kingdom to find other animals with advantages similar to mice that might better exemplify primate biology, and identified mouse lemurs ( Microcebus spp.) as the outstanding candidate. Mouse lemurs are prosimian primates, roughly half the genetic distance between mice and humans. They are the smallest, fastest developing, and among the most prolific and abundant primates in the world, distributed throughout the island of Madagascar, many in separate breeding populations due to habitat destruction. Their physiology, behavior, and phylogeny have been studied for decades in laboratory colonies in Europe and in field studies in Malagasy rainforests, and a high quality reference genome sequence has recently been completed. To initiate a classical genetic approach, we developed a deep phenotyping protocol and have screened hundreds of laboratory and wild mouse lemurs for interesting phenotypes and begun mapping the underlying mutations, in collaboration with leading mouse lemur biologists. We also seek to establish a mouse lemur gene "knockout" library by sequencing the genomes of thousands of mouse lemurs to identify null alleles in most genes from the large pool of natural genetic variants. As part of this effort, we have begun a citizen science project in which students across Madagascar explore the remarkable biology around their schools, including longitudinal studies of the local mouse lemurs. We hope this work spawns a new model organism and cultivates a deep genetic understanding of primate biology and health. We also hope it establishes a new and ethical method of genetics that bridges biological, behavioral, medical, and conservation disciplines, while

  11. Integrating model behavior, optimization, and sensitivity/uncertainty analysis: overview and application of the MOUSE software toolbox

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper provides an overview of the Model Optimization, Uncertainty, and SEnsitivity Analysis (MOUSE) software application, an open-source, Java-based toolbox of visual and numerical analysis components for the evaluation of environmental models. MOUSE is based on the OPTAS model calibration syst...

  12. Mouse Models for Drug Discovery. Can New Tools and Technology Improve Translational Power?

    PubMed Central

    Zuberi, Aamir; Lutz, Cathleen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of mouse models in biomedical research and preclinical drug evaluation is on the rise. The advent of new molecular genome-altering technologies such as CRISPR/Cas9 allows for genetic mutations to be introduced into the germ line of a mouse faster and less expensively than previous methods. In addition, the rapid progress in the development and use of somatic transgenesis using viral vectors, as well as manipulations of gene expression with siRNAs and antisense oligonucleotides, allow for even greater exploration into genomics and systems biology. These technological advances come at a time when cost reductions in genome sequencing have led to the identification of pathogenic mutations in patient populations, providing unprecedented opportunities in the use of mice to model human disease. The ease of genetic engineering in mice also offers a potential paradigm shift in resource sharing and the speed by which models are made available in the public domain. Predictively, the knowledge alone that a model can be quickly remade will provide relief to resources encumbered by licensing and Material Transfer Agreements. For decades, mouse strains have provided an exquisite experimental tool to study the pathophysiology of the disease and assess therapeutic options in a genetically defined system. However, a major limitation of the mouse has been the limited genetic diversity associated with common laboratory mice. This has been overcome with the recent development of the Collaborative Cross and Diversity Outbred mice. These strains provide new tools capable of replicating genetic diversity to that approaching the diversity found in human populations. The Collaborative Cross and Diversity Outbred strains thus provide a means to observe and characterize toxicity or efficacy of new therapeutic drugs for a given population. The combination of traditional and contemporary mouse genome editing tools, along with the addition of genetic diversity in new modeling

  13. Illuminating Cancer Systems With Genetically-Engineered Mouse Models and Coupled Luciferase Reporters In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Brandon; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a powerful non-invasive tool that has dramatically accelerated the in vivo interrogation of cancer systems and longitudinal analysis of mouse models of cancer over the past decade. Various luciferase enzymes have been genetically engineered into mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer which permit investigation of cellular and molecular events associated with oncogenic transcription, post-transcriptional processing, protein-protein interactions, transformation and oncogene addiction in live cells and animals. Luciferase-coupled GEMMs ultimately serve as a non-invasive, repetitive, longitudinal, and physiological means by which cancer systems and therapeutic responses can be investigated accurately within the autochthonous context of a living animal. PMID:23585416

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of amyloid plaques in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Ryan; Wengenack, Thomas M.; Poduslo, Joseph F.; Garwood, Michael; Jack, Clifford R.

    2011-01-01

    A major objective in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease is amyloid plaque reduction. Transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease provide a controlled and consistent environment for studying amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer's disease. Magnetic resonance imaging is an attractive tool for longitudinal studies because it offers non-invasive monitoring of amyloid plaques. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to detect individual plaques in living mice. This review discusses the mouse models, MR pulse sequences, and parameters that have been used to image plaques and how they can be optimized for future studies. PMID:21499442

  15. Mouse infection by Legionella, a model to analyze autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Dubuisson, Jean-François; Swanson, Michele S.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Autophagy is a conserved membrane traffic pathway that equips eukaryotic cells to capture cytoplasmic components within a double-membrane vacuole, or autophagosome, for delivery to lysosomes. Although best known as a mechanism to survive starvation, autophagy is now recognized to combat infection by a variety of microbes.1–3 Not surprisingly, to establish a replication niche in host cells, some intracellular pathogens have acquired mechanisms either to evade or subvert the autophagic pathway. Because they are amenable to genetic manipulation, these microbes can be exploited as experimental tools to investigate the contribution of autophagy to immunity. Here we discuss the mouse macrophage response to L. pneumophila, the facultative intracellular bacterium responsible for an acute form of pneumonia, Legionnaire’s disease. PMID:16874080

  16. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling of Interstrain Variability in Trichloroethylene Metabolism in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jerry L.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Wright, Fred A.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Quantitative estimation of toxicokinetic variability in the human population is a persistent challenge in risk assessment of environmental chemicals. Traditionally, interindividual differences in the population are accounted for by default assumptions or, in rare cases, are based on human toxicokinetic data. Objectives: We evaluated the utility of genetically diverse mouse strains for estimating toxicokinetic population variability for risk assessment, using trichloroethylene (TCE) metabolism as a case study. Methods: We used data on oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolism of TCE in 16 inbred and 1 hybrid mouse strains to calibrate and extend existing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. We added one-compartment models for glutathione metabolites and a two-compartment model for dichloroacetic acid (DCA). We used a Bayesian population analysis of interstrain variability to quantify variability in TCE metabolism. Results: Concentration–time profiles for TCE metabolism to oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolites varied across strains. Median predictions for the metabolic flux through oxidation were less variable (5-fold range) than that through glutathione conjugation (10-fold range). For oxidative metabolites, median predictions of trichloroacetic acid production were less variable (2-fold range) than DCA production (5-fold range), although the uncertainty bounds for DCA exceeded the predicted variability. Conclusions: Population PBPK modeling of genetically diverse mouse strains can provide useful quantitative estimates of toxicokinetic population variability. When extrapolated to lower doses more relevant to environmental exposures, mouse population-derived variability estimates for TCE metabolism closely matched population variability estimates previously derived from human toxicokinetic studies with TCE, highlighting the utility of mouse interstrain metabolism studies for addressing toxicokinetic variability

  17. Uncompensated polyuria in a mouse model of Bartter's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Chernavvsky, Daniel R.; Gomez, R. Ariel; Igarashi, Peter; Gitelman, Hillel J.; Smithies, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    We have used homologous recombination to disrupt the mouse gene coding for the NaK2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) expressed in kidney epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb and macula densa. This gene is one of several that when mutated causes Bartter's syndrome in humans, a syndrome characterized by severe polyuria and electrolyte imbalance. Homozygous NKCC2−/− pups were born in expected numbers and appeared normal. However, by day 1 they showed signs of extracellular volume depletion (hematocrit 51%; wild type 37%). They subsequently failed to thrive. By day 7, they were small and markedly dehydrated and exhibited renal insufficiency, high plasma potassium, metabolic acidosis, hydronephrosis of varying severity, and high plasma renin concentrations. None survived to weaning. Treatment of −/− pups with indomethacin from day 1 prevented growth retardation and 10% treated for 3 weeks survived, although as adults they exhibited severe polyuria (10 ml/day), extreme hydronephrosis, low plasma potassium, high blood pH, hypercalciuria, and proteinuria. Wild-type mice treated with furosemide, an inhibitor of NaK2Cl cotransporters, have a phenotype similar to the indomethacin-rescued −/− adults except that hydronephrosis was mild. The polyuria, hypercalciuria, and proteinuria of the −/− adults and furosemide-treated wild-type mice were unresponsive to inhibitors of the renin angiotensin system, vasopressin, and further indomethacin. Thus absence of NKCC2 in the mouse causes polyuria that is not compensated elsewhere in the nephron. The NKCC2 mutant animals should be valuable for uncovering new pathophysiologic and therapeutic aspects of genetic disturbances in water and electrolyte recovery by the kidney. PMID:10779555

  18. Mouse models for pathogenic African trypanosomes: unravelling the immunology of host-parasite-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Magez, S; Caljon, G

    2011-08-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a parasitic disease that affects a variety of mammals, including humans, on the sub-Saharan African continent. To understand the diverse parameters that govern the host-parasite-vector interactions, mouse models for the disease have proven to be a cornerstone. Despite the fact that most trypanosomes cannot be considered natural pathogens for rodents, experimental infections in mice have shed a tremendous amount of light on the general biology of these parasites and their interaction with and evasion of the mammalian immune system. Different aspects including inflammation, vaccine failure, antigenic variation, resistance/sensitivity to normal human serum and the influence of tsetse compounds on parasite transmission have all been addressed using mouse models. In more recent years, the introduction of various 'knock-out' mouse strains has allowed to analyse the implication of various cytokines, particularly TNF, IFNγ and IL-10, in the regulation of parasitaemia and induction of pathological conditions during infection. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. The STR/ort mouse model of spontaneous osteoarthritis - an update.

    PubMed

    Staines, K A; Poulet, B; Wentworth, D N; Pitsillides, A A

    2017-06-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease and a world-wide healthcare burden. Characterized by cartilage degradation, subchondral bone thickening and osteophyte formation, osteoarthritis inflicts much pain and suffering, for which there are currently no disease-modifying treatments available. Mouse models of osteoarthritis are proving critical in advancing our understanding of the underpinning molecular mechanisms. The STR/ort mouse is a well-recognized model which develops a natural form of osteoarthritis very similar to the human disease. In this Review we discuss the use of the STR/ort mouse in understanding this multifactorial disease with an emphasis on recent advances in its genetics and its bone, endochondral and immune phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fransén-Pettersson, Nina; Duarte, Nadia; Nilsson, Julia; Lundholm, Marie; Mayans, Sofia; Larefalk, Åsa; Hannibal, Tine D.; Hansen, Lisbeth; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Ivars, Fredrik; Cardell, Susanna; Palmqvist, Richard; Rozell, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF) mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT) induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders. PMID:27441847

  1. Validation of the Glaucoma Filtration Surgical Mouse Model for Antifibrotic Drug Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Seet, Li-Fong; Lee, Wing Sum; Su, Roseline; Finger, Sharon N; Crowston, Jonathan G; Wong, Tina T

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy, which, if left untreated, leads to blindness. The most common and most modifiable risk factor in glaucoma is elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which can be managed surgically by filtration surgery. The postoperative subconjunctival scarring response, however, remains the major obstacle to achieving long-term surgical success. Antiproliferatives such as mitomycin C are commonly used to prevent postoperative scarring. Efficacy of these agents has been tested extensively on monkey and rabbit models of glaucoma filtration surgery. As these models have inherent limitations, we have developed a model of glaucoma filtration surgery in the mouse. We show, for the first time, that the mouse model typically scarred within 14 d, but when augmented with mitomycin C, more animals maintained lower intraocular pressures for a longer period of time concomitant with prolonged bleb survival to beyond 28 d. The morphology of the blebs following mitomycin C treatment also resembled well-documented clinical observations, thus confirming the validity and clinical relevance of this model. We demonstrate that the antiscarring response to mitomycin C is likely to be due to its effects on conjunctival fibroblast proliferation, apoptosis and collagen deposition and the suppression of inflammation. Indeed, we verified some of these properties on mouse conjunctival fibroblasts cultured in vitro. These data support the suitability of this mouse model for studying the wound healing response in glaucoma filtration surgery, and as a potentially useful tool for the in vivo evaluation of antifibrotic therapeutics in the eye. PMID:21229189

  2. Taltirelin alleviates fatigue-like behavior in mouse models of cancer-related fatigue.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, John P; Wolff, Brian S; Cullen, Mary J; Saligan, Leorey N; Gershengorn, Marvin C

    2017-10-01

    Fatigue affects most cancer patients and has numerous potential causes, including cancer itself and cancer treatment. Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is not relieved by rest, can decrease quality of life, and has no FDA-approved therapy. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) has been proposed as a potential novel treatment for CRF, but its efficacy against CRF remains largely untested. Thus, we tested the TRH analog, taltirelin (TAL), in mouse models of CRF. To model fatigue, we used a mouse model of chemotherapy, a mouse model of radiation therapy, and mice bearing colon 26 carcinoma tumors. We used the treadmill fatigue test to assess fatigue-like behavior after treatment with TAL. Additionally, we used wild-type and TRH receptor knockout mice to determine which TRH receptor was necessary for the actions of TAL. Tumor-bearing mice displayed muscle wasting and all models caused fatigue-like behavior, with mice running a shorter distance in the treadmill fatigue test than controls. TAL reversed fatigue-like behavior in all three models and the mouse TRH 1 receptor was necessary for the effects of TAL. These data suggest that TAL may be useful in alleviating fatigue in all cancer patients and provide further support for evaluating TAL as a potential therapy for CRF in humans. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Generation of a mouse model for studying the role of upregulated RTEL1 activity in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoli; Sandhu, Sumit; Nabi, Zinnatun; Ding, Hao

    2012-10-01

    Regulator of telomere length 1 (RTEL1) is a DNA helicase protein that has been demonstrated to be required for the maintenance of telomere length and genomic stability. It has also been found to be essential for DNA homologous recombination during DNA repairing. Human RTEL1 genomic locus (20q13.3) is frequently amplified in multiple types of human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma and gastrointestinal tract tumors, indicating that upregulated RTEL1 activity could be important for tumorigenesis. In this study, we have developed a conditional transgenic mouse model that overexpress mouse Rtel1 in a Cre-excision manner. By crossing with a ubiquitous Cre mouse line, we further demonstrated that these established Rtel1 conditional transgenic mice allow to efficiently and highly express a functional Rtel1 that is able to rescue the embryonic defects of Rtel1 null mouse allele. Furthermore, we demonstrated that more than 70% transgenic mice that widely overexpress Rtel1 developed liver tumors that recapitulate many malignant features of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our work not only generated a valuable mouse model for determining the role of RTEL1 in the development of cancers, but also provided the first genetic evidence to support that amplification of RTEL1, as observed in several types of human cancers, is tumorigenic.

  4. In vivo characterization of a bigenic fluorescent mouse model of Alzheimer's disease with neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Sarah E; Ellis-Davies, Graham C R

    2013-07-01

    The loss of cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients is strongly correlated with the loss of neurons in various regions of the brain. We have created a new fluorescent bigenic mouse model of AD by crossing "H-line" yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) mice with the 5xFAD mouse model, which we call the 5XY mouse model. The 5xFAD mouse has been shown to have significant loss of L5 pyramidal neurons by 12 months of age. These neurons are transgenically labeled with YFP in the 5XY mouse, which enable longitudinal imaging of structural changes. In the 5XY mice, we observed an appearance of axonal dystrophies, with two distinct morphologies in the early stages of the disease progression. Simple swelling dystrophies are transient in nature and are not directly associated with amyloid plaques. Rosette dystrophies are more complex structures that remained stable throughout all imaging sessions, and always surrounded an amyloid plaque. Plaque growth was followed over 4 weeks, and significant growth was seen between weekly imaging sessions. In addition to axonal dystrophy appearance and plaque growth, we were able to follow spine stability in 4-month old 5XY mice, which revealed no significant loss of spines. 5XY mice also showed a striking shrinkage of the neocortex at older ages (12-14 months). The 5XY mouse model may be a valuable tool for studying specific events in the degeneration of the neocortex, and may suggest new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evaluation of synthetic vascular grafts in a mouse carotid grafting model.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alex H P; Tan, Richard P; Michael, Praveesuda L; Lee, Bob S L; Vanags, Laura Z; Ng, Martin K C; Bursill, Christina A; Wise, Steven G

    2017-01-01

    Current animal models for the evaluation of synthetic grafts are lacking many of the molecular tools and transgenic studies available to other branches of biology. A mouse model of vascular grafting would allow for the study of molecular mechanisms of graft failure, including in the context of clinically relevant disease states. In this study, we comprehensively characterise a sutureless grafting model which facilitates the evaluation of synthetic grafts in the mouse carotid artery. Using conduits electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL) we show the gradual development of a significant neointima within 28 days, found to be greatest at the anastomoses. Histological analysis showed temporal increases in smooth muscle cell and collagen content within the neointima, demonstrating its maturation. Endothelialisation of the PCL grafts, assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and CD31 staining, was near complete within 28 days, together replicating two critical aspects of graft performance. To further demonstrate the potential of this mouse model, we used longitudinal non-invasive tracking of bone-marrow mononuclear cells from a transgenic mouse strain with a dual reporter construct encoding both luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP). This enabled characterisation of mononuclear cell homing and engraftment to PCL using bioluminescence imaging and histological staining over time (7, 14 and 28 days). We observed peak luminescence at 7 days post-graft implantation that persisted until sacrifice at 28 days. Collectively, we have established and characterised a high-throughput model of grafting that allows for the evaluation of key clinical drivers of graft performance.

  6. Intraocular pressure in the smallest primate aging model: the gray mouse lemur.

    PubMed

    Dubicanac, Marko; Joly, Marine; Strüve, Julia; Nolte, Ingo; Mestre-Francés, Nadine; Verdier, Jean-Michel; Zimmermann, Elke

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the practicability of common tonometers used in veterinary medicine for rapid intraocular pressure (IOP) screening, to calibrate IOP values gained by the tonometers, and to define a reference IOP value for the healthy eye in a new primate model for aging research, the gray mouse lemur. TonoVet ® and the TonoPen ™ measurements were calibrated manometrically in healthy enucleated eyes of mouse lemurs euthanized for veterinary reasons. For comparison of the practicability of both tonometers as a rapid IOP assessment tool for living mouse lemurs, the IOP of 24 eyes of 12 animals held in the hand was measured. To define a standard reference value for IOP in mouse lemurs, 258 healthy animals were measured using the TonoVet ® . Intraocular pressure measurements for the TonoVet ® can be corrected using the formula: y = 0.981 + (1.962*TonoVet ® value), and those for the TonoPen ™ using that of y = 5.38 + (1.426*TonoPen ™ value). The calibrated IOP for a healthy mouse lemur eye was 20.3 ± 2.8 mmHg. The TonoVet ® showed advantages in practicability, for example, small corneal contact area, short and painless corneal contact, shortened total time spent on investigation, as well as the more accurate measured values. IOP measurements of healthy mouse lemur eyes were not affected by age, sex, eye side, or colony. Tonometry using TonoVet ® is the more practicable assessment tool for IOP measurement of the tiny eyes of living mouse lemurs. Pathological deviations can be identified based on the described reference value. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. Dynamics of circulating gamma delta T cell activity in an immunocompetent mouse model of high-grade glioma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human gamma delta T cells are potent effectors against glioma cell lines in vitro and in human/mouse xenograft models of glioblastoma, however, this effect has not been investigated in an immunocompetent mouse model. In this report, we established GL261 intracranial gliomas in syngeneic WT C57BL/6 m...

  8. The common parasite Toxoplasma gondii induces prostatic inflammation and microglandular hyperplasia in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Colinot, Darrelle L; Garbuz, Tamila; Bosland, Maarten C; Wang, Liang; Rice, Susan E; Sullivan, William J; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo; Jerde, Travis J

    2017-07-01

    Inflammation is the most prevalent and widespread histological finding in the human prostate, and associates with the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Several factors have been hypothesized to cause inflammation, yet the role each may play in the etiology of prostatic inflammation remains unclear. This study examined the possibility that the common protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii induces prostatic inflammation and reactive hyperplasia in a mouse model. Male mice were infected systemically with T. gondii parasites and prostatic inflammation was scored based on severity and focality of infiltrating leukocytes and epithelial hyperplasia. We characterized inflammatory cells with flow cytometry and the resulting epithelial proliferation with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. We found that T. gondii infects the mouse prostate within the first 14 days of infection and can establish parasite cysts that persist for at least 60 days. T. gondii infection induces a substantial and chronic inflammatory reaction in the mouse prostate characterized by monocytic and lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate. T. gondii-induced inflammation results in reactive hyperplasia, involving basal and luminal epithelial proliferation, and the exhibition of proliferative inflammatory microglandular hyperplasia in inflamed mouse prostates. This study identifies the common parasite T. gondii as a new trigger of prostatic inflammation, which we used to develop a novel mouse model of prostatic inflammation. This is the first report that T. gondii chronically encysts and induces chronic inflammation within the prostate of any species. Furthermore, T. gondii-induced prostatic inflammation persists and progresses without genetic manipulation in mice, offering a powerful new mouse model for the study of chronic prostatic inflammation and microglandular hyperplasia. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Basal glycogenolysis in mouse skeletal muscle: in vitro model predicts in vivo fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambeth, Melissa J.; Kushmerick, Martin J.; Marcinek, David J.; Conley, Kevin E.

    2002-01-01

    A previously published mammalian kinetic model of skeletal muscle glycogenolysis, consisting of literature in vitro parameters, was modified by substituting mouse specific Vmax values. The model demonstrates that glycogen breakdown to lactate is under ATPase control. Our criteria to test whether in vitro parameters could reproduce in vivo dynamics was the ability of the model to fit phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) dynamic NMR data from ischemic basal mouse hindlimbs and predict biochemically-assayed lactate concentrations. Fitting was accomplished by optimizing four parameters--the ATPase rate coefficient, fraction of activated glycogen phosphorylase, and the equilibrium constants of creatine kinase and adenylate kinase (due to the absence of pH in the model). The optimized parameter values were physiologically reasonable, the resultant model fit the [PCr] and [Pi] timecourses well, and the model predicted the final measured lactate concentration. This result demonstrates that additional features of in vivo enzyme binding are not necessary for quantitative description of glycogenolytic dynamics.

  10. The ataxic mouse as a model for studying downbeat nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Stahl, John S; Thumser, Zachary C; Oommen, Brian S

    2012-01-01

    Downbeat nystagmus (DBN) is a common eye movement complication of cerebellar disease. Use of mice to study pathophysiology of vestibulocerebellar disease is increasing, but it is unclear if mice can be used to study DBN; it has not been reported in this species. We determined whether DBN occurs in the ataxic mutant tottering, which carries a mutation in the Cacna1a gene for P/Q calcium channels. Spontaneous DBN occurred only rarely, and its magnitude did not exhibit the relationship to head tilt seen in human patients. DBN during yaw rotation was more common and shares some properties with the tilt-independent, gaze-independent component of human DBN, but differs in its dependence on vision. Hyperactivity of otolith circuits responding to pitch tilts is hypothesized to contribute to the gaze-independent component of human DBN. Mutants exhibited hyperactivity of the tilt maculo-ocular reflex (tiltMOR) in pitch. The hyperactivity may serve as a surrogate for DBN in mouse studies. TiltMOR hyperactivity correlates with hyperdeviation of the eyes and upward deviation of the head during ambulation; these may be alternative surrogates. Muscimol inactivation of the cerebellar flocculus suggests a floccular role in the tiltMOR hyperactivity and provides insight into the rarity of frank DBN in ataxic mice.

  11. The ataxic mouse as a model for studying downbeat nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, John S.; Thumser, Zachary C.; Oommen, Brian S.

    2016-01-01

    Downbeat nystagmus (DBN) is a common eye movement complication of cerebellar disease. Use of mice to study pathophysiology of vestibulocerebellar disease is increasing, but it is unclear if mice can be used to study DBN; it has not been reported in this species. We determined whether DBN occurs in the ataxic mutant tottering, which carries a mutation in the Cacna1a gene for P/Q calcium channels. Spontaneous DBN occurred only rarely, and its magnitude did not exhibit the relationship to head tilt seen in human patients. DBN during yaw rotation was more common and shares some properties with the tilt-independent, gaze-independent component of human DBN, but differs in its dependence on vision. Hyperactivity of otolith circuits responding to pitch tilts is hypothesized to contribute to the gaze-independent component of human DBN. Mutants exhibited hyperactivity of the tilt maculo-ocular reflex (tiltMOR) in pitch. The hyperactivity may serve as a surrogate for DBN in mouse studies. TiltMOR hyperactivity correlates with hyperdeviation of the eyes and upward deviation of the head during ambulation; these may be alternative surrogates. Muscimol inactivation of the cerebellar flocculus suggests a floccular role in the tiltMOR hyperactivity and provides insight into the rarity of frank DBN in ataxic mice. PMID:23302704

  12. Intrinsic Astrocyte Heterogeneity Influences Tumor Growth in Glioma Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Irvin, David M; McNeill, Robert S; Bash, Ryan E; Miller, C Ryan

    2017-01-01

    The influence of cellular origin on glioma pathogenesis remains elusive. We previously showed that mutations inactivating Rb and Pten and activating Kras transform astrocytes and induce tumorigenesis throughout the adult mouse brain. However, it remained unclear whether astrocyte subpopulations were susceptible to these mutations. We therefore used genetic lineage tracing and fate mapping in adult conditional, inducible genetically engineered mice to monitor transformation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) astrocytes and immunofluorescence to monitor cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment over time. Because considerable regional heterogeneity exists among astrocytes, we also examined the influence of brain region on tumor growth. GFAP astrocyte transformation induced uniformly rapid, regionally independent tumor growth, but transformation of GLAST astrocytes induced slowly growing tumors with significant regional bias. Transformed GLAST astrocytes had reduced proliferative response in culture and in vivo and malignant progression was delayed in these tumors. Recruited glial cells, including proliferating astrocytes, oligodendrocyte progenitors and microglia, were the majority of GLAST, but not GFAP astrocyte-derived tumors and their abundance dynamically changed over time. These results suggest that intrinsic astrocyte heterogeneity, and perhaps regional brain microenvironment, significantly contributes to glioma pathogenesis. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  13. Animal models for studying neural crest development: is the mouse different?

    PubMed

    Barriga, Elias H; Trainor, Paul A; Bronner, Marianne; Mayor, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    The neural crest is a uniquely vertebrate cell type and has been well studied in a number of model systems. Zebrafish, Xenopus and chick embryos largely show consistent requirements for specific genes in early steps of neural crest development. By contrast, knockouts of homologous genes in the mouse often do not exhibit comparable early neural crest phenotypes. In this Spotlight article, we discuss these species-specific differences, suggest possible explanations for the divergent phenotypes in mouse and urge the community to consider these issues and the need for further research in complementary systems. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Therapeutic effects of autologous lymphocytes activated with trastuzumab for xenograft mouse models of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shinichiro; Matsuoka, Yusuke; Ichihara, Hideaki; Yoshida, Hitoji; Yoshida, Kenshi; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Trastuzumab (TTZ) is molecular targeted drug used for metastatic breast cancer patients overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Therapeutic effects of lymphocytes activated with TTZ (TTZ-LAK) using xenograft mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-453) cells were examined in vivo. Remarkable reduction of tumor volume in a xenograft mouse models intravenously treated with TTZ-LAK cells after the subcutaneously inoculated of MDA-MB-453 cells was verified in vivo. The migration of TTZ-LAK cells in tumor of mouse models subcutaneously inoculated MDA-MB-453 cells was observed on the basis of histological analysis using immunostaining with CD-3. Induction of apoptosis in tumor of xenograft mice treated with TTZ-LAK cells was observed in micrographs using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method. It was noteworthy that the therapeutic effects of TTZ-LAK cells along with apoptosis were obtained for xenograft mouse models of human breast tumor in vivo.

  15. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the Mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the diet...

  16. Comparative Exposure to Soy Biodiesel Emissions in an Allergic Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed the immunological effects following inhalation of emissions from 100% Soy biodiesel (S100) or a 20% mix with conventional petrodiesel (S20), in a house dust mite (HDM) allergic Balb/cJ mouse model. Female mice (8/group) were exposed whole body (4 hr/d, 5 d/wk, 4wk) to...

  17. Behavioral assays with mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease: practical considerations and guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Puzzo, Daniela; Lee, Linda; Palmeri, Agostino; Calabrese, Giorgio; Arancio, Ottavio

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD) basic research and drug discovery, mouse models are essential resources for uncovering biological mechanisms, validating molecular targets and screening potential compounds. Both transgenic and non-genetically modified mouse models enable access to different types of AD-like pathology in vivo. Although there is a wealth of genetic and biochemical studies on proposed AD pathogenic pathways, as a disease that centrally features cognitive failure, the ultimate readout for any interventions should be measures of learning and memory. This is particularly important given the lack of knowledge on disease etiology – assessment by cognitive assays offers the advantage of targeting relevant memory systems without requiring assumptions about pathogenesis. A multitude of behavioral assays are available for assessing cognitive functioning in mouse models, including ones specific for hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. Here we review the basics of available transgenic and non-transgenic AD mouse models and detail three well-established behavioral tasks commonly used for testing hippocampal-dependent cognition in mice – contextual fear conditioning, radial arm water maze and Morris water maze. In particular, we discuss the practical considerations, requirements and caveats of these behavioral testing paradigms. PMID:24462904

  18. A Novel ex vivo Mouse Mesometrium Culture Model for Investigating Angiogenesis in Microvascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Martinez, Ariana D; Bierschenk, Susanne; Huang, Katie; Kaplan, Dana; Bayer, Carolyn L; Meadows, Stryder M; Sperandio, Markus; Murfee, Walter L

    2018-05-18

    The development of models that incorporate intact microvascular networks enables the investigation of multicellular dynamics during angiogenesis. Our laboratory introduced the rat mesentery culture model as such a tool, which would be enhanced with mouse tissue. Since mouse mesentery is avascular, an alternative is mouse mesometrium, the connective tissue of uterine horns. The study's objective was to demonstrate that mouse mesometrium contains microvascular networks that can be cultured to investigate multicellular dynamics during angiogenesis. Harvested mesometrium tissues from C57Bl/6 female mice were cultured in media with serum for up to 7 days. PECAM, NG2, αSMA, and LYVE-1 labeling identified endothelial cells, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and lymphatic endothelial cells, respectively. These cells comprised microvascular networks with arterioles, venules, and capillaries. Compared to day 0, capillary sprouts per vascular length were increased by 3 and 5 days in culture (day 0, 0.08 ± 0.01; day 3, 3.19 ± 0.78; day 5, 2.49 ± 0.05 sprouts/mm; p < 0.05). Time-lapse imaging of cultured tissues from FlkEGFP mice showcases the use of the model for lineage studies. The impact is supported by the identification of endothelial cell jumping from one sprout to another. These results introduce a novel culture model for investigating multicellular dynamics during angiogenesis in real-time ex vivo microvascular networks. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Genetic markers of wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with flavor preference using a mouse (Mus musculus) model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Whole wheat products provide critical nutrients for human health, differences in wheat flavor are not well understood. Using the house mouse as a model system, flavor preference and discrimination were examined using a two-choice feeding system and 24-h trials and the Student’s t statistic. To elimi...

  20. Identifying genetic markers of wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with flavor preference using a mouse model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Whole wheat products provide critical nutrients for human health, though differences in wheat flavor are not well understood. Using the house mouse as a model system, flavor was examined using a two-choice feeding system and the Student’s t statistic. To eliminate the confounding effect of processin...

  1. New Mouse Model May Aid in Developing Effective Therapies for Ovarian Cancer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A new genetically engineered mouse model appears promising as an effective tool for preclinical testing of novel therapies for ovarian cancer, which tends to be diagnosed in late stage. There are few effective treatments for the disease.

  2. Activity-Dependent Changes in MAPK Activation in the Angelman Syndrome Mouse Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filonova, Irina; Trotter, Justin H.; Banko, Jessica L.; Weeber, Edwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by disruption of the maternal "UBE3A" gene. Ube3a protein is identified as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows neuron-specific imprinting. Despite extensive research evaluating the localization and basal expression profiles of Ube3a in mouse models, the molecular…

  3. A novel phantom model for mouse tumor dose assessment under MV beams

    PubMed Central

    Gossman, Michael S.; Das, Indra J.; Sharma, Subhash C.; Lopez, Jeffrey P.; Howard, Candace M.; Claudio, Pier P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In order to determine a mouse’s dose accurately and prior to engaging in live mouse radiobiological research, a tissue-equivalent tumor-bearing phantom mouse was constructed and bored to accommodate detectors. Methods and Materials Comparisons were made between four different types of radiation detectors, each inserted into the phantom mouse for radiation measurement under a 6 MV linear accelerator beam. Dose detection response from a diode, thermoluminescent dosimeters, metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors were used and compared to that of a reference pin-point ionization chamber. Likewise, a computerized treatment planning system was also directly compared. Results Each detector system demonstrated results similar to the dose computed by the therapeutic treatment planning system, although some differences were noted. The average disagreement from a accelerator calibrated output dose prescription in the range of 200–400 cGy were −0.4% ± 0.5σ for the diode, −2.4% ± 2.6σ for the TLD, −2.9% ± 5.0σ for the MOSFET and +1.3% ± 1.4σ for the treatment planning system. Conclusions This phantom mouse design is unique, simple, reproducible and therefore recommended as a standard approach to dosimetry for radiobiological mouse studies by means of any of the detectors used in this study. We fully advocate for treatment planning modeling when possible prior to linac-based dose delivery. PMID:22048493

  4. The Oak Ridge Polycystic Kidney mouse: modeling ciliopathies of mice and men.

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, J M; Michaud III, Edward J; Schoeb, T

    2008-08-01

    The Oak Ridge Polycystic Kidney (ORPK) mouse was described nearly 14 years ago as a model for human recessive polycystic kidney disease. The ORPK mouse arose through integration of a transgene into an intron of the Ift88 gene resulting in a hypomorphic allele (Ift88Tg737Rpw). The Ift88Tg737Rpw mutation impairs intraflagellar transport (IFT), a process required for assembly of motile and immotile cilia. Historically, the primary immotile cilium was thought to have minimal importance for human health; however, a rapidly expanding number of human disorders have now been attributed to ciliary defects. Importantly, many of these phenotypes are present and can bemore » analyzed using the ORPK mouse. In this review, we highlight the research conducted using the OPRK mouse and the phenotypes shared with human cilia disorders. Furthermore, we describe an additional follicular dysplasia phenotype in the ORPK mouse, which alongside the ectodermal dysplasias seen in human Ellis-van Creveld and Sensenbrenner's syndromes, suggests an unappreciated role for primary cilia in the skin and hair follicle.« less

  5. Comparative mRNA analysis of behavioral and genetic mouse models of aggression.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Tosto, Maria G; Pain, Oliver; Sluyter, Frans; Mineur, Yann S; Crusio, Wim E; de Boer, Sietse; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; Kesserwani, Jad; Robinson, Edward; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of aggression have traditionally compared strains, most notably BALB/cJ and C57BL/6. However, these strains were not designed to study aggression despite differences in aggression-related traits and distinct reactivity to stress. This study evaluated expression of genes differentially regulated in a stress (behavioral) mouse model of aggression with those from a recent genetic mouse model aggression. The study used a discovery-replication design using two independent mRNA studies from mouse brain tissue. The discovery study identified strain (BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J) × stress (chronic mild stress or control) interactions. Probe sets differentially regulated in the discovery set were intersected with those uncovered in the replication study, which evaluated differences between high and low aggressive animals from three strains specifically bred to study aggression. Network analysis was conducted on overlapping genes uncovered across both studies. A significant overlap was found with the genetic mouse study sharing 1,916 probe sets with the stress model. Fifty-one probe sets were found to be strongly dysregulated across both studies mapping to 50 known genes. Network analysis revealed two plausible pathways including one centered on the UBC gene hub which encodes ubiquitin, a protein well-known for protein degradation, and another on P38 MAPK. Findings from this study support the stress model of aggression, which showed remarkable molecular overlap with a genetic model. The study uncovered a set of candidate genes including the Erg2 gene, which has previously been implicated in different psychopathologies. The gene networks uncovered points at a Redox pathway as potentially being implicated in aggressive related behaviors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Behavioral Phenotyping Assays for Genetic Mouse Models of Neurodevelopmental, Neurodegenerative, and Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sukoff Rizzo, Stacey J; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2017-02-08

    Animal models offer heuristic research tools to understand the causes of human diseases and to identify potential treatments. With rapidly evolving genetic engineering technologies, mutations identified in a human disorder can be generated in the mouse genome. Phenotypic outcomes of the mutation are then explicated to confirm hypotheses about causes and to discover effective therapeutics. Most neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative, and psychiatric disorders are diagnosed primarily by their prominent behavioral symptoms. Mouse behavioral assays analogous to the human symptoms have been developed to analyze the consequences of mutations and to evaluate proposed therapeutics preclinically. Here we describe the range of mouse behavioral tests available in the established behavioral neuroscience literature, along with examples of their translational applications. Concepts presented have been successfully used in other species, including flies, worms, fish, rats, pigs, and nonhuman primates. Identical strategies can be employed to test hypotheses about environmental causes and gene × environment interactions.

  7. Tumour and normal tissue radiobiology in mouse models: how close are mice to mini-humans?

    PubMed

    Koontz, Bridget F; Verhaegen, Frank; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Animal modelling is essential to the study of radiobiology and the advancement of clinical radiation oncology by providing preclinical data. Mouse models in particular have been highly utilized in the study of both tumour and normal tissue radiobiology because of their cost effectiveness and versatility. Technology has significantly advanced in preclinical radiation techniques to allow highly conformal image-guided irradiation of small animals in an effort to mimic human treatment capabilities. However, the biological and physical limitations of animal modelling should be recognized and considered when interpreting preclinical radiotherapy (RT) studies. Murine tumour and normal tissue radioresponse has been shown to vary from human cellular and molecular pathways. Small animal irradiation techniques utilize different anatomical boundaries and may have different physical properties than human RT. This review addresses the difference between the human condition and mouse models and discusses possible strategies for future refinement of murine models of cancer and radiation for the benefit of both basic radiobiology and clinical translation.

  8. Development of the Nonobese Diabetic Mouse and Contribution of Animal Models for Understanding Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Yoko

    2017-04-01

    In 1974, the discovery of a mouse and a rat that spontaneously developed hyperglycemia led to the development of 2 autoimmune diabetes models: nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse and Bio-Breeding rat. These models have contributed to our understanding of autoimmune diabetes, provided tools to dissect autoimmune islet damage, and facilitated development of early detection, prevention, and treatment of type 1 diabetes. The genetic characterization, monoclonal antibodies, and congenic strains have made NOD mice especially useful.Although the establishment of the inbred NOD mouse strain was documented by Makino et al (Jikken Dobutsu. 1980;29:1-13), this review will focus on the not-as-well-known history leading to the discovery of a glycosuric female mouse by Yoshihiro Tochino. This discovery was spearheaded by years of effort by Japanese scientists from different disciplines and dedicated animal care personnel and by the support of the Shionogi Pharmaceutical Company, Osaka, Japan. The history is based on the early literature, mostly written in Japanese, and personal communications especially with Dr Tochino, who was involved in diabetes animal model development and who contributed to the release of NOD mice to the international scientific community. This article also reviews the scientific contributions made by the Bio-Breeding rat to autoimmune diabetes.

  9. Characterization of a novel genetically obese mouse model demonstrating early onset hyperphagia and hyperleptinemia.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Keiko; Bannai, Makoto; Maruyama, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Okame, Rieko; Murakami, Noboru

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is a critical risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome, and many obese animal models are used to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the appearance of symptoms. To establish a new obese mouse model, we screened ∼13,000 ICR mice and discovered a mouse demonstrating spontaneous obesity. We named this mouse "Daruma" after a traditional Japanese ornament. Following the fixation of the genotype, these animals exhibited obese phenotypes according to Mendel's law of inheritance. In the Daruma mouse, the leptin receptor gene sequence carried two base mutations that are good candidates for the variation(s) responsible for the obese phenotype. The Daruma mice developed characteristic visceral fat accumulation at 4 wk of age, and the white adipose and liver tissues exhibited increases in cell size and lipid droplets, respectively. No histological abnormalities were observed in other tissues of the Daruma mice, even after the mice reached 25 wk of age. Moreover, the onset of impaired leptin signaling was early and manifested as hyperleptinemia and hyperinsulinemia. Pair feeding completely inhibited obesity, although these mice rapidly developed hyperphagia and obesity followed by hyperleptinemia when pair feeding ceased and free-access feeding was permitted. Therefore, the Daruma mice exhibited unique characteristics and may be a good model for studying human metabolic syndrome.

  10. Development and function of human innate immune cells in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rongvaux, Anthony; Willinger, Tim; Martinek, Jan; Strowig, Till; Gearty, Sofia V.; Teichmann, Lino L.; Saito, Yasuyuki; Marches, Florentina; Halene, Stephanie; Palucka, A. Karolina; Manz, Markus G.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Mice repopulated with human hematopoietic cells are a powerful tool for the study of human hematopoiesis and immune function in vivo. However, existing humanized mouse models are unable to support development of human innate immune cells, including myeloid cells and NK cells. Here we describe a mouse strain, called MI(S)TRG, in which human versions of four genes encoding cytokines important for innate immune cell development are knocked in to their respective mouse loci. The human cytokines support the development and function of monocytes/macrophages and natural killer cells derived from human fetal liver or adult CD34+ progenitor cells injected into the mice. Human macrophages infiltrated a human tumor xenograft in MI(S)TRG mice in a manner resembling that observed in tumors obtained from human patients. This humanized mouse model may be used to model the human immune system in scenarios of health and pathology, and may enable evaluation of therapeutic candidates in an in vivo setting relevant to human physiology. PMID:24633240

  11. Mutational landscape of a chemically-induced mouse model of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Connor, Frances; Rayner, Tim F; Aitken, Sarah J; Feig, Christine; Lukk, Margus; Santoyo-Lopez, Javier; Odom, Duncan T

    2018-06-26

    Carcinogen-induced mouse models of liver cancer are used extensively to study pathogenesis of the disease and have a critical role in validating candidate therapeutics. These models can recapitulate molecular and histological features of human disease. However, it is not known if the genomic alterations driving these mouse tumour genomes are comparable to those found in human tumours. Here, we provide a detailed genomic characterisation of tumours from a commonly used mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We analysed whole exome sequences of liver tumours arising in mice exposed to diethylnitrosamine (DEN). DEN-initiated tumours had a high, uniform number of somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs), with few insertions, deletions or copy number alterations, consistent with the known genotoxic action of DEN. Exposure of hepatocytes to DEN left a reproducible mutational imprint in resulting tumour exomes which we could computationally reconstruct using six known COSMIC mutational signatures. The tumours carried a high diversity of low-incidence, non-synonymous point mutations in many oncogenes and tumour suppressors, reflecting the stochastic introduction of SNVs into the hepatocyte genome by the carcinogen. We identified four recurrently mutated genes that were putative oncogenic drivers of HCC in this model. Every neoplasm carried activating hotspot mutations either in codon 61 of Hras, in codon 584 of Braf or in codon 254 of Egfr. Truncating mutations of Apc occurred in 21% of neoplasms, which were exclusively carcinomas supporting a role for deregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling in cancer progression. Our study provides detailed insight into the mutational landscape of tumours arising in a commonly-used carcinogen model of HCC, facilitating the future use of this model to understand the human disease. Mouse models are widely used to study the biology of cancer and to test potential therapies. Here, we have described the mutational landscape of

  12. Thermal Stimulation of the Retina Reduces Bruch's Membrane Thickness in Age Related Macular Degeneration Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Tode, Jan; Richert, Elisabeth; Koinzer, Stefan; Klettner, Alexa; von der Burchard, Claus; Brinkmann, Ralf; Lucius, Ralph; Roider, Johann

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the effect of thermal stimulation of the retina (TS-R) on Bruch's membrane (BrM) thickness in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) mouse models as a novel concept for the prophylaxis and treatment of dry AMD. Two knockout AMD mouse models, B6.129P2-Apoe tm1Unc /J (ApoE-/-) and B6.129X1-Nfe2I2 tm1Ywk /J (NRF2-/-), were chosen. One randomized eye of each mouse in four different groups (two of different age, two of different genotype) of five mice was treated by TS-R (532 nm, 10-ms duration, 50-μm spot size), the fellow eye served as control. Laser power was titrated to barely visible laser burns, then reduced by 70% to guarantee for thermal elevation without damage to the neuroretina, then applied uniformly to the murine retina. Fundus, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and fluorescein angiography (FLA) images were obtained at the day of treatment and 1 month after treatment. Eyes were enucleated thereafter to analyze BrM thickness by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a standardized blinded manner. Fundus images revealed that all ApoE-/- and NRF2-/- mice had AMD associated retinal alterations. BrM thickness was increased in untreated controls of both mouse models. Subvisible TS-R laser spots were not detectable by fundus imaging, OCT, or FLA 2 hours or 1 month after laser treatment. TEM revealed a significant reduction of BrM thickness in laser-treated eyes of all four groups compared to their fellow control eyes. TS-R reduces BrM thickness in AMD mouse models ApoE-/- and NRF2-/- without damage to the neuroretina. It may become a prophylactic or even therapeutic treatment option for dry AMD. TS-R may become a prophylactic or even therapeutic treatment option for dry AMD.

  13. Longitudinal Multiplexed Measurement of Quantitative Proteomic Signatures in Mouse Lymphoma Models Using Magneto-Nanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Appelmann, Iris; Miething, Cornelius; Shultz, Tyler O.; Ruderman, Daniel; Kim, Dokyoon; Mallick, Parag; Lowe, Scott W.; Wang, Shan X.

    2018-01-01

    Cancer proteomics is the manifestation of relevant biological processes in cancer development. Thus, it reflects the activities of tumor cells, host-tumor interactions, and systemic responses to cancer therapy. To understand the causal effects of tumorigenesis or therapeutic intervention, longitudinal studies are greatly needed. However, most of the conventional mouse experiments are unlikely to accommodate frequent collection of serum samples with a large enough volume for multiple protein assays towards single-object analysis. Here, we present a technique based on magneto-nanosensors to longitudinally monitor the protein profiles in individual mice of lymphoma models using a small volume of a sample for multiplex assays. Methods: Drug-sensitive and -resistant cancer cell lines were used to develop the mouse models that render different outcomes upon the drug treatment. Two groups of mice were inoculated with each cell line, and treated with either cyclophosphamide or vehicle solution. Serum samples taken longitudinally from each mouse in the groups were measured with 6-plex magneto-nanosensor cytokine assays. To find the origin of IL-6, experiments were performed using IL-6 knock-out mice. Results: The differences in serum IL-6 and GCSF levels between the drug-treated and untreated groups were revealed by the magneto-nanosensor measurement on individual mice. Using the multiplex assays and mouse models, we found that IL-6 is secreted by the host in the presence of tumor cells upon the drug treatment. Conclusion: The multiplex magneto-nanosensor assays enable longitudinal proteomic studies on mouse tumor models to understand tumor development and therapy mechanisms more precisely within a single biological object. PMID:29507628

  14. Longitudinal Multiplexed Measurement of Quantitative Proteomic Signatures in Mouse Lymphoma Models Using Magneto-Nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Appelmann, Iris; Miething, Cornelius; Shultz, Tyler O; Ruderman, Daniel; Kim, Dokyoon; Mallick, Parag; Lowe, Scott W; Wang, Shan X

    2018-01-01

    Cancer proteomics is the manifestation of relevant biological processes in cancer development. Thus, it reflects the activities of tumor cells, host-tumor interactions, and systemic responses to cancer therapy. To understand the causal effects of tumorigenesis or therapeutic intervention, longitudinal studies are greatly needed. However, most of the conventional mouse experiments are unlikely to accommodate frequent collection of serum samples with a large enough volume for multiple protein assays towards single-object analysis. Here, we present a technique based on magneto-nanosensors to longitudinally monitor the protein profiles in individual mice of lymphoma models using a small volume of a sample for multiplex assays. Methods: Drug-sensitive and -resistant cancer cell lines were used to develop the mouse models that render different outcomes upon the drug treatment. Two groups of mice were inoculated with each cell line, and treated with either cyclophosphamide or vehicle solution. Serum samples taken longitudinally from each mouse in the groups were measured with 6-plex magneto-nanosensor cytokine assays. To find the origin of IL-6, experiments were performed using IL-6 knock-out mice. Results: The differences in serum IL-6 and GCSF levels between the drug-treated and untreated groups were revealed by the magneto-nanosensor measurement on individual mice. Using the multiplex assays and mouse models, we found that IL-6 is secreted by the host in the presence of tumor cells upon the drug treatment. Conclusion: The multiplex magneto-nanosensor assays enable longitudinal proteomic studies on mouse tumor models to understand tumor development and therapy mechanisms more precisely within a single biological object.

  15. Histopathological Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle with Specific Reference to Mouse Models of Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Terry, Rebecca L; Wells, Dominic J

    2016-12-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of degenerative diseases for which many mouse models are available. These models are frequently used to assess potential therapeutic interventions and histological evaluation of multiple muscles is an important part of this assessment. Histological evaluation is especially useful when combined with tests of muscle function. This unit describes a protocol for necropsy, processing, cryosectioning, and histopathological evaluation of murine skeletal muscles, which is applicable to both models of muscular dystrophy and other neuromuscular conditions. Key histopathological features of dystrophic muscle are discussed using the mdx mouse (a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy) as an example. Optimal handling during dissection, processing and sectioning is vital to avoid artifacts that can confound or prevent future analyses. Muscles carefully processed using this protocol are suitable for further evaluation using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, special histochemical stains, and immuoblotting. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Immune Response to Human Metapneumovirus Infection: What We Have Learned from the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheemarla, Nagarjuna R.; Guerrero-Plata, Antonieta

    2015-01-01

    Human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a leading respiratory viral pathogen associated with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma exacerbation in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. The development of a potential vaccine against hMPV requires detailed understanding of the host immune system, which plays a significant role in hMPV pathogenesis, susceptibility and vaccine efficacy. As a result, animal models have been developed to better understand the mechanisms by which hMPV causes disease. Several animal models have been evaluated and established so far to study the host immune responses and pathophysiology of hMPV infection. However, inbred laboratory mouse strains have been one of the most used animal species for experimental modeling and therefore used for the studies of immunity and immunopathogenesis to hMPV. This review summarizes the contributions of the mouse model to our understanding of the immune response against hMPV infection. PMID:26393657

  17. Immune Response to Human Metapneumovirus Infection: What We Have Learned from the Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Cheemarla, Nagarjuna R; Guerrero-Plata, Antonieta

    2015-09-18

    Human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a leading respiratory viral pathogen associated with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma exacerbation in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. The development of a potential vaccine against hMPV requires detailed understanding of the host immune system, which plays a significant role in hMPV pathogenesis, susceptibility and vaccine efficacy. As a result, animal models have been developed to better understand the mechanisms by which hMPV causes disease. Several animal models have been evaluated and established so far to study the host immune responses and pathophysiology of hMPV infection. However, inbred laboratory mouse strains have been one of the most used animal species for experimental modeling and therefore used for the studies of immunity and immunopathogenesis to hMPV. This review summarizes the contributions of the mouse model to our understanding of the immune response against hMPV infection.

  18. Mouse Models for Unraveling the Importance of Diet in Colon Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Tammariello, Alexandra E.; Milner, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Diet and genetics are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death worldwide. Several genetically engineered mouse models have been created, including the ApcMin mouse, to aid in the identification of key cancer related processes and to assist with the characterization of environmental factors, including the diet, which influence risk. Current research using these models provides evidence that several bioactive food components can inhibit genetically predisposed colorectal cancer, while others increase risk. Specifically, calorie restriction or increased exposure to n-3 fatty acids, sulforaphane, chafuroside, curcumin, and dibenzoylmethane were reported protective. Total fat, calories and all-trans retinoic acid are associated with an increased risk. Unraveling the importance of specific dietary components in these models is complicated by the basal diet used, the quantity of test components provided, and interactions among food components. Newer models are increasingly available to evaluate fundamental cellular processes, including DNA mismatch repair, immune function and inflammation as markers for colon cancer risk. Unfortunately, these models have been used infrequently to examine the influence of specific dietary components. The enhanced use of these models can shed mechanistic insights about the involvement of specific bioactive food and components and energy as determinants of colon cancer risk. However, the use of available mouse models to exactly represent processes important to human gastrointestinal cancers will remain a continued scientific challenge. PMID:20122631

  19. PDE-4 Inhibition Rescues Aberrant Synaptic Plasticity in Drosophila and Mouse Models of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Catherine H.; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Weisz, Eliana D.; Bell, Aaron J.; Chambers, Daniel B.; Hinchey, Joseph; Choi, Richard J.; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Gertner, Michael J.; Ferrick, Neal J.; Terlizzi, Allison M.; Yohn, Nicole; Koenigsberg, Eric; Liebelt, David A.; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Woo, Newton H.; Tranfaglia, Michael R.; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E.; Siegel, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading cause of both intellectual disability and autism resulting from a single gene mutation. Previously, we characterized cognitive impairments and brain structural defects in a Drosophila model of FXS and demonstrated that these impairments were rescued by treatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists or lithium. A well-documented biochemical defect observed in fly and mouse FXS models and FXS patients is low cAMP levels. cAMP levels can be regulated by mGluR signaling. Herein, we demonstrate PDE-4 inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to ameliorate memory impairments and brain structural defects in the Drosophila model of fragile X. Furthermore, we examine the effects of PDE-4 inhibition by pharmacologic treatment in the fragile X mouse model. We demonstrate that acute inhibition of PDE-4 by pharmacologic treatment in hippocampal slices rescues the enhanced mGluR-dependent LTD phenotype observed in FXS mice. Additionally, we find that chronic treatment of FXS model mice, in adulthood, also restores the level of mGluR-dependent LTD to that observed in wild-type animals. Translating the findings of successful pharmacologic intervention from the Drosophila model into the mouse model of FXS is an important advance, in that this identifies and validates PDE-4 inhibition as potential therapeutic intervention for the treatment of individuals afflicted with FXS. PMID:25568131

  20. PDE-4 inhibition rescues aberrant synaptic plasticity in Drosophila and mouse models of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Catherine H; Schoenfeld, Brian P; Weisz, Eliana D; Bell, Aaron J; Chambers, Daniel B; Hinchey, Joseph; Choi, Richard J; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Gertner, Michael J; Ferrick, Neal J; Terlizzi, Allison M; Yohn, Nicole; Koenigsberg, Eric; Liebelt, David A; Zukin, R Suzanne; Woo, Newton H; Tranfaglia, Michael R; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E; Siegel, Steven J; Bolduc, Francois V; McDonald, Thomas V; Jongens, Thomas A; McBride, Sean M J

    2015-01-07

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading cause of both intellectual disability and autism resulting from a single gene mutation. Previously, we characterized cognitive impairments and brain structural defects in a Drosophila model of FXS and demonstrated that these impairments were rescued by treatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists or lithium. A well-documented biochemical defect observed in fly and mouse FXS models and FXS patients is low cAMP levels. cAMP levels can be regulated by mGluR signaling. Herein, we demonstrate PDE-4 inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to ameliorate memory impairments and brain structural defects in the Drosophila model of fragile X. Furthermore, we examine the effects of PDE-4 inhibition by pharmacologic treatment in the fragile X mouse model. We demonstrate that acute inhibition of PDE-4 by pharmacologic treatment in hippocampal slices rescues the enhanced mGluR-dependent LTD phenotype observed in FXS mice. Additionally, we find that chronic treatment of FXS model mice, in adulthood, also restores the level of mGluR-dependent LTD to that observed in wild-type animals. Translating the findings of successful pharmacologic intervention from the Drosophila model into the mouse model of FXS is an important advance, in that this identifies and validates PDE-4 inhibition as potential therapeutic intervention for the treatment of individuals afflicted with FXS. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/350396-13$15.00/0.

  1. Molecular and clinical implementations of ovarian cancer mouse avatar models.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Amira A; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Haluska, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Innovation in oncology drug development has been hindered by lack of preclinical models that reliably predict clinical activity of novel therapies in cancer patients. Increasing desire for individualize treatment of patients with cancer has led to an increase in the use of patient-derived xenografts (PDX) engrafted into immune-compromised mice for preclinical modeling. Large numbers of tumor-specific PDX models have been established and proved to be powerful tools in pre-clinical testing. A subset of PDXs, referred to as Avatars, establish tumors in an orthotopic and treatment naïve fashion that may represent the most clinical relevant model of individual human cancers. This review will discuss ovarian cancer (OC) PDX models demonstrating the opportunities and limitations of these models in cancer drug development, and describe concepts of clinical trials design in Avatar guided therapy.

  2. Selective Neurodegeneration, Without Neurofibrillary Tangles, in a Mouse Model of Niemann-Pick C Disease

    PubMed Central

    German, Dwight C.; Quintero, E. Matthew; Liang, Chang-Lin; Ng, Benton; Punia, Surender; Xie, Chonglun; Dietschy, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The BALB/c mouse model of Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease exhibits neuropathological similarities to the human condition. There is an age-related cerebral atrophy, demyelination of the corpus callosum, and degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells in the NPC mouse. In human NPC, many cortical and subcortical neurons contain neurofibrillary tangles, which are thought by some investigators to play an important role in the neurodegenerative process. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether neurodegeneration occurs in the NPC mouse, in brain regions other than the cerebellum and whether the degeneration is related to the presence of neurofibrillary tangles. Using light microscopic methods with immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and cell counting methods, 11-week-old NPC+/+ and NPC−/− animals were examined. In the NPC−/− mice, there were 96% fewer Purkinje cells, 28% fewer neurons in the prefrontal cortex, 20% fewer neurons in the thalamus, and 63% fewer glial cells in the corpus callosum. On the other hand, previous studies indicate normal numbers of neurons and glial cells in these same neuroanatomical regions in young NPC−/− mice. There were normal numbers of cholinergic neurons in sections assessed in the striatum and basal forebrain in the 11-week-old animals and no evidence of neurofibrillary tangles within cells. The present data indicate that both neurons and glial cells die in the NPC mouse but that all cells are not equally vulnerable. There was no evidence for neurofibrillary tangles in the NPC mouse, and therefore the degenerative process in the mouse is unrelated to the neurofibrillary tangle. PMID:11298365

  3. Broad AOX expression in a genetically tractable mouse model does not disturb normal physiology

    PubMed Central

    Szibor, Marten; Dhandapani, Praveen K.; Dufour, Eric; Holmström, Kira M.; Zhuang, Yuan; Salwig, Isabelle; Wittig, Ilka; Heidler, Juliana; Gizatullina, Zemfira; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Nandania, Jatin; Velagapudi, Vidya; Wietelmann, Astrid; Rustin, Pierre; Gellerich, Frank N.; Braun, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants and many lower organisms, but not mammals, express alternative oxidases (AOXs) that branch the mitochondrial respiratory chain, transferring electrons directly from ubiquinol to oxygen without proton pumping. Thus, they maintain electron flow under conditions when the classical respiratory chain is impaired, limiting excess production of oxygen radicals and supporting redox and metabolic homeostasis. AOX from Ciona intestinalis has been used to study and mitigate mitochondrial impairments in mammalian cell lines, Drosophila disease models and, most recently, in the mouse, where multiple lentivector-AOX transgenes conferred substantial expression in specific tissues. Here, we describe a genetically tractable mouse model in which Ciona AOX has been targeted to the Rosa26 locus for ubiquitous expression. The AOXRosa26 mouse exhibited only subtle phenotypic effects on respiratory complex formation, oxygen consumption or the global metabolome, and showed an essentially normal physiology. AOX conferred robust resistance to inhibitors of the respiratory chain in organello; moreover, animals exposed to a systemically applied LD50 dose of cyanide did not succumb. The AOXRosa26 mouse is a useful tool to investigate respiratory control mechanisms and to decipher mitochondrial disease aetiology in vivo. PMID:28067626

  4. ¹H MRS characterization of neurochemical profiles in orthotopic mouse models of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hulsey, Keith M; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Banerjee, Abhishek; Soesbe, Todd C; Spence, Jeffrey S; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M; Choi, Changho

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most common primary brain tumor, is resistant to currently available treatments. The development of mouse models of human GBM has provided a tool for studying mechanisms involved in tumor initiation and growth as well as a platform for preclinical investigation of new drugs. In this study we used (1) H MR spectroscopy to study the neurochemical profile of a human orthotopic tumor (HOT) mouse model of human GBM. The goal of this study was to evaluate differences in metabolite concentrations in the GBM HOT mice when compared with normal mouse brain in order to determine if MRS could reliably differentiate tumor from normal brain. A TE =19 ms PRESS sequence at 9.4 T was used for measuring metabolite levels in 12 GBM mice and 8 healthy mice. Levels for 12 metabolites and for lipids/macromolecules at 0.9 ppm and at 1.3 ppm were reliably detected in all mouse spectra. The tumors had significantly lower concentrations of total creatine, GABA, glutamate, total N-acetylaspartate, aspartate, lipids/macromolecules at 0.9 ppm, and lipids/macromolecules at 1.3 ppm than did the brains of normal mice. The concentrations of glycine and lactate, however, were significantly higher in tumors than in normal brain. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Molecular and cellular events during blastocyst implantation in the receptive uterus: clues from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    MATSUMOTO, Hiromichi

    2017-01-01

    The success of implantation is an interactive process between the blastocyst and the uterus. Synchronized development of embryos with uterine differentiation to a receptive state is necessary to complete pregnancy. The period of uterine receptivity for implantation is limited and referred to as the “implantation window”, which is regulated by ovarian steroid hormones. Implantation process is complicated due to the many signaling molecules in the hierarchical mechanisms with the embryo-uterine dialogue. The mouse is widely used in animal research, and is uniquely suited for reproductive studies, i.e., having a large litter size and brief estrous cycles. This review first describes why the mouse is the preferred model for implantation studies, focusing on uterine morphology and physiological traits, and then highlights the knowledge on uterine receptivity and the hormonal regulation of blastocyst implantation in mice. Our recent study revealed that selective proteolysis in the activated blastocyst is associated with the completion of blastocyst implantation after embryo transfer. Furthermore, in the context of blastocyst implantation in the mouse, this review discusses the window of uterine receptivity, hormonal regulation, uterine vascular permeability and angiogenesis, the delayed-implantation mouse model, morphogens, adhesion molecules, crosslinker proteins, extracellular matrix, and matricellular proteins. A better understanding of uterine and blastocyst biology during the peri-implantation period should facilitate further development of reproductive technology. PMID:28638003

  6. Establishment of a C57BL/6N mouse model of giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Siqi; Luo, Xiaobing; Chen, Xiaoning; Wang, Fengyun

    2002-10-01

    To establish a C57BL/6N mouse model infected with Giardia lamblia (G. lamblia) isolates from human origin. Two groups of C57BL/6N mouse were inoculated with purified cysts of two G. lamblia isolates (CD and XZ) by gavage separately. Patterns and curves of cyst excretion of the infected mice were observed and summarized. Histopathological changes of the small intestines of the infected mice were observed. Thirty-six mice receiving 1 x 10(4) cysts each were all infected. The C57BL/6N mouse showed high susceptibility to G. lamblia infection. There was no notable distinction between the two groups of the mice infected by the cysts of CD and XZ isolates. Cyst excretion occurred with intermittence. Of 36 infected mice, 32 (89%) passed cysts intermittently and 4 (11%) others persistently. The latent period of cyst excretion was 0 - 3 days p.i. (post-inoculation). The interruption of cyst excretion ranged from 12 to 20 days p.i. The fastigium of the cyst excretion was on day 6 p.i. The peak count of the cysts passed during a 2 h collection period was 2.3 x 10(7)/g fecal specimen. Edema, inflammation, cell infiltration, small blood vessels congestion, mitotic figures and mucosa necrosis appeared in sections of intestines. C57Bl/6N mouse is a suitable animal model of G. lamblia.

  7. Treatment with antioxidants ameliorates oxidative damage in a mouse model of propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Barahona, Ana; Alonso-Barroso, Esmeralda; Pérez, Belén; Murphy, Michael P; Richard, Eva; Desviat, Lourdes R

    2017-09-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of propionic acidemia (PA), a life threatening disease caused by the deficiency of propionyl CoA-carboxylase, in the catabolic pathway of branched-chain amino acids, odd-number chain fatty acids and cholesterol. Patients develop multisystemic complications including seizures, extrapyramidal symptoms, basal ganglia deterioration, pancreatitis and cardiomyopathy. The accumulation of toxic metabolites results in mitochondrial dysfunction, increased reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage, all of which have been documented in patients' samples and in a hypomorphic mouse model. Here we set out to investigate whether treatment with a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, MitoQ, or with the natural polyphenol resveratrol, which is reported to have antioxidant and mitochondrial activation properties, could ameliorate the altered redox status and its functional consequences in the PA mouse model. The results show that oral treatment with MitoQ or resveratrol decreases lipid peroxidation and the expression levels of DNA repair enzyme OGG1 in PA mouse liver, as well as inducing tissue-specific changes in the expression of antioxidant enzymes. Notably, treatment decreased the cardiac hypertrophy marker BNP that is found upregulated in the PA mouse heart. Overall, the results provide in vivo evidence to justify more in depth investigations of antioxidants as adjuvant therapy in PA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mobile Laser Indirect Ophthalmoscope: For the Induction of Choroidal Neovascularization in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Dov; Bor-Shavit, Elite; Barliya, Tilda; Dahbash, Mor; Kinrot, Opher; Gaton, Dan D; Nisgav, Yael; Livnat, Tami

    2017-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate and standardize the reliability of a mobile laser indirect ophthalmoscope in the induction of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in a mouse model. A diode laser indirect ophthalmoscope was used to induce CNV in pigmented male C57BL/6J mice. Standardization of spot size and laser intensity was determined using different aspheric lenses with increasing laser intensities applied around the optic disc. Development of CNV was evaluated 1, 5, and 14 days post laser application using fluorescein angiography (FA), histology, and choroidal flat mounts stained for the endothelial marker CD31 and FITC-dextran. Correlation between the number of laser hits to the number and size of developed CNV lesions was determined using flat mount choroid staining. The ability of intravitreally injected anti-human and anti-mouse VEGF antibodies to inhibit CNV induced by the mobile laser was evaluated. Laser parameters were standardized on 350 mW for 100 msec, using the 90 diopter lens to accomplish the highest incidence of Bruch's membrane rupture. CNV lesions' formation was validated on days 5 and 14 post laser injury, though FA showed leakage on as early as day 1. The number of laser hits was significantly correlated with the CNV area. CNV growth was successfully inhibited by both anti-human and mouse VEGF antibodies. The mobile laser indirect ophthalmoscope can serve as a feasible and a reliable alternative method for the CNV induction in a mouse model.

  9. A Mouse Ependymoma Model Provides Molecular Insights into Tumor Formation.

    PubMed

    Pajtler, Kristian W; Pfister, Stefan M

    2018-06-26

    Ozawa et al. present a murine tumor model resembling the most frequent molecular group of human supratentorial ependymoma, ST-EPN-RELA. Their model shows RELA-fusion-based de novo ependymoma tumorigenesis in the forebrain derived from neural stem cells. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Estimating Lead (Pb) Bioavailability In A Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are exposed to Pb through ingestion of Pb-contaminated soil. Soil Pb bioavailability is estimated using animal models or with chemically defined in vitro assays that measure bioaccessibility. However, bioavailability estimates in a large animal model (e.g., swine) can be...

  11. The circling mutant Pcdh15roda is a new mouse model for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Torres, Adriana Amorim; Rzadzinska, Agnieszka K; Ribeiro, Andrea Frozino; Silva, Daniel Almeida da Silva E; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Massironi, Sílvia Maria Gomes; Godard, Ana Lúcia Brunialti

    2013-01-01

    Mouse mutagenesis is a key tool for studying gene function and several mutant alleles have been described and constitute mouse models for human hereditary diseases. Genetic hearing loss represents over 50% of all hearing loss cases in children and, due to the heterogeneity of the disorder, there is still a demand for the isolation and characterization of new genes and alleles. Here we report phenotypic and molecular characterization of a new mouse model for hereditary hearing loss. The mutant rodador, isolated by Massironi and colleagues in 2006, presents an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by deafness and balance dysfunction associated with abnormal stereocilia in the inner ear. The mutation was mapped to mouse chromosome 10, and characterization of the gene Pcdh15 revealed an AT-to-GC transition in intron 23 of mutant animals. The alteration led to the switch of a dinucleotide ApA for ApG, creating a novel intronic acceptor splice site, which leads to incorporation of eight intronic bases into the processed mRNA and alteration of the downstream reading frame. In silico analysis indicated that the mutated protein is truncated and lacks two cadherin domains, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Real Time PCR analyses revealed a significantly reduced Pcdh15 mRNA level in the brain of mutant mice, which might be due to the mechanism of non-sense mediated decay. In man, mutations in the orthologue PCDH15 cause non-syndromic deafness and Usher Syndrome Type 1F, a genetic disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. Rodador mouse constitutes a new model for studying deafness in these conditions and may help in the comprehension of the pathogeneses of the disease, as well as of the mechanisms involved in the morphogenesis and function of inner ear stereocilia. This is a new ENU-induced allele and the first isolated in a BALB/c background. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Riluzole does not improve lifespan or motor function in three ALS mouse models.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Marion C; Halang, Luise; Woods, Ina; Coughlan, Karen S; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2018-08-01

    Riluzole is the most widespread therapeutic for treatment of the progressive degenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Riluzole gained FDA approval in 1995 before the development of ALS mouse models. We assessed riluzole in three transgenic ALS mouse models: the SOD1 G93A model, the TDP-43 A315T model, and the recently developed FUS (1-359) model. Age, sex and litter-matched mice were treated with riluzole (22 mg/kg) in drinking water or vehicle (DMSO) from symptom onset. Lifespan was assessed and motor function tests were carried out twice weekly to determine whether riluzole slowed disease progression. Riluzole treatment had no significant benefit on lifespan in any of the ALS mouse models tested. Riluzole had no significant impact on decline in motor performance in the FUS (1-359) and SOD1 G93A transgenic mice as assessed by Rotarod and stride length analysis. Riluzole is widely prescribed for ALS patients despite questions surrounding its efficacy. Our data suggest that if riluzole was identified as a therapeutic candidate today it would not progress past pre-clinical assessment. This raises questions about the standards used in pre-clinical assessment of therapeutic candidates for the treatment of ALS.

  13. Ghrelin and eating behavior: evidence and insights from genetically-modified mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Aki; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Perelló, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide hormone, produced by endocrine cells of the stomach, which acts in the brain to increase food intake and body weight. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying ghrelin's effects on eating behaviors has been greatly improved by the generation and study of several genetically manipulated mouse models. These models include mice overexpressing ghrelin and also mice with genetic deletion of ghrelin, the ghrelin receptor [the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)] or the enzyme that post-translationally modifies ghrelin [ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT)]. In addition, a GHSR-null mouse model in which GHSR transcription is globally blocked but can be cell-specifically reactivated in a Cre recombinase-mediated fashion has been generated. Here, we summarize findings obtained with these genetically manipulated mice, with the aim to highlight the significance of the ghrelin system in the regulation of both homeostatic and hedonic eating, including that occurring in the setting of chronic psychosocial stress. PMID:23882175

  14. Efficient generation of mouse models of human diseases via ABE- and BE-mediated base editing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Lu, Zongyang; Yang, Guang; Huang, Shisheng; Li, Guanglei; Feng, Songjie; Liu, Yajing; Li, Jianan; Yu, Wenxia; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Jia; Sun, Qiang; Huang, Xingxu

    2018-06-14

    A recently developed adenine base editor (ABE) efficiently converts A to G and is potentially useful for clinical applications. However, its precision and efficiency in vivo remains to be addressed. Here we achieve A-to-G conversion in vivo at frequencies up to 100% by microinjection of ABE mRNA together with sgRNAs. We then generate mouse models harboring clinically relevant mutations at Ar and Hoxd13, which recapitulates respective clinical defects. Furthermore, we achieve both C-to-T and A-to-G base editing by using a combination of ABE and SaBE3, thus creating mouse model harboring multiple mutations. We also demonstrate the specificity of ABE by deep sequencing and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). Taken together, ABE is highly efficient and precise in vivo, making it feasible to model and potentially cure relevant genetic diseases.

  15. Partial corrosion casting to assess cochlear vasculature in mouse models of presbycusis and CMV infection.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Mattia; Park, Albert H; Harrison, Robert V

    2016-02-01

    Some forms of sensorineural hearing loss involve damage or degenerative changes to the stria vascularis and/or other vascular structures in the cochlea. In animal models, many methods for anatomical assessment of cochlear vasculature exist, each with advantages and limitations. One methodology, corrosion casting, has proved useful in some species, however in the mouse model this technique is difficult to achieve because digestion of non vascular tissue results in collapse of the delicate cast specimen. We have developed a partial corrosion cast method that allows visualization of vasculature along much of the cochlear length but maintains some structural integrity of the specimen. We provide a detailed step-by-step description of this novel technique. We give some illustrative examples of the use of the method in mouse models of presbycusis and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A model for gas and nutrient exchange in the chorionic vasculature system of the mouse placenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbod, Parisa; Sled, John

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop an analytical model for the oxygen and nutrient transport from the umbilical cord to the small villous capillaries. The nutrient and carbon dioxide removal from the fetal cotyledons in the mouse placental system has also been considered. This model describes the mass transfer between the fetal and the maternal red blood cells in the chorionic arterial vasculature system. The model reveals the detail fetal vasculature system and its geometry and the precise mechanisms of mass transfer through the placenta. The dimensions of the villous capillaries, the total length of the villous trees, the total villi surface area, and the total resistance to mass transport in the fetal villous trees has also been defined. This is the first effort to explain the reason why there are at least 7 lobules in the mouse placenta from the fluid dynamics point of view.

  17. The Use of the Humanized Mouse Model in Gene Therapy and Immunotherapy for HIV and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Mayra A.; Zhen, Anjie; Kitchen, Scott G.

    2018-01-01

    HIV and cancer remain prevailing sources of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There are current efforts to discover novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment or cure of these diseases. Humanized mouse models provide the investigative tool to study the interaction between HIV or cancer and the human immune system in vivo. These humanized models consist of immunodeficient mice transplanted with human cells, tissues, or hematopoietic stem cells that result in reconstitution with a nearly full human immune system. In this review, we discuss preclinical studies evaluating therapeutic approaches in stem cell-based gene therapy and T cell-based immunotherapies for HIV and cancer using a humanized mouse model and some recent advances in using checkpoint inhibitors to improve antiviral or antitumor responses. PMID:29755454

  18. Mouse Models for Drug Discovery. Can New Tools and Technology Improve Translational Power?

    PubMed

    Zuberi, Aamir; Lutz, Cathleen

    2016-12-01

    The use of mouse models in biomedical research and preclinical drug evaluation is on the rise. The advent of new molecular genome-altering technologies such as CRISPR/Cas9 allows for genetic mutations to be introduced into the germ line of a mouse faster and less expensively than previous methods. In addition, the rapid progress in the development and use of somatic transgenesis using viral vectors, as well as manipulations of gene expression with siRNAs and antisense oligonucleotides, allow for even greater exploration into genomics and systems biology. These technological advances come at a time when cost reductions in genome sequencing have led to the identification of pathogenic mutations in patient populations, providing unprecedented opportunities in the use of mice to model human disease. The ease of genetic engineering in mice also offers a potential paradigm shift in resource sharing and the speed by which models are made available in the public domain. Predictively, the knowledge alone that a model can be quickly remade will provide relief to resources encumbered by licensing and Material Transfer Agreements. For decades, mouse strains have provided an exquisite experimental tool to study the pathophysiology of the disease and assess therapeutic options in a genetically defined system. However, a major limitation of the mouse has been the limited genetic diversity associated with common laboratory mice. This has been overcome with the recent development of the Collaborative Cross and Diversity Outbred mice. These strains provide new tools capable of replicating genetic diversity to that approaching the diversity found in human populations. The Collaborative Cross and Diversity Outbred strains thus provide a means to observe and characterize toxicity or efficacy of new therapeutic drugs for a given population. The combination of traditional and contemporary mouse genome editing tools, along with the addition of genetic diversity in new modeling systems

  19. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  20. Pathogenic role and therapeutic potential of pleiotrophin in mouse models of ocular vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwen; LeBlanc, Michelle E; Chen, Xiuping; Chen, Ping; Ji, Yanli; Brewer, Megan; Tian, Hong; Spring, Samantha R; Webster, Keith A; Li, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Angiogenic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR), neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Pleiotrophin, a well-known angiogenic factor, was recently reported to be upregulated in the vitreous fluid of patients with proliferative DR (PDR). However, its pathogenic role and therapeutic potential in ocular vascular diseases have not been defined in vivo. Here using corneal pocket assays, we demonstrated that pleiotrophin induced angiogenesis in vivo. To investigate the pathological role of pleiotrophin we used neutralizing antibody to block its function in multiple in vivo models of ocular vascular diseases. In a mouse model of DR, intravitreal injection of pleiotrophin-neutralizing antibody alleviated diabetic retinal vascular leakage. In a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), which is a surrogate model of ROP and PDR, we demonstrated that intravitreal injection of anti-pleiotrophin antibody prevented OIR-induced pathological retinal neovascularization and aberrant vessel tufts. Finally, pleiotrophin-neutralizing antibody ameliorated laser-induced choroidal neovascularization, a mouse model of nAMD, suggesting that pleiotrophin is involved in choroidal vascular disease. These findings suggest that pleiotrophin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DR with retinal vascular leakage, ROP with retinal neovascularization and nAMD with choroidal neovascularization. The results also support pleiotrophin as a promising target for anti-angiogenic therapy.

  1. A Longitudinal Motor Characterisation of the HdhQ111 Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yhnell, Emma; Dunnett, Stephen B; Brooks, Simon P

    2016-05-31

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a rare, incurable neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion with the first exon of the huntingtin gene. Numerous knock-in mouse models are currently available for modelling HD. However, before their use in scientific research, these models must be characterised to determine their face and predictive validity as models of the disease and their reliability in recapitulating HD symptoms. Manifest HD is currently diagnosed upon the onset of motor symptoms, thus we sought to longitudinally characterise the progression and severity of motor signs in the HdhQ111 knock-in mouse model of HD, in heterozygous mice. An extensive battery of motor tests including: rotarod, inverted lid test, balance beam, spontaneous locomotor activity and gait analysis were applied longitudinally to a cohort of HdhQ111 heterozygous mice in order to progressively assess motor function. A progressive failure to gain body weight was demonstrated from 11 months of age and motor problems in all measures of balance beam performance were shown in HdhQ111 heterozygous animals in comparison to wild type control animals from 9 months of age. A decreased latency to fall from the rotarod was demonstrated in HdhQ111 heterozygous animals in comparison to wild type animals, although this was not progressive with time. No genotype specific differences were demonstrated in any of the other motor tests included in the test battery. The HdhQ111 heterozygous mouse demonstrates a subtle and progressive motor phenotype that begins at 9 months of age. This mouse model represents an early disease stage and would be ideal for testing therapeutic strategies that require elongated lead-in times, such as viral gene therapies or striatal transplantation.

  2. Superior diastolic function with KATP channel opener diazoxide in a novel mouse Langendorff model.

    PubMed

    Makepeace, Carol M; Suarez-Pierre, Alejandro; Kanter, Evelyn M; Schuessler, Richard B; Nichols, Colin G; Lawton, Jennifer S

    2018-07-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (K ATP ) channel openers have been found to be cardioprotective in multiple animal models via an unknown mechanism. Mouse models allow genetic manipulation of K ATP channel components for the investigation of this mechanism. Mouse Langendorff models using 30 min of global ischemia are known to induce measurable myocardial infarction and injury. Prolongation of global ischemia in a mouse Langendorff model could allow the determination of the mechanisms involved in K ATP channel opener cardioprotection. Mouse hearts (C57BL/6) underwent baseline perfusion with Krebs-Henseleit buffer (30 min), assessment of function using a left ventricular balloon, delivery of test solution, and prolonged global ischemia (90 min). Hearts underwent reperfusion (30 min) and functional assessment. Coronary flow was measured using an inline probe. Test solutions included were as follows: hyperkalemic cardioplegia alone (CPG, n = 11) or with diazoxide (CPG + DZX, n = 12). Although the CPG + DZX group had greater percent recovery of developed pressure and coronary flow, this was not statistically significant. Following a mean of 74 min (CPG) and 77 min (CPG + DZX), an additional increase in end-diastolic pressure was noted (plateau), which was significantly higher in the CPG group. Similarly, the end-diastolic pressure (at reperfusion and at the end of experiment) was significantly higher in the CPG group. Prolongation of global ischemia demonstrated added benefit when DZX was added to traditional hyperkalemic CPG. This model will allow the investigation of DZX mechanism of cardioprotection following manipulation of targeted K ATP channel components. This model will also allow translation to prolonged ischemic episodes associated with cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Skeletal metastasis: treatments, mouse models, and the Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Valkenburg, Kenneth C.; Steensma, Matthew R.; Williams, Bart O.; Zhong, Zhendong

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal metastases result in significant morbidity and mortality. This is particularly true of cancers with a strong predilection for the bone, such as breast, prostate, and lung cancers. There is currently no reliable cure for skeletal metastasis, and palliative therapy options are limited. The Wnt signaling pathway has been found to play an integral role in the process of skeletal metastasis and may be an important clinical target. Several experimental models of skeletal metastasis have been used to find new biomarkers and test new treatments. In this review, we discuss pathologic process of bone metastasis, the roles of the Wnt signaling, and the available experimental models and treatments. PMID:23327798

  4. Adaptation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in experimental mouse models.

    PubMed

    Prokopyeva, E A; Sobolev, I A; Prokopyev, M V; Shestopalov, A M

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, three mouse-adapted variants of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus were obtained by lung-to-lung passages of BALB/c, C57BL/6z and CD1 mice. The significantly increased virulence and pathogenicity of all of the mouse-adapted variants induced 100% mortality in the adapted mice. Genetic analysis indicated that the increased virulence of all of the mouse-adapted variants reflected the incremental acquisition of several mutations in PB2, PB1, HA, NP, NA, and NS2 proteins. Identical amino acid substitutions were also detected in all of the mouse-adapted variants of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, including PB2 (K251R), PB1 (V652A), NP (I353V), NA (I106V, N248D) and NS1 (G159E). Apparently, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus easily adapted to the host after serial passages in the lungs, inducing 100% lethality in the last experimental group. However, cross-challenge revealed that not all adapted variants are pathogenic for different laboratory mice. Such important results should be considered when using the influenza mice model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Direct Mouse Trauma/Burn Model of Heterotopic Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jonathan R.; Agarwal, Shailesh; Brownley, R. Cameron; Loder, Shawn J.; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Cederna, Paul S.; Mishina, Yuji; Wang, Stewart C.; Levi, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the formation of bone outside of the skeleton which forms following major trauma, burn injuries, and orthopaedic surgical procedures. The majority of animal models used to study HO rely on the application of exogenous substances, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), exogenous cell constructs, or genetic mutations in BMP signaling. While these models are useful they do not accurately reproduce the inflammatory states that cause the majority of cases of HO. Here we describe a burn/tenotomy model in mice that reliably produces focused HO. This protocol involves creating a 30% total body surface area partial thickness contact burn on the dorsal skin as well as division of the Achilles tendon at its midpoint. Relying solely on traumatic injury to induce HO at a predictable location allows for time-course study of endochondral heterotopic bone formation from intrinsic physiologic processes and environment only. This method could prove instrumental in understanding the inflammatory and osteogenic pathways involved in trauma-induced HO. Furthermore, because HO develops in a predictable location and time-course in this model, it allows for research to improve early imaging strategies and treatment modalities to prevent HO formation. PMID:26274052

  6. Photoimmunotherapy of Gastric Cancer Peritoneal Carcinomatosis in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuhide; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2014-01-01

    Photoimmunotherapy (PIT) is a new cancer treatment that combines the specificity of antibodies for targeting tumors with the toxicity induced by photosensitizers after exposure to near infrared (NIR) light. We performed PIT in a model of disseminated gastric cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis and monitored efficacy with in vivo GFP fluorescence imaging. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted with a HER2-expressing, GFP-expressing, gastric cancer cell line (N87-GFP). A conjugate comprised of a photosensitizer, IR-700, conjugated to trastuzumab (tra-IR700), followed by NIR light was used for PIT. In vitro PIT was evaluated by measuring cytotoxicity with dead staining and a decrease in GFP fluorescence. In vivo PIT was evaluated in a disseminated peritoneal carcinomatosis model and a flank xenograft using tumor volume measurements and GFP fluorescence intensity. In vivo anti-tumor effects of PIT were confirmed by significant reductions in tumor volume (at day 15, p<0.0001 vs. control) and GFP fluorescence intensity (flank model: at day 3, PIT treated vs. control p<0.01 and peritoneal disseminated model: at day 3 PIT treated vs. control, p<0.05). Cytotoxic effects in vitro were shown to be dependent on the light dose and caused necrotic cell rupture leading to GFP release and a decrease in fluorescence intensity in vitro. Thus, loss of GFP fluorescence served as a useful biomarker of cell necrosis after PIT. PMID:25401794

  7. A Novel Mouse Model of Penetrating Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cernak, Ibolja; Wing, Ian D.; Davidsson, Johan; Plantman, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating traumatic brain injury (pTBI) has been difficult to model in small laboratory animals, such as rats or mice. Previously, we have established a non-fatal, rat model for pTBI using a modified air-rifle that accelerates a pellet, which hits a small probe that then penetrates the experimental animal’s brain. Knockout and transgenic strains of mice offer attractive tools to study biological reactions induced by TBI. Hence, in the present study, we adapted and modified our model to be used with mice. The technical characterization of the impact device included depth and speed of impact, as well as dimensions of the temporary cavity formed in a brain surrogate material after impact. Biologically, we have focused on three distinct levels of severity (mild, moderate, and severe), and characterized the acute phase response to injury in terms of tissue destruction, neural degeneration, and gliosis. Functional outcome was assessed by measuring bodyweight and motor performance on rotarod. The results showed that this model is capable of reproducing major morphological and neurological changes of pTBI; as such, we recommend its utilization in research studies aiming to unravel the biological events underlying injury and regeneration after pTBI. PMID:25374559

  8. A human lung xenograft mouse model of Nipah virus infection.

    PubMed

    Valbuena, Gustavo; Halliday, Hailey; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Goez, Yenny; Rockx, Barry

    2014-04-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus (family Paramyxoviridae) that causes severe and often lethal respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans with high mortality rates (up to 92%). NiV can cause Acute Lung Injury (ALI) in humans, and human-to-human transmission has been observed in recent outbreaks of NiV. While the exact route of transmission to humans is not known, we have previously shown that NiV can efficiently infect human respiratory epithelial cells. The molecular mechanisms of NiV-associated ALI in the human respiratory tract are unknown. Thus, there is an urgent need for models of henipavirus infection of the human respiratory tract to study the pathogenesis and understand the host responses. Here, we describe a novel human lung xenograft model in mice to study the pathogenesis of NiV. Following transplantation, human fetal lung xenografts rapidly graft and develop mature structures of adult lungs including cartilage, vascular vessels, ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium, and primitive "air" spaces filled with mucus and lined by cuboidal to flat epithelium. Following infection, NiV grows to high titers (10(7) TCID50/gram lung tissue) as early as 3 days post infection (pi). NiV targets both the endothelium as well as respiratory epithelium in the human lung tissues, and results in syncytia formation. NiV infection in the human lung results in the production of several cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IP-10, eotaxin, G-CSF and GM-CSF on days 5 and 7 pi. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that NiV can replicate to high titers in a novel in vivo model of the human respiratory tract, resulting in a robust inflammatory response, which is known to be associated with ALI. This model will facilitate progress in the fundamental understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis and virus-host interactions; it will also provide biologically relevant models for other respiratory viruses.

  9. A mouse model of human repetitive mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Michael J.; Pérez, Mariana Angoa; Briggs, Denise I.; Viano, David C.; Kreipke, Christian W.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the study of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI) that models the most common form of head injury in humans is presented. Existing animal models of TBI impart focal, severe damage unlike that seen in repeated and mild concussive injuries, and few are configured for repetitive application. Our model is a modification of the Marmarou weight drop method and allows repeated head impacts to lightly anesthetized mice. A key facet of this method is the delivery of an impact to the cranium of an unrestrained subject allowing rapid acceleration of the free-moving head and torso, an essential characteristic known to be important for concussive injury in humans, and a factor that is missing from existing animal models of TBI. Our method does not require scalp incision, emplacement of protective skull helmets or surgery and the procedure can be completed in 1-2 minutes. Mice spontaneously recover the righting reflex and show no evidence of seizures, paralysis or impaired behavior. Skull fractures and intracranial bleeding are very rare. Minor deficits in motor coordination and locomotor hyperactivity recover over time. Histological analyses reveal mild astrocytic reactivity (increased expression of GFAP) and increased phospho-tau but a lack of blood-brain-barrier disruption, edema and microglial activation. This new animal model is simple and cost-effective and will facilitate characterization of the neurobiological and behavioral consequences of rmTBI. It is also ideal for high throughput screening of potential new therapies for mild concussive injuries as experienced by athletes and military personnel. PMID:21930157

  10. Mouse Models Applied to the Research of Pharmacological Treatments in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Marqués-García, Fernando; Marcos-Vadillo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Models developed for the study of asthma mechanisms can be used to investigate new compounds with pharmacological activity against this disease. The increasing number of compounds requires a preclinical evaluation before starting the application in humans. Preclinical evaluation in animal models reduces the number of clinical trials positively impacting in the cost and in safety. In this chapter, three protocols for the study of drugs are shown: a model to investigate corticoids as a classical treatment of asthma; a protocol to test the effects of retinoic acid (RA) on asthma; and a mouse model to test new therapies in asthma as monoclonal antibodies.

  11. Effects of gypenosides on anxiety disorders in MPTP-lesioned mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Keon Sung; Zhao, Ting Ting; Choi, Hyun Sook; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Chong Kil; Lee, Myung Koo

    2014-06-03

    Ethanol extract (GP-EX) of Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP) ameliorates chronic stress-induced anxiety in mice. The present study investigated the effects of gypenoside-enriched components (GPS), GP-EX and water extract of GP (GP-WX) on MPTP lesion-induced affective disorders in C57BL/6 mice. GPS (50mg/kg) and GP-EX (50mg/kg) for 21 day-treatment period improved the symptom of anxiety disorders in the MPTP-lesioned mouse model of PD with or without L-DOPA treatment, which was examined by the elevated plus-maze and marble burying tests. In these states, treatments with GPS (50mg/kg) and GP-EX (50mg/kg) significantly increased the brain levels of dopamine and serotonin in the MPTP-lesioned mouse model of PD with or without l-DOPA treatment. In addition, treatments with GPS (50mg/kg) and GP-EX (50mg/kg) showed protective effects on dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-lesioned mouse model of PD with or without L-DOPA treatment. In contrast, GPS (30 mg/kg) and GP-WX (50mg/kg) showed anxiolytic effects in the same animal models, but it was not significant. These results suggest that GPS (50mg/kg) and GP-EX (50mg/kg) showed anxiolytic effects on affective disorders and protective effects on dopaminergic neurons by modulating the brain levels of dopamine and serotonin in the MPTP-lesioned mouse model of PD with or without l-DOPA treatment. Clinical trials of GPS and GP-EX need to be conducted further so as to develop adjuvant therapeutic agents for PD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impaired spatial processing in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghilan, Mohamed; Bettio, Luis E B; Noonan, Athena; Brocardo, Patricia S; Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Christie, Brian R

    2018-05-17

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual impairment. The Fmr1 -/y mouse model has been previously shown to have deficits in context discrimination tasks but not in the elevated plus-maze. To further characterize this FXS mouse model and determine whether hippocampal-mediated behaviours are affected in these mice, dentate gyrus (DG)-dependent spatial processing and Cornu ammonis 1 (CA1)-dependent temporal order discrimination tasks were evaluated. In agreement with previous findings of long-term potentiation deficits in the DG of this transgenic model of FXS, the results reported here demonstrate that Fmr1 -/y mice perform poorly in the DG-dependent metric change spatial processing task. However, Fmr1 -/y mice did not present deficits in the CA1-dependent temporal order discrimination task, and were able to remember the order in which objects were presented to them to the same extent as their wild-type littermate controls. These data suggest that the previously reported subregional-specific differences in hippocampal synaptic plasticity observed in the Fmr1 -/y mouse model may manifest as selective behavioural deficits in hippocampal-dependent tasks. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduced bioavailable manganese causes striatal urea cycle pathology in Huntington's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bichell, Terry Jo V; Wegrzynowicz, Michal; Tipps, K Grace; Bradley, Emma M; Uhouse, Michael A; Bryan, Miles; Horning, Kyle; Fisher, Nicole; Dudek, Karrie; Halbesma, Timothy; Umashanker, Preethi; Stubbs, Andrew D; Holt, Hunter K; Kwakye, Gunnar F; Tidball, Andrew M; Colbran, Roger J; Aschner, Michael; Neely, M Diana; Di Pardo, Alba; Maglione, Vittorio; Osmand, Alexander; Bowman, Aaron B

    2017-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a mutation in the huntingtin gene (HTT), resulting in profound striatal neurodegeneration through an unknown mechanism. Perturbations in the urea cycle have been reported in HD models and in HD patient blood and brain. In neurons, arginase is a central urea cycle enzyme, and the metal manganese (Mn) is an essential cofactor. Deficient biological responses to Mn, and reduced Mn accumulation have been observed in HD striatal mouse and cell models. Here we report in vivo and ex vivo evidence of a urea cycle metabolic phenotype in a prodromal HD mouse model. Further, either in vivo or in vitro Mn supplementation reverses the urea-cycle pathology by restoring arginase activity. We show that Arginase 2 (ARG2) is the arginase enzyme present in these mouse brain models, with ARG2 protein levels directly increased by Mn exposure. ARG2 protein is not reduced in the prodromal stage, though enzyme activity is reduced, indicating that altered Mn bioavailability as a cofactor leads to the deficient enzymatic activity. These data support a hypothesis that mutant HTT leads to a selective deficiency of neuronal Mn at an early disease stage, contributing to HD striatal urea-cycle pathophysiology through an effect on arginase activity. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A mouse model of mitochondrial complex III dysfunction induced by myxothiazol

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudi, Mina; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Marjavaara, Sanna

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Reversible chemical inhibition of complex III in wild type mouse. • Myxothiazol causes decreased complex III activity in mouse liver. • The model is useful for therapeutic trials to improve mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Myxothiazol is a respiratory chain complex III (CIII) inhibitor that binds to the ubiquinol oxidation site Qo of CIII. It blocks electron transfer from ubiquinol to cytochrome b and thus inhibits CIII activity. It has been utilized as a tool in studies of respiratory chain function in in vitro and cell culture models. We developed a mouse model of biochemically induced and reversible CIIImore » inhibition using myxothiazol. We administered myxothiazol intraperitoneally at a dose of 0.56 mg/kg to C57Bl/J6 mice every 24 h and assessed CIII activity, histology, lipid content, supercomplex formation, and gene expression in the livers of the mice. A reversible CIII activity decrease to 50% of control value occurred at 2 h post-injection. At 74 h only minor histological changes in the liver were found, supercomplex formation was preserved and no significant changes in the expression of genes indicating hepatotoxicity or inflammation were found. Thus, myxothiazol-induced CIII inhibition can be induced in mice for four days in a row without overt hepatotoxicity or lethality. This model could be utilized in further studies of respiratory chain function and pharmacological approaches to mitochondrial hepatopathies.« less

  15. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kochall, Susan; Thepkaysone, May-Linn; García, Sebastián A; Betzler, Alexander M; Weitz, Jürgen; Reissfelder, Christoph; Schölch, Sebastian

    2017-07-18

    Despite the advantages of easy applicability and cost-effectiveness, subcutaneous mouse models have severe limitations and do not accurately simulate tumor biology and tumor cell dissemination. Orthotopic mouse models have been introduced to overcome these limitations; however, such models are technically demanding, especially in hollow organs such as the large bowel. In order to produce uniform tumors which reliably grow and metastasize, standardized techniques of tumor cell preparation and injection are critical. We have developed an orthotopic mouse model of colorectal cancer (CRC) which develops highly uniform tumors and can be used for tumor biology studies as well as therapeutic trials. Tumor cells from either primary tumors, 2-dimensional (2D) cell lines or 3-dimensional (3D) organoids are injected into the cecum and, depending on the metastatic potential of the injected tumor cells, form highly metastatic tumors. In addition, CTCs can be found regularly. We here describe the technique of tumor cell preparation from both 2D cell lines and 3D organoids as well as primary tumor tissue, the surgical and injection techniques as well as the isolation of CTCs from the tumor-bearing mice, and present tips for troubleshooting.

  16. Revisiting the case for genetically engineered mouse models in human myelodysplastic syndrome research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Kinney, Marsha C; Scott, Linda M; Zinkel, Sandra S; Rebel, Vivienne I

    2015-08-27

    Much-needed attention has been given of late to diseases specifically associated with an expanding elderly population. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a hematopoietic stem cell-based blood disease, is one of these. The lack of clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this disease has hampered the development of efficacious therapies, especially in the presence of comorbidities. Mouse models could potentially provide new insights into this disease, although primary human MDS cells grow poorly in xenografted mice. This makes genetically engineered murine models a more attractive proposition, although this approach is not without complications. In particular, it is unclear if or how myelodysplasia (abnormal blood cell morphology), a key MDS feature in humans, presents in murine cells. Here, we evaluate the histopathologic features of wild-type mice and 23 mouse models with verified myelodysplasia. We find that certain features indicative of myelodysplasia in humans, such as Howell-Jolly bodies and low neutrophilic granularity, are commonplace in healthy mice, whereas other features are similarly abnormal in humans and mice. Quantitative hematopoietic parameters, such as blood cell counts, are required to distinguish between MDS and related diseases. We provide data that mouse models of MDS can be genetically engineered and faithfully recapitulate human disease. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Ultrastructural study of Rift Valley fever virus in the mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Christopher; Steele, Keith E.; Honko, Anna

    Detailed ultrastructural studies of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in the mouse model are needed to develop and characterize a small animal model of RVF for the evaluation of potential vaccines and therapeutics. In this study, the ultrastructural features of RVFV infection in the mouse model were analyzed. The main changes in the liver included the presence of viral particles in hepatocytes and hepatic stem cells accompanied by hepatocyte apoptosis. However, viral particles were observed rarely in the liver; in contrast, particles were extremely abundant in the CNS. Despite extensive lymphocytolysis, direct evidence of viral replication was not observed inmore » the lymphoid tissue. These results correlate with the acute-onset hepatitis and delayed-onset encephalitis that are dominant features of severe human RVF, but suggest that host immune-mediated mechanisms contribute significantly to pathology. The results of this study expand our knowledge of RVFV-host interactions and further characterize the mouse model of RVF.« less

  18. Cognitive Impairment, Neuroimaging, and Alzheimer Neuropathology in Mouse Models of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hamlett, Eric D.; Boger, Heather A.; Ledreux, Aurélie; Kelley, Christy M.; Mufson, Elliott J.; Falangola, Maria F.; Guilfoyle, David N.; Nixon, Ralph A.; Patterson, David; Duval, Nathan; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte E.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common non-lethal genetic condition that affects approximately 1 in 700 births in the United States of America. DS is characterized by complete or segmental chromosome 21 trisomy, which leads to variable intellectual disabilities, progressive memory loss, and accelerated neurodegeneration with age. During the last three decades, people with DS have experienced a doubling of life expectancy due to progress in treatment of medical comorbidities, which has allowed this population to reach the age when they develop early onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Individuals with DS develop cognitive and pathological hallmarks of AD in their fourth or fifth decade, and are currently lacking successful prevention or treatment options for dementia. The profound memory deficits associated with DS-related AD (DS-AD) have been associated with degeneration of several neuronal populations, but mechanisms of neurodegeneration are largely unexplored. The most successful animal model for DS is the Ts65Dn mouse, but several new models have also been developed. In the current review, we discuss recent findings and potential treatment options for the management of memory loss and AD neuropathology in DS mouse models. We also review age-related neuropathology, and recent findings from neuroimaging studies. The validation of appropriate DS mouse models that mimic neurodegeneration and memory loss in humans with DS can be valuable in the study of novel preventative and treatment interventions, and may be helpful in pinpointing gene-gene interactions as well as specific gene segments involved in neurodegeneration. PMID:26391050

  19. A G542X cystic fibrosis mouse model for examining nonsense mutation directed therapies.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Daniel R; Steele, Miarasa S; Valerio, Dana M; Miron, Alexander; Mann, Rachel J; LePage, David F; Conlon, Ronald A; Cotton, Calvin U; Drumm, Mitchell L; Hodges, Craig A

    2018-01-01

    Nonsense mutations are present in 10% of patients with CF, produce a premature termination codon in CFTR mRNA causing early termination of translation, and lead to lack of CFTR function. There are no currently available animal models which contain a nonsense mutation in the endogenous Cftr locus that can be utilized to test nonsense mutation therapies. In this study, we create a CF mouse model carrying the G542X nonsense mutation in Cftr using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. The G542X mouse model has reduced Cftr mRNA levels, demonstrates absence of CFTR function, and displays characteristic manifestations of CF mice such as reduced growth and intestinal obstruction. Importantly, CFTR restoration is observed in G542X intestinal organoids treated with G418, an aminoglycoside with translational readthrough capabilities. The G542X mouse model provides an invaluable resource for the identification of potential therapies of CF nonsense mutations as well as the assessment of in vivo effectiveness of these potential therapies targeting nonsense mutations.

  20. Novel In Vivo Model for Combinatorial Fluorescence Labeling in Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaolan; Gyabaah, Kenneth; Nickkholgh, Bita; Cline, J. Mark; Balaji, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The epithelial layer of prostate glands contains several types of cells, including luminal and basal cells. Yet there is paucity of animal models to study the cellular origin of normal or neoplastic development in the prostate to facilitate the treatment of heterogenous prostate diseases by targeting individual cell lineages. METHODS We developed a mouse model that expresses different types of fluorescent proteins (XFPs) specifically in prostatic cells. Using an in vivo stochastic fluorescent protein combinatorial strategy, XFP signals were expressed specifically in prostate of Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) knock-out, K-RasG12D knock-in, and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and PKD1 double knock-out mice under the control of PB-Cre promoter. RESULTS In vivo XFP signals were observed in prostate of PKD1 knock-out, K-RasG12D knock-in, and PTEN PKD1 double knock-out mice, which developed normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic prostate, respectively. The patchy expression pattern of XFPs in neoplasia tissue indicated the clonal origin of cancer cells in the prostate. CONCLUSIONS The transgenic mouse models demonstrate combinatorial fluorescent protein expression in normal and cancerous prostatic tissues. This novel prostate-specific fluorescent labeled mouse model, which we named Prorainbow, could be useful in studying benign and malignant pathology of prostate. PMID:25753731

  1. Novel In Vivo model for combinatorial fluorescence labeling in mouse prostate.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaolan; Gyabaah, Kenneth; Nickkholgh, Bita; Cline, J Mark; Balaji, K C

    2015-06-15

    The epithelial layer of prostate glands contains several types of cells, including luminal and basal cells. Yet there is paucity of animal models to study the cellular origin of normal or neoplastic development in the prostate to facilitate the treatment of heterogenous prostate diseases by targeting individual cell lineages. We developed a mouse model that expresses different types of fluorescent proteins (XFPs) specifically in prostatic cells. Using an in vivo stochastic fluorescent protein combinatorial strategy, XFP signals were expressed specifically in prostate of Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) knock-out, K-Ras(G) (12) (D) knock-in, and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and PKD1 double knock-out mice under the control of PB-Cre promoter. In vivo XFP signals were observed in prostate of PKD1 knock-out, K-Ras(G) (12) (D) knock-in, and PTEN PKD1 double knock-out mice, which developed normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic prostate, respectively. The patchy expression pattern of XFPs in neoplasia tissue indicated the clonal origin of cancer cells in the prostate. The transgenic mouse models demonstrate combinatorial fluorescent protein expression in normal and cancerous prostatic tissues. This novel prostate-specific fluorescent labeled mouse model, which we named Prorainbow, could be useful in studying benign and malignant pathology of prostate. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Humanized Mouse Models for the Study of Human Malaria Parasite Biology, Pathogenesis, and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Minkah, Nana K; Schafer, Carola; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2018-01-01

    Malaria parasite infection continues to inflict extensive morbidity and mortality in resource-poor countries. The insufficiently understood parasite biology, continuously evolving drug resistance and the lack of an effective vaccine necessitate intensive research on human malaria parasites that can inform the development of new intervention tools. Humanized mouse models have been greatly improved over the last decade and enable the direct study of human malaria parasites in vivo in the laboratory. Nevertheless, no small animal model developed so far is capable of maintaining the complete life cycle of Plasmodium parasites that infect humans. The ultimate goal is to develop humanized mouse systems in which a Plasmodium infection closely reproduces all stages of a parasite infection in humans, including pre-erythrocytic infection, blood stage infection and its associated pathology, transmission as well as the human immune response to infection. Here, we discuss current humanized mouse models and the future directions that should be taken to develop next-generation models for human malaria parasite research.

  3. Mouse models to study the effect of cardiovascular risk factors on brain structure and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Bink, Diewertje I; Ritz, Katja; Aronica, Eleonora; van der Weerd, Louise; Daemen, Mat JAP

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical data indicates that hemodynamic changes caused by cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, heart failure, and hypertension affect cognition. Yet, the underlying mechanisms of the resulting vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) are poorly understood. One reason for the lack of mechanistic insights in VCI is that research in dementia primarily focused on Alzheimer's disease models. To fill in this gap, we critically reviewed the published data and various models of VCI. Typical findings in VCI include reduced cerebral perfusion, blood–brain barrier alterations, white matter lesions, and cognitive deficits, which have also been reported in different cardiovascular mouse models. However, the tests performed are incomplete and differ between models, hampering a direct comparison between models and studies. Nevertheless, from the currently available data we conclude that a few existing surgical animal models show the key features of vascular cognitive decline, with the bilateral common carotid artery stenosis hypoperfusion mouse model as the most promising model. The transverse aortic constriction and myocardial infarction models may be good alternatives, but these models are as yet less characterized regarding the possible cerebral changes. Mixed models could be used to study the combined effects of different cardiovascular diseases on the deterioration of cognition during aging. PMID:23963364

  4. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H.M.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G.J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. Pancreatic organoids can be rapidly generated from resected tumors and biopsies, survive cryopreservation and exhibit ductal- and disease stage-specific characteristics. Orthotopically transplanted neoplastic organoids recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor development by forming early-grade neoplasms that progress to locally invasive and metastatic carcinomas. Due to their ability to be genetically manipulated, organoids are a platform to probe genetic cooperation. Comprehensive transcriptional and proteomic analyses of murine pancreatic organoids revealed genes and pathways altered during disease progression. The confirmation of many of these protein changes in human tissues demonstrates that organoids are a facile model system to discover characteristics of this deadly malignancy. PMID:25557080

  5. Treating Duchenne Cardiomyopathy in the Mouse Model by Gene Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-01

    associated virus (AAV) CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeat) gene editing therapy for Duchenne cardiomyopathy in the mdx model. In...this funding period, we performed AAV CRISPR therapy in young adult mdx mice. We observed widespread dystrophin restoration in the heart on...than dystrophin-null mice. In summary, our results suggest that the low-level dystrophin restoration obtained from the current AAV CRISPR

  6. The Gut Microbiome Is Altered in a Letrozole-Induced Mouse Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Scott T.; Skarra, Danalea V.; Rivera, Alissa J.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2016-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have reproductive and metabolic abnormalities that result in an increased risk of infertility, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The large intestine contains a complex community of microorganisms (the gut microbiome) that is dysregulated in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a letrozole-induced PCOS mouse model, we demonstrated significant diet-independent changes in the gut microbial community, suggesting that gut microbiome dysbiosis may also occur in PCOS women. Letrozole treatment was associated with a time-dependent shift in the gut microbiome and a substantial reduction in overall species and phylogenetic richness. Letrozole treatment also correlated with significant changes in the abundance of specific Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes previously implicated in other mouse models of metabolic disease in a time-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the hyperandrogenemia observed in PCOS may significantly alter the gut microbiome independently of diet. PMID:26731268

  7. Chronodependent effect of interleukin-2 on mouse spleen cells in the model of cyclophosphamide immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Shurlygina, A V; Mel'nikova, E V; Trufakin, V A

    2015-02-01

    We studied the chronodependent effect of IL-2 in the experimental model of immunodeficiency, cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression in mice. IL-2 in a dose of 100 U/ mouse was administered at 10.00 and 16.00 for 3 days after injection of cyclophosphamide. In contrast to the morning treatment with the cytokine, evening administration produced antiapoptotic effect on splenocytes and stimulated proliferation to a greater extent. This was accompanied by an increase in the number of CD4(+), CD25(+) and CD4(+)25(+) cells in the spleen to a level of intact mice. More pronounced effect of the evening mode of IL-2 administration on the proliferation and subpopulation composition of mouse spleen cells in the studied model can be associated with high blood level of CD25(+) cells at this time of the day.

  8. Fucoidan extracted from Fucus evanescens prevents endotoxin-induced damage in a mouse model of endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana A; Besednova, Natalya N; Somova, Larisa M; Plekhova, Natalya G

    2014-01-31

    An important problem of treating patients with endotoxemia is to find drugs to reduce the negative effects of endotoxin on the organism. We tested fucoidan (sulfated polysaccharide) from the brown alga Fucus evanescens as a potential drug in a mouse model of endotoxemia inducted by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The survival time of mice injected with LPS increased under fucoidan treatment compared with the group of mice injected with LPS only. The preventive administration of fucoidan to mice with endotoxemia resulted in inhibition of increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα and IL-6), as well as decreasing of the processes of hypercoagulability. The parenteral or per os administration of fucoidan resulted in decreasing the degree of microcirculatory disorders and secondary dystrophic-destructive changes in parenchymal organs of mice with endotoxemia. Taken together, these results demonstrate that fucoidan prevents endotoxin-induced damage in a mouse model of endotoxemia and increases the mice's resistance to LPS.

  9. Heterogeneity in Oligodendroglia: Is it Relevant to Mouse Models and Human Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Ornelas, Isis M.; McLane, Lauren E.; Saliu, Aminat; Evangelou, Angelina V.; Khandker, Luipa; Wood, Teresa L.

    2016-01-01

    There are many lines of evidence indicating that OPC and oligodendrocyte populations in the CNS are heterogeneous based on their developmental origins as well as from morphological and molecular criteria. Whether these distinctions reflect functional heterogeneity is less clear and has been the subject of considerable debate. Recent findings particularly from knockout mouse models have provided new evidence for regional variations in myelination phenotypes, particularly between brain and spinal cord. These data raise the possibility that oligodendrocytes in these regions have different functional capacities and/or ability to compensate for loss of a specific gene. The goal of this review is to briefly revisit the evidence for oligodendrocyte heterogeneity and then to present data from transgenic and demyelinating mouse models suggesting functional heterogeneity in myelination, demyelination and remyelination in the CNS and finally, to discuss the implications of these findings for human diseases. PMID:27557736

  10. The Relevance of Mouse Models for Investigating Age-Related Bone Loss in Humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mice are increasingly used for investigation of the pathophysiology of osteoporosis because their genome is easily manipulated, and their skeleton is similar to that of humans. Unlike the human skeleton, however, the murine skeleton continues to grow slowly after puberty and lacks osteonal remodeling of cortical bone. Yet, like humans, mice exhibit loss of cancellous bone, thinning of cortical bone, and increased cortical porosity with advancing age. Histologic evidence in mice and humans alike indicates that inadequate osteoblast-mediated refilling of resorption cavities created during bone remodeling is responsible. Mouse models of progeria also show bone loss and skeletal defects associated with senescence of early osteoblast progenitors. Additionally, mouse models of atherosclerosis, which often occurs in osteoporotic participants, also suffer bone loss, suggesting that common diseases of aging share pathophysiological pathways. Knowledge of the causes of skeletal fragility in mice should therefore be applicable to humans if inherent limitations are recognized. PMID:23689830

  11. Preclinical Imaging for the Study of Mouse Models of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Adelaide; Orlandella, Francesca Maria; Iervolino, Paola Lucia Chiara; Klain, Michele; Salvatore, Giuliana

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer, which represents the most common tumors among endocrine malignancies, comprises a wide range of neoplasms with different clinical aggressiveness. One of the most important challenges in research is to identify mouse models that most closely resemble human pathology; other goals include finding a way to detect markers of disease that common to humans and mice and to identify the most appropriate and least invasive therapeutic strategies for specific tumor types. Preclinical thyroid imaging includes a wide range of techniques that allow for morphological and functional characterization of thyroid disease as well as targeting and in most cases, this imaging allows quantitative analysis of the molecular pattern of the thyroid cancer. The aim of this review paper is to provide an overview of all of the imaging techniques used to date both for diagnosis and theranostic purposes in mouse models of thyroid cancer. PMID:29258188

  12. Mutant mouse models and their contribution to our knowledge of corpus luteum development, function and regression.

    PubMed

    Henkes, Luiz E; Davis, John S; Rueda, Bo R

    2003-11-10

    The corpus luteum is a unique organ, which is transitory in nature. The development, maintenance and regression of the corpus luteum are regulated by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine signaling events. Defining the specific mediators of luteal development, maintenance and regression has been difficult and often perplexing due to the complexity that stems from the variety of cell types that make up the luteal tissue. Moreover, some regulators may serve dual functions as a luteotropic and luteolytic agent depending on the temporal and spatial environment in which they are expressed. As a result, some confusion is present in the interpretation of in vitro and in vivo studies. More recently investigators have utilized mutant mouse models to define the functional significance of specific gene products. The goal of this mini-review is to identify and discuss mutant mouse models that have luteal anomalies, which may provide some clues as to the significance of specific regulators of corpus luteum function.

  13. Whole-brain ex-vivo quantitative MRI of the cuprizone mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Samuel A.; Vernon, Anthony C.; Torres, Joel; Dell’Acqua, Flavio; Williams, Steve C.R.; Cash, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Myelin is a critical component of the nervous system and a major contributor to contrast in Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. However, the precise contribution of myelination to multiple MR modalities is still under debate. The cuprizone mouse is a well-established model of demyelination that has been used in several MR studies, but these have often imaged only a single slice and analysed a small region of interest in the corpus callosum. We imaged and analyzed the whole brain of the cuprizone mouse ex-vivo using high-resolution quantitative MR methods (multi-component relaxometry, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and morphometry) and found changes in multiple regions, including the corpus callosum, cerebellum, thalamus and hippocampus. The presence of inflammation, confirmed with histology, presents difficulties in isolating the sensitivity and specificity of these MR methods to demyelination using this model. PMID:27833805

  14. A metabolomics and mouse models approach to study inflammatory and immune responses to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, Albert J.; Li, Henghong

    2013-12-02

    The three-year project entitled "A Metabolomics and Mouse Models Approach to Study Inflammatory and Immune Responses to Radiation" was initiated in September 2009. The overall objectives of this project were to investigate the acute and persistent effects of low dose radiation on T cell lymphocyte function and physiology, as well the contributions of these cells to radiation-induced inflammatory responses. Inflammation after ionizing radiation (IR), even at low doses, may impact a variety of disease processes, including infectious disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other potentially inflammatory disorders. There were three overall specific aims: 1. To investigate acute and persistent effects ofmore » low dose radiation on T cell subsets and function; 2. A genetic approach with mouse models to investigate p38 MAPK pathways that are involved in radiation-induced inflammatory signaling; 3. To investigate the effect of radiation quality on the inflammatory response. We have completed the work proposed in these aims.« less

  15. Anticancer activity of bacteriophage T4 and its mutant HAP1 in mouse experimental tumour models.

    PubMed

    Dabrowska, Krystyna; Opolski, Adam; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Switala-Jelen, Kinga; Godlewska, Joanna; Boratynski, Janusz; Syper, Danuta; Weber-Dabrowska, Beata; Gorski, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we have shown the ability of the bacteriophage T4 and its substrain HAP1 (selected for a higher affinity to melanoma cells) to reveal antimetastatic activity in a mouse melanoma model. Here, we investigated the potential phage anticancer activity in primary tumour models. Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with B16 or LLC cells (collected from in vitro culture). Bacteriophages T4 and HAP1 were injected intraperitoneally daily (8 x 10(8)pfu/mouse, except the experiment concerning the dose-dependence). Treatment with purified preparations of bacteriophage T4 resulted in significant reduction of tumour size, the effect being dose-dependent. HAP1 was more effective than T4 and its activity was also dose-dependent. Parallel experiments with non-purified bacteriophage lysates resulted in significant stimulation of tumour growth. These data suggest that purified bacteriophages may inhibit tumour growth, a phenomenon with potentially important clinical implications in oncology.

  16. Cilia/Ift protein and motor -related bone diseases and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways.

  17. Protective effects of vaccines against Bordetella parapertussis in a mouse intranasal challenge model.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Eguchi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Mineo

    2010-06-17

    Bordetella parapertussis causes typical whooping cough, as does Bordetella pertussis. However, current commercial vaccines are ineffective against B. parapertussis. In an effort to develop vaccines that are effective in protecting against both B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, we examined the protective effects of vaccines prepared from whole-cells and from recombinant proteins derived from B. parapertussis in a mouse intranasal challenge model. We confirmed current pertussis vaccines did not induce protective immunity against B. parapertussis in the mouse model. A whole-cell vaccine prepared from B. parapertussis induced protective immunity against B. parapertussis but not against B. pertussis, suggesting a combination of a current pertussis vaccine with a whole-cell parapertussis vaccine might prevent whooping cough caused by both species of Bordetella. We also found that filamentous hemagglutinin was a protective antigen of B. parapertussis. Our observations should lead to the development of new pertussis vaccines that can control the two prevalent forms of whooping cough.

  18. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  19. Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    collegiate football players: the NCAA Concussion Study. JAMA 290, 2549-2555. Hinkebein, J.H., Martin, T.A., Callahan, C.D., and Johnstone, B. (2003). Concept...al., 2014). We have also developed a novel mouse model of mild TBI (mTBI)/ concussion in which we have demonstrated cognitive dysfunction at 6, 12...2010). Boxing-acute complications and late sequelae: from concussion to dementia. Dtsch Arztebl Int 107, 835-839. Gaetz, M., and Weinberg, H

  20. Abnormal Notochord Branching Is Associated with Foregut Malformations in the Adriamycin Treated Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hajduk, Piotr; Sato, Hideaki; Puri, Prem; Murphy, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Oesophageal atresia (OA) and tracheooesophageal fistula (TOF) are relatively common human congenital malformations of the foregut where the oesophagus does not connect with the stomach and there is an abnormal connection between the stomach and the respiratory tract. They require immediate corrective surgery and have an impact on the future health of the individual. These abnormalities are mimicked by exposure of rat and mouse embryos in utero to the drug adriamycin. The causes of OA/TOF during human development are not known, however a number of mouse mutants where different signalling pathways are directly affected, show similar abnormalities, implicating multiple and complex signalling mechanisms. The similarities in developmental outcome seen in human infants and in the adriamycin treated mouse model underline the potential of this model to unravel the early embryological events and further our understanding of the processes disturbed, leading to such abnormalities. Here we report a systematic study of the foregut and adjacent tissues in embryos treated with adriamycin at E7 and E8 and analysed between E9 and E12, comparing morphology in 3D in 149 specimens. We describe a spectrum of 8 defects, the most common of which is ventral displacement and branching of the notochord (in 94% of embryos at E10) and a close spatial correspondence between the site of notochord branching and defects of the foregut. In addition gene expression analysis shows altered dorso-ventral foregut patterning in the vicinity of notochord branches. This study shows a number of features of the adriamycin mouse model not previously reported, implicates the notochord as a primary site of disturbance in such abnormalities and underlines the importance of the model to further address the mechanistic basis of foregut congenital abnormalities. PMID:22132119

  1. Virotherapy of the Malignant U87 Human Glioblastoma in the Orthotopic Xenotransplantation Mouse SCID Model.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Razumov, I A; Kolosova, I V; Romashchenko, A V; Zavjalov, E L

    2018-01-01

    The possibility of glioblastoma virotherapy at intravenous injection of the LIVP-GFP recombinant virus was studied in experimental model of orthotopic xenotransplantation of human glioblastoma cell line U87 to SCID laboratory mice. The LIVP-GFP recombinant virus deficient for thymidine kinase exhibited a significantly greater oncolytic capacity than the original LIVP virus, and an intravenous injection of LIVP-GFP at the early stages of tumorigenesis in mouse brain in most cases resulted in the lysis of the tumor.

  2. Characterization of Neurofibromas of the Skin and Spinal Roots in a Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    renewal program of stem/progenitor cells can cause tumorigenesis. By utilizing genetically engineered mouse models of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1...pathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla and died at birth (Gitler et al., 2003). To circumvent early lethality of the Nf1NC mice, we utilized a previously...Supplemental experimental procedures Tissue Processing For histological analysis, we utilized both paraffin sections and frozen sections. For both

  3. Obesity-Linked Mouse Models of Liver Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Jimmy Stauffer, Ph.D., and colleagues working with Robert  Wiltrout, Ph.D., in CCR’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, along with collaborators in the Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, have developed a novel mouse model that demonstrates how fat-producing phenotypes can influence the development of hepatic cancer.   The team recently reported their findings in Cancer Research.

  4. Abnormal notochord branching is associated with foregut malformations in the adriamycin treated mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hajduk, Piotr; Sato, Hideaki; Puri, Prem; Murphy, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Oesophageal atresia (OA) and tracheooesophageal fistula (TOF) are relatively common human congenital malformations of the foregut where the oesophagus does not connect with the stomach and there is an abnormal connection between the stomach and the respiratory tract. They require immediate corrective surgery and have an impact on the future health of the individual. These abnormalities are mimicked by exposure of rat and mouse embryos in utero to the drug adriamycin. The causes of OA/TOF during human development are not known, however a number of mouse mutants where different signalling pathways are directly affected, show similar abnormalities, implicating multiple and complex signalling mechanisms. The similarities in developmental outcome seen in human infants and in the adriamycin treated mouse model underline the potential of this model to unravel the early embryological events and further our understanding of the processes disturbed, leading to such abnormalities. Here we report a systematic study of the foregut and adjacent tissues in embryos treated with adriamycin at E7 and E8 and analysed between E9 and E12, comparing morphology in 3D in 149 specimens. We describe a spectrum of 8 defects, the most common of which is ventral displacement and branching of the notochord (in 94% of embryos at E10) and a close spatial correspondence between the site of notochord branching and defects of the foregut. In addition gene expression analysis shows altered dorso-ventral foregut patterning in the vicinity of notochord branches. This study shows a number of features of the adriamycin mouse model not previously reported, implicates the notochord as a primary site of disturbance in such abnormalities and underlines the importance of the model to further address the mechanistic basis of foregut congenital abnormalities.

  5. Vanadium Inhalation in a Mouse Model for the Understanding of Air-Suspended Particle Systemic Repercussion

    PubMed Central

    Fortoul, T. I.; Rodriguez-Lara, V.; Gonzalez-Villalva, A.; Rojas-Lemus, M.; Cano-Gutierrez, G.; Ustarroz-Cano, M.; Colin-Barenque, L.; Montaño, L. F.; García-Pelez, I.; Bizarro-Nevares, P.; Lopez-Valdez, N.; Falcon-Rodriguez, C. I.; Jimenez-Martínez, R. S.; Ruiz-Guerrero, M. L.; López-Zepeda, L. S.; Morales-Rivero, A.; Muñiz-Rivera-Cambas, A.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increased concern about the health effects that air-suspended particles have on human health which have been dissected in animal models. Using CD-1 mouse, we explore the effects that vanadium inhalation produce in different tissues and organs. Our findings support the systemic effects of air pollution. In this paper, we describe our findings in different organs in our conditions and contrast our results with the literature. PMID:21716674

  6. Exaggerated NMDA Mediated LTD in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome and Pharmacological Rescuing by Memantine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-McKean, Jonah J.; Costa, Alberto C. S.

    2011-01-01

    The Ts65Dn mouse is the best-studied animal model for Down syndrome. In the experiments described here, NMDA-mediated or mGluR-mediated LTD was induced in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices from Ts65Dn and euploid control mice by bath application of 20 [mu]M NMDA for 3 min and 50 [mu]M DHPG for 5 min, respectively. We found that Ts65Dn mice…

  7. Usefulness of running wheel for detection of congestive heart failure in dilated cardiomyopathy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Masami; Odagiri, Fuminori; Suzuki, Takeshi; Murayama, Takashi; Nakazato, Yuji; Unuma, Kana; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Takashi; Morimoto, Sachio; Kurebayashi, Nagomi

    2013-01-01

    Inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a progressive disease that often results in death from congestive heart failure (CHF) or sudden cardiac death (SCD). Mouse models with human DCM mutation are useful to investigate the developmental mechanisms of CHF and SCD, but knowledge of the severity of CHF in live mice is necessary. We aimed to diagnose CHF in live DCM model mice by measuring voluntary exercise using a running wheel and to determine causes of death in these mice. A knock-in mouse with a mutation in cardiac troponin T (ΔK210) (DCM mouse), which results in frequent death with a t(1/2) of 70 to 90 days, was used as a DCM model. Until 2 months of age, average wheel-running activity was similar between wild-type and DCM mice (approximately 7 km/day). At approximately 3 months, some DCM mice demonstrated low running activity (LO: <1 km/day) while others maintained high running activity (HI: >5 km/day). In the LO group, the lung weight/body weight ratio was much higher than that in the other groups, and the lungs were infiltrated with hemosiderin-loaded alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, echocardiography showed more severe ventricular dilation and a lower ejection fraction, whereas Electrocardiography (ECG) revealed QRS widening. There were two patterns in the time courses of running activity before death in DCM mice: deaths with maintained activity and deaths with decreased activity. Our results indicate that DCM mice with low running activity developed severe CHF and that running wheels are useful for detection of CHF in mouse models. We found that approximately half of ΔK210 DCM mice die suddenly before onset of CHF, whereas others develop CHF, deteriorate within 10 to 20 days, and die.

  8. Ventilatory Patterning in a Mouse Model of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Brian B; Strohl, Kingman P; Gillombardo, Carl B; Jacono, Frank J

    2010-01-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) is a breathing pattern characterized by waxing and waning of breath volume and frequency, and is often recognized following stroke, when causal pathways are often obscure. We used an animal model to address the hypothesis that cerebral infarction is a mechanism for producing breathing instability. Fourteen male A/J mice underwent either stroke (n=7) or sham (n=7) procedure. Ventilation was measured using whole body plethysmography. Respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT) and minute ventilation (Ve) mean values and coefficient of variation were computed for ventilation and oscillatory behavior. In addition, the ventilatory data were computationally fit to models to quantify autocorrelation, mutual information, sample entropy and a nonlinear complexity index. At the same time post procedure, stroke when compared to sham animal breathing consisted of a lower RR and autocorrelation, higher coefficient of variation for VT and higher coefficient of variation for Ve. Mutual information and the nonlinear complexity index were higher in breathing following stroke which also demonstrated a waxing/waning pattern. The absence of stroke in the sham animals was verified anatomically. We conclude that ventilatory pattern following cerebral infarction demonstrated increased variability with increased nonlinear patterning and a waxing/waning pattern, consistent with CSR. PMID:20472101

  9. Mouse models for the study of postnatal cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Del Olmo-Turrubiarte, A; Calzada-Torres, A; Díaz-Rosas, G; Palma-Lara, I; Sánchez-Urbina, R; Balderrábano-Saucedo, N A; González-Márquez, H; Garcia-Alonso, P; Contreras-Ramos, A

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to create a postnatal model for cardiac hypertrophy (CH), in order to explain the mechanisms that are present in childhood cardiac hypertrophy. Five days after implantation, intraperitoneal (IP) isoproterenol (ISO) was injected for 7 days to pregnant female mice. The fetuses were obtained at 15, 17 and 19 dpc from both groups, also newborns (NB), neonates (7-15 days) and young adults (6 weeks of age). Histopathological exams were done on the hearts. Immunohistochemistry and western blot demonstrated GATA4 and PCNA protein expression, qPCR real time the mRNA of adrenergic receptors (α-AR and β-AR), alpha and beta myosins (α-MHC, β-MHC) and GATA4. After the administration of ISO, there was no change in the number of offsprings. We observed significant structural changes in the size of the offspring hearts. Morphometric analysis revealed an increase in the size of the left ventricular wall and interventricular septum (IVS). Histopathological analysis demonstrated loss of cellular compaction and presence of left ventricular small fibrous foci after birth. Adrenergic receptors might be responsible for changing a physiological into a pathological hypertrophy. However GATA4 seemed to be the determining factor in the pathology. A new animal model was established for the study of pathologic CH in early postnatal stages.

  10. Investigations of oocyte in vitro maturation within a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Alexis Heng Boon; Chye, Ng Soon

    2004-02-01

    This study attempted to develop a 'less meiotically competent' murine model for oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM), which could more readily be extrapolated to human clinical assisted reproduction. Oocyte meiotic competence was drastically reduced upon shortening the standard duration of in vivo gonadotrophin stimulation from 48 h to 24 h, and by selecting only naked or partially naked germinal vesicle oocytes, instead of fully cumulus enclosed oocyte complexes. With such a less meiotically competent model, only porcine granulosa coculture significantly enhanced the oocyte maturation rate in vitro, whereas no significant enhancement was observed with macaque and murine granulosa coculture. Increased serum concentrations and the supplementation of gonadotrophins, follicular fluid and extracellular matrix gel within the culture medium did not enhance IVM under either cell-free or coculture conditions. Culture medium conditioned by porcine granulosa also enhanced the maturation rate, and this beneficial effect was not diminished upon freeze-thawing. Enhanced IVM in the presence of porcine granulosa coculture did not, however, translate into improved developmental competence, as assessed by in vitro fertilization and embryo culture to the blastocyst stage.

  11. [Establishment of mouse endometrial injury model by electrocoagulation].

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoxiao; Lin, Xiaona; Jiang, Yinshen; Shi, Libing; Wang, Jieyu; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Songying

    2014-12-23

    To establish the murine model of moderate endometrial injury. Electrocoagulation was applied to induce endometrial injury of ICR mice with 0.5 watts power while contralateral uterine cavity acted as control without electrocoagulation. The endometrial histomorphology was observed in 7 days later by microscopy and fetal number of each lateral uterus assessed at 17.5 days after pregnancy. At 7 days post-electrocoagulation, the average endometrial thickness of operating side was significantly thinner than that of control side (1.14 ± 0.08 vs 1.88 ± 0.15 mm, P < 0.05). The density of endometrial glands of operating side was significantly lower than that of control side (20 ± 2 vs 32 ± 3 per 100x field, P < 0.05). After pregnancy, the average number of embryos at operating side decreased by 63.1% compared with control (3 ± 2 vs 8 ± 2, P < 0.01). The established model of endometrial electrocoagulation injury shows morphologic changes and decreased fertile ability. It has potential uses for animal studies of endometrial injury treatment.

  12. Mouse Models for Investigating the Developmental Bases of Human Birth Defects

    PubMed Central

    MOON, ANNE M.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians and basic scientists share an interest in discovering how genetic or environmental factors interact to perturb normal development and cause birth defects and human disease. Given the complexity of such interactions, it is not surprising that 4% of human infants are born with a congenital malformation, and cardiovascular defects occur in nearly 1%. Our research is based on the fundamental hypothesis that an understanding of normal and abnormal development will permit us to generate effective strategies for both prevention and treatment of human birth defects. Animal models are invaluable in these efforts because they allow one to interrogate the genetic, molecular and cellular events that distinguish normal from abnormal development. Several features of the mouse make it a particularly powerful experimental model: it is a mammalian system with similar embryology, anatomy and physiology to humans; genes, proteins and regulatory programs are largely conserved between human and mouse; and finally, gene targeting in murine embryonic stem cells has made the mouse genome amenable to sophisticated genetic manipulation currently unavailable in any other model organism. PMID:16641221

  13. Spatio-temporal Model of Xenobiotic Distribution and Metabolism in an in Silico Mouse Liver Lobule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao; Sluka, James; Clendenon, Sherry; Glazier, James; Ryan, Jennifer; Dunn, Kenneth; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James

    Our study aims to construct a structurally plausible in silico model of a mouse liver lobule to simulate the transport of xenobiotics and the production of their metabolites. We use a physiologically-based model to calculate blood-flow rates in a network of mouse liver sinusoids and simulate transport, uptake and biotransformation of xenobiotics within the in silico lobule. Using our base model, we then explore the effects of variations of compound-specific (diffusion, transport and metabolism) and compound-independent (temporal alteration of blood flow pattern) parameters, and examine their influence on the distribution of xenobiotics and metabolites. Our simulations show that the transport mechanism (diffusive and transporter-mediated) of xenobiotics and blood flow both impact the regional distribution of xenobiotics in a mouse hepatic lobule. Furthermore, differential expression of metabolic enzymes along each sinusoid's portal to central axis, together with differential cellular availability of xenobiotics, induce non-uniform production of metabolites. Thus, the heterogeneity of the biochemical and biophysical properties of xenobiotics, along with the complexity of blood flow, result in different exposures to xenobiotics for hepatocytes at different lobular locations. We acknowledge support from National Institute of Health GM 077138 and GM 111243.

  14. The senescence accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8): A novel murine model for cardiac aging.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Babu, Sahana Suresh; Palaniyandi, Suresh S; Watanabe, Kenichi; Cooke, John P; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A

    2017-05-01

    Because cardiovascular disease remains the major cause of mortality and morbidity world-wide, there remains a compelling need for new insights and novel therapeutic avenues. In this regard, the senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) line is a particularly good model for studying the effects of aging on cardiovascular health. Accumulating evidence suggests that this model may shed light on age-associated cardiac and vascular dysfunction and disease. These animals manifest evidence of inflammation, oxidative stress and adverse cardiac remodeling that may recapitulate processes involved in human disease. Early alterations in oxidative damage promote endoplasmic reticulum stress to trigger apoptosis and cytokine production in this genetically susceptible mouse strain. Conversely, pharmacological treatments that reduce inflammation and oxidative stress improve cardiac function in these animals. Therefore, the SAMP8 mouse model provides an exciting opportunity to expand our knowledge of aging in cardiovascular disease and the potential identification of novel targets of treatment. Herein, we review the previous studies performed in SAMP8 mice that provide insight into age-related cardiovascular alterations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Synuclein impairs trafficking and signaling of BDNF in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Yang, Wanlin; Florio, Jazmin B; Rockenstein, Edward; Spencer, Brian; Orain, Xavier M; Dong, Stephanie X; Li, Huayan; Chen, Xuqiao; Sung, Kijung; Rissman, Robert A; Masliah, Eliezer; Ding, Jianqing; Wu, Chengbiao

    2017-06-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that hyperphosphorylation of tau protein plays a role in neuronal toxicities of α-synuclein (ASYN) in neurodegenerative disease such as familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease. Using a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD) that expresses GFP-ASYN driven by the PDGF-β promoter, we investigated how accumulation of ASYN impacted axonal function. We found that retrograde axonal trafficking of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in DIV7 cultures of E18 cortical neurons was markedly impaired at the embryonic stage, even though hyperphosphorylation of tau was not detectable in these neurons at this stage. Interestingly, we found that overexpressed ASYN interacted with dynein and induced a significant increase in the activated levels of small Rab GTPases such as Rab5 and Rab7, both key regulators of endocytic processes. Furthermore, expression of ASYN resulted in neuronal atrophy in DIV7 cortical cultures of either from E18 transgenic mouse model or from rat E18 embryos that were transiently transfected with ASYN-GFP for 72 hrs. Our studies suggest that excessive ASYN likely alters endocytic pathways leading to axonal dysfunction in embryonic cortical neurons in PD mouse models.

  16. Inflammatory Cytokine Pattern Is Sex-Dependent in Mouse Cutaneous Melanoma Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Surcel, Mihaela

    2017-01-01

    We present the evaluation of inflammatory cytokines in mouse cutaneous melanoma experimental model, as markers of disease evolution. Moreover, to test our experimental model, we have used low doses of dacarbazine (DTIC). C57 BL/6J mouse of both sexes were subjected to experimental cutaneous melanoma and treated with low doses of DTIC. Clinical parameters and serum cytokines were followed during tumor evolution and during DTIC therapy. Cytokine/chemokine pattern was assessed using xMAP technology and the following molecules were quantified: interleukins (IL)-1-beta, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), interferon (IFN)-gamma, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC). Significant differences were found between normal females and males mice, female mice having a statistically higher serum concentration of IL-1-beta compared to male mice, while males have a significantly higher concentration of MIP-1-alpha. During melanoma evolution in the female group, IL-1-beta, MIP-1-alpha, and KC circulatory levels were found 10-fold increased, while other cytokines doubled their values. In the male mice group, only circulatory KC increased 4 times, while IL-1-beta and TNF-alpha doubled their circulatory values. Various serum cytokines correlated with the disease evolution in cutaneous melanoma mouse model. PMID:29318162

  17. Longitudinal in vivo muscle function analysis of the DMSXL mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Decostre, Valérie; Vignaud, Alban; Matot, Béatrice; Huguet, Aline; Ledoux, Isabelle; Bertil, Emilie; Gjata, Bernard; Carlier, Pierre G; Gourdon, Geneviève; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2013-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common adult muscle dystrophy. In view of emerging therapies, which use animal models as a proof of principle, the development of reliable outcome measures for in vivo longitudinal study of mouse skeletal muscle function is becoming crucial. To satisfy this need, we have developed a device to measure ankle dorsi- and plantarflexion torque in rodents. We present an in vivo 8-month longitudinal study of the contractile properties of the skeletal muscles of the DMSXL mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1. Between 4 and 12 months of age, we observed a reduction in muscle strength in the ankle dorsi- and plantarflexors of DMSXL compared to control mice although the strength per muscle cross-section was normal. Mild steady myotonia but no abnormal muscle fatigue was also observed in the DMSXL mice. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological analysis performed at the end of the study showed respectively reduced muscle cross-section area and smaller muscle fibre diameter in DMSXL mice. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the feasibility of carrying out longitudinal in vivo studies of muscle function over several months in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy confirming the feasibility of this method to test preclinical therapeutics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding mental retardation in Down's syndrome using trisomy 16 mouse models.

    PubMed

    Galdzicki, Z; Siarey, R J

    2003-06-01

    Mental retardation in Down's syndrome, human trisomy 21, is characterized by developmental delays, language and memory deficits and other cognitive abnormalities. Neurophysiological and functional information is needed to understand the mechanisms of mental retardation in Down's syndrome. The trisomy mouse models provide windows into the molecular and developmental effects associated with abnormal chromosome numbers. The distal segment of mouse chromosome 16 is homologous to nearly the entire long arm of human chromosome 21. Therefore, mice with full or segmental trisomy 16 (Ts65Dn) are considered reliable animal models of Down's syndrome. Ts65Dn mice demonstrate impaired learning in spatial tests and abnormalities in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. We hypothesize that the physiological impairments in the Ts65Dn mouse hippocampus can model the suboptimal brain function occuring at various levels of Down's syndrome brain hierarchy, starting at a single neuron, and then affecting simple and complex neuronal networks. Once these elements create the gross brain structure, their dysfunctional activity cannot be overcome by extensive plasticity and redundancy, and therefore, at the end of the maturation period the mind inside this brain remains deficient and delayed in its capabilities. The complicated interactions that govern this aberrant developmental process cannot be rescued through existing compensatory mechanisms. In summary, overexpression of genes from chromosome 21 shifts biological homeostasis in the Down's syndrome brain to a new less functional state.

  19. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  20. Biology and therapy of inherited retinal degenerative disease: insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Veleri, Shobi; Lazar, Csilla H.; Chang, Bo; Sieving, Paul A.; Banin, Eyal; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration associated with the dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is a major cause of incurable vision loss. Tremendous progress has been made over the last two decades in discovering genes and genetic defects that lead to retinal diseases. The primary focus has now shifted to uncovering disease mechanisms and designing treatment strategies, especially inspired by the successful application of gene therapy in some forms of congenital blindness in humans. Both spontaneous and laboratory-generated mouse mutants have been valuable for providing fundamental insights into normal retinal development and for deciphering disease pathology. Here, we provide a review of mouse models of human retinal degeneration, with a primary focus on diseases affecting photoreceptor function. We also describe models associated with retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction or synaptic abnormalities. Furthermore, we highlight the crucial role of mouse models in elucidating retinal and photoreceptor biology in health and disease, and in the assessment of novel therapeutic modalities, including gene- and stem-cell-based therapies, for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:25650393

  1. The mouse as a model organism in aging research: usefulness, pitfalls and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Vanhooren, Valerie; Libert, Claude

    2013-01-01

    The mouse has become the favorite mammalian model. Among the many reasons for this privileged position of mice is their genetic proximity to humans, the possibilities of genetically manipulating their genomes and the availability of many tools, mutants and inbred strains. Also in the field of aging, mice have become very robust and reliable research tools. Since laboratory mice have a life expectancy of only a few years, genetic approaches and other strategies for intervening in aging can be tested by examining their effects on life span and aging parameters during the relatively short period of, for example, a PhD project. Moreover, experiments on mice with an extended life span as well as on mice demonstrating signs of (segmental) premature aging, together with genetic mapping strategies, have provided novel insights into the fundamental processes that drive aging. Finally, the results of studies on caloric restriction and pharmacological anti-aging treatments in mice have a high degree of relevance to humans. In this paper, we review a number of recent genetic mapping studies that have yielded novel insights into the aging process. We discuss the value of the mouse as a model for testing interventions in aging, such as caloric restriction, and we critically discuss mouse strains with an extended or a shortened life span as models of aging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk. Copyright © 2016 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging study of eye congenital birth defects in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Zachary; Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Xia, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Embryonic eyelid closure is a well-documented morphogenetic episode in mammalian eye development. Detection of eyelid closure defect in humans is a major challenge because eyelid closure and reopen occur entirely in utero. As a consequence, congenital eye defects that are associated with failure of embryonic eyelid closure remain unknown. To fill the gap, we developed a mouse model of defective eyelid closure. This preliminary work demonstrates that the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach can be used for the detection of extraocular muscle abnormalities in the mouse model. Methods Mice with either normal (Map3k1+/−) or defective (Map3k1−/−) embryonic eyelid closure were used in this study. Images of the extraocular muscles were obtained with a 9.4 T high resolution microimaging MRI system. The extraocular muscles were identified, segmented, and measured in each imaging slice using an in-house program. Results In agreement with histological findings, the imaging data show that mice with defective embryonic eyelid closure develop less extraocular muscle than normal mice. In addition, the size of the eyeballs was noticeably reduced in mice with defective embryonic eyelid closure. Conclusions We demonstrated that MRI can potentially be used for the study of extraocular muscle in the mouse model of the eye open-at-birth defect, despite the lack of specificity of muscle group provided by the current imaging resolution. PMID:28848319

  4. Interactions between Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal flora in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Meysick, K C; Garber, G E

    1992-02-01

    To study the role of vaginal flora and pH in the pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis, an intravaginal mouse model of infection was established. By employing this model, the vaginal flora and pH of mice could be monitored for changes caused by the parasite. As a baseline, the endemic vaginal flora of BALB/c mice was examined first and found to consist mainly of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species (32-76%). Lactobacilli and enteric bacilli were moderate (16-32%) in their frequency of isolation, and the prevalence of both anaerobic species and coagulase-negative staphylococci was low (4-16%). Vaginal pH was recorded at 6.5 +/- 0.3. Estrogenization, which was required for a sustained T. vaginalis infection, did not significantly alter vaginal flora; however, a slight rise in the number of bacterial species isolated per mouse and a drop in vaginal pH (6.2 +/- 0.5) were observed. Trichomonas vaginalis-infected mice did not appear to show significant changes in vaginal flora although vaginal pH was slightly increased. This mouse model could have applications in both immunologic and pathogenic studies of T. vaginalis and, with further modifications, aid in the study of protist-bacterial interactions.

  5. Follistatin does not influence the course of Escherichia coli K1 sepsis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Dieelberg, Catharina; Ribes, Sandra; Michel, Uwe; Redlich, Sandra; Brück, Wolfgang; Nau, Roland; Schütze, Sandra

    2012-12-01

    Follistatin (FS) is the binding protein of activin A and inhibits its actions. The activin/FS system participates in the fine tuning of the immune response, and concentrations of activin A and FS are elevated in serum of patients with sepsis. Intraperitoneal injection of FS markedly reduced mortality after lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in a mouse model. Here, we investigated whether FS also influences the disease course in a mouse model of sepsis induced by intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli K1, a gram-negative bacterium frequently causing septic bacterial infections. Intraperitoneal injection of 10 μg/mL FS 30 min before infection did not influence survival, weight, motor performance, or bacterial titers of the infected mice. Thus, we could not confirm the protective effect of FS observed during lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in our mouse model of E. coli sepsis. Although it is a promising therapeutic tool in chronic or acute inflammatory conditions not caused by virulent pathogens, FS does not seem to increase the resistance to bacterial infections.

  6. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents mitigate pathology in a mouse model of pseudoachondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Posey, Karen L.; Coustry, Francoise; Veerisetty, Alka C.; Hossain, Mohammad; Alcorn, Joseph L.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a severe short-limb dwarfing condition, results from mutations that cause misfolding of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Accumulated COMP in growth plate chondrocytes activates endoplasmic reticulum stress, leading to inflammation and chondrocyte death. Using a MT-COMP mouse model of PSACH that recapitulates the molecular and clinical PSACH phenotype, we previously reported that oxidative stress and inflammation play important and unappreciated roles in PSACH pathology. In this study, we assessed the ability of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents to affect skeletal and cellular pathology in our mouse model of PSACH. Treatment of MT-COMP mice with aspirin or resveratrol from birth to P28 decreased mutant COMP intracellular retention and chondrocyte cell death, and restored chondrocyte proliferation. Inflammatory markers associated with cartilage degradation and eosinophils were present in the joints of untreated juvenile MT-COMP mice, but were undetectable in treated mice. Most importantly, these treatments resulted in significantly increased femur length. This is the first and only therapeutic approach shown to mitigate both the chondrocyte and long-bone pathology of PSACH in a mouse model and suggests that reducing inflammation and oxidative stress early in the disease process may be a novel approach to treat this disorder. PMID:25859006

  7. Mouse Models of Down Syndrome as a Tool to Unravel the Causes of Mental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Noemí; Flórez, Jesús; Martínez-Cué, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Based on the homology of Hsa21 and the murine chromosomes Mmu16, Mmu17 and Mmu10, several mouse models of DS have been developed. The most commonly used model, the Ts65Dn mouse, has been widely used to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the mental disabilities seen in DS individuals. A wide array of neuromorphological alterations appears to compromise cognitive performance in trisomic mice. Enhanced inhibition due to alterations in GABAA-mediated transmission and disturbances in the glutamatergic, noradrenergic and cholinergic systems, among others, has also been demonstrated. DS cognitive dysfunction caused by neurodevelopmental alterations is worsened in later life stages by neurodegenerative processes. A number of pharmacological therapies have been shown to partially restore morphological anomalies concomitantly with cognition in these mice. In conclusion, the use of mouse models is enormously effective in the study of the neurobiological substrates of mental disabilities in DS and in the testing of therapies that rescue these alterations. These studies provide the basis for developing clinical trials in DS individuals and sustain the hope that some of these drugs will be useful in rescuing mental disabilities in DS individuals. PMID:22685678

  8. A chimeric human-mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Young, Nicholas A; Wu, Lai-Chu; Bruss, Michael; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Hampton, Jeffrey; Bolon, Brad; Jarjour, Wael N

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of Sjögren's Syndrome (SjS), the pathogenic mechanisms remain elusive and an ideal model for early drug discovery is not yet available. To establish a humanized mouse model of SjS, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy volunteers or patients with SjS were transferred into immunodeficient NOD-scid IL-2rγ(null) mouse recipients to produce chimeric mice. While no difference was observed in the distribution of cells, chimeric mice transferred with PBMCs from SjS patients produced enhanced cytokine levels, most significantly IFN-γ and IL-10. Histological examination revealed enhanced inflammatory responses in the lacrimal and salivary glands of SjS chimeras, as measured by digital image analysis and blinded histopathological scoring. Infiltrates were primarily CD4+, with minimal detection of CD8+ T-cells and B-cells. These results demonstrate a novel chimeric mouse model of human SjS that provides a unique in vivo environment to test experimental therapeutics and investigate T-cell disease pathology. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The establishment of the hemangioma model in nude mouse.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qiang; Liu, Wenying; Tang, Yunman; Yu, Song

    2005-07-01

    Hemangioma is one of the most common benign tumors in children. Most of them could regress spontaneously; however, the pathogenesis and triggering of regression are still unknown. Here, we introduce a new means in which the specimen of human hemangioma was transplanted into nude mice subcutaneously. At the same time, high dose of estradiol was administered to the experimental nude mice intramuscularly to promote implantation and proliferation of hemangioma endothelial cells. By this means, a credible animal model of human hemangioma was established. Further studies on pathogenesis and medical intervention of hemangioma could be carried on with this model. The specimen of grafted hemangioma was taken from a 6-month-old girl, in whom the hemangioma grew rapidly, by surgery. The fresh estrogen receptor-positive strawberry hemangioma specimens were sliced and inoculated subcutaneously into 16 nude mice that were divided randomly into 2 groups, namely, group 1 (n = 8) with normal diet and group 2 (n = 8) with normal diet and 10(-7) mg estradiol administered intramuscularly every week additionally. The size of grafts was measured weekly. All of the experimental mice were killed at 90 days after graft. Hemangioma tissues were harvested and sliced into 4 to 5 microm sections. Living grafts were subjected to histopathologic examination and immunohistochemistry for CD34 and Ki-67. All of the sizes of hemangioma tissues in group 1 were diminished distinctly in 30 days. Thirteen samples of hemangioma were almost absorbed and disappeared completely in 90 days. The sizes of hemangioma in group 2 were larger than primary specimens. It was observed from the section of hemangioma that endothelial cells proliferate vividly and fresh capillary blood vessels grew up into the body of hemangioma. The mean positive cell rate of CD34 in group 2 was 48.49 +/- 3.90 and the Ki-67 was 15.04 +/- 2.44. The transplanted tumor cell retained the histologic characters of original tumor. The

  10. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Moyer, E. L.; Kumar, A.; Tahimic, Candice C. G.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss can occur due to many challenges such age, radiation, microgravity, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) play a critical role in bone resorption by osteoclasts (Bartell et al. 2014). We hypothesize that suppression of excess ROS in skeletal cells, both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, regulates skeletal growth and remodeling. To test our hypothesis, we used transgenic mCAT mice which overexpress the human anti-oxidant catalase gene targeted to the mitochondria, the main site for endogenous ROS production. mCAT mice have a longer life-span than wildtype controls and have been used to study various age-related disorders. To stimulate remodeling, 16 week old mCAT mice or wildtype mice were exposed to treatment (hindlimb-unloading and total body-irradiation) or sham treatment conditions (control). Tissues were harvested 2 weeks later for skeletal analysis (microcomputed tomography), biochemical analysis (gene expression and oxidative damage measurements), and ex vivo bone marrow derived cell culture (osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis). mCAT mice expressed the transgene and displayed elevated catalase activity in skeletal tissue and marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts grown ex vivo. In addition, when challenged with treatment, bone tissues from wildtype mice showed elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), indicating oxidative damage) whereas mCAT mice did not. Correlation analysis revealed that increased catalase activity significantly correlated with decreased MDA levels and that increased oxidative damage correlated with decreased percent bone volume (BVTV). In addition, ex-vivo cultured osteoblast colony growth correlated with catalase activity in the osteoblasts. Thus, we showed that these transgenic mice can be used as a model to study the relationship between markers of oxidative damage and skeletal properties. mCAT mice displayed reduced BVTV and trabecular number relative to wildtype mice, as well as increased structural model index in the

  11. Genetically manipulated mouse models of lung disease: potential and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Alexander J. S.; Owen, Caroline A.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2012-01-01

    Gene targeting in mice (transgenic and knockout) has provided investigators with an unparalleled armamentarium in recent decades to dissect the cellular and molecular basis of critical pathophysiological states. Fruitful information has been derived from studies using these genetically engineered mice with significant impact on our understanding, not only of specific biological processes spanning cell proliferation to cell death, but also of critical molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of human disease. This review will focus on the use of gene-targeted mice to study various models of lung disease including airways diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, pneumonia, and acute lung injury. We will attempt to review the current technological approaches of generating gene-targeted mice and the enormous dataset derived from these studies, providing a template for lung investigators. PMID:22198907

  12. Complete cardiac regeneration in a mouse model of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Haubner, Bernhard Johannes; Adamowicz-Brice, Martyna; Khadayate, Sanjay; Tiefenthaler, Viktoria; Metzler, Bernhard; Aitman, Tim; Penninger, Josef M

    2012-12-01

    Cardiac remodeling and subsequent heart failure remain critical issues after myocardial infarction despite improved treatment and reperfusion strategies. Recently, complete cardiac regeneration has been demonstrated in fish and newborn mice following resection of the cardiac apex. However, it remained entirely unclear whether the mammalian heart can also completely regenerate following a complex cardiac ischemic injury. We established a protocol to induce a severe heart attack in one-day-old mice using left anterior descending artery (LAD) ligation. LAD ligation triggered substantial cardiac injury in the left ventricle defined by Caspase 3 activation and massive cell death. Ischemia-induced cardiomyocyte death was also visible on day 4 after LAD ligation. Remarkably, 7 days after the initial ischemic insult, we observed complete cardiac regeneration without any signs of tissue damage or scarring. This tissue regeneration translated into long-term normal heart functions as assessed by echocardiography. In contrast, LAD ligations in 7-day-old mice resulted in extensive scarring comparable to adult mice, indicating that the regenerative capacity for complete cardiac healing after heart attacks can be traced to the first week after birth. RNAseq analyses of hearts on day 1, day 3, and day 10 and comparing LAD-ligated and sham-operated mice surprisingly revealed a transcriptional programme of major changes in genes mediating mitosis and cell division between days 1, 3 and 10 postnatally and a very limited set of genes, including genes regulating cell cycle and extracellular matrix synthesis, being differentially regulated in the regenerating hearts. We present for the first time a mammalian model of complete cardiac regeneration following a severe ischemic cardiac injury. This novel model system provides the unique opportunity to uncover molecular and cellular pathways that can induce cardiac regeneration after ischemic injury, findings that one day could be translated

  13. Differential Bone Loss in Mouse Models of Colon Cancer Cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Bonetto, Andrea; Kays, Joshua K.; Parker, Valorie A.; Matthews, Ryan R.; Barreto, Rafael; Puppa, Melissa J.; Kang, Kyung S.; Carson, James A.; Guise, Theresa A.; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Robling, Alexander G.; Couch, Marion E.; Koniaris, Leonidas G.; Zimmers, Teresa A.

    2017-01-01

    Cachexia is a distinctive feature of colorectal cancer associated with body weight loss and progressive muscle wasting. Several mechanisms responsible for muscle and fat wasting have been identified, however it is not known whether the physiologic and molecular crosstalk between muscle and bone tissue may also contribute to the cachectic phenotype in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether tumor growth associates with bone loss using several experimental models of colorectal cancer cachexia, namely C26, HT-29, and ApcMin/+. The effects of cachexia on bone structure and strength were evaluated with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), micro computed tomography (μCT), and three-point bending test. We found that all models showed tumor growth consistent with severe cachexia. While muscle wasting in C26 hosts was accompanied by moderate bone depletion, no loss of bone strength was observed. However, HT-29 tumor bearing mice showed bone abnormalities including significant reductions in whole-body bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), femoral trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), but no declines in strength. Similarly, cachexia in the ApcMin/+ mice was associated with significant decreases in BMD, BMC, BV/TV, Tb.N, and Tb.Th as well as decreased strength. Our data suggest that colorectal cancer is associated with muscle wasting and may be accompanied by bone loss dependent upon tumor type, burden, stage and duration of the disease. It is clear that preserving muscle mass promotes survival in cancer cachexia. Future studies will determine whether strategies aimed at preventing bone loss can also improve outcomes and survival in colorectal cancer cachexia. PMID:28123369

  14. Differential Bone Loss in Mouse Models of Colon Cancer Cachexia.

    PubMed

    Bonetto, Andrea; Kays, Joshua K; Parker, Valorie A; Matthews, Ryan R; Barreto, Rafael; Puppa, Melissa J; Kang, Kyung S; Carson, James A; Guise, Theresa A; Mohammad, Khalid S; Robling, Alexander G; Couch, Marion E; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Zimmers, Teresa A

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia is a distinctive feature of colorectal cancer associated with body weight loss and progressive muscle wasting. Several mechanisms responsible for muscle and fat wasting have been identified, however it is not known whether the physiologic and molecular crosstalk between muscle and bone tissue may also contribute to the cachectic phenotype in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether tumor growth associates with bone loss using several experimental models of colorectal cancer cachexia, namely C26, HT-29, and Apc Min/+ . The effects of cachexia on bone structure and strength were evaluated with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), micro computed tomography (μCT), and three-point bending test. We found that all models showed tumor growth consistent with severe cachexia. While muscle wasting in C26 hosts was accompanied by moderate bone depletion, no loss of bone strength was observed. However, HT-29 tumor bearing mice showed bone abnormalities including significant reductions in whole-body bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), femoral trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), but no declines in strength. Similarly, cachexia in the Apc Min/+ mice was associated with significant decreases in BMD, BMC, BV/TV, Tb.N, and Tb.Th as well as decreased strength. Our data suggest that colorectal cancer is associated with muscle wasting and may be accompanied by bone loss dependent upon tumor type, burden, stage and duration of the disease. It is clear that preserving muscle mass promotes survival in cancer cachexia. Future studies will determine whether strategies aimed at preventing bone loss can also improve outcomes and survival in colorectal cancer cachexia.

  15. Glyburide reduces bacterial dissemination in a mouse model of melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Koh, Gavin C K W; Weehuizen, Tassili A; Breitbach, Katrin; Krause, Kathrin; de Jong, Hanna K; Kager, Liesbeth M; Hoogendijk, Arjan J; Bast, Antje; Peacock, Sharon J; van der Poll, Tom; Steinmetz, Ivo; Wiersinga, W Joost

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei infection (melioidosis) is an important cause of community-acquired Gram-negative sepsis in Northeast Thailand, where it is associated with a ~40% mortality rate despite antimicrobial chemotherapy. We showed in a previous cohort study that patients taking glyburide ( = glibenclamide) prior to admission have lower mortality and attenuated inflammatory responses compared to patients not taking glyburide. We sought to define the mechanism underlying this observation in a murine model of melioidosis. Mice (C57BL/6) with streptozocin-induced diabetes were inoculated with ~6 × 10(2) cfu B. pseudomallei intranasally, then treated with therapeutic ceftazidime (600 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice daily starting 24 h after inoculation) in order to mimic the clinical scenario. Glyburide (50 mg/kg) or vehicle was started 7 d before inoculation and continued until sacrifice. The minimum inhibitory concentration of glyburide for B. pseudomallei was determined by broth microdilution. We also examined the effect of glyburide on interleukin (IL) 1β by bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Diabetic mice had increased susceptibility to melioidosis, with increased bacterial dissemination but no effect was seen of diabetes on inflammation compared to non-diabetic controls. Glyburide treatment did not affect glucose levels but was associated with reduced pulmonary cellular influx, reduced bacterial dissemination to both liver and spleen and reduced IL1β production when compared to untreated controls. Other cytokines were not different in glyburide-treated animals. There was no direct effect of glyburide on B. pseudomallei growth in vitro or in vivo. Glyburide directly reduced the secretion of IL1β by BMDMs in a dose-dependent fashion. Diabetes increases the susceptibility to melioidosis. We further show, for the first time in any model of sepsis, that glyburide acts as an anti-inflammatory agent by reducing IL1β secretion accompanied by diminished cellular

  16. The untapped potential of genetically-engineered mouse models in chemoprevention research: Opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Abate-Shen, Cory; Brown, Powel H.; Colburn, Nancy H.; Gerner, Eugene W.; Green, Jeffery E.; Lipkin, Martin; Nelson, William G.; Threadgill, David

    2009-01-01

    Summary The past decade has witnessed the unveiling of a powerful new generation of genetically-engineered mouse (GEM) models of human cancer, which are proving to be highly effective for elucidating cancer mechanisms and interrogating novel experimental therapeutics. This new generation of GEM models are well-suited for chemoprevention research, particularly for investigating progressive stages of carcinogenesis, identifying biomarkers for early detection and intervention, and pre-clinical assessment of novel agents or combinations of agents. Here we discuss opportunities and challenges for the application of GEM models in prevention research, as well as strategies to maximize their relevance for human cancer. PMID:19138951

  17. Atmosphere behavior in gas-closed mouse-algal systems - An experimental and modelling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averner, M. M.; Moore, B., III; Bartholomew, I.; Wharton, R.

    1984-01-01

    A NASA-sponsored research program initiated using mathematical modelling and laboratory experimentation aimed at examining the gas-exchange characteristics of artificial animal/plant systems closed to the ambient atmosphere is studied. The development of control techniques and management strategies for maintaining the atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen at physiological levels is considered. A mathematical model simulating the behavior of a gas-closed mouse-algal system under varying environmental conditions is described. To verify and validate the model simulations, an analytical system with which algal growth and gas exchange characteristics can be manipulated and measured is designed, fabricated, and tested. The preliminary results are presented.

  18. Glyburide Reduces Bacterial Dissemination in a Mouse Model of Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Gavin C. K. W.; Weehuizen, Tassili A.; Breitbach, Katrin; Krause, Kathrin; de Jong, Hanna K.; Kager, Liesbeth M.; Hoogendijk, Arjan J.; Bast, Antje; Peacock, Sharon J.; van der Poll, Tom; Steinmetz, Ivo; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2013-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei infection (melioidosis) is an important cause of community-acquired Gram-negative sepsis in Northeast Thailand, where it is associated with a ∼40% mortality rate despite antimicrobial chemotherapy. We showed in a previous cohort study that patients taking glyburide ( = glibenclamide) prior to admission have lower mortality and attenuated inflammatory responses compared to patients not taking glyburide. We sought to define the mechanism underlying this observation in a murine model of melioidosis. Methods Mice (C57BL/6) with streptozocin-induced diabetes were inoculated with ∼6×102 cfu B. pseudomallei intranasally, then treated with therapeutic ceftazidime (600 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice daily starting 24 h after inoculation) in order to mimic the clinical scenario. Glyburide (50 mg/kg) or vehicle was started 7 d before inoculation and continued until sacrifice. The minimum inhibitory concentration of glyburide for B. pseudomallei was determined by broth microdilution. We also examined the effect of glyburide on interleukin (IL) 1β by bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Results Diabetic mice had increased susceptibility to melioidosis, with increased bacterial dissemination but no effect was seen of diabetes on inflammation compared to non-diabetic controls. Glyburide treatment did not affect glucose levels but was associated with reduced pulmonary cellular influx, reduced bacterial dissemination to both liver and spleen and reduced IL1β production when compared to untreated controls. Other cytokines were not different in glyburide-treated animals. There was no direct effect of glyburide on B. pseudomallei growth in vitro or in vivo. Glyburide directly reduced the secretion of IL1β by BMDMs in a dose-dependent fashion. Conclusions Diabetes increases the susceptibility to melioidosis. We further show, for the first time in any model of sepsis, that glyburide acts as an anti-inflammatory agent by reducing IL1

  19. The effects of aging on the BTBR mouse model of autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jasien, Joan M.; Daimon, Caitlin M.; Wang, Rui; Shapiro, Bruce K.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by alterations in social functioning, communicative abilities, and engagement in repetitive or restrictive behaviors. The process of aging in individuals with autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders is not well understood, despite the fact that the number of individuals with ASD aged 65 and older is projected to increase by over half a million individuals in the next 20 years. To elucidate the effects of aging in the context of a modified central nervous system, we investigated the effects of age on the BTBR T + tf/j mouse, a well characterized and widely used mouse model that displays an ASD-like phenotype. We found that a reduction in social behavior persists into old age in male BTBR T + tf/j mice. We employed quantitative proteomics to discover potential alterations in signaling systems that could regulate aging in the BTBR mice. Unbiased proteomic analysis of hippocampal and cortical tissue of BTBR mice compared to age-matched wild-type controls revealed a significant decrease in brain derived neurotrophic factor and significant increases in multiple synaptic markers (spinophilin, Synapsin I, PSD 95, NeuN), as well as distinct changes in functional pathways related to these proteins, including “Neural synaptic plasticity regulation” and “Neurotransmitter secretion regulation.” Taken together, these results contribute to our understanding of the effects of aging on an ASD-like mouse model in regards to both behavior and protein alterations, though additional studies are needed to fully understand the complex interplay underlying aging in mouse models displaying an ASD-like phenotype. PMID:25225482

  20. Effect of CPAP in a Mouse Model of Hyperoxic Neonatal Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Reyburn, Brent; Fiore, Juliann M. Di; Raffay, Thomas; Martin, Richard J.; Y.S., Prakash; Jafri, Anjum; MacFarlane, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP] and supplemental oxygen have become the mainstay of neonatal respiratory support in preterm infants. Although oxygen therapy is associated with respiratory morbidities including bronchopulmonary dysplasia [BPD], the long-term effects of CPAP on lung function are largely unknown. We used a hyperoxia-induced mouse model of BPD to explore the effects of daily CPAP during the first week of life on later respiratory system mechanics. Objective To test the hypothesis that daily CPAP in a newborn mouse model of BPD improves longer term respiratory mechanics. Methods Mouse pups from C57BL/6 pregnant dams were exposed to room air [RA] or hyperoxia [50% O2, 24hrs/day] for the first postnatal week with or without exposure to daily CPAP [6cmH2O, 3hrs/day]. Respiratory system resistance [Rrs] and compliance [Crs] were measured following a subsequent 2 week period of room RA recovery. Additional measurements included radial alveolar counts and macrophage counts. Results Mice exposed to hyperoxia had significantly elevated Rrs, decreased Crs, reduced alveolarization, and increased macrophage counts at three weeks compared to RA treated mice. Daily CPAP treatment significantly improved Rrs, Crs and alveolarization, and decreased lung macrophage infiltration in hyperoxia-exposed pups. Conclusions We have demonstrated that daily CPAP had a longer term benefit on baseline respiratory system mechanics in a neonatal mouse model of BPD. We speculate that this beneficial effect of CPAP was the consequence of a decrease in the inflammatory response and resultant alveolar injury associated with hyperoxic newborn lung injury. PMID:26394387

  1. Decreased adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the PDAPP mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Michael H; Yazdani, Umar; Norris, Rebekah D; Games, Dora; German, Dwight C; Eisch, Amelia J

    2006-03-01

    Abnormal subgranular zone (SGZ) neurogenesis is proposed to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related decreases in hippocampal function. Our goal was to examine hippocampal neurogenesis in the PDAPP mouse, a model of AD with age-dependent accumulation of amyloid-beta(42) (Abeta(42))-containing plaques that is well studied with regard to AD therapies. A secondary goal was to determine whether altered neurogenesis in the PDAPP mouse is associated with abnormal maturation or number of mature cells. A tertiary goal was to provide insight into why hippocampal neurogenesis appears to be increased in AD post-mortem tissue and decreased in most AD mouse models. We report an age-dependent decrease in SGZ proliferation in homozygous PDAPP mice. At 1 year of age, PDAPP mice also had new dentate gyrus granule neurons with abnormal maturation and fewer dying cells relative to control mice. In contrast to decreased SGZ cell birth, PDAPP mice had increased birth of immature neurons in the outer portion of the granule cell layer (oGCL), providing insight into why some studies link AD with increased neurogenesis. However, these ectopic oGCL cells were still rare compared with SGZ proliferating cells, emphasizing that the primary characteristic of PDAPP mice is decreased neurogenesis. The decrease in SGZ neurogenesis was not associated with an age-dependent loss of dentate granule neurons. The altered neurogenesis in the PDAPP mouse may contribute to the age-related cognitive deficits reported in this model of AD and may be a useful adjunct target for assessing the impact of AD therapies. J. Comp. Neurol. 495:70-83, 2006. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Quantifying spontaneous metastasis in a syngeneic mouse melanoma model using real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wentao; McLaughlin, Sarah L; Klinke, David J

    2017-08-07

    Modeling metastasis in vivo with animals is a priority for both revealing mechanisms of tumor dissemination and developing therapeutic methods. While conventional intravenous injection of tumor cells provides an efficient and consistent system for studying tumor cell extravasation and colonization, studying spontaneous metastasis derived from orthotopic tumor sites has the advantage of modeling more aspects of the metastatic cascade, but is challenging as it is difficult to detect small numbers of metastatic cells. In this work, we developed an approach for quantifying spontaneous metastasis in the syngeneic mouse B16 system using real time PCR. We first transduced B16 cells with lentivirus expressing firefly luciferase Luc2 gene for bioluminescence imaging. Next, we developed a real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for the detection of luciferase-expressing, metastatic tumor cells in mouse lungs and other organs. To illustrate the approach, we quantified lung metastasis in both spontaneous and experimental scenarios using B16F0 and B16F10 cells in C57BL/6Ncrl and NOD-Scid Gamma (NSG) mice. We tracked B16 melanoma metastasis with both bioluminescence imaging and qPCR, which were found to be self-consistent. Using this assay, we can quantitatively detect one Luc2 positive tumor cell out of 10 4 tissue cells, which corresponds to a metastatic burden of 1.8 × 10 4 metastatic cells per whole mouse lung. More importantly, the qPCR method was at least a factor of 10 more sensitive in detecting metastatic cell dissemination and should be combined with bioluminescence imaging as a high-resolution, end-point method for final metastatic cell quantitation. Given the rapid growth of primary tumors in many mouse models, assays with improved sensitivity can provide better insight into biological mechanisms that underpin tumor metastasis.

  3. Metformin suppresses cancer initiation and progression in genetic mouse models of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Qian, Weikun; Jiang, Zhengdong; Cheng, Liang; Li, Jie; Sun, Liankang; Zhou, Cancan; Gao, Luping; Lei, Meng; Yan, Bin; Cao, Junyu; Duan, Wanxing; Ma, Qingyong

    2017-07-24

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide with an overall five-year survival rate less than 7%. Accumulating evidence has revealed the cancer preventive and therapeutic effects of metformin, one of the most widely prescribed medications for type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, its role in pancreatic cancer is not fully elucidated. Herein, we aimed to further study the preventive and therapeutic effects of metformin in genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic cancer. LSL-Kras G12D/+ ; Pdx1-Cre (KC) mouse model was established to investigate the effect of metformin in pancreatic tumorigenesis suppression; LSL-Kras G12D/+ ; Trp53 fl/+ ; Pdx1-Cre (KPC) mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic efficiency of metformin in PDAC. Chronic pancreatitis was induced in KC mice by peritoneal injection of cerulein. Following metformin treatment, pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) and mouse pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPanIN) were decreased in KC mice. Chronic pancreatitis induced a stroma-rich and duct-like structure and increased the formation of ADM and mPanIN lesions, in line with an increased cytokeratin 19 (CK19)-stained area. Metformin treatment diminished chronic pancreatitis-mediated ADM and mPanIN formation. In addition, it alleviated the percent area of Masson's trichrome staining, and decreased the number of Ki67-positive cells. In KPC mice, metformin inhibited tumor growth and the incidence of abdominal invasion. More importantly, it prolonged the overall survival. Metformin inhibited pancreatic cancer initiation, suppressed chronic pancreatitis-induced tumorigenesis, and showed promising therapeutic effect in PDAC.

  4. Cotinine administration improves impaired cognition in the mouse model of Fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Marta; Beurel, Eleonore; Jope, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    Cotinine is the major metabolite of nicotine and has displayed some capacity for improving cognition in mouse models following chronic administration. We tested if acute cotinine treatment is capable of improving cognition in the mouse model of Fragile X syndrome, Fmr1 -/- knockout mice, and if this is related to inhibition by cotinine treatment of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), which is abnormally active in Fmr1 -/- mice. Acute cotinine treatment increased the inhibitory serine-phosphorylation of GSK3β and the activating phosphorylation of AKT, which can mediate serine-phosphorylation of GSK3β, in both wild-type and Fmr1 -/- mouse hippocampus. Acute cotinine treatment improved cognitive functions of Fmr1 -/- mice in coordinate and categorical spatial processing, novel object recognition, and temporal ordering. However, cotinine failed to restore impaired cognition in GSK3β knockin mice, in which a serine9-to-alanine9 mutation blocks the inhibitory serine phosphorylation of GSK3β, causing GSK3β to be hyperactive. These results indicate that acute cotinine treatment effectively repairs impairments of these four cognitive tasks in Fmr1 -/- mice, and suggest that this cognition-enhancing effect of cotinine is linked to its induction of inhibitory serine-phosphorylation of GSK3. Taken together, these results show that nicotinic receptor agonists can act as cognitive enhancers in a mouse model of Fragile X syndrome and highlight the potential role of inhibiting GSK3β in mediating the beneficial effects of cotinine on memory. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Immunotherapy for choroidal neovascularization in a laser-induced mouse model simulating exudative (wet) macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Puran S.; Hu, Zhiwei; Tezel, Tongalp H.; Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kang, Shin Goo; Cruz, Jose M. C.; Bora, Nalini S.; Garen, Alan; Kaplan, Henry J.

    2003-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness after age 55 in the industrialized world. Severe loss of central vision frequently occurs with the exudative (wet) form of AMD, as a result of the formation of a pathological choroidal neovasculature (CNV) that damages the macular region of the retina. We tested the effect of an immunotherapy procedure, which had been shown to destroy the pathological neovasculature in solid tumors, on the formation of laser-induced CNV in a mouse model simulating exudative AMD in humans. The procedure involves administering an Icon molecule that binds with high affinity and specificity to tissue factor (TF), resulting in the activation of a potent cytolytic immune response against cells expressing TF. The Icon binds selectively to TF on the vascular endothelium of a CNV in the mouse and pig models and also on the CNV of patients with exudative AMD. Here we show that the Icon dramatically reduces the frequency of CNV formation in the mouse model. After laser treatment to induce CNV formation, the mice were injected either with an adenoviral vector encoding the Icon, resulting in synthesis of the Icon by vector-infected mouse cells, or with the Icon protein. The route of injection was i.v. or intraocular. The efficacy of the Icon in preventing formation of laser-induced CNV depends on binding selectively to the CNV. Because the Icon binds selectively to the CNV in exudative AMD as well as to laser-induced CNV, the Icon might also be efficacious for treating patients with exudative AMD.

  6. Development of a Mouse Model for Assessing Fatigue during Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Maria A; Trammell, Rita A; Verhulst, Steve; Ran, Sophia; Toth, Linda A

    2011-01-01

    Fatigue and disturbed sleep are common problems for cancer patients and affect both quality of life and compliance with treatment. Fatigue may be associated with cancer itself and with the treatment, particularly for therapies with neurotoxic side effects. To develop a model system for evaluation of chemotherapy-related fatigue, we studied mice treated with either a commonly used formulation of the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel (paclitaxel; Taxol), which is known to have neurotoxic properties, or a nanoparticle formulation of paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel; Abraxane) that is reported to have greater potency and efficacy yet fewer side effects than does paclitaxel. Mice were treated with 1 of these 2 agents (10 mg/kg IV daily for 5 consecutive days) and were monitored from 1 wk before through 4 wk after treatment. Dependent measures included running wheel activity, locomotor activity on the cage floor, core temperature, sleep patterns, CBC count, serum cytokine and chemokine concentrations, and neurologic assessment. For both drugs, mice showed the most severe perturbations of activity during the first recovery week after drug administration. Mice treated with paclitaxel showed greater neutropenia and motor deficits than did mice treated with nab-paclitaxel. However, deficits had largely resolved by 4 wk after administration of either drug. We conclude that these measures provide an assessment of chemotherapy-related fatigue that potentially can distinguish toxicity associated with different formulations of the same agent. PMID:21535922

  7. Altered Erythropoiesis in Mouse Models of Type 3 Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, R. M.; Ferbo, L.; Boero, M.; Palmieri, A.; Osella, L.; Pollicino, P.; Miniscalco, B.

    2017-01-01

    Type 3 haemochromatosis (HFE3) is a rare genetic iron overload disease which ultimately lead to compromised organs functioning. HFE3 is caused by mutations in transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) gene that codes for two main isoforms (Tfr2α and Tfr2β). Tfr2α is one of the hepatic regulators of iron inhibitor hepcidin. Tfr2β is an intracellular isoform of the protein involved in the regulation of iron levels in reticuloendothelial cells. It has been recently demonstrated that Tfr2 is also involved in erythropoiesis. This study aims to further investigate Tfr2 erythropoietic role by evaluating the erythropoiesis of two Tfr2 murine models wherein either one or both of Tfr2 isoforms have been selectively silenced (Tfr2 KI and Tfr2 KO). The evaluations were performed in bone marrow and spleen, in 14 days' and 10 weeks' old mice, to assess erythropoiesis in young versus adult animals. The lack of Tfr2α leads to macrocytosis with low reticulocyte number and increased hemoglobin values, together with an anticipation of adult BM erythropoiesis and an increased splenic erythropoiesis. On the other hand, lack of Tfr2β (Tfr2 KI mice) causes an increased and immature splenic erythropoiesis. Taken together, these data confirm the role of Tfr2α in modulation of erythropoiesis and of Tfr2β in favoring iron availability for erythropoiesis. PMID:28540293

  8. Mouse models for four types of Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhito; Matsushima, Yoshibumi

    2003-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary syndrome caused by a deficiency of melanocytes and other neural crest-derived cells. Depending on a variety of symptoms associated with the auditory-pigmentary symptoms, WS is classified into four types: WS type 1 (WS1), WS2, WS3, and WS4. Six genes contributing to this syndrome--PAX3, SOX10, MITF, SLUG, EDN3 and EDNRB--have been cloned so far, all of them necessary for normal development of melanocytes. Mutant mice with coat color anomalies were helpful in identifying these genes, although the phenotypes of these mice did not necessarily perfectly match those of the four types of WS. Here we describe mice with mutations of murine homologs of WS genes and verify their suitability as models for WS with special interest in the cochlear disorder. The mice include splotch (Sp), microphthalmia (mi), Slugh-/-, WS4, JF1, lethal-spotting (ls), and Dominant megacolon (Dom). The influence of genetic background on the phenotypes of mice mutated in homologs of WS genes is also addressed. Finally, possible interactions among the six WS gene products are discussed.

  9. Proteomic characterization of a mouse model of familial Danish dementia.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Monica; Renzone, Giovanni; Matsuda, Shuji; Scaloni, Andrea; D'Adamio, Luciano; Zambrano, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    A dominant mutation in the ITM2B/BRI2 gene causes familial Danish dementia (FDD) in humans. To model FDD in animal systems, a knock-in approach was recently implemented in mice expressing a wild-type and mutant allele, which bears the FDD-associated mutation. Since these FDD(KI) mice show behavioural alterations and impaired synaptic function, we characterized their synaptosomal proteome via two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis. After identification by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to electrospray-linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry, the differentially expressed proteins were classified according to their gene ontology descriptions and their predicted functional interactions. The Dlg4/Psd95 scaffold protein and additional signalling proteins, including protein phosphatases, were revealed by STRING analysis as potential players in the altered synaptic function of FDD(KI) mice. Immunoblotting analysis finally demonstrated the actual downregulation of the synaptosomal scaffold protein Dlg4/Psd95 and of the dual-specificity phosphatase Dusp3 in the synaptosomes of FDD(KI) mice.

  10. Proteomic Characterization of a Mouse Model of Familial Danish Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Monica; Renzone, Giovanni; Matsuda, Shuji; Scaloni, Andrea; D'Adamio, Luciano; Zambrano, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    A dominant mutation in the ITM2B/BRI2 gene causes familial Danish dementia (FDD) in humans. To model FDD in animal systems, a knock-in approach was recently implemented in mice expressing a wild-type and mutant allele, which bears the FDD-associated mutation. Since these FDDKI mice show behavioural alterations and impaired synaptic function, we characterized their synaptosomal proteome via two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis. After identification by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to electrospray-linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry, the differentially expressed proteins were classified according to their gene ontology descriptions and their predicted functional interactions. The Dlg4/Psd95 scaffold protein and additional signalling proteins, including protein phosphatases, were revealed by STRING analysis as potential players in the altered synaptic function of FDDKI mice. Immunoblotting analysis finally demonstrated the actual downregulation of the synaptosomal scaffold protein Dlg4/Psd95 and of the dual-specificity phosphatase Dusp3 in the synaptosomes of FDDKI mice. PMID:22619496

  11. Fatal breathing dysfunction in a mouse model of Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Albert; Zanella, Sebastien; Koch, Henner; Kruse, Shane E; Lee, Donghoon; Ramirez, Jan M; Palmiter, Richard D

    2012-07-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy with gliosis in several brain regions that usually results in infantile death. Loss of murine Ndufs4, which encodes NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) iron-sulfur protein 4, results in compromised activity of mitochondrial complex I as well as progressive neurodegenerative and behavioral changes that resemble LS. Here, we report the development of breathing abnormalities in a murine model of LS. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense bilateral lesions in the dorsal brain stem vestibular nucleus (VN) and cerebellum of severely affected mice. The mutant mice manifested a progressive increase in apnea and had aberrant responses to hypoxia. Electrophysiological recordings within the ventral brain stem pre-Bötzinger respiratory complex were also abnormal. Selective inactivation of Ndufs4 in the VN, one of the principle sites of gliosis, also led to breathing abnormalities and premature death. Conversely, Ndufs4 restoration in the VN corrected breathing deficits and prolonged the life span of knockout mice. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction within the VN results in aberrant regulation of respiration and contributes to the lethality of Ndufs4-knockout mice.

  12. Metabonomic Profiling of TASTPM Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zeping; Browne, Edward R.; Liu, Tao

    2012-12-07

    Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying early stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important for the development of new therapies against and diagnosis of AD. In this study, non-targeted metabotyping of TASTPM transgenic AD mice was performed. The metabolic profiles of both brain and plasma of TASTPM mice were characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to those of wild type C57BL/6J mice. TASTPM mice were metabolically distinct compared to wild type mice (Q28 Y = 0.587 and 0.766 for PLS-DA models derived from brain and plasma, respectively). A number of metabolites were found to be perturbed in TASTPM mice in bothmore » brain (D11 fructose, L-valine, L-serine, L-threonine, zymosterol) and plasma (D-glucose, D12 galactose, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and D-gluconic acid). In addition, enzyme immunoassay confirmed that selected endogenous steroids were significantly perturbed in brain (androstenedione and 17-OH-progesterone) and plasma (cortisol and testosterone) of TASTPM mice. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that perturbations related to amino acid metabolism (brain), steroid biosynthesis (brain), linoleic acid metabolism (plasma) and energy metabolism (plasma) accounted for the differentiation of TASTPM and wild-type« less

  13. A Redox Sensitive Pathway in the Mouse ES Cell Assay Modeled From ToxCast HTS Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The broad chemical landscape coupled with the lack of developmental toxicity information across most environmental chemicals has motivated the need for high- throughput screening methods and predictive models of developmental toxicity. Towards this end, we used the mouse embryoni...

  14. Therapeutic action of ghrelin in a mouse model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Chorny, Alejo; Delgado, Mario

    2006-05-01

    Ghrelin is a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide with potential endogenous anti-inflammatory activities ameliorating some pathologic inflammatory conditions. Crohn's disease is a chronic debilitating disease characterized by severe T helper cell (Th)1-driven inflammation of the colon. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of ghrelin in a murine model of colitis. We examined the anti-inflammatory action of ghrelin in the colitis induced by intracolonic administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Diverse clinical signs of the disease were evaluated, including weight loss, diarrhea, colitis, and histopathology. We also investigated the mechanisms involved in the potential therapeutic effect of ghrelin, such as inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, Th1-type response, and regulatory factors. Ghrelin ameliorated significantly the clinical and histopathologic severity of the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis; abrogating body weight loss, diarrhea, and inflammation; and increasing survival. The therapeutic effect was associated with down-regulation of both inflammatory and Th1-driven autoimmune response through the regulation of a wide spectrum of inflammatory mediators. In addition, a partial involvement of interluekin-10/transforming growth factor-beta1-secreting regulatory T cells in this therapeutic effect was demonstrated. Importantly, the ghrelin treatment was therapeutically effective in established colitis and avoided the recurrence of the disease. Our data demonstrate novel anti-inflammatory actions for ghrelin in the gastrointestinal tract, ie, the capacity to deactivate the intestinal inflammatory response and to restore mucosal immune tolerance at multiple levels. Consequently, ghrelin administration represents a novel possible therapeutic approach for the treatment of Crohn's disease and other Th1-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

  15. Effects of environmental enrichment on the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, A D; Corcoran-Gomez, K; Eckert, K A; Fahey, A G; Hoots, B L; Charleston, L B; Charleston, J S; Roberts, C R; Markowitz, H

    2009-04-01

    The manner in which an animal's environment is furnished may have significant implications for animal welfare as well as research outcomes. We evaluated four different housing conditions to determine the effects of what has been considered standard rodent enrichment and the exercise opportunities those environments allow on disease progression in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model. Forty-eight copper/zinc superoxide dismutase mice (strain: B6SJL-TgN [SOD1-G931]1Gur) (SOD1) and 48 control (C) (strain: B6SJL-TgN[SOD1]2Gur) male mice were randomly assigned to four different conditions where 12 SOD1 and 12 C animals were allotted to each condition (n = 96). Conditions tested the effects of standard housing, a forced exercise regime, access to a mouse house and opportunity for ad libitum exercise on a running wheel. In addition to the daily all-occurrence behavioural sampling, mice were weighed and tested twice per week on gait and Rotor-Rod performance until the mice reached the age of 150 days (C) or met the criteria for our humane endpoint (SOD1). The SOD1 mice exposed to the forced exercise regime and wheel access did better in average lifespan and Rotor-Rod performance, than SOD1 mice exposed to the standard cage and mouse house conditions. In SOD1 mice, stride length remained longest throughout the progression of the disease in mice exposed to the forced exercise regime compared with other SOD1 conditions. Within the control group, mice in the standard cage and forced exercise regime conditions performed significantly less than the mice with the mouse house and wheels on the Rotor-Rod. Alpha motor neuron counts were highest in mice with wheels and in mice exposed to forced exercise regime in both mouse strains. All SOD1 mice had significantly lower alpha neuron counts than controls (P < 0.05). These data show that different enrichment strategies affect behaviour and disease progression in a transgenic mouse model, and may have implications for the

  16. Mouse Models as Tools to Identify Genetic Pathways for Retinal Degeneration, as Exemplified by Leber's Congenital Amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by severe loss of vision in the first year of life. In addition to early vision loss, a variety of other eye-related abnormalities including roving eye movements, deep-set eyes, and sensitivity to bright light also occur with this disease. Many animal models of LCA are available and the study them has led to a better understanding of the pathology of the disease, and has led to the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at curing or slowing down LCA. Mouse models, with their well-developed genetics and similarity to human physiology and anatomy, serve as powerful tools with which to investigate the etiology of human LCA. Such mice provide reproducible, experimental systems for elucidating pathways of normal development, function, designing strategies and testing compounds for translational research and gene-based therapies aimed at delaying the diseases progression. In this chapter, I describe tools used in the discovery and evaluation of mouse models of LCA including a Phoenix Image-Guided Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and a Diagnosys Espion Visual Electrophysiology System. Three mouse models are described, the rd3 mouse model for LCA12 and LCA1, the rd12 mouse model for LCA2, and the rd16 mouse model for LCA10.

  17. Development, validation and characterization of a novel mouse model of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD).

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Willett, Thomas L; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2014-11-01

    The etiology of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD) is poorly understood but the hallmark of ABD is a lack of bone turnover. ABD occurs in renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and is suspected to occur in elderly patients on long-term anti-resorptive therapy. A major clinical concern of ABD is diminished bone quality and an increased fracture risk. To our knowledge, experimental animal models for ABD other than ROD-ABD have not been developed or studied. The objectives of this study were to develop a mouse model of ABD without the complications of renal ablation, and to characterize changes in bone quality in ABD relative to controls. To re-create the adynamic bone condition, 4-month old female Col2.3Δtk mice were treated with ganciclovir to specifically ablate osteoblasts, and pamidronate was used to inhibit osteoclastic resorption. Four groups of animals were used to characterize bone quality in ABD: Normal bone controls, No Formation controls, No Resorption controls, and an Adynamic group. After a 6-week treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and the bones were harvested for analyses. Bone quality assessments were conducted using established techniques including bone histology, quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), microcomputed tomography (microCT), and biomechanical testing. Histomorphometry confirmed osteoblast-related hallmarks of ABD in our mouse model. Bone formation was near complete suppression in the No Formation and Adynamic specimens. Inhibition of bone resorption in the Adynamic group was confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stain. Normal bone mineral density and architecture were maintained in the Adynamic group, whereas the No Formation group showed a reduction in bone mineral content and trabecular thickness relative to the Adynamic group. As expected, the No Formation group had a more hypomineralized profile and the Adynamic group had a higher mean mineralization profile that is

  18. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    parameters. Taken together, this typically catabolic treatment (disuse and irradiation) appeared to stimulate cortical expansion in MCAT mice but not WT mice. In conclusion, these results reveal the importance of mitochondrial ROS generation in skeletal remodeling and show that MCAT mice provide a useful animal model for bone studies.

  19. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0325 TITLE: Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using ...Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION ...Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0325 Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b

  20. Hemagglutination and graft-versus-host disease in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse lymphoproliferative disease model.

    PubMed Central

    Pirruccello, S. J.; Nakamine, H.; Beisel, K. W.; Kleveland, K. L.; Okano, M.; Taguchi, Y.; Davis, J. R.; Mahloch, M. L.; Purtilo, D. T.

    1992-01-01

    In the course of evaluating the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse-human peripheral blood lymphocyte (SCID-PBL) model of lymphoproliferative disease, we noted hemagglutination occurring in peripheral blood smears of mice with serum human immunoglobulin levels greater than 1.0 mg/ml. The hemagglutinating process was mediated by human anti-mouse red cell antibodies of the IgM class, peaked at five to seven weeks post-transfer of 5 to 7 x 10(7) human PBL and was generally self limiting. However, death resulted in some mice when serum immunoglobulin levels were greater than 3.0 mg/ml. The most severely affected mice had hemagglutination induced congestion of liver, lungs and spleen. Several mice also had lesions consistent with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) including focal hepatic necrosis and destruction of mouse splenic hematopoietic elements. The lesions associated with hemagglutination and GVHD in SCID-PBL mice are distinct from those associated with EBV-induced lymphoproliferation. Recognition of these pathologic processes are required for a thorough understanding of the SCID-PBL model. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1580330

  1. Quantitative 3D investigation of Neuronal network in mouse spinal cord model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukreeva, I.; Campi, G.; Fratini, M.; Spanò, R.; Bucci, D.; Battaglia, G.; Giove, F.; Bravin, A.; Uccelli, A.; Venturi, C.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Cedola, A.

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of the neuronal network in mouse spinal cord models represents the basis for the research on neurodegenerative diseases. In this framework, the quantitative analysis of the single elements in different districts is a crucial task. However, conventional 3D imaging techniques do not have enough spatial resolution and contrast to allow for a quantitative investigation of the neuronal network. Exploiting the high coherence and the high flux of synchrotron sources, X-ray Phase-Contrast multiscale-Tomography allows for the 3D investigation of the neuronal microanatomy without any aggressive sample preparation or sectioning. We investigated healthy-mouse neuronal architecture by imaging the 3D distribution of the neuronal-network with a spatial resolution of 640 nm. The high quality of the obtained images enables a quantitative study of the neuronal structure on a subject-by-subject basis. We developed and applied a spatial statistical analysis on the motor neurons to obtain quantitative information on their 3D arrangement in the healthy-mice spinal cord. Then, we compared the obtained results with a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Our approach paves the way to the creation of a “database” for the characterization of the neuronal network main features for a comparative investigation of neurodegenerative diseases and therapies.

  2. A mouse model for MERS coronavirus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cockrell, Adam S; Yount, Boyd L; Scobey, Trevor; Jensen, Kara; Douglas, Madeline; Beall, Anne; Tang, Xian-Chun; Marasco, Wayne A; Heise, Mark T; Baric, Ralph S

    2016-11-28

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel virus that emerged in 2012, causing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), severe pneumonia-like symptoms and multi-organ failure, with a case fatality rate of ∼36%. Limited clinical studies indicate that humans infected with MERS-CoV exhibit pathology consistent with the late stages of ARDS, which is reminiscent of the disease observed in patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Models of MERS-CoV-induced severe respiratory disease have been difficult to achieve, and small-animal models traditionally used to investigate viral pathogenesis (mouse, hamster, guinea-pig and ferret) are naturally resistant to MERS-CoV. Therefore, we used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to modify the mouse genome to encode two amino acids (positions 288 and 330) that match the human sequence in the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 receptor, making mice susceptible to MERS-CoV infection and replication. Serial MERS-CoV passage in these engineered mice was then used to generate a mouse-adapted virus that replicated efficiently within the lungs and evoked symptoms indicative of severe ARDS, including decreased survival, extreme weight loss, decreased pulmonary function, pulmonary haemorrhage and pathological signs indicative of end-stage lung disease. Importantly, therapeutic countermeasures comprising MERS-CoV neutralizing antibody treatment or a MERS-CoV spike protein vaccine protected the engineered mice against MERS-CoV-induced ARDS.

  3. Pathogenesis of emerging severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus in C57/BL6 mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Cong; Liang, Mifang; Ning, Junyu; Gu, Wen; Jiang, Hong; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Fushun; Zhang, Quanfu; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Ting; Han, Ying; Zhang, Weilun; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Qin; Sun, Lina; Liu, Qinzhi; Wang, Tao; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Shiwen; Deng, Ying; Qin, Chuan; Li, Dexin

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of an emerging viral disease, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS), caused by SFTS virus (SFTSV), has prompted the need to understand pathogenesis of SFTSV. We are unique in establishing an infectious model of SFTS in C57/BL6 mice, resulting in hallmark symptoms of thrombocytopenia and leukocytopenia. Viral RNA and histopathological changes were identified in the spleen, liver, and kidney. However, viral replication was only found in the spleen, which suggested the spleen to be the principle target organ of SFTSV. Moreover, the number of macrophages and platelets were largely increased in the spleen, and SFTSV colocalized with platelets in cytoplasm of macrophages in the red pulp of the spleen. In vitro cellular assays further revealed that SFTSV adhered to mouse platelets and facilitated the phagocytosis of platelets by mouse primary macrophages, which in combination with in vivo findings, suggests that SFTSV-induced thrombocytopenia is caused by clearance of circulating virus-bound platelets by splenic macrophages. Thus, this study has elucidated the pathogenic mechanisms of thrombocytopenia in a mouse model resembling human SFTS disease. PMID:22665769

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of mouse brain using high-resolution anatomical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, L. J.; Hadimani, R. L.; Kanthasamy, A. G.; Jiles, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility of non-invasive treatment of brain disorders in humans. Studies on animals can allow rapid progress of the research including exploring a variety of different treatment conditions. Numerical calculations using animal models are needed to help design suitable TMS coils for use in animal experiments, in particular, to estimate the electric field induced in animal brains. In this paper, we have implemented a high-resolution anatomical MRI-derived mouse model consisting of 50 tissue types to accurately calculate induced electric field in the mouse brain. Magnetic field measurements have been performed on the surface of the coil and compared with the calculations in order to validate the calculated magnetic and induced electric fields in the brain. Results show how the induced electric field is distributed in a mouse brain and allow investigation of how this could be improved for TMS studies using mice. The findings have important implications in further preclinical development of TMS for treatment of human diseases.

  5. Synaptic Vesicle Recycling Is Unaffected in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marland, Jamie R K; Smillie, Karen J; Cousin, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, and arises from trisomy of human chromosome 21. Accumulating evidence from studies of both DS patient tissue and mouse models has suggested that synaptic dysfunction is a key factor in the disorder. The presence of several genes within the DS trisomy that are either directly or indirectly linked to synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis suggested that presynaptic dysfunction could underlie some of these synaptic defects. Therefore we determined whether SV recycling was altered in neurons from the Ts65Dn mouse, the best characterised model of DS to date. We found that SV exocytosis, the size of the SV recycling pool, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, activity-dependent bulk endocytosis and SV generation from bulk endosomes were all unaffected by the presence of the Ts65Dn trisomy. These results were obtained using battery of complementary assays employing genetically-encoded fluorescent reporters of SV cargo trafficking, and fluorescent and morphological assays of fluid-phase uptake in primary neuronal culture. The absence of presynaptic dysfunction in central nerve terminals of the Ts65Dn mouse suggests that future research should focus on the established alterations in excitatory / inhibitory balance as a potential route for future pharmacotherapy.

  6. Synaptic Vesicle Recycling Is Unaffected in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marland, Jamie R. K.; Smillie, Karen J.; Cousin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, and arises from trisomy of human chromosome 21. Accumulating evidence from studies of both DS patient tissue and mouse models has suggested that synaptic dysfunction is a key factor in the disorder. The presence of several genes within the DS trisomy that are either directly or indirectly linked to synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis suggested that presynaptic dysfunction could underlie some of these synaptic defects. Therefore we determined whether SV recycling was altered in neurons from the Ts65Dn mouse, the best characterised model of DS to date. We found that SV exocytosis, the size of the SV recycling pool, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, activity-dependent bulk endocytosis and SV generation from bulk endosomes were all unaffected by the presence of the Ts65Dn trisomy. These results were obtained using battery of complementary assays employing genetically-encoded fluorescent reporters of SV cargo trafficking, and fluorescent and morphological assays of fluid-phase uptake in primary neuronal culture. The absence of presynaptic dysfunction in central nerve terminals of the Ts65Dn mouse suggests that future research should focus on the established alterations in excitatory / inhibitory balance as a potential route for future pharmacotherapy. PMID:26808141

  7. Primary amines protect against retinal degeneration in mouse models of retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Golczak, Marcin; Chen, Yu; Okano, Kiichiro; Kohno, Hideo; Shiose, Satomi; Ishikawa, Kaede; Harte, William; Palczewska, Grazyna; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate vision is initiated by photoisomerization of the visual pigment chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, and is maintained by continuous regeneration of this retinoid through a series of reactions termed the retinoid cycle. However, toxic side reaction products, especially those involving reactive aldehyde groups of the photoisomered product, all-trans-retinal, can cause severe retinal pathology. Here we lowered peak concentrations of free all-trans-retinal with primary amine-containing FDA-approved drugs that did not inhibit chromophore regeneration in mouse models of retinal degeneration. Schiff base adducts between all-trans-retinal and these amines were identified by mass spectrometry. Adducts were observed in mouse eyes only when an experimental drug protected the retina from degeneration in both short-term and long-term treatment experiments. This study demonstrates a molecular basis of all-trans-retinal-induced retinal pathology and identifies an assemblage of FDA-approved compounds with protective effects against this pathology in a mouse model that displays features of Stargardt’s and age-related retinal degeneration. PMID:22198730

  8. Application of Synchrotron Radiation Imaging for Non-destructive Monitoring of Mouse Rheumatoid Arthritis Model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chang-Hyuk; Kim, Hong-Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon

    This study was performed to observe microstructures of the rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet using a synchrotron radiation beam and to compare findings with histological observations. X-ray refraction images from ex-vivo rheumatoid arthritis induced mouse feet were obtained with an 8KeV white (unmonochromatic) beam and 20 micron thick CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal. The visual image was magnified using a x 10 microscope objective and captured using digital CCD camera. Experiments were performed at 1B2 bending magnet beamline of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea. Obtained images were compared with histopathologic findings from same sample. Cartilage destruction and thickened joint capsulemore » with joint space narrowing were clearly identified at each grade of rheumatoid model with spatial resolution of as much as 1.2 micron and these findings were directly correlated with histopathologic findings. The results suggest that x-ray microscopy study of the rheumatoid arthritis model using synchrotron radiation demonstrates the potential for clinically relevant micro structure of mouse feet without sectioning and fixation.« less

  9. Age-dependent phenotypic characteristics of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Susanna; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2008-08-01

    The triple-transgenic mouse line (3 x Tg-AD) harboring PS1M146V, APPSwe, and taup301L transgenes represents the only transgenic model for Alzheimer's disease (AD) to date capturing both beta-amyloid and tau neuropathology. The present study provides an extensive behavioral characterization of the 3 x Tg-AD mouse line, evaluating the emergence of noncognitive and cognitive AD-like symptoms at two ages corresponding to the early (6-7 months) and advanced (12-13 months) stages of AD-pathology. Enhanced responsiveness to aversive stimulation was detected in mutant mice at both ages: the 3 x Tg-AD genotype enhanced acoustic startle response and facilitated performance in the cued-version of the water maze. These noncognitive phenotypes were accompanied by hyperactivity and reduced locomotor habituation in the open field at the older age. Signs of cognitive aberrations were also detected at both ages, but they were limited to associative learning. The present study suggests that this popular transgenic mouse model of AD has clear phenotypes beyond the cognitive domain, and their potential relationship to the cognitive phenotypes should be further explored.

  10. Rett syndrome treatment in mouse models: searching for effective targets and strategies.

    PubMed

    Ricceri, Laura; De Filippis, Bianca; Laviola, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive developmental disorder, primarily affecting girls with a prevalence of 1 in every 10,000 births; it represents the second most common cause of intellectual disability in females. Mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) have been identified as clear etiological factors in more than 90% of classical RTT cases. Whereas the mechanisms leading to the severe, progressive and specific neurological dysfunctions when this gene is mutated still remain to be elucidated, a series of different mouse models have been generated, bearing different Mecp2 mutation. Neurobehavioural analysis in these mouse lines have been carried out and phenotyping analysis can be now utilised to preclinically evaluate the effects of potential RTT treatments. This review summarizes the different results achieved in this research field taking into account different key targets identified to ameliorate RTT phenotype in mouse models, including those not directly downstream of MeCP2 and those limited to the early phases of postnatal development. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Neurodevelopmental Disorders'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Maternal diet modulates the risk for neural tube defects in a mouse model of diabetic pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kappen, Claudia; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Salbaum, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes have long been known to carry a higher risk for congenital malformations, such as neural tube defects. Using the FVB inbred mouse strain and the Streptozotocin-induced diabetes model, we tested whether the incidence of neural tube defects in diabetic pregnancies can be modulated by maternal diet. In a comparison of two commercial mouse diets, which are considered nutritionally replete, we found that maternal consumption of the unfavorable diet was associated with a more than three-fold higher rate of neural tube defects. Our results demonstrate that maternal diet can act as a modifier of the risk for abnormal development in high-risk pregnancies, and provide support for the possibility that neural tube defects in human diabetic pregnancies might be preventable by optimized maternal nutrition. PMID:20868740

  12. Multi-modality optical imaging of ovarian cancer in a post-menopausal mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jennifer M.; Rice, Photini Faith; Marion, Samuel L.; Bentley, David L.; Brewer, Molly A.; Utzinger, Urs; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2011-03-01

    Our goal is to use optical imaging to detect cancer development on the sub cellular scale. By determining the microscopic changes that precede ovarian cancer we hope to develop a minimally invasive screening test for high risk patients. A mouse ovarian cancer model has been developed by treating mice with 4-Vinylcyclohexene Diepoxide to induce ovarian failure and 7, 12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce ovarian cancer. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) we have obtained co-registered en face images of sixty-seven mouse ovaries ex vivo and forty-two ovaries in vivo. Preliminary analysis indicates that OCT and MPM can visualize ovarian microstructure. During the next year we will be completing a long term survival study using post-menopausal mice that have been treated with DMBA to induce cancer and imaged in vivo at time points before and after treatment.

  13. Disease Model Discovery from 3,328 Gene Knockouts by The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, Terrence F.; Conte, Nathalie; West, David B.; Jacobsen, Julius O.; Mason, Jeremy; Warren, Jonathan; Chen, Chao-Kung; Tudose, Ilinca; Relac, Mike; Matthews, Peter; Karp, Natasha; Santos, Luis; Fiegel, Tanja; Ring, Natalie; Westerberg, Henrik; Greenaway, Simon; Sneddon, Duncan; Morgan, Hugh; Codner, Gemma F; Stewart, Michelle E; Brown, James; Horner, Neil; Haendel, Melissa; Washington, Nicole; Mungall, Christopher J.; Reynolds, Corey L; Gallegos, Juan; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Sorg, Tania; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Bower, Lynette R; Moore, Mark; Morse, Iva; Gao, Xiang; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Obata, Yuichi; Cho, Soo Young; Seong, Je Kyung; Seavitt, John; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Herault, Yann; Wurst, Wolfgang; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Lloyd, K.C. Kent; Flenniken, Ann M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Newbigging, Susan; McKerlie, Colin; Justice, Monica J.; Murray, Stephen A.; Svenson, Karen L.; Braun, Robert E.; White, Jacqueline K.; Bradley, Allan; Flicek, Paul; Wells, Sara; Skarnes, William C.; Adams, David J.; Parkinson, Helen; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D.M.; Smedley, Damian

    2017-01-01

    Although next generation sequencing has revolutionised the ability to associate variants with human diseases, diagnostic rates and development of new therapies are still limited by our lack of knowledge of function and pathobiological mechanism for most genes. To address this challenge, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) is creating a genome- and phenome-wide catalogue of gene function by characterizing new knockout mouse strains across diverse biological systems through a broad set of standardised phenotyping tests, with all mice made readily available to the biomedical community. Analysing the first 3328 genes reveals models for 360 diseases including the first for type C Bernard-Soulier, Bardet-Biedl-5 and Gordon Holmes syndromes. 90% of our phenotype annotations are novel, providing the first functional evidence for 1092 genes and candidates in unsolved diseases such as Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia 3. Finally, we describe our role in variant functional validation with the 100,000 Genomes and other projects. PMID:28650483

  14. Terahertz spectroscopy of brain tissue from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Shumyatsky, Pavel; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) absorption and index of refraction of brain tissues from a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a control wild-type (normal) mouse were compared using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Three dominating absorption peaks associated to torsional-vibrational modes were observed in AD tissue, at about 1.44, 1.8, and 2.114 THz, closer to the peaks of free tryptophan molecules than in normal tissue. A possible reason is that there is more free tryptophan in AD brain tissue, while in normal brain tissue more tryptophan is attached to other molecules. Our study suggests that THz-absorption modes may be used as an AD biomarker fingerprint in brain, and that THz-TDS is a promising technique for early diagnosis of AD.

  15. Developmental abnormalities and age-related neurodegeneration in a mouse model of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, David M.; Santucci, Daniela; Kilbridge, Joshua; Chua-Couzens, Jane; Fontana, David J.; Daniels, Scott E.; Johnson, Randolph M.; Chen, Karen; Sun, Yuling; Carlson, Elaine; Alleva, Enrico; Epstein, Charles J.; Mobley, William C.

    1996-01-01

    To study the pathogenesis of central nervous system abnormalities in Down syndrome (DS), we have analyzed a new genetic model of DS, the partial trisomy 16 (Ts65Dn) mouse. Ts65Dn mice have an extra copy of the distal aspect of mouse chromosome 16, a segment homologous to human chromosome 21 that contains much of the genetic material responsible for the DS phenotype. Ts65Dn mice show developmental delay during the postnatal period as well as abnormal behaviors in both young and adult animals that may be analogous to mental retardation. Though the Ts65Dn brain is normal on gross examination, there is age-related degeneration of septohippocampal cholinergic neurons and astrocytic hypertrophy, markers of the Alzheimer disease pathology that is present in elderly DS individuals. These findings suggest that Ts65Dn mice may be used to study certain developmental and degenerative abnormalities in the DS brain. PMID:8917591

  16. Mouse neuroblastoma cell based model and the effect of epileptic events on calcium oscillations and neural spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhwan; Baek, Juyeong; Jung, Unsang; Lee, Sangwon; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Shinwon

    2013-05-01

    Recently, Mouse neuroblastoma cells are considered as an attractive model for the study of human neurological and prion diseases, and intensively used as a model system in different areas. Among those areas, differentiation of neuro2a (N2A) cells, receptor mediated ion current, and glutamate induced physiological response are actively investigated. The reason for the interest to mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells is that they have a fast growing rate than other cells in neural origin with a few another advantages. This study evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spikes recording of mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in mouse N2A cell with our proposed imaging modality, we report that mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells can be an important model related to epileptic activity studies. It is concluded that the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells produce the epileptic spikes in vitro in the same way as produced by the neurons or the astrocytes. This evidence advocates the increased and strong level of neurotransmitters release by enhancement in free calcium using the 4-aminopyridine which causes the mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to produce the epileptic spikes and calcium oscillation.

  17. In vivo evaluation of antiviral efficacy against genital herpes using mouse and guinea pig models.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Frances; Veselenak, Ronald L; Bourne, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Both the guinea pig and mouse are important animal models for the study of genital herpes. The murine model has been used extensively to evaluate vaccines and antiviral agents by measuring the incidence of infection and the magnitude of viral replication; however, this model is limited with regard to distinguishing between candidate vaccines or treatments. In contrast, the guinea pig closely mimics human infection and provides an excellent model of both primary and recurrent genital herpes disease. This animal model is especially important in the study of viral transmission through the evaluation of latent viral reactivation and virus shedding into the genital tract. Here, we describe methodologies to determine viral infection, severity of primary disease, and quantification of primary viral replication in the genital tract for both the guinea pig and murine models of genital herpes. Additionally, we detail the evaluation of the onset of primary disease and progression to the day of death in the mouse model. Further, we summarize methods to assess the frequency of recurrences, frequency and magnitude of virus shedding, and latent viral load in the sensory nerve ganglia of the guinea pig.

  18. Challenges and advances in mouse modeling for human pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wanglong

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is critical for developed countries, where its rate of diagnosis has been increasing steadily annually. In the past decade, the advances of pancreatic cancer research have not contributed to the decline in mortality rates from pancreatic cancer—the overall 5-year survival rate remains about 5% low. This number only underscores an obvious urgency for us to better understand the biological features of pancreatic carcinogenesis, to develop early detection methods, and to improve novel therapeutic treatments. To achieve these goals, animal modeling that faithfully recapitulates the whole process of human pancreatic cancer is central to making the advancements. In this review, we summarize the currently available animal models for pancreatic cancer and the advances in pancreatic cancer animal modeling. We compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of three major categories of these models: (1) carcinogen-induced; (2) xenograft and allograft; and (3) genetically engineered mouse models. We focus more on the genetically engineered mouse models, a category which has been rapidly expanded recently for their capacities to mimic human pancreatic cancer and metastasis, and highlight the combinations of these models with various newly developed strategies and cell-lineage labeling systems. PMID:23114842

  19. The Targeted Delivery of Interleukin 4 Inhibits Development of Endometriotic Lesions in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Quattrone, Federica; Sanchez, Ana Maria; Pannese, Maria; Hemmerle, Teresa; Viganò, Paola; Candiani, Massimo; Petraglia, Felice; Neri, Dario; Panina-Bordignon, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Endometriosis is caused by the displacement of endometrium outside the uterus contributing heavily to infertility and debilitating pelvic pain. Ectopic adhesion and growth are believed to occur under the influence of a favorable hormonal environment and immunological factors. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of a targeted therapy with an antibody-based pharmacodelivery of interleukin 4 (F8-IL4) in a mouse model of experimentally induced endometriosis. Endometriosis-like lesions were induced in Balb/c mice. The animals were treated intravenously with F8-IL4 or with untargeted IL4 (KSF-IL4). Twelve days after disease induction, the lesions were isolated. A significant reduction in the number of total lesions/mouse and in the total volume of lesions/mouse was observed in mice treated with F8-IL4 compared to controls (P = .029 and P = .006, respectively), while no difference was found between KSF-IL4-treated mice and their controls. Gene expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Expression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix invasion, and neovascularization was significantly downregulated in F8-IL4-treated mice compared to their controls (integrin β1: P = .02; metalloproteinase [MMP] 3: P = .02; MMP9: P = .04; vascular endothelial growth factor: P = .04). Gene expression of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, IL1β, IL1α, and IL6) did not vary in the ectopic lesions isolated from F8-IL4-treated mice compared to their controls. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significantly reduced expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin in the lesions of mice treated with F8-IL4. Our results show that the antibody-mediated targeted delivery of IL4 inhibits the development of endometriosis in a syngeneic mouse model by likely impairing adhesion, invasion, and vascularization of the ectopic endometrium. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Instability of the insertional mutation in CftrTgH(neoim)Hgu cystic fibrosis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Charizopoulou, Nikoletta; Jansen, Silke; Dorsch, Martina; Stanke, Frauke; Dorin, Julia R; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    Background A major boost to the cystic fibrosis disease research was given by the generation of various mouse models using gene targeting in embryonal stem cells. Moreover, the introduction of the same mutation on different inbred strains generating congenic strains facilitated the search for modifier genes. From the original CftrTgH(neoim)Hgu CF mouse model we have generated using strict brother × sister mating two inbred CftrTgH(neoim)Hgu mouse lines (CF/1 and CF/3). Thereafter, the insertional mutation was introgressed from CF/3 into three inbred backgrounds (C57BL/6, BALB/c, DBA/2J) generating congenic animals. In every backcross cycle germline transmission of the insertional mutation was monitored by direct probing the insertion via Southern RFLP. In order to bypass this time consuming procedure we devised an alternative PCR based protocol whereby mouse strains are differentiated at the Cftr locus by Cftr intragenic microsatellite genotypes that are tightly linked to the disrupted locus. Results Using this method we were able to identify animals carrying the insertional mutation based upon the differential haplotypic backgrounds of the three inbred strains and the mutant CftrTgH(neoim)Hgu at the Cftr locus. Moreover, this method facilitated the identification of the precise vector excision from the disrupted Cftr locus in two out of 57 typed animals. This reversion to wild type status took place without any loss of sequence revealing the instability of insertional mutations during the production of congenic animals. Conclusions We present intragenic microsatellite markers as a tool for fast and efficient identification of the introgressed locus of interest in the recipient strain during congenic animal breeding. Moreover, the same genotyping method allowed the identification of a vector excision event, posing questions on the stability of insertional mutations in mice. PMID:15102331

  1. Cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of Marfan syndrome develops into two distinctive phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Tae, Hyun-Jin; Marshall, Shannon; Krawczyk, Melissa; Talan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in fibrillin-1. Cardiac dysfunction in MFS has not been characterized halting the development of therapies of cardiac complication in MFS. We aimed to study the age-dependent cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of MFS FbnC1039G+/− mouse [Marfan heterozygous (HT) mouse] and its association with valvular regurgitation. Marfan HT mice of 2–4 mo demonstrated a mild hypertrophic cardiac remodeling with predominant decline of diastolic function and increased transforming growth factor-β canonical (p-SMAD2/3) and noncanonical (p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK) signaling and upregulation of hypertrophic markers natriuretic peptides atrium natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide. Among older HT mice (6–14 mo), cardiac remodeling was associated with two distinct phenotypes, manifesting either dilated or constricted left ventricular chamber. Dilatation of left ventricular chamber was accompanied by biochemical evidence of greater mechanical stress, including elevated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and higher brain natriuretic peptide expression. The aortic valve regurgitation was registered in 20% of the constricted group and 60% of the dilated group, whereas mitral insufficiency was observed in 40% of the constricted group and 100% of the dilated group. Cardiac dysfunction was not associated with the increase of interstitial fibrosis and nonmyocyte proliferation. In the mouse model fibrillin-1, haploinsufficiency results in the early onset of nonfibrotic hypertrophic cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, independently from valvular abnormalities. MFS heart is vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dilatation in the face of valvular regurgitation, and stress-activated MAPK signals represent a potential target for cardiac management in MFS. PMID:26566724

  2. Cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of Marfan syndrome develops into two distinctive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tae, Hyun-Jin; Petrashevskaya, Natalia; Marshall, Shannon; Krawczyk, Melissa; Talan, Mark

    2016-01-15

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in fibrillin-1. Cardiac dysfunction in MFS has not been characterized halting the development of therapies of cardiac complication in MFS. We aimed to study the age-dependent cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of MFS FbnC1039G+/- mouse [Marfan heterozygous (HT) mouse] and its association with valvular regurgitation. Marfan HT mice of 2-4 mo demonstrated a mild hypertrophic cardiac remodeling with predominant decline of diastolic function and increased transforming growth factor-β canonical (p-SMAD2/3) and noncanonical (p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK) signaling and upregulation of hypertrophic markers natriuretic peptides atrium natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide. Among older HT mice (6-14 mo), cardiac remodeling was associated with two distinct phenotypes, manifesting either dilated or constricted left ventricular chamber. Dilatation of left ventricular chamber was accompanied by biochemical evidence of greater mechanical stress, including elevated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and higher brain natriuretic peptide expression. The aortic valve regurgitation was registered in 20% of the constricted group and 60% of the dilated group, whereas mitral insufficiency was observed in 40% of the constricted group and 100% of the dilated group. Cardiac dysfunction was not associated with the increase of interstitial fibrosis and nonmyocyte proliferation. In the mouse model fibrillin-1, haploinsufficiency results in the early onset of nonfibrotic hypertrophic cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, independently from valvular abnormalities. MFS heart is vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dilatation in the face of valvular regurgitation, and stress-activated MAPK signals represent a potential target for cardiac management in MFS.

  3. Long-term exposure to intranasal oxytocin in a mouse autism model

    PubMed Central

    Bales, K L; Solomon, M; Jacob, S; Crawley, J N; Silverman, J L; Larke, R H; Sahagun, E; Puhger, K R; Pride, M C; Mendoza, S P

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide involved in mammalian social behavior. It is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Previous studies in healthy rodents (prairie voles and C57BL/6J mice) have shown that there may be detrimental effects of long-term intranasal administration, raising the questions about safety and efficacy. To investigate the effects of OT on the aspects of ASD phenotype, we conducted the first study of chronic intranasal OT in a well-validated mouse model of autism, the BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J inbred strain (BTBR), which displays low sociability and high repetitive behaviors. BTBR and C57BL/6J (B6) mice (N=94) were administered 0.8  IU/kg of OT intranasally, daily for 30 days, starting on day 21. We ran a well-characterized set of behavioral tasks relevant to diagnostic and associated symptoms of autism, including juvenile reciprocal social interactions, three-chambered social approach, open-field exploratory activity, repetitive self-grooming and fear-conditioned learning and memory, some during and some post treatment. Intranasal OT did not improve autism-relevant behaviors in BTBR, except for female sniffing in the three-chambered social interaction test. Male saline-treated BTBR mice showed increased interest in a novel mouse, both in chamber time and sniffing time, whereas OT-treated male BTBR mice showed a preference for the novel mouse in sniffing time only. No deleterious effects of OT were detected in either B6 or BTBR mice, except possibly for the lack of a preference for the novel mouse's chamber in OT-treated male BTBR mice. These results highlight the complexity inherent in understanding the effects of OT on behavior. Future investigations of chronic intranasal OT should include a wider dose range and early developmental time points in both healthy rodents and ASD models to affirm the efficacy and safety of OT. PMID:25386957

  4. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing frommore » 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. - Highlights: ► We demonstrated ER stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model. ► We described the asymmetrical nature of wound repair in the MEVM. ► We identified the distribution of various ER stress markers in the MEVM.« less

  5. A Bone-Implant Interaction Mouse Model for Evaluating Molecular Mechanism of Biomaterials/Bone Interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenlong; Dan, Xiuli; Wang, Ting; Lu, William W; Pan, Haobo

    2016-11-01

    The development of an optimal animal model that could provide fast assessments of the interaction between bone and orthopedic implants is essential for both preclinical and theoretical researches in the design of novel biomaterials. Compared with other animal models, mice have superiority in accessing the well-developed transgenic modification techniques (e.g., cell tracing, knockoff, knockin, and so on), which serve as powerful tools in studying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we introduced the establishment of a mouse model, which was specifically tailored for the assessment of bone-implant interaction in a load-bearing bone marrow microenvironment and could potentially allow the molecular mechanism study of biomaterials by using transgenic technologies. The detailed microsurgery procedures for developing a bone defect (Φ = 0.8 mm) at the metaphysis region of the mouse femur were recorded. According to our results, the osteoconductive and osseointegrative properties of a well-studied 45S5 bioactive glass were confirmed by utilizing our mouse model, verifying the reliability of this model. The feasibility and reliability of the present model were further checked by using other materials as objects of study. Furthermore, our results indicated that this animal model provided a more homogeneous tissue-implant interacting surface than the rat at the early stage of implantation and this is quite meaningful for conducting quantitative analysis. The availability of transgenic techniques to mechanism study of biomaterials was further testified by establishing our model on Nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the distribution of Nestin + cells was demonstrated to be recruited to the surface of 45S5 glass as early as 3 days postsurgery, indicating that Nestin + lineage stem cells may participate in the subsequent regeneration process. In summary, the bone-implant interaction mouse model could serve as a potential candidate to evaluate the early stage tissue

  6. A novel surgical approach for intratracheal administration of bioactive agents in a fetal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Carlon, Marianne S; Toelen, Jaan; da Cunha, Marina Mori; Vidović, Dragana; Van der Perren, Anke; Mayer, Steffi; Sbragia, Lourenço; Nuyts, Johan; Himmelreich, Uwe; Debyser, Zeger; Deprest, Jan

    2012-10-31

    Prenatal pulmonary delivery of cells, genes or pharmacologic agents could provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies for a variety of genetic and acquired diseases. Apart from congenital or inherited abnormalities with the requirement for long-term expression of the delivered gene, several non-inherited perinatal conditions, where short-term gene expression or pharmacological intervention is sufficient to achieve therapeutic effects, are considered as potential future indications for this kind of approach. Candidate diseases for the application of short-term prenatal therapy could be the transient neonatal deficiency of surfactant protein B causing neonatal respiratory distress syndrome(1,2) or hyperoxic injuries of the neonatal lung(3). Candidate diseases for permanent therapeutic correction are Cystic Fibrosis (CF)(4), genetic variants of surfactant deficiencies(5) and α1-antitrypsin deficiency(6). Generally, an important advantage of prenatal gene therapy is the ability to start therapeutic intervention early in development, at or even prior to clinical manifestations in the patient, thus preventing irreparable damage to the individual. In addition, fetal organs have an increased cell proliferation rate as compared to adult organs, which could allow a more efficient gene or stem cell transfer into the fetus. Furthermore, in utero gene delivery is performed when the individual's immune system is not completely mature. Therefore, transplantation of heterologous cells or supplementation of a non-functional or absent protein with a correct version should not cause immune sensitization to the cell, vector or transgene product, which has recently been proven to be the case with both cellular and genetic therapies(7). In the present study, we investigated the potential to directly target the fetal trachea in a mouse model. This procedure is in use in larger animal models such as rabbits and sheep(8), and even in a clinical setting(9), but has to date not been

  7. NCI Mouse Repository | FNLCR Staging

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Mouse Repository is an NCI-funded resource for mouse cancer models and associated strains. The repository makes strains available to all members of the scientific community (academic, non-profit, and commercial). NCI Mouse Repository strains

  8. A mouse model of alcoholic liver fibrosis-associated acute kidney injury identifies key molecular pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Shinji; Chappell, Grace A.; Iwata, Yasuhir

    Clinical data strongly indicate that acute kidney injury (AKI) is a critical complication in alcoholic hepatitis, an acute-on-chronic form of liver failure in patients with advanced alcoholic fibrosis. Development of targeted therapies for AKI in this setting is hampered by the lack of an animal model. To enable research into molecular drivers and novel therapies for fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI, we aimed to combine carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced fibrosis with chronic intra-gastric alcohol feeding. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered a low dose of CCl{sub 4} (0.2 ml/kg 2 × week/6 weeks) followed by alcohol intragastrically (up to 25 g/kg/day formore » 3 weeks) and with continued CCl{sub 4}. We observed that combined treatment with CCl{sub 4} and alcohol resulted in severe liver injury, more pronounced than using each treatment alone. Importantly, severe kidney injury was evident only in the combined treatment group. This mouse model reproduced distinct pathological features consistent with AKI in human alcoholic hepatitis. Transcriptomic analysis of kidneys revealed profound effects in the combined treatment group, with enrichment for damage-associated pathways, such as apoptosis, inflammation, immune-response and hypoxia. Interestingly, Havcr1 and Lcn2, biomarkers of AKI, were markedly up-regulated. Overall, this study established a novel mouse model of fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI and identified key mechanistic pathways. - Highlights: • Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a critical complication in alcoholic hepatitis • We developed a novel mouse model of fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI • This model reproduces key molecular and pathological features of human AKI • This animal model can help identify new targeted therapies for alcoholic hepatitis.« less

  9. Centralized mouse repositories.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Leah Rae; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T

    2012-10-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world.

  10. Centralized Mouse Repositories

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Leah Rae; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T.

    2013-01-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world. PMID:22945696

  11. Genetically engineered mouse models for epithelial ovarian cancer: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Howell, Viive M

    2014-03-01

    The development of preclinical spontaneous genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) requires an understanding of the genetic basis of the human disease. Such robust models have proven invaluable for increasing understanding of human malignancies as well as identifying new biomarkers and testing new therapies for these diseases. While GEMMs have been reported for ovarian cancer, the majority have proven disappointing overall in their recapitulation of paired genetic and histological features especially for serous ovarian epithelial cancer. This review describes GEMMs for ovarian cancer, in particular, high grade serous ovarian cancer and assesses these in light of recent changes in our understanding of the human malignancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting Mouse Liver Microsomal Stability with “Pruned” Machine Learning Models and Public Data

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, Alexander L.; Stratton, Thomas P.; Ekins, Sean; Freundlich, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mouse efficacy studies are a critical hurdle to advance translational research of potential therapeutic compounds for many diseases. Although mouse liver microsomal (MLM) stability studies are not a perfect surrogate for in vivo studies of metabolic clearance, they are the initial model system used to assess metabolic stability. Consequently, we explored the development of machine learning models that can enhance the probability of identifying compounds possessing MLM stability. Methods Published assays on MLM half-life values were identified in PubChem, reformatted, and curated to create a training set with 894 unique small molecules. These data were used to construct machine learning models assessed with internal cross-validation, external tests with a published set of antitubercular compounds, and independent validation with an additional diverse set of 571 compounds (PubChem data on percent metabolism). Results “Pruning” out the moderately unstable/moderately stable compounds from the training set produced models with superior predictive power. Bayesian models displayed the best predictive power for identifying compounds with a half-life ≥1 hour. Conclusions Our results suggest the pruning strategy may be of general benefit to improve test set enrichment and provide machine learning models with enhanced predictive value for the MLM stability of small organic molecules. This study represents the most exhaustive study to date of using machine learning approaches with MLM data from public sources. PMID:26415647

  13. Recent technological advances in using mouse models to study ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    House, Carrie Danielle; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina Messineo

    2014-01-01

    Serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer in the United States with disease recurrence being the major cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of SEOC, the survival rate for women with this disease has remained relatively unchanged in the last two decades. Preclinical mouse models of ovarian cancer, including xenograft, syngeneic, and genetically engineered mice, have been developed to provide a mechanism for studying the development and progression of SEOC. Such models strive to increase our understanding of the etiology and dissemination of ovarian cancer in order to overcome barriers to early detection and resistance to standard chemotherapy. Although there is not a single model that is most suitable for studying ovarian cancer, improvements have led to current models that more closely mimic human disease in their genotype and phenotype. Other advances in the field, such as live animal imaging techniques, allow effective monitoring of the microenvironment and therapeutic efficacy. New and improved preclinical mouse models, combined with technological advances to study such models, will undoubtedly render success of future human clinical trials for patients with SEOC.

  14. Recent Technological Advances in Using Mouse Models to Study Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    House, Carrie Danielle; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina Messineo

    2014-01-01

    Serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer in the United States with disease recurrence being the major cause of morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of SEOC, the survival rate for women with this disease has remained relatively unchanged in the last two decades. Preclinical mouse models of ovarian cancer, including xenograft, syngeneic, and genetically engineered mice, have been developed to provide a mechanism for studying the development and progression of SEOC. Such models strive to increase our understanding of the etiology and dissemination of ovarian cancer in order to overcome barriers to early detection and resistance to standard chemotherapy. Although there is not a single model that is most suitable for studying ovarian cancer, improvements have led to current models that more closely mimic human disease in their genotype and phenotype. Other advances in the field, such as live animal imaging techniques, allow effective monitoring of the microenvironment and therapeutic efficacy. New and improved preclinical mouse models, combined with technological advances to study such models, will undoubtedly render success of future human clinical trials for patients with SEOC. PMID:24592355

  15. OB glue paste technique for establishing nude mouse human gastric cancer orthotopic transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jun; Wei, Pin-Kang; Zhang, Shen; Qin, Zhi-Feng; Li, Jun; Sun, Da-Zhi; Xiao, Yan; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Lin, Hui-Ming; Zheng, Guo-Jing; Su, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Ya-Lin; Liu, Yan-Fang; Xu, Ling

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To establish nude mouse human gastric cancer orthotopic transplantation models using OB glue paste technique. METHODS: Using OB glue paste technique, orthotopic transplantation models were established by implanting SGC-7901 and MKN-45 human gastric cancer cell strains into the gastric wall of nude mice. Biological features, growth of the implanted tumors, the success rate of transplantation and the rate of auto-metastasis of the two models were observed. RESULTS: The success rates of orthotopic transplan-tation of the two models were 94.20% and 96%. The rates of hepatic metastasis, pulmonary metastasis, peritoneal metastasis, lymphocytic metastasis and splenic metastasis were 42.13% and 94.20%, 48.43% and 57.97%, 30.83% and 36.96%, 67.30% and 84.06%, and 59.75% and 10.53%, respectively. The occurrence of ascites was 47.80% and 36.96%. CONCLUSION: OB glue paste technique is easy to follow. The biological behaviors of the nude mouse human gastric cancer orthotopic transplantation models established with this technique are similar to the natural processes of growth and metastasis of human gastric cancer, and, therefore, can be used as an ideal model for experimental research of proliferative metastasis of tumors. PMID:18720543

  16. Humanized mouse model for assessing the human immune response to xenogeneic and allogeneic decellularized biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Raymond M; Johnson, Todd D; He, Jingjin; Rong, Zhili; Wong, Michelle; Nigam, Vishal; Behfar, Atta; Xu, Yang; Christman, Karen L

    2017-06-01

    Current assessment of biomaterial biocompatibility is typically implemented in wild type rodent models. Unfortunately, different characteristics of the immune systems in rodents versus humans limit the capability of these models to mimic the human immune response to naturally derived biomaterials. Here we investigated the utility of humanized mice as an improved model for testing naturally derived biomaterials. Two injectable hydrogels derived from decellularized porcine or human cadaveric myocardium were compared. Three days and one week after subcutaneous injection, the hydrogels were analyzed for early and mid-phase immune responses, respectively. Immune cells in the humanized mouse model, particularly T-helper cells, responded distinctly between the xenogeneic and allogeneic biomaterials. The allogeneic extracellular matrix derived hydrogels elicited significantly reduced total, human specific, and CD4 + T-helper cell infiltration in humanized mice compared to xenogeneic extracellular matrix hydrogels, which was not recapitulated in wild type mice. T-helper cells, in response to the allogeneic hydrogel material, were also less polarized towards a pro-remodeling Th2 phenotype compared to xenogeneic extracellular matrix hydrogels in humanized mice. In both models, both biomaterials induced the infiltration of macrophages polarized towards a M2 phenotype and T-helper cells polarized towards a Th2 phenotype. In conclusion, these studies showed the importance of testing naturally derived biomaterials in immune competent animals and the potential of utilizing this humanized mouse model for further studying human immune cell responses to biomaterials in an in vivo environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Predicting Mouse Liver Microsomal Stability with "Pruned" Machine Learning Models and Public Data.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Alexander L; Stratton, Thomas P; Ekins, Sean; Freundlich, Joel S

    2016-02-01

    Mouse efficacy studies are a critical hurdle to advance translational research of potential therapeutic compounds for many diseases. Although mouse liver microsomal (MLM) stability studies are not a perfect surrogate for in vivo studies of metabolic clearance, they are the initial model system used to assess metabolic stability. Consequently, we explored the development of machine learning models that can enhance the probability of identifying compounds possessing MLM stability. Published assays on MLM half-life values were identified in PubChem, reformatted, and curated to create a training set with 894 unique small molecules. These data were used to construct machine learning models assessed with internal cross-validation, external tests with a published set of antitubercular compounds, and independent validation with an additional diverse set of 571 compounds (PubChem data on percent metabolism). "Pruning" out the moderately unstable / moderately stable compounds from the training set produced models with superior predictive power. Bayesian models displayed the best predictive power for identifying compounds with a half-life ≥1 h. Our results suggest the pruning strategy may be of general benefit to improve test set enrichment and provide machine learning models with enhanced predictive value for the MLM stability of small organic molecules. This study represents the most exhaustive study to date of using machine learning approaches with MLM data from public sources.

  18. A prenatal nicotine exposure mouse model of methylphenidate responsive ADHD-associated cognitive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinmin; Fan, Fangfang; McCarthy, Deirdre M; Zhang, Lin; Cannon, Elisa N; Spencer, Thomas J; Biederman, Joseph; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2017-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to nicotine via cigarette smoke or other forms of tobacco use is a significant environmental risk factor for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the link between prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) and ADHD are not well understood. Animal models, especially rodent models, are beginning to bridge this gap in knowledge. Although ADHD is characterized by hyperactivity, inattention, impulsivity and working memory deficits, the majority of the animal models are based on only one or two ADHD associated phenotypes, in particular, hyperactivity or inattention. We report a PNE mouse model that displays the full range of ADHD associated behavioral phenotypes including working memory deficit, attention deficit and impulsive-like behavior. All of the ADHD-associated phenotypes respond to a single administration of a therapeutic equivalent dose of methylphenidate. In an earlier study, we showed that PNE produces hyperactivity, frontal cortical hypodopaminergic state and thinning of the cingulate cortex. Collectively, these data suggest that the PNE mouse model recapitulates key features of ADHD and may be a suitable preclinical model for ADHD research. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapamycin improves sociability in the BTBR T(+)Itpr3(tf)/J mouse model of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Burket, Jessica A; Benson, Andrew D; Tang, Amy H; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2014-01-01

    Overactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic forms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), such as tuberous sclerosis complex, neurofibromatosis 1, and fragile X syndrome. Administration of mTORC1 (mTOR complex 1) inhibitors (e.g. rapamycin) in syndromic mouse models of ASDs improved behavior, cognition, and neuropathology. However, since only a minority of ASDs are due to the effects of single genes (∼10%), there is a need to explore inhibition of mTOR activity in mouse models that may be more relevant to the majority of nonsyndromic presentations, such as the genetically inbred BTBR T(+)Itpr3(tf)/J (BTBR) mouse model of ASDs. BTBR mice have social impairment and exhibit increased stereotypic behavior. In prior work, d-cycloserine, a partial glycineB site agonist that targets the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, was shown to improve sociability in both Balb/c and BTBR mouse models of ASDs. Importantly, NMDA receptor activation regulates mTOR signaling activity. The current study investigated the ability of rapamycin (10mg/kg, i.p.×four days), an mTORC1 inhibitor, to improve sociability and stereotypic behavior in BTBR mice. Using a standard paradigm to assess mouse social behavior, rapamycin improved several measures of sociability in the BTBR mouse, suggesting that mTOR overactivation represents a therapeutic target that mediates or contributes to impaired sociability in the BTBR mouse model of ASDs. Interestingly, there was no effect of rapamycin on stereotypic behaviors in this mouse model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Generation of a neuro-specific microarray reveals novel differentially expressed noncoding RNAs in mouse models for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Gstir, Ronald; Schafferer, Simon; Scheideler, Marcel; Misslinger, Matthias; Griehl, Matthias; Daschil, Nina; Humpel, Christian; Obermair, Gerald J; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Striessnig, Joerg; Flucher, Bernhard E; Hüttenhofer, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    We have generated a novel, neuro-specific ncRNA microarray, covering 1472 ncRNA species, to investigate their expression in different mouse models for central nervous system diseases. Thereby, we analyzed ncRNA expression in two mouse models with impaired calcium channel activity, implicated in Epilepsy or Parkinson's disease, respectively, as well as in a mouse model mimicking pathophysiological aspects of Alzheimer's disease. We identified well over a hundred differentially expressed ncRNAs, either from known classes of ncRNAs, such as miRNAs or snoRNAs or which represented entirely novel ncRNA species. Several differentially expressed ncRNAs in the calcium channel mouse models were assigned as miRNAs and target genes involved in calcium signaling, thus suggesting feedback regulation of miRNAs by calcium signaling. In the Alzheimer mouse model, we identified two snoRNAs, whose expression was deregulated prior to amyloid plaque formation. Interestingly, the presence of snoRNAs could be detected in cerebral spine fluid samples in humans, thus potentially serving as early diagnostic markers for Alzheimer's disease. In addition to known ncRNAs species, we also identified 63 differentially expressed, entirely novel ncRNA candidates, located in intronic or intergenic regions of the mouse genome, genomic locations, which previously have been shown to harbor the majority of functional ncRNAs. © 2014 Gstir et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Brain growth trajectories in mouse strains with central and peripheral serotonin differences: relevance to autism models.

    PubMed

    Flood, Z C; Engel, D L J; Simon, C C; Negherbon, K R; Murphy, L J; Tamavimok, W; Anderson, G M; Janušonis, S

    2012-05-17

    The genetic heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) suggests that their underlying neurobiology involves dysfunction at the neural network level. Understanding these neural networks will require a major collaborative effort and will depend on validated and widely accepted animal models. Many mouse models have been proposed in autism research, but the assessment of their validity often has been limited to measuring social interactions. However, two other well-replicated findings have been reported in ASDs: transient brain overgrowth in early postnatal life and elevated 5-HT (serotonin) levels in blood platelets (platelet hyperserotonemia). We examined two inbred mouse strains (C57BL/6 and BALB/c) with respect to these phenomena. The BALB/c strain is less social and exhibits some other autistic-like behaviors. In addition, it has a lower 5-HT synthesis rate in the central nervous system due to a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2) gene. The postnatal growth of brain mass was analyzed with mixed-effects models that included litter effects. The volume of the hippocampal complex and the thickness of the somatosensory cortex were measured in 3D-brain reconstructions from serial sections. The postnatal whole-blood 5-HT levels were assessed with high-performance liquid chromatography. With respect to the BALB/c strain, the C57BL/6 strain showed transient brain overgrowth and persistent blood hyperserotonemia. The hippocampal volume was permanently enlarged in the C57BL/6 strain, with no change in the adult brain mass. These results indicate that, in mice, autistic-like shifts in the brain and periphery may be associated with less autistic-like behaviors. Importantly, they suggest that consistency among behavioral, anatomical, and physiological measures may expedite the validation of new and previously proposed mouse models of autism, and that the construct validity of models should be demonstrated when these measures are

  2. An adjuvant free mouse model of oral allergenic sensitization to rice seeds protein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rice is commonly known as a staple crop consumed worldwide, though with several rice proteins being reported for allergic properties in clinical studies. Thus, there is a growing need for the development of an animal model to better understand the allergenicity of rice proteins and the immunological and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of food allergy. Methods Groups of BALB/c mice were sensitized daily with freshly homogenized rice flour (30 mg or 80 mg) without adjuvant by intragastric gavage. In addition, the mice were challenged with extracted rice flour proteins at several time points intragastrically. Hypersensitivity symptoms in mice were evaluated according to a scoring system. Vascular leakage, ELISA of rice protein-specific IgE, histopathology of small intestine, and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis were conducted on challenged mice. Results An adjuvant free mouse model of rice allergy was established with sensitized mice showing increased scratching behaviors and increased vascular permeability. Rice protein-specific IgE was detected after eighteen days of sensitization and from the fifth challenge onwards. Inflammatory damage to the epithelium in the small intestine of mice was observed beyond one month of sensitization. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis results confirmed the positive rice allergy in the mouse model. Conclusions We introduced a BALB/c mouse model of rice allergy with simple oral sensitization without the use of adjuvant. This model would serve as a useful tool for further analysis on the immunopathogenic mechanisms of the various rice allergens, for the evaluation of the hypersensitivity of rice or other cereal grains, and to serve as a platform for the development of immunotherapies against rice allergens. PMID:21605393

  3. A tailored mouse model of CLN2 disease: A nonsense mutant for testing personalized therapies

    PubMed Central

    Geraets, Ryan D.; Beraldi, Rosanna; Weimer, Jill M.; Pearce, David A.

    2017-01-01

    The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (NCLs), also known as Batten disease, result from mutations in over a dozen genes. Although, adults are susceptible, the NCLs are frequently classified as pediatric neurodegenerative diseases due to their greater pediatric prevalence. Initial clinical presentation usually consists of either seizures or retinopathy but develops to encompass both in conjunction with declining motor and cognitive function. The NCLs result in premature death due to the absence of curative therapies. Nevertheless, preclinical and clinical trials exist for various therapies. However, the genotypes of NCL animal models determine which therapeutic approaches can be assessed. Mutations of the CLN2 gene encoding a soluble lysosomal enzyme, tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1), cause late infantile NCL/CLN2 disease. The genotype of the original mouse model of CLN2 disease, Cln2-/-, excludes mutation guided therapies like antisense oligonucleotides and nonsense suppression. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a model of CLN2 disease that allows for the assessment of all therapeutic approaches. Nonsense mutations in CLN2 disease are frequent, the most common being CLN2R208X. Thus, we created a mouse model that carries a mutation equivalent to the human p.R208X mutation. Molecular assessment of Cln2R207X/R207X tissues determined significant reduction in Cln2 transcript abundance and TPP1 enzyme activity. This reduction leads to the development of neurological impairment (e.g. tremors) and neuropathology (e.g. astrocytosis). Collectively, these assessments indicate that the Cln2R207X/R207X mouse is a valid CLN2 disease model which can be used for the preclinical evaluation of all therapeutic approaches including mutation guided therapies. PMID:28464005

  4. Oral LD50 toxicity modeling and prediction of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals on rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses were performed using the LD(50) oral toxicity data of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) on rodents: rat and mouse. PFCs are studied under the EU project CADASTER which uses the available experimental data for prediction and prioritization of toxic chemicals for risk assessment by using the in silico tools. The methodology presented here applies chemometrical analysis on the existing experimental data and predicts the toxicity of new compounds. QSAR analyses were performed on the available 58 mouse and 50 rat LD(50) oral data using multiple linear regression (MLR) based on theoretical molecular descriptors selected by genetic algorithm (GA). Training and prediction sets were prepared a priori from available experimental datasets in terms of structure and response. These sets were used to derive statistically robust and predictive (both internally and externally) models. The structural applicability domain (AD) of the models were verified on 376 per- and polyfluorinated chemicals including those in REACH preregistration list. The rat and mouse endpoints were predicted by each model for the studied compounds, and finally 30 compounds, all perfluorinated, were prioritized as most important for experimental toxicity analysis under the project. In addition, cumulative study on compounds within the AD of all four models, including two earlier published models on LC(50) rodent analysis was studied and the cumulative toxicity trend was observed using principal component analysis (PCA). The similarities and the differences observed in terms of descriptors and chemical/mechanistic meaning encoded by descriptors to prioritize the most toxic compounds are highlighted.

  5. Glucosylceramide Administration as a Vaccination Strategy in Mouse Models of Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Visesato; Farnoud, Amir M.; Singh, Ashutosh; Rella, Antonella; Tanno, Hiromasa; Ishii, Keiko; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Sato, Toshiya; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and the causative agent of the disease cryptococcosis. Cryptococcosis is initiated as a pulmonary infection and in conditions of immune deficiency disseminates to the blood stream and central nervous system, resulting in life-threatening meningoencephalitis. A number of studies have focused on the development of a vaccine against Cryptococcus, primarily utilizing protein-conjugated components of the Cryptococcus polysaccharide capsule as antigen. However, there is currently no vaccine against Cryptococcus in the clinic. Previous studies have shown that the glycosphingolipid, glucosylceramide (GlcCer), is a virulence factor in C. neoformans and antibodies against this lipid inhibit fungal growth and cell division. In the present study, we have investigated the possibility of using GlcCer as a therapeutic agent against C. neoformans infections in mouse models of cryptococcosis. GlcCer purified from a non-pathogenic fungus, Candida utilis, was administered intraperitoneally, prior to infecting mice with a lethal dose of C. neoformans. GlcCer administration prevented the dissemination of C. neoformans from the lungs to the brain and led to 60% mouse survival. GlcCer administration did not cause hepatic injury and elicited an anti-GlcCer antibody response, which was observed independent of the route of administration and the strains of mouse. Taken together, our results suggest that fungal GlcCer can protect mice against lethal doses of C. neoformans infection and can provide a viable vaccination strategy against Cryptococcus. PMID:27082428

  6. Glucosylceramide Administration as a Vaccination Strategy in Mouse Models of Cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Mor, Visesato; Farnoud, Amir M; Singh, Ashutosh; Rella, Antonella; Tanno, Hiromasa; Ishii, Keiko; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Sato, Toshiya; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and the causative agent of the disease cryptococcosis. Cryptococcosis is initiated as a pulmonary infection and in conditions of immune deficiency disseminates to the blood stream and central nervous system, resulting in life-threatening meningoencephalitis. A number of studies have focused on the development of a vaccine against Cryptococcus, primarily utilizing protein-conjugated components of the Cryptococcus polysaccharide capsule as antigen. However, there is currently no vaccine against Cryptococcus in the clinic. Previous studies have shown that the glycosphingolipid, glucosylceramide (GlcCer), is a virulence factor in C. neoformans and antibodies against this lipid inhibit fungal growth and cell division. In the present study, we have investigated the possibility of using GlcCer as a therapeutic agent against C. neoformans infections in mouse models of cryptococcosis. GlcCer purified from a non-pathogenic fungus, Candida utilis, was administered intraperitoneally, prior to infecting mice with a lethal dose of C. neoformans. GlcCer administration prevented the dissemination of C. neoformans from the lungs to the brain and led to 60% mouse survival. GlcCer administration did not cause hepatic injury and elicited an anti-GlcCer antibody response, which was observed independent of the route of administration and the strains of mouse. Taken together, our results suggest that fungal GlcCer can protect mice against lethal doses of C. neoformans infection and can provide a viable vaccination strategy against Cryptococcus.

  7. In vitro developmental model of the gastrointestinal tract from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Torihashi, Shigeko; Kuwahara, Masaki; Kurahashi, Masaaki

    2007-10-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent and retain their potential to form cells, tissues and organs originated from three embryonic germ layers. Recently, we developed in vitro organ--gut-like structures--from mouse ES cells. They had basically similar morphological features to a mouse gastrointestinal tract in vivo composed of three distinct layers (i.e., epithelium, connective tissue and musculature). Gut-like structures showed spontaneous contractions derived from pacemaker cells (interstitial cells of Cajal) in the musculature. We also examined their formation process and expression pattern of transcription factors crucial for gut organogenesis such as Id2, Sox17, HNF3beta/Foxa2 and GATA4. We found that they mimic the development of embryonic gut in vivo and showed a similar expression pattern of common transcription factors. They also maintain their developmental potential after transplantation to a renal capsule. Therefore, gut-like structures are suitable for in vitro models of gastrointestinal tracts and their development. In addition, we pointed out several unique features different from gut in vivo that provide useful and advantageous tools to investigate the developmental mechanism of the gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Estradiol and progesterone influence on influenza infection and immune response in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sarah M; Sweet, Leigh M; Oppenheimer, Karen H; Suratt, Benjamin T; Phillippe, Mark

    2017-10-01

    Influenza infection severity may be mediated by estradiol and/or progesterone. An exploratory study was designed to evaluate 17-β-estradiol and progesterone on influenza infection and examine immune-mediated response in a mouse model. Inoculation with placebo or mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza virus occurred. Treatment groups included 17-β-estradiol, progesterone, ovariectomy, and pregnancy. Mice were assessed for morbidity and mortality. Toll-like receptor gene studies and airspace cell differentials were performed. Onset of morbidity was earlier and morbidity duration greater for progesterone. Absence of morbidity/mortality and overall survival was greater for 17-β-estradiol. Airspace cell differentials suggest improved immune cell recruitment for 17-β-estradiol. Pregnant mouse data demonstrate significant mortality during the period of increased progesterone. Select immune cell markers demonstrate patterns of regulation that may promote proper immune response to influenza infection for 17-β-estradiol. Estradiol may play a protective and progesterone a detrimental role in the pathophysiology of influenza infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Dynamic gene expression analysis in a H1N1 influenza virus mouse pneumonia model.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanyan; Gao, Yingjie; Shi, Yujing; Cui, Xiaolan

    2017-06-01

    H1N1, a major pathogenic subtype of influenza A virus, causes a respiratory infection in humans and livestock that can range from a mild infection to more severe pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Understanding the dynamic changes in the genome and the related functional changes induced by H1N1 influenza virus infection is essential to elucidating the pathogenesis of this virus and thereby determining strategies to prevent future outbreaks. In this study, we filtered the significantly expressed genes in mouse pneumonia using mRNA microarray analysis. Using STC analysis, seven significant gene clusters were revealed, and using STC-GO analysis, we explored the significant functions of these seven gene clusters. The results revealed GOs related to H1N1 virus-induced inflammatory and immune functions, including innate immune response, inflammatory response, specific immune response, and cellular response to interferon-beta. Furthermore, the dynamic regulation relationships of the key genes in mouse pneumonia were revealed by dynamic gene network analysis, and the most important genes were filtered, including Dhx58, Cxcl10, Cxcl11, Zbp1, Ifit1, Ifih1, Trim25, Mx2, Oas2, Cd274, Irgm1, and Irf7. These results suggested that during mouse pneumonia, changes in the expression of gene clusters and the complex interactions among genes lead to significant changes in function. Dynamic gene expression analysis revealed key genes that performed important functions. These results are a prelude to advancements in mouse H1N1 influenza virus infection biology, as well as the use of mice as a model organism for human H1N1 influenza virus infection studies.

  10. Effects of oxidative stress on hyperglycaemia-induced brain malformations in a diabetes mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Ya; Wang, Guang; Han, Sha-Sha

    Pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) enhances the risk of fetal neurodevelopmental defects. However, the mechanism of hyperglycaemia-induced neurodevelopmental defects is not fully understood. In this study, several typical neurodevelopmental defects were identified in the streptozotocin-induced diabetes mouse model. The neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin/forkhead box P1-labelled neuronal differentiation was suppressed and glial fibrillary acidic protein-labelled glial cell lineage differentiation was slightly promoted in pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) mice. Various concentrations of glucose did not change the U87 cell viability, but glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression was altered with varying glucose concentrations. Mouse maternal hyperglycaemia significantly increased Tunel{sup +} apoptosis but didmore » not dramatically affect PCNA{sup +} cell proliferation in the process. To determine the cause of increased apoptosis, we determined the SOD activity, the expression of Nrf2 as well as its downstream anti-oxidative factors NQO1 and HO1, and found that all of them significantly increased in PGDM fetal brains compared with controls. However, Nrf2 expression in U87 cells was not significantly changed by different glucose concentrations. In mouse telencephalon, we observed the co-localization of Tuj-1 and Nrf2 expression in neurons, and down-regulating of Nrf2 in SH-SY5Y cells altered the viability of SH-SY5Y cells exposed to high glucose concentrations. Taken together, the data suggest that Nrf2-modulated antioxidant stress plays a crucial role in maternal hyperglycaemia-induced neurodevelopmental defects. - Highlights: • Typical neurodevelopmental defects could be observed in STZ-treated mouse fetuses. • Nrf2 played a crucial role in hyperglycaemia-induced brain malformations. • The effects of hyperglycaemia on neurons and glia cells were not same.« less

  11. Generation and Characterization of a Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Shannon; Salphati, Laurent; Gomez-Zepeda, David; Wanek, Thomas; Chen, Liangfu; Chu, Xiaoyan; Kunta, Jeevan; Mezler, Mario; Menet, Marie-Claude; Chasseigneaux, Stephanie; Declèves, Xavier; Langer, Oliver; Pierre, Esaie; DiLoreto, Karen; Hoft, Carolin; Laplanche, Loic; Pang, Jodie; Pereira, Tony; Andonian, Clara; Simic, Damir; Rode, Anja; Yabut, Jocelyn; Zhang, Xiaolin; Scheer, Nico

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is expressed in various tissues, such as the gut, liver, kidney and blood brain barrier (BBB), where it mediates the unidirectional transport of substrates to the apical/luminal side of polarized cells. Thereby BCRP acts as an efflux pump, mediating the elimination or restricting the entry of endogenous compounds or xenobiotics into tissues and it plays important roles in drug disposition, efficacy and safety. Bcrp knockout mice (Bcrp(-/-)) have been used widely to study the role of this transporter in limiting intestinal absorption and brain penetration of substrate compounds. Here we describe the first generation and characterization of a mouse line humanized for BCRP (hBCRP), in which the mouse coding sequence from the start to stop codon was replaced with the corresponding human genomic region, such that the human transporter is expressed under control of the murineBcrppromoter. We demonstrate robust human and loss of mouse BCRP/Bcrp mRNA and protein expression in the hBCRP mice and the absence of major compensatory changes in the expression of other genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition. Pharmacokinetic and brain distribution studies with several BCRP probe substrates confirmed the functional activity of the human transporter in these mice. Furthermore, we provide practical examples for the use of hBCRP mice to study drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The hBCRP mouse is a promising model to study the in vivo role of human BCRP in limiting absorption and BBB penetration of substrate compounds and to investigate clinically relevant DDIs involving BCRP. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. A clinically authentic mouse model of enterovirus 71 (EV-A71)-induced neurogenic pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chua, Beng Hooi; Alonso, Sylvie; Chow, Vincent T K; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-06-30

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a neurotropic virus that sporadically causes fatal neurologic illness among infected children. Animal models of EV-A71 infection exist, but they do not recapitulate in animals the spectrum of disease and pathology observed in fatal human cases. Specifically, neurogenic pulmonary oedema (NPE)-the main cause of EV-A71 infection-related mortality-is not observed in any of these models. This limits their utility in understanding viral pathogenesis of neurologic infections. We report the development of a mouse model of EV-A71 infection displaying NPE in severely affected animals. We inoculated one-week-old BALB/c mice with an adapted EV-A71 strain and identified clinical signs consistent with observations in human cases and other animal models. We also observed respiratory distress in some mice. At necropsy, we found their lungs to be heavier and incompletely collapsed compared to other mice. Serum levels of catecholamines and histopathology of lung and brain tissues of these mice strongly indicated onset of NPE. The localization of virally-induced brain lesions also suggested a potential pathogenic mechanism for EV-A71-induced NPE. This novel mouse model of virally-induced NPE represents a valuable resource for studying viral mechanisms of neuro-pathogenesis and pre-clinical testing of potential therapeutics and prophylactics against EV-A71-related neurologic complications.

  13. Tumour and normal tissue radiobiology in mouse models: how close are mice to mini-humans?

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegen, Frank; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Animal modelling is essential to the study of radiobiology and the advancement of clinical radiation oncology by providing preclinical data. Mouse models in particular have been highly utilized in the study of both tumour and normal tissue radiobiology because of their cost effectiveness and versatility. Technology has significantly advanced in preclinical radiation techniques to allow highly conformal image-guided irradiation of small animals in an effort to mimic human treatment capabilities. However, the biological and physical limitations of animal modelling should be recognized and considered when interpreting preclinical radiotherapy (RT) studies. Murine tumour and normal tissue radioresponse has been shown to vary from human cellular and molecular pathways. Small animal irradiation techniques utilize different anatomical boundaries and may have different physical properties than human RT. This review addresses the difference between the human condition and mouse models and discusses possible strategies for future refinement of murine models of cancer and radiation for the benefit of both basic radiobiology and clinical translation. PMID:27612010

  14. A Mouse Model of Acinetobacter baumannii-Associated Pneumonia Using a Clinically Isolated Hypervirulent Strain

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Greg; Kuo Lee, Rhonda; Lam, Christopher K.; Kanzaki, Gregory; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Xu, H. Howard

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important emerging pathogen in health care-acquired infections and is responsible for severe nosocomial and community-acquired pneumonia. Currently available mouse models of A. baumannii pneumonia show poor colonization with little to no extrapulmonary dissemination. Here, we describe a mouse model of A. baumannii pneumonia using a clinical isolate (LAC-4 strain) that reliably reproduces the most relevant features of human pulmonary A. baumannii infection and pathology. Using this model, we have shown that LAC-4 infection induced rapid bacterial replication in the lungs, significant extrapulmonary dissemination, and severe bacteremia by 24 h postintranasal inoculation. Infected mice showed severe bronchopneumonia and dilatation and inflammatory cell infiltration in the perivascular space. More significantly, 100% of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice succumbed to 108 CFU of LAC-4 inoculation within 48 h. When this model was used to assess the efficacy of antimicrobials, all mice treated with imipenem and tigecycline survived a lethal intranasal challenge, with minimal clinical signs and body weight loss. Moreover, intranasal immunization of mice with formalin-fixed LAC-4 protected 40% of mice from a lethal (100× 100% lethal dose) intraperitoneal challenge. Thus, this model offers a reproducible acute course of A. baumannii pneumonia without requiring additional manipulation of host immune status, which will facilitate the development of therapeutic agents and vaccines against A. baumannii pneumonia in humans. PMID:23689726

  15. Low-dose rapamycin extends lifespan in a mouse model of mtDNA depletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Stephanie E; Yang, Hua; Sharma, Rohit; Javors, Martin; Skinner, Owen; Mootha, Vamsi; Hirano, Michio; Schon, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial disorders affecting oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) are caused by mutations in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. One promising candidate for treatment is the drug rapamycin, which has been shown to extend lifespan in multiple animal models, and which was previously shown to ameliorate mitochondrial disease in a knock-out mouse model lacking a nuclear-encoded gene specifying an OxPhos structural subunit (Ndufs4). In that model, relatively high-dose intraperitoneal rapamycin extended lifespan and improved markers of neurological disease, via an unknown mechanism. Here, we administered low-dose oral rapamycin to a knock-in (KI) mouse model of authentic mtDNA disease, specifically, progressive mtDNA depletion syndrome, resulting from a mutation in the mitochondrial nucleotide salvage enzyme thymidine kinase 2 (TK2). Importantly, low-dose oral rapamycin was sufficient to extend Tk2KI/KI mouse lifespan significantly, and did so in the absence of detectable improvements in mitochondrial dysfunction. We found no evidence that rapamycin increased survival by acting through canonical pathways, including mitochondrial autophagy. However, transcriptomics and metabolomics analyses uncovered systemic metabolic changes pointing to a potential ‘rapamycin metabolic signature.’ These changes also implied that rapamycin may have enabled the Tk2KI/KI mice to utilize alternative energy reserves, and possibly triggered indirect signaling events that modified mortality through developmental reprogramming. From a therapeutic standpoint, our results support the possibility that low-dose rapamycin, while not targeting the underlying mtDNA defect, could represent a crucial therapy for the treatment of mtDNA-driven, and some nuclear DNA-driven, mitochondrial diseases. PMID:28973153

  16. The contribution of mouse models to understanding the pathogenesis of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, James N.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Talbot, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), which is caused by inactivating mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, is characterized by loss of lower motor neurons in the spinal cord. The gene encoding SMN is very highly conserved in evolution, allowing the disease to be modeled in a range of species. The similarities in anatomy and physiology to the human neuromuscular system, coupled with the ease of genetic manipulation, make the mouse the most suitable model for exploring the basic pathogenesis of motor neuron loss and for testing potential treatments. Therapies that increase SMN levels, either through direct viral delivery or by enhancing full-length SMN protein expression from the SMN1 paralog, SMN2, are approaching the translational stage of development. It is therefore timely to consider the role of mouse models in addressing aspects of disease pathogenesis that are most relevant to SMA therapy. Here, we review evidence suggesting that the apparent selective vulnerability of motor neurons to SMN deficiency is relative rather than absolute, signifying that therapies will need to be delivered systemically. We also consider evidence from mouse models suggesting that SMN has its predominant action on the neuromuscular system in early postnatal life, during a discrete phase of development. Data from these experiments suggest that the timing of therapy to increase SMN levels might be crucial. The extent to which SMN is required for the maintenance of motor neurons in later life and whether augmenting its levels could treat degenerative motor neuron diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), requires further exploration. PMID:21708901

  17. Effect of sclerostin antibody treatment in a mouse model of severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Roschger, Andreas; Roschger, Paul; Keplingter, Petra; Klaushofer, Klaus; Abdullah, Sami; Kneissel, Michaela; Rauch, Frank

    2014-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone fragility disorder that is usually caused by mutations affecting collagen type I production in osteoblasts. Stimulation of bone formation through sclerostin antibody treatment (Sost-ab) has shown promising results in mouse models of relatively mild OI. We assessed the effect of once-weekly intravenous Sost-ab injections for 4weeks in male Col1a1(Jrt)/+mice, a model of severe dominant OI, starting either at 4weeks (growing mice) or at 20weeks (adult mice) of age. Sost-ab had no effect on weight or femur length. In OI mice, no significant treatment-associated differences in serum markers of bone formation (alkaline phosphatase activity, procollagen type I N-propeptide) or resorption (C-telopeptide of collagen type I) were found. Micro-CT analyses at the femur showed that Sost-ab treatment was associated with higher trabecular bone volume and higher cortical thickness in wild type mice at both ages and in growing OI mice, but not in adult OI mice. Three-point bending tests of the femur showed that in wild type but not in OI mice, Sost-ab was associated with higher ultimate load and work to failure. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging of the femur did not show any effect of Sost-ab on CaPeak (the most frequently occurring calcium concentration in the bone mineral density distribution), regardless of genotype, age or measurement location. Thus, Sost-ab had a larger effect in wild type than in Col1a1(Jrt)/+mice. Previous studies had found marked improvements of Sost-ab on bone mass and strength in an OI mouse model with a milder phenotype. Our data therefore suggest that Sost-ab is less effective in a more severely affected OI mouse model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishment of a mouse model with misregulated chromosome condensation due to defective Mcph1 function.

    PubMed

    Trimborn, Marc; Ghani, Mahdi; Walther, Diego J; Dopatka, Monika; Dutrannoy, Véronique; Busche, Andreas; Meyer, Franziska; Nowak, Stefanie; Nowak, Jean; Zabel, Claus; Klose, Joachim; Esquitino, Veronica; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kuss, Andreas W; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Mueller, Susanne; Poehlmann, Charlotte; Gavvovidis, Ioannis; Schindler, Detlev; Sperling, Karl; Neitzel, Heidemarie

    2010-02-16

    Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome). The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608) containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation) appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1(gt/gt) mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1(gt/gt) animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function.

  19. The importance of the Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model in autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, James A; Wong, F. Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the pancreatic infiltration of immune cells resulting in T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. The successes of the Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model have come in multiple forms including identifying key genetic and environmental risk factors e.g. Idd loci and effects of microorganisms including the gut microbiota, respectively, and how they may contribute to disease susceptibility and pathogenesis. Furthermore, the NOD model also provides insights into the roles of the innate immune cells as well as the B cells in contributing to the T cell-mediated disease. Unlike many autoimmune disease models, the NOD mouse develops spontaneous disease and has many similarities to human T1D. Through exploiting these similarities many targets have been identified for immune-intervention strategies. Although many of these immunotherapies did not have a significant impact on human T1D, they have been shown to be effective in the NOD mouse in early stage disease, which is not equivalent to trials in newly-diagnosed patients with diabetes. However, the continued development of humanized NOD mice would enable further clinical developments, bringing T1D research to a new translational level. Therefore, it is the aim of this review to discuss the importance of the NOD model in identifying the roles of the innate immune system and the interaction with the gut microbiota in modifying diabetes susceptibility. In addition, the role of the B cells will also be discussed with new insights gained through B cell depletion experiments and the impact on translational developments. Finally, this review will also discuss the future of the NOD mice and the development of humanized NOD mice, providing novel insights into human T1D. PMID:26403950

  20. A recombinant lentiviral PDGF-driven mouse model of proneural glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rahme, Gilbert J; Luikart, Bryan W; Cheng, Chao; Israel, Mark A

    2018-02-19

    Mouse models of glioblastoma (GBM), the most aggressive primary brain tumor, are critical for understanding GBM pathology and can contribute to the preclinical evaluation of therapeutic agents. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling has been implicated in the development and pathogenesis of GBM, specifically the proneural subtype. Although multiple mouse models of PDGF-driven glioma have been described, they require transgenic mice engineered to activate PDGF signaling and/or impair tumor suppressor genes and typically represent lower-grade glioma. We designed recombinant lentiviruses expressing both PDGFB and a short hairpin RNA targeting Cdkn2a to induce gliomagenesis following stereotactic injection into the dentate gyrus of adult immunocompetent mice. We engineered these viruses to coexpress CreERT2 with PDGFB, allowing for deletion of floxed genes specifically in transduced cells, and designed another version of this recombinant lentivirus in which enhanced green fluorescent protein was coexpressed with PDGFB and CreERT2 to visualize transduced cells. The dentate gyrus of injected mice showed hypercellularity one week post-injection and subsequently developed bona fide tumors with the pathologic hallmarks of GBM leading to a median survival of 77 days post-injection. Transcriptomic analysis of these tumors revealed a proneural gene expression signature. Informed by the genetic alterations observed in human GBM, we engineered a novel mouse model of proneural GBM. While reflecting many of the advantages of transgenic mice, this model allows for the facile in vivo testing of gene function in tumor cells and makes possible the rapid production of large numbers of immunocompetent tumor-bearing mice for preclinical testing of therapeutics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Sensorimotor assessment of the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Glajch, Kelly E.; Fleming, Sheila M.; Surmeier, D. James; Osten, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by marked impairments in motor function caused by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Animal models of PD have traditionally been based on toxins, such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), that selectively lesion dopaminergic neurons. Motor impairments from 6-OHDA lesions of SNc neurons are well characterized in rats, but much less work has been done in mice. In this study, we compare the effectiveness of a series of drug-free behavioral tests in assessing sensorimotor impairments in the unilateral 6-OHDA mouse model, including six tests used for the first time in this PD mouse model (the automated treadmill “DigiGait” test, the challenging beam test, the adhesive removal test, the pole test, the adjusting steps test, and the test of spontaneous activity) and two tests used previously in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice (the limb-use asymmetry “cylinder” test and the manual gait test). We demonstrate that the limb-use asymmetry, challenging beam, pole, adjusting steps, and spontaneous activity tests are all highly robust assays for detecting sensorimotor impairments in the 6-OHDA mouse model. We also discuss the use of the behavioral tests for specific experimental objectives, such as simple screening for well-lesioned mice in studies of PD cellular pathophysiology or comprehensive behavioral analysis in preclinical therapeutic testing using a battery of sensorimotor tests. PMID:22178078

  2. Establishment of a Mouse Model with Misregulated Chromosome Condensation due to Defective Mcph1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Diego J.; Dopatka, Monika; Dutrannoy, Véronique; Busche, Andreas; Meyer, Franziska; Nowak, Stefanie; Nowak, Jean; Zabel, Claus; Klose, Joachim; Esquitino, Veronica; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kuss, Andreas W.; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Mueller, Susanne; Poehlmann, Charlotte; Gavvovidis, Ioannis; Schindler, Detlev; Sperling, Karl; Neitzel, Heidemarie

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome). The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608) containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation) appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1gt/gt mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1gt/gt animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function. PMID:20169082

  3. Follistatin is a metastasis suppressor in a mouse model of HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Seachrist, Darcie D; Sizemore, Steven T; Johnson, Emhonta; Abdul-Karim, Fadi W; Weber Bonk, Kristen L; Keri, Ruth A

    2017-06-05

    Follistatin (FST) is an intrinsic inhibitor of activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily of ligands. The prognostic value of FST and its family members, the follistatin-like (FSTL) proteins, have been studied in various cancers. However, these studies, as well as limited functional analyses of the FSTL proteins, have yielded conflicting results on the role of these proteins in disease progression. Furthermore, very few have been focused on FST itself. We assessed whether FST may be a suppressor of tumorigenesis and/or metastatic progression in breast