Science.gov

Sample records for a1900 projectile fragment

  1. Momentum distributions of isotopes produced by fragmentation of relativistic C-12 and O-16 projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, D. E.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Heckman, H. H.; Cork, B.; Bieser, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    The fragment momentum distributions in the projectile rest frame are, typically, Gaussian shaped, narrow, consistent with isotropy, depend on fragment and projectile, and have no significant correlation with target mass or beam energy. The nuclear temperature is inferred from the momentum distributions of the fragments and is approximately equal to the projectile nuclear binding energy, indicative of small energy transfer between target and fragment.

  2. Study of Projectile Fragmentation Reactions at Intermediate Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souliotis, George A.

    The experimental measurements of the present work represent a first attempt towards obtaining systematic data of projectile fragment distributions near 0 degrees produced by intermediate-energy beams delivered by the K1200 cyclotron at the NSCL. The measurements were performed with two different devices operated as 0-degree spectrometers: the K1200 interim beamline and the A1200 mass separator. Momentum distributions and limited angular distributions of projectile -like fragments (PLFs) from a ^{14} N (75 MeV/u) beam with ^{27 }Al and ^{181}Ta targets were measured using the interim K1200 beamline, but the results were of limited quality. In a first series of measurements with the A1200, the 0-degree momentum distributions of PLFs from several beams (^{20} Ne (85 MeV/u), ^{15}N (70 MeV/u) and ^{18}O (70 Mev/u)) were measured, but only a limited number of complete momentum spectra were obtained. In a second series, a detailed measurement of neutron-rich PLFs from the reaction ^{18}O (80 MeV/u) + ^{27}Al was successfully performed. Accurate measurements of 0-degree momentum distributions and relative yields of PLFs were obtained and analysed. Analysis of the centroids of the momentum-per -nucleon (velocity) distributions of the fragments indicated that, along with the fragmentation (break-up) channels, direct stripping and/or pick-up channels contribute significantly to the production of the fragments. Interestingly, the mean velocities of nucleon pick-up products were considerably lower than that of the beam, consistent with momentum conservation and the additional assumption that the nucleon(s) picked -up from the target have preferentially momenta (on average) equal to the nuclear Fermi momentum oriented in the direction of the projectile motion. The widths of the momentum distributions of both nucleon-removal and nucleon pick-up products were in agreement with the independent-particle model of Goldhaber and the cluster stripping model of Friedman. In the case of

  3. The collision of a hypervelocity massive projectile with free-standing graphene: Investigation of secondary ion emission and projectile fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Sheng; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Eller, Michael J; Della-Negra, Serge; Schweikert, Emile A

    2017-02-07

    We present here the study of the individual hypervelocity massive projectiles (440-540 keV, 33-36 km/s Au 400 4+ cluster) impact on 1-layer free-standing graphene. The secondary ions were detected and recorded separately from each individual impact in the transmission direction using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. We observed C 1-10 ± ions emitted from graphene, the projectiles which penetrated the graphene, and the Au 1-3 ± fragment ions in mass spectra. During the projectile-graphene interaction, the projectile loses ∼15% of its initial kinetic energy (∼0.18 keV/atom, 72 keV/projectile). The Au projectiles are neutralized when approaching the graphene and then partially ionized again via electron tunneling from the hot rims of the holes on graphene, obtaining positive and negative charges. The projectile reaches an internal energy of ∼450-500 eV (∼4400-4900 K) after the impact and then undergoes a ∼90-100 step fragmentation with the ejection of Au 1 atoms in the experimental time range of ∼0.1 μs.

  4. The collision of a hypervelocity massive projectile with free-standing graphene: Investigation of secondary ion emission and projectile fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Sheng; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Eller, Michael J.; Della-Negra, Serge; Schweikert, Emile A.

    2017-02-01

    We present here the study of the individual hypervelocity massive projectiles (440-540 keV, 33-36 km/s Au4004+ cluster) impact on 1-layer free-standing graphene. The secondary ions were detected and recorded separately from each individual impact in the transmission direction using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. We observed C1-10± ions emitted from graphene, the projectiles which penetrated the graphene, and the Au1-3± fragment ions in mass spectra. During the projectile-graphene interaction, the projectile loses ˜15% of its initial kinetic energy (˜0.18 keV/atom, 72 keV/projectile). The Au projectiles are neutralized when approaching the graphene and then partially ionized again via electron tunneling from the hot rims of the holes on graphene, obtaining positive and negative charges. The projectile reaches an internal energy of ˜450-500 eV (˜4400-4900 K) after the impact and then undergoes a ˜90-100 step fragmentation with the ejection of Au1 atoms in the experimental time range of ˜0.1 μs.

  5. Production of exotic nuclei in projectile fragmentation at relativistic and Fermi energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogul, R.; Ergun, A.; Buyukcizmeci, N.

    2017-02-01

    Isotopic distributions of projectile fragmentation in peripheral heavy ion collisions of 86Kr on 112Sn are calculated within the statistical multifragmentation model. Obtained data are compared to the experimental cross section measurements. We show the enhancement in the production of neutron-rich isotopes close to the projectile, observed in the experiments. Our results show the universality of the limitation of the excitation energy induced in the projectile residues.

  6. Characteristics study of projectile's lightest fragment for 84Kr36-emulsion interaction at around 1 A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, N.; Singh, V.; Inbanathan, S. S. R.

    2017-04-01

    In this article, we present the results of our investigations on the projectile's lightest fragment (proton) multiplicity and probability distributions with 84Kr36 emulsion collision at around 1 A GeV. The multiplicity and normalized multiplicity of projectile's lightest fragment (proton) are correlated with the compound particles, shower particles, black particles, grey particles; alpha (helium nucleus) fragments and heavily ionizing charged particles. It is found that projectile's lightest fragment (proton) is strongly correlated with compound particles and shower particles rather than other particles and the average multiplicity of projectile's lightest fragment (proton) increases with increasing compound, shower and heavily ionizing charge particles. Normalized projectile's lightest fragment (proton) is strongly correlated with compound particles, shower particles and heavily ionizing charge particles. The multiplicity distribution of the projectile's lightest fragment (proton) emitted in the 84Kr36 + emulsion interaction at around 1 A GeV with different target has been well explained by KNO scaling. The mean multiplicity of projectile's lightest fragments (proton) depends on the mass number of the projectile and does not significantly dependent of the projectile energy. The mean multiplicity of projectile's lightest fragment (proton) increases with increasing the target mass number.

  7. Production of spin-polarized radioactive ion beams via projectile fragmentation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kameda, D.; Ueno, H.; Yoshimi, A.

    2008-02-06

    Spin-polarized radioactive ion beams are produced in the projectile fragmentation reaction induced by intermediate-energy heavy ion beams. The degree of spin polarization shows characteristic dependence on the outgoing momentum of the projectile fragment in the magnitude around 1{approx}10%. The qualitative behavior is well described by the kinematical model of the fragmentation process. Recently, we have successfully produced spin-polarized beams of aluminum isotopes in the mass A{approx}30 region via the fragmentation of 95 MeV/u {sup 40}Ar projectiles. The magnetic moments of {sup 30}Al and {sup 32}Al and the electric quadrupole moments of {sup 31}Al and {sup 32}Al have been measured usingmore » the {beta}-NMR technique with the polarized RI beams of the Al isotopes.« less

  8. Projectile fragmentation of 500 A MeV 56Fe in nuclear emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun-Sheng; Zhang, Dong-Hai; Li, Hui-Ling; Yasuda, N.

    2013-07-01

    N-4 stacks of nuclear emulsion were exposed to 500 A MeV 56Fe ions at the HIMAC NIRS. Particle production was investigated in 56Fe-Em interactions. The multiplicity distribution of projectile fragments was done in this paper and compared with interactions induced by 56Fe and other heavy ions in nuclear emulsion at other energies. The variation of characteristics of the heavy ion interactions with the mass and energy of the projectile is studied.

  9. High-Velocity Impact Fragmentation of Projectiles Experimental Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Program (JIMTP) Tube -Launched, Optically Tracked, Wire-Guided (TOW) 2B Insensitive Munitions (IM) Warhead effort. The referenced experiments were...conducted to determine the velocity reduction and fragmentation profile of barrier materials subjected to impact by the IM Fragment Impact (FI) test...9 LIST OF TABLES Table Title Page 1. Single Material Test Matrix

  10. Scaling invariance of spherical projectile fragmentation upon high-velocity impact on a thin continuous shield

    SciTech Connect

    Myagkov, N. N., E-mail: nn-myagkov@mail.ru

    The problem of aluminum projectile fragmentation upon high-velocity impact on a thin aluminum shield is considered. A distinctive feature of this description is that the fragmentation has been numerically simulated using the complete system of equations of deformed solid mechanics by a method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics in three-dimensional setting. The transition from damage to fragmentation is analyzed and scaling relations are derived in terms of the impact velocity (V), ratio of shield thickness to projectile diameter (h/D), and ultimate strength (σ{sub p}) in the criterion of projectile and shield fracture. Analysis shows that the critical impact velocity V{sub c}more » (separating the damage and fragmentation regions) is a power function of σ{sub p} and h/D. In the supercritical region (V > V{sub c}), the weight-average fragment mass asymptotically tends to a power function of the impact velocity with exponent independent of h/D and σ{sub p}. Mean cumulative fragment mass distributions at the critical point are scale-invariant with respect to parameters h/D and σ{sub p}. Average masses of the largest fragments are also scale-invariant at V > V{sub c}, but only with respect to variable parameter σ{sub p}.« less

  11. On projectile fragmentation at high-velocity perforation of a thin bumper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    By means of 3D numerical simulations, we study the statistical properties of the fragments cloud formed during high-velocity impact of a spherical projectile on a mesh bumper. We present a quantitative description of the projectile fragmentation, and study the nature of the transition from the damage to the fragmentation of the projectile when the impact velocity varies. A distinctive feature of the present work is that the calculations are carried out by smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method applied to the equations of mechanics of deformable solids (MDS). We describe the materials behavior by the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and the Johnson-Cook model for the yield strength. The maximum principal stress spall model is used as the fracture model. It is shown that the simulation results of fragmentation based on the MDS equations by the SPH method are qualitatively consistent with the results obtained earlier on the basis of the molecular dynamics and discrete element models. It is found that the power-law distribution exponent does not depend on energy imparted to the projectile during the high-velocity impact. At the same time, our calculations show that the critical impact velocity, the power-law exponent and other critical exponents depend on the fracture criterion.

  12. Refrigeration and freezing of porcine tissue does not affect the retardation of fragment simulating projectiles.

    PubMed

    Breeze, J; Carr, D J; Mabbott, A; Beckett, S; Clasper, J C

    2015-05-01

    Explosively propelled fragments are the most common cause of injury to UK service personnel in modern conflicts. Numerical injury models to simulate such injuries utilise algorithms based upon gelatin and animal tissue testing but data is limited on many fragment simulating projectiles and these simulants cannot represent human anatomy. Testing with post mortem specimens may overcome this limitation but no information exists about how post mortem tissue changes and storage conditions in humans or animals may affect projectile penetration. Two chisel nosed cylinders (0.49 g and 1.10 g) and a 0.51 g (5 mm) sphere were fired into three groups of porcine tissue (fresh, refrigerated and frozen then refrigerated) and compared to 20% gelatin. Depth of projectile penetration was ascertained with the assistance of computed tomography and kinetic energy absorption by tissues measured using Doppler radar and high speed photography. No difference in depth of penetration was found between porcine tissue stored in the different manners compared with 20% gelatin by impact velocities less than 100 m/s. Insufficient numbers of projectiles were retained in tissue at higher velocities for statistical analysis to be undertaken. Energy absorbed per millimetre of tissue ranged between 0.42 and 0.98 J/mm for different porcine tissue despite differing storage. This pilot study would suggest that the effect of refrigerating or freezing porcine tissue followed by thawing has no effect on its ability to retard these projectiles. Further research is required to ascertain if these results occur at greater velocities and for other types of projectile. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Determining the velocity required for skin perforation by fragment simulating projectiles: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Breeze, John; Clasper, J C

    2013-12-01

    Explosively propelled fragments are the most common cause of injury to soldiers on current operations. Researchers desire models to predict their injurious effects so as to refine methods of potential protection. Well validated physical and numerical models based on the penetration of standardised fragment simulating projectiles (FSPs) through muscle exist but not for skin, thereby reducing the utility of such models. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methodology to identify all open source information quantifying the effects of postmortem human subject (PMHS) and animal skin on the retardation of metallic projectiles. Projectile sectional density (mass over presented cross-sectional area) was compared with the velocity required for skin perforation or penetration, with regard to skin origin (animal vs PMHS), projectile shape (sphere vs cylinder) and skin backing (isolated skin vs that backed by muscle). 17 original experimental studies were identified, predominantly using skin from the thigh. No statistical difference in the velocity required for skin perforation with regard to skin origin or projectile shape was found. A greater velocity was required to perforate intact skin on a whole limb than isolated skin alone (p<0.05). An empirical relationship describing the velocity required to perforate skin by metallic FSPs of a range of sectional densities was generated. Skin has a significant effect on the retardation of FSPs, necessitating its incorporation in future injury models. Perforation algorithms based on animal and PMHS skin can be used interchangeably as well as spheres and cylinders of matching sectional density. Future numerical simulations for skin perforation must match the velocity for penetration and also require experimental determination of mechanical skin properties, such as tensile strength, strain and elasticity at high strain rates.

  14. Projectile fragmentation of {sup 40,48}Ca and isotopic scaling in a transport approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailova, T. I., E-mail: tmikh@jinr.ru; Erdemchimeg, B.; Artukh, A. G.

    2016-07-15

    We investigate theoretically projectile fragmentation in reactions of {sup 40,48}Ca on {sup 9}Be and {sup 181}Ta targets using a Boltzmann-type transport approach, which is supplemented by a statistical decay code to describe the de-excitation of the hot primary fragments. We determine the thermodynamical properties of the primary fragments and calculate the isotope distributions of the cold final fragments. These describe the data reasonably well. For the pairs of projectiles with different isotopic content we analyze the isotopic scaling (or isoscaling) of the final fragment distributions, which has been used to extract the symmetry energy of the primary source. The calculationmore » exhibits isoscaling behavior for the total yields as do the experiments. We also perform an impact-parameter-dependent isoscaling analysis in view of the fact that the primary systems at different impact parameters have very different properties. Then the isoscaling behavior is less stringent, which we can attribute to specific structure effects of the {sup 40,48}Ca pair. The symmetry energy determined in this way depends on these structure effects.« less

  15. Projectile fragmentation of 40,48Ca and isotopic scaling in a transport approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailova, T. I.; Erdemchimeg, B.; Artukh, A. G.; Di Toro, M.; Wolter, H. H.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate theoretically projectile fragmentation in reactions of 40,48Ca on 9Be and 181Ta targets using a Boltzmann-type transport approach, which is supplemented by a statistical decay code to describe the de-excitation of the hot primary fragments. We determine the thermodynamical properties of the primary fragments and calculate the isotope distributions of the cold final fragments. These describe the data reasonably well. For the pairs of projectiles with different isotopic content we analyze the isotopic scaling (or isoscaling) of the final fragment distributions, which has been used to extract the symmetry energy of the primary source. The calculation exhibits isoscaling behavior for the total yields as do the experiments. We also perform an impact-parameter-dependent isoscaling analysis in view of the fact that the primary systems at different impact parameters have very different properties. Then the isoscaling behavior is less stringent, which we can attribute to specific structure effects of the 40,48Ca pair. The symmetry energy determined in this way depends on these structure effects.

  16. Yields of projectile fragments in sulphur-emulsion interactions at 3.7 A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, S.; Osman, W.; Fayed, M.

    2017-05-01

    This work presents the basic characteristics of singly, doubly and heavily charged projectile fragments (PFs) emitted in inelastic interactions of 32S ions with photo-emulsion nuclei at Dubna energy (3.7 A GeV). Our experimental data are compared with the corresponding data for other projectiles at the same incident energy. The study of mean multiplicities of different charged PFs against the projectile mass shows a power-law relationship. The multiplicity distributions of singly and doubly charged PFs have been fitted well with a Gaussian distribution function. The yields of PFs broken up from the interactions of 32S projectile nuclei with different target nuclei are studied. The beam energy dependence in terms of the various order moments is studied as well.

  17. Feasibility of Isotope Harvesting at a Projectile Fragmentation Facility: 67Cu

    PubMed Central

    Mastren, Tara; Pen, Aranh; Peaslee, Graham F.; Wozniak, Nick; Loveless, Shaun; Essenmacher, Scott; Sobotka, Lee G.; Morrissey, David J.; Lapi, Suzanne E.

    2014-01-01

    The work presented here describes a proof-of-principle experiment for the chemical extraction of 67Cu from an aqueous beam stop at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). A 76 MeV/A 67Cu beam was stopped in water, successfully isolated from the aqueous solution through a series of chemical separations involving a chelating disk and anion exchange chromatography, then bound to NOTA-conjugated Herceptin antibodies, and the bound activity was validated using instant thin-layer chromatography (ITLC). The chemical extraction efficiency was found to be 88 ± 3% and the radiochemical yield was ≥95%. These results show that extraction of radioisotopes from an aqueous projectile-fragment beam dump is a feasible method for obtaining radiochemically pure isotopes. PMID:25330839

  18. Half-life measurements of isomeric states populated in projectile fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowry, M.; Podolyák, Zs.; Kurcewicz, J.; Pietri, S.; Bunce, M.; Regan, P. H.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Nociforo, C.; Prochazka, A.; Weick, H.; Allegro, P.; Benlliure, J.; Benzoni, G.; Boutachkov, P.; Gerl, J.; Gorska, M.; Gottardo, A.; Gregor, N.; Janik, R.; Knöbel, R.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Litvinov, Y. A.; Merchan, E.; Mukha, I.; Naqvi, F.; Pfeiffer, B.; Pfützner, M.; Plaß, W.; Pomorski, M.; Riese, B.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Schaffner, H.; Kurz, N.; Denis Bacelar, A. M.; Bruce, A. M.; Farrelly, G. F.; Alkhomashi, N.; Al-Dahan, N.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Spiller, P.; Stadlmann, J.; Strmen, P.; Sun, B.; Takeda, H.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.; Winfield, J. S.; Wollersheim, H.-J.; Woods, P. J.

    2012-10-01

    The half-lives of excited isomeric states observed in 195Au, 201Tl and 215Rn are reported for the first time. Delayed γ-rays were correlated with nuclei produced in the projectile fragmentation of relativistic 238U ions, unambiguously identified in terms of their atomic number (Z) and mass-to-charge ratio (A/Q) after traversing an in-flight separator. The observation of a long-lived isomeric state in 195Au with t1/2 = 16-4+8 μs is presented. Two shorter-lived isomeric states were detected in 201Tl and 215Rn with t1/2 = 95-21+39 and 57-12+21 ns respectively. In total 24 isomeric states were identified in different nuclei from Pt to Rn (A ˜ 200) during the current study, the majority of which were previously reported. The wealth of spectroscopic data provides the opportunity to determine the isomeric ratios over a wide range of Z, A and angular momentum (I ħ) of the reaction products. In particular, high-spin states with I ≳ 18 ħ provide a robust test of theoretical models of fragmentation.

  19. Target effects in isobaric yield ratio differences between projectile fragmentation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Zhang, Yan-Li; Qiao, Chun-Yuan; Wang, Shan-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) between reactions is know to be sensitive to the density difference between projectiles in heavy-ion collisions around the Fermi energy. Purpose: The target effects in the isobaric yield ratio (IYR) and the IBD results have been studied. Methods: The amount of isotopes in the 140 A MeV 48 ,40Ca +181Ta /9Be and 58 ,64Ni +181Ta /9Be reactions have been previously measured with high accuracy. The IYR and IBD results have been obtained from these reactions to study the effects of the light 9Be and heavy 181Ta targets. A ratio (rΔ μ) between the IBD results for the reactions with Ta and Be targets is defined to quantitatively show the target dependence of the IBD results. Results The IYRs for reactions with symmetric projectiles are more easily affected than those for reactions with neutron-rich projectiles. The IBD results are suppressed by using the 181Ta target to different degrees. Conclusions: The IYR and IBD results are influenced by the target used. The IBD for the I =1 isobaric chain is suggested as a probe to study the difference between the neutron and proton densities of the reaction systems.

  20. Ionization, evaporation and fragmentation of C60 in collisions with highly charged C, O and F ions—effect of projectile charge state.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, A. H.; Misra, D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2007-09-01

    We study the various inelastic processes such ionization, fragmentation and evaporation of C60 molecule in collisions with fast heavy ions. We have used 2.33 MeV/u C, O and F projectile ion beams. Various ionization and fragmentation products were detected using time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The multiply charged C60r+ ions were detected for maximum r = 4. The projectile charge state (qp) dependence of the single and double ionization cross sections is well reproduced by a model based on the giant dipole plasmon resonance (GDPR). The qp-dependence of the fragmentation yields, was found to be linear. Variation of relative yields of the evaporation products of C602+ (i.e. C582+, C562+ etc) and C603+ (i.e. C583+, C563+ etc) with qp has also been investigated for various projectiles.

  1. Feasibility of Isotope Harvesting at a Projectile Fragmentation Facility: 67Cu

    DOE PAGES

    Mastren, Tara; Pen, Aranh; Peaslee, Graham F.; ...

    2014-10-21

    The work presented here describes a proof-of-principle experiment for the chemical extraction of 67Cu from an aqueous beam stop at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). A 76 MeV/A 67Cu beam was stopped in water, successfully isolated from the aqueous solution through a series of chemical separations involving a chelating disk and anion exchange chromatography, then bound to NOTA-conjugated Herceptin antibodies, and the bound activity was validated using instant thin-layer chromatography (ITLC). The chemical extraction efficiency was found to be 88 ± 3% and the radiochemical yield was ≥95%. These results show that extraction of radioisotopes from an aqueous projectile-fragmentmore » beam dump is a feasible method for obtaining radiochemically pure isotopes.« less

  2. Determination of Impact Parameters in Aligned Breakup of Projectile-like Fragments in $$^{197}$$Au + $$^{197}$$Au Collisions at 23$A$MeV

    DOE PAGES

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczyńska, K.; Wilczynski, J.; ...

    2016-03-01

    Symmetric and asymmetric aligned breakup of projectile-like fragments inmore » $$^{197}$$Au + $$^{197}$$Au collisions at 23$A$,MeV was studied. Independently of the asymmetry, the reaction yields have been found peaked at a common, very narrow range of impact parameters.« less

  3. Protective ability of the standard U.S. Military Personal Armor System, Ground Troops (PASGT) fragmentation vest against common small arms projectiles.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G K; Bullian, M E

    1993-08-01

    This study analyzes the ballistic protection provided by the standard U.S. Military Personal Armor System, Ground Troops fragmentation vest against threats from handgun and shotgun projectiles. Damage assessment was conducted using 10% ordnance gelatin, a tissue simulant which has been proven to have a close correlation with living tissue. The standard fragmentation vest was shown to provide protection from commonly encountered handgun bullets and shotgun pellets, but not from shotgun slugs or center-fire rifle bullets.

  4. Parasitic production of slow RI-beam from a projectile fragment separator by ion guide Laser Ion Source (PALIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, Tetsu

    2009-10-01

    The projectile fragment separator BigRIPS of RIBF at RIKEN provides a wide variety of short-lived radioactive isotope (RI) ions without restrictions on their lifetime or chemical properties. A universal slow RI-beam facility (SLOWRI) to decelerate the beams from BigRIPS using an RF-carpet ion guide has been proposed as a principal facility of RIBF. However, beam time at such a modern accelerator facility is always limited and operational costs are high. We therefore propose an additional scheme as a complementary option to SLOWRI to drastically enhance the usability of such an expensive facility. In BigRIPS, a single primary beam produces thousands of isotopes but only one isotope is used for an experiment while the other >99.99% of isotopes are simply dumped in the slits or elsewhere in the fragment separator. We plan to locate a compact gas cell with 1 bar Ar at the slits. The thermalized ions in the cell will be quickly neutralized and transported to the exit by gas flow and resonantly re-ionized by lasers. Such low energy RI-beams will always be provided without any restriction to the main experiment. It will allow us to run parasitic experiments for precision atomic or decay spectroscopy, mass measurements. Furthermore, the resonance ionization in the cell itself can be used for high-sensitive laser spectroscopy, which will expand our knowledge of the ground state property of unstable nuclei.

  5. Energy distributions of H{sup +} fragments ejected by fast proton and electron projectiles in collision with H{sub 2}O molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, A. L. F. de; Lecointre, J.; Luna, H.

    Experimental measurements of the kinetic energy distribution spectra of H{sup +} fragment ions released during radiolysis of water molecules in collision with 20, 50, and 100 keV proton projectiles and 35, 200, 400, and 1000 eV electron projectiles are reported using a pulsed beam and drift tube time-of-flight based velocity measuring technique. The spectra show that H{sup +} fragments carrying a substantial amount of energy are released, some having energies well in excess of 20 eV. The majority of the ions lie within the 0-5 eV energy range with the proton spectra showing an almost constant profile between 1.5 andmore » 5 eV and, below this, increasing gradually with decreasing ejection energy up to the near zero energy value while the electron spectra, in contrast, show a broad maximum between 1 and 3 eV and a pronounced dip around 0.25 eV. Beyond 5 eV, both projectile spectra show a decreasing profile with the electron spectra decreasing far more rapidly than the proton spectra. Our measured spectra thus indicate that major differences are present in the collision dynamics between the proton and the electron projectiles interacting with gas phase water molecules.« less

  6. Extraction of thermalized projectile fragments from a large volume gas cell

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, K.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Morrissey, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    Experiments to determine the stopping and extraction efficiency of energetic (90 MeV/u) 76Ga fragments in a 1.2 m long gas cell filled with helium at 123 mbar are reported. The thermalized ions were transported by DC and RF fields as well as gas flow, then jetted through a supersonic nozzle into a RF quadrupole ion-guide and accelerated into an electrostatic beam line. The ions were collected in either a Faraday cup or a silicon beta-detector immediately after acceleration or after magnetic analysis. The range distributions of the ions and extraction efficiency of the system were measured for different implantation ratesmore » and compared with the theoretically calculated values. The singly charged 76Ga ions were observed as [ 76Ga(H 2O) n] + molecular ions with n=0, 1, and 2. The stopping efficiency and the extraction efficiency were obtained from the measured distributions and compared to previous results from other devices.« less

  7. Elastic break-up of 156 MeV 6Li projectiles with large asymptotic relative momenta of the fragments: . Experimental observations and the diffractive disintegration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heide, N.; Rebel, H.; Corcalciuc, V.; Gils, H. J.; Jelitto, H.; Kiener, J.; Wentz, J.; Zagromski, S.; Srivastava, D. K.

    1989-11-01

    The triple-differential cross sections for elastic break-up of 156 MeV 6Li projectiles by the reactions 208Pb( 6Li, αd) 208Pb g.s. and 12C( 6Li, αd) 12C g.s. have been measured with large asymptotic relative momenta of the outgoing fragments. The data exhibit rather unfamiliar shapes of the energy spectra, often replacing the usual bell-shape distributions by double-peaked structures and varying rapidly with the relative emission angles. The origin of these features has been explored and the cross sections have been analysed on the basis of a diffractive disintegration approach.

  8. Projectile stopping system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, T.J.; Pittenger, L.C.

    1996-11-26

    A projectile interceptor launches a projectile catcher into the path of a projectile. In one embodiment, signals indicative of the path of a projectile are received by the projectile interceptor. A flinger mechanism has a projectile catcher releasably attached thereto, such that the projectile catcher can be released and launched from the flinger mechanism. A controller connected to the flinger mechanism uses the signals indicative of the path of the projectile to determine the launch parameters of the projectile catcher. The controller directs the flinger mechanism to release the projectile catcher such that the projectile catcher is launched into the path of the projectile and intercepts the projectile. 13 figs.

  9. Cross sections of projectile-like fragments in the reaction {sup 19}F+{sup 66}Zn in the beam energy range of 3-6 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sodaye, S.

    2009-06-15

    Angular distributions of projectile-like fragments (PLFs) have been measured in the reaction {sup 19}F+{sup 66}Zn at E{sub lab}=61,82,92, and 109 MeV to understand their formation in the low energy domain (< or approx. 7 MeV nucleon). In this energy range, maximum angular momentum 'l{sub max}' in the reaction is lower than or close to the critical or limiting angular momentum for complete fusion 'l{sub lim}(CF).' The sum-rule model was modified to explain the cross sections of PLFs in the present study. For the first time, the modified sum-rule model, with a competition of incomplete fusion (ICF) reaction with complete fusionmore » below l{sub lim}(CF) reasonably reproduced the cross sections of PLFs in the beam energy range of the present study. It was observed that the cross sections of lighter PLFs fall more rapidly with decreasing beam energy compared to those of heavier PLFs, suggesting a change in the reaction mechanism from heavier to lighter PLFs. Transfer probabilities for peripheral collisions were calculated within the framework of a semiclassical formalism. The parameters of the nuclear potential required for the calculation of transfer probability were obtained by fitting the elastic scattering data measured in the present work. Calculated transfer probabilities were significantly lower compared to the corresponding experimental values, suggesting a significant overlap of the projectile and the target nuclei in incomplete fusion reactions. The present analysis showed that the overlap of the projectile and the target nuclei increases with increasing mass transfer at a given beam energy and for a given PLF, overlap increases with increasing beam energy.« less

  10. Projectile Motion Details.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnick, Jeffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an exercise that attempts to correct for the common discrepancies between theoretical and experimental predictions concerning projectile motion using a spring-loaded projectile ball launcher. Includes common correction factors for student use. (MVL)

  11. A reconsideration of the wounding mechanism of very high velocity projectiles--importance of projectile shape.

    PubMed

    Fackler, M L; Bellamy, R F; Malinowski, J A

    1988-01-01

    In 1976 a paper appeared which forecast "significant increases in velocities of projectiles from guns and fragments from warheads." It was postulated that the higher velocity projectiles would cause shallow wounds with wide tissue destruction on the surface--especially when striking velocity exceeded the speed of sound in tissue (about 1.5 km/sec). Other studies have not dealt with projectiles in this velocity range; the conclusions and assumptions stated in this 1976 paper have been quoted by others and accepted as fact. In a previous study, we shot blunt fragments into gelatin, but our findings did not support the proposed hypothesis that temporary cavity shape in tissue changes at velocities above the sonic speed. The temporary cavity becomes larger with increasing velocity but it does not become shallow unless the projectile fragments on impact. In the present study, we shot a series of blunt projectiles into animal tissue at velocities of 764 to 2,049 m/s. The stellate skin and muscle disruption splits from temporary cavity stretch we observed in this study are not apparent on entrance wounds from individual explosive device fragments in the living wounded. We suggest, therefore, that studies using blunt projectiles at striking velocities above 700 m/s are lacking in clinical relevance. We also compared wounds produced by pointed projectiles with those produced by blunt projectiles. The marked difference in wound morphology showed the fallacy of doing a study with blunt missiles and applying conclusions from that study to tissue disruption caused by all projectiles.

  12. Superconducting Magnetic Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed projectile launcher exploits Meissner effect to transfer much of kinetic energy of relatively massive superconducting plunger to smaller projectile, accelerating projectile to high speed. Because it operates with magnetic fields, launcher not limited by gas-expansion thermodynamics. Plunger energized mechanically and/or chemically, avoiding need for large electrical power supplies and energy-storage systems. Potential applications include launching of projectiles for military purposes and for scientific and industrial tests of hypervelocity impacts.

  13. Forensic and clinical issues in the use of frangible projectile.

    PubMed

    Komenda, Jan; Hejna, Petr; Rydlo, Martin; Novák, Miroslav; Krajsa, Jan; Racek, František; Rejtar, Pavel; Jedlička, Luděk

    2013-08-01

    Frangible projectiles for firearms, which break apart on impact, are mainly used by law enforcement agencies for training purposes, but can also be used for police interventions. Apart from the usual absence of lead in the projectiles, the main advantage of using frangible projectiles is the reduced risk of ricochet after impact with a hard target. This article describes the design and function of frangible projectiles, and describes gunshot wounds caused by ultra-frangible projectiles which fragment after penetration of soft tissues. Shooting experiments performed by the authors confirmed that differences in the geometry and technology of frangible projectiles can significantly modify their wounding effects. Some frangible projectiles have minimal wounding effects because they remain compact after penetration of soft tissues, comparable to standard fully jacketed projectiles. However, a number of ultra-frangible projectiles disintegrate into very small fragments after impact with a soft tissue substitute. In shooting experiments, we found that the terminal behavior of selected ultra-frangible projectiles was similar in a block of ballistic gel and the soft tissues of the hind leg of a pig, except that the degree of disintegration was less in the gel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. In-flight dynamics of volcanic ballistic projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, M. A.; Cruz-Vázquez, O.; Del Bello, E.; Scarlato, P.; Ricci, T.

    2017-09-01

    Centimeter to meter-sized volcanic ballistic projectiles from explosive eruptions jeopardize people and properties kilometers from the volcano, but they also provide information about the past eruptions. Traditionally, projectile trajectory is modeled using simplified ballistic theory, accounting for gravity and drag forces only and assuming simply shaped projectiles free moving through air. Recently, collisions between projectiles and interactions with plumes are starting to be considered. Besides theory, experimental studies and field mapping have so far dominated volcanic projectile research, with only limited observations. High-speed, high-definition imaging now offers a new spatial and temporal scale of observation that we use to illuminate projectile dynamics. In-flight collisions commonly affect the size, shape, trajectory, and rotation of projectiles according to both projectile nature (ductile bomb versus brittle block) and the location and timing of collisions. These, in turn, are controlled by ejection pulses occurring at the vent. In-flight tearing and fragmentation characterize large bombs, which often break on landing, both factors concurring to decrease the average grain size of the resulting deposits. Complex rotation and spinning are ubiquitous features of projectiles, and the related Magnus effect may deviate projectile trajectory by tens of degrees. A new relationship is derived, linking projectile velocity and size with the size of the resulting impact crater. Finally, apparent drag coefficient values, obtained for selected projectiles, mostly range from 1 to 7, higher than expected, reflecting complex projectile dynamics. These new perspectives will impact projectile hazard mitigation and the interpretation of projectile deposits from past eruptions, both on Earth and on other planets.

  15. Hybrid armature projectile

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Asay, James R.; Hall, Clint A.; Konrad, Carl H.; Sauve, Gerald L.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Susoeff, Allan R.

    1993-01-01

    A projectile for a railgun that uses a hybrid armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the hybrid plasma brush. In addition, the hybrid armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasama blowby.

  16. Projectile Motion Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucie, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes projectile motion using symmetry and simple geometry. Deduces the direction of velocity at any point, range, time of flight, maximum height, safety parabola, and maximum range for a projectile launched upon a plane inclined at any angle with respect to the horizontal. (Author/GA)

  17. Teaching Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  18. Hybrid armature projectile

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.; Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Konrad, C.H.; Sauve, G.L.; Shahinpoor, M.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1993-03-02

    A projectile for a railgun that uses a hybrid armature and provides a seed block around part of the outer surface of the projectile to seed the hybrid plasma brush. In addition, the hybrid armature is continuously vaporized to replenish plasma in a plasma armature to provide a tandem armature and provides a unique ridge and groove to reduce plasma blowby.

  19. Projectile Motion Hoop Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Connor; Dunn, Amy; Armstrong, Zachary; Adams, Wendy K.

    2018-04-01

    Projectile motion is a common phenomenon that is used in introductory physics courses to help students understand motion in two dimensions. Authors have shared a range of ideas for teaching this concept and the associated kinematics in The Physics Teacher; however, the "Hoop Challenge" is a new setup not before described in TPT. In this article an experiment is illustrated to explore projectile motion in a fun and challenging manner that has been used with both high school and university students. With a few simple materials, students have a vested interest in being able to calculate the height of the projectile at a given distance from its launch site. They also have an exciting visual demonstration of projectile motion when the lab is over.

  20. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  1. Projectile Motion with Mathematica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Alwis, Tilak

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to use the computer algebra system (CAS) Mathematica to analyze projectile motion with and without air resistance. These experiments result in several conjectures leading to theorems. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/ASK)

  2. Small caliber guided projectile

    DOEpatents

    Jones, James F [Albuquerque, NM; Kast, Brian A [Albuquerque, NM; Kniskern, Marc W [Albuquerque, NM; Rose, Scott E [Albuquerque, NM; Rohrer, Brandon R [Albuquerque, NM; Woods, James W [Albuquerque, NM; Greene, Ronald W [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-08-24

    A non-spinning projectile that is self-guided to a laser designated target and is configured to be fired from a small caliber smooth bore gun barrel has an optical sensor mounted in the nose of the projectile, a counterbalancing mass portion near the fore end of the projectile and a hollow tapered body mounted aft of the counterbalancing mass. Stabilizing strakes are mounted to and extend outward from the tapered body with control fins located at the aft end of the strakes. Guidance and control electronics and electromagnetic actuators for operating the control fins are located within the tapered body section. Output from the optical sensor is processed by the guidance and control electronics to produce command signals for the electromagnetic actuators. A guidance control algorithm incorporating non-proportional, "bang-bang" control is used to steer the projectile to the target.

  3. Multi-factor Analysis of Pre-control Fracture Simulations about Projectile Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Ren-Yi; Zhou, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The study of projectile material pre-control fracture is helpful to improve the projectile metal effective fragmentation and the material utilization rate. Fragments muzzle velocity and lethality can be affected by the different explosive charge and the way of initiation. The finite element software can simulate the process of projectile explosive rupture which has a pre-groove in the projectile shell surface and analysis of typical node velocity change with time, to provides a reference for the design and optimization of precontrol frag.

  4. German Explosive Ordnance (Projectiles and Projectile Fuzes)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1953-03-01

    CAP IGNITER BRIDGE INSULATION BLACK POWDER Figure 320—Electric Primers c/12nA and c/22 354 PROJECTILES 0.75 inch, length of body. 0.281 inch...of lip. 0.75 inch, length of body. Number of threads, 5 RH. CONSTRUCTION. The primer houses an igniter bridge which consists of lead styphnate...dipped in gelatin. This bridge has a resistance of approxi- mately 2.2 ohms and is in the circuit with the in- sulated contact plug, the spring washer

  5. Projectile Motion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordry, Sean

    2003-10-01

    Textbooks almost always have a stroboscopic photograph of a ball falling alongside of one with an initial horizontal speed. These photos are great for showing how the two objects experience the same vertical acceleration; however, the photos don't usually illustrate what happens if a projectile is launched at some angle. There are a number of ways to illustrate the effects of the launch angle: shooting a ball or stream of water through hoops, for example. Those demonstrations, though, do not allow for side-by-side comparison of the effects of various launch angles. Thus, a few years ago I constructed this three-dimensional projectile model to do just that. The model is composed of two three-dimensional "stroboscopic sculptures" representing the trajectory of two projectiles.

  6. More on Projectile Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, M. I.

    2000-01-01

    Mathematically explains why the range of a projectile is most insensitive to aiming errors when the initial angle is close to 45 degrees, whereas other observables such as maximum height or flight time are most insensitive for near-vertical launching conditions. (WRM)

  7. Projectile Motion Hoop Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Connor; Dunn, Amy; Armstrong, Zachary; Adams, Wendy K.

    2018-01-01

    Projectile motion is a common phenomenon that is used in introductory physics courses to help students understand motion in two dimensions. Authors have shared a range of ideas for teaching this concept and the associated kinematics in "The Physics Teacher" ("TPT"); however, the "Hoop Challenge" is a new setup not…

  8. Projectile Motion without Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizcallah, Joseph A.

    2018-01-01

    Projectile motion is a constant theme in introductory-physics courses. It is often used to illustrate the application of differential and integral calculus. While most of the problems used for this purpose, such as maximizing the range, are kept at a fairly elementary level, some, such as determining the safe domain, involve not so elementary…

  9. Subcaliber discarding sabot airgun projectiles.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Schönekeß, Holger; Herbst, Jörg; Staats, Hans-Georg; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Nguyen, Thanh Tien; Bockholdt, Britta

    2014-03-01

    Medical literature abounds with reports on injuries and fatalities caused by airgun projectiles. While round balls or diabolo pellets have been the standard projectiles for airguns for decades, today, there are a large number of different airgun projectiles available. A very uncommon--and until now unique--discarding sabot airgun projectile (Sussex Sabo Bullet) was introduced into the market in the 1980s. The projectile, available in 0.177 (4.5 mm) and 0.22 (5.5 mm) caliber, consists of a plastic sabot cup surrounding a subcaliber copper-coated lead projectile in typical bullet shape. Following the typical principle of a discarding sabot projectile, the lightweight sabot is supposed to quickly loose velocity and to fall to the ground downrange while the bullet continues on target. These sabot-loaded projectiles are of special forensic interest due to their non-traceability and ballistic parameters. Therefore, it is the aim of this work to investigate the ballistic performance of these sabot airgun projectiles by high-speed video analyses and by measurement of the kinetic parameters of the projectile parts by a transient recording system as well as observing their physical features after being fired. While the sabot principle worked properly in high-energy airguns (E > 17 J), separation of the core projectile from the sabot cup was also observed when discharged in low-energy airguns (E < 7.5 J). While the velocity of the discarded Sussex Sabo core projectile was very close to the velocity of a diabolo-type reference projectile (RWS Meisterkugel), energy density was up to 60 % higher. To conclude, this work is the first study to demonstrate the regular function of this uncommon type of airgun projectile.

  10. Semiconductor projectile impact detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shriver, E. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor projectile impact detector is described for use in determining micrometeorite presence, as well as its flux and energy comprising a photovoltaic cell which generates a voltage according to the light and heat emitted by the micrometeorites upon impact. A counter and peak amplitude measuring device were used to indicate the number of particules which strike the surface of the cell as well as the kinetic energy of each of the particles.

  11. Skirted projectiles for railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Susoeff, Allan R.

    1994-01-01

    A single skirt projectile (20) having an insulating skirt (22) at its rear, or a dual trailing skirt projectile (30, 40, 50, 60) having an insulating skirt (32, 42, 52, 62) succeeded by an arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64), is accelerated by a railgun accelerator 10 having a pair of parallel conducting rails (1a, 1b) which are separated by insulating wall spacers (11). The insulating skirt (22, 32, 42, 52, 62) includes a plasma channel (38). The arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64) interrupts the conduction that occurs in the insulating skirt channel (38) by blocking the plasma arc (3) from conducting current from rail to rail (1a, 1b) at the rear of the projectile (30, 40, 50, 60). The arc extinguishing skirt may be comprised of two plates (36a, 36b) which form a horseshoe wherein the plates are parallel to the rails (1a, b); a chisel-shape design; cross-shaped, or it may be a cylindrical (64). The length of the insulating skirt channel is selected such that there is sufficient plasma in the channel to enable adequate current conduction between the rails (1a, 1b).

  12. Skirted projectiles for railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.

    1994-01-04

    A single skirt projectile (20) having an insulating skirt (22) at its rear, or a dual trailing skirt projectile (30, 40, 50, 60) having an insulating skirt (32, 42, 52, 62) succeeded by an arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64), is accelerated by a railgun accelerator 10 having a pair of parallel conducting rails (1a, 1b) which are separated by insulating wall spacers (11). The insulating skirt (22, 32, 42, 52, 62) includes a plasma channel (38). The arc extinguishing skirt (34, 44, 54, 64) interrupts the conduction that occurs in the insulating skirt channel (38) by blocking the plasma arc (3) from conducting current from rail to rail (1a, 1b) at the rear of the projectile (30, 40, 50, 60). The arc extinguishing skirt may be comprised of two plates (36a, 36b) which form a horseshoe wherein the plates are parallel to the rails (1a, b); a chisel-shape design; cross-shaped, or it may be a cylindrical (64). The length of the insulating skirt channel is selected such that there is sufficient plasma in the channel to enable adequate current conduction between the rails (1a, 1b).

  13. Deformation and Fracture Behavior of Steel Projectiles Impact AD95 Ceramic Targets-Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gang; Zhang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of steel projectile impacting ceramic target is an interesting investigation topic. The deformation and failure behavior of projectile and target was investigated experimentally in the normal impact by different velocities. Lab-scale ballistic tests of AD95 ceramic targets with 20 mm thickness against two different hardness 38CrSi steel projectiles with 7.62 mm diameter have been conducted at a range of velocities from 100 to 1000 m/s. Experimental results show that, with the impact velocity increasing, for the soft projectiles, the deformation and fracture modes were mushrooming, shear cracking, petalling and fragmentation(with large fragments and less number), respectively; for the hard projectiles there are three deformation and fracture modes: mushrooming, shearing cracking and fragmentation(with small fragments and large number). All projectiles were rebound after impact. But, with the velocity change, the target failure modes have changed. At low velocity, only radial cracks were found; then circumferential cracks appeared with the increasing velocity; the ceramic cone occurred when the velocity reached 400 m/s above, and manifested in two forms: front surface intact at lower velocity and perforated at higher velocity. The higher velocity, the fragment size is smaller and more uniform distribution. The difference of ceramic target damage is not obvious after impacted by two kinds of projectiles with different hardness at the same velocity. National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.: 11072072).

  14. Highly Integrated Spinning Projectile (HISP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-06

    At A A , AlAA 92-1214 HIGHLY INTEGRATED SPINNING PROJECTILE (HISP) G.R. Legters D.P. Lianos R.G. Brosch Senior Scientist, SAIC Senior Engineer...Integrated Spinning Projectile (HISP) Personal Author: Legters , G.R.; Lianos, D.P.; Brosch, R.G. Corporate Author Or Publisher: SAIC, Melbourne Beach...000001 Record ID: 26099 Source of Document: AIAA AIAA-92-1214 HIGHLY INTEGRATED SPINNING PROJECTILE (HISP) 3» en ZO O G. R. Legters Senior

  15. Interactions of relativistic neon to nickel projectiles in hydrogen, elemental production cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, C. N.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Chen, C.-X.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H. J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Ferrando, P.; Fonte, R.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T. G.; Insolia, A.; Jones, F. C.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Mitchell, J. W.; Potenza, R.; Romanski, J.; Russo, G. V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C. E.; Tuvé, C.; Waddington, C. J.; Webber, W. R.; Wefel, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the elemental production cross sections for 17 projectile-energy combinations with energies between 338 and 894 MeV/nucleon interacting in a liquid hydrogen target. These results were obtained from two runs at the LBL Bevalac using projectiles ranging from 22Ne to 58Ni. Cross sections were measured for all fragment elements with charges greater than or equal to half the charge of the projectile. The results show that, over the energy and ion range investigated, the general decrease in cross section with decreasing fragment charge is strongly modified by the isospin of the projectile ion. Significant additional modifications of the cross sections due to the internal structure of the nucleus have also been seen. These include both pairing and shell effects. Differences in the cross sections due to the differing energies of the projectile are also considerable.

  16. Wound ballistics of injuries caused by handguns with different types of projectiles.

    PubMed

    von See, Constantin; Stuehmer, Alexander; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Blum, Katrin S; Bormann, Kai-Hendrik; Rücker, Martin

    2009-07-01

    There are considerable differences in the shape and composition of military and civilian projectiles. Five different projectiles with the same kinetic energy were fired into the heads of freshly sacrificed pigs (n=30) through the submental region in the occipital direction. Computed tomography (CT) and 3D face scans of the animal skulls were obtained before and after firing. The image data sets were fused and provided the basis for a quantitative analysis of destruction patterns. As a result of the destruction of the parietal bone at the potential exit site, there were significant volume difference between the Action 4 (6.45 +/- 3.42 ml) and the Hydra-Shok projectile (12.71 +/- 2.86 ml). The partial metal-jacketed projectile showed a minor increase in volume (4.89 +/- 1.47 ml) and a partial loss of soft projectile components. Radiology showed differences between the various projectiles in fragmentation and bone and soft-tissue destruction. Although the projectiles had the same kinetic energy, there were considerable differences in injury patterns between full metal-jacketed projectiles, which are the only projectiles permitted for military use under the Geneva Conventions, and the other investigated projectiles. These injuries present a major medical challenge to both first responders and surgeons.

  17. Ballistic projectile trajectory determining system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, T.J.

    1997-05-20

    A computer controlled system determines the three-dimensional trajectory of a ballistic projectile. To initialize the system, predictions of state parameters for a ballistic projectile are received at an estimator. The estimator uses the predictions of the state parameters to estimate first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A single stationary monocular sensor then observes the actual first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A comparator generates an error value related to the predicted state parameters by comparing the estimated first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile with the observed first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. If the error value is equal to or greater than a selected limit, the predictions of the state parameters are adjusted. New estimates for the trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile are made and are then compared with actual observed trajectory characteristics. This process is repeated until the error value is less than the selected limit. Once the error value is less than the selected limit, a calculator calculates trajectory characteristics such a the origin and destination of the ballistic projectile. 8 figs.

  18. Ballistic projectile trajectory determining system

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    A computer controlled system determines the three-dimensional trajectory of a ballistic projectile. To initialize the system, predictions of state parameters for a ballistic projectile are received at an estimator. The estimator uses the predictions of the state parameters to estimate first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A single stationary monocular sensor then observes the actual first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. A comparator generates an error value related to the predicted state parameters by comparing the estimated first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile with the observed first trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile. If the error value is equal to or greater than a selected limit, the predictions of the state parameters are adjusted. New estimates for the trajectory characteristics of the ballistic projectile are made and are then compared with actual observed trajectory characteristics. This process is repeated until the error value is less than the selected limit. Once the error value is less than the selected limit, a calculator calculates trajectory characteristics such a the origin and destination of the ballistic projectile.

  19. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  20. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  1. Projectile motion without calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizcallah, Joseph A.

    2018-07-01

    Projectile motion is a constant theme in introductory-physics courses. It is often used to illustrate the application of differential and integral calculus. While most of the problems used for this purpose, such as maximizing the range, are kept at a fairly elementary level, some, such as determining the safe domain, involve not so elementary techniques, which can hardly be assumed of the targeted audience. In the literature, several attempts have been undertaken to avoid calculus altogether and keep the exposition entirely within the realm of algebra and/or geometry. In this paper, we propose yet another non-calculus approach which uses the projectile’s travel times to shed new light on these problems and provide instructors with an alternate method to address them with their students.

  2. Water radiolysis by low-energy carbon projectiles from first-principles molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kohanoff, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Water radiolysis by low-energy carbon projectiles is studied by first-principles molecular dynamics. Carbon projectiles of kinetic energies between 175 eV and 2.8 keV are shot across liquid water. Apart from translational, rotational and vibrational excitation, they produce water dissociation. The most abundant products are H and OH fragments. We find that the maximum spatial production of radiolysis products, not only occurs at low velocities, but also well below the maximum of energy deposition, reaching one H every 5 Å at the lowest speed studied (1 Bohr/fs), dissociative collisions being more significant at low velocity while the amount of energy required to dissociate water is constant and much smaller than the projectile’s energy. A substantial fraction of the energy transferred to fragments, especially for high velocity projectiles, is in the form of kinetic energy, such fragments becoming secondary projectiles themselves. High velocity projectiles give rise to well-defined binary collisions, which should be amenable to binary approximations. This is not the case for lower velocities, where multiple collision events are observed. H secondary projectiles tend to move as radicals at high velocity, as cations when slower. We observe the generation of new species such as hydrogen peroxide and formic acid. The former occurs when an O radical created in the collision process attacks a water molecule at the O site. The latter when the C projectile is completely stopped and reacts with two water molecules. PMID:28267804

  3. Air-Powered Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, T.; Bjorklund, R. A.; Elliott, D. G.; Jones, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air-powered launcher fires plastic projectiles without using explosive propellants. Does not generate high temperatures. Launcher developed for combat training for U.S. Army. With reservoir pressurized, air launcher ready to fire. When pilot valve opened, sleeve (main valve) moves to rear. Projectile rapidly propelled through barrel, pushed by air from reservoir. Potential applications in seismic measurements, avalanche control, and testing impact resistance of windshields on vehicles.

  4. Projectile penetration into ballistic gelatin.

    PubMed

    Swain, M V; Kieser, D C; Shah, S; Kieser, J A

    2014-01-01

    Ballistic gelatin is frequently used as a model for soft biological tissues that experience projectile impact. In this paper we investigate the response of a number of gelatin materials to the penetration of spherical steel projectiles (7 to 11mm diameter) with a range of lower impacting velocities (<120m/s). The results of sphere penetration depth versus projectile velocity are found to be linear for all systems above a certain threshold velocity required for initiating penetration. The data for a specific material impacted with different diameter spheres were able to be condensed to a single curve when the penetration depth was normalised by the projectile diameter. When the results are compared with a number of predictive relationships available in the literature, it is found that over the range of projectiles and compositions used, the results fit a simple relationship that takes into account the projectile diameter, the threshold velocity for penetration into the gelatin and a value of the shear modulus of the gelatin estimated from the threshold velocity for penetration. The normalised depth is found to fit the elastic Froude number when this is modified to allow for a threshold impact velocity. The normalised penetration data are found to best fit this modified elastic Froude number with a slope of 1/2 instead of 1/3 as suggested by Akers and Belmonte (2006). Possible explanations for this difference are discussed. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-10-13

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  6. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  7. Electromagnetic launcher for heavy projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Kotov, A. V.; Polistchook, V. P.; Shurupov, A. V.; Shurupov, M. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we present the electromagnetic launcher with capacitive power source of 4.8 MJ. Our installation allows studying of the projectile acceleration in railgun in two regimes: with a solid armature and with a plasma piston. The experiments with plasma piston were performed in the railgun with the length of barrel of 0.7-1.0 m and its inner diameter of 17-24 mm. The velocities of lexan projectiles with weight of 5-15 g were in a range of 2.5-3.5 km/s. The physical mechanisms that limit speed of throwing in railgun are discussed.

  8. Target-projectile interaction during impact melting at Kamil Crater, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Agnese; D'Orazio, Massimo; Cordier, Carole; Folco, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    In small meteorite impacts, the projectile may survive through fragmentation; in addition, it may melt, and chemically and physically interact with both shocked and melted target rocks. However, the mixing/mingling between projectile and target melts is a process still not completely understood. Kamil Crater (45 m in diameter; Egypt), generated by the hypervelocity impact of the Gebel Kamil Ni-rich ataxite on sandstone target, allows to study the target-projectile interaction in a simple and fresh geological setting. We conducted a petrographic and geochemical study of macroscopic impact melt lapilli and bombs ejected from the crater, which were collected during our geophysical campaign in February 2010. Two types of glasses constitute the impact melt lapilli and bombs: a white glass and a dark glass. The white glass is mostly made of SiO2 and it is devoid of inclusions. Its negligible Ni and Co contents suggest derivation from the target rocks without interaction with the projectile (<0.1 wt% of projectile contamination). The dark glass is a silicate melt with variable contents of Al2O3 (0.84-18.7 wt%), FeOT (1.83-61.5 wt%), and NiO (<0.01-10.2 wt%). The dark glass typically includes fragments (from few μm to several mm in size) of shocked sandstone, diaplectic glass, lechatelierite, and Ni-Fe metal blebs. The metal blebs are enriched in Ni compared to the Gebel Kamil meteorite. The dark glass is thus a mixture of target and projectile melts (11-12 wt% of projectile contamination). Based on recently proposed models for target-projectile interaction and for impact glass formation, we suggest a scenario for the glass formation at Kamil. During the transition from the contact and compression stage and the excavation stage, projectile and target liquids formed at their interface and chemically interact in a restricted zone. Projectile contamination affected only a shallow portion of the target rocks. The SiO2 melt that eventually solidified as white glass behaved as

  9. Projectile-generating explosive access tool

    DOEpatents

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos; Hughs, Chance G; Todd, Steven N

    2013-06-11

    A method for generating a projectile using an explosive device that can generate a projectile from the opposite side of a wall from the side where the explosive device is detonated. The projectile can be generated without breaching the wall of the structure or container. The device can optionally open an aperture in a solid wall of a structure or a container and form a high-kinetic-energy projectile from the portion of the wall removed to create the aperture.

  10. Microspoiler Actuation for Guided Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-06

    and be hardened to gun -launch. Several alternative designs will be explored using various actuation techniques, and downselection to an optimal design...aerodynamic optimization of the microspoiler mechanism, mechanical design/ gun hardening, and parameter estimation from experimental data. These...performed using the aerodynamic parameters in Table 2. Projectile trajectories were simulated without gravity at zero gun elevation. The standard 30mm

  11. Novice Rules for Projectile Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, David P.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates several aspects of undergraduate students' rules for projectile motion including general patterns; rules for questions about time, distance, solids and liquids; and changes in rules when asked to ignore air resistance. Reports approach differences by sex and high school physics experience, and that novice rules are situation…

  12. Projectile Motion Gets the Hose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Liyanage, Chinthaka

    2011-01-01

    Students take a weekly quiz in our introductory physics course. During the week in which material focused on projectile motion, we not-so-subtly suggested what problem the students would see on the quiz. The quiz problem was an almost exact replica of a homework problem we worked through in the class preceding the quiz. The goal of the problem is…

  13. The Projectile Inside the Loop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varieschi, Gabriele U.

    2006-01-01

    The loop-the-loop demonstration can be easily adapted to study the kinematics of projectile motion, when the moving body falls inside the apparatus. Video capturing software can be used to reveal peculiar geometrical effects of this simple but educational experiment.

  14. Multiple impacts of dusty projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Stefan; Güttler, Carsten; Blum, Jurgen

    In the context of early stages of planetesimal formation we performed laboratory and drop tower experiments to study multiple impacts of small dust-aggregate projectiles into solid sintered dust targets. Both collision partners consisted of 1.5 µm monodisperse spherical SiO2 monomers with volume filling factors of 0.15 (projectiles) and 0.35 (targets), respectively. The fragile projectiles were accelerated by a solenoid accelerator with a linear projectile magazine, which enabled us to perform 25 impacts within 4.5 s of microgravity time in the Bremen drop tower. We measured the mass-accretion efficiency for different impact velocities between 3 and 5 m s-1 , using an analytical balance and imaging methods. Furthermore, we observed random collisions among small dust aggregates with sizes around 1 mm and collision velocities of the order of 0.25 m s-1 and used them to improve the dust-aggregate collision model of Güttler et al. (2010). u

  15. Having Fun with a 3-D Projectile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammi, Matthew; Greenhalgh, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The use of projectiles is a concept familiar to most students, whether it is a classic slingshot, bow and arrow, or even a spit wad through a straw. Perhaps the last thing a teacher wants is more projectiles in the classroom. However, the concept of projectiles is relevant to most students and may provide a means of bringing more authenticity into…

  16. Developmental changes in children's understanding of horizontal projectile motion.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yi; Zhu, Liqi; Chen, Zhe

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated 5- to 13-year-old children's performance in solving horizontal projectile motion problems, in which they predicted the trajectory of a carried object released from a carrier in three different contexts. The results revealed that 5- and 8-year-olds' trajectory predictions were easily distracted by salient contextual features (e.g. the relative spatial locations between objects), whereas a proportion of 11- and 13-year-olds' performance suggested the engagement of the impetus concept in trajectory prediction. The impetus concept is a typical misconception of inertial motion that assumes that motion is caused by force. Children's performance across ages suggested that their naïve knowledge of projectile motion was neither well-developed and coherent nor completely fragmented. Instead, this study presented the dynamic process in which children with age gradually overcame the influences of contextual features and consistently used the impetus concept across motion problems. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  17. Desorption Induced by KEV Molecular and Cluster Projectiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Matthew Glenn

    1990-01-01

    A new experimental method has been developed for studying negative secondary ion (SI) emission from solid surfaces bombarded by polyatomic primary ions of 5 to 30 keV. The method is based on the time-of-flight (TOF) analysis of primary ions which are produced by either ^ {252}Cf fission fragment induced desorption or by extraction from a liquid metal ion source, and then accelerated into a field free region. The primary ions included organic monomer, dimer, and fragment ions of coronene and phenylalanine, (CsI)_ nCs ^{+} cluster ions, and Au _sp{n}{+} cluster ions. Secondary electrons, emitted from a target surface upon primary ion impact, are used to identify which primary ion has hit the surface. An event-by-event coincidence counting technique allows several secondary ion TOF spectra, correlated to several different primary ions, to be acquired simultaneously. Negative SI yields from organic (phenylalanine and dinitrostilbene), CsI, and Au surfaces have been measured for a number of different mono- and polyatomic primary ions. The results show, for example, yields ranging from 1 to 10% for phenylalanine (M-H) ^{ -}, 1 to 10% for I^{-} , and 1 to 5% for Au^{-} , with Cs_2I^ {+} and Cs_3I _sp{2}{+} clusters as projectiles. Yields for the same surfaces using Cs ^{+} primary ions are much less than 1%, indicating that SI yields are enhanced with clusters. A yield enhancement occurs when the SI yield per atom of a polyatomic projectile is greater than the SI yield of its monoatomic equivalent, at the same velocity. Thus, a (M-H) ^{-} yield increase of a factor of 50, when phenylalanine is bombarded with Cs_3I_sp{2} {+} instead of Cs^{+ }, represents a yield enhancement factor of 10. For the projectiles and samples studied, it was observed that the heavier the mass of the constituents of a projectile, the larger the enhancement effects, and that the largest yield enhancements (with CsI and Au _ n projectiles) occur for the organic target, phenylalanine. One possible

  18. Collision forces for compliant projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    1990-01-01

    Force histories resulting from the impact of compliant projectiles were determined experimentally. A long instrumented rod was used as the target, and the impact force was calculated directly from the measured strain response. Results from a series of tests on several different sized impactors were used to define four dimensionless parameters that determine, for a specified impactor velocity and size, the amplitude, duration, shape, and impulse of the impact force history.

  19. Projectiles, pendula, and special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.

    2005-05-01

    The kind of flat-earth gravity used in introductory physics appears in an accelerated reference system in special relativity. From this viewpoint, we work out the special relativistic description of a ballistic projectile and a simple pendulum, two examples of simple motion driven by earth-surface gravity. The analysis uses only the basic mathematical tools of special relativity typical of a first-year university course.

  20. Wind-influenced projectile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, Reginald Christian; Perico Esguerra, Jose; Day Vallejos, Jazmine; Jerard Canda, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    We solved the wind-influenced projectile motion problem with the same initial and final heights and obtained exact analytical expressions for the shape of the trajectory, range, maximum height, time of flight, time of ascent, and time of descent with the help of the Lambert W function. It turns out that the range and maximum horizontal displacement are not always equal. When launched at a critical angle, the projectile will return to its starting position. It turns out that a launch angle of 90° maximizes the time of flight, time of ascent, time of descent, and maximum height and that the launch angle corresponding to maximum range can be obtained by solving a transcendental equation. Finally, we expressed in a parametric equation the locus of points corresponding to maximum heights for projectiles launched from the ground with the same initial speed in all directions. We used the results to estimate how much a moderate wind can modify a golf ball’s range and suggested other possible applications.

  1. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  2. Sequential injection gas guns for accelerating projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Jeffrey M [Idaho Falls, ID; Chu, Henry S [Idaho Falls, ID; Novascone, Stephen R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-11-15

    Gas guns and methods for accelerating projectiles through such gas guns are described. More particularly, gas guns having a first injection port located proximate a breech end of a barrel and a second injection port located longitudinally between the first injection port and a muzzle end of the barrel are described. Additionally, modular gas guns that include a plurality of modules are described, wherein each module may include a barrel segment having one or more longitudinally spaced injection ports. Also, methods of accelerating a projectile through a gas gun, such as injecting a first pressurized gas into a barrel through a first injection port to accelerate the projectile and propel the projectile down the barrel past a second injection port and injecting a second pressurized gas into the barrel through the second injection port after passage of the projectile and to further accelerate the projectile are described.

  3. Sonic Simulation of Near Projectile Hits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, J. I.; Rodemich, E. R.

    1988-01-01

    Measured frequencies identify projectiles and indicate miss distances. Developmental battlefield-simulation system for training soldiers uses sounds emitted by incoming projectiles to identify projectiles and indicate miss distances. Depending on projectile type and closeness of each hit, system generates "kill" or "near-kill" indication. Artillery shell simulated by lightweight plastic projectile launched by compressed air. Flow of air through groove in nose of projectile generates acoustic tone. Each participant carries audio receiver measure and process tone signal. System performs fast Fourier transforms of received tone to obtain dominant frequency during each succeeding interval of approximately 40 ms (an interval determined from practical signal-processing requirements). With modifications, system concept applicable to collision-warning or collision-avoidance systems.

  4. Projectile-generating explosive access tool

    DOEpatents

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos [Albuquerque, NM; Hughs, Chance G [Tijeras, NM; Todd, Steven N [Rio Rancho, NM

    2011-10-18

    An explosive device that can generate a projectile from the opposite side of a wall from the side where the explosive device is detonated. The projectile can be generated without breaching the wall of the structure or container. The device can optionally open an aperture in a solid wall of a structure or a container and form a high-kinetic-energy projectile from the portion of the wall removed to create the aperture.

  5. Stopping power: Effect of the projectile deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kompaneets, Roman, E-mail: kompaneets@mpe.mpg.de; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2014-11-15

    The stopping force is the force exerted on the projectile by its wake. Since the wake does not instantly adjust to the projectile velocity, the stopping force should be affected by the projectile deceleration caused by the stopping force itself. We address this effect by deriving the corresponding correction to the stopping force in the cold plasma approximation. By using the derived expression, we estimate that if the projectile is an ion passing through an electron-proton plasma, the correction is small when the stopping force is due to the plasma electrons, but can be significant when the stopping force ismore » due to the protons.« less

  6. Aerodynamic flail for a spinning projectile

    DOEpatents

    Cole, James K.

    1990-05-01

    A flail is provided which reduces the spin of a projectile in a recovery system which includes a parachute, a cable connected to the parachute, a swivel, and means for connecting the swivel to the projectile. The flail includes a plurality of flexible filaments and a rotor for attaching the filaments to the front end of the projectile. The rotor is located radially with respect to the spinning axis of the projectile. In one embodiment, the projectile includes a first nose cone section housing a deployable spin damping assembly; a second nose cone section, housing a deployable parachute assembly; a shell section, supporting the first and second nose cone sections during flight of the projectile; a mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second cone section; and a mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section. In operation of this embodiment, the deployable spin damping assembly deploys during flight of the projectile when the mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second nose cone section are actuated. Then, upon actuation of the mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section, two things happen: the spin damping assembly separates from the projectile; and the deployable parachute assembly is deployed.

  7. Aerodynamic flail for a spinning projectile

    DOEpatents

    Cole, James K.

    1990-01-01

    A flail is provided which reduces the spin of a projectile in a recovery system which includes a parachute, a cable connected to the parachute, a swivel, and means for connecting the swivel to the projectile. The flail includes a plurality of flexible filaments and a rotor for attaching the filaments to the front end of the projectile. The rotor is located radially with respect to the spinning axis of the projectile. In one embodiment, the projectile includes a first nose cone section housing a deployable spin damping assembly; a second nose cone section, housing a deployable parachute assembly; a shell section, supporting the first and second nose cone sections during flight of the projectile; a mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second cone section; and a mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section. In operation of this embodiment, the deployable spin damping assembly deploys during flight of the projectile when the mechanism for releasing the first nose cone section from the second nose cone section are actuated. Then, upon actuation of the mechanism for releasing the second nose cone section from the shell section, two things happen: the spin damping assembly separates from the projectile; and the deployable parachute assembly is deployed.

  8. Graphical Method for Determining Projectile Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J. C.; Baker, J. C.; Franzel, L.; McMahon, D.; Songer, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present a nontrigonometric graphical method for predicting the trajectory of a projectile when the angle and initial velocity are known. Students enrolled in a general education conceptual physics course typically have weak backgrounds in trigonometry, making inaccessible the standard analytical calculation of projectile range. Furthermore,…

  9. Projectile Combustion Effects on Ram Accelerator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitale, Saarth Anjali

    University of Washington Abstract Projectile Combustion Effects on Ram Accelerator Performance Saarth Anjali Chitale Chair of the Supervisory Committee: Prof. Carl Knowlen William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics The ram accelerator facility at the University of Washington is used to propel projectiles at supersonic velocities. This concept is similar to an air-breathing ramjet engine in that sub-caliber projectiles, shaped like the ramjet engine center-body, are shot through smooth-bore steel-walled tubes having an internal diameter of 38 mm. The ram accelerator propulsive cycles operate between Mach 2 to 10 and have the potential to accelerate projectile to velocities greater than 8 km/s. The theoretical thrust versus Mach number characteristics can be obtained using knowledge of gas dynamics and thermodynamics that goes into the design of the ram accelerator. The corresponding velocity versus distance profiles obtained from the test runs at the University of Washington, however, are often not consistent with the theoretical predictions after the projectiles reach in-tube Mach numbers greater than 4. The experimental velocities are typically greater than the expected theoretical predictions; which has led to the proposition that the combustion process may be moving up onto the projectile. An alternative explanation for higher than predicted thrust, which is explored here, is that the performance differences can be attributed to the ablation of the projectile body which results in molten metal being added to the flow of the gaseous combustible mixture around the projectile. This molten metal is assumed to mix uniformly and react with the gaseous propellant; thereby enhancing the propellant energy release and altering the predicted thrust-Mach characteristics. This theory predicts at what Mach number the projectile will first experience enhanced thrust and the corresponding velocity-distance profile. Preliminary results are in good agreement

  10. Three-phase hypervelocity projectile launcher

    DOEpatents

    Fugelso, L. Erik; Langner, Gerald C.; Burns, Kerry L.; Albright, James N.

    1994-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile launcher for use in perforating borehole casings provides improved penetration into the surrounding rock structure. The launcher includes a first cylinder of explosive material that defines an axial air-filled cavity, a second cylinder of explosive material defining an axial frustum-shaped cavity abutting and axially aligned with the first cylinder. A pliant washer is located between and axially aligned with the first and second cylinders. The frustum shaped cavity is lined with a metal liner effective to form a projectile when the first and second cylinders are detonated. The washer forms a unique intermediate projectile in advance of the liner projectile and enables the liner projectile to further penetrate into and fracture the adjacent rock structure.

  11. The Zero-Degree Detector System for Fragmentation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Howell, L. W.; Kuznetsov, E.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of nuclear fragmentation cross sections requires the detection and identification of individual projectile fragments. If light and heavy fragments are recorded in 'ne same detector, it may be impossible distinguish the signal from the light fragment. To overcome this problem, we have developed the Zero-Degree Detector System. The ZDDS enables the measurement of cross sections for light fragment production by using pixelated detectors to separately measure the signals of each fragment. The system has been used to measure the fragmentation of beams as heavy as Fe at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan.

  12. Experimental assessment of eye protection efficiency against high speed projectiles.

    PubMed

    Speck, Alexis; Zelzer, Benedikt; Eppig, Timo; Langenbucher, Achim

    2013-02-01

    Work in hazardous zones with the risk of mechanical injuries requires protection with safety spectacles. Mechanical eye injuries with metal foreign bodies are often caused by rotational material machining or production processes with high pressure or high velocity moving parts. Normative regulations restrict to tests with small and fast flying objects (e.g. 6mm ball). The literature does not provide any information about protection capabilities against larger objects with high mass and arbitrary shape. The purpose of this study was to test the protection efficiency of safety spectacles against flying objects. The scope of this paper is to present a new test setup for mechanical impact resistance testing of personal protective eyewear against objects with arbitrary shape and mass. The setup is based on a catapult platform, accelerating a sliding carriage on a rail. A pull rope system allows velocities up to 62±2 m·s(-1). A photo sensor was used for velocity measurement. The carriage can be loaded with projectiles of up to 30mm×30mm×40mm in size with arbitrary orientation, depending on the carriage insert. Testing and validation was done with projectiles such as 7g metal chips and fragments with approximate dimensions of 10mm×15mm. Samples were standard occupational safety spectacles mounted on a test head. The projectile impact was captured with a monochrome high speed camera. The aiming accuracy test showed deviations of approximately 1mm of two impacts on the same spectacle surface with a free flight distance of 150mm. All tests with slow, medium and high speed projectiles showed no contact with the eye medium. Objects with velocities from 10 m·s(-1) to 62 m·s(-1) fired the spectacle off from the test head. The medium speed test cut off one side of the spectacle frame. The high speed test with 62±2 m·s(-1) cracked the polycarbonate shield. We describe a method for accelerating arbitrary objects up to 62 m·s(-1) and for aiming these objects on safety

  13. Penetration of fast projectiles into resistant media: From macroscopic to subatomic projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaite, José

    2017-09-01

    The penetration of a fast projectile into a resistant medium is a complex process that is suitable for simple modeling, in which basic physical principles can be profitably employed. This study connects two different domains: the fast motion of macroscopic bodies in resistant media and the interaction of charged subatomic particles with matter at high energies, which furnish the two limit cases of the problem of penetrating projectiles of different sizes. These limit cases actually have overlapping applications; for example, in space physics and technology. The intermediate or mesoscopic domain finds application in atom cluster implantation technology. Here it is shown that the penetration of fast nano-projectiles is ruled by a slightly modified Newton's inertial quadratic force, namely, F ∼v 2 - β, where β vanishes as the inverse of projectile diameter. Factors essential to penetration depth are ratio of projectile to medium density and projectile shape.

  14. Impact fragmentation of polyurethane and polypropylene cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimura, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Daisuke; Preechasupanya, Worrayut; Matsumoto, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    The impact fragmentation of a bulk polyurethane elastomer (PU) and polypropylene (PP) cylinder have been investigated using a Cu plate projectile launched by a propellant gun at a velocity of 0.53-1.4 km/s. A projectile drills into a PU sample and forms a cavity in the sample. A small number of tiny fragments are formed. When the projectile smashes in at 1.4 km/s, the PU cylinder bursts and PU fragments form. On the other hand, a brittle fracture occurs on the PP cylinder. The mass of fragments from the PU sample generated at a lower impact velocity is distributed in the lognormal form, whereas the mass of fragments from the PU sample generated by a 1.4 km/s impact follows a power-law distribution. The fragment mass distribution of the PP sample generated at a lower impact velocity obeys the power-law form, whereas that generated at a higher impact velocity follows the lognormal form.

  15. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  16. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure.

  17. Hypervelocity High Speed Projectile Imagery and Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    This DVD contains video showing the results of hypervelocity impact. One is showing a projectile impact on a Kevlar wrapped Aluminum bottle containing 3000 psi gaseous oxygen. One video show animations of a two stage light gas gun.

  18. Projectile channeling in chain bundle dusty plasma liquids: Wave excitation and projectile-wave interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Tseng, Yu-Ping; I, Lin

    2011-03-15

    The microscopic channeling dynamics of projectiles in subexcitable chain bundle dusty plasma liquids consisting of long chains of negatively charged dusts suspended in low pressure glow discharges is investigated experimentally using fast video-microscopy. The long distance channeling of the projectile in the channel formed by the surrounding dust chain bundles and the excitation of a narrow wake associated with the elliptical motions of the background dusts are demonstrated. In the high projectile speed regime, the drag force due to wake wave excitation increases with the decreasing projectile speed. The excited wave then leads the slowed down projectile after the projectilemore » speed is decreased below the resonant speed of wave excitation. The wave-projectile interaction causes the increasing projectile drag below the resonant speed and the subsequent oscillation around a descending average level, until the projectile settles down to the equilibrium point. Long distance projectile surfing through the resonant crest trapping by the externally excited large amplitude solitary wave is also demonstrated.« less

  19. Dynamics of Liquid-Filled Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    1 Estimate of Shape of the Free Surface of the Liquid in a Liquid-Pilled Projectile During Acceleration 6 CHAPTER II. ANGULAR ACCELERATION OF THE...LIQUID IN A LIQUID-FILLED PROJECTILE DURING FLIGHT 13 Liquid "Spinup" in Configuration A 13 Angular Acceleration of the Liquid in Con... Angular Acceleration. 13 2.2 Tangential Velocity of Liquid Versus Radial Position at Several Values of Time (Liquid Configuration A) 21 2.3 Tangential

  20. The child as a projectile.

    PubMed

    Tibbs, R E; Haines, D E; Parent, A D

    1998-12-01

    Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death in children under the age of fourteen. The majority of these injuries/deaths occur when the child becomes airborne during an accident. The most common mechanisms by which children become airborne are motor vehicle collisions, bicycling accidents, and falls. A head injury is seen in a significant number of children in this setting. This includes injury to the scalp, skull, coverings of the brain, or the brain itself. These injuries are the most common cause of death in children resulting from unintentional injury. Other typical injuries include external bruises and abrasions, extremity fractures, and bruising or bleeding of internal organs. We propose to name this constellation of injuries the projectile child syndrome. This refers to those injuries occurring in infants and children as a result of becoming airborne during the events of an accident. The pattern of injuries seen as related to the anatomy of the child is stressed. A review of the impact to society and guidelines for prevention are presented.

  1. Heavy Ion Fragmentation Experiments at the Bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using the heavy-ion capability of the Bevatron were studied. The purpose was to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Attempts were also made to: (1) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (2) test the applicability of high-energy multi-particle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (3) apply the cross-section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (4) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross sections.

  2. A Meteorite Fragment Trapped Between Positive and Negative Shatter Cones in a Limestone Block Stored at the Meteorkrater-Museum Steinheim, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, E.; Hoelzel, M.; Schmieder, M.; Rasser, M.; Fietzke, J.; Frische, M.; Kutterolf, S.

    2017-07-01

    A metallic fragment on a shatter cone surface of a shattered limestone block is composed of Fe, Ni, and Co. Kamacite, taenite, troilite, and schreibersite were identified. These findings suggest this fragment is a piece of the Steinheim projectile.

  3. Target and Projectile: Material Effects on Crater Excavation and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L. B.; Burleson, T.; Cintala, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Scaling relationships allow the initial conditions of an impact to be related to the excavation flow and final crater size and have proven useful in understanding the various processes that lead to the formation of a planetary-scale crater. In addition, they can be examined and tested through laboratory experiments in which the initial conditions of the impact are known and ejecta kinematics and final crater morphometry are measured directly. Current scaling relationships are based on a point-source assumption and treat the target material as a continuous medium; however, in planetary-scale impacts, this may not always be the case. Fragments buried in a megaregolith, for instance, could easily approach or exceed the dimensions of the impactor; rubble-pile asteroids could present similar, if not greater, structural complexity. Experiments allow exploration into the effects of target material properties and projectile deformation style on crater excavation and dimensions. This contribution examines two of these properties: (1) the deformation style of the projectile, ductile (aluminum) or brittle (soda-lime glass) and (2) the grain size of the target material, 0.5-1 mm vs. 1-3 mm sand.

  4. Forest Fragmentation

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters

    2007-01-01

    What Is Forest Fragmentation,and Why Is It Important? Forest fragmentation refers to a loss of forest and the division of the remaining forest into smaller blocks. Fragmentation is of concern primarily because of its impact on the conservation of biological diversity. Forest fragmentation can affect the amount and quality of habitat for many wildlife species (Fahrig...

  5. Evaluating simulant materials for understanding cranial backspatter from a ballistic projectile.

    PubMed

    Das, Raj; Collins, Alistair; Verma, Anurag; Fernandez, Justin; Taylor, Michael

    2015-05-01

    In cranial wounds resulting from a gunshot, the study of backspatter patterns can provide information about the actual incidents by linking material to surrounding objects. This study investigates the physics of backspatter from a high-speed projectile impact and evaluates a range of simulant materials using impact tests. Next, we evaluate a mesh-free method called smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the splashing mechanism during backspatter. The study has shown that a projectile impact causes fragmentation at the impact site, while transferring momentum to fragmented particles. The particles travel along the path of least resistance, leading to partial material movement in the reverse direction of the projectile motion causing backspatter. Medium-density fiberboard is a better simulant for a human skull than polycarbonate, and lorica leather is a better simulant for a human skin than natural rubber. SPH is an effective numerical method for modeling the high-speed impact fracture and fragmentations. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of sputtering of Langmuir-Blodgett multilayers by keV C60 projectiles

    PubMed Central

    Paruch, R.; Rzeznik, L.; Czerwinski, B.; Garrison, B. J.; Winograd, N.; Postawa, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics computer simulations are applied to investigate fundamental processes induced by an impact of keV C60 projectile at an organic overlayer composed of long, well-organized linear molecules. The energy transfer pathways, sputtering yields, and the damage induced in the irradiated system, represented by a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) multilayers composed from molecules of bariated arachidic acid, are investigated as a function of the kinetic energy and impact angle of the projectile and the thickness of the organic system. In particular, the unique challenges of depth profiling through a LB film vs. a more isotropic solid are discussed. The results indicate that the trajectories of projectile fragments and, consequently, the primary energy can be channeled by the geometrical structure of the overlayer. Although, a similar process is known from sputtering of single crystals by atomic projectiles, it has not been anticipated to occur during C60 bombardment due to the large size of the projectile. An open and ordered molecular structure of LB films is responsible for such behavior. Both the extent of damage and the efficiency of sputtering depend on the kinetic energy, the impact angle, and the layer thickness. The results indicate that the best depth profiling conditions can be achieved with low-energy cluster projectiles irradiating the organic overlayer at large off-normal angles. PMID:20174461

  7. Penetration experiments in aluminum 1100 targets using soda-lime glass projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark J.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William E.; Haynes, Gerald; See, Thomas H.; Winkler, Jerry L.

    1995-01-01

    The cratering and penetration behavior of annealed aluminum 1100 targets, with thickness varied from several centimeters to ultra-thin foils less than 1 micrometer thick, were experimentally investigated using 3.2 mm diameter spherical soda-lime glass projectiles at velocities from 1 to 7 km/s. The objective was to establish quantitative, dimensional relationships between initial impact conditions (impact velocity, projectile diameter, and target thickness) and the diameter of the resulting crater or penetration hole. Such dimensional relationships and calibration experiments are needed to extract the diameters and fluxes of hypervelocity particles from space-exposed surfaces and to predict the performance of certain collisional shields. The cratering behavior of aluminum 1100 is fairly well predicted. However, crater depth is modestly deeper for our silicate impactors than the canonical value based on aluminum projectiles and aluminum 6061-T6 targets. The ballistic-limit thickness was also different. These differences attest to the great sensitivity of detailed crater geometry and penetration behavior on the physical properties of both the target and impactor. Each penetration experiment was equipped with a witness plate to monitor the nature of the debris plume emanating from the rear of the target. This plume consists of both projectile fragments and target debris. Both penetration hole and witness-plate spray patterns systematically evolve in response to projectile diameter/target thickness. The relative dimensions of the projectile and target totally dominate the experimental products documented in this report; impact velocity is an important contributor as well to the evolution of penetration holes, but is of subordinate significance for the witness-plate spray patterns.

  8. Additional Crime Scenes for Projectile Motion Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Dan; Bonner, David

    2011-12-01

    Building students' ability to transfer physics fundamentals to real-world applications establishes a deeper understanding of underlying concepts while enhancing student interest. Forensic science offers a great opportunity for students to apply physics to highly engaging, real-world contexts. Integrating these opportunities into inquiry-based problem solving in a team environment provides a terrific backdrop for fostering communication, analysis, and critical thinking skills. One such activity, inspired jointly by the museum exhibit "CSI: The Experience"2 and David Bonner's TPT article "Increasing Student Engagement and Enthusiasm: A Projectile Motion Crime Scene,"3 provides students with three different crime scenes, each requiring an analysis of projectile motion. In this lesson students socially engage in higher-order analysis of two-dimensional projectile motion problems by collecting information from 3-D scale models and collaborating with one another on its interpretation, in addition to diagramming and mathematical analysis typical to problem solving in physics.

  9. Ocular Injuries Due to Projectile Impacts

    PubMed Central

    (Michael) Scott, William R.; Lloyd, William C.; Benedict, James V.; Meredith, Roy

    2000-01-01

    An animal model has been developed using enucleated porcine eyes to evaluate ocular trauma. The eyes were pressurized to approximately 18mmHg and mounted in a container with a 10% gelatin mixture. The corneas of sixteen pressurized eyes were impacted by a blunt metal projectile (mass of 2.6gm, 3.5gm or 45.5gm) at velocities of 4.0 to 38.1 m/s. The impacted eyes were evaluated by an ophthalmologist. A numerical classification scheme was used to categorize the severity of the ocular injury. A chi-squared test indicates that the injury level is associated with the kinetic energy (KE) and not the momentum of the projectile. The enucleated eyes began to experience lens dislocations when the KE of the projectile was approximately 0.75Nm, and retinal injuries when the KE was approximately 1.20Nm. PMID:11558084

  10. The representational dynamics of remembered projectile locations.

    PubMed

    De Sá Teixeira, Nuno Alexandre; Hecht, Heiko; Oliveira, Armando Mónica

    2013-12-01

    When people are instructed to locate the vanishing location of a moving target, systematic errors forward in the direction of motion (M-displacement) and downward in the direction of gravity (O-displacement) are found. These phenomena came to be linked with the notion that physical invariants are embedded in the dynamic representations generated by the perceptual system. We explore the nature of these invariants that determine the representational mechanics of projectiles. By manipulating the retention intervals between the target's disappearance and the participant's responses, while measuring both M- and O-displacements, we were able to uncover a representational analogue of the trajectory of a projectile. The outcomes of three experiments revealed that the shape of this trajectory is discontinuous. Although the horizontal component of such trajectory can be accounted for by perceptual and oculomotor factors, its vertical component cannot. Taken together, the outcomes support an internalization of gravity in the visual representation of projectiles.

  11. Ocular injuries due to projectile impacts.

    PubMed

    Scott, W R; Lloyd, W C; Benedict, J V; Meredith, R

    2000-01-01

    An animal model has been developed using enucleated porcine eyes to evaluate ocular trauma. The eyes were pressurized to approximately 18 mmHg and mounted in a container with a 10% gelatin mixture. The corneas of sixteen pressurized eyes were impacted by a blunt metal projectile (mass of 2.6 gm, 3.5 gm or 45.5 gm) at velocities of 4.0 to 38.1 m/s. The impacted eyes were evaluated by an ophthalmologist. A numerical classification scheme was used to categorize the severity of the ocular injury. A chi-squared test indicates that the injury level is associated with the kinetic energy (KE) and not the momentum of the projectile. The enucleated eyes began to experience lens dislocations when the KE of the projectile was approximately 0.75 Nm, and retinal injuries when the KE was approximately 1.20 Nm.

  12. Human body projectiles implantation in victims of suicide bombings and implications for health and emergency care providers: the 7/7 experience.

    PubMed

    Patel, H D L; Dryden, S; Gupta, A; Stewart, N

    2012-07-01

    On 7 July 2005 four suicide bombings occurred on the London transport systems. In some of the injured survivors, bone fragments were embedded as biological foreign bodies. The aim of this study was to revisit those individuals who had sustained human projectile implantation injuries as a result of the bomb blasts at all scenes, review the process of body parts mapping and DNA identification at the scene, detail the management of such injuries and highlight the protocols that have been put in place for protection against blood borne pathogens. We retrospectively reviewed 12 instances of victims who sustained human body projectile implantation injuries. The Metropolitan Police and forensic scientists identified the human projectiles using DNA profiling and mapped these on the involved carriages and those found outside. All human projectiles included were greater than 3 cm(2). Twelve cases had human projectile implantation injuries. Of these, two died at the scene and ten were treated in hospital. Projectiles were mapped at three of the four bomb blast sites. Our findings show that victims within a 2m radius of the blast had human projectile injuries. Eight of the allogenic bony fragments that were identified in the survivors originated from the suicide bomber. All victims with an open wound should have prophylaxis against hepatitis B and serum stored for appropriate action against HIV and hepatitis C infection. All victims following a suicide bombing should be assumed to have human body projectile implantation injuries with blood products or bony fragments. All immediate care providers should receive prophylaxis against hepatitis B virus and appropriate action should be taken against HIV and hepatitis C infection.

  13. Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    error calculation. Projectiles are then grouped together according to the similarity of their components. Also discussed is graphical- cluster analysis...ballistic, armor, grouping, clustering 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF...Fig. 10 Graphical structure of 15 clusters of the jacket/core radii profiles with plots of the profiles contained within each cluster . The size of

  14. Maximizing the Range of a Projectile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ronald A.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses solutions to the problem of maximizing the range of a projectile. Presents three references that solve the problem with and without the use of calculus. Offers a fourth solution suitable for introductory physics courses that relies more on trigonometry and the geometry of the problem. (MDH)

  15. Speed, Acceleration, Chameleons and Cherry Pit Projectiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Likar, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the mechanics of cherry pit projectiles and ends with showing the similarity between cherry pit launching and chameleon tongue projecting mechanisms. The whole story is written as an investigation, following steps that resemble those typically taken by scientists and can therefore serve as an illustration of scientific…

  16. Bulldozing Your Way Through Projectile Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1983-01-01

    Presents two models and two demonstrations targeted at student understanding of projectile motion as the sum of two independent, perpendicular vectors. Describes materials required, construction, and procedures used. Includes a discussion of teaching points appropriate to each demonstration or model. (JM)

  17. Trajectory And Heating Of A Hypervelocity Projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    Technical paper presents derivation of approximate, closed-form equation for relationship between velocity of projectile and density of atmosphere. Results of calculations based on approximate equation agree well with results from numerical integrations of exact equations of motion. Comparisons of results presented in series of graphs.

  18. An Inexpensive Mechanical Model for Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, David

    2011-01-01

    As experienced physicists, we see the beauty and simplicity of projectile motion. It is merely the superposition of uniform linear motion along the direction of the initial velocity vector and the downward motion due to the constant acceleration of gravity. We see the kinematic equations as just the mathematical machinery to perform the…

  19. Teaching Projectile Motion to Eliminate Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Anne; Mitchelmore, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Student misconceptions of projectile motion are well documented, but their effect on the teaching and learning of the mathematics of motion under gravity has not been investigated. An experimental unit was designed that was intended to confront and eliminate misconceptions in senior secondary school students. The approach was found to be…

  20. Cambodian students’ prior knowledge of projectile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piten, S.; Rakkapao, S.; Prasitpong, S.

    2017-09-01

    Students always bring intuitive ideas about physics into classes, which can impact what they learn and how successful they are. To examine what Cambodian students think about projectile motion, we have developed seven open-ended questions and applied into grade 11 students before (N=124) and after (N=131) conventional classes. Results revealed several consistent misconceptions, for instance, many students believed that the direction of a velocity vector of a projectile follows the curved path at every position. They also thought the direction of an acceleration (or a force) follows the direction of motion. Observed by a pilot sitting on the plane, the falling object, dropped from a plane moving at a constant initial horizontal speed, would travel backward and land after the point of its release. The greater angle of the launched projectile creates the greater horizontal range. The hand force imparted with the ball leads the ball goes straight to hit the target. The acceleration direction points from the higher position to lower position. The misconceptions will be used as primary resources to develop instructional instruments to promote Cambodian students’ understanding of projectile motion in the following work.

  1. Launching a Projectile into Deep Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the discussion about Newton's work in a history of mathematics course, one of the presentations calculated the amount of energy necessary to send a projectile into deep space. Afterwards, the students asked for a recalculation with two changes: First the launch under study consisted of a single stage, but the students desired to…

  2. Ballistics projectile image analysis for firearm identification.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongguang

    2006-10-01

    This paper is based upon the observation that, when a bullet is fired, it creates characteristic markings on the cartridge case and projectile. From these markings, over 30 different features can be distinguished, which, in combination, produce a "fingerprint" for a firearm. By analyzing features within such a set of firearm fingerprints, it will be possible to identify not only the type and model of a firearm, but also each and every individual weapon just as effectively as human fingerprint identification. A new analytic system based on the fast Fourier transform for identifying projectile specimens by the line-scan imaging technique is proposed in this paper. This paper develops optical, photonic, and mechanical techniques to map the topography of the surfaces of forensic projectiles for the purpose of identification. Experiments discussed in this paper are performed on images acquired from 16 various weapons. Experimental results show that the proposed system can be used for firearm identification efficiently and precisely through digitizing and analyzing the fired projectiles specimens.

  3. Projectile Impact Effects on Aircraft Wire Harnesses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-08

    circuits Aircraft wire harnesses Modified ETFE Projectile damage and fires 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identit) by block number...Tile Firifinr~ari~ne An overview of tile test fiririý raný,e is shown in Figure b. In tile for-eyrouria is tre rifle, witzh stock removed, utor iuyo e

  4. High School Students' Understanding of Projectile Motion Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilber, Refik; Karaman, Ibrahim; Duzgun, Bahattin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of conceptual change-based instruction and traditionally designed physics instruction on students' understanding of projectile motion concepts. Misconceptions related to projectile motion concepts were determined by related literature on this subject. Accordingly, the Projectile Motion…

  5. Gun Testing Ballistics Issues for Insensitive Munitions Fragment Impact Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ernest; Schultz, Emmanuel; NATO Munitions Safety Information Analysis Centre Team

    2017-06-01

    The STANAG 4496 Ed. 1 Fragment Impact, Munitions Test Procedure is normally conducted by gun launching a projectile for attack against a munition. The purpose of this test is to assess the reaction of a munition impacted by a fragment. The test specifies a standardized projectile (fragment) with a standard test velocity of 2530+/-90 m/s, or an alternate test velocity of 1830+/-60 m/s. The standard test velocity can be challenging to achieve and has several loosely defined and undefined characteristics that can affect the test item response. This publication documents the results of an international review of the STANAG 4496 related to the fragment impact test. To perform the review, MSIAC created a questionnaire in conjunction with the custodian of this STANAG and sent it to test centers. Fragment velocity variation, projectile tilt upon impact and aim point variation were identified as observed gun testing issues. Achieving 2530 m/s consistently and cost effectively can be challenging. The aim point of impact of the fragment is chosen with the objective of obtaining the most violent reaction. No tolerance for aim point is specified, although aim point variation can be a source for IM response variation. Fragment tilt on impact is also unspecified. The standard fragment fabricated from a variety of different steels which have a significant margin for mechanical properties. These, as well as other gun testing issues, have significant implications to resulting IM response.

  6. Method of and apparatus for accelerating a projectile

    DOEpatents

    Goldstein, Yeshayahu S. A.; Tidman, Derek A.

    1986-01-01

    A projectile is accelerated along a confined path by supplying a pulsed high pressure, high velocity plasma jet to the rear of the projectile as the projectile traverses the path. The jet enters the confined path at a non-zero angle relative to the projectile path. The pulse is derived from a dielectric capillary tube having an interior wall from which plasma forming material is ablated in response to a discharge voltage. The projectile can be accelerated in response to the kinetic energy in the plasma jet or in response to a pressure increase of gases in the confined path resulting from the heat added to the gases by the plasma.

  7. Initiation of Gaseous Detonation by Conical Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verreault, Jimmy

    Initiation and stabilization of detonation by hypersonic conical projectiles launched into combustible gas mixtures is investigated. This phenomenon must be understood for the design and optimization of specific hypersonic propulsion devices, such as the oblique detonation wave engine and the ram accelerator. The criteria for detonation initiation by a projectile is also related to fundamental aspects of detonation research, such as the requirement for direct initiation of a detonation by a blast wave. Experimental results of this problem also offer useful references for validation of numerical and theoretical modeling. Projectiles with cone half angles varying from 15° to 60° were launched into stoichiometric mixtures of hydrogen/oxygen with 70% argon dilution at initial pressures between 10 and 200 kPa. The projectiles were launched from a combustion-driven gas gun at velocities up to 2.2 km/s (corresponding to 133% of the Chapman Jouguet velocity). Pictures of the flowfields generated by the projectiles were taken via Schlieren photography. Five combustion regimes were observed about the projectile ranging from prompt and delayed oblique detonation wave formation, combustion instabilities, a wave splitting, and an inert shock wave. Two types of transition from the prompt oblique detonation wave regime to the inert shock regime were observed. The first (the delayed oblique detonation wave regime) showed an inert shock attached to the tip of the projectile followed by a sharp kink at the onset of an oblique detonation wave; this regime occurred by decreasing the cone angle at high mixture pressures. The second (the combustion instabilities regime) exhibited large density gradients due to combustion ignition and quenching phenomena; this regime occurred by decreasing the mixture pressure at large cone angles. A number of theoretical models were considered to predict critical conditions for the initiation of oblique detonations. The Lee-Vasiljev model agreed

  8. Apparatus and method for the acceleration of projectiles to hypervelocities

    DOEpatents

    Hertzberg, Abraham; Bruckner, Adam P.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    1990-01-01

    A projectile is initially accelerated to a supersonic velocity and then injected into a launch tube filled with a gaseous propellant. The projectile outer surface and launch tube inner surface form a ramjet having a diffuser, a combustion chamber and a nozzle. A catalytic coated flame holder projecting from the projectile ignites the gaseous propellant in the combustion chamber thereby accelerating the projectile in a subsonic combustion mode zone. The projectile then enters an overdriven detonation wave launch tube zone wherein further projectile acceleration is achieved by a formed, controlled overdriven detonation wave capable of igniting the gaseous propellant in the combustion chamber. Ultrahigh velocity projectile accelerations are achieved in a launch tube layered detonation zone having an inner sleeve filled with hydrogen gas. An explosive, which is disposed in the annular zone between the inner sleeve and the launch tube, explodes responsive to an impinging shock wave emanating from the diffuser of the accelerating projectile thereby forcing the inner sleeve inward and imparting an acceleration to the projectile. For applications wherein solid or liquid high explosives are employed, the explosion thereof forces the inner sleeve inward, forming a throat behind the projectile. This throat chokes flow behind, thereby imparting an acceleration to the projectile.

  9. Investigating the Sources and Timing of Projectiles Striking the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, K. H.; Kring, D. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; McKay, D. S.; Ross, D. K.

    2011-01-01

    The lunar surface is exposed to bombardment by asteroids, comets, and debris from them. Surviving fragments of those projectiles in the lunar regolith provide a direct measure of the sources of exogenous material delivered to the Moon. Con-straining the temporal flux of their delivery will directly address key questions about the bombardment history of the inner Solar System. Regolith breccias, which are consolidated samples of the lunar regolith, were closed to further impact processing at the time they were assembled into rocks [1]. They are, therefore, time capsules of impact bombardment at different times through lunar history. Here we investigate the impact archive preserved in the Apollo 16 regolith breccias and compare this record to evidence of projectile species in other lunar samples.

  10. The aerodynamics of some guided projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Some characteristic projectile shapes are considered with various added components intended to provide lift, stability, and control. The intent of the additions is to provide some means for altering the normal ballistic flight path of a projectile for various purposes such as: achieving greater accuracy at the impact point, selecting alternate impact points, extending range, improved evasion, and so on. The configurations presented illustrate the effects of a flare, wings, and tails for providing stability and lift, and the effects of aft-tails, a close-coupled flap, and all-moving forward wings for control. The relative merits of the various configurations, all of which provided for flight path alterations are discussed.

  11. The aerodynamics of some guided projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Some characteristic projectile shapes are considered with various added components intended to provide lift, stability, and control. The intent of the additions is to provide some means for altering the normal ballistic flight path of a projectile for various purposes such as: achieving greater accuracy at the impact point, selecting alternate impact points, extending range, improved evasion, and so on. The configurations presented illustrate the effects of a flare, wings, and tails for providing stability and lift, and the effects of aft-tails, a close-coupled flap, and all-moving forward wings for control. The relative merits of the various configurations, all of which provided for flight path alterations, are discussed.

  12. Supercavitating Projectile Tracking System and Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-30

    Distribution is unlimited 20100104106 Attorney Docket No. 96681 SUPERCAVITATING PROJECTILE TRACKING SYSTEM AND METHOD STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT...underwater track or path 14 of a supercavitating vehicle under surface 16 of a body of water. In this embodiment, passive acoustic or pressure...transducers 12 are utilized to measure a pressure field produced by a moving supercavitating vehicle. The present invention provides a low-cost, reusable

  13. Rapid Ultrasonic Inspection of Artillery Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    field behavior as a function of gap separation d 26 Fig. 14 Electromagnet equivalent circuit model use for final design of yoke, pole pieces and...card 64 Fig. 37 Frequency response of receiver circuit 66 Fig. 38 a) Configuration of EMAT used to launch both longitudinal and circumferential... circuit for OD and ID location 88 Fig. 51 Photograph of fully assembled EMAT inspection system during projectile inspection 92 Fig. 52 Sequence

  14. Excalibur Precision 155mm Projectiles (Excalibur)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report ( SAR ) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-366 Excalibur Precision 155mm Projectiles (Excalibur) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget...Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval (DAMIR) March 21, 2016 18:18:38 UNCLASSIFIED Excalibur December 2015 SAR March 21, 2016 18:18:38... SAR March 21, 2016 18:18:38 UNCLASSIFIED 3 PB - President’s Budget PE - Program Element PEO - Program Executive Officer PM - Program Manager POE

  15. Fatal lawn mower related projectile injury.

    PubMed

    Colville-Ebeling, Bonnie; Lynnerup, Niels; Banner, Jytte

    2014-06-01

    Fatal lawn mower related injuries are a relatively rare occurrence. In a forensic setting, the primary aim is to reconstruct the injury mechanism and establish the cause of death. A relatively rare, but characteristic type of injury is a so-called projectile or missile injury. This occurs when the operator or a bystander is impacted by an object mobilized from the grass by the rotating mower blades. This type of injury often leaves only modest external trauma, which increases the risk of overlooking an entry wound. In this paper we present a case of a fatal lawn mower related projectile injury which was initially overlooked, later interpreted as a possible gunshot homicide, and finally identified as a lawn mower related projectile injury when autopsy revealed a piece of metal thread in the main bronchus to the right middle lobe, hemopericardium, and right-sided hemothorax. To our knowledge, this injury mechanism has not previously been reported as a cause of death. This case illustrates the importance of postmortem radiological imaging and interdisciplinary cooperation when establishing manner and cause of death in unusual cases.

  16. Photon emission from massive projectile impacts on solids.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lima, F A; Pinnick, V T; Della-Negra, S; Schweikert, E A

    2011-01-01

    First evidence of photon emission from individual impacts of massive gold projectiles on solids for a number of projectile-target combinations is reported. Photon emission from individual impacts of massive Au(n) (+q) (1 ≤ n ≤ 400; q = 1-4) projectiles with impact energies in the range of 28-136 keV occurs in less than 10 ns after the projectile impact. Experimental observations show an increase in the photon yield from individual impacts with the projectile size and velocity. Concurrently with the photon emission, electron emission from the impact area has been observed below the kinetic emission threshold and under unlikely conditions for potential electron emission. We interpret the puzzling electron emission and correlated luminescence observation as evidence of the electronic excitation resulting from the high-energy density deposited by massive cluster projectiles during the impact.

  17. Photon emission from massive projectile impacts on solids

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Lima, F. A.; Pinnick, V. T.; Della-Negra, S.; Schweikert, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    First evidence of photon emission from individual impacts of massive gold projectiles on solids for a number of projectile-target combinations is reported. Photon emission from individual impacts of massive Aun+q (1 ≤ n ≤ 400; q = 1–4) projectiles with impact energies in the range of 28–136 keV occurs in less than 10 ns after the projectile impact. Experimental observations show an increase in the photon yield from individual impacts with the projectile size and velocity. Concurrently with the photon emission, electron emission from the impact area has been observed below the kinetic emission threshold and under unlikely conditions for potential electron emission. We interpret the puzzling electron emission and correlated luminescence observation as evidence of the electronic excitation resulting from the high-energy density deposited by massive cluster projectiles during the impact. PMID:21603128

  18. Universal odd-even staggering in isotopic fragmentation and spallation cross sections of neutron-rich fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, B.; Tu, X. L.; Wang, M.

    2018-04-01

    An evident odd-even staggering (OES) in fragment cross sections has been experimentally observed in many fragmentation and spallation reactions. However, quantitative comparisons of this OES effect in different reaction systems are still scarce for neutron-rich nuclei near the neutron drip line. By employing a third-order difference formula, the magnitudes of this OES in extensive experimental cross sections are systematically investigated for many neutron-rich nuclei with (N -Z ) from 1 to 23 over a broad range of atomic numbers (Z ≈3 -50 ). A comparison of these magnitude values extracted from fragment cross sections measured in different fragmentation and spallation reactions with a large variety of projectile-target combinations over a wide energy range reveals that the OES magnitude is almost independent of the projectile-target combinations and the projectile energy. The weighted average of these OES magnitudes derived from cross sections accurately measured in different reaction systems is adopted as the evaluation value of the OES magnitude. These evaluated OES magnitudes are recommended to be used in fragmentation and spallation models to improve their predictions for fragment cross sections.

  19. 30MM GAU-8/A Plastic Frangible Projectile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    20. ABSTRACT fContlnuo on rmvert» tld» 11 nacaaaary and Idontlly by block numbmr) ■feA 30mm target practice (TP) projectile, designed to break...contract to solve these problems. As a result, the Air Force has decided to delay further development of this projectile design concept...Section Title I INTRODUCTION II TECHNICAL DISCUSSION Design Parameters Final Projectile Design Design Evolution Acceptance Testing III

  20. Microcraters formed in glass by low density projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandeville, J.-C.; Vedder, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Microcraters were produced in soda-lime glass by the impact of low density projectiles of polystyrene with masses between 0.7 and 62 picograms and velocities between 2 and 14 kilometers per second. The morphology of the craters depends on the velocity and angle of incidence of the projectiles. The transitions in morphology of the craters formed by polystyrene spheres occur at higher velocities than they do for more dense projectiles. For oblique impact, the craters are elongated and shallow with the spallation threshold occuring at higher velocity. For normal incidence, the total displaced mass of the target material per unit of projectile kinetic energy increases slowly with the energy.

  1. Prediction of projectile ricochet behavior after water impact.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Yves; Bergeron, Guy

    2012-11-01

    Although not very common, forensic investigation related to projectile ricochet on water can be required when undesirable collateral damage occurs. Predicting the ricochet behavior of a projectile is challenging owing to numerous parameters involved: impact velocity, incident angle, projectile stability, angular velocity, etc. Ricochet characteristics of different projectiles (K50 BMG, 0.5-cal Ball M2, 0.5-cal AP-T C44, 7.62-mm Ball C21, and 5.56-mm Ball C77) were studied in a pool. The results are presented to assess projectile velocity after ricochet, ricochet angle, and projectile azimuth angle based on impact velocity or incident angle for each projectile type. The azimuth ranges show the highest variability at low postricochet velocity. The critical ricochet angles were ranging from 15 to 30°. The average ricochet angles for all projectiles were pretty close for all projectiles at 2.5 and 10° incident angles for the range of velocities studied. © 2012 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012. Reproduced with the permission of the Minister of the Department of National Defence.

  2. Visualization of Projectile Flying at High Speed in Dusty Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Chihiro; Watanabe, Yasumasa; Suzuki, Kojiro

    2017-10-01

    Considering a spacecraft that encounters particle-laden environment, such as dust particles flying up over the regolith by the jet of the landing thruster, high-speed flight of a projectile in such environment was experimentally simulated by using the ballistic range. At high-speed collision of particles on the projectile surface, they may be reflected with cracking into smaller pieces. On the other hand, the projectile surface will be damaged by the collision. To obtain the fundamental characteristics of such complicated phenomena, a projectile was launched at the velocity up to 400 m/s and the collective behaviour of particles around projectile was observed by the high-speed camera. To eliminate the effect of the gas-particle interaction and to focus on only the effect of the interaction between the particles and the projectile's surface, the test chamber pressure was evacuated down to 30 Pa. The particles about 400μm diameter were scattered and formed a sheet of particles in the test chamber by using two-dimensional funnel with a narrow slit. The projectile was launched into the particle sheet in the tangential direction, and the high-speed camera captured both projectile and particle motions. From the movie, the interaction between the projectile and particle sheet was clarified.

  3. Electric rail gun projectile acceleration to high velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, D. P.; Mccormick, T. J.; Barber, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric rail accelerators are being investigated for application in electric propulsion systems. Several electric propulsion applications require that the rail accelerator be capable of launching projectiles at velocities above 10 km/s. An experimental program was conducted to develop rail accelerator technology for high velocity projectile launch. Several 6 mm bore, 3 m long rail accelerators were fabricated. Projectiles with a mass of 0.2 g were accelerated by plasmas, carrying currents up to 150 kA. Experimental design and results are described. Results indicate that the accelerator performed as predicted for a fraction of the total projectile acceleration. The disparity between predicted and measured results are discussed.

  4. A ballistic performance study on multiphase particulate systems impacted by various projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comtois-Arnaldo, Christian; Petel, Oren

    2017-06-01

    The present study investigates the complex multiscale dynamic response of particulate composites, in an effort to link the bulk material behavior to strain-rate activated microstructures. These investigations involve multiphase systems containing micron-sized ceramic particles integrated into a siloxane elastomer to create flexible nanocomposites with varying inclusion properties. In particular, the effects of varying particle morphology, strength, volume fraction, and density are under investigation. The experimental focus of the study concerns the ballistic penetration of the nanocomposite targets. The targets are impacted by fragment simulating steel projectiles of constant mass and varying nose shapes (i.e., flat, ogive, and chisel-nose) to identify variations in the penetration mechanics. The projectiles are accelerated in a single-stage gas gun to velocities ranging from 200 m/s to 900 m/s prior to impact. The results for each projectile type are compared to analytical penetration models in order to shed light on the dominant penetration mechanisms and their relationship to the microstructure of the nanocomposites.

  5. Fundamental Aerodynamic Investigations for Development of Arrow-Stabilized Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurzweg, Hermann

    1947-01-01

    The numerous patent applications on arrow-stabilized projectiles indicate that the idea of projectiles without spin is not new, but has appeared in various proposals throughout the last decades. As far as projectiles for subsonic speeds are concerned, suitable shapes have been developed for sometime, for example, numerous grenades. Most of the patent applications, though, are not practicable particularly for projectiles with supersonic speed. This is because the inventor usually does not have any knowledge of aerodynamic flow around the projectile nor any particular understanding of the practical solution. The lack of wind tunnels for the development of projectiles made it necessary to use firing tests for development. These are obviously extremely tedious or expensive and lead almost always to failures. The often expressed opinion that arrow-stabilized projectiles cannot fly supersonically can be traced to this condition. That this is not the case has been shown for the first time by Roechling on long projectiles with foldable fins. Since no aerodynamic investigations were made for the development of these projectiles, only tedious series of firing tests with systematic variation of the fins could lead to satisfactory results. These particular projectiles though have a disadvantage which lies in the nature cf foldable fins. They occasionally do not open uniformly in flight, thus causing unsymmetry in flow and greater scatter. The junctions of fins and body are very bad aerodynamically and increase the drag. It must be possible to develop high-performance arrow-stabilized projectiles based on the aerodynamic research conducted during the last few years at Peenemuende and new construction ideas. Thus the final shape, ready for operational use, could be developed in the wind tunnel without loss of expensive time in firing tests. The principle of arrow-stabilized performance has been applied to a large number of caliburs which were stabilized by various means Most

  6. On high explosive launching of projectiles for shock physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Damian C.; Forest, Charles A.; Clark, David A.; Buttler, William T.; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Rightley, Paul

    2007-06-01

    The hydrodynamic operation of the "Forest Flyer" type of explosive launching system for shock physics projectiles was investigated in detail using one and two dimensional continuum dynamics simulations. The simulations were numerically converged and insensitive to uncertainties in the material properties; they reproduced the speed of the projectile and the shape of its rear surface. The most commonly used variant, with an Al alloy case, was predicted to produce a slightly curved projectile, subjected to some shock heating and likely exhibiting some porosity from tensile damage. The curvature is caused by a shock reflected from the case; tensile damage is caused by the interaction of the Taylor wave pressure profile from the detonation wave with the free surface of the projectile. The simulations gave only an indication of tensile damage in the projectile, as damage is not understood well enough for predictions in this loading regime. The flatness can be improved by using a case of lower shock impedance, such as polymethyl methacrylate. High-impedance cases, including Al alloys but with denser materials improving the launching efficiency, can be used if designed according to the physics of oblique shock reflection, which indicates an appropriate case taper for any combination of explosive and case material. The tensile stress induced in the projectile depends on the relative thickness of the explosive, expansion gap, and projectile. The thinner the projectile with respect to the explosive, the smaller the tensile stress. Thus if the explosive is initiated with a plane wave lens, the tensile stress is lower than that for initiation with multiple detonators over a plane. The previous plane wave lens designs did, however, induce a tensile stress close to the spall strength of the projectile. The tensile stress can be reduced by changes in the component thicknesses. Experiments verifying the operation of explosively launched projectiles should attempt to measure

  7. Locating the source of projectile fluid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, Christopher R.; Gittes, Fred

    2011-08-01

    The ill-posed projectile problem of finding the source height from spattered droplets of viscous fluid is a longstanding obstacle to accident reconstruction and crime-scene analysis. It is widely known how to infer the impact angle of droplets on a surface from the elongation of their impact profiles. However, the lack of velocity information makes finding the height of the origin from the impact position and angle of individual drops not possible. From aggregate statistics of the spatter and basic equations of projectile motion, we introduce a reciprocal correlation plot that is effective when the polar launch angle is concentrated in a narrow range. The vertical coordinate depends on the orientation of the spattered surface and equals the tangent of the impact angle for a level surface. When the horizontal plot coordinate is twice the reciprocal of the impact distance, we can infer the source height as the slope of the data points in the reciprocal correlation plot. If the distribution of launch angles is not narrow, failure of the method is evident in the lack of linear correlation. We perform a number of experimental trials, as well as numerical calculations and show that the height estimate is relatively insensitive to aerodynamic drag. Besides its possible relevance for crime investigation, reciprocal-plot analysis of spatter may find application to volcanism and other topics and is most immediately applicable for undergraduate science and engineering students in the context of crime-scene analysis.

  8. Penetration of projectiles into granular targets.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2013-06-01

    Energetic collisions of subatomic particles with fixed or moving targets have been very valuable to penetrate into the mysteries of nature. But the mysteries are quite intriguing when projectiles and targets are macroscopically immense. We know that countless debris wandering in space impacted (and still do) large asteroids, moons and planets; and that millions of craters on their surfaces are traces of such collisions. By classifying and studying the morphology of such craters, geologists and astrophysicists obtain important clues to understand the origin and evolution of the Solar System. This review surveys knowledge about crater phenomena in the planetary science context, avoiding detailed descriptions already found in excellent papers on the subject. Then, it examines the most important results reported in the literature related to impact and penetration phenomena in granular targets obtained by doing simple experiments. The main goal is to discern whether both schools, one that takes into account the right ingredients (planetary bodies and very high energies) but cannot physically reproduce the collisions, and the other that easily carries out the collisions but uses laboratory ingredients (small projectiles and low energies), can arrive at a synergistic intersection point.

  9. Magma Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  10. Shape Effect Analysis of Aluminum Projectile Impact on Whipple Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquilla, Maria J.; Miller, Joshua E.

    2017-01-01

    respect to their mass, size, and material composition needs to be summarized in a form that can be used in MMOD analysis. The mechanism that brings these fragment traits into MMOD analysis is through ballistic limit equations (BLE) that have been developed largely for a few types of materials1. As a BLE provides the failure threshold for a shield or spacecraft component based on parameters such as the projectile impact velocity and size, and the target's materials, thickness, and configuration, it is used to design protective shields for spacecraft such as Whipple shields (WS) to an acceptable risk level. The majority of experiments and simulations to test shields and validate BLEs have, heretofore, largely used spheres as the impactor, not properly reflecting the irregular shapes of MMOD. This shortfall has motivated a numerical impact analysis study of HVI involving non-spherical geometries to identify key parameters that environment models should provide.

  11. Chameleon fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Upadhye, Amol, E-mail: philippe.brax@cea.fr, E-mail: aupadhye@anl.gov

    2014-02-01

    A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an ''afterglow'' experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signaturemore » which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for φ{sup 4} and 1/φ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments.« less

  12. Corrected Launch Speed for a Projectile Motion Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Justin M.; Boleman, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    At our university, students in introductory physics classes perform a laboratory exercise to measure the range of a projectile fired at an assigned angle. A set of photogates is used to determine the initial velocity of the projectile (the launch velocity). We noticed a systematic deviation between the experimentally measured range and the range…

  13. Microcraters formed in glass by projectiles of various densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedder, J. F.; Mandeville, J.-C.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment was conducted investigating the effect of projectile density on the structure and size of craters in soda lime glass and fused quartz. The projectiles were spheres of polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB), aluminum, and iron with velocities between 0.5 and 15 km/sec and diameters between 0.4 and 5 microns. The projectile densities spanned the range expected for primary and secondary particles of micrometer size at the lunar surface, and the velocities spanned the lower range of micrometeoroid velocities and the upper range of secondary projectile velocities. There are changes in crater morphology as the impact velocity increases, and the transitions occur at lower velocities for the projectiles of higher density. The sequence of morphological features of the craters found for PS-DVB impacting soda lime glass for increasing impact velocity, described in a previous work (Mandeville and Vedder, 1971), also occurs in fused quartz and in both targets with the more dense aluminum and iron projectiles. Each transition in morphology occurs at impact velocities generating a certain pressure in the target. High density projectiles require a lower velocity than low-density projectiles to generate a given shock pressure.

  14. Cantilever Beam Design for Projectile Internal Moving Mass Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    instabilities. Soper (1) considered the stability of a projectile with a cylindrical mass fitted loosely within a cavity. Using a similar...oscillating beam configuration shows promise as a viable, cost-effective, reliable projectile control mechanism. 25 5. References 1. Soper , W

  15. Operation of polycarbonate projectiles in the ram accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Timothy

    The ram accelerator is a hypervelocity launcher with direct space launch applications in which a sub-caliber projectile, analogous to the center-body of a ramjet engine, flies through fuel and oxidizer that have been premixed in a tube. Shock interactions in the tube ignite the propellant upon entrance of the projectile and the combustion travels with it, creating thrust on the projectile by stabilizing a high pressure region of gas behind it. Conventional ram accelerator projectiles consist of aluminum, magnesium, or titanium nosecones and bodies. An experimental program has been undertaken to determine the performance of polycarbonate projectiles in ram accelerator operation. Experimentation using polycarbonate projectiles has been divided into two series: determining the lower limit for starting velocity (i.e., less than 1100 m/s) and investigating the upper velocity limit. To investigate the influence of body length and starting velocity, a newly developed "combustion gun" was used to launch projectiles to their initial velocities. The combustion gun uses 3-6 m of ram accelerator test section as a breech and 4-6 m of the ram accelerator test section as a launch tube. A fuel-oxidizer mix is combusted in the breech using a spark plug or electric match and bursts a diaphragm, accelerating the ram projectile to its entrance velocity. The combustion gun can be operated at modest fill pressures (20 bar) but can only launch to relatively low velocities (approximately 1000 m/s) without destroying the projectile and obturator upon launch. Projectiles were successfully started at entrance velocities as low as 810 m/s and projectile body lengths as long as 91 mm were used. The tests investigating the upper Mach number limits of polycarbonate projectiles used the conventional single-stage light-gas gun because of its ability to reach higher velocities with a lower acceleration launch. It was determined that polycarbonate projectiles have an upper velocity limit in the

  16. Direct detection of projectile relics from the end of the lunar basin-forming epoch.

    PubMed

    Joy, Katherine H; Zolensky, Michael E; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Huss, Gary R; Ross, D Kent; McKay, David S; Kring, David A

    2012-06-15

    The lunar surface, a key proxy for the early Earth, contains relics of asteroids and comets that have pummeled terrestrial planetary surfaces. Surviving fragments of projectiles in the lunar regolith provide a direct measure of the types and thus the sources of exogenous material delivered to the Earth-Moon system. In ancient [>3.4 billion years ago (Ga)] regolith breccias from the Apollo 16 landing site, we located mineral and lithologic relics of magnesian chondrules from chondritic impactors. These ancient impactor fragments are not nearly as diverse as those found in younger (3.4 Ga to today) regolith breccias and soils from the Moon or that presently fall as meteorites to Earth. This suggests that primitive chondritic asteroids, originating from a similar source region, were common Earth-Moon-crossing impactors during the latter stages of the basin-forming epoch.

  17. Interactions in hydrogen of relativistic neon to nickel projectiles: Total charge-changing cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-X.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H. J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Ferrando, P.; Fonte, R.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T. G.; Insolia, A.; Jones, F. C.; Knott, C. N.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Mitchell, J. W.; Potenza, R.; Romanski, J.; Russo, G. V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C. E.; Tuvé, C.; Waddington, C. J.; Webber, W. R.; Wefel, J. P.; Zhang, X.

    1994-06-01

    A liquid hydrogen target was used to study the nuclear fragmentation of beams of relativistic heavy ions, 22Ne to 58Ni, over an energy range 400 to 900 MeV/nucleon. The experiments were carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac HISS facility, using the charge-velocity-rigidity method to identify the charged fragments. Here we describe the general concept of the experiment and present total charge-changing cross sections obtained from 17 separate runs. These new measured cross sections display an energy dependence which follows semiempirical model predictions. The mass dependence of the cross sections behaves as predicted by optical models, but within the experimental energy range, the optical model parameters display a clear energy dependence. The isospin of the projectile nuclei also appears to be an important factor in the interaction process.

  18. Heavy ion fragmentation experiments at the bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Collaborative research efforts to study the fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using heavy ion beams of the Bevatron/Bevalac are described. The goal of the program is to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Effects were also made to: (a) study processes of heavy nuclei in matter, (b) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (c) test the applicability of high energy multiparticle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (d) apply the cross section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (e) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross-sections.

  19. [Traumatology due to ancient lead missile projectiles].

    PubMed

    Moog, Ferdinand Peter

    2002-01-01

    The lead missiles of slingers in antiquity, known as glans or molybdis, are widely considered to have been very dangerous projectiles of the ancient armies. Ballistic investigations and results of experimental archaeology seem to confirm this. However, the findings of medical history concerning these missiles disagree with this view. In ancient medical texts these missiles are only mentioned sporadically, as in Celsus or Paul of Aigina, and wounds caused by them are merely discussed incidentally. There is so far no evidence at all on them in palaeopathology. It is undisputed however that in individual cases these missiles were able to cause serious injuries, especially when they hit unprotected parts of the body. Accordingly, their main effect seems to have consisted in the intimidation of the enemy.

  20. Trajectory Control of Small Rotating Projectiles by Laser Sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Limbach, Christopher; Miles, Richard

    2015-09-01

    The possibility of controlling the trajectory of the supersonic motion of a rotating axisymmetric projectile using a remotely generated laser spark was investigated. The dynamic images of the interaction of thermal inhomogeneity created by the laser spark with the bow shock in front of the projectile were obtained. The criterion for a strong shock wave interaction with the thermal inhomogeneity at different angles of a shock wave was derived. Significant changes in the configuration of the bow shock wave and changes in the pressure distribution over the surface of the rotating projectile can appear for laser spark temperature of T' = 2500-3000 K. The experiment showed that strong interaction takes place for both plane and oblique shock waves. The measurement of the velocity of the precession of the rotating projectile axis from the initial position in time showed that the angle of attack of the projectile deviates with a typical time of perturbation propagation along the projectile's surface. Thus the laser spark can change the trajectory of the rotating projectile, moving at supersonic speed, through the creation of thermal heterogeneity in front of it.

  1. Veterinary Forensics: Firearms and Investigation of Projectile Injury.

    PubMed

    Bradley-Siemens, N; Brower, A I

    2016-09-01

    Projectile injury represents an estimated 14% of reported animal cruelty cases in the United States. Cases involving projectiles are complicated by gross similarities to other common types of injury, including bite wounds and motor vehicle injuries, by weapons and ammunition not commonly recognized or understood by veterinary medical professionals, and by required expertise beyond that employed in routine postmortem examination. This review describes the common types of projectile injuries encountered within the United States, as well as firearms and ammunition associated with this form of injury. The 3 stages of ballistics-internal, external, and terminal-and wounding capacity are discussed. A general understanding of firearms, ammunition, and ballistics is necessary before pursuing forensic projectile cases. The forensic necropsy is described, including gunshot wound examination, projectile trajectories, different imaging procedures, collection and storage of projectile evidence, and potential advanced techniques for gunpowder analysis. This review presents aspects of projectile injury investigation that must be considered in tandem with standard postmortem practices and procedures to ensure reliable conclusions are reached for medicolegal as well as diagnostic purposes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Femoral vessel injury by a nonlethal weapon projectile.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Rodrigo Bruno; Miranda, Gustavo Cunha; Mota de Moraes, Leonardo; Nasser, Felipe; Burihan, Marcelo Calil; Ingrund, José Carlos

    2018-06-01

    Rubber projectiles are used as an alternative to metal bullets owing to their lower morbidity and mortality rate. There are few reports of vascular lesions of extremities caused by rubber projectiles in the literature. The authors report the case of a 37-year-old man who was the victim of a penetrating injury to the left thigh with a rubber projectile. He reported only pain at the site of the injury; pulses were decreased in the affected limb. After arteriography confirmed an injury to the superficial femoral artery, he underwent an arterial and venous femorofemoral bypass using a reversed contralateral saphenous vein.

  3. Microcraters formed in glass by low density projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandeville, J.-C.; Vedder, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    Microcraters were produced in soda-lime glass by the impact of low density projectiles of polystyrene (p = 1.06 g/cu cm) with masses between 0.7 and 62 picograms and velocities between 2 and 14 km/s. The morphology of the craters depended on the velocity and the angle of incidence of the projectiles and these are discussed in detail. It was found that the transitions in morphology of the craters formed by polystyrene spheres occurred at higher velocities than they did for more dense projectiles.

  4. Modified Point Mass Trajectory Simulation for Base-Burn Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    Konrad Adenauer Ufer 2-6 1 DGAM 54 Koblenz ATTN: Mr. J.L. Perez Minguez GERMANY Poligono de Experiencias Paseo de Extremedura WTD 91 D. BW-031 28024...directly related to the average projectile base pressure, Pb, as follows: 1 Pb Cob YM2_ (1) 2 db2 where: db = base diameter of projectile in calibers M...and p v Ab is the free-stream mass flow through an area equal to the base of the projectile, Ab. Danberg (1990) has shown that ABP is linearly related

  5. Mercury as the Unaccreted Projectile: Thermal Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, Erik; Gabriel, Travis; Jackson, Alan; Perera, Viranga

    2017-10-01

    Mercury retained substantial volatiles during its formation, in far greater proportion than the Moon, despite losing ~2/3 of its rocky mantle. Its volatile-rich geochemistry would contraindicate a giant impact because it would drive away the volatiles, as in the hypothesis for the Moon. However, the thermal consequences of Mercury formation vary considerably between the two giant impact scenarios, ‘direct hit’ (DH; Benz et al. 1989) and ‘hit and run’ (HR; Asphaug and Reufer 2014). Each begins with a differentiated chondritic proto-Mercury (PM) a bit larger than Mars. In DH, PM gets eroded by a very energetic impactor half its mass, at ~6-7 times the escape velocity. To remove half of PM’s mantle, the post-impact target gets completely shock-vaporized and is sheared apart into space. The bound remnant in DH would experience a comparable deposition of shock enthalpy, as in Moon formation, and would expand into a much larger volume of heliocentric space, leading to a dry planet. The bound remnant will go on to re-accrete much of the silicate mantle that it just lost, another challenge for DH. In HR, PM is the projectile that slams into a terrestrial planet twice its size (proto-Venus or proto-Earth). For typical impact angle and speed, a typical outcome is to ‘bounce”. But for HR to explain Mercury, PM must avoid accretion every time it encounters the target, until it is scattered or migrates away (or is accreted, in which case there is no Mercury), leading to multi-HR scenarios. Tides are intense in HR because the projectile grazes the target core; gravity does most of the work of mantle stripping. Shocks play a secondary role. Whereas in DH the impactor blasts the target inside-out, in HR the runner emerges relatively unshocked, and undispersed except for losing the gravitationally-unbound material. HR is a mechanism for collecting low-shocked remnants, because the intensely shocked material ends up bound to the target or escaping to heliocentric space

  6. Neutron-rich rare-isotope production from projectile fission of heavy nuclei near 20 MeV/nucleon beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonta, N.; Souliotis, G. A.; Loveland, W.; Kwon, Y. K.; Tshoo, K.; Jeong, S. C.; Veselsky, M.; Bonasera, A.; Botvina, A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the possibilities of producing neutron-rich nuclides in projectile fission of heavy beams in the energy range of 20 MeV/nucleon expected from low-energy facilities. We report our efforts to theoretically describe the reaction mechanism of projectile fission following a multinucleon transfer collision at this energy range. Our calculations are mainly based on a two-step approach: The dynamical stage of the collision is described with either the phenomenological deep-inelastic transfer model (DIT) or with the microscopic constrained molecular dynamics model (CoMD). The de-excitation or fission of the hot heavy projectile fragments is performed with the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We compared our model calculations with our previous experimental projectile-fission data of 238U (20 MeV/nucleon) + 208Pb and 197Au (20 MeV/nucleon) + 197Au and found an overall reasonable agreement. Our study suggests that projectile fission following peripheral heavy-ion collisions at this energy range offers an effective route to access very neutron-rich rare isotopes toward and beyond the astrophysical r-process path.

  7. Measurement of sound emitted by flying projectiles with aeroacoustic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Shakkottai, P.; Harstad, K. G.; Back, L. H.

    1988-01-01

    Training projectiles with axisymmetric ring cavities that produce intense tones in an airstream were shot in a straight-line trajectory. A ground-based microphone was used to obtain the angular distribution of sound intensity produced from the flying projectile. Data reduction required calculation of Doppler and attenuation factors. Also, the directional sensitivity of the ground-mounted microphone was measured and used in the data reduction. A rapid angular variation of sound intensity produced from the projectile was found that can be used to plot an intensity contour map on the ground. A full-scale field test confirmed the validity of the aeroacoustic concept of producing a relatively intense whistle from the projectile, and the usefulness of short-range flight tests that yield acoustic data free of uncertainties associated with diffraction, reflection, and refraction at jet boundaries in free-jet tests.

  8. Oblique impact: Projectile richochet, concomitant ejecta and momentum transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gault, Donald E.; Schultz, Peter H.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of oblique impact indicate that projectile richochet occurs for trajectory angles less than 30 deg and that the richocheted projectile, accompanied by some target material, are ejected at velocities that are a large fraction of the impact velocity. Because the probability of occurrence of oblique impact less than 30 deg on a planetary body is about one out of every four impact events, oblique impacts would seem to be a potential mechanism to provide a source of meteorites from even the largest atmosphere-free planetary bodies. Because the amount of richocheted target material cannot be determined from previous results, additional experiments in the Ames Vertical Gun laboratory were undertaken toward that purpose using pendulums; one to measure momentum of the richocheted projectile and concomitant target ejecta, and a second to measure the momentum transferred from projectile to target. These experiments are briefly discussed.

  9. Guiding supersonic projectiles using optically generated air density channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Luke A.; Sprangle, Phillip

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using optically generated channels of reduced air density to provide trajectory correction (guiding) for a supersonic projectile. It is shown that the projectile experiences a force perpendicular to its direction of motion as one side of the projectile passes through a channel of reduced air density. A single channel of reduced air density can be generated by the energy deposited from filamentation of an intense laser pulse. We propose changing the laser pulse energy from shot-to-shot to build longer effective channels. Current femtosecond laser systems with multi-millijoule pulses could provide trajectory correction of several meters on 5 km trajectories for sub-kilogram projectiles traveling at Mach 3.

  10. 32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER SLAB AND UNDERSIDE OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Penetration analysis of projectile with inclined concrete target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. W.; Yoo, Y. H.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents numerical analysis result of projectile penetration with concrete target. We applied dynamic material properties of 4340 steels, aluminium and explosive for projectile body. Dynamic material properties were measured with static tensile testing machine and Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Moreover, we used three concrete damage models included in LS-DYNA 3D, such as SOIL_CONCRETE, CSCM (cap model with smooth interaction) and CONCRETE_DAMAGE (K&C concrete) models. Strain rate effect for concrete material is important to predict the fracture deformation and shape of concrete, and penetration depth for projectiles. CONCRETE_DAMAGE model with strain rate effect also applied to penetration analysis. Analysis result with CSCM model shows good agreement with penetration experimental data. The projectile trace and fracture shapes of concrete target were compared with experimental data.

  12. Aerodynamic Validation of Emerging Projectile and Missile Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Inflation Layers at the Surface of the M549 Projectile....................................39 Figure 33. Probe Profile from Nose to Shock Front...behavior is critical for the design of new projectile shapes. The conventional approach to predict this aerodynamic behavior is through wind tunnel ...tool to study fluid flows and complements empirical methods and wind tunnel testing. In this study, the computer program ANSYS CFX was used to

  13. Determination of extra trajectory parameters of projectile layout motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishchenko, A.; Burkin, V.; Faraponov, V.; Korolkov, L.; Maslov, E.; Diachkovskiy, A.; Chupashev, A.; Zykova, A.

    2017-11-01

    The paper presents a brief description of the experimental track developed and implemented on the base of the RIAMM TSU for external trajectory investigations on determining the main aeroballistic parameters of various shapes projectiles, in the wide velocity range. There is comparison between the experimentally obtained dependence of the fin-stabilized projectile mock-up aerodynamic drag coefficient on the Mach number with the 1958 aerodynamic drag law and aerodynamic tests of the same mock-up

  14. Multiplicative Quaternion Extended Kalman Filtering for Nonspinning Guided Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    tactical applications are inertial. The advantages of using quaternions rather than Euler angles to represent projectile attitude are discussed, and...projectiles generally don’t experience a wide range of heading angles , this has not a primary concern. The other major advantage of quaternions (or...DCMs) over Euler angles is their propagation equations are linear with respect to the quaternion and only depend on the IMU’s angular velocity. This

  15. Impact Behaviour of Soft Body Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalam, Sayyad Abdul; Rayavarapu, Vijaya Kumar; Ginka, Ranga Janardhana

    2018-02-01

    Bird strike analysis is a common type of analysis done during the design and analysis of primary structures such as engine cowlings or fuselage panels. These simulations are done in order to predict whether various designs will pass the necessary certification tests. Composite materials are increasingly being used in aerospace industry and bird strike is a major threat which may lead to serious structural damage of those materials. Such phenomenon may arise from numerous impact scenarios. The focus of current study is on the finite element modeling for composite structures and simulation of high velocity impact loads from soft body projectiles with an explicit dynamics code AUTODYN. This paper investigates the methodology which can be utilized to certify an aircraft for bird strike resistance using computational technique by first demonstrating the accuracy of the method for bird impact on rigid target modeling and then applies the developed model to a more complex problem. The model developed for bird strike threat assessment incorporates parameters of bird number (bird density), bird body mass, equation of state (EOS) and bird path during impact.

  16. Orientation estimation algorithm applied to high-spin projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, D. F.; Lin, J.; Zhang, X. M.; Li, J.

    2014-06-01

    High-spin projectiles are low cost military weapons. Accurate orientation information is critical to the performance of the high-spin projectiles control system. However, orientation estimators have not been well translated from flight vehicles since they are too expensive, lack launch robustness, do not fit within the allotted space, or are too application specific. This paper presents an orientation estimation algorithm specific for these projectiles. The orientation estimator uses an integrated filter to combine feedback from a three-axis magnetometer, two single-axis gyros and a GPS receiver. As a new feature of this algorithm, the magnetometer feedback estimates roll angular rate of projectile. The algorithm also incorporates online sensor error parameter estimation performed simultaneously with the projectile attitude estimation. The second part of the paper deals with the verification of the proposed orientation algorithm through numerical simulation and experimental tests. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that the orientation estimator can effectively estimate the attitude of high-spin projectiles. Moreover, online sensor calibration significantly enhances the estimation performance of the algorithm.

  17. Limiting fragmentation from scale-invariant merging of fast partons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, A.; Bzdak, A.; Peschanski, R.

    2008-07-01

    Exploiting the idea that the fast partons of an energetic projectile can be treated as sources of colour radiation interpreted as wee partons, it is shown that the recently observed property of extended limiting fragmentation implies a scaling law for the rapidity distribution of fast partons. This leads to a picture of a self-similar process where, for fixed total rapidity Y, the sources merge with probability varying as 1 / y.

  18. Characteristic fragment size distributions in dynamic fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fenghua; Molinari, Jean-François; Ramesh, K. T.

    2006-06-01

    The one-dimensional fragmentation of a dynamically expanding ring (Mott's problem) is studied numerically to obtain the fragment signatures under different strain rates. An empirical formula is proposed to calculate an average fragment size. Rayleigh distribution is found to describe the statistical properties of the fragment populations.

  19. Impact fragmentation of a brittle metal compact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Megan; Hooper, Joseph P.

    2018-05-01

    The fragmentation behavior of a metal powder compact which is ductile in compression but brittle in tension is studied via impact experiments and analytical models. Consolidated metal compacts were prepared via cold-isostatic pressing of <10 μm zinc powder at 380 MPa followed by moderate annealing at 365 °C. The resulting zinc material is ductile and strain-hardening in high-rate uniaxial compression like a traditional metal, but is elastic-brittle in tension with a fracture toughness comparable to a ceramic. Cylindrical samples were launched up to 800 m/s in a gas gun into thin aluminum perforation targets, subjecting the projectile to a complex multiaxial and time-dependent stress state that leads to catastrophic fracture. A soft-catch mechanism using low-density artificial snow was developed to recover the impact debris, and collected fragments were analyzed to determine their size distribution down to 30 μm. Though brittle fracture occurs along original particle boundaries, no power-law fragmentation behavior was observed as is seen in other low-toughness materials. An analytical theory is developed to predict the characteristic fragment size accounting for both the sharp onset of fragmentation and the effect of increasing impact velocity.

  20. Decay analysis of compound nuclei with masses A ≈30 - 200 formed in reactions involving loosely bound projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Singh, BirBikram; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamics of compound nuclei formed in the reactions using loosely bound projectiles are analyzed within the framework of the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) of Gupta and Collaborators. We have considered the reactions with neutron-rich and neutron-deficient projectiles, respectively, as 7Li , 9Be , and 7Be , on various targets at three different Elab energies, forming compound nuclei in the mass region A ˜30 - 200. For these reactions, the contributions of light-particle (LP, A ≤4 ) cross sections σLP, energetically favored intermediate-mass-fragment (IMF, 5 ≤A2≤20 ) cross sections σIMF, as well as the fusion-fission ff cross sections σff constitute the σfus(=σLP+σIMF+σff ), i.e., the contributions of the emitted LPs, IMFs, and ff fragments are added for all the angular momenta up to the ℓmax value for the respective reactions. Interestingly, we find that the empirically fitted neck-length parameter Δ Remp , the only parameter of the DCM, is uniquely fixed to address σfus for all the reactions having the same loosely bound projectile at a chosen incident laboratory energy. It may be noted that, in DCM, the dynamical collective mass motion of preformed LPs, IMFs, and ff fragments or clusters, through the modified interaction potential barrier, are treated on parallel footing. The modification of the barrier is due to nonzero Δ Remp , and the values of corresponding modified interaction-barrier heights Δ VBemp for such reactions are almost of the same order, specifically at the respective ℓmax value.

  1. Multivariate-data-visualization-based investigation of projectiles in sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Agam; Chauhan, Yagnesh; Patel, Prithvi; Chaudhury, Bhaskar

    2018-07-01

    The kinematics and dynamics of projectiles in sports is a complex topic involving several physical quantities and variables such as time, distance, velocity, acceleration, momentum, force, energy, viscosity, pressure, torque, bounce, sliding, rolling, etc. The analysis of these complex sets of multidimensional information, including the correlation between different variables, is an important requirement for the clear understanding of projectile trajectories in sports. However, those who do not have a strong mechanics or physics background find it difficult to interpret the data and comprehend the results in terms of the interacting forces and mutual interaction, which perpetuate the motion of the ball (or projectile). To address this issue, we propose a novel multivariate-data-visualization-based understanding of projectiles in sports inspired by the basic Gestalt principle that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. The data representation approach involves the use of a single two-dimensional plane for the representation of multidimensional dynamic variables, and thereby completely removes the requirement of using several 2D plots for analysing and comprehending the meaning behind all of the data and how it correlates. For this study, we have considered the dynamics of two ball sports, namely volleyball and table tennis, as well as the sport of badminton, which involves high-drag projectile motion. We have presented a basic computational model incorporating the important forces to study projectile motion in sports. The data generated by the simulation is investigated using the proposed visualization methodology, and we show how this helps it to be interpreted easily, improving the clarity of our understanding of projectile trajectories in sports using both force and energy language.

  2. Comparisons of cross-section predictions for relativistic iron and argon beams with semiempirical fragmentation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Khan, Ferdous

    1993-01-01

    Cross-section predictions with semi-empirical nuclear fragmentation models from the Langley Research Center and the Naval Research Laboratory are compared with experimental data for the breakup of relativistic iron and argon projectile nuclei in various targets. Both these models are commonly used to provide fragmentation cross-section inputs into galactic cosmic ray transport codes for shielding and exposure analyses. Overall, the Langley model appears to yield better agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Injury Risk Assessment of Non-Lethal Projectile Head Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Oukara, Amar; Nsiampa, Nestor; Robbe, Cyril; Papy, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic energy non-lethal projectiles are used to impart sufficient effect onto a person in order to deter uncivil or hazardous behavior with a low probability of permanent injury. Since their first use, real cases indicate that the injuries inflicted by such projectiles may be irreversible and sometimes lead to death, especially for the head impacts. Given the high velocities and the low masses involved in such impacts, the assessment approaches proposed in automotive crash tests and sports may not be appropriate. Therefore, there is a need of a specific approach to assess the lethality of these projectiles. In this framework, some recent research data referred in this article as “force wall approach” suggest the use of three lesional thresholds (unconsciousness, meningeal damages and bone damages) that depend on the intracranial pressure. Three corresponding critical impact forces are determined for a reference projectile. Based on the principle that equal rigid wall maximal impact forces will produce equal damage on the head, these limits can be determined for any other projectile. In order to validate the consistence of this innovative method, it is necessary to compare the results with other existing assessment methods. This paper proposes a comparison between the “force wall approach” and two different head models. The first one is a numerical model (Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model-SUFEHM) from Strasbourg University; the second one is a mechanical surrogate (Ballistics Load Sensing Headform-BLSH) from Biokinetics. PMID:25400712

  4. Charge radii of neutron deficient Fe 52 , 53 produced by projectile fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Minamisono, K.; Rossi, D. M.; Beerwerth, R.

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient 52,53Fe prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δmore » $$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$ of 52,53Fe are determined relative to stable 56Fe as δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$ 56,52=$-$0.034(13) fm 2 and δ$$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$56,53=$-$0.218(13) fm 2, respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ$$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$. The values of δ$$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$ exhibit a minimum at the N=28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. As a result, the trend of δ$$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ$$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$ of closed-shell Ca isotopes« less

  5. Charge Radii of Neutron Deficient Fe,5352 Produced by Projectile Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisono, K.; Rossi, D. M.; Beerwerth, R.; Fritzsche, S.; Garand, D.; Klose, A.; Liu, Y.; Maaß, B.; Mantica, P. F.; Miller, A. J.; Müller, P.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Olsen, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Saperstein, E. E.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient Fe,5352 prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δ ⟨r2⟩ of Fe,5352 are determined relative to stable 56Fe as δ ⟨r2⟩56 ,52=-0.034 (13 ) fm2 and δ ⟨r2⟩56 ,53=-0.218 (13 ) fm2 , respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ ⟨r2⟩. The values of δ ⟨r2⟩ exhibit a minimum at the N =28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. The trend of δ ⟨r2⟩ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ ⟨r2⟩ of closed-shell Ca isotopes.

  6. Charge radii of neutron deficient Fe 52 , 53 produced by projectile fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Minamisono, K.; Rossi, D. M.; Beerwerth, R.; ...

    2016-12-15

    Bunched-beam collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on neutron deficient 52,53Fe prepared through in-flight separation followed by a gas stopping. This novel scheme is a major step to reach nuclides far from the stability line in laser spectroscopy. Differential mean-square charge radii δmore » $$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$ of 52,53Fe are determined relative to stable 56Fe as δ$$\\langle$$r2$$\\rangle$$ 56,52=$-$0.034(13) fm 2 and δ$$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$56,53=$-$0.218(13) fm 2, respectively, from the isotope shift of atomic hyperfine structures. The multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method is used to calculate atomic factors to deduce δ$$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$. The values of δ$$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$ exhibit a minimum at the N=28 neutron shell closure. The nuclear density functional theory with Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals is used to interpret the data. As a result, the trend of δ$$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$ along the Fe isotopic chain results from an interplay between single-particle shell structure, pairing, and polarization effects and provides important data for understanding the intricate trend in the δ$$\\langle$$r 2$$\\rangle$$ of closed-shell Ca isotopes« less

  7. Locus of the apices of projectile trajectories under constant drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Saldaña, H.

    2017-11-01

    Using the hodograph method, we present an analytical solution for projectile coplanar motion under constant drag, parametrised by the velocity angle. We find the locus formed by the apices of the projectile trajectories, and discuss its implementation for the motion of a particle on an inclined plane in presence of Coulomb friction. The range and time of flight are obtained numerically, and we find that the optimal launching angle is smaller than in the drag-free case. This is a good example of a problem with constant dissipation of energy that includes curvature; it is appropriate for intermediate courses of mechanics.

  8. Projectile general motion in a vacuum and a spreadsheet simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benacka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives the solution and analysis of projectile motion in a vacuum if the launch and impact heights are not equal. Formulas for the maximum horizontal range and the corresponding angle are derived. An Excel application that simulates the motion is also presented, and the result of an experiment in which 38 secondary school students developed the application and investigated the system is given. A questionnaire survey was carried out to find out whether the students found the lessons interesting, learned new skills and wanted to model projectile motion in the air as an example of more realistic motion. The results are discussed.

  9. Numerical simulation of fluid flow around a scramaccelerator projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.; Sobota, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the fluid motion and temperature distribution around a 'scramaccelerator' projectile are obtained for Mach numbers in the 5-10 range. A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for inviscid and viscous two-dimensional or axisymmetric compressible flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly, using bilinear isoparametric quadrilateral elements, mass lumping, and a shock-capturing Petrov-Galerkin formulation. Computed results indicate that maintaining on-design performance for controlling and stabilizing oblique detonation waves is critically dependent on projectile shape and Mach number.

  10. When Does Air Resistance Become Significant in Projectile Motion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2018-03-01

    In an article in this journal, it was shown that air resistance could never be a significant source of error in typical free-fall experiments in introductory physics laboratories. Since projectile motion is the two-dimensional version of the free-fall experiment and usually follows the former experiment in such laboratories, it seemed natural to extend the same analysis to this type of motion. We shall find that again air resistance does not play a significant role in the parameters of interest in a traditional projectile motion experiment.

  11. HZEFRG1 - SEMIEMPIRICAL NUCLEAR FRAGMENTATION MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    The high charge and energy (HZE), Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model, HZEFRG1, was developed to provide a computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program package for generating nuclear fragmentation databases. These databases can then be used in radiation transport applications such as space radiation shielding and dosimetry, cancer therapy with laboratory heavy ion beams, and simulation studies of detector design in nuclear physics experiments. The program provides individual element and isotope production cross sections for the breakup of high energy heavy ions by the combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of the interacting nuclei. The nuclear breakup contributions are estimated using an energy-dependent abrasion-ablation model of heavy ion fragmentation. The abrasion step involves removal of nucleons by direct knockout in the overlap region of the colliding nuclei. The abrasions are treated on a geometric basis and uniform spherical nuclear density distributions are assumed. Actual experimental nuclear radii obtained from tabulations of electron scattering data are incorporated. Nuclear transparency effects are included by using an energy-dependent, impact-parameter-dependent average transmission factor for the projectile and target nuclei, which accounts for the finite mean free path of nucleons in nuclear matter. The ablation step, as implemented by Bowman, Swiatecki, and Tsang (LBL report no. LBL-2908, July 1973), was treated as a single-nucleon emission for every 10 MeV of excitation energy. Fragmentation contributions from electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) processes, arising from the interacting Coulomb fields, are estimated by using the Weiszacker-Williams theory, extended to include electric dipole and electric quadrupole contributions to one-nucleon removal cross sections. HZEFRG1 consists of a main program, seven function subprograms, and thirteen subroutines. Each is fully commented and begins with a brief description of its

  12. Tethers as Debris: Simulating Impacts of Tether Fragments on Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    The SPHC hydrodynamic code was used to simulate impacts of Kevlar and aluminum projectiles on a model of the LI-900 type insulating tiles used on Space Shuffle Orbiters The intent was to examine likely damage that such tiles might experience if impacted by orbital debris consisting of tether fragments. Projectile speeds ranged from 300 meters per second to 10 kilometers per second. Damage is characterized by penetration depth, tile surface-hole diameter, tile body-cavity diameter, coating fracture diameter, tether and cavity wall material phases, and deformation of the aluminum backwall.

  13. 22. VAL, VIEW OF PROJECTILE LOADING DECK LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VAL, VIEW OF PROJECTILE LOADING DECK LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD TOP OF CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING DRIVE CABLES, DRIVE GEAR, BOTTOM OF CAMERA TOWER AND 'CROWS NEST' CONTROL ROOM. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. When Does Air Resistance Become Significant in Projectile Motion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2018-01-01

    In an article in this journal, it was shown that air resistance could never be a significant source of error in typical free-fall experiments in introductory physics laboratories. Since projectile motion is the two-dimensional version of the free-fall experiment and usually follows the former experiment in such laboratories, it seemed natural to…

  15. On the Trajectories of Projectiles Depicted in Early Ballistic Woodcuts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by quaint woodcut depictions often found in many late 16th and 17th century ballistic manuals of cannonballs fired in air, a comparison of their shapes with those calculated for the classic case of a projectile moving in a linear resisting medium is made. In considering the asymmetrical nature of such trajectories, the initial launch…

  16. The Long Decay Model of One-Dimensional Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattery, Mark Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces a research study on student model formation and development in introductory mechanics. As a point of entry, I present a detailed analysis of the Long Decay Model of one-dimensional projectile motion. This model has been articulated by Galileo ("in De Motu") and by contemporary students. Implications for instruction are…

  17. Using Statcast to lift the discussion of projectile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, P. B.

    2017-04-01

    Home run data from Major League Baseball's Statcast can be described by adding a lift force to the equations of projectile motion commonly used in undergraduate computational physics courses. We discuss how the Statcast data can be implemented in the classroom.

  18. Apparatus for Teaching Physics: A Versatile Projectile Motion Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigo, Robert B.; Korda, Anthony

    1984-01-01

    Describes the design and use of a projectile motion apparatus to illustrate a variety of projective motion results typically discussed in an introductory course. They include independence of horizontal (constant speed) and vertical (constant acceleration) motions, parabolic path shape, and other types of motion. (JN)

  19. Using Tracker as a Pedagogical Tool for Understanding Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Loo Kang; Chew, Charles; Goh, Giam Hwee; Tan, Samuel; Lee, Tat Leong

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the use of Tracker as a pedagogical tool in the effective learning and teaching of projectile motion in physics. When a computer model building learning process is supported and driven by video analysis data, this free Open Source Physics tool can provide opportunities for students to engage in active enquiry-based…

  20. Projectile General Motion in a Vacuum and a Spreadsheet Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benacka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives the solution and analysis of projectile motion in a vacuum if the launch and impact heights are not equal. Formulas for the maximum horizontal range and the corresponding angle are derived. An Excel application that simulates the motion is also presented, and the result of an experiment in which 38 secondary school students…

  1. Flight Performance of a Man Portable Guided Projectile Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    include precision guided technologies. The focus of this study is maneuvering projectiles launched from man portable weapon systems . A novel guided...5 Figure 5. Body-fixed coordinate system and aerodynamic angles...20 Figure 20. Earth and body-fixed coordinate systems and Euler angles. ........................................24

  2. Projectile Motion in the "Language" of Orbital Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We consider the orbit of projectiles launched with arbitrary speeds from the Earth's surface. This is a generalization of Newton's discussion about the transition from parabolic to circular orbits, when the launch speed approaches the value [image omitted]. We find the range for arbitrary launch speeds and angles, and calculate the eccentricity of…

  3. 78. PHOTO OF A PROJECTILE FIRING USING A SABOT TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PHOTO OF A PROJECTILE FIRING USING A SABOT TAKEN WITH A 70 MM MITCHEL MOTION PICTURE CAMERA, Date unknown, circa 1950. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) Photograph represents central frame of negative. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Small-angle fragmentation of carbon ions at 0.6 GeV/n: A comparison with models of ion-ion interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Krutenkova, A. P.; Abramov, B. M.; Alekseev, P. N.; ...

    2015-05-29

    Momentum distributions of hydrogen and helium isotopes from ¹²C fragmentation at 3.5° were measured at 0.6 GeV/nucleon in the FRAGM experiment at ITEP TWA heavy ion accelerator. The fragments were selected by correlated time of flight and dE/dx measurements with a magnetic spectrometer with scintillation counters. The main attention was drawn to the high momentum region where the fragment velocity exceeds the velocity of the projectile nucleus. The momentum spectra of fragments span the region of the fragmentation peak as well as the cumulative region. The differential cross sections cover six orders of magnitude. The distributions measured are compared tomore » the predictions of three ion-ion interaction models: BC, QMD and LAQGSM03.03. The kinetic energy spectra of fragments in the projectile rest frame have an exponential shape with two temperatures, being defined by their slope parameters.« less

  5. Small-angle fragmentation of carbon ions at 0.6 GeV/n. A comparison with models of ion-ion interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Krutenkova, Anna P.; Abramov, B. M.; Alekseev, P. N.; ...

    2015-05-29

    The momentum distributions of hydrogen and helium isotopes from 12C fragmentation at 3.5° were measured at 0.6 GeV/nucleon in the FRAGM experiment at ITEP TWA heavy ion accelerator. The fragments were selected by correlated time of flight and dE/dx measurements with a magnetic spectrometer with scintillation counters. The main attention was drawn to the high momentum region where the fragment velocity exceeds the velocity of the projectile nucleus. The momentum spectra of fragments span the region of the fragmentation peak as well as the cumulative region. Moreover, the differential cross sections cover six orders of magnitude. The distributions measured aremore » compared to the predictions of three ion-ion interaction models: BC, QMD and LAQGSM03.03. The kinetic energy spectra of fragments in the projectile rest frame have an exponential shape with two temperatures, being defined by their slope parameters.« less

  6. Experimental studies of collision and fragmentation phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Davis, D. R.; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    The reduction and publication of an extensive data set collected in experiments over several years at Ames and PSI is briefly examined. Hartmann has been assembling data sets from his experiments on catastrophic fragmentation of various materials, including basalt, other igneous rock, ice, and weak dirt clods. Weidenschilling and Davis have continued to gather and reduce data on oblique impacts. The data indicate a power law distribution of ejecta mass vs. velocity, with a slope that is independent of azimuth, and does not vary with impact angle from normal impacts to at least 75 deg from vertical. In order to improve models of coagulation of dust aggregates in the solar nebula, SJW developed an apparatus for drop tests of fragile projectiles. Davis and Weidenschilling continued to collect and analyze experimental data on collisional catastrophic disruption at the Ames Vertical Gun Range.

  7. Apparatus and method for producing fragment-free openings

    DOEpatents

    Cherry, Christopher R.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for explosively penetrating hardened containers such as steel drums without producing metal fragmentation is disclosed. The apparatus can be used singularly or in combination with water disrupters and other disablement tools. The apparatus is mounted in close proximity to the target and features a main sheet explosive that is initiated at least three equidistant points along the sheet's periphery. A buffer material is placed between the sheet explosive and the target. As a result, the metallic fragments generated from the detonation of the detonator are attenuated so that no fragments from the detonator are transferred to the target. As a result, an opening can be created in containers such as steel drums through which access to the IED is obtained to defuse it with projectiles or fluids.

  8. Fission fragment yields from heavy-ion-induced reactions measured with a fragment separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, O. B.; Delaune, O.; Farget, F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Amthor, A. M.; Bastin, B.; Bazin, D.; Blank, B.; Cacéres, L.; Chbihi, A.; Fernández-Dominguez, B.; Grévy, S.; Kamalou, O.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Mittig, W.; Pereira, J.; Perrot, L.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Savajols, H.; Sherrill, B. M.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Villari, A. C.

    2018-04-01

    The systematic study of fission fragment yields under different initial conditions has provided valuable experimental data for benchmarking models of fission product yields. Nuclear reactions using inverse kinematics coupled to the use of a high-resolution spectrometer with good fragment identification are shown here to be a powerful tool to measure the inclusive isotopic yields of fission fragments. In-flight fusion-fission was used in this work to produce secondary beams of neutron-rich isotopes in the collisions of a 238U beam at 24 MeV/u with 9Be and 12C targets at GANIL using the LISE3 fragment separator. Unique identification of the A, Z, and atomic charge state, q, of fission products was attained with the Δ E- TKE-B ρ- ToF measurement technique. Mass, and atomic number distributions are reported for the two reactions. The results show the importance of different reaction mechanisms in the two cases. The optimal target material for higher yields of neutron-rich high- Z isotopes produced in fusion-fission reactions as a function of projectile energy is discussed.

  9. Investigation of shock-induced combustion past blunt projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to simulate shock-induced combustion in premixed hydrogen-air mixtures at various free-stream conditions and parameters. Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock-induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A seven-species, seven reactions finite rate hydrogen-air chemical reaction mechanism is used combined with a finite-difference, shock-fitting method to solve the complete set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations. The study has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one-dimensional wave-interaction model.

  10. Developmental changes of misconception and misperception of projectiles.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Kyeong

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the developmental changes of perceptual and cognitive commonsense physical knowledge. Children 4 to 9 years old (N = 156; 79 boys, 77 girls) participated. Each child was asked to predict the landing positions of balls that rolled down and fell off a virtual ramp and to choose the most natural-looking motion from different projectile motions depicted. The landing position of the most natural-looking projectile was compared with the predicted landing position and also compared with the actual landing position. The results showed children predicted the ball's landing position closer to the ramp than the actual position. Children also chose the depiction in which the ball fell closer to the ramp than the accurate position, although the error in the prediction task was larger than in the perception task and decreased with age. The results indicated the developmental convergence of explicit reasoning and implicit perception, which suggest a single knowledge system with representational re-description.

  11. Group theoretical formulation of free fall and projectile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düztaş, Koray

    2018-07-01

    In this work we formulate the group theoretical description of free fall and projectile motion. We show that the kinematic equations for constant acceleration form a one parameter group acting on a phase space. We define the group elements ϕ t by their action on the points in the phase space. We also generalize this approach to projectile motion. We evaluate the group orbits regarding their relations to the physical orbits of particles and unphysical solutions. We note that the group theoretical formulation does not apply to more general cases involving a time-dependent acceleration. This method improves our understanding of the constant acceleration problem with its global approach. It is especially beneficial for students who want to pursue a career in theoretical physics.

  12. Study on miss distance based on projectile shock wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guohua; Cheng, Gang; Zhang, Chenjun; Zhou, Lei

    2017-05-01

    The paper establishes miss distance models based on physical characteristic of shock-wave. The aerodynamic theory shows that the shock-wave of flying super-sonic projectile is generated for the projectile compressing and expending its ambient atmosphere. It advances getting miss distance according to interval of the first sensors, which first catches shock-wave, to solve the problem such as noise filtering on severe background, and signals of amplifier vibration dynamic disposal and electromagnetism compatibility, in order to improves the precision and reliability of gathering wave N signals. For the first time, it can identify the kinds of pills and firing units automatically, measure miss distance and azimuth when pills are firing. Application shows that the tactics and technique index is advanced all of the world.

  13. Ballistics considerations for small-caliber, low-density projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.

    1993-11-01

    One major application for single- and two-stage light gas guns is for fueling magnetic fusion confinement devices. Powder guns are not a feasible alternative due to possible plasma contamination by residual powder gases and the eventual requirement of steady-state operation at {approximately} 1 Hz, which will dictate a closed gas handling system where propellant gases are recovered, processed and recompressed. Interior ballistic calculations for single-stage light gas guns, both analytical and numerical, are compared to an extensive data base for low density hydrogenic projectiles (pellets). Some innovative range diagnostics are described for determining the size and velocity of these smallmore » (several mm) size projectiles. A conceptual design of a closed cycle propellant gas system is presented including tradeoffs between different light propellant gases.« less

  14. The origins and early elaboration of projectile technology.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, Corey A; Thompson, Jessica C

    2018-01-01

    The ability of Homo sapiens to kill prey at a distance is arguably one of the catalysts for our current ecological dominance. Many researchers have suggested its origins lie in the African Middle Stone Age or the European Middle Palaeolithic (∼300-30 thousand years ago), but the perishable components of armatures rarely preserve. Most research on this subject therefore emphasises analysis of armature tip size, shape, and diagnostic impacts or residues. Other lines of evidence have included human skeletal anatomy or analyses of the species composition of faunal assemblages. Projectile Impact Marks (PIMs) on archaeofaunal remains offer an ideal complement to this work, but their potential has been restricted mainly to the later Eurasian zooarchaeological record. A review of current evidence and approaches shows that systematic PIM research could add much to our understanding of early projectile technology, especially in Africa. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. IX. Mechanical Properties of Dust Aggregates Probed by a Solid-projectile Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki; Blum, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic characterization of mechanical properties of dust aggregates has been one of the most important problems to quantitatively discuss the dust growth in protoplanetary disks. We experimentally investigate the dynamic properties of dust aggregates by low-speed (≤slant 3.2 m s-1) impacts of solid projectiles. Spherical impactors made of glass, steel, or lead are dropped onto a dust aggregate with a packing fraction of ϕ = 0.35 under vacuum conditions. The impact results in cratering or fragmentation of the dust aggregate, depending on the impact energy. The crater shape can be approximated by a spherical segment and no ejecta are observed. To understand the underlying physics of impacts into dust aggregates, the motion of the solid projectile is acquired by a high-speed camera. Using the obtained position data of the impactor, we analyze the drag-force law and dynamic pressure induced by the impact. We find that there are two characteristic strengths. One is defined by the ratio between impact energy and crater volume and is ≃120 kPa. The other strength indicates the fragmentation threshold of dynamic pressure and is ≃10 kPa. The former characterizes the apparent plastic deformation and is consistent with the drag force responsible for impactor deceleration. The latter corresponds to the dynamic tensile strength to create cracks. Using these results, a simple model for the compaction and fragmentation threshold of dust aggregates is proposed. In addition, the comparison of drag-force laws for dust aggregates and loose granular matter reveals the similarities and differences between the two materials.

  16. Development of Fluidic Guidance for KEW (Kinetic Energy Weapon) Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-30

    commanded to a hit-to-kill on a hostile ICBK booster. A novel application of-the photo-acoustic effect is used for laser detection. An acoustic wave...Hughes High Endo-Atmospheric Interceptor Concept.. 2 3 Conceptual SDI KE projectile ........................ 3 4 Schematic of photo-acoustic effect ...practical, KEWs must be lightweight, able to withstand high "g" forces, and insensitive to nuclear and electro-magnetic effects . Laser command guidance can

  17. Wave propagation in a plate after impact by a projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1987-01-01

    The wave propagation in a circular plate after impact by a cylindrical projectile is studied. In the vicinity of impact, the pressure is computed numerically. An intense pressure pulse is generated that peaks 0.2 microns after impact, then drops sharply to a plateau. The response of the plate is determined adopting a modal solution of Mindlin's equations. Velocity and acceleration histories display both propagating and dispersive features.

  18. Centrifuge Modeling of Projectile Penetration in Granular Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    expulsion from the pd mer pocket) upon firing, but not enough to create any difficulties with cartridge extraction from the chamber. To help obtain...reinitialized and repositioned on the sample bucket before each measurement. The projectile was then carefully extracted , the impact surface was noted...the gun mount and the spent cartridge was extracted from the chamber. The payload platform was then locked in the horizontal position and the balance

  19. Measuring the Effects of Lift and Drag on Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    The trajectory of a projectile through the air is affected both by gravity and by aerodynamic forces. The latter forces can conveniently be ignored in many situations, even when they are comparatively large. For example, if a 145-g, 74-mm diameter baseball is pitched at 40 ms[superscript -1] (89.5 mph), it experiences a drag force of about 1.5 N.…

  20. Learning Projectile Motion with the Computer Game ``Scorched 3D``

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurcevic, John S.

    2008-01-01

    For most of our students, video games are a normal part of their lives. We should take advantage of this medium to teach physics in a manner that is engrossing for our students. In particular, modern video games incorporate accurate physics in their game engines, and they allow us to visualize the physics through flashy and captivating graphics. I recently used the game "Scorched 3D" to help my students understand projectile motion.

  1. Target Acquisition for Projectile Vision-Based Navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Future Work 20 8. References 21 Appendix A. Simulation Results 23 Appendix B. Derivation of Ground Resolution for a Diffraction-Limited Pinhole Camera...results for visual acquisition (left) and target recognition (right). ..........19 Figure B-1. Differential object and image areas for pinhole camera...projectile and target (measured in terms of the angle ) will depend on target heading. In particular, because we have aligned the x axis along the

  2. Projectile and Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Electromagnetic Dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Adamczyk, Anne; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Differential cross sections for electromagnetic dissociation in nuclear collisions are calculated for the first time. In order to be useful for three - dimensional transport codes, these cross sections have been calculated in both the projectile and lab frames. The formulas for these cross sections are such that they can be immediately used in space radiation transport codes. Only a limited amount of data exists, but the comparison between theory and experiment is good.

  3. Occult lawn mower projectile injury presenting with hemoptysis.

    PubMed

    Darvie, Patric J; Ballard, David H; Harris, Nicholas; Bhargava, Peeyush; Rao, Vyas R; Samra, Navdeep S

    2017-12-01

    We present the case of a 72-year-old man with hemoptysis after a thoracic projectile injury, which occurred while mowing the lawn. Chest radiograph followed by a computed tomography angiogram revealed a metallic foreign body in the right middle lobe of the lung. The patient underwent a right anterolateral thoracotomy where the object was successfully retrieved. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery.

  4. Ultrahigh-speed X-ray imaging of hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stuart; Singh, Bipin; Cool, Steven; Entine, Gerald; Campbell, Larry; Bishel, Ron; Rushing, Rick; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2011-08-01

    High-speed X-ray imaging is an extremely important modality for healthcare, industrial, military and research applications such as medical computed tomography, non-destructive testing, imaging in-flight projectiles, characterizing exploding ordnance, and analyzing ballistic impacts. We report on the development of a modular, ultrahigh-speed, high-resolution digital X-ray imaging system with large active imaging area and microsecond time resolution, capable of acquiring at a rate of up to 150,000 frames per second. The system is based on a high-resolution, high-efficiency, and fast-decay scintillator screen optically coupled to an ultra-fast image-intensified CCD camera designed for ballistic impact studies and hypervelocity projectile imaging. A specially designed multi-anode, high-fluence X-ray source with 50 ns pulse duration provides a sequence of blur-free images of hypervelocity projectiles traveling at speeds exceeding 8 km/s (18,000 miles/h). This paper will discuss the design, performance, and high frame rate imaging capability of the system.

  5. Doubly differential cross sections for galactic heavy-ion fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Norbury, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1987-01-01

    An abrasion-ablation T-matrix formulation is applied to the calculation of double differential-cross sections in projectile fragmentation of 2.1 GeV/nucleon O-16 on Be-9 and 86 MeV/nucleon C-12 on C-12 and Ag-108. An exponential parameterization of the ablation T-matrix is used and the total width of the intermediate states is taken as a parameter. Fitted values of the total width to experimental results are used to predict the lifetime of the ablation stage and indicate a decay time on the order of 10 to the -19th power sec.

  6. Selectable fragmentation warhead

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Courtney S.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Montoya, Nelson I.; Stahl, David B.

    1993-01-01

    A selectable fragmentation warhead capable of producing a predetermined number of fragments from a metal plate, and accelerating the fragments toward a target. A first explosive located adjacent to the plate is detonated at selected number of points by laser-driven slapper detonators. In one embodiment, a smoother-disk and a second explosive, located adjacent to the first explosive, serve to increase acceleration of the fragments toward a target. The ability to produce a selected number of fragments allows for effective destruction of a chosen target.

  7. Characteristics and measurement of supersonic projectile shock waves by a 32-microphone ring array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho; Wu, Yan-Chyuan; Tsung, Tsing-Tshih

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses about the characteristics of supersonic projectile shock wave in muzzle region during firing of high explosive anti-tank (HEAT) and high explosive (HE) projectiles. HEAT projectiles are fired horizontally at a muzzle velocity of Mach 3.5 from a medium caliber tank gun equipped with a newly designed multi-perforated muzzle brake, whereas HE projectiles are fired at elevation angles at a muzzle velocity of Mach 2 from a large caliber howitzer equipped with a newly designed double-baffle muzzle brake. In the near field, pressure signatures of the N-wave generated from projectiles are measured by 32-microphone ring array wrapped by cotton sheath. Records measured by the microphone array are used to demonstrate several key characteristics of the shock wave of supersonic projectile. All measurements made in this study can be a significant reference for developing guns, tanks, or the chassis of fighting vehicles.

  8. Strain Behavior of Concrete Panels Subjected to Different Nose Shapes of Projectile Impact

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangkyu; Kim, Gyuyong; Kim, Hongseop; Son, Minjae; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Nam, Jeongsoo

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluates the fracture properties and rear-face strain distribution of nonreinforced and hooked steel fiber-reinforced concrete panels penetrated by projectiles of three different nose shapes: sharp, hemispherical, and flat. The sharp projectile nose resulted in a deeper penetration because of the concentration of the impact force. Conversely, the flat projectile nose resulted in shallower penetrations. The penetration based on different projectile nose shapes is directly related to the impact force transmitted to the rear face. Scabbing can be more accurately predicted by the tensile strain on the rear face of concrete due to the projectile nose shape. The tensile strain on the rear face of the concrete was reduced by the hooked steel fiber reinforcement because the hooked steel fiber absorbed some of the impact stress transmitted to the rear face of the concrete. Consequently, the strain behavior on the rear face of concrete according to the projectile nose shape was confirmed. PMID:29522479

  9. Strain Behavior of Concrete Panels Subjected to Different Nose Shapes of Projectile Impact.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangkyu; Kim, Gyuyong; Kim, Hongseop; Son, Minjae; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Nam, Jeongsoo

    2018-03-09

    This study evaluates the fracture properties and rear-face strain distribution of nonreinforced and hooked steel fiber-reinforced concrete panels penetrated by projectiles of three different nose shapes: sharp, hemispherical, and flat. The sharp projectile nose resulted in a deeper penetration because of the concentration of the impact force. Conversely, the flat projectile nose resulted in shallower penetrations. The penetration based on different projectile nose shapes is directly related to the impact force transmitted to the rear face. Scabbing can be more accurately predicted by the tensile strain on the rear face of concrete due to the projectile nose shape. The tensile strain on the rear face of the concrete was reduced by the hooked steel fiber reinforcement because the hooked steel fiber absorbed some of the impact stress transmitted to the rear face of the concrete. Consequently, the strain behavior on the rear face of concrete according to the projectile nose shape was confirmed.

  10. Characteristics and measurement of supersonic projectile shock waves by a 32-microphone ring array.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho; Wu, Yan-Chyuan; Tsung, Tsing-Tshih

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses about the characteristics of supersonic projectile shock wave in muzzle region during firing of high explosive anti-tank (HEAT) and high explosive (HE) projectiles. HEAT projectiles are fired horizontally at a muzzle velocity of Mach 3.5 from a medium caliber tank gun equipped with a newly designed multi-perforated muzzle brake, whereas HE projectiles are fired at elevation angles at a muzzle velocity of Mach 2 from a large caliber howitzer equipped with a newly designed double-baffle muzzle brake. In the near field, pressure signatures of the N-wave generated from projectiles are measured by 32-microphone ring array wrapped by cotton sheath. Records measured by the microphone array are used to demonstrate several key characteristics of the shock wave of supersonic projectile. All measurements made in this study can be a significant reference for developing guns, tanks, or the chassis of fighting vehicles.

  11. The drag force on a subsonic projectile in a fluid complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A. V.; Zhukhovitskii, D. I.

    2012-09-15

    The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is employed to describe a subsonic particle flow induced in complex plasmas by a moving projectile. Drag forces acting on the projectile in different flow regimes are calculated. It is shown that, along with the regular neutral gas drag, there is an additional force exerted on the projectile due to dissipation in the surrounding particle fluid. This additional force provides significant contribution to the total drag.

  12. Adding Liquid Payloads Effects to the 6-DOF Trajectory of Spinning Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Adding Liquid Payloads Effects to the 6-DOF Trajectory of Spinning Projectiles by Gene R. Cooper ARL-TR-5118 March 2010...Liquid Payloads Effects to the 6-DOF Trajectory of Spinning Projectiles Gene R. Cooper Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...September 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adding Liquid Payloads Effects to the 6-DOF Trajectory of Spinning Projectiles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  13. High Velocity Firings of Slug Projectiles in a Double-Travel 120-MM Gun System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    constraints presented by TBD. This charge configuration was then tested using aluminium slug projectiles to avoid the unnecessary expenditure of APFSDS...test projectile was a depleted uranium alloy (U-.75Ti) rod with a standard, four piece, aluminum sabot assembly. The launch package had a nominal...the rod is shown in Figure 2. Figure 2. Scaled, Long Rod Penetrator. Figure 3. Aluminium Slug Projectile. The aluminium slug rounds, fired at Range 18

  14. Experimental Flight Characterization of Spin Stabilized Projectiles at High Angle of Attack

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-07

    ARL-TR-8082 ● AUG 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Experimental Flight Characterization of Spin- Stabilized Projectiles at High ...Experimental Flight Characterization of Spin- Stabilized Projectiles at High Angle of Attack by Frank Fresconi and Ilmars Celmins Weapons and Materials...June 2016–June 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Flight Characterization of Spin-Stabilized Projectiles at High Angle of Attack 5a. CONTRACT

  15. Comparison of fragments created by low- and hyper-velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, T.; Liou, J.-C.

    This paper summarizes two new satellite impact experiments. The objective of the experiments was to investigate the outcome of low- and hyper-velocity impacts on two identical target satellites. The first experiment was performed at a low-velocity of 1.5 km/s using a 40-g aluminum alloy sphere. The second experiment was performed at a hyper-velocity of 4.4 km/s using a 4-g aluminum alloy sphere. The target satellites were 15 cm × 15 cm × 15 cm in size and 800 g in mass. The ratios of impact energy to target mass for the two experiments were approximately the same. The target satellites were completely fragmented in both experiments, although there were some differences in the characteristics of the fragments. The projectile of the low-velocity impact experiment was partially fragmented while the projectile of the hyper-velocity impact experiment was completely fragmented beyond recognition. To date, approximately 1500 fragments from each impact experiment have been collected for detailed analysis. Each piece has been weighed, measured, and analyzed based on the analytic method used in the NASA Standard Breakup Model (2000 revision). These fragments account for about 95% of the target mass for both impact experiments. Preliminary analysis results will be presented in this paper.

  16. On ballistic parameters of less lethal projectiles influencing the severity of thoracic blunt impacts.

    PubMed

    Pavier, Julien; Langlet, André; Eches, Nicolas; Jacquet, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The development and safety certification of less lethal projectiles require an understanding of the influence of projectile parameters on projectile-chest interaction and on the resulting terminal effect. Several energy-based criteria have been developed for chest injury assessment. Many studies consider kinetic energy (KE) or energy density as the only projectile parameter influencing terminal effect. In a common KE range (100-160 J), analysis of the firing tests of two 40 mm projectiles of different masses on animal surrogates has been made in order to investigate the severity of the injuries in the thoracic region. Experimental results have shown that KE and calibre are not sufficient to discriminate between the two projectiles as regards their injury potential. Parameters, such as momentum, shape and impedance, influence the projectile-chest interaction and terminal effect. A simplified finite element model of projectile-structure interaction confirms the experimental tendencies. Within the range of ballistic parameters used, it has been demonstrated that maximum thoracic deflection is a useful parameter to predict the skeletal level of injury, and it largely depends on the projectile pre-impact momentum. However, numerical simulations show that these results are merely valid for the experimental conditions used and cannot be generalised. Nevertheless, the transmitted impulse seems to be a more general factor governing the thorax deflection.

  17. Chemical modification of projectile residues and target material in a MEMIN cratering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Matthias; Hecht, Lutz; Deutsch, Alexander; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the MEMIN project, a hypervelocity cratering experiment has been performed using a sphere of the iron meteorite Campo del Cielo as projectile accelerated to 4.56 km s-1, and a block of Seeberger sandstone as target material. The ejecta, collected in a newly designed catcher, are represented by (1) weakly deformed, (2) highly deformed, and (3) highly shocked material. The latter shows shock-metamorphic features such as planar deformation features (PDF) in quartz, formation of diaplectic quartz glass, partial melting of the sandstone, and partially molten projectile, mixed mechanically and chemically with target melt. During mixing of projectile and target melts, the Fe of the projectile is preferentially partitioned into target melt to a greater degree than Ni and Co yielding a Fe/Ni that is generally higher than Fe/Ni in the projectile. This fractionation results from the differing siderophile properties, specifically from differences in reactivity of Fe, Ni, and Co with oxygen during projectile-target interaction. Projectile matter was also detected in shocked quartz grains. The average Fe/Ni of quartz with PDF (about 20) and of silica glasses (about 24) are in contrast to the average sandstone ratio (about 422), but resembles the Fe/Ni-ratio of the projectile (about 14). We briefly discuss possible reasons of projectile melting and vaporization in the experiment, in which the calculated maximum shock pressure does not exceed 55 GPa.

  18. Separation and Depleted Uranium Fragments from Gun Test Catchment. Volume 2. Catchment System and Separations Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-30

    projectile fragments from target materials, principally sand. Phase I activities included (1) literature review of separations technology , (2) site visits, (3...the current operation, evaluation of alternative means for separation of DU from sand, a review of uranium mining technology for v possible...the current operation, evaluation of alternative means for separation of DU from sand, a review of uranium mining technology for possible

  19. Effect of projectile on incomplete fusion reactions at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay R.; Shuaib, Mohd.; Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Kumar, R.; Singh, Devendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Prasad, R.

    2017-11-01

    Present work deals with the experimental studies of incomplete fusion reaction dynamics at energies as low as ≈ 4 - 7 MeV/A. Excitation functions populated via complete fusion and/or incomplete fusion processes in 12C+175Lu, and 13C+169Tm systems have been measured within the framework of PACE4 code. Data of excitation function measurements on comparison with different projectile-target combinations suggest the existence of ICF even at slightly above barrier energies where complete fusion (CF) is supposed to be the sole contributor, and further demonstrates strong projectile structure dependence of ICF. The incomplete fusion strength functions for 12C+175Lu, and 13C+169Tm systems are analyzed as a function of various physical parameters at a constant vrel ≈ 0.053c. It has been found that one neutron (1n) excess projectile 13C (as compared to 12C) results in less incomplete fusion contribution due to its relatively large negative α-Q-value, hence, α Q-value seems to be a reliable parameter to understand the ICF dynamics at low energies. In order to explore the reaction modes on the basis of their entry state spin population, the spin distribution of residues populated via CF and/or ICF in 16O+159Tb system has been done using particle-γ coincidence technique. CF-α and ICF-α channels have been identified from backward (B) and forward (F) α-gated γspectra, respectively. Reaction dependent decay patterns have been observed in different α emitting channels. The CF channels are found to be fed over a broad spin range, however, ICF-α channels was observed only for high-spin states. Further, the existence of incomplete fusion at low bombarding energies indicates the possibility to populate high spin states

  20. Universality of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-03-16

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism.

  1. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  2. The Effect of Muzzle Jet Asymmetry on Projectile Motion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    fixture was designed to provide invariant mechanical support to the gun tube while allowing control of the symmetry of the muzzle gar flow field...Figure 4. A 2S4mm diameter by 12.7mm thick (non-metric dimensions: 10 in x 1/2 in) aluminum base plate is press fit onto the muzzle of a 6.71mm...indicated by the opaque regions of concentrated powder particles. The muzzle flow at a considerably later time, Figure 1, shows the projectile to be

  3. Stagnation pressure activated fuel release mechanism for hypersonic projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Cartland, Harry E.; Hunter, John W.

    2003-01-01

    A propulsion-assisted projectile has a body, a cowl forming a combustion section and a nozzle section. The body has a fuel reservoir within a central portion of the body, and a fuel activation system located along the central axis of the body and having a portion of the fuel activation system within the fuel reservoir. The fuel activation system has a fuel release piston with a forward sealing member where the fuel release piston is adapted to be moved when the forward sealing member is impacted with an air flow, and an air-flow channel adapted to conduct ambient air during flight to the fuel release piston.

  4. Ballistic Impact of Braided Composites With a Soft Projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M., Jr.; Binienda, Wieslaw; Xie, Ming; Braley, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Impact tests using a soft gelatin projectile were performed to identify failure modes that occur at high strain energy density during impact loading. Use of a soft projectile allows a large amount of kinetic energy to be transferred into strain energy in the target before penetration occurs. Failure modes were identified for flat aluminum plates and for flat composite plates made from a triaxial braid having a quasi-isotropic fiber architecture with fibers in the 0 and +/- 60 deg. directions. For the aluminum plates, a large hole formed as a result of crack propagation from the initiation site at the center of the plate to the fixed boundaries. For the composite plates, fiber tensile failure occurred in the back ply at the center of the plate. Cracks then propagated from this site along the +/- 60 deg. fiber directions until triangular flaps opened to allow the projectile to pass through the plate. The damage size was only slightly larger than the initial impact area. It was difficult to avoid slipping of the fixed edges of the plates during impact, and slipping was shown to have a large effect on the penetration threshold. Failure modes were also identified for composite half-rings fabricated with the 0 deg. fibers aligned circumferentially. Slipping of the edges was not a problem in the half-ring tests. For the composite half-rings, fiber tensile failure also occurred in the back ply. However, cracks initially propagated from this site in a direction transverse to the 0 deg. fibers. The cracks then turned to follow the +/- 60 deg. fibers for a short distance before turning again to follow 0 deg. fibers until two approximately rectangular flaps opened to allow the projectile to pass through the plate. The damage size in the composite half-rings was also only slightly larger than the initial impact area. Cracks did not propagate to the boundaries, and no delamination was observed. The damage tolerance demonstrated by the quasi-isotropic triaxial braid composites

  5. Comment on ‘Wind-influenced projectile motion’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winther Andersen, Poul

    2015-11-01

    We comment on the article ‘Wind-influenced projectile motion’ by Bernardo et al (2015 Eur. J. Phys. 36 025016) where they examine the trajectory of a particle that is subjected to gravity and a linear air resistance plus the influence from the wind. They find by using the Lambert W function that the particle's trajectory for a special angle, the critical angle {θ }{{C}}, between the initial velocity and the horizontal is part of a straight line. In this comment we will show that this result can be proved without using the Lambert W function which is not that well known to beginning students of physics.

  6. Image-guided scapulothoracic arthroscopy for removing firearm projectiles

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Benno; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Pochini, Alberto De Castro

    2014-01-01

    Scapulothoracic arthroscopy is gaining recognition among arthroscopic procedures as it is considered a relatively low morbidity procedure; also, continuing studies of this technique are making it safer. Scapulothoracic arthroscopy can be used for removal of a foreign body. This case report describes the removal of a firearm projectile using image-guided arthroscopy, highlighting the anatomical aspects and characteristics of the surgical technique. In this case, the patient recovered uneventfully, with complete remission of symptoms in 30 days, returning to his usual activities within 2 months after surgery. PMID:25480137

  7. Angular Motion of Projectiles with a Moving Internal Part.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    Ball Rotor T317 hellIntermal Projectile RingsM505 Fuze Quasi-linear Angular Motion N\\ ANSTRACT (-jCanhs si rveree side ff naeweemv end identify by...LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1. 20mm Shell T282E1 with Arming Ball Rotor .... .......... 20 2. Fast Mode Damping Rate for the 20mm T282E1...fuze has a spherical arming rotor in a cylindrical cavity with small but non-zero clearanc’es (Figure 1). The fourth sa.ell - the 8-inch T317 - showed

  8. Destructive behavior of iron oxide in projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wang; Xiaochen, Wang; Quan, Yang; Zhongde, Shan

    2017-12-01

    The damage strain values of Q235-A surface oxide scale were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS) and universal tensile testing machine. The finite element simulation was carried out to study the destruction effects of oxidation at different impact rates. The results show that the damage value of the oxide strain is 0.08%. With the increase of the projectile velocity, the damage area of the oxide scale is increased, and the damage area is composed of the direct destruction area and the indirect failure area. The indirect damage area is caused by the stress/strain to the surrounding expansion after the impact of the steel body.

  9. Increasing Student Engagement and Enthusiasm: A Projectile Motion Crime Scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, David

    2010-05-01

    Connecting physics concepts with real-world events allows students to establish a strong conceptual foundation. When such events are particularly interesting to students, it can greatly impact their engagement and enthusiasm in an activity. Activities that involve studying real-world events of high interest can provide students a long-lasting understanding and positive memorable experiences, both of which heighten the learning experiences of those students. One such activity, described in depth in this paper, utilizes a murder mystery and crime scene investigation as an application of basic projectile motion.

  10. Management of in-tube projectiles using acoustic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostina, M. A.; Bortalevich, S. I.; Loginov, E. L.; Shinyakov, Y. A.; Sukhorukov, M. P.

    2018-03-01

    The article describes the method of measuring the distance from the operator's console installed outside the pipe to the in-tube projectile. A method for measuring distance in the absence of an echo signal is proposed. To do this, two identical ultrasonic locators operating at different frequencies were installed inside and outside the pipeline. The change in the duration of an acoustic pulse propagating in a circular waveguide with rigid walls is shown, which leads to a decrease in the data transfer rate.

  11. Optical model calculations of heavy-ion target fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Norbury, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The fragmentation of target nuclei by relativistic protons and heavy ions is described within the context of a simple abrasion-ablation-final-state interaction model. Abrasion is described by a quantum mechanical formalism utilizing an optical model potential approximation. Nuclear charge distributions of the excited prefragments are calculated by both a hypergeometric distribution and a method based upon the zero-point oscillations of the giant dipole resonance. Excitation energies are estimated from the excess surface energy resulting from the abrasion process and the additional energy deposited by frictional spectator interactions of the abraded nucleons. The ablation probabilities are obtained from the EVA-3 computer program. Isotope production cross sections for the spallation of copper targets by relativistic protons and for the fragmenting of carbon targets by relativistic carbon, neon, and iron projectiles are calculated and compared with available experimental data.

  12. Coulomb effects in low-energy nuclear fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Chun, Sang Y.; Badavi, Francis F.; John, Sarah

    1993-01-01

    Early versions of the Langley nuclear fragmentation code NUCFRAG (and a publicly released version called HZEFRG1) assumed straight-line trajectories throughout the interaction. As a consequence, NUCFRAG and HZEFRG1 give unrealistic cross sections for large mass removal from the projectile and target at low energies. A correction for the distortion of the trajectory by the nuclear Coulomb fields is used to derive fragmentation cross sections. A simple energy-loss term is applied to estimate the energy downshifts that greatly alter the Coulomb trajectory at low energy. The results, which are far more realistic than prior versions of the code, should provide the data base for future transport calculations. The systematic behavior of charge-removal cross sections compares favorably with results from low-energy experiments.

  13. Control Performance, Aerodynamic Modeling, and Validation of Coupled Simulation Techniques for Guided Projectile Roll Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    39–44) has been explored in depth in the literature. Of particular interest for this study are investigations into roll control. Isolating the...Control Performance, Aerodynamic Modeling, and Validation of Coupled Simulation Techniques for Guided Projectile Roll Dynamics by Jubaraj...Simulation Techniques for Guided Projectile Roll Dynamics Jubaraj Sahu, Frank Fresconi, and Karen R. Heavey Weapons and Materials Research

  14. An Analytic Approach to Projectile Motion in a Linear Resisting Medium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Sean M.

    2006-01-01

    The time of flight, range and the angle which maximizes the range of a projectile in a linear resisting medium are expressed in analytic form in terms of the recently defined Lambert W function. From the closed-form solutions a number of results characteristic to the motion of the projectile in a linear resisting medium are analytically confirmed,…

  15. Reaction dynamics of {sup 34-38}Mg projectile with carbon target using Glauber model

    SciTech Connect

    Shama, Mahesh K., E-mail: maheshphy82@gmail.com; Department of Applied Sciences, Chandigarh Engineering College, Landran Mohali-140307; Panda, R. N.

    2015-08-28

    We have studied nuclear reaction cross-sections for {sup 34-38}Mg isotopes as projectile with {sup 12}C target at projectile energy 240AMeV using Glauber model with the conjunction of densities from relativistic mean filed formalism. We found good agreement with the available experimental data. The halo status of {sup 37}Mg is also investigated.

  16. The Effect of Projectile Density and Disruption on the Crater Excavation Flow-Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Jennifer L. B.; Schultz, P. H.

    2005-01-01

    The ejection parameters of material excavated by a growing crater directly relate to the subsurface excavation flow-field. The ejection angles and speeds define the end of subsurface material streamlines at the target surface. Differences in the subsurface flow-fields can be inferred by comparing observed ejection parameters of various impacts obtained using three-dimensional particle image velocimetry (3D PIV). The work presented here investigates the observed ejection speeds and angles of material ejected during vertical (90 impact angle) experimental impacts for a range of different projectile types. The subsurface flow-fields produced during vertical impacts are simple when compared with that of oblique impacts, affected primarily by the depth of the energy and momentum deposition of the projectile. This depth is highly controlled by the projectile/target density ratio and the disruption of the projectile (brittle vs. ductile deformation). Previous studies indicated that cratering efficiency and the crater diameter/depth ratio were affected by projectile disruption, velocity, and the projectile/target density ratio. The effect of these projectile properties on the excavation flow-field are examined by comparing different projectile materials.

  17. Solution to Projectile Motion with Quadratic Drag and Graphing the Trajectory in Spreadsheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benacka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This note gives the analytical solution to projectile motion with quadratic drag by decomposing the velocity vector to "x," "y" coordinate directions. The solution is given by definite integrals. First, the impact angle is estimated from above, then the projectile coordinates are computed, and the trajectory is graphed at various launch angles and…

  18. Projectile Motion on an Inclined Misty Surface: I. Capturing and Analysing the Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, S. Y.; Foong, S. K.; Lim, C. H.; Lim, C. C.; Lin, K.; Kuppan, L.

    2009-01-01

    Projectile motion is usually the first non-uniform two-dimensional motion that students will encounter in a pre-university physics course. In this article, we introduce a novel technique for capturing the trajectory of projectile motion on an inclined Perspex plane. This is achieved by coating the Perspex with a thin layer of fine water droplets…

  19. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  20. Spreadsheet Application Showing the Proper Elevation Angle, Points of Shot and Impact of a Projectile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benacka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides the formula for the elevation angle at which a projectile has to be fired in a vacuum from a general position to hit a target at a given distance. A spreadsheet application that models the trajectory is presented, and the problem of finding the points of shot and impact of a projectile moving in a vacuum if three points of the…

  1. Magnetic induction system for two-stage gun projectile velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, R L; Konrad, C H

    1984-05-01

    A magnetic induction technique for measuring projectile velocities has been implemented on Sandia's two-stage light gas gun. The system has been designed to allow for projectile velocity measurements to an accuracy of approx. 0.2 percent. The velocity system has been successfully tested in a velocity range of 3.5 km/s to 6.5 km/s.

  2. Fragments and Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Can teachers contact the inner coherence of mathematics while working in a context fragmented by always-new objectives, criteria, and initiatives? How, more importantly, can learners experience the inner coherence of mathematics while working in a context fragmented by testing, modular curricular, short-term learning objectives, and lessons that…

  3. Fragmentation studies of relativistic iron ions using plastic nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Scampoli, P; Durante, M; Grossi, G; Manti, L; Pugliese, M; Gialanella, G

    2005-01-01

    We measured fluence and fragmentation of high-energy (1 or 5 A GeV) 56Fe ions accelerated at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron or at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (Brookhaven National Laboratory, NY, USA) using solid-state CR-39 nuclear track detectors. Different targets (polyethylene, PMMA, C, Al, Pb) were used to produce a large spectrum of charged fragments. CR-39 plastics were exposed both in front and behind the shielding block (thickness ranging from 5 to 30 g/cm2) at a normal incidence and low fluence. The radiation dose deposited by surviving Fe ions and charged fragments was measured behind the shield using an ionization chamber. The distribution of the measured track size was exploited to distinguish the primary 56Fe ions tracks from the lighter fragments. Measurements of projectile's fluence in front of the shield were used to determine the dose per incident particle behind the block. Simultaneous measurements of primary 56Fe ion tracks in front and behind the shield were used to evaluate the fraction of surviving iron projectiles and the total charge-changing fragmentation cross-section. These physical measurements will be used to characterize the beam used in parallel biological experiments. c2005 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatial fragment distribution from a therapeutic pencil-like carbon beam in water.

    PubMed

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Komori, Masataka; Sasaki, Hitomi; Akiu, Kengo; Ogawa, Masako; Fukumura, Akifumi; Urakabe, Eriko; Inaniwa, Taku; Nishio, Teiji; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2005-07-21

    The latest heavy ion therapy tends to require information about the spatial distribution of the quality of radiation in a patient's body in order to make the best use of any potential advantage of swift heavy ions for the therapeutic treatment of a tumour. The deflection of incident particles is described well by Molière's multiple-scattering theory of primary particles; however, the deflection of projectile fragments is not yet thoroughly understood. This paper reports on our investigation of the spatial distribution of fragments produced from a therapeutic carbon beam through nuclear reactions in thick water. A DeltaE-E counter telescope system, composed of a plastic scintillator, a gas-flow proportional counter and a BGO scintillator, was rotated around a water target in order to measure the spatial distribution of the radiation quality. The results revealed that the observed deflection of fragment particles exceeded the multiple scattering effect estimated by Molière's theory. However, the difference can be sufficiently accounted for by considering one term involved in the multiple-scattering formula; this term corresponds to a lateral 'kick' at the point of production of the fragment. This kick is successfully explained as a transfer of the intra-nucleus Fermi momentum of a projectile to the fragment; the extent of the kick obeys the expectation derived from the Goldhaber model.

  5. Fragmentation of an elastica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2009-03-01

    When a thin rod is submitted to an axial force greater than its critical buckling load it takes the shape of an elastica. As the load further increases, a rod made of a brittle material breaks suddenly. More than two fragments may be formed during this fragmentation. In this work we discuss the sequence of events that lead to the final broken state with two or more fragments. We show that the criterion for breaking is not trivial. In particular, we investigate the effect of the duration of the loading and we show that at a given load the waiting time before breaking is broadly distributed. We discuss the consequences of the time delayed breaking on the distributions of fragment sizes and fragment numbers.

  6. Earliest stone-tipped projectiles from the Ethiopian rift date to >279,000 years ago.

    PubMed

    Sahle, Yonatan; Hutchings, W Karl; Braun, David R; Sealy, Judith C; Morgan, Leah E; Negash, Agazi; Atnafu, Balemwal

    2013-01-01

    Projectile weapons (i.e. those delivered from a distance) enhanced prehistoric hunting efficiency by enabling higher impact delivery and hunting of a broader range of animals while reducing confrontations with dangerous prey species. Projectiles therefore provided a significant advantage over thrusting spears. Composite projectile technologies are considered indicative of complex behavior and pivotal to the successful spread of Homo sapiens. Direct evidence for such projectiles is thus far unknown from >80,000 years ago. Data from velocity-dependent microfracture features, diagnostic damage patterns, and artifact shape reported here indicate that pointed stone artifacts from Ethiopia were used as projectile weapons (in the form of hafted javelin tips) as early as >279,000 years ago. In combination with the existing archaeological, fossil and genetic evidence, these data isolate eastern Africa as a source of modern cultures and biology.

  7. Earliest Stone-Tipped Projectiles from the Ethiopian Rift Date to >279,000 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Sahle, Yonatan; Hutchings, W. Karl; Braun, David R.; Sealy, Judith C.; Morgan, Leah E.; Negash, Agazi; Atnafu, Balemwal

    2013-01-01

    Projectile weapons (i.e. those delivered from a distance) enhanced prehistoric hunting efficiency by enabling higher impact delivery and hunting of a broader range of animals while reducing confrontations with dangerous prey species. Projectiles therefore provided a significant advantage over thrusting spears. Composite projectile technologies are considered indicative of complex behavior and pivotal to the successful spread of Homo sapiens. Direct evidence for such projectiles is thus far unknown from >80,000 years ago. Data from velocity-dependent microfracture features, diagnostic damage patterns, and artifact shape reported here indicate that pointed stone artifacts from Ethiopia were used as projectile weapons (in the form of hafted javelin tips) as early as >279,000 years ago. In combination with the existing archaeological, fossil and genetic evidence, these data isolate eastern Africa as a source of modern cultures and biology. PMID:24236011

  8. Impact response of graphite-epoxy flat laminates using projectiles that simulate aircraft engine encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, J. L., Jr.; Cook, T. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the response of a graphite-epoxy material to foreign object impact was made by impacting spherical projectiles of gelatin, ice, and steel normally on flat panels. The observed damage was classified as transverse (stress wave delamination and cracking), penetrative, or structural (gross failure): the minimum, or threshold, velocity to cause each class of damage was established as a function of projectile characteristics. Steel projectiles had the lowest transverse damage threshold, followed by gelatin and ice. Making use of the threshold velocities and assuming that the normal component of velocity produces the damage in nonnormal impacts, a set of impact angles and velocities was established for each projectile material which would result in damage to composite fan blades. Analysis of the operating parameters of a typical turbine fan blade shows that small steel projectiles are most likely to cause delamination and penetration damage to unprotected graphite-epoxy composite fan blades.

  9. Impact Interaction of Projectile with Conducting Wall at the Presence of Electric Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemerys, Volodymyr T.; Raychenko, Aleksandr I.; Karpinos, Boris S.

    2002-07-01

    The paper introduces with schemes of possible electromagnetic armor augmentation. The interaction of projectile with a main wall of target after penetration across the pre-defense layer is of interest here. The same problem is of interest for the current-carrying elements of electric guns. The theoretical analysis is done in the paper for the impact when the kinetic energy of projectile is enough to create the liquid layer in the crater of the wall's metal. Spherical head of projectile and right angle of inclination have been taken for consideration. The solution of problem for the liquid layer of metal around the projectile head has resulted a reduction of the resistant properties of wall material under current influence, in view of electromagnetic pressure appearance, what is directed towards the wall likely the projectile velocity vector.

  10. Non-contact and contact measurement system for detecting projectile position in electromagnetic launch bore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weidong; Yuan, Weiqun; Xu, Rong; Zhao, Hui; Cheng, Wenping; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhao, Ying; Yan, Ping

    2017-12-01

    This paper introduces a new measurement system for measuring the position of a projectile within a rapid fire electromagnetic launching system. The measurement system contains both non-contact laser shading and metal fiber contact measurement devices. Two projectiles are placed in the rapid fire electromagnetic launch bore, one in the main accelerating segment and the other in the pre-loading segment. The projectile placed in the main accelerating segment should be shot first, and then the other is loaded into the main segment from the pre-loading segment. The main driving current (I-main) can only be discharged again when the second projectile has arrived at the key position (the projectile position corresponds to the discharging time) in the main accelerating segment. So, it is important to be able to detect when the second projectile arrives at the key position in the main accelerating segment. The B-dot probe is the most widely used system for detecting the position of the projectile in the electromagnetic launch bore. However, the B-dot signal is affected by the driving current amplitude and the projectile velocity. There is no current in the main accelerating segment when the second projectile moves into this segment in rapid fire mode, so the B-dot signal for detecting the key position is invalid. Due to the presence of a high-intensity magnetic field, a high current, a high-temperature aluminum attachment, smoke and strong vibrations, it is very difficult to detect the projectile position in the bore accurately. So, other measurements need to be researched and developed in order to achieve high reliability. A measurement system based on a laser (non-contact) and metal fibers (contact) has been designed, and the integrated output signal based on this detector is described in the following paper.

  11. Computation of transonic flow past projectiles at angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reklis, R. P.; Sturek, W. B.; Bailey, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    Aerodynamic properties of artillery shell such as normal force and pitching moment reach peak values in a narrow transonic Mach number range. In order to compute these quantities, numerical techniques have been developed to obtain solutions to the three-dimensional transonic small disturbance equation about slender bodies at angle of attack. The computation is based on a plane relaxation technique involving Fourier transforms to partially decouple the three-dimensional difference equations. Particular care is taken to assure accurate solutions near corners found in shell designs. Computed surface pressures are compared to experimental measurements for circular arc and cone cylinder bodies which have been selected as test cases. Computed pitching moments are compared to range measurements for a typical projectile shape.

  12. Adolescents' cognition of projectile motion: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Yan; Yu, Guoliang

    2009-04-01

    Previous work on the development of intuitive knowledge about projectile motion has shown a dissociation between action knowledge expressed on an action task and conceptual knowledge expressed on a judgment task for young children. The research investigated the generality of dissociation for adolescents. On the action task, participants were asked to swing Ball A of a bifilar pendulum to some height then release it to collide with Ball B, which was projected to hit a target. On the judgment task, participants indicated orally the desired swing angle at which Ball A should be released so that Ball B would strike a target. Unlike previous findings with adults, the adolescents showed conceptual difficulties on the judgment task and well-developed action knowledge on the action task, which suggests dissociation between the two knowledge systems is also present among adolescents. The result further supports the hypothesis that the two knowledge systems follow different developmental trajectories and at different speeds.

  13. Selected Screen for Engaging Students in Projectile Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dramae, A.; Toedtanya, K.; Wuttiprom, S.

    2017-09-01

    Connecting physics concepts to activities that are interesting to students or what they encounter in everyday life will help students build a strong foundation. When there is an interesting activity for the student, it will result in the student responding, engaging, and enthusiasm in learning. Learning activities that are based on what students are interested in and regularly experience will enable students to understand the long and memorable experience. Both of these will enhance the student’s learning experience. One of the activities that can be described in this research used the learning activity through movies, which is the application of the basic motion projectile for students to understand the characteristics of such movement. It also aims to further develop critical thinking skills of learners.

  14. Dimensional crossover in fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez, Arezky H.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2000-11-01

    Experiments in which thick clay plates and glass rods are fractured have revealed different behavior of fragment mass distribution function in the small and large fragment regions. In this paper we explain this behavior using non-extensive Tsallis statistics and show how the crossover between the two regions is caused by the change in the fragments’ dimensionality during the fracture process. We obtain a physical criterion for the position of this crossover and an expression for the change in the power-law exponent between the small and large fragment regions. These predictions are in good agreement with the experiments on thick clay plates.

  15. Native Frames: Disentangling Sequential from Concerted Three-Body Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, Jyoti; Severt, T.; Berry, Ben; Jochim, Bethany; Feizollah, Peyman; Kaderiya, Balram; Zohrabi, M.; Ablikim, U.; Ziaee, Farzaneh; Raju P., Kanaka; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2018-03-01

    A key question concerning the three-body fragmentation of polyatomic molecules is the distinction of sequential and concerted mechanisms, i.e., the stepwise or simultaneous cleavage of bonds. Using laser-driven fragmentation of OCS into O++C++S+ and employing coincidence momentum imaging, we demonstrate a novel method that enables the clear separation of sequential and concerted breakup. The separation is accomplished by analyzing the three-body fragmentation in the native frame associated with each step and taking advantage of the rotation of the intermediate molecular fragment, CO2 + or CS2 + , before its unimolecular dissociation. This native-frame method works for any projectile (electrons, ions, or photons), provides details on each step of the sequential breakup, and enables the retrieval of the relevant spectra for sequential and concerted breakup separately. Specifically, this allows the determination of the branching ratio of all these processes in OCS3 + breakup. Moreover, we find that the first step of sequential breakup is tightly aligned along the laser polarization and identify the likely electronic states of the intermediate dication that undergo unimolecular dissociation in the second step. Finally, the separated concerted breakup spectra show clearly that the central carbon atom is preferentially ejected perpendicular to the laser field.

  16. Fragment capture device

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point ofmore » the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.« less

  17. Fragment capture device

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  18. Techniques for Transition and Surface Temperature Measurements on Projectiles at Hypersonic Velocities- A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    A research effort to advance techniques for determining transition location and measuring surface temperatures on graphite-tipped projectiles in hypersonic flight in a ballistic range is described. Projectiles were launched at muzzle velocities of approx. 4.7 km/sec into air at pressures of 190-570 Torr. Most launches had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 2.5-5 degrees at pressures of 380 Torr and above and 3-6 degrees at pressures of 190-380 Torr. Arcjet-ablated and machined, bead-blasted projectiles were launched; special cleaning techniques had to be developed for the latter class of projectiles. Improved methods of using helium to remove the radiating gas cap around the projectiles at the locations where ICCD (intensified charge coupled device) camera images were taken are described. Two ICCD cameras with a wavelength sensitivity range of 480-870 nm have been used in this program for several years to obtain images. In the last year, a third camera, with a wavelength sensitivity range of 1.5-5 microns [in the infrared (IR)], has been added. ICCD and IR camera images of hemisphere nose and 70 degree sphere-cone nose projectiles at velocities of 4.0-4.7 km/sec are presented. The ICCD images clearly show a region of steep temperature rise indicative of transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Preliminary temperature data for the graphite projectile noses are presented.

  19. Non-invasive timing of gas gun projectiles with light detection and ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, P. M.; Bartram, B. D.; Gibson, L. L.; Wu, M.; Dattelbaum, D. M.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) diagnostic to track the position of a projectile inside of a gas gun launch tube in real-time. This capability permits the generation of precisely timed trigger pulses useful for triggering high-latency diagnostics such as a flash lamp-pumped laser. An initial feasibility test was performed using a 72 mm bore diameter single-stage gas gun routinely used for dynamic research at Los Alamos. A 655 nm pulsed diode laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz was used to interrogate the position of the moving projectile in real-time. The position of the projectile in the gun barrel was tracked over a distance of ~ 3 meters prior to impact. The position record showed that the projectile moved at a velocity of 489 m/s prior to impacting the target. This velocity was in good agreement with independent measurements of the projectile velocity by photon Doppler velocimetry and timing of the passage of the projectile through optical marker beams positioned at the muzzle of the gun. The time-to-amplitude conversion electronics used enable the LIDAR data to be processed in real-time to generate trigger pulses at preset separations between the projectile and target.

  20. Non-Invasive Timing of Gas Gun Projectiles with Light Detection and Ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Peter; Wu, Ming; Dattelbaum, Dana

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) diagnostic to track the position of a projectile inside of the gas gun barrel in real-time. This capability permits the generation of precisely timed trigger pulses useful for pre-triggering high-latency diagnostics such as a flash lamp-pumped laser. An initial feasibility test was performed using a 72 mm bore single-stage gas gun routinely used for dynamic research at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A 655-nm pulsed (~100 ps) diode laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of ~100 kHz was used to interrogate the position of the moving projectile in real-time. The position of the projectile in the gun barrel was tracked over a distance of ~3 meters prior to impact. The position record showed that the projectile moved at a constant velocity (483 m/s) prior to impacting the target. This velocity was in good agreement with independent measurements of the projectile velocity by photon Doppler velocimetry, and timing of the passage of the projectile through optical marker beams positioned at the muzzle of the gun. The LIDAR return can be processed in real-time to generate pre-trigger pulses at preset separations between the projectile and target. Work funded by LANL Laboratory Directed Research Project 2011012DR. LA-UR-13-21121, approved for public release.

  1. Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Shevitz, Daniel Wolf; Key, Brian P.; Garcia, Daniel B.

    2017-09-05

    The Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT) is a software package used for probabilistic consequence evaluation of fragmenting sources. The typical use case for FIT is to simulate an exploding shell and evaluate the consequence on nearby objects. FIT is written in the programming language Python and is designed as a collection of interacting software modules. Each module has a function that interacts with the other modules to produce desired results.

  2. Experimental study of the penetrating of plates by projectile at low initial speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, M. Yu; Orlova, Yu N.; Smakotin, Ig L.; Glazyrin, V. P.; Orlov, Yu N.

    2017-11-01

    The research of the penetration process of lightweight plates by a projectile in the range of initial velocities up to 325 m/s was attempted. The projectile was a shell bullet and the barriers were of ice, MDF-panels and plexiglas barriers. The response of barriers to impact loading is studied. High-speed shooting of each experiment is obtained, including photos of the front and rear sides of the barriers. An attempt was made to reproduce the scenario of the destruction of barriers. The results of experiments can be interpreted only as qualitative tests. Projectile was not destroyed.

  3. Projectile motion in real-life situation: Kinematics of basketball shooting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changjan, A.; Mueanploy, W.

    2015-06-01

    Basketball shooting is a basic practice for players. The path of the ball from the players to the hoop is projectile motion. For undergraduate introductory physics courses student must be taught about projectile motion. Basketball shooting can be used as a case study for learning projectile motion from real-life situation. In this research, we discuss the relationship between optimal angle, minimum initial velocity and the height of the ball before the player shoots the ball for basketball shooting problem analytically. We found that the value of optimal angle and minimum initial velocity decreases with increasing the height of the ball before the player shoots the ball.

  4. Effect of Target Thickness on Cratering and Penetration of Projectiles Impacting at Velocities to 13,000 Feet Per Second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Lambert, C. H., Jr.; Schryer, David R.; Casey, Francis W., Jr.

    1958-01-01

    In order to determine the effects of target thickness on the penetration and cratering of a target resulting from impacts by high-velocity projectiles, a series of experimental tests have been run. The projectile-target material combinations investigated were aluminum projectiles impacting aluminum targets and steel projectiles impacting aluminum and copper targets. The velocity spectrum ranged from 4,000 ft/sec to 13,000 ft/sec. It has been found that the penetration is a function of target thickness provided that the penetration is greater than 20 percent of the target thickness. Targets of a thickness such that the penetration amounts to less than 20 percent of the thickness may be regarded as quasi-infinite. An empirical formula has been established relating the penetration to the target thickness and to the penetration of a projectile of the same mass, configuration, and velocity into a quasi- infinite target. In particular, it has been found that a projectile can completely penetrate a target whose thickness is approximately one and one-half times as great as the penetration of a similar projectile into a quasi-infinite target. The diameter of a crater has also been found to be a function of the target thickness provided that the target thickness is not greater than the projectile length in the case of cylindrical projectiles and not greater than two to three times the projectile diameter in the case of spherical projectiles.

  5. Injuries caused by fragmenting rifle ammunition.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Jorgen Joakim; Naess, Paal Aksel; Gaarder, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Although penetrating injuries are encountered on a regular basis in high volume trauma centres, most civilian trauma teams will be unfamiliar with the treatment of patients with injuries caused by fragmenting ammunition. The terrorist attacks in Norway on July 22, 2011 included a shooting spree causing 69 deaths and 60 injured. One of the weapons used was a semi-automatic rifle, calibre 5.56mm, with soft tip, short stop ammunition. The aim of the present study was to describe the characteristic injury patterns and lessons learned from the treatment of multiple patients admitted at the regional trauma centre with injuries from this type of ammunition. We undertook an observational study of patients admitted at Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval after the shooting spree at Utoya on July 22, 2011. Data on demographics, injuries, injury severity, surgical procedures and outcome were collected prospectively. Of the 21 patients admitted after the shooting incident, 18 were identified with injuries caused by fragmenting ammunition and included in the study. Median age was 17 years (IQR 16, 19), median ISS 21 (IQR 12, 30) and 12 patients were female. They had been hit by a total of 38 projectiles, of which 32 were fragmenting bullets. Of the seven patients who sustained injuries to the head, neck and face, one patient required a craniotomy and one patient had a non-survivable head injury. Of the 11 patients with torso injuries, six of the eight patients with chest injuries had intra-thoracic injuries that could be treated with chest tubes only. One patient had cardiac tamponade, requiring thoracotomy. Six patients underwent laparotomy, four of them more than one. Of the 10 patients with extremity injuries, two had nerve injuries and six patients had fractures. Five amputations were performed within the first nine days. A total of 101 operations were required within the first four weeks. The majority of these were repeated soft tissue debridements due to progressive necrosis

  6. Shape Distribution of Fragments from Microsatellite Impact Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.C.; Hanada, T.

    2009-01-01

    Fragment shape is an important factor for conducting reliable orbital debris damage assessments for critical space assets, such as the International Space Station. To date, seven microsatellite impact tests have been completed as part of an ongoing collaboration between Kyushu University and the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office. The target satellites ranged in size from 15 cm 15 cm 15 cm to 20 cm 20 cm 20 cm. Each target satellite was equipped with fully functional electronics, including circuits, battery, and transmitter. Solar panels and multi-layer insulation (MLI) were added to the target satellites of the last two tests. The impact tests were carried out with projectiles of different sizes and impact speeds. All fragments down to about 2 mm in size were collected and analyzed based on their three orthogonal dimensions, x, y, and z, where x is the longest dimension, y is the longest dimension in the plane perpendicular to x, and z is the longest dimension perpendicular to both x and y. Each fragment was also photographed and classified by shape and material composition. This data set serves as the basis of our effort to develop a fragment shape distribution. Two distinct groups can be observed in the x/y versus y/z distribution of the fragments. Objects in the first group typically have large x/y values. Many of them are needle-like objects originating from the fragmentation of carbon fiber reinforced plastic materials used to construct the satellites. Objects in the second group tend to have small x/y values, and many of them are box-like or plate-like objects, depending on their y/z values. Each group forms the corresponding peak in the x/y distribution. However, only one peak can be observed in the y/z distribution. These distributions and how they vary with size, material type, and impact parameters will be described in detail within the paper.

  7. The challenges in developing a finite element injury model of the neck to predict the penetration of explosively propelled projectiles.

    PubMed

    Breeze, Johno; Newbery, T; Pope, D; Midwinter, M J

    2014-09-01

    Neck injuries sustained by UK service personnel serving on current operations from explosively propelled fragments result in significant mortality and long-term morbidity. Many of these injuries could potentially have been prevented had the soldiers been wearing their issued neck collars at the time of injury. The aim of this research is to develop an accurate method of predicting the resultant damage to cervical neurovascular structures from explosively propelled fragments. A finite element numerical model has been developed based on an anatomically accurate, anthropometrically representative 3D mathematical mesh of cervical neurovascular structures. Currently, the model simulates the passage of a fragment simulating projectile through all anatomical components of the neck using material models based upon 20% ballistic gelatin on the simplification that all tissue types act like homogenous muscle. The material models used to define the properties of each element within the model will be sequentially replaced by ones specific to each individual tissue within an anatomical structure. However, the cumulative effect of so many additional variables will necessitate experimental validation against both animal models and post-mortem human subjects to improve the credibility of any predictions made by the model. We believe this approach will in the future have the potential to enable objective comparisons between the mitigative effects of different body armour systems to be made with resultant time and financial savings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. A Web-Based Video Digitizing System for the Study of Projectile Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, John W.; Carlton, Les G.; Ekkekakis, Panteleimon; Hay, James G.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses advantages of a video-based, digitized image system for the study and analysis of projectile motion in the physics laboratory. Describes the implementation of a web-based digitized video system. (WRM)

  9. High resolution imaging of a subsonic projectile using automated mirrors with large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Y.; Ishii, M.; Oku, H.

    2017-02-01

    Visual tracking of high-speed projectiles is required for studying the aerodynamics around the objects. One solution to this problem is a tracking method based on the so-called 1 ms Auto Pan-Tilt (1ms-APT) system that we proposed in previous work, which consists of rotational mirrors and a high-speed image processing system. However, the images obtained with that system did not have high enough resolution to realize detailed measurement of the projectiles because of the size of the mirrors. In this study, we propose a new system consisting of enlarged mirrors for tracking a high-speed projectiles so as to achieve higher-resolution imaging, and we confirmed the effectiveness of the system via an experiment in which a projectile flying at subsonic speed tracked.

  10. Projectile containing metastable intermolecular composites and spot fire method of use

    DOEpatents

    Asay, Blaine W.; Son, Steven F.; Sanders, V. Eric; Foley, Timothy; Novak, Alan M.; Busse, James R.

    2012-07-31

    A method for altering the course of a conflagration involving firing a projectile comprising a powder mixture of oxidant powder and nanosized reductant powder at velocity sufficient for a violent reaction between the oxidant powder and the nanosized reductant powder upon impact of the projectile, and causing impact of the projectile at a location chosen to draw a main fire to a spot fire at such location and thereby change the course of the conflagration, whereby the air near the chosen location is heated to a temperature sufficient to cause a spot fire at such location. The invention also includes a projectile useful for such method and said mixture preferably comprises a metastable intermolecular composite.

  11. 'The Monkey and the Hunter' and Other Projectile Motion Experiments with Logo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolodiy, George Oleh

    1988-01-01

    Presents the LOGO computer language as a source to experience and investigate scientific laws. Discusses aspects and uses of LOGO. Lists two LOGO programs, one to simulate a gravitational field and the other projectile motion. (MVL)

  12. Model-based Estimation for Pose, Velocity of Projectile from Stereo Linear Array Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhuxin; Wen, Gongjian; Zhang, Xing; Li, Deren

    2012-01-01

    The pose (position and attitude) and velocity of in-flight projectiles have major influence on the performance and accuracy. A cost-effective method for measuring the gun-boosted projectiles is proposed. The method adopts only one linear array image collected by the stereo vision system combining a digital line-scan camera and a mirror near the muzzle. From the projectile's stereo image, the motion parameters (pose and velocity) are acquired by using a model-based optimization algorithm. The algorithm achieves optimal estimation of the parameters by matching the stereo projection of the projectile and that of the same size 3D model. The speed and the AOA (angle of attack) could also be determined subsequently. Experiments are made to test the proposed method.

  13. Wounding potential of 4.4-mm (.173) caliber steel ball projectiles.

    PubMed

    Kamphausen, Thomas; Janßen, Katharina; Banaschak, Sibylle; Rothschild, Markus Alexander

    2018-03-06

    From time to time, severe or fatal injuries caused by small caliber air rifle projectiles are seen. In forensic sciences, the theoretical wounding potential of these weapons and projectiles is widely known. Usually, shots against the skull were reported and, in these cases, penetrating the eyes or thin bone layers of the temporal region. Amongst a huge number of different projectiles available for air guns, sub-caliber 4.4-mm (.173) caliber steel ball projectiles were used in an unusual suicide case. This case led to fundamental questions concerning wound ballistics. An 82-year-old man shot once against his right temporal region and twice into his mouth with a 4.5-mm (.177) caliber air rifle. Because of the exceptionally deep penetration of the base of the skull and the use of spherical-shaped sub-caliber air rifle projectiles, terminal ballistic features were analyzed and compared to results published in forensic literature. Test shots using the same weapon and similar projectiles were fired into ballistic gelatin to measure and calculate basic wound ballistic variables of cal. 4.4-mm (.173) steel balls. In comparison, further test shots with cal. 4.5-mm (.177) steel balls BB (ball bearing), flat-headed and pointed air rifle pellets ("diabolos") were carried out. The theoretical penetration depth in solid bone was calculated with 36.4 mm, and test shots in gelatin from hard contact produced an on-average wound track of 120 mm underlining the potential wounding effect. Furthermore, spherical projectiles could roll back and forth within the barrel, and an air cushion between projectile and breechblock can reduce muzzle velocity by more than half, explaining the retained missile in the temporal region.

  14. [A sign of the rotational impact of the gunshot projectile on the flat bone].

    PubMed

    Leonov, S V

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the mechanisms of formation of the gunshot fracture of the flat bones with special reference to the translational and rotational motion of the projectile. A total of 120 real and experimental injuries of this type were available for the investigation with the use of simulation by the finite-elemental analysis. A set of morphological features has been identified that make it possible to determine the direction of rotation of the gunshot projectile.

  15. A Synopsis of Yaw-Induction Techniques Used During Projectile Free-Flight Aerodynamics Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    the projectile exits the launch tube is often needed. Over the years, numerous yaw-induction techniques have been developed to deliberately...launch phase, and provide insight pertaining to their implementation and success based upon some quantitative results. 2. WORN TUBES AS YAW...disturbances are predominantly introduced while the projectile is still in bore or in transition (i.e., mechanically disengaged from the gun tube but not

  16. Computational Simulation of High-Speed Projectiles in Air, Water, and Sand

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-03

    Supercavitating projectiles can be used for underwater mine neutralization, beach and surf zone mine clearance, littoral ASW, and neutralizing combat...swimmer systems. The water entry phase of flight is interesting and challenging due to projectile transitioning from flight in air to supercavitating ...is formed. Neaves and Edwards [1] simulated this case using a supercavitation code developed at NSWC-PC. The results presented are in good agreement

  17. Time-Accurate Numerical Prediction of Free Flight Aerodynamics of a Finned Projectile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    develop (with fewer dollars) more lethal and effective munitions. The munitions must stay abreast of the latest technology available to our...consuming. Computer simulations can and have provided an effective means of determining the unsteady aerodynamics and flight mechanics of guided projectile...Recently, the time-accurate technique was used to obtain improved results for Magnus moment and roll damping moment of a spinning projectile at transonic

  18. Trajectory Prediction of Spin-Stabilized Projectiles With a Steady Liquid Payload

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    analysis assumes the effect of a liquid payload is similar to the Magnus effect . Spectral analysis used to numerically compute liquid-fill induced...the internal motion of a liquid payload can induce destabilizing moments on the projectile. This report creates a method to include the effect of... effect , liquid payload moments are added to the applied loads on the projectile. These loads are computed by solving the linearized Navier-Stokes

  19. Generating an Aerodynamic Model for Projectile Flight Simulation Using Unsteady, Time Accurate Computational Fluid Dynamic Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Figure 17. Station line center of Magnus force vs. Mach number for spin-stabilized projectile...forces and moments on the projectile. It is also relatively easy to change the wind tunnel model to allow detailed parametric effects to be...such as pitch and roll damping, as well as, Magnus force and moment coefficients, are difficult to obtain in a wind tunnel and require a complex

  20. Projectile Roll Dynamics and Control With a Low-Cost Skid-to-Turn Maneuver System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    scheme. The mechatronics of the maneuver system was provided. The suitability of this design for survival at gun launch was assessed through...Projectile Roll Dynamics and Control With a Low-Cost Skid-to-Turn Maneuver System by Frank Fresconi, Ilmars Celmins, Mark Ilg, and James...5069 ARL-TR-6363 March 2013 Projectile Roll Dynamics and Control With a Low-Cost Skid-to-Turn Maneuver System Frank Fresconi, Ilmars

  1. Non-lead, environmentally safe projectiles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, Richard A.; McCoig, Thomas M.; Dooley, Joseph B.

    1998-01-01

    A projectile, such as a bullet, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A base constituent, made of a material having density greater than lead, is combined with a binder constituent having less density. The binder constituent is malleable and ductile metallic phase material that forms projectile shapes when subjected to a consolidation force, such as compression. The metal constituents can be selected, rationed, and consolidated to achieve desired frangibility characteristics.

  2. Non-lead, environmentally safe projectiles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, Richard A.; McCoig, Thomas M.; Dooley, Joseph B.

    2000-01-01

    A projectile, such as a bullet, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A base constituent, made of a material having density greater than lead, is combined with a binder constituent having less density. The binder constituent is malleable and ductile metallic phase material that forms projectile shapes when subjected to a consolidation force, such as compression. The metal constituents can be selected, rationed, and consolidated to achieve desired frangibility characteristics.

  3. Non-lead environmentally safe projectiles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, Richard A.; McCoig, Thomas M.; Dooley, Joseph B.

    1999-01-01

    A projectile, such as a bullet, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A base constituent, made of a material having density greater than lead, is combined with a binder constituent having less density. The binder constituent is malleable and ductile metallic base material that forms projectile shapes when subjected to a consolidation force, such as compression. The metal constituents can be selected, rationed, and consolidated to achieve desired frangibility characteristics.

  4. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  5. Global optical model potential for A=3 projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, D. Y.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Varner, R. L.; Wolski, R.

    2009-02-01

    A global optical model potential (GDP08) for He3 projectiles has been obtained by simultaneously fitting the elastic scattering data of He3 from targets of 40⩽AT⩽209 at incident energies of 30⩽Einc⩽217 MeV. Uncertainties and correlation coefficients between the global potential parameters were obtained by using the bootstrap statistical method. GDP08 was found to satisfactorily account for the elastic scattering of H3 as well, which makes it a global optical potential for the A=3 nuclei. Optical model calculations using the GDP08 global potential are compared with the experimental angular distributions of differential cross sections for He3-nucleus and H3-nucleus scattering from different targets of 6⩽AT⩽232 at incident energies of 4⩽Einc⩽450 MeV. The optical potential for the doubly-magic nucleus Ca40, the low-energy correction to the real potential for nuclei with 58≲AT≲120 at Einc<30 MeV, the comparison with double-folding model calculations and the CH89 potential, and the spin-orbit potential parameters are discussed.

  6. Ballistic Impact of Braided Composites with a Soft Projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M., Jr.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Xie, Ming; Braley, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Impact tests using a soft gelatin projectile were performed to identify failure modes that occur at high strain energy density during impact loading. Failure modes were identified for aluminum plates and for composites plates and half-rings made from triaxial carbon fiber braid having a 0/+/- 60deg architecture. For aluminum plates, a large hole formed as a result of crack propagation from the initiation site at the center of the plate. For composite plates, fiber tensile failure occurred in the back ply at the center of the plate. Cracks then propagated from this site along the +/-60deg fiber directions until triangular flaps opened to form a hole. For composite half-rings fabricated with 0deg fibers aligned circumferentially, fiber tensile failure also occurred in the back ply. Cracks first propagated from this site perpendicular the 0deg fibers. The cracks then turned to follow the +/-60deg fibers and 0deg fibers until rectangular flaps opened to form a hole. Damage in the composites was localized near the impact site, while cracks in the aluminum extended to the boundaries.

  7. Study of hypervelocity projectile impact on thick metal plates

    DOE PAGES

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; ...

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments:more » Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.« less

  8. Multiple pulsed hypersonic liquid diesel fuel jetsdriven by projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianthong, K.; Takayama, K.; Milton, B. E.; Behnia, M.

    2005-06-01

    Further studies on high-speed liquid diesel fuel jets injected into ambient air conditions have been carried out. Projectile impact has been used as the driving mechanism. A vertical two-stage light gas gun was used as a launcher to provide the high-speed impact. This paper describes the experimental technique and visualization methods that provided a rapid series of jet images in the one shot. A high-speed video camera (106 fps) and shadowgraph optical system were used to obtain visualization. Very interesting and unique phenomena have been discovered and confirmed in this study. These are that multiple high frequency jet pulses are generated within the duration of a single shot impact. The associated multiple jet shock waves have been clearly captured. This characteristic consistently occurs with the smaller conical angle, straight cone nozzles but not with those with a very wide cone angle or curved nozzle profile. An instantaneous jet tip velocity of 2680 m/s (Mach number of 7.86) was the maximum obtained with the 40^circ nozzle. However, this jet tip velocity can only be sustained for a few microseconds as attenuation is very rapid.

  9. Electromagnetic Dissociation Cross Sections for High LET Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear interaction cross sections are used in space radiation transport codes to calculate the probability of fragment emission in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Strong interactions usually dominate in these collisions, but electromagnetic (EM) interactions can also sometimes be important. Strong interactions typically occur when the projectile nucleus hits a target nucleus, with a small impact parameter. For impact parameters larger than the sum of the nuclear radii, EM reactions dominate and the process is called electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) if one of the nuclei undergo fragmentation. Previous models of EMD have been used to calculate single proton (p) production, single neutron (n) production or light ion production, where a light ion is defined as an isotope of hydrogen (H) or helium (He), such as a deuteron (2H), a triton (3H), a helion (3He) or an alpha particle (4He). A new model is described which can also account for multiple nucleon production, such as 2p, 2n, 1p1n, 2p1n, 2p2n, etc. in addition to light ion production. Such processes are important to include for the following reasons. Consider, for example, the EMD reaction 56Fe + Al --> 52Cr + X + Al, for a 56Fe projectile impacting Al, which produces the high linear energy transfer (LET) fragment 52Cr. In this reaction, the most probable particles representing X are either 2p2n or 4He. Therefore, production of the high LET fragment 52Cr, must include the multiple nucleon production of 2p2n in addition to the light ion production of 4He. Previous models, such as the NUCFRG3 model, could only account for the 4He production process in this reaction and could not account for 2p2n. The new EMD model presented in this work accounts for both the light ion and multiple nucleon processes, and is therefore able to correctly account for the production of high LET products such as 52Cr. The model will be described and calculations will be presented that show the importance of light ion and multiple

  10. Design and Analysis of A Spin-Stabilized Projectile Experimental Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Noah; Rodebaugh, Gregory; Elkins, Christopher; van Poppel, Bret; Benson, Michael; Cremins, Michael; Lachance, Austin; Ortega, Raymond; Vanderyacht, Douglas

    2017-11-01

    Spinning objects experience an effect termed `The Magnus Moment' due to an uneven pressure distribution based on rotation within a crossflow. Unlike the Magnus force, which is often small for spin-stabilized projectiles, the Magnus moment can have a strong detrimental effect on aerodynamic flight stability. Simulations often fail to accurately predict the Magnus moment in the subsonic flight regime. In an effort to characterize the conditions that cause the Magnus moment, researchers in this work employed Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) techniques to measure three dimensional, three component, sub-millimeter resolution fluid velocity fields around a scaled model of a spinning projectile in flight. The team designed, built, and tested using a novel water channel apparatus that was fully MRI-compliant - water-tight and non-ferrous - and capable of spinning a projectile at a constant rotational speed. A supporting numerical simulation effort informed the design process of the scaled projectile to thicken the hydrodynamic boundary layer near the outer surface of the projectile. Preliminary testing produced two-dimensional and three-dimensional velocity data and revealed an asymmetric boundary layer around the projectile, which is indicative of the Magnus effect.

  11. Experimental investigation on underwater trajectory deviation of high-speed projectile with different nose shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Qi, Yafei; Huang, Wei; Gao, Yubo

    2017-01-01

    The investigation on free-surface impact of projectiles has last for more than one hundred years due to its noticeable significance on improving defensive weapon technology. Laboratory-scaled water entry experiments for trajectory stability had been performed with four kinds of projectiles at a speed range of 20˜200 m/s. The nose shapes of the cylindrical projectiles were designed into flat, ogive, hemi-sphere and cone to make comparisons on the trajectory deviation when they were launched into water at a certain angle of 0˜20°. Two high-speed cameras positioned orthogonal to each other and normal to the water tank were employed to capture the entire process of projectiles' penetration. From the experimental results, the consecutive images in two planes were presented to display the general process of the trajectory deviation. Compared with the effect of impact velocities and nose shape on trajectory deviation, it merited conclude that flat projectiles had a better trajectory stability, while ogival projectiles experienced the largest attitude change. The characteristics of pressure waves were also investigated.

  12. Pepper spray projectile/disperser for countering hostage and barricade situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Roy

    1997-01-01

    An improved less-than-lethal projectile for use in hostage, barricade and tactical assault situations has been developed. The projectile is launched from a standoff position and disperse the incapacitating agent oleoresin capsicum in the form of atomized droplets. A literature search followed by an experimental study were conducted of the mechanism of barrier defeat for various shaped projectiles against the targets of interest in this work: window glass, plasterboard and plywood. Some of the trade- offs between velocity, standoff, projectile shape and size, penetration, and residual energy were quantified. Analysis of the ballistic trajectory and recoil, together with calculations of he amount of pepper spray needed to incapacitate the occupants of a typical barricaded structure, indicated the suitability of using a fin stabilized projectile fired from a conventional 37 mm riot control gas gun. Two projectile designs were considered, manufactured and tested. The results of static tests to simulate target impact, together with live firing trials against a variety of targets, showed that rear ejection of the atomized spray was more reproducible and effective than nose ejection. The performance characteristics of the finalized design were investigated in trials using the standard barrier for testing barrier penetrating tear gas agents as defined by the National Institute of Justice.

  13. Ablation and deceleration of mass-driver launched projectiles for space disposal of nuclear wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Bowen, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The energy cost of launching a projectile containing nuclear waste is two orders of magnitude lower with a mass driver than with a typical rocket system. A mass driver scheme will be feasible, however, only if ablation and deceleration are within certain tolerable limits. It is shown that if a hemisphere-cylinder-shaped projectile protected thermally with a graphite nose is launched vertically to attain a velocity of 17 km/sec at an altitude of 40 km, the mass loss from ablation during atmospheric flight will be less than 0.1 ton, provided the radius of the projectile is under 20 cm and the projectile's mass is of the order of 1 ton. The velocity loss from drag will vary from 0.4 to 30 km/sec, depending on the mass and radius of the projectile, the smaller velocity loss corresponding to large mass and small radius. Ablation is always within a tolerable range for schemes using a mass driver launcher to dispose of nuclear wastes outside the solar system. Deceleration can also be held in the tolerable range if the mass and diameter of the projectile are properly chosen.

  14. Spinning projectile's attitude measurement with LW infrared radiation under sea-sky background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Miaomiao; Bu, Xiongzhu; Yu, Jing; He, Zilu

    2018-05-01

    With the further development of infrared radiation research in sea-sky background and the requirement of spinning projectile's attitude measurement, the sea-sky infrared radiation field is used to carry out spinning projectile's attitude angle instead of inertial sensors. Firstly, the generation mechanism of sea-sky infrared radiation is analysed. The mathematical model of sea-sky infrared radiation is deduced in LW (long wave) infrared 8 ∼ 14 μm band by calculating the sea surface and sky infrared radiation. Secondly, according to the movement characteristics of spinning projectile, the attitude measurement model of infrared sensors on projectile's three axis is established. And the feasibility of the model is analysed by simulation. Finally, the projectile's attitude calculation algorithm is designed to improve the attitude angle estimation accuracy. The results of semi-physical experiments show that the segmented interactive algorithm estimation error of pitch and roll angle is within ±1.5°. The attitude measurement method is effective and feasible, and provides accurate measurement basis for the guidance of spinning projectile.

  15. The effect of perforations on the ballistics of a flare-stabilized projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermagen, W. H.; Yalamanchili, R. J.

    Flight tests of two 35/105 mm flare stabilized projectile configurations were conducted. The projectiles were fired from the M68 tank cannon at Mach 4.0 using a standard M735 sabot. Flight data were obtained with a doppler velocimeter. The perforated flare projectiles showed a reduced drag for M greater than 1.7, which increased significantly at velocities below M 1.7, while the solid flare rounds had a slightly higher drag above Mach 1.7. Below Mach 1.7, the solid flare rounds had less drag than the perforated flare round. Both solid and perforated flare projectiles had a maximum range of less than 8.0 kilometers. The effects of the perforations on the flight performance were small. The flight data are compared to previous tests of the German-made 'LKL' projectile. The differences in flight performance between solid flares, flares with perforations, and the LKL-perforated flare rounds were small and of no practical consequence. Dispersion tests of the solid-flare stabilized projectiles were conducted at one, two, and three kilometers with excellent results. Very low dispersions were observed at all ranges.

  16. Destabilization and intracranial fragmentation of a full metal jacket bullet.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, A; Raul, J S; Geraut, A; Tortel, M C; Ludes, B

    2009-10-01

    We report a case with an atypical entrance wound as a result of a destabilized full metal jacket bullet penetration. The destabilized bullet by an impact with the dorsal hand experiences a yawing to tumbling motion in flight. The large angle of yaw induces a larger presenting profile upon impact that contributes, associated to a rapid deceleration, to a greater mechanical force on the projectile structure and a fragmentation into core and jacket. Forensic pathologists have to be aware that the metal jacket bullet could tend to break up outside or inside the body particularly after a shooting through a target. This phenomenon induces atypical entrance wounds and atypical X-ray presentation. 2009 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine.

  17. High speed observation of fragment impact initiation of nitromethane charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, M. D.; Haskins, P. J.; Briggs, R. I.; Cheese, P.; Stennett, C.; Fellows, J.

    2000-04-01

    Ultra high-speed digital photography has been used to record the onset and build-up of reaction in nitromethane charges that have been impacted by steel fragments. The nitromethane charges were housed in PMMA cylinders and back-lit using conventional flash bulbs. Flat plates of aluminum were glued to one end of the cylinder and PMMA plates to the other. The completed charge was positioned to allow normal impact of the projectiles through the aluminum barrier plate. The events were filmed using an Imacon 468, ultra high-speed digital image system, capable of framing at up to 100 million pictures per second. Using this system it was possible to record detailed photographic information concerning the onset and growth of reaction due to shock initiation of the nitromethane charges. The results obtained to date are consistent with the established concepts for initiation of homogeneous and heterogeneous materials.

  18. High Speed Observation of Fragment Impact Initiation of Nitromethane Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, M. D.; Briggs, R. I.; Haskins, P. J.; Stennett, C.

    1999-06-01

    Ultra high speed digital photography has been used to record the onset and build-up of reaction in nitromethane charges that have been impacted by steel fragments. The nitromethane charges were housed in perspex cylinders and back-lit using conventional flash bulbs. Flat plates of aluminium of varying thicknesses were glued to one end of the cylinder and perspex plates to the other. The completed charge was positioned to allow normal impact of the projectiles. The events were filmed using and Imacon 468, ultra high speed digital image system capable of framing at up to 100 million pictures per second, with a minimum interframe time of 10 nanoseconds, and exposure time of between 10ns and 1 millisecond. Using this system it was possible to record detailed photographic information concerning the onset and growth of reaction due to shock initiation of the nitromethane charges. The implications of these results for the ignition and growth process in nitromethane are discussed.

  19. The Fragmentation of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Information and communication technologies, especially the Internet, have vastly increased access to information and educational opportunities. Steadily increasing consumer demand is driving the development of online educational materials. The end result may be a "fragmentation" of learning involving multiple learning providers and delivery modes,…

  20. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Treesearch

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  1. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  2. Intermediate mass fragment emission and iso-scaling in dissipative Ca+Sn reactions at 45 AMeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, H.; Quinlan, M. J.; Tõke, J.; Pawelczak, I.; Henry, E.; Schröder, W. U.; Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Maiolino, C.; Auditore, L.; Loria, D.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Cavallaro, S.; Geraci, E.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Verde, G.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guazzoni, P.; Zetta, L.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lo Nigro, S.; Politi, G.; Loria, D.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Vigilante, M.

    2013-04-01

    The production mechanism of intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) with atomic numbers Z = 3 - 7 is explored in the intermediate energy regime, studying dissipative 48Ca+112Sn and 48Ca+124Sn reactions at E/A = 45MeV. Various aspects of IMF emission patterns point to an inelastic break-up type production mechanism involving excited projectile-like fragment from dissipative interactions. Isotopic yield ratios of identical IMFs from the above two dissipative reactions have been analysed using the "isoscaling" method. Observed trends are correlated with ground-state binding energy systematics and their relevance for an evaluation of the symmetry energy is discussed.

  3. Instantaneous charge state of uranium projectiles in fully ionized plasmas from energy loss experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Roberto; Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.; Casas, David

    2017-04-01

    The instantaneous charge state of uranium ions traveling through a fully ionized hydrogen plasma has been theoretically studied and compared with one of the first energy loss experiments in plasmas, carried out at GSI-Darmstadt by Hoffmann et al. in the 1990s. For this purpose, two different methods to estimate the instantaneous charge state of the projectile have been employed: (1) rate equations using ionization and recombination cross sections and (2) equilibrium charge state formulas for plasmas. Also, the equilibrium charge state has been obtained using these ionization and recombination cross sections and compared with the former equilibrium formulas. The equilibrium charge state of projectiles in plasmas is not always reached, and it depends mainly on the projectile velocity and the plasma density. Therefore, a non-equilibrium or an instantaneous description of the projectile charge is necessary. The charge state of projectile ions cannot be measured, except after exiting the target, and experimental data remain very scarce. Thus, the validity of our charge state model is checked by comparing the theoretical predictions with an energy loss experiment, as the energy loss has a generally quadratic dependence on the projectile charge state. The dielectric formalism has been used to calculate the plasma stopping power including the Brandt-Kitagawa (BK) model to describe the charge distribution of the projectile. In this charge distribution, the instantaneous number of bound electrons instead of the equilibrium number has been taken into account. Comparing our theoretical predictions with experiments, it is shown the necessity of including the instantaneous charge state and the BK charge distribution for a correct energy loss estimation. The results also show that the initial charge state has a strong influence in order to estimate the energy loss of the uranium ions.

  4. Projectile metallic foreign bodies in the orbit: a retrospective study of epidemiologic factors, management, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, M; Legmann, A; Rubin, P A

    1997-01-01

    Intraorbital projectile metallic foreign bodies are associated with significant ocular and orbital injuries. The authors sought to evaluate epidemiologic factors, the incidence of associated ocular and orbital injury, and the nature and necessity of surgical intervention in these cases. Charts of all patients with projectile intraorbital metallic foreign bodies seen at our institution (27) over the preceding 7 years were evaluated with respect to age, sex, type of injury, associated ocular and orbital injuries, location of the projectile (anterior, epibulbar, or posterior), postinjury visual acuity, and surgical intervention. The majority of patients were male, between the ages of 11 and 30, and had BB pellet injuries. Thirteen projectiles were lodged anteriorly, 4 were in an epibulbar position, and the remaining 10 were posterior to the equator. Twelve of 13 anterior, and 4 of 4 epibulbar foreign bodies were removed surgically, whereas only 2 of 10 posterior foreign bodies required surgery. No case of surgical intervention resulted in a decrease of visual acuity. Associated ocular injuries were both more common and severe in patients with posteriorly located foreign bodies. Final visual acuity was better at presentation and at discharge in patients with anteriorly located foreign bodies. Intraorbital projectile metallic foreign bodies can be a source of significant ocular morbidity. Management of these cases is dependent on the location of the projectile. Ancillary radiographic studies can be helpful. Surgery to remove the projectile should be considered in each case, but foreign bodies that are not readily accessible often may be left safely in place. Closer regulation of the pellet gun industry, with an emphasis on education and protective eyewear use, would be helpful in reducing these injuries.

  5. Effect of Grain Scale Properties on Bulk Deformation of Granular Deposits Due to High Speed Projectile Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-08

    Details of 1D compression test Material: Florida coastal sand Mean diameter: 0.37(mm) Vessel: Stainless steel Vessel inner diameter 6.0(mm... turned out that the projectile deceleration behavior observed in the experiment is a consequence of the complicated compression behavior of sand...applicability of the proposed EOS into high-speed projectile impact experiment. It turned out that the projectile deceleration behavior observed in the

  6. Fragmentation of tetrahydrofuran molecules by H(+), C(+), and O(+) collisions at the incident energy range of 25-1000 eV.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, Tomasz J; Pranszke, Bogusław

    2015-01-29

    We have studied fragmentation processes of the gas-phase tetrahydrofuran (THF) molecules in collisions with the H(+), C(+), and O(+) cations. The collision energies have been varied between 25 and 1000 eV and thus covered a velocity range from 10 to 440 km/s. The following excited neutral fragments of THF have been observed: the atomic hydrogen H(n), n = 4-9, carbon atoms in the 2p3s (1)P1, 2p4p (1)D2, and 2p4p (3)P states and vibrationally and rotationally excited diatomic CH fragments in the A(2)Δ and B(2)Σ(-) states. Fragmentation yields of these excited fragments have been measured as functions of the projectile energy (velocity). Our results show that the fragmentation mechanism depends on the projectile cations and is dominated by electron transfer from tetrahydrofuran molecules to cations. It has been additionally hypothesized that in the C(+)+THF collisions a [C-C4H8O](+) complex is formed prior to dissociation. The possible reaction channels involved in fragmentation of THF under the H(+), C(+), and O(+) cations impact are also discussed.

  7. Cryobiology of coral fragments.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Mary; Farrell, Ann; Carter, Virginia L

    2013-02-01

    Around the world, coral reefs are dying due to human influences, and saving habitat alone may not stop this destruction. This investigation focused on the biological processes that will provide the first steps in understanding the cryobiology of whole coral fragments. Coral fragments are a partnership of coral tissue and endosymbiotic algae, Symbiodinium sp., commonly called zooxanthellae. These data reflected their separate sensitivities to chilling and a cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide) for the coral Pocillopora damicornis, as measured by tissue loss and Pulse Amplitude Modulated fluorometry 3weeks post-treatment. Five cryoprotectant treatments maintained the viability of the coral tissue and zooxanthellae at control values (1M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0h exposures, and 1.5M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0 and 1.5h exposures, P>0.05, ANOVA), whereas 2M concentrations did not (P<0.05, ANOVA). A seasonal response to chilling was observed in the coral tissue, but not in the zooxanthellae. During the winter when the fragments were chilled, the coral tissue remained relatively intact (∼25% loss) post-treatment, but the zooxanthellae numbers in the tissue declined after 5min of chilling (P<0.05, ANOVA). However, in the late spring, coral tissue (∼75% loss) and zooxanthellae numbers declined in response to chilling alone (P<0.05, ANOVA). When a cryoprotectant (1M dimethyl sulfoxide) was used in concert with chilling it protected the coral against tissue loss after 45min of cryoprotectant exposure (P>0.05, ANOVA), but it did not protect against the loss of zooxanthellae (P<0.05, ANOVA). The zooxanthellae are the most sensitive element in the coral fragment complex and future cryopreservation protocols must be guided by their greater sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fragmentation of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, Siva; Kamyabi, Nabiollah

    Tumor cells have to travel through blood capillaries to be able to metastasize and colonize in distant organs. Among the numerous cells that are shed by the primary tumor, very few survive in circulation. In vivo studies have shown that tumor cells can undergo breakup at microcapillary junctions affecting their survival. It is currently unclear what hydrodynamic and biomechanical factors contribute to fragmentation and moreover how different are the breakup dynamics of highly and weakly metastatic cells. In this study, we use microfluidics to investigate flow-induced breakup of prostate and breast cancer cells. We observe several different modes of breakup of cancer cells, which have striking similarities with breakup of viscous drops. We quantify the breakup time and find that highly metastatic cancer cells take longer to breakup than lowly metastatic cells suggesting that tumor cells may dynamically modify their deformability to avoid fragmentation. We also identify the role that cytoskeleton and membrane plays in the breakup process. Our study highlights the important role that tumor cell fragmentation plays in cancer metastasis. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

  9. Ecosystem extent and fragmentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayre, Roger; Hansen, Matt

    2017-01-01

    One of the candidate essential biodiversity variable (EBV) groups described in the seminal paper by Pereira et al. (2014) concerns Ecosystem Structure. This EBV group is distinguished from another EBV group which encompasses aspects of Ecosystem Function. While the Ecosystem Function EBV treats ecosystem processes like nutrient cycling, primary production, trophic interactions, etc., the Ecosystem Structure EBV relates to the set of biophysical properties of ecosystems that create biophysical environmental context, confer biophysical structure, and occur geographically. The Ecosystem Extent and Fragmentation EBV is one of the EBVs in the Ecosystem Structure EBV group.Ecosystems are understood to exist at multiple scales, from very large areas (macro-ecosystems) like the Arctic tundra, for example, to something as small as a tree in an Amazonian rain forest. As such, ecosystems occupy space and therefore can be mapped across any geography of interest, whether that area of interest be a site, a nation, a region, a continent, or the planet. One of the most obvious and seemingly straightforward EBVs is Ecosystem Extent and Fragmentation. Ecosystem extent refers to the location and geographic distribution of ecosystems across landscapes or in the oceans, while ecosystem fragmentation refers to the spatial pattern and connectivity of ecosystem occurrences on the landscape.

  10. Bone-patch type secondary projectiles: A report on two shots fired at point-blank range using hollow point bullets.

    PubMed

    Malbranque, S; Jousset, N; Nedelcu, C; Rougé-Maillart, C

    2014-12-01

    The number of head wounds due to firearms remains low in France because these cases are primarily linked to suicide (or attempted suicide) and, to a lesser extent, to attacks or hunting accidents [1]. Characterized by the impact of a projectile, which in most cases is made of metal, at high levels of kinetic energy, such acts generally result in severe trans-cerebral lesions with significant levels of morbidity/mortality [2]. Seldom are cases reported in the literature that give a detailed study of intracranial foreign bodies made of bone in such situations [3]. Here we report on the case of two suicides resulting from a transcranial gunshot wounds caused by weapons and ammunition issued by the French police force. Each case helped distinguish a characteristic bone fragment, in the form of a "patch", equivalent in size to the caliber of the bullet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemical projectile-target interaction during hypervelocity cratering experiments (MEMIN project).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M.; Hecht, L.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    The detection and identification of meteoritic components in impact-derived rocks are of great value for confirming an impact origin and reconstructing the type of extraterrestrial material that repeatedly stroke the Earth during geologic evolution [1]. However, little is known about processes that control the projectile distribution into the various impactites that originate during the cratering and excavation process, and inter-element fractionation between siderophile elements during impact cratering. In the context of the MEMIN project, cratering experiments have been performed using spheres of Cr-V-Co-Mo-W-rich steel and of the iron meteorite Campo del Cielo (IAB) as projectiles accelerated to about 5 km/s, and blocks of Seeberger sandstone as target. The experiments were carried out at the two-stage acceleration facilities of the Fraunhofer Ernst-Mach-Institute (Freiburg). Our results are based on geochemical analyses of highly shocked ejecta material. The ejecta show various shock features including multiple sets of planar deformations features (PDF) in quartz, diaplectic quartz, and partial melting of the sandstone. Melting is concentrated in the phyllosilicate-bearing sandstone matrix but involves quartz, too. Droplets of molten projectile have entered the low-viscosity sandstone melt but not quartz glass. Silica-rich sandstone melts are enriched in the elements that are used to trace the projectile, like Fe, Ni, Cr, Co, and V (but no or little W and Mo). Inter-element ratios of these "projectile" tracer elements within the contaminated sandstone melt may be strongly modified from the original ratios in the projectiles. This fractionation most likely result from variation in the lithophile or siderophile character and/or from differences in reactivity of these tracer elements with oxygen [2] during interaction of metal melt with silicate melt. The shocked quartz with PDF is also enriched in Fe and Ni (experiment with a meteorite iron projectile) and in Fe

  12. Charge-to-mass dispersion methods for abrasion-ablation fragmentation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Norbury, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Methods to describe the charge-to-mass dispersion distributions of projectile prefragments are presented and used to determine individual isotope cross-sections or various elements produced in the fragmentation of relativistic argon nuclei by carbon targets. Although slight improvements in predicted cross-sections are obtained for the quantum mechanical giant dipole resonance (GDR) distribution when compared qith the predictions of the geometric GDR model, the closest agreement between theory and experiment continues to be obtained with the simple hypergeometric distribution, which treats the nucleons in the nucleus as completely uncorrelated.

  13. Nuclear fragmentation energy and momentum transfer distributions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Khan, Ferdous

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of energy and momentum transfer in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. Transverse and longitudinal momentum transfers to the projectile are shown to arise from the real and absorptive part of the optical potential, respectively. Comparisons of fragment momentum distribution observables with experiments are made and trends outlined based on our knowledge of the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction. Corrections to the above calculations are discussed. Finally, use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is indicated.

  14. Accuracy Improvement Capability of Advanced Projectile Based on Course Correction Fuze Concept

    PubMed Central

    Elsaadany, Ahmed; Wen-jun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Improvement in terminal accuracy is an important objective for future artillery projectiles. Generally it is often associated with range extension. Various concepts and modifications are proposed to correct the range and drift of artillery projectile like course correction fuze. The course correction fuze concepts could provide an attractive and cost-effective solution for munitions accuracy improvement. In this paper, the trajectory correction has been obtained using two kinds of course correction modules, one is devoted to range correction (drag ring brake) and the second is devoted to drift correction (canard based-correction fuze). The course correction modules have been characterized by aerodynamic computations and flight dynamic investigations in order to analyze the effects on deflection of the projectile aerodynamic parameters. The simulation results show that the impact accuracy of a conventional projectile using these course correction modules can be improved. The drag ring brake is found to be highly capable for range correction. The deploying of the drag brake in early stage of trajectory results in large range correction. The correction occasion time can be predefined depending on required correction of range. On the other hand, the canard based-correction fuze is found to have a higher effect on the projectile drift by modifying its roll rate. In addition, the canard extension induces a high-frequency incidence angle as canards reciprocate at the roll motion. PMID:25097873

  15. Accuracy improvement capability of advanced projectile based on course correction fuze concept.

    PubMed

    Elsaadany, Ahmed; Wen-jun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Improvement in terminal accuracy is an important objective for future artillery projectiles. Generally it is often associated with range extension. Various concepts and modifications are proposed to correct the range and drift of artillery projectile like course correction fuze. The course correction fuze concepts could provide an attractive and cost-effective solution for munitions accuracy improvement. In this paper, the trajectory correction has been obtained using two kinds of course correction modules, one is devoted to range correction (drag ring brake) and the second is devoted to drift correction (canard based-correction fuze). The course correction modules have been characterized by aerodynamic computations and flight dynamic investigations in order to analyze the effects on deflection of the projectile aerodynamic parameters. The simulation results show that the impact accuracy of a conventional projectile using these course correction modules can be improved. The drag ring brake is found to be highly capable for range correction. The deploying of the drag brake in early stage of trajectory results in large range correction. The correction occasion time can be predefined depending on required correction of range. On the other hand, the canard based-correction fuze is found to have a higher effect on the projectile drift by modifying its roll rate. In addition, the canard extension induces a high-frequency incidence angle as canards reciprocate at the roll motion.

  16. Evaluating the risk of eye injuries: intraocular pressure during high speed projectile impacts.

    PubMed

    Duma, Stefan M; Bisplinghoff, Jill A; Senge, Danielle M; McNally, Craig; Alphonse, Vanessa D

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the risk of eye injuries by determining intraocular pressure during high speed projectile impacts. A pneumatic cannon was used to impact eyes with a variety of projectiles at multiple velocities. Intraocular pressure was measured with a small pressure sensor inserted through the optic nerve. A total of 36 tests were performed on 12 porcine eyes with a range of velocities between 6.2 m/s and 66.5 m/s. Projectiles selected for the test series included a 6.35  mm diameter metal ball, a 9.25  mm diameter aluminum rod, and an 11.16  mm diameter aluminum rod. Experiments were designed with velocities in the range of projectile consumer products such as toy guns. A range of intraocular pressures ranged between 2017 mmHg to 26,426 mmHg (39 psi-511 psi). Four of the 36 impacts resulted in globe rupture. Intraocular pressures dramatically above normal physiological pressure were observed for high speed projectile impacts. These pressure data provide critical insight to chronic ocular injuries and long-term complications such as glaucoma and cataracts.

  17. Energetic ion bombardment of Ag surfaces by C60+ and Ga+ projectiles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shixin; Szakal, Christopher; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2005-10-01

    The ion bombardment-induced release of particles from a metal surface is investigated using energetic fullerene cluster ions as projectiles. The total sputter yield as well as partial yields of neutral and charged monomers and clusters leaving the surface are measured and compared with corresponding data obtained with atomic projectile ions of similar impact kinetic energy. It is found that all yields are enhanced by about one order of magnitude under bombardment with the C60+ cluster projectiles compared with Ga+ ions. In contrast, the electronic excitation processes determining the secondary ion formation probability are unaffected. The kinetic energy spectra of sputtered particles exhibit characteristic differences which reflect the largely different nature of the sputtering process for both types of projectiles. In particular, it is found that under C60+ impact (1) the energy spectrum of sputtered atoms peaks at significantly lower kinetic energies than for Ga+ bombardment and (2) the velocity spectra of monomers and dimers are virtually identical, a finding which is in pronounced contrast to all published data obtained for atomic projectiles. The experimental findings are in reasonable agreement with recent molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Experimental investigation on underwater trajectory deviation of high-speed projectile with different nose shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, Wei; Gao, Yubo; Qi, Yafei; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory-scaled oblique water entry experiments for the trajectory stability in the water column have been performed with four different nosed-projectiles at a range of velocities from 20m /s to 250 m /s . The slender projectiles are designed with flat, ogival, hemi-sperical, truncated-ogival noses to make comparisons on the trajectory deviation when they are launched at vertical and oblique impact angles (0°~25°). Two high-speed cameras that are positioned orthogonal to each other and normal to the column are employed to capture the entire process of projectiles' penetration. From the experimental results, the sequential images in two planes are presented to compare the trajectory deviation of different impact tests and the 3D trajectory models are extracted based on the location recorded by cameras. Considering the effect influenced by the impact velocities and noses of projectiles, it merited concluded that trajectory deviation is affected from most by impact angle, and least by impact velocities. Additionally, ogival projectiles tend to be more sensitive to oblique angle and experienced the largest attitude changing. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.: 11372088).

  19. Micro-Satellite Impact Tests to Investigate Multi-Layer Insulation Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.C.; Murakami, Junko; Hanaha, Toshiya

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes two satellite impact experiments completed in 2008. The objective of the experiments is to investigate the physical properties of satellite fragments, including those originated from Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) and solar panels. The ultimate goal is to use the results to improve the NASA Standard Breakup Model. The targets were two cubic micro-satellites, 20 cm by 20 cm by 20 cm in size, and approximately 1,500 g in mass. The main structure of each micro-satellite was composed of five layers; the top and bottom layers and three internal layers parallel to the top and bottom layers, plus four side panels. The top layer was equipped with solar cells that was mounted to an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel with CFRP face sheets. The four side panels and the bottom layer are all covered with MLI. The two satellite impact experiments were conducted using the two-stage light gas gun at the Kyushu Institute of Technology in Kitakyusyu, Japan. For the first experiment (labeled Shot F), the satellite was oriented in such a way that the solar panel was facing the incoming projectile, a 39.3 g aluminum alloy solid sphere. For the second experiment (labeled Shot R), the satellite was oriented so that the solar panel was on the opposite side of the impact surface. The projectile used in the second shot was a 39.2 g aluminum alloy solid sphere. The impact speeds of Shot F and Shot R were 1.74 km/s and 1.78 km/s, respectively. The ratio of the impact kinetic energy to satellite mass for the two experiments was about 40 J/g. Both target satellites were completely fragmented, although there were noticeable differences in the characteristics of the fragments. Approximately 1,800 fragments were collected from Shot F but only 1,000 fragments were collected from Shot R. This difference primarily comes from the number of needle-like CFRP and MLI fragments. The difference in CFRP pieces depends on how the CFRP panels were fragmented. Regarding the MLI pieces, a

  20. Ages of Zhamanshin Crater Impactites and Projectile Tektites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izokh, E. P.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Korotkova, N. N.

    1993-07-01

    The Zhamanshin impact crater is the only one in which impactites have been found together with layered Muong Nong-type glasses and tektites-irghizites associated with microtektites. The K-Ar ages of these tektites vary from 0.69 to 5.2 m.y, while fission-track ages vary from 0.75 to 1.08 m.y. All geological data demonstrate a 10,000-year age of the impact event; this age coincides with the age of the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary [1]. A very young fission-track age of the Zhamanshin basic impactites was obtained [2]; however, these results were contested [3]. To eliminate the suggested high differences in thermal stability between basic and acidic Zhamanshin glasses, glass heating experiments were performed. The ~0.01-m.y. age (Table 1) of the basic impact glass collected from the deep bore holes shows that secondary heating and fission-track annealing by Sun-heating, fires, etc., must be excluded. The same age differences (1-2 orders of magnitude) were confirmed by thermoluminescence. Furthermore, in the Muong Nong-type Zhamanshinite, which is full of target rock inclusions, two different fission-track groups were recognized (Table 2). Therefore the Muong Nong-type Zhamanshinites are not local impactites, but instead represent a part of the projectile, as first suggested by J. O'Keefe [4]. In the Zhamanshin case, few tektites that fell opposite to impact explosion were partially remelted, while tektites that landed just after explosion are practically intact, like all other Australasian tektites [1,5]. Tables 1 and 2 appear here in the hard copy. References: [1] Izokh E. (1991) Soviet Geol. and Geophys., 32, 1-10. [2] Kashkarov L. et al. (1987) 2nd Intl. Conf. on Nat. Glasses, Prague, 199-202. [3] Koeberl C. and Storzer D., ibid., 207-213. [4] O'Keefe J. (1987) Meteoritics, 22, 219-228. [5] Izokh E. and Le duc An (1983) Meteoritika, 42, 158-169.

  1. Virtual fragment preparation for computational fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Ludington, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) has become an important component of the drug discovery process. The use of fragments can accelerate both the search for a hit molecule and the development of that hit into a lead molecule for clinical testing. In addition to experimental methodologies for FBDD such as NMR and X-ray Crystallography screens, computational techniques are playing an increasingly important role. The success of the computational simulations is due in large part to how the database of virtual fragments is prepared. In order to prepare the fragments appropriately it is necessary to understand how FBDD differs from other approaches and the issues inherent in building up molecules from smaller fragment pieces. The ultimate goal of these calculations is to link two or more simulated fragments into a molecule that has an experimental binding affinity consistent with the additive predicted binding affinities of the virtual fragments. Computationally predicting binding affinities is a complex process, with many opportunities for introducing error. Therefore, care should be taken with the fragment preparation procedure to avoid introducing additional inaccuracies.This chapter is focused on the preparation process used to create a virtual fragment database. Several key issues of fragment preparation which affect the accuracy of binding affinity predictions are discussed. The first issue is the selection of the two-dimensional atomic structure of the virtual fragment. Although the particular usage of the fragment can affect this choice (i.e., whether the fragment will be used for calibration, binding site characterization, hit identification, or lead optimization), general factors such as synthetic accessibility, size, and flexibility are major considerations in selecting the 2D structure. Other aspects of preparing the virtual fragments for simulation are the generation of three-dimensional conformations and the assignment of the associated atomic point charges.

  2. Some Dynamical Features of Molecular Fragmentation by Electrons and Swift Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro, E. C.; Sigaud, L.; Wolff, W.; Luna, H.; Natalia, Ferreira

    To date, the large majority of studies on molecular fragmentation by swift charged particles have been carried out using simple molecules, for which reliable Potential Energy Curves are available to interpret the measured fragmentation yields. For complex molecules the scenario is quite different and such guidance is not available, obscuring even a simple organization of the data which are currently obtained for a large variety of molecules of biological or technological interest. In this work we show that a general and relatively simple methodology can be used to obtain a broader picture of the fragmentation pattern of an arbitrary molecule. The electronic ionization or excitation cross section of a given molecular orbital, which is the first part of the fragmentation process, can be well scaled by a simple and general procedure at high projectile velocities. The fragmentation fractions arising from each molecular orbital can then be achieved by matching the calculated ionization with the measured fragmentation cross sections. Examples for Oxygen, Chlorodifluoromethane and Pyrimidine molecules are presented.

  3. Projectile motion of a once rotating object: physical quantities at the point of return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabasi, Sameer

    2016-09-01

    Vertical circular motion is a widely used example to explain non-uniform circular motion in most undergraduate general physics textbooks. However, most of these textbooks do not elaborate on the case when this motion turns into projectile motion under certain conditions. In this paper, we describe thoroughly when a mass attached to a cord, moving in a vertical circular motion, turns into a projectile and its location and velocity when it rejoins the circular orbit. This paper provides an intuitive understanding, supported by basic kinematic equations, to give an interesting elegant connection between circular motion and projectile motion—something lacking in most physics textbooks—and will be very useful to present to an undergraduate class to deepen their understanding of both models of motion.

  4. On the non-equilibrium dynamics of cavitation around the underwater projectile in variable motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Lu, C. J.; Li, J.; Chen, X.; Gong, Z. X.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the dynamic behavior of the non-equilibrium cavitation occurring around the underwater projectiles navigating with variable speed was numerically and theoretically investigated. The cavity collapse induced by the decelerating motion of the projectiles can be classified into two types: periodic oscillation and damped oscillation. In each type the evolution of the total mass of vapor in cavity are found to have strict correlation with the pressure oscillation in far field. By defining the equivalent radius of cavity, we introduce the specific kinetic energy of collapse and demonstrate that its change-rate is in good agreement with the pressure disturbance. We numerically investigated the influence of angle of attack on the collapse effect. The result shows that when the projectile decelerates, an asymmetric-focusing effect of the pressure induced by collapse occurs on its pressure side. We analytically explained such asymmetric-focusing effect.

  5. Systematic study of probable projectile-target combinations for the synthesis of the superheavy nucleus 302120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Safoora, V.

    2016-08-01

    Probable projectile-target combinations for the synthesis of the superheavy element 302120 have been studied taking the Coulomb and proximity potential as the interaction barrier. The probabilities of the compound nucleus formation PCN for the projectile-target combinations found in the cold reaction valley of 302120 are estimated. At energies near and above the Coulomb barrier, we have calculated the capture, fusion, and evaporation residue cross sections for the reactions of all probable projectile-target combinations so as to predict the most promising projectile-target combinations for the synthesis of the superheavy element 302120 in heavy-ion fusion reactions. The calculated fusion and evaporation cross sections for the more asymmetric ("hotter") projectile-target combination is found to be higher than the less asymmetric ("colder") combination. It can be seen from the nature of the quasifission barrier height, mass asymmetry, the probability of compound nucleus formation, survival probability, and excitation energy, the systems 44Ar+258No , 46Ar+256No , 48Ca+254Fm , 50Ca+252Fm , 54Ti+248Cf , and 58Cr+244Cm in deep region I of the cold reaction valley and the systems 62Fe+240Pu , 64Fe+238Pu , 68Ni+234U , 70Ni+232U , 72Ni+230U , and 74Zn+228Th in the other cold valleys are identified as the better projectile-target combinations for the synthesis of 302120. Our predictions on the synthesis of 302120 superheavy nuclei using the combinations 54Cr+248Cm , 58Fe+244Pu , 64Ni+238U , and 50Ti+249Cf are compared with available experimental data and other theoretical predictions.

  6. Deformations on Hole and Projectile Surfaces Caused By High Velocity Friction During Ballistic Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamış, M. B.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the deformations caused by the ballistic impact on the MM composites and on projectile surfaces are examined. The hole section and grain deformation of unreinforced targets are also examined after impact. The relatively high complexity of impact problems is caused by the large number of intervening parameters like relative velocity of projectile and target, shape of colliding objects, relative stiffness and masses, time-dependent surface of contact, geometry and boundary conditions and material characteristics. The material used in this investigation are 2024 and 7075 aluminum alloys as matrix reinforced with SiC and Al2O3 particles. The matrix materials are extensively used in defense applications due to its favorable ballistic properties, moderate strength, high corrosion resistance and super plastic potential. Two different composites were produced; one by casting and the other by lamination. The ballistic tests of the composite targets were carried out according to NIJ Standard-0101.04, Temperature 21 °C, RH=65% with 7.62 mm projectiles. The bullet weight was 9.6 g and their muzzle velocities were in the range of 770-800 m/s. The projectiles consisted of a steel core, copper jacket and lead material. The composite targets were positioned 15 m from the rifle. The interaction between projectiles and the target hole created after impact were examined by light microscopy and photography. Different damage and failure mechanisms such as petalling, cracking, spalling, dishing, etc., were observed on the target body. On the other hand, dramatic wear and damages on the projectile surface were also observed. The targets were supported with Al-5083 backing blocks having 40 mm thickness.

  7. Normal impact of a low-velocity projectile against a taut string-like membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yifei; Sun, Zhili

    2018-07-01

    For the impact system in which a moving projectile transversely impacts against a taut fabric band, 1-D linearized model applies because of low-velocity, sufficient pretension, and the sizes of the objects. This projectile-to-band impact model can serve as the physical prototype of applications in engineering such as cable-membrane architectures and seat belts. In this fundamental work, the response properties under central and non-central impacts are investigated analytically from the viewpoint of wave propagations, while comparisons and verifications are made with finite element (FE) analysis. For a central impact after the first separation, band can catch up with the projectile such that a contact-impact state is re-established when m is in the small interval neighbouring m = 1. For a non-central impact, the projectile would be subjected to a combination of translation and rotation due to asymmetric wave propagations. From every certain instant, the projectile is subjected to an additional rotational acceleration (principal moment) with an abrupt or zero initial value in the anti-clockwise or clockwise direction. The swing amplitude of a small-j or a flat projectile is susceptible to significant fluctuations, and vice versa. The band with a rather large off-centre ratio for the impacted zone and a rather short length of the shorter segment would facilitate a larger accumulation of swing amplitude in a single direction soon after the impact. The linearized impact models proposed can be used to well describe the small-deflection responses for the system, based on 1-D wave propagations or the dependence of quasi-static band deflection on time if the impact duration is much longer than the double wave transit time for the band.

  8. An historical context of modern principles in the management of intracranial injury from projectiles.

    PubMed

    Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Dunn, Gavin P; Laws, Edward R

    2010-05-01

    The contemporary management of projectile head injuries owes much to the lessons neurosurgeons have distilled from their experiences in war. Through early investigation and an increasingly detailed account of wartime clinical experience, neurosurgeons--including the field's early giants--began to gain a greater understanding not only of intracranial missile pathophysiology but also of appropriate management. In this paper, the authors trace the development of the principles of managing intracranial projectile injury from the Crimean War in the 19th century through the Vietnam War to provide a context that frames a summary of today's core management principles.

  9. Estimating 3D positions and velocities of projectiles from monocular views.

    PubMed

    Ribnick, Evan; Atev, Stefan; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos P

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of localizing a projectile in 3D based on its apparent motion in a stationary monocular view. A thorough theoretical analysis is developed, from which we establish the minimum conditions for the existence of a unique solution. The theoretical results obtained have important implications for applications involving projectile motion. A robust, nonlinear optimization-based formulation is proposed, and the use of a local optimization method is justified by detailed examination of the local convexity structure of the cost function. The potential of this approach is validated by experimental results.

  10. Non-lead, environmentally safe projectiles and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, R.A.; McCoig, T.M.; Dooley, J.B.

    1998-06-02

    A projectile, such as a bullet, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A base constituent, made of a material having density greater than lead, is combined with a binder constituent having less density. The binder constituent is malleable and ductile metallic phase material that forms projectile shapes when subjected to a consolidation force, such as compression. The metal constituents can be selected, rationed, and consolidated to achieve desired frangibility characteristics. 7 figs.

  11. Physics Learning Achievement Study: Projectile, Using Mathematica Program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutem, Artit; Kerdmee, Supoj

    2013-01-01

    The propose of this study is to study Physics Learning Achievement, projectile motion, using the Mathematica program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students, comparing with Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students who study the projectile motion experiment set. The samples are…

  12. Fragment-based lead generation: identification of seed fragments by a highly efficient fragment screening technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Lars; Ritscher, Allegra; Müller, Gerhard; Hafenbradl, Doris

    2009-08-01

    For the detection of the precise and unambiguous binding of fragments to a specific binding site on the target protein, we have developed a novel reporter displacement binding assay technology. The application of this technology for the fragment screening as well as the fragment evolution process with a specific modelling based design strategy is demonstrated for inhibitors of the protein kinase p38alpha. In a fragment screening approach seed fragments were identified which were then used to build compounds from the deep-pocket towards the hinge binding area of the protein kinase p38alpha based on a modelling approach. BIRB796 was used as a blueprint for the alignment of the fragments. The fragment evolution of these deep-pocket binding fragments towards the fully optimized inhibitor BIRB796 included the modulation of the residence time as well as the affinity. The goal of our study was to evaluate the robustness and efficiency of our novel fragment screening technology at high fragment concentrations, compare the screening data with biochemical activity data and to demonstrate the evolution of the hit fragments with fast kinetics, into slow kinetic inhibitors in an in silico approach.

  13. The African Origin of Complex Projectile Technology: An Analysis Using Tip Cross-Sectional Area and Perimeter

    PubMed Central

    Sisk, Matthew L.; Shea, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a body of literature focusing on the functionality of modern and stylistically distinct projectile points, comparatively little attention has been paid to quantifying the functionality of the early stages of projectile use. Previous work identified a simple ballistics measure, the Tip Cross-Sectional Area, as a way of determining if a given class of stone points could have served as effective projectile armatures. Here we use this in combination with an alternate measure, the Tip Cross-Sectional Perimeter, a more accurate proxy of the force needed to penetrate a target to a lethal depth. The current study discusses this measure and uses it to analyze a collection of measurements from African Middle Stone Age pointed stone artifacts. Several point types that were rejected in previous studies are statistically indistinguishable from ethnographic projectile points using this new measure. The ramifications of this finding for a Middle Stone Age origin of complex projectile technology is discussed. PMID:21755048

  14. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. V. Multiple Impacts of Dusty Agglomerates at Velocities Above the Fragmentation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Stefan; Güttler, Carsten; Blum, Jürgen

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, a number of new experiments have advanced our knowledge on the early growth phases of protoplanetary dust aggregates. Some of these experiments have shown that collisions between porous and compacted agglomerates at velocities above the fragmentation threshold velocity can lead to growth of the compact body, when the porous collision partner fragments upon impact and transfers mass to the compact agglomerate. To obtain a deeper understanding of this potentially important growth process, we performed laboratory and drop tower experiments to study multiple impacts of small, highly porous dust-aggregate projectiles onto sintered dust targets. The projectile and target consisted of 1.5 μm monodisperse, spherical SiO2 monomers with volume filling factors of 0.15 ± 0.01 and 0.45 ± 0.05, respectively. The fragile projectiles were accelerated by a solenoid magnet and combined with a projectile magazine with which 25 impacts onto the same spot on the target could be performed in vacuum. We measured the mass-accretion efficiency and the volume filling factor for different impact velocities between 1.5 and 6.0 m s^{-1}. The experiments at the lowest impact speeds were performed in the Bremen drop tower under microgravity conditions to allow partial mass transfer also for the lowest adhesion case. Within this velocity range, we found a linear increase of the accretion efficiency with increasing velocity. In the laboratory experiments, the accretion efficiency increases from 0.12 to 0.21 in units of the projectile mass. The recorded images of the impacts showed that the mass transfer from the projectile to the target leads to the growth of a conical structure on the target after less than 100 impacts. From the images, we also measured the volume filling factors of the grown structures, which ranged from 0.15 (uncompacted) to 0.40 (significantly compacted) with increasing impact speed. The velocity dependency of the mass-transfer efficiency and the packing

  15. Tank fragmentation test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daye, C. J.; Cooksey, D.; Walters, R. J.; Auble, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    A photographic study of a simulated tank fragmentation test was made. Sixteen disks and four spheres were ejected from a test article mounted in a vertical orientation 110 ft above a target installed on the test chamber floor. The test was performed at a chamber pressure of 25 microns. Velocities at impingement on the target ranged from 88 to 120 ft/sec; corresponding ejection velocities at the exit plane of the ejector assembly ranged from 29 to 87 ft/sec. Tumble axes of the disks were expected to be all in the north-south direction; the majority of those measured were, while some were skewed from this direction, the maximum observed being 90 deg. A typical measured tumble rate was 2.4 turns/sec. The dispersion pattern measured on the target was reasonably regular, and measured approximately 16 ft east-to-west by 11 ft north-to-south.

  16. Ablation effects in oxygen-lead fragmentation at 2.1 GeV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of particle evaporation was used to examine ablation effects in the fragmentation of 2.1 GeV/nucleon oxygen nuclei by lead targets. Following the initial abrasion process, the excited projectile prefragment is assumed to statistically decay in a manner analogous to that of a compound nucleus. The decay probabilities for the various particle emission channels are calculated by using the EVAP-4 Monte Carlo computer program. The input excitation energy spectrum for the prefragment is estimated from the geometric ""clean cut'' abrasion-ablation model. Isotope production cross sections are calculated and compared with experimental data and with the predictions from the standard geometric abrasion-ablation fragmentation model.

  17. Projectile-target mixing in melted ejecta formed during a hypervelocity impact cratering event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Noreen Joyce; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Shahinpoor, M.; Anderson, W. W.

    1993-01-01

    Tektites contain little to no projectile contamination while, in contrast, some distal ejecta deposits can be relatively projectile-rich (e.g. the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary clay). This compositional difference motivated an experimental study of hypervelocity target-projectile mixing processes. We hope to scale up the results from these experiments and apply them to terrestrial impact structures like the Chicxulub Crater, Yucutan, Mexico, the leading contender as the site for the impact that caused the mass extinction that marks the K-T boundary. Shock decomposition of the approximately 500m thickness of anhydrite, or greater thickness of limestone, in the target rocks at Chicxulub may have been a critical mechanism for either global cooling via SO3, and subsequently H2SO4, formation, or possibly, global warming via increased CO2 formation. Understanding target-projectile mixing processes during hypervelocity impact may permit more accurate estimates of the amount of potentially toxic, target-derived material reaching stratospheric heights.

  18. Approximate Formula for the Vertical Asymptote of Projectile Motion in Midair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudinov, Peter Sergey

    2010-01-01

    The classic problem of the motion of a point mass (projectile) thrown at an angle to the horizon is reviewed. The air drag force is taken into account with the drag factor assumed to be constant. An analytical approach is used for the investigation. An approximate formula is obtained for one of the characteristics of the motion--the vertical…

  19. Amazing Physics: Learning about Work, Energy and Projectile Motion in a Historical Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tural, Guner

    2013-01-01

    Teaching physics through a historical context provides effective learning and increases students' motivation for and interest in physics. For example, trebuchets and mangonels may be interesting historical contexts for learning about energy, work, and projectile motion. In this study, the implementation of physics lessons related to these subjects…

  20. Preservice Elementary School Teachers' Conceptual Change about Projectile Motion: Refutation Text, Demonstration, Affective Factors, and Relevance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynd, Cynthia; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Investigates changes in preservice teachers' conceptions about projectile motion brought about by a combination of reading and demonstration and appeal to usefulness. Results indicate the effectiveness of a combined Demo-Text condition on immediate posttests and effectiveness of text in producing long-term change. Analysis also indicates an…

  1. The Effect of Cooperative Learning on Grade 12 Learners' Performance in Projectile Motions, South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibirige, Israel; Lehong, Moyahabo Jeridah

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the effect of cooperative learning on Grade 12 learners' performance in projectile motions. A quasi-experimental research design with non-equivalent control group was used. Two schools were purposively selected from Maleboho Central circuit in South Africa based on their performance in Physical Sciences Grade 12 results of 2011.…

  2. Projectile Motion with a Drag Force: Were the Medievals Right After All?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    An educational and historical study of the projectile motion with drag forces dependent on speed shows, by simple results, that trajectories quite similar to those depicted before the Galilean era may be obtained with a realistic choice of quantities involved. Numerical simulations of the trajectory in space and velocity coordinates help us to…

  3. Evaluation of eye injury risk from projectile shooting toys using the focus headform - biomed 2009.

    PubMed

    Bisplinghoff, Jill A; Duma, Stefan M

    2009-01-01

    Half of eye injuries in the United States are caused by a blunt impact and more specifically, eye injuries effecting children often result from projectile shooting toys. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the risk of eye injuries of currently available projectile shooting toys. In order to assess the risk of each toy, a Facial and Ocular Countermeasure Safety (FOCUS) headform was used to measure the force applied to the eye during each hit for a total of 18 tests. The selected toys included a dart gun, a foam launcher, and a ball launcher. The force ranged from 4-93 N and was analyzed using the injury risk function for globe rupture for the FOCUS headform. Projectile characteristics were also examined using normalized energy to determine risk of corneal abrasion, hyphema, lens dislocation, retinal damage and globe rupture. It was found that the three toys tested produced peak loads corresponding with risk of globe rupture between 0% and 17.3%. The normalized energy results show no risk of hyphema, lens dislocation, retinal damage or globe rupture and a maximum risk of corneal abrasion of 5.9%. This study concludes that although there are many eye injuries caused by projectiles, the selected toys show a very low risk of eye injury.

  4. Compensation method of cloud infrared radiation interference based on a spinning projectile's attitude measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Miaomiao; Bu, Xiongzhu; Yu, Jing; He, Zilu

    2018-01-01

    Based on the study of earth infrared radiation and further requirement of anticloud interference ability for a spinning projectile's infrared attitude measurement, a compensation method of cloud infrared radiation interference is proposed. First, the theoretical model of infrared radiation interference is established by analyzing the generation mechanism and interference characteristics of cloud infrared radiation. Then, the influence of cloud infrared radiation on attitude angle is calculated in the following two situations. The first situation is the projectile in cloud, and the maximum of roll angle error can reach ± 20 deg. The second situation is the projectile outside of cloud, and it results in the inability to measure the projectile's attitude angle. Finally, a multisensor weighted fusion algorithm is proposed based on trust function method to reduce the influence of cloud infrared radiation. The results of semiphysical experiments show that the error of roll angle with a weighted fusion algorithm can be kept within ± 0.5 deg in the presence of cloud infrared radiation interference. This proposed method improves the accuracy of roll angle by nearly four times in attitude measurement and also solves the problem of low accuracy of infrared radiation attitude measurement in navigation and guidance field.

  5. In situ observation of penetration process in silica aerogel: Deceleration mechanism of hard spherical projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimi, Rei; Kadono, Toshihiko; Arakawa, Masahiko; Yasui, Minami; Dohi, Koji; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Iida, Yosuke; Tsuchiyama, Akira

    2011-02-01

    A large number of cometary dust particles were captured with low-density silica aerogels by NASA's Stardust Mission. Knowledge of the details of the capture mechanism of hypervelocity particles in silica aerogel is needed in order to correctly derive the original particle features from impact tracks. However, the mechanism has not been fully understood yet. We shot hard spherical projectiles of several different materials into silica aerogel of density 60 mg cm -3 and observed their penetration processes using an image converter or a high-speed video camera. In order to observe the deceleration of projectiles clearly, we carried out impact experiments at two velocity ranges; ˜4 km s -1 and ˜200 m s -1. From the movies we took, it was indicated that the projectiles were decelerated by hydrodynamic force which was proportional to v2 ( v: projectile velocity) during the faster penetration process (˜4 km s -1) and they were merely overcoming the aerogel crushing strength during the slower penetration process (˜200 m s -1). We applied these deceleration mechanisms for whole capture process to calculate the track length. Our model well explains the track length in the experimental data set by Burchell et al. (Burchell, M.J., Creighton, J.A., Cole, M.J., Mann, J., Kearsley, A.T. [2001]. Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 36, 209-221).

  6. Analytical evaluation of the trajectories of hypersonic projectiles launched into space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, John David

    An equation of motion has been derived that may be solved using simple analytic functions which describes the motion of a projectile launched from the surface of the Earth into space accounting for both Newtonian gravity and aerodynamic drag. The equation of motion is based upon the Kepler equation of motion differential and variable transformations with the inclusion of a decaying angular momentum driving function and appropriate simplifying assumptions. The new equation of motion is first compared to various numerical and analytical trajectory approximations in a non-rotating Earth reference frame. The Modified Kepler solution is then corrected to include Earth rotation and compared to a rotating Earth simulation. Finally, the modified equation of motion is used to predict the apogee and trajectory of projectiles launched into space by the High Altitude Research Project from 1961 to 1967. The new equation of motion allows for the rapid equalization of projectile trajectories and intercept solutions that may be used to calculate firing solutions to enable ground launched projectiles to intercept or rendezvous with targets in low Earth orbit such as ballistic missiles.

  7. Steady state numerical solutions for determining the location of MEMS on projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiprayu, K.; Abdigusna, M. F. F.; Gunawan, P. H.

    2018-03-01

    This paper is devoted to compare the numerical solutions for the steady and unsteady state heat distribution model on projectile. Here, the best location for installing of the MEMS on the projectile based on the surface temperature is investigated. Numerical iteration methods, Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel have been elaborated to solve the steady state heat distribution model on projectile. The results using Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel are shown identical but the discrepancy iteration cost for each methods is gained. Using Jacobi’s method, the iteration cost is 350 iterations. Meanwhile, using Gauss-Seidel 188 iterations are obtained, faster than the Jacobi’s method. The comparison of the simulation by steady state model and the unsteady state model by a reference is shown satisfying. Moreover, the best candidate for installing MEMS on projectile is observed at pointT(10, 0) which has the lowest temperature for the other points. The temperature using Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel for scenario 1 and 2 atT(10, 0) are 307 and 309 Kelvin respectively.

  8. The scaling and dynamics of a projectile obliquely impacting a granular medium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dengming; Ye, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Xiaojing

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of a spherical projectile obliquely impacting into a two-dimensional granular bed is numerically investigated using the discrete element method. The influences of projectile's initial velocities and impacting angles are mainly considered. Numerical results show that the relationship between the final penetration depth and the initial impact velocity is very similar to that in the vertical-impact case. However, the dependence of the stopping time on the impact velocity of the projectile exhibits critical characteristics at different impact angles: the stopping time approximately increases linearly with the impact velocity for small impact angles but decreases in an exponential form for larger impact angles, which demonstrates the existence of two different regimes at low and high impact angles. When the impact angle is regarded as a parametric variable, a phenomenological force model at large impact angles is eventually proposed based on the simulation results, which can accurately describe the nature of the resistance force exerted on the projectile by the granular medium at different impact angels during the whole oblique-impact process. The degenerate model agrees well with the existing experimental results in the vertical-impact cases.

  9. On the Locus Formed by the Maximum Heights of Projectile Motion with Air Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Saldana, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the locus formed by the set of maxima of the trajectories of a projectile launched in a medium with linear drag. Such a place, the locus of apexes, is written in terms of the Lambert "W" function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. To characterize the locus, a study of…

  10. Minimum velocity necessary for nonconventional projectiles to penetrate the eye: an experimental study using pig eyes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John W; Dahlstrom, Dean B; Powley, Kramer D

    2011-06-01

    To satisfy the Criminal Code of Canada's definition of a firearm, a barreled weapon must be capable of causing serious bodily injury or death to a person. Canadian courts have accepted the forensically established criteria of "penetration or rupture of an eye" as serious bodily injury. The minimal velocity of nonconventional ammunition required to penetrate the eye including airsoft projectiles has yet to be established. To establish minimal threshold requirements for eye penetration, empirical tests were conducted using a variety of airsoft projectiles. Using the data obtained from these tests, and previous research using "air gun" projectiles, an "energy density" parameter was calculated for the minimum penetration threshold of an eye. Airsoft guns capable of achieving velocities in excess of 99 m/s (325 ft/s) using conventional 6-mm airsoft ammunition will satisfy the forensically established criteria of "serious bodily injury." The energy density parameter for typical 6-mm plastic airsoft projectiles is 4.3 to 4.8 J/cm². This calculation also encompasses 4.5-mm steel BBs.

  11. Measurement of in-situ strength using projectile penetration: Tests of a new launching system

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.R.; Newmark, R.L.; Charest, J.A.

    1987-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a continuing need to measure rock strength in situ, both for simple prediction of cavity size, and as input to computational models. In a previous report we compared two methods for measuring formation strength in situ: projectile penetration and a cone penetrometer. We determined that the projectile method was more promising for application to our large-diameter (2-4-m) hole environment. A major practical problem has been the development of a launcher and an apparatus for measuring depth of penetration that would be suitable for use in large-diameter holes. We are developing a gas-gun launcher systemmore » that will be capable of measuring both depth of penetration and deceleration of a reusable projectile. The current version of the launcher is trailer-mounted for testing at our Nevada Test Site (NTS) in tunnels and outcrops, but its design is such that it can be readily adapted for emplacement hole use. We test the current launcher on 60-cm cubes of gypsum cement, mixed to provie a range of densities (1.64 to 2.0 g/cc) and strengths (3 to 17 MPa). We compared depth of penetration of a 84-g projectile from a ''Betsy'' seismic gun - traveling on the order of 500 m/s - with the depth of penetration of a 13-kg projectile from the gas gun - traveling on the order of 30 m/s. For projectiles with the same nose size and shape, impacting targets of approximately constant strength, penetration depth was proportional to projectile kinetic energy. The ratio of kinetic energy to penetration depth was approximately proportional to target strength. Tests in tuffs with a wide range of strengths at NTS gave a similar linear relationship between the ratio of kinetic energy to penetration and target strength, and also a linear relationship between deceleration and strength. It appears that penetration can indeed be used as a semiquantitative measure of strength.« less

  12. On moments of the multiplicity events of slow target fragments in relativistic Sulfur-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, A.; Kamel, S.; Rashed, N.; Sabry, N.

    2014-07-01

    A detailed study on the multiplicity characteristics of the slow target fragments emitted in relativistic heavy-ion collisions has been carried out at ELab = 3.7A and 200A GeV using 32S projectile. The beam energy dependence of the black particles produced in the full phase space of 32S-emulsion (32S-Em) interactions on the target size in terms of their moments (mean, variance, skewness and kurtosis) is investigated. The various order moments of target fragments emitted in the interactions of 32S beams with the heavy (AgBr) target nuclei are estimated in the forward (FHS) and backward (BHS) hemispheres. The investigated values of ratio of variance to mean at both energies show that the multiplicity distributions (MDs) are not Poissonian and the strongly correlated emission of target fragments are in the forward directions. The degree of anisotropic fragment emission and nature of correlation among the emitted fragments are investigated. The energy dependence of entropy is examined in both hemispheres. The entropy values normalized to average multiplicity are found to be energy independent. Scaling of MD of black particles produced in these interactions has been studied to verify the validity of scaling hypothesis via two scaling (Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO)-scaling and Hegyi-scaling) functions. A simplified universal function has been used in each scaling to display the experimental data.

  13. Thermodynamical string fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Nadine; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from the LHC. While some improvements can be noted, it turns out to be nontrivial to obtain effects as big as required, and further work is called for.

  14. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-01-01

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. PMID:27322266

  15. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-06-16

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment.

  16. Mass spectrometry for fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Whitehouse, Andrew J; Coyne, Anthony G; Abell, Chris

    2017-11-08

    Fragment-based approaches in chemical biology and drug discovery have been widely adopted worldwide in both academia and industry. Fragment hits tend to interact weakly with their targets, necessitating the use of sensitive biophysical techniques to detect their binding. Common fragment screening techniques include differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) and ligand-observed NMR. Validation and characterization of hits is usually performed using a combination of protein-observed NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and X-ray crystallography. In this context, MS is a relatively underutilized technique in fragment screening for drug discovery. MS-based techniques have the advantage of high sensitivity, low sample consumption and being label-free. This review highlights recent examples of the emerging use of MS-based techniques in fragment screening. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. Fragment Screening and HIV Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening has proven to be a powerful alternative to traditional methods for drug discovery. Biophysical methods, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance, are used to screen a diverse library of small molecule compounds. Although compounds identified via this approach have relatively weak affinity, they provide a good platform for lead development and are highly efficient binders with respect to their size. Fragment screening has been utilized for a wide-range of targets, including HIV-1 proteins. Here, we review the fragment screening studies targeting HIV-1 proteins using X-ray crystallography or surface plasmon resonance. These studies have successfully detected binding of novel fragments to either previously established or new sites on HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. In addition, fragment screening against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been used as a tool to better understand the complex nature of ligand binding to a flexible target. PMID:21972022

  18. Fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Feyfant, Eric; Cross, Jason B; Paris, Kevin; Tsao, Désirée H H

    2011-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD), which is comprised of both fragment screening and the use of fragment hits to design leads, began more than 15 years ago and has been steadily gaining in popularity and utility. Its origin lies on the fact that the coverage of chemical space and the binding efficiency of hits are directly related to the size of the compounds screened. Nevertheless, FBDD still faces challenges, among them developing fragment screening libraries that ensure optimal coverage of chemical space, physical properties and chemical tractability. Fragment screening also requires sensitive assays, often biophysical in nature, to detect weak binders. In this chapter we will introduce the technologies used to address these challenges and outline the experimental advantages that make FBDD one of the most popular new hit-to-lead process.

  19. The Dependency of Penetration on the Momentum Per Unit Area of the Impacting Projectile and the Resistance of Materials to Penetration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Rufus D., Jr.; Kinard, William H.

    1960-01-01

    The results of this investigation indicate that the penetration of projectiles into quasi-infinite targets can be correlated as a function of the maximum momentum per unit area possessed by the projectiles. The penetration of projectiles into aluminum, copper, and steel targets was found to be a linear function while the penetration into lead targets was a nonlinear function of the momentum per unit area of the impacting projectiles. Penetration varied inversely as the projectile density and the elastic modulus of the target material for a given projectile momentum per unit area. Crater volumes were found to be a linear function of the kinetic energy of the projectile, the greater volumes being obtained in the target materials which had the lowest yield strength and the lowest speed of sound.

  20. Energy-dependent expansion of .177 caliber hollow-point air gun projectiles.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ronald; Schultz, Benno; Bockholdt, Britta; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    Amongst hundreds of different projectiles for air guns available on the market, hollow-point air gun pellets are of special interest. These pellets are characterized by a tip or a hollowed-out shape in their tip which, when fired, makes the projectiles expand to an increased diameter upon entering the target medium. This results in an increase in release of energy which, in turn, has the potential to cause more serious injuries than non-hollow-point projectiles. To the best of the authors' knowledge, reliable data on the terminal ballistic features of hollow-point air gun projectiles compared to standard diabolo pellets have not yet been published in the forensic literature. The terminal ballistic performance (energy-dependent expansion and penetration) of four different types of .177 caliber hollow-point pellets discharged at kinetic energy levels from approximately 3 J up to 30 J into water, ordnance gelatin, and ordnance gelatin covered with natural chamois as a skin simulant was the subject of this investigation. Energy-dependent expansion of the tested hollow-point pellets was observed after being shot into all investigated target media. While some hollow-point pellets require a minimum kinetic energy of approximately 10 J for sufficient expansion, there are also hollow-point pellets which expand at kinetic energy levels of less than 5 J. The ratio of expansion (RE, calculated by the cross-sectional area (A) after impact divided by the cross-sectional area (A 0 ) of the undeformed pellet) of hollow-point air gun pellets reached values up of to 2.2. The extent of expansion relates to the kinetic energy of the projectile with a peak for pellet expansion at the 15 to 20 J range. To conclude, this work demonstrates that the hollow-point principle, i.e., the design-related enlargement of the projectiles' frontal area upon impact into a medium, does work in air guns as claimed by the manufacturers.

  1. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    PubMed

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms.

  2. Dispersion of Projectile and Target Debris Upon Penetration of Thin Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynn, D.; Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.; Horz, F.

    1996-03-01

    We continue to conduct penetration experiments of thin foils to support the development of cosmic-dust flight instruments that utilize thin films for the measurement of particle trajectories, or for the potential soft capture of hypervelocity impactors for subsequent compositional analysis upon retrieval to Earth. Each experiment is equipped with a witness plate, mounted to the rear of the target and fabricated from soft Aluminum-1100, ~30 x 30 cm in size and ranging from 2 to 5 mm thick; these witness plates essentially simulate the rear wall of a capture cell onto which the projectile material will plate out, including material that is being dislodged from the penetrated foil itself. Using compositionally contrasting projectile and foil materials in the laboratory, such as soda-lime glass impactors and aluminum targets, one produces two distinct populations of craters on the witness plates.

  3. Onset of cavity deformation upon subsonic motion of a projectile in a fluid complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhukhovitskii, D I; Ivlev, A V; Fortov, V E; Morfill, G E

    2013-06-01

    We study the deformation of a cavity around a large projectile moving with subsonic velocity in the cloud of small dust particles. To solve this problem, we employ the Navier-Stokes equation for a compressible fluid with due regard for friction between dust particles and atoms of neutral gas. The solution shows that due to friction, the pressure of a dust cloud at the surface of a cavity around the projectile can become negative, which entails the emergence of a considerable asymmetry of the cavity, i.e., the cavity deformation. Corresponding threshold velocity is calculated, which is found to decrease with increasing cavity size. Measurement of such velocity makes it possible to estimate the static pressure inside the dust cloud.

  4. Basic and applied studies of the ram accelerator as a hypervelocity projectile launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckner, Adam P.; Knowlen, Carl

    1993-12-01

    The potential of using ram accelerator technology for an impulsive launcher of autonomously guided interceptors, such as the LEAP, has been studied during this contract period. In addition, fundamental investigations on some of the engineering issues which must be addressed for enabling ram accelerator propulsive modes to operate at 4 km/sec have been undertaken. An experimental investigation of the gas dynamic limits of ram accelerator operation has demonstrated the existence of two distinct limiting mechanisms that must be accounted for when designing projectiles for these launchers. Other experiments were conducted to make detailed pressure measurements of the flow fields at the tube walls to study the effects of projectile canting. Results from this LEAP launcher study and the experimental investigations indicate that the ram accelerator technology is well suited for applications as a transportable launcher capable of meeting the needs of theater ballistic missile defense missions.

  5. Influence of the power supply parameters on the projectile energy in the permanent magnet electrodynamic accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waindok, Andrzej; Piekielny, Paweł

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of the research is to investigate, how the power supply parameters influence the kinetic energy of the movable element, called commonly a projectile or bullet. A calculation and measurement results of transient characteristics for an electrodynamic accelerator with permanent magnet support were presented in the paper. The calculations were made with using field-circuit model, which includes the parameters of the power supply, mass of the bullet and friction phenomenon. Characteristics of energy and muzzle velocity verso supply voltage (50 V to 350 V) and capacitance value (60 mF to 340.5 mF) were determined, as well. A measurement verification of selected points of calculation characteristics were carried out for investigated values of muzzle velocity. A good conformity between calculation and measurement results was obtained. Concluding, presented characteristics of the muzzle velocity and energy of the projectile vs. power supply parameters indicate, that accelerators could be used for fatigue testing of materials.

  6. A NASTRAN investigation of simulated projectile damage effects on a UH-1B tail boom model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Futterer, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    A NASTRAN model of a UH-1B tail boom that had been designed for another project was used to investigate the effect on structural integrity of simulated projectile damage. Elements representing skin, and sections of stringers, longerons and bulkheads were systematically deleted to represent projectile damage. The structure was loaded in a manner to represent the flight loads that would be imposed on the tail boom at a 130 knot cruise. The deflection of four points on the rear of the tail boom relative to the position of these points for the unloaded, undamaged condition of the tail boom was used as a measure of the loss of structural rigidity. The same procedure was then used with the material properties of the aluminum alloys replaced with the material properties of T300/5208 high strength graphite/epoxy fibrous composite material, (0, + or - 45, 90)s for the skin and (0, + or - 45)s for the longerons, stringers, and bulk heads.

  7. Ballistic Analysis of Firing Table Data for 155MM, M825 Smoke Projectile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    PROVING GROUND , MARYLAND I I 4 .i. NOTICES Destroy this report when it is no longer needed. DO NOT return it to the originator. Additional copies of this...ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING MONITORING U.S. Army Ballistic Research Laboratory AGENCY REPORT NUMBER ATTN: SLCBR-DD-T BRL-R-3865 Aberdeen Proving Ground ...thru September 1988 at Dugway Proving Ground . Such an analysis will consider whether the M825 MOD PIP Base projectile is ballistically matched or

  8. Cardiac changes after simulated behind armor blunt trauma or impact of nonlethal kinetic projectile ammunition.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Sebastian N; Arborelius, Ulf P; Gryth, Dan; Sonden, Anders; Gustavsson, Jenny; Wangyal, Tashi; Svensson, Leif; Rocksén, David

    2011-11-01

    Cardiac-related injuries caused by blunt chest trauma remain a severe problem. The aim of this study was to investigate pathophysiological changes in the heart that might arise after behind armor blunt trauma or impacts of nonlethal projectiles. Sixteen pigs were shot directly at the sternum with "Sponge Round eXact I Mpact" (nonlethal ammunition; diameter 40 mm and weight 28 g) or hard-plastic ammunition (diameter 65 mm and weight 58 g) to simulate behind armor blunt trauma. To evaluate the influence of the shot location, seven additional pigs where exposed to an oblique heart shot. Physiologic parameters, electrocardiography, echocardiogram, the biochemical marker troponin I (TnI), and myocardial injuries were analyzed. Nonlethal kinetic projectiles (101-108 m/s; 143-163 J) did not cause significant pathophysiological changes. Five of 18 pigs shot with 65-mm plastic projectiles (99-133 m/s; 284-513 J) to the front or side of the thorax died directly after the shot. No major physiologic changes could be observed in surviving animals. Animals shot with an oblique heart shot (99-106 m/s; 284-326 J) demonstrated a small, but significant decrease in saturation. Energy levels over 300 J caused increased TnI and myocardial damages in most of the pigs. This study indicates that nonlethal kinetic projectiles "eXact iMpact" does not cause heart-related damage under the examined conditions. On impact, sudden heart arrest may occur independently from the cardiac's electrical cycle. The cardiac enzyme, TnI, can be used as a reliable diagnostic marker to detect heart tissue damages after blunt chest trauma.

  9. Off-shell gluon production in interaction of a projectile with 2 or 3 targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. A.; Salykin, M. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    Within the effective QCD action for the Regge kinematics, the amplitudes for virtual gluon emission are studied in collision of a projectile with two and three targets. It is demonstrated that all non-Feynman singularities cancel between induced vertices and rescattering contributions. Formulas simplify considerably in a special gauge, which is a straightforward generalization of the light-cone gauge for emission of real gluons.

  10. Development of a Telemetry-Enabled High-G Projectile Carrier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    of High Velocity Guns, Version 2 (IBHVG2) interior ballistics simulation • Pete Muller, ARL, helped populate the ARL sensor suite boards...differences in external characteristics between the conventional M831 and the modified M831 high-g carrier projectile can be seen in figure 3. Figure 2...of High Velocity Guns, Version 2 (IBHVG2) (6). The output values from the simulation for the selected charge weight are seen in table 2. Table 2

  11. Navy Lasers, Railgun, and Hypervelocity Projectile: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-27

    surface ships to defend themselves against enemy missiles—solid state lasers (SSLs), the electromagnetic railgun (EMRG), and the hypervelocity... electromagnetic railgun (EMRG), and the hypervelocity projectile (HVP). 1 Any one of these new weapon technologies, if successfully developed and deployed...Number: N00024-15-R-4132, FedBizOpps.gov, July 29, 2015. See also Justin Doubleday, “Navy Developing Integrated Mount For Electromagnetic Railgun

  12. Experimental Evaluation of Cold-Sprayed Copper Rotating Bands for Large-Caliber Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    ABSTRACT A copper rotating band is the munition component responsible for both obturation and transfer of torque from the gun barrel’s rifling to the...munition, thereby causing the projectile to spin. Pure copper, copper alloy, and brass rotating bands are typically fabricated to steel munitions using...Machine Shop for fabrication; and the Transonic Experimental Facility for facilitating the gun -launch experiments. vi INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

  13. Optimization of aerodynamic form of projectile for solving the problem of shooting range increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipanov, Alexey M.; Korolev, Stanislav A.; Rusyak, Ivan G.

    2017-10-01

    The article is devoted to the development of methods for solving the problem of external ballistics using a more complete system of motion equation taken into account the rotation and oscillation about the mass center and using aerodynamic coefficients of forces and moments which are calculated on the basis of modeling the hydrodynamics of flow around the projectile. Developed methods allows to study the basic ways of increasing the shooting range or artillery.

  14. Demonstration of UXO-PenDepth for the Estimation of Projectile Penetration Depth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Effects (JTCG/ME) in August 2001. The accreditation process included verification and validation (V&V) by a subject matter expert (SME) other than...Within UXO-PenDepth, there are three sets of input parameters that are required: impact conditions (Fig. 1a), penetrator properties , and target... properties . The impact conditions that need to be defined are projectile orientation and impact velocity. The algorithm has been evaluated against

  15. Aerodynamic Analysis of the M33 Projectile Using the CFX Code

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE A 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The M33 projectile has been analyzed using the ANSYS CFX code that is based...analyzed using the ANSYS CFX code that is based on the numerical solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations. Simulation data were obtained...using the CFX code. The ANSYS - CFX code is a commercial CFD program used to simulate fluid flow in a variety of applications such as gas turbine

  16. Navy Lasers, Railgun, and Hypervelocity Projectile: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-21

    surface ships to defend themselves against enemy missiles—solid state lasers (SSLs), the electromagnetic railgun (EMRG), and the hypervelocity...SSLs), the electromagnetic railgun (EMRG), and the hypervelocity projectile (HVP). 1 Any one of these new weapon technologies, if successfully...Integrated Mount For Electromagnetic Railgun,” Inside the Navy, July 31, 2015.) 12 Sources for cost of HVP: David Martin, “Navy’s Newest Weapon Kills at

  17. Hypervelocity impact of mm-size plastic projectile on thin aluminum plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poniaev, S. A.; Kurakin, R. O.; Sedov, A. I.; Bobashev, S. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Nechunaev, A. F.

    2017-06-01

    The experimental studies of the process of hypervelocity (up to 6 km/s) impact of a mm-size projectile on a thin aluminum plate is described. The numerical simulation of this process is presented. The data on the evolution, structure, and composition of the debris cloud formed as a result of the impact are reported. Basic specific features of the debris cloud formation are revealed.

  18. Linear Theory of a Projectile With a Rotating Internal Part in Atmospheric Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    shape, or form. Fuze mechanisms used on some indirect fire ammunition employ a rotor that is permitted to move slightly with respect to the main...series of experiments where a projectile with a loose internal part was driven by the rotor of a freely gimbaled gyroscope. The gyroscope yaw history...cases, weapon system designers require guidance on the effect of the rotating internal part as well as guidance on how to optimally configure such a

  19. Aerodynamic Characteristics of the 30mm XM788E1 and XM789 projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    successfully predicted the effect of a cubic Magnus moment on the damping rates by means of an amplitude-plane analysis. However, the amplitude-plane...technique becomes cumbersome for a projectile with both Magnus and pitch-dariping moment non-linearities. The effects of changi,,y epi- cyclic...show the existence of a slow arm limit- cycle yaw at high subsonic speeds, and a limit-epicycle yaw at lower subsonic speeds. The effect of the limit

  20. Physics-Based Virtual Fly-Outs of Projectiles on Supercomputers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    moved along with its grid as it flew downrange. The supersonic projectile modeled in this study is an ogive- cylinder -finned configuration (see...resulting from the unsteady jet interaction flow field is clearly evident (Figure 10). The effect of the jet is stronger as evidenced by the larger...little or no effect on the other aerodynamic forces. These results show the potential to gain fundamental understanding of the complex, flow

  1. Case-study of fatal gunshot wounds from non-lethal projectiles.

    PubMed

    Chowaniec, Czesław; Kobek, Mariusz; Jabłoński, Christian; Kabiesz-Neniczka, Stanisława; Karczewska, Weronika

    2008-07-04

    The authors present a case of the death of a 60-year-old man shot using rubber projectiles that were fired by a police officer from a Mossberg smooth-bore shotgun in an enclosed space from a distance of a few metres. The post-mortem examination revealed that death had been due to gunshot wounds in the chest which had caused heart and lung damage with subsequent massive internal haemorrhaging.

  2. Aerodynamic Optimization of a Supersonic Bending Body Projectile by a Vector-Evaluated Genetic Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Evaluated Genetic Algorithm prepared by Justin L Paul Academy of Applied Science 24 Warren Street Concord, NH 03301 under contract W911SR...Supersonic Bending Body Projectile by a Vector-Evaluated Genetic Algorithm prepared by Justin L Paul Academy of Applied Science 24 Warren Street... Genetic Algorithm 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W199SR-15-2-001 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Justin L Paul 5d. PROJECT

  3. Position Estimation for Projectiles Using Low-cost Sensors and Flight Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    GPS/INS Loose-coupling Parameter Estimation ............................................................6 2.6 Extended Kalman Filter ...environment using low-cost measurement devices and projectile flight dynamics. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) was developed to blend accelerometer...kGPSIbias B GPSIkGPSIbias B GPSIGPSIbias B aρaρa ,,1,,, 1    (15) 7 2.6 Extended Kalman Filter A sequential EKF was used to combine

  4. Wound Ballistics Modeling for Blast Loading Blunt Force Impact and Projectile Penetration.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul A.

    Light body armor development for the warfighter is based on trial-and-error testing of prototype designs against ballistic projectiles. Torso armor testing against blast is nonexistent but necessary to protect the heart and lungs. In tests against ballistic projectiles, protective apparel is placed over ballistic clay and the projectiles are fired into the armor/clay target. The clay represents the human torso and its behind-armor, permanent deflection is the principal metric used to assess armor protection. Although this approach provides relative merit assessment of protection, it does not examine the behind-armor blunt trauma to crucial torso organs. We propose a modeling andmore » simulation (M&S) capability for wound injury scenarios to the head, neck, and torso of the warfighter. We will use this toolset to investigate the consequences of, and mitigation against, blast exposure, blunt force impact, and ballistic projectile penetration leading to damage of critical organs comprising the central nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. We will leverage Sandia codes and our M&S expertise on traumatic brain injury to develop virtual anatomical models of the head, neck, and torso and the simulation methodology to capture the physics of wound mechanics. Specifically, we will investigate virtual wound injuries to the head, neck, and torso without and with protective armor to demonstrate the advantages of performing injury simulations for the development of body armor. The proposed toolset constitutes a significant advance over current methods by providing a virtual simulation capability to investigate wound injury and optimize armor design without the need for extensive field testing.« less

  5. Electron-electron interaction in ion-atom collisions studied by projectile state-resolved Auger-electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohyung Lee.

    This dissertation addresses the problem of dynamic electron-electron interactions in fast ion-atom collisions using projectile Auger electron spectroscopy. The study was carried out by measuring high-resolution projectile KKL Auger electron spectra as a function of projectile energy for the various collision systems of 0.25-2 MeV/u O{sup q+} and F{sup q+} incident on H{sub 2} and He targets. The electrons were detected in the beam direction, where the kinematic broadening is minimized. A zero-degree tandem electron spectrometer system, was developed and showed the versatility of zero-degree measurements of collisionally-produced atomic states. The zero-degree binary encounter electrons (BEe), quasifree target electrons ionizedmore » by the projectiles in head-on collisions, were observed as a strong background in the KLL Auger electron spectrum. They were studied by treating the target ionization as 180{degree} Rutherford elastic scattering in the projectile frame, and resulted in a validity test of the impulse approximation (IA) and a way to determine the spectrometer efficiency. An anomalous q-dependence, in which the zero-degree BEe yields increase with decreasing projectile charge state (q), was observed. State-resolved KLL Auger cross sections were determined by using the BEe normalization and thus the cross section of the electron-electron interactions such as resonant transfer-excitation (RTE), electron-electron excitation (eeE), and electron-electron ionization (eeI) were determined. Projectile 2l capture with 1s {yields} 2p excitation by the captured target electron was observed as an RTE process with Li-like and He-like projectiles and the measured RTEA (RTE followed by Auger decay) cross sections showed good agreement with an RTE-IA treatment and RTE alignment theory.« less

  6. Non-Normal Projectile Penetration in Soil and Rock: User’s Guide for Computer Code PENC02D.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    the path traveled , with projec- tile orientation shown every FREQI projectile lengths. In this run, FREQI was input as 2.5. The horizontal lines...must be a closed surface in the direction of travel ; the bluntness of the nose requires a near 90-deg element for closure. Sheet 3 shows the beginning...plots for this problem. Sheets 1 and 2 automatically verify the projectile shape and path traveled . Sheets 3, 4, and 5 show the axial deceleration

  7. In-pipe aerodynamic characteristics of a projectile in comparison with free flight for transonic Mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruschka, R.; Klatt, D.

    2018-03-01

    The transient shock dynamics and drag characteristics of a projectile flying through a pipe 3.55 times larger than its diameter at transonic speed are analyzed by means of time-of-flight and pipe wall pressure measurements as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In addition, free-flight drag of the 4.5-mm-pellet-type projectile was also measured in a Mach number range between 0.5 and 1.5, providing a means for comparison against in-pipe data and CFD. The flow is categorized into five typical regimes the in-pipe projectile experiences. When projectile speed and hence compressibility effects are low, the presence of the pipe has little influence on the drag. Between Mach 0.5 and 0.8, there is a strong drag increase due to the presence of the pipe, however, up to a value of about two times the free-flight drag. This is exactly where the nose-to-base pressure ratio of the projectile becomes critical for locally sonic speed, allowing the drag to be estimated by equations describing choked flow through a converging-diverging nozzle. For even higher projectile Mach numbers, the drag coefficient decreases again, to a value slightly below the free-flight drag at Mach 1.5. This behavior is explained by a velocity-independent base pressure coefficient in the pipe, as opposed to base pressure decreasing with velocity in free flight. The drag calculated by CFD simulations agreed largely with the measurements within their experimental uncertainty, with some discrepancies remaining for free-flying projectiles at supersonic speed. Wall pressure measurements as well as measured speeds of both leading and trailing shocks caused by the projectile in the pipe also agreed well with CFD.

  8. Observation of the Hydrogen Migration in the Cation-Induced Fragmentation of the Pyridine Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wasowicz, Tomasz J; Pranszke, Bogusław

    2016-02-25

    The ability to selectively control chemical reactions related to biology, combustion, and catalysis has recently attracted much attention. In particular, the hydrogen atom relocation may be used to manipulate bond-breaking and new bond-forming processes and may hold promise for far-reaching applications. Thus, the hydrogen atom migration preceding fragmentation of the gas-phase pyridine molecules by the H(+), H2(+), He(+), He(2+), and O(+) impact has been studied experimentally in the energy range of 5-2000 eV using collision-induced luminescence spectroscopy. Formation of the excited NH(A(3)Π) radicals was observed among the atomic and diatomic fragments. The structure of the pyridine molecule is lacking of the NH group, therefore observation of its A(3)Π → X(3)Σ(-) emission bands is an evidence of the hydrogen atom relocation prior to the cation-induced fragmentation. The NH(A(3)Π) emission yields indicate that formation of the NH radicals depends on the type of selected projectile and can be controlled by tuning its velocity. The plausible collisional mechanisms as well as fragmentation channels for NH formation in pyridine are discussed.

  9. Determine ISS Soyuz Orbital Module Ballistic Limits for Steel Projectiles Hypervelocity Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Frankel

    2013-01-01

    A new orbital debris environment model (ORDEM 3.0) defines the density distribution of the debris environment in terms of the fraction of debris that are low-density (plastic), medium-density (aluminum) or high-density (steel) particles. This hypervelocity impact (HVI) program focused on assessing ballistic limits (BLs) for steel projectiles impacting the enhanced Soyuz Orbital Module (OM) micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shield configuration. The ballistic limit was defined as the projectile size on the threshold of failure of the OM pressure shell as a function of impact speeds and angle. The enhanced OM shield configuration was first introduced with Soyuz 30S (launched in May 2012) to improve the MMOD protection of Soyuz vehicles docked to the International Space Station (ISS). This test program provides HVI data on U.S. materials similar in composition and density to the Russian materials for the enhanced Soyuz OM shield configuration of the vehicle. Data from this test program was used to update ballistic limit equations used in Soyuz OM penetration risk assessments. The objective of this hypervelocity impact test program was to determine the ballistic limit particle size for 440C stainless steel spherical projectiles on the Soyuz OM shielding at several impact conditions (velocity and angle combinations). This test report was prepared by NASA-JSC/ HVIT, upon completion of tests.

  10. The solar maximum satellite capture cell: Impact features and orbital debris and micrometeoritic projectile materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, D. S.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Schramm, L. S.; Barrett, R. A.; Zook, H. A.; Blanford, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    The physical properties of impact features observed in the Solar Max main electronics box (MEB) thermal blanket generally suggest an origin by hypervelocity impact. The chemistry of micrometeorite material suggests that a wide variety of projectile materials have survived impact with retention of varying degrees of pristinity. Impact features that contain only spacecraft paint particles are on average smaller than impact features caused by micrometeorite impacts. In case both types of materials co-occur, it is belevied that the impact feature, generally a penetration hole, was caused by a micrometeorite projectile. The typically smaller paint particles were able to penetrate though the hole in the first layer and deposit in the spray pattern on the second layer. It is suggested that paint particles have arrived with a wide range of velocities relative to the Solar Max satellite. Orbiting paint particles are an important fraction of materials in the near-Earth environment. In general, the data from the Solar Max studies are a good calibration for the design of capture cells to be flown in space and on board Space Station. The data also suggest that development of multiple layer capture cells in which the projectile may retain a large degree of pristinity is a feasible goal.

  11. Influence of impact conditions on plasma generation during hypervelocity impact by aluminum projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Weidong, E-mail: swdgh@bit.edu.cn; Lv, Yangtao; Li, Jianqiao

    2016-07-15

    For describing hypervelocity impact (relative low-speed as related to space debris and much lower than travelling speed of meteoroids) phenomenon associated with plasma generation, a self-developed 3D code was advanced to numerically simulate projectiles impacting on a rigid wall. The numerical results were combined with a new ionization model which was developed in an early study to calculate the ionized materials during the impact. The calculated results of ionization were compared with the empirical formulas concluded by experiments in references and a good agreement was obtained. Then based on the reliable 3D numerical code, a series of impacts with differentmore » projectile configurations were simulated to investigate the influence of impact conditions on hypervelocity impact generated plasma. It was found that the form of empirical formula needed to be modified. A new empirical formula with a critical impact velocity was advanced to describe the velocity dependence of plasma generation and the parameters of the modified formula were ensured by the comparison between the numerical predictions and the empirical formulas. For different projectile configurations, the changes of plasma charges with time are different but the integrals of charges on time almost stayed in the same level.« less

  12. Asymmetric material impact: Achieving free surfaces velocities nearly double that of the projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam, Tariq; Dattelbaum, Dana; Gustavsen, Richard

    Hypervelocity impact speeds are often limited by practical considerations in guns and explosive driven systems. In particular, for gas guns (both powder driven and light gas guns), there is the general trend that higher projectile speeds often come at the expense of smaller diameters, and thus less time for examining shock phenomena prior to two dimensional release waves affecting the observed quantities of interest. Similarly, explosive driven systems have their own set of limiting conditions due to limitations in explosive energy and size of devices required as engineering dimensions increase. The focus in this study is to present a methodologymore » of obtaining free surface velocities well in excess of the projectile velocity. The key to this approach is in using a high impedance projectile that impacts a series of progressively lower impedance materials. The free surface velocity (if they were separated) of each of the progressively lower impedance materials would increase for each material. The theory behind this approach, as well as experimental results are presented.« less

  13. Asymmetric material impact: Achieving free surfaces velocities nearly double that of the projectile

    DOE PAGES

    Aslam, Tariq; Dattelbaum, Dana; Gustavsen, Richard; ...

    2015-05-19

    Hypervelocity impact speeds are often limited by practical considerations in guns and explosive driven systems. In particular, for gas guns (both powder driven and light gas guns), there is the general trend that higher projectile speeds often come at the expense of smaller diameters, and thus less time for examining shock phenomena prior to two dimensional release waves affecting the observed quantities of interest. Similarly, explosive driven systems have their own set of limiting conditions due to limitations in explosive energy and size of devices required as engineering dimensions increase. The focus in this study is to present a methodologymore » of obtaining free surface velocities well in excess of the projectile velocity. The key to this approach is in using a high impedance projectile that impacts a series of progressively lower impedance materials. The free surface velocity (if they were separated) of each of the progressively lower impedance materials would increase for each material. The theory behind this approach, as well as experimental results are presented.« less

  14. Highly accurate analytic formulae for projectile motion subjected to quadratic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    The classical phenomenon of motion of a projectile fired (thrown) into the horizon through resistive air charging a quadratic drag onto the object is revisited in this paper. No exact solution is known that describes the full physical event under such an exerted resistance force. Finding elegant analytical approximations for the most interesting engineering features of dynamical behavior of the projectile is the principal target. Within this purpose, some analytical explicit expressions are derived that accurately predict the maximum height, its arrival time as well as the flight range of the projectile at the highest ascent. The most significant property of the proposed formulas is that they are not restricted to the initial speed and firing angle of the object, nor to the drag coefficient of the medium. In combination with the available approximations in the literature, it is possible to gain information about the flight and complete the picture of a trajectory with high precision, without having to numerically simulate the full governing equations of motion.

  15. Hypervelocity gun. [using both electric and chemical energy for projectile propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, F. C.; Biehl, A. J. (Inventor)

    1965-01-01

    A velocity amplifier system which uses both electric and chemical energy for projectile propulsion is provided in a compact hypervelocity gun suitable for laboratory use. A relatively heavy layer of a tamping material such as concrete encloses a loop of an electrically conductive material. An explosive charge at least partially surrounding the loop is adapted to collapse the loop upon detonation of the charge. A source of electricity charges the loop through two leads, and an electric switch which is activated by the charge explosive charge, disconnects the leads from the source of electricity and short circuits them. An opening in the tamping material extends to the loop and forms a barrel. The loop, necked down in the opening, forms the sabot on which the projectile is located. When the loop is electrically charged and the explosive detonated, the loop is short circuited and collapsed thus building up a magnetic field which acts as a sabot catcher. The sabot is detached from the loop and the sabot and projectile are accelerated to hypervelocity.

  16. Numerical simulation of the effect of regular and sub-caliber projectiles on military bunkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiricek, Pavel; Foglar, Marek

    2015-09-01

    One of the most demanding topics in blast and impact engineering is the modelling of projectile impact. To introduce this topic, a set of numerical simulations was undertaken. The simulations study the impact of regular and sub-calibre projectile on Czech pre-WW2 military bunkers. The penetrations of the military objects are well documented and can be used for comparison. The numerical model composes of a part from a wall of a military object. The concrete block is subjected to an impact of a regular and sub-calibre projectile. The model is divided into layers to simplify the evaluation of the results. The simulations are processed within ANSYS AUTODYN software. A nonlinear material model of with damage and incorporated strain-rate effect was used. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated in means of the damage of the concrete block. Progress of the damage is described versus time. The numerical simulation provides good agreement with the documented penetrations.

  17. Dynamic fracture of inorganic glasses by hard spherical and conical projectiles.

    PubMed

    Chaudhri, M Munawar

    2015-03-28

    In this article, high-speed photographic investigations of the dynamic crack initiation and propagation in several inorganic glasses by the impact of small spherical and conical projectiles are described. These were carried out at speeds of up to approximately 2×10(6) frames s(-1). The glasses were fused silica, 'Pyrex' (a borosilicate glass), soda lime and B(2)O(3). The projectiles were 0.8-2 mm diameter spheres of steel, glass, sapphire and tungsten carbide, and their velocities were up to 340 m s(-1). In fused silica and Pyrex, spherical projectiles' impact produced Hertzian cone cracks travelling at terminal crack velocities, whereas in soda-lime glass fast splinter cracks were generated. No crack bifurcation was observed, which has been explained by the nature of the stress intensity factor of the particle-impact-generated cracks, which leads to a stable crack growth. Crack bifurcation was, however, observed in thermally tempered glass; this bifurcation has been explained by the tensile residual stress and the associated unstable crack growth. A new explanation has been proposed for the decrease of the included angle of the Hertzian cone cracks with increasing impact velocity. B(2)O(3) glass showed dynamic compaction and plasticity owing to impact with steel spheres. Other observations, such as total contact time, crack lengths and response to oblique impacts, have also been explained. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical analysis of the Magnus moment on a spin-stabilized projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremins, Michael; Rodebaugh, Gregory; Verhulst, Claire; Benson, Michael; van Poppel, Bret

    2016-11-01

    The Magnus moment is a result of an uneven pressure distribution that occurs when an object rotates in a crossflow. Unlike the Magnus force, which is often small for spin-stabilized projectiles, the Magnus moment can have a strong detrimental effect on flight stability. According to one source, most transonic and subsonic flight instabilities are caused by the Magnus moment [Modern Exterior Ballistics, McCoy], and yet simulations often fail to accurately predict the Magnus moment in the subsonic regime. In this study, we present hybrid Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) predictions of the Magnus moment for a spin-stabilized projectile. Velocity, pressure, and Magnus moment predictions are presented for multiple Reynolds numbers and spin rates. We also consider the effect of a sting mount, which is commonly used when conducting flow measurements in a wind tunnel or water channel. Finally, we present the initial designs for a novel Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) experiment to measure three-dimensional flow around a spinning projectile. This work was supported by the Department of Defense High Performance Computing Modernization Program (DoD HPCMP).

  19. Morphology and chemistry of projectile residue in small experimental impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horz, F.; Fechtig, H.; Janicke, J.; Schneider, E.

    1983-11-01

    Small-scale impact craters (5-7 mm in diameter) were produced with a light gas gun in high purity Au and Cu targets using soda lime glass (SL) and man-made basalt glass (BG) as projectiles. Maximum impact velocity was 6.4 km/s resulting in peak pressures of approximately 120-150 GPa. Copious amounts of projectile melts are preserved as thin glass liners draping the entire crater cavity; some of this liner may be lost by spallation, however. SEM investigations reveal complex surface textures including multistage flow phenomena and distinct temporal deposition sequences of small droplets. Inasmuch as some of the melts were generated at peak pressures greater than 120 GPa, these glasses represent the most severely shocked silicates recovered from laboratory experiments to date. Major element analyses reveal partial loss of alkalis; Na2O loss of 10-15 percent is observed, while K2O loss may be as high as 30-50 percent. Although the observed volatile loss in these projectile melts is significant, it still remains uncertain whether target melts produced on planetary surfaces are severely fractionated by selective volatilization processes.

  20. Supercavitating flow around high-speed underwater projectile near free surface induced by air entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chang; Huang, Jian; Wang, Yiwei; Wu, Xiaocui; Huang, Chenguang; Wu, Xianqian

    2018-03-01

    Cavitating flow near free surface is a complicated issue and may provide new inspiration on high-speed surface cruising. This study observes stable supercavitating flow as a new phenomenon in a launch experiment of axisymmetric projectile when the upper side of the projectile coincides with the free surface. A numerical approach is established using large eddy-simulation and volume-of-fluid methods, and good agreements are achieved between numerical and experimental results. Supercavity formation mechanism is revealed by analyzing the experiment photographs and the iso-surface of 90% water volume fraction in numerical results. The entrainment of a large amount of air into the cavity can cause the pressure inside the cavity to similarly increase with the pressure outside the cavity, which makes the actual cavitation number close to zero and is similar to supercavitation. Cases with various headforms of the projectile and cavitation numbers on the cavitating flow, as well as the drag reduction effects are further examined. Results indicate that the present strategy near the free surface could possibly be a new effective approach for high-speed cruising after vigorous design optimization in the future.

  1. Optical fiber-based system for continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohua; Sun, Jinglin; Li, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports the design of an optical fiber-based velocity measurement system and its application in measuring the in-bore projectile velocity. The measurement principle of the implemented system is based on Doppler effect and heterodyne detection technique. The analysis of the velocity measurement principle deduces the relationship between the projectile velocity and the instantaneous frequency (IF) of the optical fiber-based system output signal. To extract the IF of the fast-changing signal carrying the velocity information, an IF extraction algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transforms is detailed. Besides, the performance of the algorithm is analyzed by performing corresponding simulation. At last, an in-bore projectile velocity measurement experiment with a sniper rifle having a 720 m/s muzzle velocity is performed to verify the feasibility of the optical fiber-based velocity measurement system. Experiment results show that the measured muzzle velocity is 718.61 m/s, and the relative uncertainty of the measured muzzle velocity is approximately 0.021%.

  2. Optical fiber-based system for continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guohua; Sun, Jinglin; Li, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports the design of an optical fiber-based velocity measurement system and its application in measuring the in-bore projectile velocity. The measurement principle of the implemented system is based on Doppler effect and heterodyne detection technique. The analysis of the velocity measurement principle deduces the relationship between the projectile velocity and the instantaneous frequency (IF) of the optical fiber-based system output signal. To extract the IF of the fast-changing signal carrying the velocity information, an IF extraction algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transforms is detailed. Besides, the performance of the algorithm is analyzed by performing corresponding simulation. At last, an in-bore projectile velocity measurement experiment with a sniper rifle having a 720 m/s muzzle velocity is performed to verify the feasibility of the optical fiber-based velocity measurement system. Experiment results show that the measured muzzle velocity is 718.61 m/s, and the relative uncertainty of the measured muzzle velocity is approximately 0.021%.

  3. An (e, 2e+ ion) study of electron-impact ionization and fragmentation of tetrafluoromethane at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, Khokon; Ren, Xueguang; Wang, Enliang; Kumar, S. V. K.; Dorn, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    We study ionization and fragmentation of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) molecule induced by electron impact at low energies ( E 0 = 38 and 67 eV). We use a reaction microscope combined with a pulsed photoemission electron beam for our experimental investigation. The momentum vectors of the two outgoing electrons (energies E 1, E 2) and one fragment ion are detected in triple coincidence (e, 2e+ ion). After dissociation, the fragment products observed are CF3 +, CF2 +, CF+, F+ and C+. For CF3 + and CF2 + channels, we measure the ionized orbitals binding energies, the kinetic energy (KE) of the charged fragments and the two-dimensional (2D) correlation map between binding energy (BE) and KE of the fragments. From the BE and KE spectra, we conclude which molecular orbitals contribute to particular fragmentation channels of CF4. We also measure the total ionization cross section for the formation of CF3 + and CF2 + ions as function of projectile energy. We compare our results with earlier experiments and calculations for electron-impact and photoionization. The major contribution to CF3 + formation originates from ionization of the 4t2 orbital while CF2 + is mainly formed after 3t2 orbital ionization. We also observe a weak contribution of the (4a1)-1 state for the channel CF3 +.

  4. The motion of an arbitrarily rotating spherical projectile and its application to ball games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the differential equations which govern the motion of a spherical projectile rotating about an arbitrary axis in the presence of an arbitrary ‘wind’ are developed. Three forces are assumed to act on the projectile: (i) gravity, (ii) a drag force proportional to the square of the projectile's velocity and in the opposite direction to this velocity and (iii) a lift or ‘Magnus’ force also assumed to be proportional to the square of the projectile's velocity and in a direction perpendicular to both this velocity and the angular velocity vector of the projectile. The problem has been coded in Matlab and some illustrative model trajectories are presented for ‘ball-games’, specifically golf and cricket, although the equations could equally well be applied to other ball-games such as tennis, soccer or baseball. Spin about an arbitrary axis allows for the treatment of situations where, for example, the spin has a component about the direction of travel. In the case of a cricket ball the subtle behaviour of so-called ‘drift’, particularly ‘late drift’, and also ‘dip’, which may be produced by a slow bowler's off or leg-spin, are investigated. It is found that the trajectories obtained are broadly in accord with those observed in practice. We envisage that this paper may be useful in two ways: (i) for its inherent scientific value as, to the best of our knowledge, the fundamental equations derived here have not appeared in the literature and (ii) in cultivating student interest in the numerical solution of differential equations, since so many of them actively participate in ball-games, and they will be able to compare their own practical experience with the overall trends indicated by the numerical results. As the paper presents equations which can be further extended, it may be of interest to research workers. However, since only the most basic principles of fundamental mechanics are employed, it should be well within the grasp of first

  5. The Chicxulub impact at the K-Pg boundary - search for traces of the projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, A.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most interesting problems in the context of the end-Cretaceous Chicxulub impact is the question after the whererabouts of the main mass of the projectile. The nature of this >10 km-sized Chicxulub projectile was constrained by an anomaly in the chromium isotope 54 in the K-Pg deposit at Stevens Klint, Denmark, to a carbonaceous chondrite of type CM2 [1]. About 1.5 % of the estimated mass of the projectile has been detected world-wide in the K-Pg boundary layer; mainly in the form of platinum group elements (PGE) as well as other siderophile elements (Ni, Co ... ). A contamination by or even a major contribution of other "projectile" elements to the K-Pg event bed was rarely proposed. The few examples in the literature (cf. compilation in [2, 3]) used rare earth elements (REE) distribution patterns that are slightly inconsistent with REE patterns typical for the upper continental crust (UCC). Ejecta consisting of UCC target rocks is expected to form the overwhelming mass of the ejecta. In most K-Pg layers, however, the ejecta is diluted or even totally masked by a component of more local origin and with features of high-energy deposition mechanisms. Numerical models [4] indicate a deposition of >500km3 projectile material, corresponding to >2 x 10exp9 tons of mainly silica, iron, and magnesium in the K-Pg event bed. Detecting the "meteoritic" origin of these major elements, however, in a matrix of siliceous detritus, is practically impossible. Recent LA-ICP-MS analyses show that siliceous impact spherules - hydrated glass or altered to chlorite - in the Chicxulub event bed at various locations (e.g., Shell Creek, La Lajilla, La Popa) have REE patterns that are flat and un-fractionated, corresponding quite well to a typical CI-pattern. The REE abundances are chondritic to sub-chondritic. Mixing calculations indicate that the maximum REE contribution of UCC material to the REE budget of these spherules is on the order of 2 %, but usually much less. These

  6. Techniques for Surface-Temperature Measurements and Transition Detection on Projectiles at Hypersonic Velocities--Status Report No. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.; Wilder, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    The latest developments in a research effort to advance techniques for measuring surface temperatures and heat fluxes and determining transition locations on projectiles in hypersonic free flight in a ballistic range are described. Spherical and hemispherical titanium projectiles were launched at muzzle velocities of 4.6-5.8 km/sec into air and nitrogen at pressures of 95-380 Torr. Hemisphere models with diameters of 2.22 cm had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 5.5-8 degrees and 4.7-7 degrees, depending on whether they were launched using an evacuated launch tube or not. Hemisphere models with diameters of 2.86 cm had maximum pitch and yaw angles of 2.0-2.5 degrees. Three intensified-charge-coupled-device (ICCD) cameras with wavelength sensitivity ranges of 480-870 nm (as well as one infrared camera with a wavelength sensitivity range of 3 to 5 microns), were used to obtain images of the projectiles in flight. Helium plumes were used to remove the radiating gas cap around the projectiles at the locations where ICCD camera images were taken. ICCD and infrared (IR) camera images of titanium hemisphere projectiles at velocities of 4.0-4.4 km/sec are presented as well as preliminary temperature data for these projectiles. Comparisons were made of normalized temperature data for shots at approx.190 Torr in air and nitrogen and with and without the launch tube evacuated. Shots into nitrogen had temperatures 6% lower than those into air. Evacuation of the launch tube was also found to lower the projectile temperatures by approx.6%.

  7. Avian persistence in fragmented rainforest.

    PubMed

    Lens, Luc; Van Dongen, Stefan; Norris, Ken; Githiru, Mwangi; Matthysen, Erik

    2002-11-08

    What factors determine the persistence of species in fragmented habitats? To address this question, we studied the relative impacts of forest deterioration and fragmentation on bird species in 12 rainforest fragments in Kenya, combining 6 years of individual capture-recapture data with measurements of current captures and museum specimens. Species mobility, as estimated from species-specific dispersal rates, and tolerance to habitat deterioration, as estimated from change in fluctuating asymmetry with increasing habitat disturbance, explained 88% of the variation in patch occupancy among eight forest bird species. Occupancy increased with mobility and with tolerance to deterioration, where both variables contributed equally to this relationship. We conclude that individual-level study, such as of dispersal behavior and phenotypic development, can predict patterns of persistence at the species level. More generally, for conservation tactics to stand a high chance of success, they should include action both within sites, to minimize habitat deterioration, and across landscapes, to maximize dispersal.

  8. Fragmentation of molecular tributyltin chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmekhin, S.; Caló, A.; Kisand, V.; Nõmmiste, E.; Kotilainen, H.; Aksela, H.; Aksela, S.

    2008-06-01

    Fragmentation of tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) vapour has been studied experimentally by means of time-of-flight mass spectrometry at the photon energy range of 9-25 eV of synchrotron radiation, at 21.22 eV of HeI as well as with 500 eV electron beam excitation. Branching ratios of the tributyltin chloride fragments taken with HeI and synchrotron radiation have been presented first time. Calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were carried out for TBTCl and the ionization energies obtained were used to predict the dissociation pathways creating the observed ions.

  9. Comparative analysis of properties of channels of deuteron and tritium production in {sup 16}Op collisions at a projectile momentum of 3.25 GeV/c per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Olimov, K., E-mail: olimov@uzsci.net; Glagolev, V. V.; Gulamov, K. G.

    2014-12-15

    The results of a comparative analysis of channels involving the inclusive production of deuterons and tritons in {sup 16}Op collisions at a projectile momentum of 3.25 GeV/c per nucleon are presented. The mechanisms governing proton, deuteron, and triton production in the fragmentation of oxygen nuclei are found to be independent. It is shown that the observed proton-multiplicity correlations are associated predominantly with the character of the primary event of a proton-nucleon collision in {sup 16}Op interactions. It is found that, in reactions involving triton production, the contributions of processes leading to an increase in the mean proton multiplicity (n →more » p + π{sup −} and np → pn) and processes leading to its decrease (p → n + π{sup +}) compensate each other.« less

  10. A Method to Determine Angular Orientation of a Projectile Using a Polarization Scanning Reference Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankipati, Venkata Varun

    This thesis presents a method to determine the angular orientation of a projectile in flight, by mechanically scanning a linearly polarized, microwave reference source. In particular, the research focuses on real time measurement of the roll angle. A 10 GHz, linearly polarized electromagnetic wave is radiated toward the projectile by means of a 10 dB horn antenna. The projectile is equipped with a backward facing 10 dB horn antenna, which has orientation, namely roll angle, sensitivity. The response of the received signal follows a cosine law, producing a maximum when the receiver orientation is aligned with the transmitting polarization. As expected, the peak response shifts in response to the roll-angle, however, unambiguous recovery of the angle requires synchronization with the polarization orientation of the source. This has been achieved through the use of a unique transmitter power sequence, which includes a start-of-scan and end-of-scan time stamp. Based on the above concept, a complete system comprising a polarization scanning reference source, the receiving antenna mounted on a vehicle, and pertinent electronic components, has been tested for both line of sight and non-line of sight applications. The transmitter antenna, mounted on a computer controlled stepper motor allowed source polarization to be scanned from -90° to 90° in 0.3 seconds. The receiving antenna continuously samples the received electromagnetic background at the source frequency and uses a RF detector and a data acquisition system to record the subsequent time-varying voltage signal, which is processed to recover the roll-angle. Measurements in an anechoic chamber were used to confirm the efficacy of the system and field trials, using a transmitter power of 2 W, were successfully demonstrated over a distance of 0.15 miles. The distance limit can be extended by increasing the transmitter power, receiver sensitivity and increase source frequency.

  11. Performance of primary repair on colon injuries sustained from low-versus high-energy projectiles.

    PubMed

    Lazovic, Ranko; Radojevic, Nemanja; Curovic, Ivana

    2016-04-01

    Among various reasons, colon injuries may be caused by low- or high-energy firearm bullets, with the latter producing a temporary cavitation phenomenon. The available treatment options include primary repair and two-stage management, but recent studies have shown that primary repair can be widely used with a high success rate. This paper investigates the differences in performance of primary repair on these two types of colon injuries. Two groups of patients who sustained colon injuries due to single gunshot wounds, were retrospectively categorized based on the type of bullet. Primary colon repair was performed in all patients selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria (Stone and Fabian's criteria). An almost absolute homogeneity was attained among the groups in terms of age, latent time before surgery, and four trauma indexes. Only one patient from the low-energy firearm projectile group (4%) developed a postsurgical complication versus nine patients (25.8%) from the high-energy group, showing statistically significant difference (p = 0.03). These nine patients experienced the following postsurgical complications: pneumonia, abscess, fistula, suture leakage, and one multiorgan failure with sepsis. Previous studies concluded that one-stage primary repair is the best treatment option for colon injuries. However, terminal ballistics testing determined the projectile's path through the body and revealed that low-energy projectiles caused considerably lesser damage than their high-energy counterparts. Primary colon repair must be performed definitely for low-energy short firearm injuries but very carefully for high-energy injuries. Given these findings, we suggest that the treatment option should be determined based not only on the bullet type alone but also on other clinical findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of a viscoelastic target on the impact response of a flat-nosed projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Jialing; Liu, Hua

    2018-02-01

    Taylor impact is a widely used strategy in which a flat-nosed projectile is fired onto a rigid anvil directly to determine the dynamic strength of rod specimens. Nowadays, the rigid anvil is often replaced by an output target bar to ensure the accuracy of measurement via recording strain signals in the output bar. For testing the dynamic strength of low-density materials, a low-impedance target bar, which exhibits viscoelastic characteristics is often employed. In this paper, an extended Taylor model is proposed to improve the idealization of treating the target bar as perfectly rigid material in the classic Taylor model, and the viscoelastic effect of the target bar is incorporated. The viscoelastic target bar is depicted by two elastic springs and one dashpot. Based on the plastic shock wave theory in the flat-nosed projectile associated with the viscoelastic wave analysis in the target bar, the viscoelastic effect of the target bar on the impact response of the flat-nosed projectile is investigated. The finite element simulation is also carried out to verify the theoretical model, and good agreement is found. The present theoretical model is also called the Taylor-cylinder Hopkinson impact, which provides a more accurate way to identify the dynamic material parameters. The dynamic responses of the present model are further compared with previous elastic and rigid target bar models. It is found that the viscoelastic effect of the target bar should be taken into consideration in the Taylor-cylinder Hopkinson impact test for low-impedance materials.

  13. Considerations about projectile and target X-rays induced during heavy ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, F.; Bauer, D. V.; Duarte, A.; Ferrari, T. M.; Niekraszewicz, L. A. B.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J. F.

    2018-02-01

    In this work we present some results concerning the X-rays emitted by heavy ions during target bombardment. In this case, Cl4+ and Cl5+ ions with energies from 4 MeV to 10 MeV were employed to irradiate vitreous carbon planchets. Moreover, total X-ray production cross sections of titanium X-rays induced by chlorine ions were obtained as well for the same energy range. Only inner shell transitions were considered in the present work. The titanium target consisted of a thin film deposited over vitreous carbon planchets. The results indicate that the projectile X-ray yields increase as a function of the bombarding energy for the present energy range. Effects due to projectile charge state appears to be of minor importance at these low ion velocities. It is shown that a simple exponential function can represent the continuum background of such complex spectra. The chlorine transition rates Kβ/Kα obtained from chlorine acting as a projectile interacting with a carbon target are about half the value when compared to the chlorine Kβ/Kα ratios obtained when a LiCl target is bombarded with C+ and C3+ ions with energies from 2 MeV to 6 MeV. As far as the total X-ray production cross sections of Ti induced by chlorine ions are concerned, the ECPSSR theory underestimates the Ti total X-rays production cross sections by several orders of magnitude. The role of electron capture and possible mechanisms responsible for these effects are discussed.

  14. Death, injury and disability from kinetic impact projectiles in crowd-control settings: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Haar, Rohini J; Iacopino, Vincent; Ranadive, Nikhil; Dandu, Madhavi; Weiser, Sheri D

    2017-01-01

    Objective We conducted a systematic review of the available literature on deaths, injuries and permanent disability from rubber and plastic bullets, as well as from bean bag rounds, shot pellets and other projectiles used in arrests, protests and other contexts from 1 January 1990 until 1 June 2017. Data sources PubMed, Scopus, JSTOR and grey literature. Data synthesis We report on descriptive statistics as well as data on injury severity, permanent disability and death. We analysed potential risk factors for injury severity, including the site of impact, firing distance and access to medical care. Results Of 3228 identified articles, 26 articles met inclusion criteria. These articles included injury data on 1984 people, 53 of whom died as a result of their injuries. 300 people suffered permanent disability. Deaths and permanent disability often resulted from strikes to the head and neck (49.1% of deaths and 82.6% of permanent disabilities). Of the 2135 injuries in those who survived their injuries, 71% were severe, injuries to the skin and to the extremities were most frequent. Anatomical site of impact, firing distance and timely access to medical care were correlated with injury severity and risk of disability. Conclusions Kinetic impact projectiles (KIPs), often called rubber or plastic bullets, are used commonly in crowd-control settings. We find that these projectiles have caused significant morbidity and mortality during the past 27 years, much of it from penetrative injuries and head, neck and torso trauma. Given their inherent inaccuracy, potential for misuse and associated health consequences of severe injury, disability and death, KIPs do not appear to be appropriate weapons for use in crowd-control settings. There is an urgent need to establish international guidelines on the use of crowd-control weapons to prevent unnecessary injuries and deaths. PMID:29255079

  15. Performance of primary repair on colon injuries sustained from low-versus high-energy projectiles

    PubMed Central

    Lazovic, Ranko; Radojevic, Nemanja; Curovic, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Among various reasons, colon injuries may be caused by low- or high-energy firearm bullets, with the latter producing a temporary cavitation phenomenon. The available treatment options include primary repair and two-stage management, but recent studies have shown that primary repair can be widely used with a high success rate. This paper investigates the differences in performance of primary repair on these two types of colon injuries. Two groups of patients who sustained colon injuries due to single gunshot wounds, were retrospectively categorized based on the type of bullet. Primary colon repair was performed in all patients selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria (Stone and Fabian's criteria). An almost absolute homogeneity was attained among the groups in terms of age, latent time before surgery, and four trauma indexes. Only one patient from the low-energy firearm projectile group (4%) developed a postsurgical complication versus nine patients (25.8%) from the high-energy group, showing statistically significant difference (p = 0.03). These nine patients experienced the following postsurgical complications: pneumonia, abscess, fistula, suture leakage, and one multiorgan failure with sepsis. Previous studies concluded that one-stage primary repair is the best treatment option for colon injuries. However, terminal ballistics testing determined the projectile's path through the body and revealed that low-energy projectiles caused considerably lesser damage than their high-energy counterparts. Primary colon repair must be performed definitely for low-energy short firearm injuries but very carefully for high-energy injuries. Given these findings, we suggest that the treatment option should be determined based not only on the bullet type alone but also on other clinical findings. PMID:26874437

  16. Antipodal fragment velocities for porous and weak targets at catastrophic impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanagisawa, M.; Itoi, T.

    1993-01-01

    Mortar, porous alumina, and sand targets, which were spherical in shape and from 11 to 15 cm in diameter, were impacted normally by plastic (polycarbonate) projectiles of nearly 1 g in mass at velocities about 6 km/s. Fragment velocity at the antipole of impact site (antipodal velocity, V(sub a)), for each experiment, was obtained from two Flash X-ray images recorded prior to and at predetermined delayed time after impact event. It has been revealed that the velocities for the same E/M(sub t) (impact energy divided by target mass) depend strongly on target material, and differ about an order of magnitude between the sand and basalt.

  17. Antipodal fragment velocities for porous and weak targets at catastrophic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, M.; Itoi, T.

    1993-03-01

    Mortar, porous alumina, and sand targets, which were spherical in shape and from 11 to 15 cm in diameter, were impacted normally by plastic (polycarbonate) projectiles of nearly 1 g in mass at velocities about 6 km/s. Fragment velocity at the antipole of impact site (antipodal velocity, V(sub a)), for each experiment, was obtained from two Flash X-ray images recorded prior to and at predetermined delayed time after impact event. It has been revealed that the velocities for the same E/M(sub t) (impact energy divided by target mass) depend strongly on target material, and differ about an order of magnitude between the sand and basalt.

  18. Concept and numerical simulations of a reactive anti-fragment armour layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hušek, Martin; Kala, Jiří; Král, Petr; Hokeš, Filip

    2017-07-01

    The contribution describes the concept and numerical simulation of a ballistic protective layer which is able to actively resist projectiles or smaller colliding fragments flying at high speed. The principle of the layer was designed on the basis of the action/reaction system of reactive armour which is used for the protection of armoured vehicles. As the designed ballistic layer consists of steel plates simultaneously combined with explosive material - primary explosive and secondary explosive - the technique of coupling the Finite Element Method with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics was used for the simulations. Certain standard situations which the ballistic layer should resist were simulated. The contribution describes the principles for the successful execution of numerical simulations, their results, and an evaluation of the functionality of the ballistic layer.

  19. Magnetic moment of the fragmentation-aligned 61Fe (9/2(+)) isomer.

    PubMed

    Matea, I; Georgiev, G; Daugas, J M; Hass, M; Neyens, G; Astabatyan, R; Baby, L T; Balabanski, D L; Bélier, G; Borremans, D; Goldring, G; Goutte, H; Himpe, P; Lewitowicz, M; Lukyanov, S; Méot, V; Santos, F de Oliveira; Penionzhkevich, Yu E; Roig, O; Sawicka, M

    2004-10-01

    We report on the g factor measurement of an isomer in the neutron-rich (61)(26)Fe (E(*)=861 keV and T(1/2)=239(5) ns). The isomer was produced and spin aligned via a projectile-fragmentation reaction at intermediate energy, the time dependent perturbed angular distribution method being used for the measurement of the g factor. For the first time, due to significant improvements of the experimental technique, an appreciable residual alignment of the nuclear spin ensemble has been observed, allowing a precise determination of its g factor, including the sign: g=-0.229(2). In this way we open the possibility to study moments of very neutron-rich short-lived isomers, not accessible via other production and spin-orientation methods.

  20. Foreign Object Damage in a Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitride by Spherical Projectiles of Various Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Racz, Zsolt; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Brewer, David N.

    2006-01-01

    Assessments of foreign object damage (FOD) of a commercial, gas-turbine grade, in situ toughened silicon nitride ceramic (AS800, Honeywell Ceramics Components) were made using four different projectile materials at ambient temperature. AS800 flexure target specimens rigidly supported were impacted at their centers in a velocity range from 50 to 450 m/s by spherical projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm. Four different projectile materials were used including hardened steel, annealed steel, silicon nitride ceramic, and brass. Post-impact strength of each target specimen impacted was determined as a function of impact velocity to appraise the severity of local impact damage. For a given impact velocity, the degree of strength degradation was greatest for ceramic balls, least for brass balls, and intermediate for annealed and hardened steel balls. For steel balls, hardened projectiles yielded more significant impact damage than annealed counterparts. The most important material parameter affecting FOD was identified as hardness of projectiles. Impact load as a function of impact velocity was quasi-statically estimated based on both impact and static indentation associated data.

  1. 3-D ballistic transport of ellipsoidal volcanic projectiles considering horizontal wind field and variable shape-dependent drag coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    An innovative 3-D numerical model for the dynamics of volcanic ballistic projectiles is presented here. The model focuses on ellipsoidal particles and improves previous approaches by considering horizontal wind field, virtual mass forces, and drag forces subjected to variable shape-dependent drag coefficients. Modeling suggests that the projectile's launch velocity and ejection angle are first-order parameters influencing ballistic trajectories. The projectile's density and minor radius are second-order factors, whereas both intermediate and major radii of the projectile are of third order. Comparing output parameters, assuming different input data, highlights the importance of considering a horizontal wind field and variable shape-dependent drag coefficients in ballistic modeling, which suggests that they should be included in every ballistic model. On the other hand, virtual mass forces should be discarded since they almost do not contribute to ballistic trajectories. Simulation results were used to constrain some crucial input parameters (launch velocity, ejection angle, wind speed, and wind azimuth) of the block that formed the biggest and most distal ballistic impact crater during the 1984-1993 eruptive cycle of Lascar volcano, Northern Chile. Subsequently, up to 106 simulations were performed, whereas nine ejection parameters were defined by a Latin-hypercube sampling approach. Simulation results were summarized as a quantitative probabilistic hazard map for ballistic projectiles. Transects were also done in order to depict aerial hazard zones based on the same probabilistic procedure. Both maps combined can be used as a hazard prevention tool for ground and aerial transits nearby unresting volcanoes.

  2. Maximum range of a projectile launched from a height h: a non-calculus treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, S.; Lagomarsino, D.

    2014-07-01

    The classical example of problem solving, maximizing the range of a projectile launched from height h with velocity v over the ground level, has received various solutions. In some of these, one can find the maximization of the range R by differentiating R as a function of an independent variable or through the implicit differentiation in Cartesian or polar coordinates. In other papers, various elegant non-calculus solutions can be found. In this paper, this problem is revisited on the basis of the elementary analytical geometry and the trigonometry only.

  3. CFD Prediction for Spin Rate of Fixed Canards on a Spinning Projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, X. L.; Jia, Ch. Y.; Jiang, T. Y.

    2011-09-01

    A computational study performed for spin rate of fixed canards on a spinning projectile is presented in this paper. The cancards configurations provide challenges in terms of the determination of the aerodynamic forces and moments and the flow field changes which could have significant effect on the stability, performance, and corrected round accuracy. Advanced time accurate Navier-Stokes computations have been performed to compute the spin rate associated with the spinning motion of the cancards configurations at supersonic speed. The results show that roll-damping moment of cancards varies linearly with the spin rate at supersonic velocity.

  4. Transonic static and dynamic stability characteristics of a finned projectile configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyden, R. P.; Brooks, C. W., Jr.; Davenport, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Static and dynamic stability tests were made of a finned projectile configuration with the aft-mounted fins arranged in a cruciform pattern. The tests were made at free stream Mach numbers of 0.7, 0.9, 1.1, and 1.2 in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel. Some of the parameters measured during the tests were lift, drag, pitching moment, pitch damping, and roll damping. Configurations tested included the body with undeflected fins, the body with various fin deflections for control, and the body with fins removed. Theoretical estimates of the stability derivatives were made for the fins on configuration.

  5. High intensity tone generation by axisymmetric ring cavities on training projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out on the production of high intensity tones by axisymmetric ring cavities. Maximum sound production occurs during a double resonance at Strouhal numbers which depend only on the local flow velocity independent of cavity location. Values of sound pressure of about 115 dB at 1 meter distance can be generated by axisymmetric ring cavities on projectiles moving at a relatively low flight speed equal to 65 m/s. Frequencies in the audible range up to several Kilo Hertz can be generated aeroacoustically.

  6. Single ionization and capture cross sections from biological molecules by bare projectile impact*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Michele A.; Monti, Juan M.; Montenegro, Pablo D.; Fojón, Omar A.; Champion, Christophe; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2017-02-01

    We report calculations on single differential and total cross sections for single ionization and single electron capture from biological targets, namely, vapor water and DNA nucleobasese molecules, by bare projectile impact: H+, He2+, and C6+. They are performed within the Continuum Distorted Wave - Eikonal Initial State approximation and compared to several existing experimental data. This study is oriented to the obtention of a reliable set of theoretical data to be used as input in a Monte Carlo code destined to micro- and nano- dosimetry.

  7. Contact force history and dynamic response due to the impact of a soft projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    A series of ballistic impact tests on several different instrumented targets was performed to characterize the dynamic contact force history resulting from the impact of a compliant projectile. The results show that the variation of contact force history with impact velocity does not follow the trends predicted by classical impact models. An empirical model was therefore developed to describe this behavior. This model was then used in a finite-element analysis to estimate the force history and calculate the resulting dynamic strain response in a transversely impacted composite laminate.

  8. Remarks on Certain Aspects of Solid Explosive Detonation Via Small Projectile Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    S [CURITY CL.ASSIFICATION OF TWI.rI5rAG Form, Approved REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMS 4o 0 7U -0188 __________________________________________I Exp...PIERFORMIWG OftGANLZATION REPO"t NUM5ER( S S . MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) RDl-SS-88-11. b B. NAME Of PtRFORMIPANG O*CLANLZATION 6 b. DFfsC...SHOCK VELOCITY (U s ), AND PROJECTILE IMPACT VELOCITY VI) .................................... A-I APPENDIX B - SHOCK COMPRESSION INFORMATION FOR

  9. Developments in SPR Fragment Screening.

    PubMed

    Chavanieu, Alain; Pugnière, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Fragment-based approaches have played an increasing role alongside high-throughput screening in drug discovery for 15 years. The label-free biosensor technology based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is now sensitive and informative enough to serve during primary screens and validation steps. In this review, the authors discuss the role of SPR in fragment screening. After a brief description of the underlying principles of the technique and main device developments, they evaluate the advantages and adaptations of SPR for fragment-based drug discovery. SPR can also be applied to challenging targets such as membrane receptors and enzymes. The high-level of immobilization of the protein target and its stability are key points for a relevant screening that can be optimized using oriented immobilized proteins and regenerable sensors. Furthermore, to decrease the rate of false negatives, a selectivity test may be performed in parallel on the main target bearing the binding site mutated or blocked with a low-off-rate ligand. Fragment-based drug design, integrated in a rational workflow led by SPR, will thus have a predominant role for the next wave of drug discovery which could be greatly enhanced by new improvements in SPR devices.

  10. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  11. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  12. Exclusive measurements of light fragment production at forward angles in NePb and NeNaF collisions at {E}/{A} = 400 MeV and 800 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastid, N.; Alard, J. P.; Arnold, J.; Augerat, J.; Babinet, R.; Biagi, F.; Brochard, F.; Crouau, M.; Charmensat, P.; Dupieux, P.; Fodor, Z.; Fraysse, L.; Girard, J.; Gorodetzky, P.; Gosset, J.; Laspalles, C.; Lemaire, M. C.; Le Merdy, A.; L'hôte, D.; Lucas, B.; Marroncle, J.; Montarou, G.; Parizet, M. J.; Poitou, J.; Qassoud, D.; Racca, C.; Rahmani, A.; Schimmerling, W.; Terrien, Y.; Valette, O.

    1990-01-01

    Emission of light fragments at small angles is studied in relativistic heavy ion collisions using the Diogene plastic wall for both symmetrical and non-symmetrical target-projectile systems with 400 MeV per nucleon and 800 MeV per nucleon incident neon nuclei. Efficiency of multiplicity measurements in the small angle range for the selection of central or peripheral collisions is confirmed for asymmetric systems. Differential production cross sections of Z = 1 fragments show evidence for the existence of two emitting sources. The apparent temperature of each source is obtained from comparison with a thermodynamical model.

  13. Exclusive measurements of light fragment production at forward angles in Ne-Pb and Ne-NaF collisions at E/A=400 MeV and 800 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastid, N.; Alard, J. P.; Arnold, J.; Augerat, J.; Babinet, R.; Biagi, F.; Brochard, F.; Crouau, M.; Charmensat, P.; Dupieux, P.; hide

    1990-01-01

    Emission of light fragments at small angles is studied in relativistic heavy ion collisions using the Diogene plastic wall for both symmetrical and non-symmetrical target-projectile systems with 400 MeV per nucleon and 800 MeV per nucleon incident neon nuclei. Efficiency of multiplicity measurements in the small angle range for the selection of central or peripheral collisions is confirmed for asymmetric systems. Differential production cross sections of Z = 1 fragments show evidence for the existence of two emitting sources. The apparent temperature of each source is obtained from comparison with a thermodynamical model.

  14. Heavy fragment production cross sections from 1.05 GeV/nucleon 56Fe in C, Al, Cu, Pb, and CH2 targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.; Rademacher, S. E.; Borak, T.; Carter, T. R.; Frankel, K. A.; Schimmerling, W.; Stronach, C. E.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    We have obtained charge-changing cross sections and partial cross sections for fragmentation of 1.05 GeV/nucleon Fe projectiles incident on H, C, Al, Cu, and Pb nuclei. The energy region covered by this experiment is critical for an understanding of galactic cosmic ray propagation and space radiation biophysics. Surviving primary beam particles and fragments with charges from 12 to 25 produced within a forward cone of half-angle 61 mrad were detected using a silicon detector telescope to identify their charge and the cross sections were calculated after correction of the measured yields for finite target thickness effects. The cross sections are compared to model calculations and to previous measurements. Cross sections for the production of fragments with even-numbered nuclear charges are seen to be enhanced in almost all cases.

  15. Fragmentation dynamics of meso-tetraphenyl iron (III) porphyrin chloride dication under energy control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Allouche, A. R.; Bernard, J.; Brédy, R.; Qian, D. B.; Ma, X.; Martin, S.; Chen, L.

    2017-03-01

    Meso-tetraphenyl iron (III) porphyrin chloride dications (FeTPPCl2+)* were prepared in collisions with F+ and H+ at 3 keV. The dominant fragmentation channels were observed to involve the loss of the Cl atom and the successive loss of neutral phenyl groups for both collisional systems. The mass spectra in correlation with the deposited excitation energy distributions of the parent ions for the main fragmentation channels were measured by using the collision induced dissociation under energy control method. The global excitation energy distribution was found to be shifted to lower energies in collisions with H+ compared to collisions with F+ showing a noteworthy change of the excitation energy window using different projectile ions. Partial excitation energy distributions of the parent ions FeTPPCl2+ were obtained for each fragmentation group. In a theoretical work, we have calculated the dissociation energies for the loss of one and two phenyl groups, including phenyl and (phenyl ± H). The energy barrier for the hydrogen atom transfer during the loss of (phenyl-H) has been also calculated. The measured energy difference for the successive loss of two phenyl groups was compared with the theoretical values.

  16. A Method for Studying the Temperature Dependence of Dynamic Fracture and Fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David R.; Chapman, David J.; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic fracture of a body is a late-stage phenomenon typically studied under simplified conditions, in which a sample is deformed under uniform stress and strain rate. This can be produced by evenly loading the inner surface of a cylinder. Due to the axial symmetry, as the cylinder expands the wall is placed into a tensile hoop stress that is uniform around the circumference. While there are various techniques to generate this expansion such as explosives, electromagnetic drive, and existing gas gun techniques they are all limited in the fact that the sample cylinder must be at room temperature. We present a new method using a gas gun that facilitates experiments on cylinders from 150 K to 800 K with a consistent, repeatable loading. These highly diagnosed experiments are used to examine the effect of temperature on the fracture mechanisms responsible for failure, and their resulting influence on fragmentation statistics. The experimental geometry employs a steel ogive located inside the target cylinder, with the tip located about halfway in. A single stage light gas gun is then used to launch a polycarbonate projectile into the cylinder at 1,000 m/sec-1. The projectile impacts and flows around the rigid ogive, driving the sample cylinder from the inside. The use of a non-deforming ogive insert allows us to install temperature control hardware inside the rear of the cylinder. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) is used for cooling and a resistive high current load for heating. Multiple channels of upshifted photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) track the expansion velocity along the cylinder enabling direct comparison to computer simulations, while High speed imaging is used to measure the strain to failure. The recovered cylinder fragments are also subject to optical and electron microscopy to ascertain the failure mechanism. PMID:26168019

  17. A Method for Studying the Temperature Dependence of Dynamic Fracture and Fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Jones, David R; Chapman, David J; Eakins, Daniel E

    2015-06-28

    The dynamic fracture of a body is a late-stage phenomenon typically studied under simplified conditions, in which a sample is deformed under uniform stress and strain rate. This can be produced by evenly loading the inner surface of a cylinder. Due to the axial symmetry, as the cylinder expands the wall is placed into a tensile hoop stress that is uniform around the circumference. While there are various techniques to generate this expansion such as explosives, electromagnetic drive, and existing gas gun techniques they are all limited in the fact that the sample cylinder must be at room temperature. We present a new method using a gas gun that facilitates experiments on cylinders from 150 K to 800 K with a consistent, repeatable loading. These highly diagnosed experiments are used to examine the effect of temperature on the fracture mechanisms responsible for failure, and their resulting influence on fragmentation statistics. The experimental geometry employs a steel ogive located inside the target cylinder, with the tip located about halfway in. A single stage light gas gun is then used to launch a polycarbonate projectile into the cylinder at 1,000 m/sec(-1). The projectile impacts and flows around the rigid ogive, driving the sample cylinder from the inside. The use of a non-deforming ogive insert allows us to install temperature control hardware inside the rear of the cylinder. Liquid nitrogen (LN₂) is used for cooling and a resistive high current load for heating. Multiple channels of upshifted photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) track the expansion velocity along the cylinder enabling direct comparison to computer simulations, while High speed imaging is used to measure the strain to failure. The recovered cylinder fragments are also subject to optical and electron microscopy to ascertain the failure mechanism.

  18. A high-precision velocity measuring system design for projectiles based on S-shaped laser screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huayi; Qian, Zheng; Yu, Hao; Li, Yutao

    2018-03-01

    The high-precision measurement of the velocity of high-speed flying projectile is of great significance for the evaluation and development of modern weapons. The velocity of the high-speed flying projectile is usually measured by laser screen velocity measuring system. But this method cannot achieve the repeated measurements, so we cannot make an indepth evaluation of the uncertainty about the measuring system. This paper presents a design based on S-shaped laser screen velocity measuring system. This design can achieve repeated measurements. Therefore, it can effectively reduce the uncertainty of the velocity measuring system. In addition, we made a detailed analysis of the uncertainty of the measuring system. The measurement uncertainty is 0.2% when the velocity of the projectile is about 200m/s.

  19. Role of hexadecapole deformation of projectile 28Si in heavy-ion fusion reactions near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Hagino, K.; Rowley, N.

    2018-06-01

    The vast knowledge regarding the strong influence of quadrupole deformation β2 of colliding nuclei in heavy-ion sub-barrier fusion reactions inspires a desire to quest the sensitivity of fusion dynamics to higher order deformations, such as β4 and β6 deformations. However, such studies have rarely been carried out, especially for deformation of projectile nuclei. In this article, we investigated the role of β4 of the projectile nucleus in the fusion of the 28Si+92Zr system. We demonstrated that the fusion barrier distribution is sensitive to the sign and value of the β4 parameter of the projectile, 28Si, and confirmed that the 28Si nucleus has a large positive β4. This study opens an indirect way to estimate deformation parameters of radioactive nuclei using fusion reactions, which is otherwise difficult because of experimental constraints.

  20. Fragmentation

    Treesearch

    K.H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Effective resource management takes into account the administrative and biophysical settings within which natural resources occur. A setting may be described in many ways; for example, by forest land ownership, by reserved and roadless designation, or by the distribution of human populations in relation to forest (chapter 3). The physical arrangement of forest in a...

  1. Fragments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Lowery

    Based on experiences growing out of a high school course on visual education, exercise cards are presented which are concerned with the boundaries of experience. They may act as preparation and stimulus for traditional art classes. The activities are divided into groups of enduring activities: mapping, representing; sensory awareness; inner…

  2. Fragments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    This performance autoethnography shows the author's struggle in finding his place, scholarship, voice, and body, into the academic setting. Mixing together memories of his lived experience with sugar cane workers, notes, and leftovers of different fieldworks, plus 6 years of life as grad student at the University of Illinois, the author looks for…

  3. Charge exchange of highly charged argon ions as a function of projectile energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, F. I.; Biedermann, C.; Radtke, R.; Fussmann, G.

    2007-03-01

    X-ray emission of highly charged argon ions following charge exchange collisions with argon atoms has been measured as a function of projectile energy. The ions are extracted from the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in Berlin and selected according to their massto-charge ratios. Experiments focussed on hydrogen-like and bare argon ions which were decelerated from 125q eV/amu to below 0.25q eV/amu prior to interaction with an argon gas target. The x-ray spectra recorded probe the cascading transitions resulting from electron capture into Rydberg states and are found to vary significantly with collision velocity. This indicates a shift in the orbital angular momentum of the capture state. Hardness ratios are observed to increase with decreasing projectile energy though at a rate which differs from the results of simulations. For comparison, measurements of the x-ray emission following charge exchange within the trap were carried out and are in agreement with the findings of the EBIT group at LLNL. Both of these in situ measurements, however, are in discrepancy with the results of the experiments using extracted ions.

  4. Learning to throw on a rotating carousel: recalibration based on limb dynamics and projectile kinematics.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Hugo; Pick, Herbert L; Rieser, John J

    2005-05-01

    Skilled actions exhibit adjustment in calibration to bring about their goals. The sought-after calibrations change as a function of the environmental situation that stages the actions. In these experiments participants sat on one side of a rotating carousel and threw beanbags underhanded at a target fixed on the opposite side. Logically, aimed throwing in this situation involves adjustment to fit changes in limb dynamics (originating from Coriolis forces) and changes in perceived projectile kinematics (originating from the tangential velocity of thrower and target). We studied whether such adjustment involved one or multiple components of recalibration. An initial experiment showed that exposure to rotation while throwing beanbags produced a robust recalibration in the direction of underhanded throws as manifest in throwing at stationary targets from a stationary position. Following some initial decay this recalibration persisted and approached an asymptote. Subsequent experiments suggested two independent components of recalibration. One is based on limb dynamics and accounts for the initial decay. The other is based on the perceived projectile kinematics and accounts for the stable change in throwing direction. These results raised the question of how multiple components of recalibration of an action are related. We propose that movement components are independent and calibrated separately at different levels in the organization of an action.

  5. The effects of external acoustic pressure fields on a free-running supercavitating projectile.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Peter J K; Rogers, Peter H; Doane, John W

    2010-12-01

    Proliferation of supercavitating torpedoes has motivated research on countermeasures against them as well as on the fluid phenomenon which makes them possible. The goal of this research was to investigate an envisaged countermeasure, an acoustic field capable of slowing or diverting the weapon by disrupting the cavitation envelope. The research focused on the interactions between high pressure amplitude sound waves and a supercavity produced by a small free-flying projectile. The flight dynamics and cavity geometry measurements were compared to control experiments and theoretical considerations were made for evaluating the effects. Corrugations on the cavity/water interface caused by the pressure signal have been observed and characterized. Results also show that the accuracy of a supercavitating projectile can be adversely affected by the sound signal. This research concludes with results that indicate that it is acoustic cavitation in the medium surrounding the supercavity, caused by the high pressure amplitude sound, that is responsible for the reduced accuracy. A hypothesis has been presented addressing the means by which the acoustic cavitation could cause this effect.

  6. Bringing Javanesse Traditional Dance into Basic Physics Class: Exemplifying Projectile Motion through Video Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, Langlang; Prasetya Aji, Mahardika; Susilo; Marwoto, Putut

    2016-08-01

    An alternative approach of an arts-based instruction for Basic Physics class has been developed through the implementation of video analysis of a Javanesse traditional dance: Bambangan Cakil. A particular movement of the dance -weapon throwing- was analyzed by employing the LoggerPro software package to exemplify projectile motion. The results of analysis indicated that the movement of the thrown weapon in Bambangan Cakil dance provides some helping explanations of several physics concepts of projectile motion: object's path, velocity, and acceleration, in a form of picture, graph and also table. Such kind of weapon path and velocity can be shown via a picture or graph, while such concepts of decreasing velocity in y direction (weapon moving downward and upward) due to acceleration g can be represented through the use of a table. It was concluded that in a Javanesse traditional dance there are many physics concepts which can be explored. The study recommends to bring the traditional dance into a science class which will enable students to get more understanding of both physics concepts and Indonesia cultural heritage.

  7. Experimental and numerical study of water-filled vessel impacted by flat projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ren, Peng; Huang, Wei; Gao, Yu Bo

    2014-05-01

    To understand the failure modes and impact resistance of double-layer plates separated by water, a flat-nosed projectile was accelerated by a two-stage light gas gun against a water-filled vessel which was placed in an air-filled tank. Targets consisted of a tank made of two flat 5A06 aluminum alloy plates held by a high strength steel frame. The penetration process was recorded by a digital high-speed camera. The same projectile-target system was also used to fire the targets placed directly in air for comparison. Parallel numerical tests were also carried out. The result indicated that experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. Numerical simulations were able to capture the main physical behavior. It was also found that the impact resistance of double layer plates separated by water was lager than that of the target plates in air. Tearing was the main failure models of the water-filled vessel targets which was different from that of the target plates in air where the shear plugging was in dominate.

  8. Deterministic physical systems under uncertain initial conditions: the case of maximum entropy applied to projectile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecinos, Alejandra; Davis, Sergio; Peralta, Joaquín

    2018-07-01

    The kinematics and dynamics of deterministic physical systems have been a foundation of our understanding of the world since Galileo and Newton. For real systems, however, uncertainty is largely present via external forces such as friction or lack of precise knowledge about the initial conditions of the system. In this work we focus on the latter case and describe the use of inference methodologies in solving the statistical properties of classical systems subject to uncertain initial conditions. In particular we describe the application of the formalism of maximum entropy (MaxEnt) inference to the problem of projectile motion, given information about the average horizontal range over many realizations. By using MaxEnt we can invert the problem and use the provided information on the average range to reduce the original uncertainty in the initial conditions. Also, additional insight into the initial condition's probabilities, and the projectile path distribution itself, can be achieved based on the value of the average horizontal range. The wide applicability of this procedure, as well as its ease of use, reveals a useful tool with which to revisit a large number of physics problems, from classrooms to frontier research.

  9. Evaluation of the performance of three elastomers for non-lethal projectile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thota, N.; Epaarachchi, J.; Lau, K. T.

    2015-09-01

    Less lethal kinetic ammunitions with soft noses such as eXact iMpact 1006, National Sports Spartan and B&T have been commonly used by military and law enforcement officers in the situations where lethal force is not warranted. In order to explore new materials to be used as nose in such ammunitions, a scholastic study using finite element simulations has been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of two rubber like elastomers and a polyolefinic foam (low density, highly compressible, stiff and closed cell type of thermos plastic elastomer). State-of-the art thorax surrogate MTHOTA has been employed for the evaluation of blunt thoracic trauma. Force-rigid wall method was employed for the evaluation of head damage curves for each material. XM 1006 has been used as the benchmark projectile for the purpose of comparison. Both blunt thoracic trauma and head damage criterion point of view, both rubbers (R1 and R2) have yielded high values of VCmax and peak impact force. Polyolefinic foam (F1) considered in the study has yielded very promising VCmax values and very less peak impact force when compared with those of bench mark projectile XM 1006.

  10. The influence of projectile ion induced chemistry on surface pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Prasanta, E-mail: prasantak@vecc.gov.in; Satpati, Biswarup

    We report the critical role of projectile induced chemical inhomogeneity on surface nanostructure formation. Experimental inconsistency is common for low energy ion beam induced nanostructure formation in the presence of uncontrolled and complex contamination. To explore the precise role of contamination on such structure formation during low energy ion bombardment, a simple and clean experimental study is performed by selecting mono-element semiconductors as the target and chemically inert or reactive ion beams as the projectile as well as the source of controlled contamination. It is shown by Atomic Force Microscopy, Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy measurementsmore » that bombardment of nitrogen-like reactive ions on Silicon and Germanium surfaces forms a chemical compound at impact zones. Continuous bombardment of the same ions generates surface instability due to unequal sputtering and non-uniform re-arrangement of the elemental atom and compound. This instability leads to ripple formation during ion bombardment. For Argon-like chemically inert ion bombardment, the chemical inhomogeneity induced boost is absent; as a result, no ripples are observed in the same ion energy and fluence.« less

  11. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: approximately twice the efficiency if the fission fragment energy can be directly converted into electricity; reduction of the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collection of the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem.

  12. Radio Frequency Oscillator Technique for Monitoring Velocity and Structural Integrity of Projectiles during Their Exit from the Muzzle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    JAN 73 1473 EDITION OF • NOV 6S IS OBSOLETE SECURITY M^ mrm THIS PAGE (When Date Entered) UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OP THIS PAOKWhrn Dmtm...similar to those obtained during the laboratory simulation (Figure 5) o > Q ID < 47.5 48.5 49.5 50.5 TIME ( ms ) Figure 5, Example of the...45> ■400 VELOCITY PULSE PROJECTILE TYPE HE(TP) 12 TIME ( MS ) Figure 8. Time Series for the 75mm HE(JPl Projectile, Rd, No. 4 reference length

  13. Investigation of Inertia Welding Process for Applying Gilding Metal Rotating Bands to Projectile, 155-mm, M483A1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-01

    AISI 4140 steel body, but additional work remains to be done because pure copper behaves differently than gilding metal when subjected to the inertia...bands to AISI 1340 steel bodies used with the 155-mm, M483A1 Projectile. As a result of the effort it was demon- strated that the process is practical...rotating bands to AISI 1340 steel bodies used with the 155-mm, M483A1 Projectile. As a result of the effort it was demonstrated that the process is

  14. Fragmentation of the Chelyabinsk Fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, J.

    2013-12-01

    The most intense bolide since the 1908 Tunguska event occurred in the early morning hours of 15 February 2013 near the Russian town of Chelyabinsk. The impacting asteroid ranged between 17 and 20 m diameter with a mass of about 10,000 tons. Its estimated pre-atmospheric velocity was about 18.6 km/sec at a low angle of 20° from the horizontal. The resulting airburst occurred at an altitude of about 23 km and released an estimated total energy of about 440 kT (1.7 x 1015 J). The blast wave shattered windows on the ground over a wide area and collapsed the roof of a zinc factory. In spite of the size of the initital asteroid, only small fragments (a few kg, so far) have been recovered. The entry of an asteroid into Earth's atmosphere and its aerodynamic fragmentation and deceleration has been modeled by a number of authors over the past few decades. Full-featured numerical simulations are presently limited in their ability to simultaneously incorporate fragmentation, energy coupling between solid fragments and the atmosphere, and thermal radiation, but an approximate treatment of the fragmentation and dispersion of a large entering meteoroid called the 'pancake model' has achieved good fits to other observed events, including the Tunguska explosion, the 1947 Shikote-Alin fall and strewn fields from larger iron meteorite falls, such as the Henbury craters. Simulations using the pancake model can fit the overall observations of the Chelyabinsk event using an 18 m diameter asteroid of density 3000 kg/m3 following the observed trajectory and possessing an initial strength of about 7 MPa, which is relatively high for a stony meteoroid. This suggests that the asteroid was not a strengthless rubble pile, but in fact possessed considerable strength, compared to other stony meteorites of similar type. Aerodynamic breakup begins at an altitude of 31 km and the final airburst occurs at 22 km, releasing about 250 kT at this time. Subsequent to this airburst, large fragments

  15. Workflow Design Using Fragment Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Sébastien; Blay-Fornarino, Mireille; France, Robert

    The Service-Oriented Architecture (Soa) paradigm supports the assembly of atomic services to create applications that implement complex business processes. Assembly can be accomplished by service orchestrations defined by Soa architects. The Adore method allows Soa architects to model complex orchestrations of services by composing models of smaller orchestrations called orchestration fragments. The Adore method can also be used to weave fragments that address new concerns into existing application models. In this paper we illustrate how the Adore method can be used to separate and compose process aspects in a Soa design of the Car Crash Crisis Management System. The paper also includes a discussion of the benefits and limitations of the Adore method.

  16. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  17. Injecting asteroid fragments into resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farinella, Paolo; Gonczi, R.; Froeschle, Christiane; Froeschle, Claude

    1992-01-01

    We have quantitatively modeled the chance insertion of asteroid collisional fragments into the 3:1 and g = g(sub 6) resonances, through which they can achieve Earth-approaching orbits. Although the results depend on some poorly known parameters, they indicate that most meteorites and near-earth asteroids probably come from a small and non-representative sample of asteroids, located in the neighborhood of the two resonances.

  18. The fragmentation of Kosmos 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    On 6 Dec. 1991 Kosmos 2163, a maneuverable Soviet spacecraft which had been in orbit for 58 days, experienced a major breakup at an altitude of approximately 210 km. Although numerous pieces of debris were created, the fragments decayed rapidly leaving no long-term impact on the near-Earth environment. The assessed cause of the event is the deliberate detonation of an explosive device. Details of this event are presented.

  19. Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-11-20

    While telomerase is expressed in ~90% of primary human tumors, most somatic tissue cells except transiently proliferating stem-like cells do not have detectable telomerase activity (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Telomeres progressively shorten with each cell division in normal cells, including proliferating stem-like cells, due to the end replication (lagging strand synthesis) problem and other causes such as oxidative damage, therefore all somatic cells have limited cell proliferation capacity (Hayflick limit) (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The progressive telomere shortening eventually leads to growth arrest in normal cells, which is known as replicative senescence (Shay et al. , 1991). Once telomerase is activated in cancer cells, telomere length is stabilized by the addition of TTAGGG repeats to the end of chromosomes, thus enabling the limitless continuation of cell division (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Therefore, the link between aging and cancer can be partially explained by telomere biology. There are many rapid and convenient methods to study telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) (Mender and Shay, 2015b) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this protocol paper we describe Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis to determine average telomeric length of cells. Telomeric length can be indirectly measured by a technique called Telomere Restriction Fragment analysis (TRF). This technique is a modified Southern blot, which measures the heterogeneous range of telomere lengths in a cell population using the length distribution of the terminal restriction fragments (Harley et al. , 1990; Ouellette et al. , 2000). This method can be used in eukaryotic cells. The description below focuses on the measurement of human cancer cells telomere length. The principle of this method relies on the lack of

  20. Image-guided neurosurgery for secondary operative removal of projectiles after missile injury of the brain.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Chris; Woerner, Ulrich; Luelsdorf, Peter

    2008-04-01

    The primary treatment of penetrating missile injuries of the brain includes debridement of the scalp, fractured skull, and necrotic brain parenchyma. It is acceptable to remove all bony and metallic fragments that are accessible without additional trauma to nondamaged brain regions. Therefore, bone chips and bullets are often initially retained in the brain and are supposedly responsible for delayed cerebral infections and posttraumatic seizures. We successfully operated on 3 patients electively to remove bony and metallic fragments secondarily after penetrating brain trauma. We used an electromagnetic neuronavigation system for preoperative planning and chose a less invasive approach for the exact intraoperative localization of the fragments. All fragments were extracted without any problems. No patients had any additional neurologic deficits, and no signs of cerebral infections or seizures occurred between 4 and 8 weeks after the operative revision. We recommend the implementation of neuronavigation techniques into the surgical strategy for secondary removal of retained missile fragments.

  1. Stability analyses of the mass abrasive projectile high-speed penetrating into a concrete target Part III: Terminal ballistic trajectory analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Chen, X. W.; Fang, Q.; Kong, X. Z.; He, L. L.

    2015-08-01

    During the high-speed penetration of projectiles into concrete targets (the impact velocity ranges from 1.0 to 1.5 km/s), important factors such as the incident oblique and attacking angles, as well as the asymmetric abrasions of the projectile nose induced by the target-projectile interactions, may lead to obvious deviation of the terminal ballistic trajectory and reduction of the penetration efficiency. Based on the engineering model for the mass loss and nose-blunting of ogive-nosed projectiles established, by using the Differential Area Force Law (DAFL) method and semi-empirical resistance function, a finite differential approach was programmed (PENTRA2D) for predicting the terminal ballistic trajectory of mass abrasive high-speed projectiles penetrating into concrete targets. It accounts for the free-surface effects on the drag force acting on the projectile, which are attributed to the oblique and attacking angles, as well as the asymmetric nose abrasion of the projectile. Its validation on the prediction of curvilinear trajectories of non-normal high-speed penetrators into concrete targets is verified by comparison with available test data. Relevant parametric influential analyses show that the most influential factor for the stability of terminal ballistic trajectories is the attacking angle, followed by the oblique angle, the discrepancy of asymmetric nose abrasion, and the location of mass center of projectile. The terminal ballistic trajectory deviations are aggravated as the above four parameters increase.

  2. Fragmentation during primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Jayanta

    Understanding the physics of the very first stars in the universe, the so-called Population III (or Pop III) stars, is crucial in determining how the universe evolved into what we observe today. In the standard model of Pop III star formation, the baryonic matter, mainly atomic hydrogen, collapses gravitationally into small Dark Matter (DM) minihalos. However, so far there is little understanding on how the thermal, dynamical and chemical evolution of the primordial gas depend on the initial configuration of the minihalos (for example, rotation of the unstable clumps inside minihalos, turbulence, formation of molecular hydrogen and cosmic variance of the minihalos). We use the modified version of the Gadget-2 code, a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, to follow the evolution of the collapsing gas in both idealized as well as more realistic minihalos. Unlike some earlier cosmological calculations, the implementation of sink particles allows us to follow the evolution of the accretion disk that builds up in the centre of each minihalo and fragments. We find that the fragmentation behavior depends on the adopted choice of three-body H2 formation rate coefficient. The increasing cooling rate during rapid conversion of the atomic to molecular hydrogen is offset by the heating due to gas contraction. We propose that the H2 cooling, the heating due to H2 formation and compressional heating together set a density and temperature structure in the disk that favors fragmentation. We also find that the cloud's initial degree of rotation has a significant effect on the thermal and dynamical evolution of the collapsing gas. Clouds with higher rotation exhibit spiral-arm-like structures that become gravitationally unstable to fragmentation on several scales. These type of clouds tend to fragment more and have lower accretion rates compared to their slowly rotating counterparts. In addition, we find that the distribution of specific angular

  3. Fragmentation of cosmic-string loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The fragmentation of cosmic string loops is discussed, and the results of a simulation of this process are presented. The simulation can evolve any of a large class of loops essentially exactly, including allowing fragments that collide to join together. Such reconnection enhances the production of small fragments, but not drastically. With or without reconnections, the fragmentation process produces a collection of nonself-intersecting loops whose typical length is on the order of the persistence length of the initial loop.

  4. Evaluating Fragment Construction Policies for SDT Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    allocates a fragment and begins translation. Once a termination condition is met, Strata emits any trampolines that are necessary. Trampolines are pieces... trampolines (unless its target previously exists in the fragment cache). Once a CTI’s target instruction becomes available in the fragment cache, the CTI is...linked directly to the destination, avoiding future uses of the trampoline . This mechanism is called Fragment Linking and avoids significant overhead

  5. Forward-backward multiplicity correlations of target fragments in nucleus-emulsion collisions at a few hundred MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong-Hai; Chen, Yan-Ling; Wang, Guo-Rong; Li, Wang-Dong; Wang, Qing; Yao, Ji-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Li, Rong; Li, Jun-Sheng; Li, Hui-Ling

    2015-01-01

    The forward-backward multiplicity and correlations of a target evaporated fragment (black track particle) and target recoiled proton (grey track particle) emitted from 150 A MeV 4He, 290 A MeV 12C, 400 A MeV 12C, 400 A MeV 20Ne and 500 A MeV 56Fe induced different types of nuclear emulsion target interactions are investigated. It is found that the forward and backward averaged multiplicity of a grey, black and heavily ionized track particle increases with the increase of the target size. The averaged multiplicity of a forward black track particle, backward black track particle, and backward grey track particle do not depend on the projectile size and energy, but the averaged multiplicity of a forward grey track particle increases with an increase of projectile size and energy. The backward grey track particle multiplicity distribution follows an exponential decay law and the decay constant decreases with an increase of target size. The backward-forward multiplicity correlations follow linear law which is independent of the projectile size and energy, and the saturation effect is observed in some heavy target data sets.

  6. Fragment and Debris Hazards from Accidental Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-13

    region boundr’ a - fragment weight m - number of fragments with weight PAq . are determined using 9. the ever- age weight of fragments voeithing more than...34 Nineteenth Explosives Safety Seminar, Los Ang. es, CA, Sep 1980. Merz, Hans A., "The Effects of Explosions in Slightly Buried Concrete Structures

  7. Global-scale patterns of forest fragmentation

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; R. O' Neill; B. Jones; E. Smith

    2000-01-01

    We report an analysis of forest fragmentation based on 1-km resolution land-cover maps for the globe. Measurements in analysis windows from 81 km 2 (9 x 9 pixels, "small" scale) to 59,049 km 2 (243 x 243 pixels, "large" scale) were used to characterize the fragmentation around each forested pixel. We identified six categories of fragmentation (...

  8. Compact multiwire proportional counters for the detection of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhingan, Akhil; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Singh, R. P.; Varughese, T.; Singh, Hardev; Behera, B. R.; Mandal, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    Two large area multistep position sensitive (two dimensional) multiwire proportional counters have been developed for experiments involving study of fission dynamics using general purpose scattering chamber facility at IUAC. Both detectors have an active area of 20×10 cm2 and provide position signals in horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) planes, timing signal for time of flight measurements and energy signal giving the differential energy loss in the active volume. The design features are optimized for the detection of low energy heavy ions at very low gas pressures. Special care was taken in setting up the readout electronics, constant fraction discriminators for position signals in particular, to get optimum position and timing resolutions along with high count rate handling capability of low energy heavy ions. A custom made charge sensitive preamplifier, having lower gain and shorter decay time, has been developed for extracting the differential energy loss signal. The position and time resolutions of the detectors were determined to be 1.1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and 1.7 ns FWHM, respectively. The detector could handle heavy ion count rates exceeding 20 kHz without any breakdown. Time of flight signal in combination with differential energy loss signal gives a clean separation of fission fragments from projectile and target like particles. The timing and position signals of the detectors are used for fission coincidence measurements and subsequent extraction of their mass, angular, and total kinetic energy distributions. This article describes systematic study of these fission counters in terms of efficiency, time resolution, count rate handling capability, position resolution, and the readout electronics. The detector has been operated with both five electrode geometry and four electrode geometry, and a comparison has been made in their performances.

  9. Ramifications of projectile velocity on the ballistic dart penetration of sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, Peter Anthony

    With the advent of novel in-situ experimental measurement techniques, highly resolved quantitative observations of dynamic events within granular media can now be made. In particular, high speed imagery and digital analysis now allow for the ballistic behaviors of sand to be examined not only across a range of event velocities but across multiple length scales. In an attempt to further understand the dynamic behavior of granular media, these new experimental developments were implemented utilizing high speed photography coupled with piezo-electric stress gauges to observe visually accessible ballistic events of a dart penetrating Ottawa sand. Projectile velocities ranged from 100 to over 300 meters per second with two distinct chosen fields of view to capture bulk and grain-scale behaviors. Each event was analyzed using the digital image correlation technique, particle image velocimetry from which two dimensional, temporally resolved, velocity fields were extracted, from which bulk granular flow and compaction wave propagation were observed and quantified. By comparing bulk, in situ, velocity field behavior resultant from dart penetration, momentum transfer could be quantified measuring radius of influence or dilatant fluid approximations from which a positive correlation was found across the explored velocity regime, including self similar tendencies. This was, however, not absolute as persistent scatter was observed attributed to granular heterogeneous effects. These were tentatively measured in terms of an irreversible energy amount calculated via energy balance. Grain scale analysis reveals analogous behavior to the bulk response with more chaotic structure, though conclusions were limited by the image processing method to qualitative observations. Even so, critical granular behaviors could be seen, such as densification, pore collapse, and grain fracture from which basic heterogeneous phenomena could be examined. These particularly dominated near nose

  10. Evaluation of Titanium-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr (Ti-5553) Alloy against Fragment and Armor-Piercing Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Alloy Ti-6Al-4V; ARL-MR- 486; U.S. Army Research Laboratory: Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, July 2000. Donachie, M. J., Jr. Titanium: A Technical...Tests of Armor Materials. TOP-2-2-710 (AD A137873), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 8 July 1993. Veeck, S.; Lee, D.; Boyer, R.; Briggs, R. The...195 BEAR HILL RD WALTHAM MA 02451 1 RMI TITANIUM CO W PALLANTE PO BOX 269 1000 WARREN AVE NILES OH 44446 2 SOUTHWEST RSRCH INST

  11. The Experimental Projectile Impact Chamber (EPIC) at Centro de Astrobiología, Spain: Reproducibility and verification of scaling relations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormö, J.; Wünnemann, K.; Collins, G.; Melero Asensio, I.

    2012-09-01

    The Experimental Projectile Impact Chamber (EPIC) consists of a 20.5mm caliber, compressed gas gun and a 7m wide test bed. It is possible to vary the projectile size and density, the velocity up to about 5001n/"s, the impact angle. and the target composition. The EPIC is especially designed for the analysis of impacts into unconsolidated and liquid targets. i.e. allowing the use of gravity scaling. The general objective with the EPIC is to analyze the cratering and modification processes at wet-target (e.g. marinle) impacts. We have carried out 14 shots into dry sand targets with two projectile compositions (light and weak; heavy and strong), at two impact angles. at three impact velocities, and in both quarter-space and half- space geometries. We recorded the impacts with a high-speed camera and compared the results with numerical simulations using iSALE. The evaluation demonstrated that there are noticeable differences between the results from the two projectile types, but that the crater dimensions are consistent with scaling laws based on other impact experiments [1]. This proves the usefulness of the EPIC in the analysis of natural impacts.

  12. Suggested Courseware for the Non-Calculus Physics Student: Projectile Motion, Circular Motion, Rotational Dynamics, and Statics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Joyce; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Evaluates 10 courseware packages covering topics for introductory physics. Discusses the price; sub-topics; program type; interaction; possible hardware; time; calculus required; graphics; and comments on each program. Recommends two packages in projectile and circular motion, and three packages in statics and rotational dynamics. (YP)

  13. The WRAIR projectile concussive impact model of mild traumatic brain injury: re-design, testing and preclinical validation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lai Yee; Larimore, Zachary; Holmes, Larry; Cartagena, Casandra; Mountney, Andrea; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Schmid, Kara; Shear, Deborah; Tortella, Frank

    2014-08-01

    The WRAIR projectile concussive impact (PCI) model was developed for preclinical study of concussion. It represents a truly non-invasive closed-head injury caused by a blunt impact. The original design, however, has several drawbacks that limit the manipulation of injury parameters. The present study describes engineering advancements made to the PCI injury model including helmet material testing, projectile impact energy/head kinematics and impact location. Material testing indicated that among the tested materials, 'fiber-glass/carbon' had the lowest elastic modulus and yield stress for providing an relative high percentage of load transfer from the projectile impact, resulting in significant hippocampal astrocyte activation. Impact energy testing of small projectiles, ranging in shape and size, showed the steel sphere produced the highest impact energy and the most consistent impact characteristics. Additional tests confirmed the steel sphere produced linear and rotational motions on the rat's head while remaining within a range that meets the criteria for mTBI. Finally, impact location testing results showed that PCI targeted at the temporoparietal surface of the rat head produced the most prominent gait abnormalities. Using the parameters defined above, pilot studies were conducted to provide initial validation of the PCI model demonstrating quantifiable and significant increases in righting reflex recovery time, axonal damage and astrocyte activation following single and multiple concussions.

  14. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  15. Vocal fold fixation caused by penetration of a high-velocity steel projectile.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chau-Shiang; Ho, Chi-Kung; Hsu, Ruey-Fen

    2014-01-01

    Vocal fold fixation as a result of trauma caused by a foreign body is rare. We report a unique case of vocal fold fixation caused by traumatic penetration of a shard of steel in a 31-year-old steelworker. While the patient was at work, an airborne projectile suddenly pierced his neck and entered his larynx, causing progressive hoarseness and dyspnea. Flexible laryngoscopy detected no obvious foreign body, but it did reveal that the right vocal fold had become immobile. Computed tomography revealed that a 2.5-cm sliver of steel had become impacted in the right cricoarytenoid joint, which made the arytenoid cartilage unable to rotate. An emergency tracheostomy was performed with local anesthesia to construct a functioning airway, and then rigid laryngoscopy was performed with general anesthesia. The foreign body was removed with the assistance of a microscope and microscissors. Postoperatively, the patient immediately regained control of his right vocal fold, and he experienced no permanent injury.

  16. High-velocity projectile impact induced 9R phase in ultrafine-grained aluminium.

    PubMed

    Xue, Sichuang; Fan, Zhe; Lawal, Olawale B; Thevamaran, Ramathasan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Yue; Yu, K Y; Wang, Jian; Thomas, Edwin L; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Xinghang

    2017-11-21

    Aluminium typically deforms via full dislocations due to its high stacking fault energy. Twinning in aluminium, although difficult, may occur at low temperature and high strain rate. However, the 9R phase rarely occurs in aluminium simply because of its giant stacking fault energy. Here, by using a laser-induced projectile impact testing technique, we discover a deformation-induced 9R phase with tens of nm in width in ultrafine-grained aluminium with an average grain size of 140 nm, as confirmed by extensive post-impact microscopy analyses. The stability of the 9R phase is related to the existence of sessile Frank loops. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the formation mechanisms of the 9R phase in aluminium. This study sheds lights on a deformation mechanism in metals with high stacking fault energies.

  17. A covariant multiple scattering series for elastic projectile-target scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Franz; Maung-Maung, Khin

    1989-01-01

    A covariant formulation of the multiple scattering series for the optical potential is presented. The case of a scalar nucleon interacting with a spin zero isospin zero A-body target through meson exchange, is considered. It is shown that a covariant equation for the projectile-target t-matrix can be obtained which sums the ladder and crossed ladder diagrams efficiently. From this equation, a multiple scattering series for the optical potential is derived, and it is shown that in the impulse approximation, the two-body t-matrix associated with the first order optical potential is the one in which one particle is kept on mass-shell. The meaning of various terms in the multiple scattering series is given. The construction of the first-order optical potential for elastic scattering calculations is described.

  18. Effect of nose shape and tail length on supersonic stability characteristics of a projectile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, W. C.; Collins, I. K.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of nose shape and tail length on the static stability of a fin-stabilized projectile has been investigated in the Langley Unitary Plan with tunnel at angles of attack to about 12 deg for a Mach number range from 1.5 to 2.5. The tests were made at a constant Reynolds number of 6.56 x 1,000,000 per meter. The results of the investigation showed that nose shape had no effect on the static stability. Increasing the tail length resulted in a progressively stabilizing tendency. However, only the 1.5-caliber-tail-length configuration was stable over the test angle-of-attack range at Mach number 1.5. This configuration was marginally stable or unstable at the higher Mach numbers, and the shorter configurations were unstable at all Mach numbers for either part of or the entire test angle-of-attack range.

  19. Trajectory characteristics and heating of hypervelocity projectiles having large ballistic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Michael E.

    1986-01-01

    A simple, approximate equation describing the velocity-density relationship (or velocity-altitude) has been derived from the flight of large ballistic coefficient projectiles launched at high speeds. The calculations obtained by using the approximate equation compared well with results for numerical integrations of the exact equations of motion. The flightpath equation was used to parametrically calculate maximum body decelerations and stagnation pressures for initial velocities from 2 to 6 km/s. Expressions were derived for the stagnation-point convective heating rates and total heat loads. The stagnation-point heating was parametrically calculated for a nonablating wall and an ablating carbon surface. Although the heating rates were very high, the pulse decayed quickly. The total nose-region heat shield weight was conservatively estimated to be only about 1 percent of the body mass.

  20. Human observers are biased in judging the angular approach of a projectile.

    PubMed

    Welchman, Andrew E; Tuck, Val L; Harris, Julie M

    2004-01-01

    How do we decide whether an object approaching us will hit us? The optic array provides information sufficient for us to determine the approaching trajectory of a projectile. However, when using binocular information, observers report that trajectories near the mid-sagittal plane are wider than they actually are. Here we extend this work to consider stimuli containing additional depth cues. We measure observers' estimates of trajectory direction first for computer rendered, stereoscopically presented, rich-cue objects, and then for real objects moving in the world. We find that, under both rich cue conditions and with real moving objects, observers show positive bias, overestimating the angle of approach when movement is near the mid-sagittal plane. The findings question whether the visual system, using both binocular and monocular cues to depth, can make explicit estimates of the 3-D location and movement of objects in depth.