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Sample records for a1at deficiency compared

  1. Diagnosis and Management of Patients with a1-Antitrypsin (A1AT) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David; Teckman, Jeffrey; Di Bisceglie, Adrian; Brenner, David A.

    2012-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency is an autosomal co-dominant disease that can cause chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in children and adults and increases risk for emphysema in adults. The development of symptomatic disease varies—some patients have life-threatening symptoms in childhood whereas others remain asymptomatic and healthy into old age. As a result of this variability, patients present across multiple disciplines, including pediatrics, adult medicine, hepatology, genetics, and pulmonology. This can give physicians the mistaken impression that the condition is less common than it actually is, and can lead to fragmented care that omits critical interventions commonly performed other specialists. We sought to present a rational approach for hepatologists to manage adult patients with A1AT deficiency. PMID:22200689

  2. Comparative study of Msx-1 expression in early normal and vitamin A-deficient avian embryos.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Kostetskii, I; Zile, M H; Solursh, M

    1995-07-01

    Homeobox-containing genes may play an important role in establishing embryonic patterns during development of vertebrates. Retinoic acid is able to induce expression of Hox genes in cells in culture and to alter expression patterns in the developing vertebrate embryos. Using wholemount in situ hybridization, we have examined and compared the expression patterns of a homeobox-containing gene, Msx-1, in early normal and vitamin A-deficient quail embryos. At gastrulation stage, Msx-1 is primarily expressed in the posterior half of both normal and vitamin A-deficient embryos. However, the gene is expressed wider and stronger in the vitamin A-deficient embryos. At neurulation stages, Msx-1 is continuously expressed in the posterior region up to Hensen's node and in the edge of the neural fold in both normal and vitamin A-deficient embryos. Notably, in the vitamin A-deficient embryos, Msx-1 is expressed more strongly and is also expressed ectopically in the anterior and precardiac regions. These results provide evidence that endogenous retinoids are involved in the normal expression of Msx-1 in avian embryo and that the expression of Msx-1 is downregulated by endogenous and physiological retinoids in vivo during early avian embryogenesis.

  3. Proteomic and comparative genomic analysis reveals adaptability of Brassica napus to phosphorus-deficient stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuisen; Ding, Guangda; Wang, Zhenhua; Cai, Hongmei; Xu, Fangsen

    2015-03-18

    Given low solubility and immobility in many soils of the world, phosphorus (P) may be the most widely studied macronutrient for plants. In an attempt to gain an insight into the adaptability of Brassica napus to P deficiency, proteome alterations of roots and leaves in two B. napus contrasting genotypes, P-efficient 'Eyou Changjia' and P-inefficient 'B104-2', under long-term low P stress and short-term P-free starvation conditions were investigated, and proteomic combined with comparative genomic analyses were conducted to interpret the interrelation of differential abundance protein species (DAPs) responding to P deficiency with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for P deficiency tolerance. P-efficient 'Eyou Changjia' had higher dry weight and P content, and showed high tolerance to low P stress compared with P-inefficient 'B104-2'. A total of 146 DAPs were successfully identified by MALDI TOF/TOF MS, which were categorized into several groups including defense and stress response, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, signaling and regulation, amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, protein process, biogenesis and cellular component, and function unknown. 94 of 146 DAPs were mapped to a linkage map constructed by a B. napus population derived from a cross between the two genotypes, and 72 DAPs were located in the confidence intervals of QTLs for P efficiency related traits. We conclude that the identification of these DAPs and the co-location of DAPs with QTLs in the B. napus linkage genetic map provide us novel information in understanding the adaptability of B. napus to P deficiency, and helpful to isolate P-efficient genes in B. napus. Low P seriously limits the production and quality of B. napus. Proteomics and genetic linkage map were widely used to study the adaptive strategies of B. napus response to P deficiency, proteomic combined with comparative genetic analysis to investigate the correlations between DAPs and QTLs are scarce. Thus, we herein investigated

  4. Legume adaptation to sulfur deficiency revealed by comparing nutrient allocation and seed traits in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Hélène; Poignavent, Germain; Le Signor, Christine; Aimé, Delphine; Vieren, Eric; Tadla, Charlène; Lugan, Raphaël; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Santoni, Anne-Lise; Wipf, Daniel; Buitink, Julia; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Salon, Christophe; Gallardo, Karine

    2013-12-01

    Reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions and the use of sulfur-free mineral fertilizers are decreasing soil sulfur levels and threaten the adequate fertilization of most crops. To provide knowledge regarding legume adaptation to sulfur restriction, we subjected Medicago truncatula, a model legume species, to sulfur deficiency at various developmental stages, and compared the yield, nutrient allocation and seed traits. This comparative analysis revealed that sulfur deficiency at the mid-vegetative stage decreased yield and altered the allocation of nitrogen and carbon to seeds, leading to reduced levels of major oligosaccharides in mature seeds, whose germination was dramatically affected. In contrast, during the reproductive period, sulfur deficiency had little influence on yield and nutrient allocation, but the seeds germinated slowly and were characterized by low levels of a biotinylated protein, a putative indicator of germination vigor that has not been previously related to sulfur nutrition. Significantly, plants deprived of sulfur at an intermediary stage (flowering) adapted well by remobilizing nutrients from source organs to seeds, ensuring adequate quantities of carbon and nitrogen in seeds. This efficient remobilization of photosynthates may be explained by vacuolar sulfate efflux to maintain leaf metabolism throughout reproductive growth, as suggested by transcript and metabolite profiling. The seeds from these plants, deprived of sulfur at the floral transition, contained normal levels of major oligosaccharides but their germination was delayed, consistent with low levels of sucrose and the glycolytic enzymes required to restart seed metabolism during imbibition. Overall, our findings provide an integrative view of the legume response to sulfur deficiency.

  5. Comparative effects of alcohol and thiamine deficiency on the developing central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bâ, Abdoulaye

    2011-11-20

    The present study addresses the still unresolved issue of the character of alcohol-thiamine metabolic interferences in the developing central nervous system (CNS). Investigations compare developmental neurotoxicity evoked by three patterns of maternal thiamine deficiency (pre, peri and postnatal), with two patterns of maternal chronic alcohol intake (alcohol alone and alcohol+thiamine cotreatment), on seven neurodevelopmental abilities in the offspring. The three patterns of thiamine deficiency, pair-compared with controls, highlight four sequences of development: (1) embryonic-perinatal sequence; (2) perinatal-postnatal sequence; (3) "ontogeny in ontogeny out" sequence; (4) "off and on" developing sequence. The results suggest a temporally- and regionally emergence of structures and centers underlying functional maturation during CNS ontogenesis. Furthermore, both developmental thiamine deficiencies and ethanol exposure produce two waves of neurofunctional alterations, peaking at P15 (postnatal day 15) and P25, respectively. The first peak of vulnerability is a prenatal event; it may interfere with the periods of intense cellular proliferation and migration. The second peak represents both perinatal and postnatal events; it may interfere with the periods of cellular differentiation, synaptogenesis, axonogenesis and myelinogenesis. Alcohol+thiamine cotreatment fails to reduce the first peak, but neutralizes essentially the second peak. The results suggest that alcohol interferes with thiamine during cellular differentiation and membrane developmental processes mainly. Indeed, among the three conditions of thiamine-deficient diet, only perinatal thiamine deficiency exhibits a closer relationship with developmental alcohol exposure. Together, these observations suggest that the critical period for alcohol-thiamine antagonism occurs perinatally and affects primarily cellular differentiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children: a comparative study of ferrous ascorbate and colloidal iron.

    PubMed

    Yewale, Vijay N; Dewan, Bhupesh

    2013-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of ferrous ascorbate and colloidal iron in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children. Eighty one children, aged 6 mo to 12 y, were screened for iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and those diagnosed with IDA were randomized to receive ferrous ascorbate or colloidal iron for a period of 12 wk, such that each child received elemental iron 3 mg/kg body weight/d. Increase in hemoglobin (Hb) level was the primary outcome measure. Assessment was performed at baseline, wk 4, wk 8 and wk 12. Of 81 children screened, 73 were included in the study. The mean rise in Hb at the end of the 12 wk was significantly higher in ferrous ascorbate group than the colloidal iron group [3.59 ± 1.67 g/dl vs. 2.43 ± 1.73 g/dl; P < 0.01]. Significantly higher proportion of children receiving ferrous ascorbate (64.86 % vs. 31.03 %; P < 0.01) became non-anemic in comparison to colloidal iron. Ferrous ascorbate provides a significantly higher rise in hemoglobin levels in comparison to colloidal iron. The study supports the use of ferrous ascorbate in the pediatric age group, providing evidence for its role as an efficient oral iron supplement in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

  7. Comparative transcript profiling of maize inbreds in response to long-term phosphorus deficiency stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanling; Mu, Chunhua; Chen, Yu; Kong, Xiangpei; Xu, Yuanchao; Zheng, Hongxia; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Qingcheng; Xue, Yanfang; Li, Zongxin; Ding, Zhaojun; Liu, Xia

    2016-12-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is an important food and energy crop, and low phosphate (Pi) availability is one of the major constraints in maize production worldwide. Plants adapt suitably to acclimate to low Pi stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of Pi deficiency response is still unclear. In this study, comparative transcriptomic analyses were conducted to investigate the differences of transcriptional responses in two maize genotypes with different tolerances to low phosphorus (LP) stress. LP-tolerant genotype QXN233 maintained higher P and Pi levels in shoots than LP-sensitive genotype QXH0121 suffering from Pi deficiency at seedling stage. Moreover, the transcriptomic analysis identified a total of 1391 Pi-responsive genes differentially expressed between QXN233 and QXH0121 under LP stress. Among these genes, 468 (321 up- and 147 down-regulated) were identified in leaves, and 923 (626 up- and 297 down-regulated) were identified in roots. These Pi-responsive genes were involved in various metabolic pathways, the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, ion transport, phytohormone regulation, and other adverse stress responses. Consistent with the differential tolerance to LP stress, five maize inorganic Pi transporter genes were more highly up-regulated in QXN233 than in QXH0121. Results provide important information to further study the changes in global gene expression between LP-tolerant and LP-sensitive maize genotypes and to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying maize's long-term response to Pi deficiency. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  8. Holotranscobalamin in laboratory diagnosis of cobalamin deficiency compared to total cobalamin and methylmalonic acid.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rima; Herrmann, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Cobalamin-saturated transcobalamin, also called holotranscobalamin (holoTC), constitutes only between 6% and 20% of total plasma B(12). Serum concentration of holoTC is a new marker in laboratory diagnosis of cobalamin deficiency. We tested the utility of holoTC in assessing vitamin B(12) status. We measured concentrations of holoTC and methylmalonic acid (MMA) in 1018 serum samples that were referred to our laboratory for total cobalamin testing. Concentrations of MMA were lower in females compared to males and this difference was no more significant after adjusting for serum creatinine. Moreover, age was associated with higher concentrations of serum MMA, higher holoTC and slightly higher concentrations of total cobalamin. Higher concentrations of serum creatinine were associated with higher concentrations of MMA and holoTC. However, no association between serum creatinine and total cobalamin was observed. Only subjects with normal serum creatinine showed a negative correlation between serum holoTC and MMA (r= -0.36, p<0.001). In subjects with MMA > or =300 nmol/L and holoTC < or =35 pmol/L, concentrations of total cobalamin were well within the normal range (median; 25th/75th percentiles=212; 171/272 pmol/L). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis displayed a higher sensitivity and specificity for holoTC compared with vitamin B(12) for detecting concentrations of MMA > or =300 nmol/L in individuals with normal renal function. Compared to total cobalamin, we observed a better performance of holoTC assay in detecting elevated concentrations of MMA in subjects with normal renal function. The majority of subjects with combined low holoTC and elevated MMA had normal concentrations of total cobalamin. HoloTC can be used as a first line parameter in detecting cobalamin deficiency.

  9. FBG1 Is the Final Arbitrator of A1AT-Z Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, John H.; Wen, Hsiang; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.; Glenn, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is the leading cause of childhood liver failure and one of the most common lethal genetic diseases. The disease-causing mutant A1AT-Z fails to fold correctly and accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the liver, resulting in hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in a subset of patients. Furthermore, A1AT-Z sequestration in hepatocytes leads to a reduction in A1AT secretion into the serum, causing panacinar emphysema in adults. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the details by which A1AT-Z is degraded in hepatic cell lines. We identified the ubiquitin ligase FBG1, which has been previously shown to degrade proteins by both the ubiquitin proteasome pathway and autophagy, as being key to A1AT-Z degradation. Using chemical and genetic approaches we show that FBG1 degrades A1AT-Z through both the ubiquitin proteasome system and autophagy. Overexpression of FBG1 decreases the half-life of A1AT-Z and knocking down FBG1 in a hepatic cell line, and in mice results in an increase in ATAT. Finally, we show that FBG1 degrades A1AT-Z through a Beclin1-dependent arm of autophagy. In our model, FBG1 acts as a safety ubiquitin ligase, whose function is to re-ubiquitinate ER proteins that have previously undergone de-ubiquitination to ensure they are degraded. PMID:26295339

  10. Comparative study of Zn deficiency in L. sativa and B. oleracea plants: NH4(+) assimilation and nitrogen derived protective compounds.

    PubMed

    Navarro-León, Eloy; Barrameda-Medina, Yurena; Lentini, Marco; Esposito, Sergio; Ruiz, Juan M; Blasco, Begoña

    2016-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a major problem in agricultural crops of many world regions. N metabolism plays an essential role in plants and changes in their availability and their metabolism could seriously affect crop productivity. The main objective of the present work was to perform a comparative analysis of different strategies against Zn deficiency between two plant species of great agronomic interest such as Lactuca sativa cv. Phillipus and Brassica oleracea cv. Bronco. For this, both species were grown in hydroponic culture with different Zn doses: 10μM Zn as control and 0.01μM Zn as deficiency treatment. Zn deficiency treatment decreased foliar Zn concentration, although in greater extent in B. oleracea plants, and caused similar biomass reduction in both species. Zn deficiency negatively affected NO3(-) reduction and NH4(+) assimilation and enhanced photorespiration in both species. Pro and GB concentrations were reduced in L. sativa but they were increased in B. oleracea. Finally, the AAs profile changed in both species, highlighting a great increase in glycine (Gly) concentration in L. sativa plants. We conclude that L. sativa would be more suitable than B. oleracea for growing in soils with low availability of Zn since it is able to accumulate a higher Zn concentration in leaves with similar biomass reduction. However, B. oleracea is able to accumulate N derived protective compounds to cope with Zn deficiency stress.

  11. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-09-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin(®) ) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra(®) ) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2-75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-01-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin®) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra®) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2–75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin. PMID:25761372

  13. Gastrointestinal symptoms are closely associated with depression in iron deficiency anemia: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Gulsum Emel; Uyanik, Mehmet Sevki; Top, Mehmet Serif; Tapan, Umit; Ak, Recep; Uyanik, Vesile

    2015-01-01

    Until now, very few studies evaluated the association between gastrointestinal and psychiatric symptoms in iron deficiency anemia (IDA). The study investigated the frequency of functional dyspepsia (FD) in IDA patients and determined its association with depression and somatization. The study was conducted at the Hematology Department of Trakya University Medical Faculty, which is a tertiary referral center in northwestern Turkey. It was a case-control study. A total of 125 consecutive IDA patients and 57 healthy control subjects were included. Patients and controls were questioned about the severity of their gastrointestinal system (GIS)-related symptoms and the presence of constipation and associated symptoms using a visual analog scale. In addition, IDA patients were administered a validated depression scale (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI) and somatization symptoms checklist. IDA patients had more frequent self-reported constipation compared with controls (56% vs 22.8%, P < .001). The mean scores of bloating, dyspepsia, and constipation-related quality of life (QoL) disturbance were significantly higher in the IDA group than in the control group (all P values.

  14. Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Children With First Attack of Seizure and on Healthy Control Group: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    FALLAH, Razieh; TIRANDAZI, Behnaz; FERDOSIAN, Farzad; FADAVI, Nafiseh

    2014-01-01

    Objective Seizures are the most common pediatric neurologic problem. Research of the association between iron deficiency and seizures has shown conflicting results. This study evaluates iron status of children with a first seizure attack (febrile seizure (FS) or first unprovoked afebrile seizure (FUS) and healthy control group. Materials & Methods In a cross sectional case control study, iron status of 6–60 month year old admitted children with first seizure to Shahid Sadoughi Hospital from August 2011–December 2012 were evaluated and compared with healthy control children that were referred to primary health care center of Azadshar, Yazd, Iran. Results 150 children were compared in three equal (FS, afebrile seizure, and control) groups. Hemoglobin levels in FUS (11.39 ± 1.07 g/dl) and FS (11.46 ± 1.18 g/dl) were lower than the control group (11.9 ± 0.89 g/dl) group. Serum iron levels in FS (38.52 ± 11.38 μg/dL) and FUS (42.68 ± 14.76 μg/dL) were lower than the control group (54.32 ± 13.46 μg/dL). Serum ferritin level in FUS (46.21 ± 27.63 ng/mL) and FS (48.91 ± 22.96 ng/ mL) was lower than the control group (75.13 ± 35.57 ng/mL). Iron deficiency (48% in FS, 44% in FUS and 28% in control group) and iron deficiency anemia (26% in FUS, 22% in FS, and 10% in healthy children) was more frequent in children with seizures. Conclusion Iron status should be evaluated in children with a first attack of febrile or afebrile seizures. PMID:25143769

  15. Comparative study of potential endothelioprotectors and impaza in modeled nitric oxide deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pokrovskii, M V; Kochkarov, V I; Pokrovskaya, T G; Artyushkova, E B; Pashin, E N; Danilenko, L M; Korokin, M V; Belous, A S; Korokina, L V; Malykhin, V A; Zaloznykh, Ya I; Brusnik, M S; Zhavbert, E S

    2009-09-01

    Experimental NO deficiency induced by L-NAME injection led to the development of arterial hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and reduced blood content of nitrates and nitrites. Impaza, NO donors, activators of NO-synthase, antioxidants, and antihypertensive preparations produced endothelium-protective effect of different degree.

  16. A comparative study between intramuscular iron dextran and oral ferrous sulphate in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Komolafe, J O; Kuti, O; Ijadunola, K T; Ogunniyi, S O

    2003-11-01

    A comparative study was conducted to demonstrate the difference, if any, in effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy with either iron dextran or ferrous sulphate. Sixty pregnant women with iron deficiency anaemia were assigned randomly to either group and treated for 6 weeks. The age and parity distributions with mean packed cell volumes (PCVs) and gestational age at onset of treatment in the two groups were comparable. Comparing the mean PCVs at week 2, week 4 and week 6 of treatment the iron dextran group recorded higher and statistically significant mean PCVs (P<0.001). Thirty-six per cent of patients in the iron dextran group compared to 3.3% in the oral iron group (P=0.004) had their anaemia corrected by the sixth week. No significant side effects accompanied the use of intramuscular iron dextran. It was concluded that iron dextran corrects iron deficiency anaemia faster than ferrous sulphate. Parenteral iron should be considered in pregnant woman with moderate and asymptomatic severe anaemia between gestation ages of 28 weeks and 34 weeks; this may reduce the frequency of blood transfusion both in the antenatal and postnatal periods in these patients.

  17. Team physician #7. A comparative study of functional bracing in the anterior cruciate deficient knee.

    PubMed

    Rink, P C; Scott, R A; Lupo, R L; Guest, S J

    1989-06-01

    We evaluated the ability of three functional knee braces, (CTI, OTI, and TS7) to control anterolateral rotary instability of the knee. Fourteen subjects, none of elite athletic status, with arthroscopically proven anterior cruciate deficient knees were selected. The subjects evaluated each brace after one-month periods, and then underwent testing with physical examinations, KT-1000 arthrometry, and timed running events. All braces reduced subjective symptoms of knee instability. Different subjects preferred different braces. KT-1000 testing showed a reduction in anterior tibial displacement for all braces; however, this reduction did not increase as forces increased. A timed figure-of-eight running event did not show any functional advantage of bracing. Five subluxation events occurred in four subjects while braced. Functional braces appear to have a role in the anterior cruciate deficient knee, but only in conjunction with activity modification.

  18. The Comparative Efficacy of the Masquelet versus Titanium Mesh Cage Reconstruction Techniques for the Treatment of Large Long Bone Deficiencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Efficacy of the Masquelet versus Titanium Mesh Cage Reconstruction Techniques for the Treatment of Large Long Bone Deficiencies 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...and compare the functional outcome of patients with large segmental bone defects reconstructed with the Masquelet technique (MT) versus the titanium ...Masquelet technique; Titanium mesh cage technique 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  19. Vitamin D deficiency in UK South Asian Women of childbearing age: a comparative longitudinal investigation with UK Caucasian women.

    PubMed

    Darling, A L; Hart, K H; Macdonald, H M; Horton, K; Kang'ombe, A R; Berry, J L; Lanham-New, S A

    2013-02-01

    This is the first 1-year longitudinal study which assesses vitamin D deficiency in young UK-dwelling South Asian women. The findings are that vitamin D deficiency is extremely common in this group of women and that it persists all year around, representing a significant public health concern. There is a lack of longitudinal data assessing seasonal variation in vitamin D status in young South Asian women living in northern latitudes. Studies of postmenopausal South Asian women suggest a lack of seasonal change in 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D], although it is unclear whether this is prevalent among premenopausal South Asians. We aimed to evaluate, longitudinally, seasonal changes in 25(OH)D and prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in young UK-dwelling South Asian women as compared with Caucasians. We also aimed to establish the relative contributions of dietary vitamin D and sun exposure in explaining serum 25(OH)D. This is a 1-year prospective cohort study assessing South Asian (n = 35) and Caucasian (n = 105) premenopausal women living in Surrey, UK (51° N), aged 20-55 years. The main outcome measured was serum 25(OH)D concentration. Secondary outcomes were serum parathyroid hormone, self-reported dietary vitamin D intake and UVB exposure by personal dosimetry. Serum 25(OH)D <25 nmol/L was highly prevalent in South Asians in the winter (81 %) and autumn (79.2 %). Deficient status (below 50 nmol/L) was common in Caucasian women. Multi-level modelling suggested that, in comparison to sun exposure (1.59, 95 %CI = 0.83-2.35), dietary intake of vitamin D had no impact on 25(OH)D levels (-0.08, 95 %CI = -1.39 to 1.23). Year-round vitamin D deficiency was extremely common in South Asian women. These findings pose great health threats regarding the adverse effects of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy and warrant urgent vitamin D public health policy and action.

  20. Tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint 3D-kinematics in patients with posterior cruciate ligament deficiency compared to healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) plays an important role in maintaining physiological kinematics and function of the knee joint. To date mainly in-vitro models or combined magnetic resonance and fluoroscopic systems have been used for quantifying the importance of the PCL. We hypothesized, that both tibiofemoral and patellofemoral kinematic patterns are changed in PCL-deficient knees, which is increased by isometric muscle flexion. Therefore the aim of this study was to simultaneously investigate tibiofemoral and patellofemoral 3D kinematics in patients suffering from PCL deficiency during different knee flexion angles and under neuromuscular activation. Methods We enrolled 12 patients with isolated PCL-insufficiency as well as 20 healthy volunteers. Sagittal MR-images of the knee joint were acquired in different positions of the knee joint (0°, 30°, 90° flexion, with and without flexing isometric muscle activity) on a 0.2 Tesla open MR-scanner. After segmentation of the patella, femur and tibia local coordinate systems were established to define the spatial position of these structures in relation to each other. Results At full extension and 30° flexion no significant difference was observed in PCL-deficient knee joints neither for tibiofemoral nor for patellofemoral kinematics. At 90° flexion the femur of PCL-deficient patients was positioned significantly more anteriorly in relation to the tibia and both, the patellar tilt and the patellar shift to the lateral side, significantly increased compared to healthy knee joints. While no significant effect of isometric flexing muscle activity was observed in healthy individuals, in PCL-deficient knee joints an increased paradoxical anterior translation of the femur was observed at 90° flexion compared to the status of muscle relaxation. Conclusions Significant changes in tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint kinematics occur in patients with isolated PCL-insufficiency above 30 degrees of flexion

  1. An oily fish diet increases insulin sensitivity compared to a red meat diet in young iron-deficient women.

    PubMed

    Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Pérez-Granados, Ana M; Schoppen, Stefanie; Vaquero, M Pilar

    2009-08-01

    Beneficial effects of n-3 fatty acids on a variety of physiological functions have been reported, but information related to the effects of oily fish consumed within a varied diet on glucose metabolism and diabetes risk is scarce. The objective of the study was to compare the effects of a diet rich in oily fish to those of a diet rich in red meat on lipid profile, oxidative status, glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in young, iron-deficient women. The study was designed attending the CONSORT statement guidelines. It was a randomised crossover dietary intervention study with two 8-week periods. Two diets were designed differing only in their oily fish or red meat content (four portions per week). Twenty-five young iron-deficient women with normal lipid, glucose and insulin levels participated in the assay. Lipid profile (total, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol, TAG), fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and oxidation (lipoperoxides) and inflammation (soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) biomarkers were analysed. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) and Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI). Insulin levels significantly decreased and insulin sensitivity significantly increased with the oily fish diet. HDL-cholesterol significantly increased with the oily fish diet. Other parameters did not significantly differ between diets. An increase in oily fish consumption increases insulin sensitivity in young iron-deficient women. This outcome should be considered when giving dietary advice to this population.

  2. Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver from damage. The condition can lead to emphysema and liver disease ( cirrhosis ). ... descent. Adults with severe A1AT deficiency will develop emphysema, often before 40 years of age. Smoking can ...

  3. Posterior tibial displacement in the PCL-deficient knee is reduced compared to the normal knee during gait.

    PubMed

    Orita, Naoya; Deie, Masataka; Shimada, Noboru; Iwaki, Daisuke; Asaeda, Makoto; Hirata, Kazuhiko; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-11-01

    Most individuals with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury do not complain of disability even if posterior instability is objectively revealed by a static physical examination, such as the posterior drawer test. This suggests it is insufficient to only evaluate posterior instability under static conditions. Therefore, we have investigated the effect of isolated PCL injury on the detailed kinematics of the knee in a dynamic environment such as during gait. Eight unilateral PCL-deficient males and eight healthy control volunteers participated in this study. Isolated PCL injury was diagnosed by clinical examination. Stress X-ray imaging showed an average side-to-side difference of 12.7 ± 3.5 mm. Knee kinematics including anteroposterior tibial displacement were analysed during walking using the point cluster technique. Posterior tibial displacement from initial contact was significantly smaller during 9-22 % of the gait cycle by an average of 0.4 cm in the PCL group, compared to controls. In the PCL-deficient knee, the external rotational angle increased by an average of 3.3° at the loading response during 3-11 % of the gait cycle and the varus angle from initial contact increased by an average of 2.0° during 28-52 % of the gait cycle, compared to controls. Dynamic changes in the rotation and posterior translation patterns were seen after isolated PCL injury, suggesting the kinematics of PCL-deficient knees might be different to normal knees. These factors may contribute to long-term osteoarthritic change. Consequently, when choosing conservative treatment for PCL injury, these changes should be considered to prevent osteoarthritic change. III.

  4. Comparative 13C metabolic flux analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient, L-valine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Blombach, Bastian; Lang, Siegmund; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    L-Valine can be formed successfully using C. glutamicum strains missing an active pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC). Wild-type C. glutamicum and four PDHC-deficient strains were compared by (13)C metabolic flux analysis, especially focusing on the split ratio between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Compared to the wild type, showing a carbon flux of 69% ± 14% through the PPP, a strong increase in the PPP flux was observed in PDHC-deficient strains with a maximum of 113% ± 22%. The shift in the split ratio can be explained by an increased demand of NADPH for l-valine formation. In accordance, the introduction of the Escherichia coli transhydrogenase PntAB, catalyzing the reversible conversion of NADH to NADPH, into an L-valine-producing C. glutamicum strain caused the PPP flux to decrease to 57% ± 6%, which is below the wild-type split ratio. Hence, transhydrogenase activity offers an alternative perspective for sufficient NADPH supply, which is relevant for most amino acid production systems. Moreover, as demonstrated for L-valine, this bypass leads to a significant increase of product yield due to a concurrent reduction in carbon dioxide formation via the PPP.

  5. A Comparative Study of Ethylene Emanation upon Nitrogen Deficiency in Natural Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    De Gernier, Hugues; De Pessemier, Jérôme; Xu, Jiajia; Cristescu, Simona M.; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Hermans, Christian

    2016-01-01

    An original approach to develop sustainable agriculture with less nitrogen fertilizer inputs is to tackle the cross-talk between nitrogen nutrition and plant growth regulators. In particular the gaseous hormone, ethylene, is a prime target for that purpose. The variation of ethylene production in natural accessions of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana was explored in response to the nitrate supply. Ethylene was measured with a laser-based photoacoustic detector. First, experimental conditions were established with Columbia-0 (Col-0) accession, which was grown in vitro on horizontal plates across a range of five nitrate concentrations (0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, or 10 mM). The concentrations of 1 and 10 mM nitrate were retained for further characterization. Along with a decrease of total dry biomass and higher biomass allocation to the roots, the ethylene production was 50% more important at 1 mM than at 10 mM nitrate. The total transcript levels of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASES (ACS) in roots and those of ACC OXIDASES (ACO) in shoots increased by 100% between the same treatments. This was mainly due to higher transcript levels of ACS6 and of ACO2 and ACO4 respectively. The assumption was that during nitrogen deficiency, the greater biomass allocation in favor of the roots was controlled by ethylene being released in the shoots after conversion of ACC originating from the roots. Second, biomass and ethylene productions were measured in 20 additional accessions. Across all accessions, the total dry biomass and ethylene production were correlated negatively at 1 mM but positively at 10 mM nitrate. Furthermore, polymorphism was surveyed in ACC and ethylene biosynthesis genes and gene products among accessions. Very few substitutions modifying the amino acids properties in conserved motifs of the enzymes were found in the accessions. Natural variation of ethylene production could be further explored to improve Nitrogen Use Efficiency (NUE), in particular by

  6. A Comparative Study of Ethylene Emanation upon Nitrogen Deficiency in Natural Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    De Gernier, Hugues; De Pessemier, Jérôme; Xu, Jiajia; Cristescu, Simona M; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Hermans, Christian

    2016-01-01

    An original approach to develop sustainable agriculture with less nitrogen fertilizer inputs is to tackle the cross-talk between nitrogen nutrition and plant growth regulators. In particular the gaseous hormone, ethylene, is a prime target for that purpose. The variation of ethylene production in natural accessions of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana was explored in response to the nitrate supply. Ethylene was measured with a laser-based photoacoustic detector. First, experimental conditions were established with Columbia-0 (Col-0) accession, which was grown in vitro on horizontal plates across a range of five nitrate concentrations (0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, or 10 mM). The concentrations of 1 and 10 mM nitrate were retained for further characterization. Along with a decrease of total dry biomass and higher biomass allocation to the roots, the ethylene production was 50% more important at 1 mM than at 10 mM nitrate. The total transcript levels of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASES (ACS) in roots and those of ACC OXIDASES (ACO) in shoots increased by 100% between the same treatments. This was mainly due to higher transcript levels of ACS6 and of ACO2 and ACO4 respectively. The assumption was that during nitrogen deficiency, the greater biomass allocation in favor of the roots was controlled by ethylene being released in the shoots after conversion of ACC originating from the roots. Second, biomass and ethylene productions were measured in 20 additional accessions. Across all accessions, the total dry biomass and ethylene production were correlated negatively at 1 mM but positively at 10 mM nitrate. Furthermore, polymorphism was surveyed in ACC and ethylene biosynthesis genes and gene products among accessions. Very few substitutions modifying the amino acids properties in conserved motifs of the enzymes were found in the accessions. Natural variation of ethylene production could be further explored to improve Nitrogen Use Efficiency (NUE), in particular by

  7. Abalation of Ghrelin receptor in leptin-deficient mice has paradoxical effects on glucose homeostasis compared to Ghrelin-abalated Leptin-deficient mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ghrelin is produced predominantly in stomach and is known to be the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Ghrelin is a GH stimulator and an orexigenic hormone. In contrast, leptin is an anorexic hormone, and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice are obese and diabetic. To study...

  8. Fibromyalgia, mood disorders, and intense creative energy: A1AT polymorphisms are not always silent.

    PubMed

    Schmechel, Donald E; Edwards, Christopher L

    2012-12-01

    Persons with single copies of common alpha-1-antitrypsin polymorphisms such as S and Z are often considered "silent carriers". Published evidence however supports a complex behavioral phenotype or trait - intense creative energy ("ICE")-associated with A1AT polymorphisms. We now confirm that phenotype and present an association of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and A1AT in a consecutive series of neurological patients. This is a retrospective case control series of 3176 consecutive patients presenting to Duke University Memory Clinic (747 patients) and to regional community-based Caldwell Hospital Neurology and Memory center (2429 patients). Work-up included medical history and examination, psychological evaluation, and genetic analysis. Chronic widespread pain (CWP) or FMS were diagnosed according to clinical guidelines, mostly as secondary diagnoses. Neurological patients carrying A1AT polymorphisms were common (ca 16% prevalence) and carriers had significantly higher use of inhaler and anxiolytic medications. Patients with ICE phenotype had a significantly higher proportion of A1AT polymorphisms (42%) compared to non-ICE patients (13%). Presence of CWP or FMS was common (14-22%) with average age at presentation of 56 years old and mostly female gender (82%). Patients with CWP/FMS had again significantly higher proportion of A1AT polymorphisms (38%) compared to other neurological patients (13%). Patients with anxiety disorders, bipolar I or bipolar II disorders or PTSD also had increased proportion of A1AT polymorphisms and significant overlap with ICE and FMS phenotype. Significant reductions in CWP/FMS prevalence are seen in apolipoprotein E4 carriers and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation homozygotes. Since ICE phenotype is reported as a lifelong behavioral attribute, the presumption is that A1AT carriers have fundamental differences in brain development and inflammatory response. In support of this concept is finding those persons reporting a

  9. Comparative histological study of the effects of high calcium diet and vitamin D supplements on epiphyseal plates of vitamin-D-deficient chicks.

    PubMed

    Jande, S S; Dickson, I R

    1980-01-01

    A comparative histological and microradiographic study of the tibial epiphyseal plates of chickens raised on: (1) a vitamin-D-deficient diet; (2) a vitamin-D-deficient diet supplemented with cholecalciferol, and (3) a vitamin-D-deficient diet to which extra calcium had been added, has revealed that a high-calcium diet did not normalize the epiphyseal plates completely. However, it restored the normal length and chondrocyte arrangement to the proliferative zone. The degenerative zone became elongated and this seems to be related to the hypophosphataemic condition which has developed as a result of the special diet.

  10. A high prevalence of biochemical evidence of vitamin B12 or folate deficiency does not translate into a comparable prevalence of anemia.

    PubMed

    Metz, Jack

    2008-06-01

    Based on biochemical evidence, a high prevalence of biochemical evidence of vitamin B12 or folate deficiency has been reported in a number of areas in the world. The evidence that these biochemical abnormalities lead to a comparable prevalence of anemia is reviewed. The overall contribution of vitamin B12 deficiency to the global burden of anemia is probably not significant, except perhaps in women and their infants and children in vegetarian communities. In developed countries, folate-deficiency anemia is uncommon. In some developing countries, this anemia is still seen, but there are no comprehensive data on the relative prevalence compared with anemia due to malaria, iron-deficiency, hemoglobinopathy, and HIV disease. It seems unlikely that folate deficiency makes a major contribution to the burden of anemia in developing countries. Iron-deficiency anemia may coexist with vitamin B12 and especially folate deficiency, and may confound the hematological features of the vitamin deficiencies whose prevalence would then be underestimated. Supplementation of the diet of pregnant women with folic acid can virtually eliminate folate-deficiency anemia in these women. There are very few data on the hematological effect of vitamin B12 supplementation or fortification at the population level. The addition of vitamin B12 to the supplementation of the diet of pregnant women with iron and folic acid does not produce an increased hematological response, at least in nonvegetarian populations. There are numerous reports of the effect of folic acid fortification of food on tests of folate status, but only a single published report on the hematological response was found.

  11. Vitamin A deficiency in rats induces anatomic and metabolic changes comparable with those of neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghenimi, Nadirah; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine; Biran, Marc; Pallet, Véronique; Higueret, Paul; Gallis, Jean-Louis

    2009-04-01

    Anatomic and metabolic changes in central nervous system induced by 14 wk of vitamin A deprivation (VAD) were monitored and quantified in rats. In vivo brain magnetic resonance imaging (4.7T) was performed at 5, 7, 9, 11, and 14 wk of each diet after weaning in the following: 1) VAD group; 2) control pair-fed group; and 3) control group that consumed the diet ad libitum (1.15 microg retinol/g diet). After 14 wk, high-resolution magic angle spinning proton NMR spectroscopy (11.7T) was performed on small samples of cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. Serum retinol concentrations remained stable and cerebral volume (CV) increased as a linear function of body weight in the ad libitum group (R(2) = 0.78; P = 0.047) and pair-fed controls (R(2) = 0.78; P = 0.046). In VAD rats, retinol decreased from the onset of deprivation (2.2 +/- 0.14 micromol/L) to reach 0.3 +/- 0.13 micromol/L at wk 5, followed by a stopping of body weight gain from wk 7. In VAD rats, the CV decreased from wk 5 and reached a value 11% lower than that of the control group (P < 0.001) at wk 14 and was correlated with retinol status (R(2) = 0.99; P = 0.002). The VAD hippocampal volume decreased beginning at wk 9 and was 22% lower than that of the control group at wk 14 (P < 0.001). Compared with the control, VAD led to lower N acetyl aspartate:creatine+phosphocreatine (Cr) in cortex (-36%), striatum (-22%), and hippocampus (-19%) and higher myoinositol:Cr in cortex (+127%) and striatum (+150%). VAD induced anatomic and metabolic changes comparable to those associated with neurodegenerative disorders. By wk 7 of deprivation, the slowing in cerebral growth that correlated with the retinol level could be considered as a predictive marker of brain disorders, confirmed by metabolic data from VAD rats after 14 wk.

  12. X-ray deficiency on strongly accreting T Tauri stars. Comparing Orion with Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, I.; Merín, B.; Bouy, H.; Manara, C. F.; Ribas, Á.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Depending on whether a T Tauri star accretes material from its circumstellar disk or not, different X-ray emission properties can be found. The accretion shocks produce cool heating of the plasma, contributing to the soft X-ray emission from the star. Aims: Using X-ray data from the Chandra Orion Ultra-deep Project and accretion rates that were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 photometric measurements in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), we studied the relation between the accretion processes and the X-ray emissions of a coherent sample of T Tauri sources in the region. Methods: We performed regression and correlation analyses of our sample of T Tauri stars between the X-ray parameters, stellar properties, and the accretion measurements. Results: We find that a clear anti-correlation is present between the residual X-ray luminosity and the accretion rates in our samples in Orion that is consistent with that found on the XMM-Newton Extended Survey of the Taurus molecular cloud (XEST) study. A considerable number of classified non-accreting sources show accretion rates comparable to those of classical T Tauri Stars (CTTS). Our data do not allow us to confirm the classification between classical and weak-line T Tauri stars (WTTS), and the number of WTTS in this work is small compared to the complete samples. Thus, we have used the entire samples as accretors in our analysis. We provide a catalog with X-ray luminosities (corrected from distance) and accretion measurements of an ONC T Tauri stars sample. Conclusions: Although Orion and Taurus display strong differences in their properties (total gas and dust mass, star density, strong irradiation from massive stars), we find that a similar relation between the residual X-ray emission and accretion rate is present in the Taurus molecular cloud and in the accreting samples from the ONC. The spread in the data suggests dependencies of the accretion rates and the X-ray luminosities other than the

  13. Comparative response to single or divided doses of parenteral iron for functional iron deficiency in hemodialysis patients receiving erythropoietin (EPO).

    PubMed

    Saltissi, D; Sauvage, D; Westhuyzen, J

    1998-01-01

    EPO treatment rapidly corrects anemia in patients with end-stage renal failure treated with hemodialysis, as long as sufficient iron is available. Absolute and relative (to demand) iron deficiency blunts the erythropoietic response and parenteral iron is frequently required during the course of therapy to restore EPO efficacy. Since the optimum time course of iron administration to restore EPO response in the short term is unknown, we compared three protocols of i.v. iron dextran administration in apparent functionally iron-deficient HD patients on oral iron therapy (hemoglobin < 10.0 g/dl plus ferritin < 100 micrograms/l and/or transferrin saturation < 20%). Intravenous iron (Imferon; Fisons Pty Ltd.) was given either as a single 600 mg dose (n = 15, Group I) or in divided doses of 100 mg administered on 6 successive dialyses (n = 14, Group II) or weekly for 6 weeks (n = 14, Group III). Response was monitored for 8 weeks. No adverse effects were observed. Collectively, mean hemoglobin increased (p < 0.01) by 0.4-0.5 g/dl plateauing at 4 weeks (between group comparison, p = 0.92). Mean ferritin concentrations changed with time (p < 0.01), peaking at 2 weeks in Groups I and II and at 4 weeks in Group III. Mean transferrin saturation levels also increased during the study (p < 0.001). The between group comparisons for the trends in iron indices were significant (p < 0.01 and 0.05 respectively). As there were no clinically significant differences in hemoglobin response at 4 weeks, single dose iron infusion would seem to be the most expedient in the short term, however frequent small doses are similarly effective.

  14. Moxidectin has a lower neurotoxic potential but comparable brain penetration in P-glycoprotein-deficient CF-1 mice compared to ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Janko, C; Geyer, J

    2013-06-01

    The anti-parasitic drugs ivermectin (IVM) and moxidectin (MOX) normally show limited brain penetration in vertebrates because of effective drug efflux at the blood-brain barrier by P-glycoprotein, encoded by the multi-drug resistance (MDR1) gene. However, dogs with homozygous nt230(del4) mutation in the MDR1 gene do not express a functionally active P-glycoprotein and show increased brain penetration of these drugs, resulting in neurological toxicity to different degrees. Thus, whereas IVM provokes neurological toxicity at 0.1 mg/kg, MOX is tolerated at this dosage. To investigate whether this difference is attributable to lower brain penetration of MOX in the absence of P-glycoprotein or to their neurotoxic potential, we applied IVM and MOX to P-glycoprotein-deficient CF-1 mice and comparatively analysed the absolute drug concentrations in the brain. Furthermore, we quantified drug-induced neurotoxicity by measuring the walking performance of the mice on a rotarod setup. We found that at a dosage of 0.2 mg/kg, representing 0.23 μmol/kg IVM and 0.31 μmol/kg MOX, the absolute drug concentrations in the brain were comparable with 100.8 pmol/g and 140.2 pmol/g, respectively. However, MOX induced the same degree of neurotoxicosis at the higher dosage of 1.09 μmol/kg (0.7 mg/kg) compared with IVM at 0.40 μmol/kg (0.35 mg/kg), demonstrating the 2.7-fold lower neurotoxic potential of MOX compared to IVM. This could be explained by a lower binding affinity or lower intrinsic activity of MOX at the relevant central nervous system receptors compared with IVM.

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae antibody titres in patients with primary antibody deficiency receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) compared to subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG).

    PubMed

    Knutsen, A P; Leiva, L E; Caruthers, C; Rodrigues, J; Sorensen, R U

    2015-10-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) are effective in the treatment of patients with primary antibody deficiency disorders (PAD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) antibody titres to 14 serotypes in patients receiving IVIG compared to SCIG and to correlate Spn antibody levels to clinical outcome. The doses of immunoglobulin (Ig)G/kg/month were similar in both IVIG and SCIG groups. In 11 patients treated with IVIG, Spn antibody titres were ≥ 1·3 μg/ml to 99·4 ± 2·1% of the 14 serotypes at peak IVIG but decreased to 66·9 ± 19·8% at trough IVIG. Loss of Spn titres ≥ 1·3 μg/ml was most frequent for Spn serotypes 1, 4, 9V and 23. This correlated with lower Spn antibody titres to these serotypes at peak IVIG compared to the other serotypes. In 13 patients treated with SCIG, Spn antibody titres were protective to 58·2 ± 23·3% of the serotypes 3-5 days after infusion, similar to trough IVIG. Similarly, the Spn serotypes with the least protective percentages were the same as the ones observed in trough IVIG. There were no annualized serious bacterial infections (aSBI) in either group. However, there were significantly decreased annualized other infections (aOI) in the SCIG group compared to the IVIG-treated group, 0·8 ± 0·7 versus 2·2 ± 1·2 infections/patient/year (P = 0·004). Breakthrough aOI did not correlate with protective or higher serum Spn antibody titres. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Comparative shoot proteome analysis of two potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) genotypes contrasting in nitrogen deficiency responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meise, Philipp; Jozefowicz, Anna Maria; Uptmoor, Ralf; Mock, Hans-Peter; Ordon, Frank; Schum, Annegret

    2017-08-23

    Aiming at a better understanding of the physiological and biochemical background of nitrogen use efficiency, alterations in the shoot proteome under N-deficiency were investigated in two contrasting potato genotypes grown in vitro with 60 and 7.5mM N, respectively. A gel based proteomic approach was applied to identify candidate proteins associated with genotype specific responses to N-deficiency. 21% of the detected proteins differed in abundance between the two genotypes. Between control and N-deficiency conditions 19.5% were differentially accumulated in the sensitive and 15% in the tolerant genotype. 93% of the highly N-deficiency responsive proteins were identified by MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The major part was associated with photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, stress response and regulation. Differential accumulation of enzymes involved in the Calvin cycle and glycolysis suggest activation of alternative carbohydrate pathways. In the tolerant genotype, increased abundance under N-deficiency was also found for enzymes involved in chlorophyll synthesis and stability of enzymes, which increase photosynthetic carbon fixation efficiency. Out of a total of 106 differentially abundant proteins, only eight were detected in both genotypes. Our findings suggest that mutually responsive proteins reflect universal stress responses while adaptation to N-deficiency in metabolic pathways is more genotype specific. Nitrogen losses from arable farm land considerably contribute to environmental pollution. In potato, this is a special problem due cultivation on light soils, irrigation and the shallow root system. Therefore, breeding of cultivars with improved nitrogen use efficiency and stable yields under reduced N fertilization is an important issue. Knowledge of genotype dependent adaptation to N-deficiency at the proteome level can help to understand regulation of N efficiency and development of N-efficient cultivars. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  17. Marine Oxygen-Deficient Zones Harbor Depauperate Denitrifying Communities Compared to Novel Genetic Diversity in Coastal Sediments.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Jennifer L; Weisman, David; Yasuda, Michie; Jayakumar, Amal; Morrison, Hilary G; Ward, Bess B

    2015-08-01

    Denitrification is a critically important biogeochemical pathway that removes fixed nitrogen from ecosystems and thus ultimately controls the rate of primary production in nitrogen-limited systems. We examined the community structure of bacteria containing the nirS gene, a signature gene in the denitrification pathway, from estuarine and salt marsh sediments and from the water column of two of the world's largest marine oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs). We generated over 125,000 nirS gene sequences, revealing a large degree of genetic diversity including 1,815 unique taxa, the vast majority of which formed clades that contain no cultured representatives. These results underscore how little we know about the genetic diversity of metabolisms underlying this critical biogeochemical pathway. Marine sediments yielded 1,776 unique taxa when clustered at 95 % sequence identity, and there was no single nirS denitrifier that was a competitive dominant; different samples had different highly abundant taxa. By contrast, there were only 39 unique taxa identified in samples from the two ODZs, and 99 % of the sequences belonged to 5 or fewer taxa. The ODZ samples were often dominated by nirS sequences that shared a 92 % sequence identity to a nirS found in the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) genus Scalindua. This sequence was abundant in both ODZs, accounting for 38 and 59 % of all sequences, but it was virtually absent in marine sediments. Our data indicate that ODZs are remarkably depauperate in nirS genes compared to the remarkable genetic richness found in coastal sediments.

  18. Comparative transcriptome analysis of nodules of two Mesorhizobium-chickpea associations with differential symbiotic efficiency under phosphate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nasr Esfahani, Maryam; Inoue, Komaki; Chu, Ha Duc; Nguyen, Kien Huu; Van Ha, Chien; Watanabe, Yasuko; Burritt, David J; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Mochida, Keiichi; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2017-09-01

    Phosphate (Pi) deficiency is known to be a major limitation for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF), and hence legume crop productivity globally. However, very little information is available on the adaptive mechanisms, particularly in the important legume crop chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), which enable nodules to respond to low-Pi availability. Thus, to elucidate these mechanisms in chickpea nodules at molecular level, we used an RNA sequencing approach to investigate transcriptomes of the nodules in Mesorhizobium mediterraneum SWRI9-(MmSWRI9)-chickpea and M. ciceri CP-31-(McCP-31)-chickpea associations under Pi-sufficient and Pi-deficient conditions, of which the McCP-31-chickpea association has a better SNF capacity than the MmSWRI9-chickpea association during Pi starvation. Our investigation revealed that more genes showed altered expression patterns in MmSWRI9-induced nodules than in McCP-31-induced nodules (540 vs. 225) under Pi deficiency, suggesting that the Pi-starvation-more-sensitive MmSWRI9-induced nodules required expression change in a larger number of genes to cope with low-Pi stress than the Pi-starvation-less-sensitive McCP-31-induced nodules. The functional classification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) was examined to gain an understanding of how chickpea nodules respond to Pi starvation, caused by soil Pi deficiency. As a result, more DEGs involved in nodulation, detoxification, nutrient/ion transport, transcriptional factors, key metabolic pathways, Pi remobilization and signalling were found in Pi-starved MmSWRI9-induced nodules than in Pi-starved McCP-31-induced nodules. Our findings have enabled the identification of molecular processes that play important roles in the acclimation of nodules to Pi deficiency, ultimately leading to the development of Pi-efficient chickpea symbiotic associations suitable for Pi-deficient soils. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect of long-term GH replacement therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in isolated GH deficiency compared with multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies: a sub-analysis from the Dutch National Registry of Growth Hormone Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    van Bunderen, Christa C; van den Dries, Carline J; Heymans, Martijn W; Franken, Anton A M; Koppeschaar, Hans P F; van der Lely, Aart J; Drent, Madeleine L

    2014-08-01

    Isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) could provide a model to investigate the influence of GH deficiency per se and the effect of GH replacement therapy without the influence from other pituitary hormone deficiencies or their treatment. The aim of this study is to address the questions about differences between IGHD and multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHDs) in clinical presentation and in responsiveness to GH treatment. A nationwide surveillance study was carried out to describe the difference in the clinical presentation and responsiveness to GH treatment of patients with IGHD and MPHDs. The Dutch National Registry of GH Treatment in Adults was founded in 1998 to gain more insight into long-term efficacy and safety of GH therapy. Out of 2891 enrolled patients, 266 patients with IGHD at the start of GH treatment were identified and compared with 310 patients with MPHDs. Cardiovascular indices will be investigated at baseline and during long-term follow-up, including body composition, lipid profile, glucose metabolism, blood pressure, and morbidity. Patients with IGHD and MPHDs were demonstrated to be different entities at clinical presentation. Metabolically, patients with MPHDs had a larger waist circumference, lower HDL cholesterol level, and higher triglyceride level. The effect of GH treatment was comparable between patient groups. GH seems to protect against rising lipid levels and blood pressure, even after excluding patients using corresponding concomitant medication. The risk for cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus during follow-up was not different between patients with IGHD and MPHDs. Patients with IGHD had a less impaired metabolic profile than patients with MPHDs at baseline. Influence of other pituitary hormone replacement therapies on the effect of GH treatment is not demonstrated. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  20. Higher Prevalence of Metformin-Induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Sulfonylurea Combination Compared with Insulin Combination in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Donghoon; Yun, Jae-Seung; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Tae-Seok; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Long-term and high-dose treatment with metformin is known to be associated with vitamin B12 deficiency in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether the prevalence of B12 deficiency was different in patients treated with different combination of hypoglycemic agents with metformin during the same time period. A total of 394 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin and sulfonylurea (S+M group, n = 299) or metformin and insulin (I+M group, n = 95) were consecutively recruited. The vitamin B12 and folate levels were quantified using the chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as vitamin B12≤300 pg/mL without folate deficiency (folate>4 ng/mL). The mean age of and duration of diabetes in the subjects were 59.4±10.5 years and 12.2±6.7 years, respectively. The mean vitamin B12 level of the total population was 638.0±279.6 pg/mL. The mean serum B12 levels were significantly lower in the S+M group compared with the I+M group (600.0±266.5 vs. 757.7±287.6 pg/mL, P<0.001). The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in the metformin-treated patients was significantly higher in the S+M group compared with the I+M group (17.4% vs. 4.2%, P = 0.001). After adjustment for various factors, such as age, sex, diabetic duration, duration or daily dose of metformin, diabetic complications, and presence of anemia, sulfonylurea use was a significant independent risk factor for B12 deficiency (OR = 4.74, 95% CI 1.41–15.99, P = 0.012). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with metformin combined with sulfonylurea require clinical attention for vitamin B12 deficiency and regular monitoring of their vitamin B12 levels. PMID:25299054

  1. Higher prevalence of metformin-induced vitamin B12 deficiency in sulfonylurea combination compared with insulin combination in patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Donghoon; Yun, Jae-Seung; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lim, Tae-Seok; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Long-term and high-dose treatment with metformin is known to be associated with vitamin B12 deficiency in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether the prevalence of B12 deficiency was different in patients treated with different combination of hypoglycemic agents with metformin during the same time period. A total of 394 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin and sulfonylurea (S+M group, n = 299) or metformin and insulin (I+M group, n = 95) were consecutively recruited. The vitamin B12 and folate levels were quantified using the chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as vitamin B12≤300 pg/mL without folate deficiency (folate>4 ng/mL). The mean age of and duration of diabetes in the subjects were 59.4±10.5 years and 12.2±6.7 years, respectively. The mean vitamin B12 level of the total population was 638.0±279.6 pg/mL. The mean serum B12 levels were significantly lower in the S+M group compared with the I+M group (600.0±266.5 vs. 757.7±287.6 pg/mL, P<0.001). The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in the metformin-treated patients was significantly higher in the S+M group compared with the I+M group (17.4% vs. 4.2%, P = 0.001). After adjustment for various factors, such as age, sex, diabetic duration, duration or daily dose of metformin, diabetic complications, and presence of anemia, sulfonylurea use was a significant independent risk factor for B12 deficiency (OR = 4.74, 95% CI 1.41-15.99, P = 0.012). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes who were treated with metformin combined with sulfonylurea require clinical attention for vitamin B12 deficiency and regular monitoring of their vitamin B12 levels.

  2. Insights into Resistance to Fe Deficiency Stress from a Comparative Study of In Vitro-Selected Novel Fe-Efficient and Fe-Inefficient Potato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Boamponsem, Georgina A.; Leung, David W. M.; Lister, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency induces chlorosis (IDC) in plants and can result in reduced plant productivity. Therefore, development of Fe-efficient plants is of great interest. To gain a better understanding of the physiology of Fe-efficient plants, putative novel plant variants were regenerated from potato (Solanum tubersosum L. var. ‘Iwa’) callus cultures selected under Fe deficient or low Fe supply (0–5 μM Fe). Based on visual chlorosis rating (VCR), 23% of callus-derived regenerants were classified as Fe-efficient (EF) and 77% as Fe-inefficient (IFN) plant lines when they were grown under Fe deficiency conditions. Stem height was found to be highly correlated with internodal distance, leaf and root lengths in the EF plant lines grown under Fe deficiency conditions. In addition, compared to the IFN plant lines and control parental biotype, the EF plants including the lines named A1, B2, and B9, exhibited enhanced formation of lateral roots and root hairs as well as increased expression of ferritin (fer3) in the leaf and iron-regulated transporter (irt1) in the root. These morphological adaptations and changes in expression the fer3 and irt1 genes of the selected EF potato lines suggest that they are associated with resistance to low Fe supply stress. PMID:28955367

  3. Comparative analysis of Brassica napus plasma membrane proteins under phosphorus deficiency using label-free and MaxQuant-based proteomics approaches.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuisen; Luo, Ying; Ding, Guangda; Xu, Fangsen

    2016-02-05

    Phosphorus (P) deficiency is a primary constraint for plant growth in terrestrial ecosystems. To better understand the genotypic differences in the adaptation mechanism of Brassica napus to P deficiency, we purified the plasma membrane (PM) from the roots of two genotypes: P-efficient "Eyou Changjia" and P-inefficient "B104-2". Combining label-free quantitative proteomics with the MaxQuant approach, a total of 71 proteins that significantly changed in abundances were identified in the two genotypes in response to P-free starvation, including 31 in "Eyou Changjia" and 40 in "B104-2". Based on comparative genomics study, 28 proteins were mapped to the confidence intervals of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for P efficiency related traits. Seven decreased proteins with transporter activity were found to be located in the PM by subcellular localization analyses. These proteins involved in intracellular protein transport and ATP hydrolysis coupled proton transport were mapped to the QTL for P content and dry weight. Compared with "B104-2", more decreased proteins referring to transporter activity were found in "Eyou Changjia", showing that substance exchange was decreased in response to short-term P-free starvation. Together with the finding, more decreased proteins functioning in signal transduction and protein synthesis/degradation suggested that "Eyou Changjia" could slow the progression of growth and save more P in response to short-term P-free starvation. P deficiency seriously limits the production and quality of B. napus. Roots absorb water and nutrients and anchor the plant in the soil. Therefore, to study root PM proteome under P stress would be helpful to understand the adaptation mechanism for P deficiency. However, PM proteome analysis in B. napus has been seldom reported due to the high hydrophobicity and low abundance of PM. Thus, we herein investigated the PM proteome alteration of roots in two B. napus genotypes, with different P deficient tolerances, in

  4. Comparative analysis of potassium deficiency-responsive transcriptomes in low potassium susceptible and tolerant wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Li; Zhang, Jiabao; Xin, Xiuli; Zhang, Congzhi; Ma, Donghao; Chen, Lin; Zhao, Bingzi

    2015-01-01

    Potassium (K+) deficiency as a common abiotic stress can inhibit the growth of plants and thus reduce the agricultural yields. Nevertheless, scarcely any development has been promoted in wheat transcriptional changes under K+ deficiency. Here we investigated root transcriptional changes in two wheat genotypes, namely, low-K+ tolerant “Tongzhou916” and low-K+ susceptible “Shiluan02-1”. There were totally 2713 and 2485 probe sets displayed expression changes more than 1.5-fold in Tongzhou916 and Shiluan02-1, respectively. Low-K+ responsive genes mainly belonged to the categories as follows: metabolic process, cation binding, transferase activity, ion transporters and so forth. We made a comparison of gene expression differences between the two wheat genotypes. There were 1321 and 1177 up-regulated genes in Tongzhou916 and Shiluan02-1, respectively. This result indicated that more genes took part in acclimating to low-K+ stress in Tongzhou916. In addition, there were more genes associated with jasmonic acid, defense response and potassium transporter up-regulated in Tongzhou916. Moreover, totally 19 genes encoding vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase, ethylene-related, auxin response, anatomical structure development and nutrient reservoir were uniquely up-regulated in Tongzhou916. For their important role in root architecture, K+ uptake and nutrient storage, unique genes above may make a great contribution to the strong low-K+ tolerance in Tongzhou916. PMID:25985414

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of the Haemophilus ducreyi porin-deficient mutant 35000HP::P2AB.

    PubMed

    Davie, Jeremiah J; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2009-04-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted, genital ulcerative disease chancroid. The genome of strain 35000HP contains two known porin proteins, OmpP2A and OmpP2B. Loss of OmpP2A and OmpP2B expression in the mutant 35000HP::P2AB resulted in no obvious growth defect or phenotype. Comparison of outer membrane profiles indicated increased expression of the 58.5-kDa chaperone, GroEL, in the porin-deficient mutant. A proteomics-based comparison resulted in the identification of 231 proteins present in membrane-associated protein samples, of which a subset of 56 proteins was differentially expressed at a level of 1.5-fold or greater in the porin-deficient strain 35000HP::P2AB relative to that in 35000HP. Twenty of the differentially expressed proteins were selected for real-time PCR, resulting in the validation of 90% of the selected subgroup. Proteins identified in these studies suggested a decreased membrane stability phenotype, which was verified by disk diffusion assay. Loss of OmpP2A and OmpP2B resulted in global protein expression changes which appear to compensate for the absence of porin expression in 35000HP::P2AB.

  6. Comparative Analysis of PvPAP Gene Family and Their Functions in Response to Phosphorus Deficiency in Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Cuiyue; Sun, Lili; Yao, Zhufang; Liao, Hong; Tian, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) play a vital role in adaptive strategies of plants to phosphorus (P) deficiency. However, their functions in relation to P efficiency are fragmentary in common bean. Principal Findings Five PvPAPs were isolated and sequenced in common bean. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PvPAPs could be classified into two groups, including a small group with low molecular mass, and a large group with high molecular mass. Among them, PvPAP3, PvPAP4 and PvPAP5 belong to the small group, while the other two belong to the large group. Transient expression of 35S:PvPAPs-GFP on onion epidermal cells verified the variations of subcellular localization among PvPAPs, suggesting functional diversities of PvPAPs in common bean. Quantitative PCR results showed that most PvPAPs were up-regulated by phosphate (Pi) starvation. Among them, the expression of the small group PvPAPs responded more to Pi starvation, especially in the roots of G19833, the P-efficient genotype. However, only overexpressing PvPAP1 and PvPAP3 could result in significantly increased utilization of extracellular dNTPs in the transgenic bean hairy roots. Furthermore, overexpressing PvPAP3 in Arabidopsis enhanced both plant growth and total P content when dNTPs were supplied as the sole external P source. Conclusions The results suggest that PvPAPs in bean varied in protein structure, response to P deficiency and subcellular localization. Among them, both PvPAP1 and PvPAP3 might function as utilization of extracellular dNTPs. PMID:22662274

  7. Occurrence of impaired fasting glucose in GH-deficient adults receiving GH replacement compared with untreated subjects.

    PubMed

    Woodmansee, Whitney W; Hartman, Mark L; Lamberts, Steven W J; Zagar, Anthony J; Clemmons, David R

    2010-01-01

    The effects of GH replacement on glucose metabolism in GH-deficient (GHD) adults in clinical practice are not well defined. Therefore, we assessed GH treatment effects on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and haemoglobin A1c (A1c) concentrations in GHD adults in a clinical setting. Post-hoc analysis of the observational Hypopituitary Control and Complications Study conducted at 157 US centres (1997-2002). GH-deficient adults who were GH-naïve at study entry and had at least two FPG measurements. Effect of GH treatment on the frequency and time course of abnormal FPG (> or =5.6 mmol/l) development, FPG normalization, progression of increased FPG and abnormal follow-up A1c (>6%) values in GHD patients treated with GH (n = 403) or untreated (n = 169) at their physician's discretion. In subjects without pre-existing diabetes mellitus, development of an abnormal FPG tended to occur in a greater percentage of GH-treated than untreated subjects (35.3% versus 24.5, P = 0.06). Additionally, GH treatment was associated with a mild, transient increase in FPG and shorter time to development of an abnormal FPG in these subjects (P < 0.01). Most ( approximately 80%) abnormal FPG values were below 7 mmol/l and normalized in 69% of GH-treated subjects without diabetes. Treatment with GH had no effect on the rate of FPG normalization, progression of increased FPG or abnormal follow-up A1c values. Initiation of GH replacement in GHD adults was associated with a mild increase in FPG that often normalized spontaneously. Nevertheless, clinicians should monitor FPG in patients receiving GH treatment.

  8. Compared with saturated fatty acids, dietary monounsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates increase atherosclerosis and VLDL cholesterol levels in LDL receptor-deficient, but not apolipoprotein E-deficient, mice.

    PubMed

    Merkel, M; Velez-Carrasco, W; Hudgins, L C; Breslow, J L

    2001-11-06

    Heart-healthy dietary recommendations include decreasing the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). However, the relative benefit of replacing SFA with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), or carbohydrates (CARB) is still being debated. We have used two mouse models of atherosclerosis, low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLRKO) and apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoEKO) mice to measure the effects of four isocaloric diets enriched with either SFA, MUFA, PUFA, or CARB on atherosclerotic lesion area and lipoprotein levels. In LDLRKO mice, compared with the SFA diet, the MUFA and CARB diets significantly increased atherosclerosis in both sexes, but the PUFA diet had no effect. The MUFA and CARB diets also increased very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) in males and VLDL-C levels in females. Analysis of data from LDLRKO mice on all diets showed that atherosclerotic lesion area correlated positively with VLDL-C levels (males: r = 0.47, P < 0.005; females: r = 0.52, P < 0.001). In contrast, in apoEKO mice there were no significant dietary effects on atherosclerosis in either sex. Compared with the SFA diet, the CARB diet significantly decreased VLDL-C in males and the MUFA, PUFA, and CARB diets decreased VLDL-C and the CARB diet decreased LDL-C in females. In summary, in LDLRKO mice the replacement of dietary SFA by either MUFA or CARB causes a proportionate increase in both atherosclerotic lesion area and VLDL-C. There were no significant dietary effects on atherosclerotic lesion area in apoEKO mice. These results are surprising and suggest that, depending on the underlying genotype, dietary MUFA and CARB can actually increase atherosclerosis susceptibility, probably by raising VLDL-C levels through a non-LDL receptor, apoE-dependent pathway.

  9. Compared with saturated fatty acids, dietary monounsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates increase atherosclerosis and VLDL cholesterol levels in LDL receptor-deficient, but not apolipoprotein E-deficient, mice

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Martin; Velez-Carrasco, Wanda; Hudgins, Lisa C.; Breslow, Jan L.

    2001-01-01

    Heart-healthy dietary recommendations include decreasing the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). However, the relative benefit of replacing SFA with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), or carbohydrates (CARB) is still being debated. We have used two mouse models of atherosclerosis, low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLRKO) and apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoEKO) mice to measure the effects of four isocaloric diets enriched with either SFA, MUFA, PUFA, or CARB on atherosclerotic lesion area and lipoprotein levels. In LDLRKO mice, compared with the SFA diet, the MUFA and CARB diets significantly increased atherosclerosis in both sexes, but the PUFA diet had no effect. The MUFA and CARB diets also increased very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) in males and VLDL-C levels in females. Analysis of data from LDLRKO mice on all diets showed that atherosclerotic lesion area correlated positively with VLDL-C levels (males: r = 0.47, P < 0.005; females: r = 0.52, P < 0.001). In contrast, in apoEKO mice there were no significant dietary effects on atherosclerosis in either sex. Compared with the SFA diet, the CARB diet significantly decreased VLDL-C in males and the MUFA, PUFA, and CARB diets decreased VLDL-C and the CARB diet decreased LDL-C in females. In summary, in LDLRKO mice the replacement of dietary SFA by either MUFA or CARB causes a proportionate increase in both atherosclerotic lesion area and VLDL-C. There were no significant dietary effects on atherosclerotic lesion area in apoEKO mice. These results are surprising and suggest that, depending on the underlying genotype, dietary MUFA and CARB can actually increase atherosclerosis susceptibility, probably by raising VLDL-C levels through a non-LDL receptor, apoE-dependent pathway. PMID:11606787

  10. Proteomics of Arabidopsis Seed Germination. A Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Gibberellin-Deficient Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Karine; Job, Claudette; Groot, Steven P.C.; Puype, Magda; Demol, Hans; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Job, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    We examined the role of gibberellins (GAs) in germination of Arabidopsis seeds by a proteomic approach. For that purpose, we used two systems. The first system consisted of seeds of the GA-deficient ga1 mutant, and the second corresponded to wild-type seeds incubated in paclobutrazol, a specific GA biosynthesis inhibitor. With both systems, radicle protrusion was strictly dependent on exogenous GAs. The proteomic analysis indicated that GAs do not participate in many processes involved in germination sensu stricto (prior to radicle protrusion), as, for example, the initial mobilization of seed protein and lipid reserves. Out of 46 protein changes detected during germination sensu stricto (1 d of incubation on water), only one, corresponding to the cytoskeleton component α-2,4 tubulin, appeared to depend on the action of GAs. An increase in this protein spot was noted for the wild-type seeds but not for the ga1 seeds incubated for 1 d on water. In contrast, GAs appeared to be involved, directly or indirectly, in controlling the abundance of several proteins associated with radicle protrusion. This is the case for two isoforms of S-adenosyl-methionine (Ado-Met) synthetase, which catalyzes the formation of Ado-Met from Met and ATP. Owing to the housekeeping functions of Ado-Met, this event is presumably required for germination and seedling establishment, and might represent a major metabolic control of seedling establishment. GAs can also play a role in controlling the abundance of a β-glucosidase, which might be involved in the embryo cell wall loosening needed for cell elongation and radicle extension. PMID:12068122

  11. A comparative study on the effects of excess iodine and herbs with excess iodine on thyroid oxidative stress in iodine-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tianshu; Shi, Rui; Qi, Tengche; Yin, Huisi; Mei, Lan; Han, Xiaoqing; Cui, Peng

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of excess iodine and herbs with excess iodine on treating iodine deficiency-induced goiter from the perspective of oxidative stress and to measure selenium values in Chinese herbs. One hundred twenty 4-week-old Wistar rats were selected and randomly divided into four groups after inducing iodine-deficiency goiter: normal control group (NC), model control group (MC), iodine excess group (IE), and herbs with iodine excess group (HIE). The activities of oxidative enzymes and levels of oxidative products were measured using biochemical tests. The expression of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) in the thyroid was detected by immunohistochemistry and the expression of peroxiredoxin 5 (PRDX5) by the Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Selenium values in iodine-excessive herbs were measured by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The herbs with iodine excess were tested to contain rich selenium. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PRDX5 increased markedly, and the values of malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-HNE decreased significantly in the HIE group. In conclusion, compared with excess iodine, herbs with excess iodine damaged thyroid follicular cells less, which may be related to the increase of antioxidant capacity and rich selenium values in iodine-excessive herbs.

  12. Preventing vitamin B12 deficiency in South Asian women of childbearing age: a randomised controlled trial comparing an oral vitamin B12 supplement with B12 dietary advice.

    PubMed

    Mearns, G J; Koziol-McLain, J; Obolonkin, V; Rush, E C

    2014-08-01

    To examine the effectiveness, acceptability and sustainability of interventions to reduce vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency in South Asian women before conception. A 6-month randomised controlled trial conducted in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants (62 South Asian women, 18-50 years old) were stratified by dietary practices, then randomised to three treatment groups: B12 Supplement (oral cyanocobalamin 6 μg/day) (n=21), Placebo (n=21), or B12 Dietary Advice (n=20). Primary outcome measures were changes in B12 biomarkers (serum B12 and holotranscobalamin (holoTC)) at 6 months. Dietary B12 intake was estimated from a B12 food-specific frequency questionnaire (B12FFQ). Intention-to-treat analysis was applied using 'last observation carried forward' method. Changes in B12 biomarkers by treatment were compared using analysis of variance. Pearson's correlations tested relationships between dietary B12 intake and B12 biomarkers. At baseline, 48% of women tested as insufficient or deficient in serum B12 (<222 pmol/l) and 51% as insufficient or deficient in holoTC (<45 pmol/l). B12 status was moderately correlated with dietary B12 intake (r=0.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.3-0.7)) and 44% of women reported insufficient dietary intake (<2.4 μg/day). B12 Supplement was the only treatment group to record a significant increase in B12 biomarkers over 6 months: serum B12 by 30% (95% CI (11-48%)) and holoTC by 42% (12-72%). The prevalence of B12 insufficiency among Auckland South Asian women is high and moderately correlated with inadequate intake of foods that contain B12. Cyanocobalamin supplementation (6 μg/day) was associated with improved B12 biomarkers, with a potential to improve preconception B12 status in South Asian women.

  13. Comparable Genital Tract Infection, Pathology, and Immunity in Rhesus Macaques Inoculated with Wild-Type or Plasmid-Deficient Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar D

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yanyan; Frazer, Lauren C.; O'Connell, Catherine M.; Tarantal, Alice F.; Andrews, Charles W.; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Russell, Ali N.; Sullivan, Jeanne E.; Poston, Taylor B.; Vallejo, Abbe N.

    2015-01-01

    Rhesus macaques were studied to directly address the potential for plasmid-deficient Chlamydia trachomatis to serve as a live attenuated vaccine in the genital tract. Five repeated cervical inoculations of rhesus macaques with wild-type serovar D strain D/UW-3/Cx or a plasmid-deficient derivative of this strain, CTD153, resulted in infections with similar kinetics and induced comparable levels of protective immunity. After all animals received five challenges with D/UW-3/Cx, levels of inflammation observed grossly and histologically were similar between the groups. Animals in both groups developed evidence of oviduct dilatation; however, reduced oviduct dilatation was observed for “controllers,” i.e., animals without detectable chlamydial DNA in the fimbriae at weeks 5 and 12. Grouping animals into “ascenders” and “controllers” revealed that elevated early T cell responses were associated with protection, whereas higher antibody responses were associated with ascension. Protected animals shared common major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles. Overall, genetic differences of individual animals, rather than the presence or absence of the chlamydial plasmid in the primary infecting strain, appeared to play a role in determining the outcome of infection. PMID:26216426

  14. Comparable Genital Tract Infection, Pathology, and Immunity in Rhesus Macaques Inoculated with Wild-Type or Plasmid-Deficient Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar D.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanyan; Frazer, Lauren C; O'Connell, Catherine M; Tarantal, Alice F; Andrews, Charles W; O'Connor, Shelby L; Russell, Ali N; Sullivan, Jeanne E; Poston, Taylor B; Vallejo, Abbe N; Darville, Toni

    2015-10-01

    Rhesus macaques were studied to directly address the potential for plasmid-deficient Chlamydia trachomatis to serve as a live attenuated vaccine in the genital tract. Five repeated cervical inoculations of rhesus macaques with wild-type serovar D strain D/UW-3/Cx or a plasmid-deficient derivative of this strain, CTD153, resulted in infections with similar kinetics and induced comparable levels of protective immunity. After all animals received five challenges with D/UW-3/Cx, levels of inflammation observed grossly and histologically were similar between the groups. Animals in both groups developed evidence of oviduct dilatation; however, reduced oviduct dilatation was observed for "controllers," i.e., animals without detectable chlamydial DNA in the fimbriae at weeks 5 and 12. Grouping animals into "ascenders" and "controllers" revealed that elevated early T cell responses were associated with protection, whereas higher antibody responses were associated with ascension. Protected animals shared common major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles. Overall, genetic differences of individual animals, rather than the presence or absence of the chlamydial plasmid in the primary infecting strain, appeared to play a role in determining the outcome of infection.

  15. The Comparative Efficacy of the Masquelet versus Titanium Mesh Cage Reconstruction Techniques for the Treatment of Large Long Bone Deficiencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    radiographic determination of defect healing , and comparative assessment of cost and resource expenditures between the two techniques. From 11 patients...study subject #2) has been noncompliant with the postoperative management and developed superficial wound infection which progressed into deep...adequate bone defect healing and restoring injured limb function have been extremely challenging. Standard treatment options are exceedingly complex

  16. Comparative study of human hematopoietic cell engraftment into BALB/c and C57BL/6 strain of rag-2/jak3 double-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Ayumi; Hattori, Shinichiro; Kariya, Ryusho; Iwanaga, Sumako; Taura, Manabu; Harada, Hideki; Suzu, Shinya; Okada, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice are becoming invaluable tools in human stem cell and tumor research. In this study, we generated Rag-2/Jak3 double-deficient (Rag-2⁻/⁻Jak3⁻/⁻) mice with a C57/BL6 and Balb/c genetic background and compared the human lymphohematopoietic cell engraftment rate. Human cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells were successfully engrafted into Balb/c Rag-2⁻/⁻Jak3⁻/⁻ mice; however, the engraftment rate was far lower in C57/BL6 Rag-2⁻/⁻Jak3⁻/⁻ mice. Transplantation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in the same tendency. Thus, a Balb/c background offers superior engraftment capacity than a C57/BL6 background and provides an attractive model for human hematopoietic cell engraftment.

  17. Deletion of both ICAM-1 and C3 Enhances Severity of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Compared to C3-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sherry S.; Ludwig, Michael; Wohler, Jillian E.; Bullard, Daniel C.; Szalai, Alex J.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and leukocyte infiltration, demyelination of neurons, and blood-brain barrier breakdown. The development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for MS is dependent on a number of components of the immune system including complement and adhesion molecules. Previous studies in our lab have examined the role of C3, the central complement component, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) a key cell adhesion molecule involved in leukocyte trafficking to sites of inflammation including the CNS. In these studies we demonstrated that myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE is markedly attenuated in both ICAM-1−/− and C3−/− mice. Given the pivotal role that these proteins play in EAE, we hypothesized that EAE in ICAM-1−/− and C3−/− double mutant mice would likely fail to develop. Unexpectedly, EAE in ICAM-1−/− × C3−/− mice was only modestly attenuated compared to wild type mice and significantly worse than C3−/− mice. Leukocyte infiltration was commensurate with disease severity between the three groups of mice. Spinal cord T cells from ICAM-1−/− × C3−/− mice produced the highest levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α, despite reduced disease severity compared to wild type mice. The mechanisms behind the elevated EAE severity in ICAM-1−/− × C3−/− mice may relate to altered homing of leukocytes or processing of self-antigens in the double mutant background. PMID:18634851

  18. Comparative transcriptomics with a motility-deficient mutant leads to identification of a novel polysaccharide secretion system in Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Risser, Douglas D; Meeks, John C

    2013-02-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria are capable of gliding motility by an undefined mechanism. Within the heterocyst-forming clades, some strains, such as the Nostoc spp. and Fisherella spp., are motile only as specialized filaments termed hormogonia. Here we report on the phenotype of inactivation of a methyl-accepting chemotaxis-like protein in Nostoc punctiforme, designated HmpD. The gene hmpD was found to be essential for hormogonium development, motility and polysaccharide secretion. Comparative global transcriptional profiling of the ΔhmpD strain demonstrated that HmpD has a profound effect on the transcriptional programme of hormogonium development, influencing approximately half of the genes differentially transcribed during differentiation. Utilizing this transcriptomic data, we identified a gene locus, designated here as hps, that appears to encode for a novel polysaccharide secretion system. Transcripts for the genes in the hps locus are upregulated in two steps, with the second step dependent on HmpD. Deletion of hpsA, hpsBCD or hpsEFG resulted in the complete loss of motility and polysaccharide secretion, similar to deletion of hmpD. Genes in the hps locus are highly conserved in the filamentous cyanobacteria, but generally absent in unicellular strains, implying a common mechanism of motility unique to the filamentous cyanobacteria.

  19. Comparative Study of Collagen versus Synthetic-Based Meniscal Scaffolds in Treating Meniscal Deficiency in Young Active Population

    PubMed Central

    Bulgheroni, Erica; Grassi, Alberto; Campagnolo, Monica; Bulgheroni, Paolo; Mudhigere, Abhishek; Gobbi, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 2 different meniscal scaffolds in treating patients with irreparable partial medial meniscal tear and patients complaining of pain in the medial compartment of the knee due to a previous partial medial meniscectomy. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that both the scaffolds are effective in improving clinical outcomes in these patient populations. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients underwent collagen-based medial meniscus implantation (CMI-Menaflex) and 25 with a second-generation scaffold (Actifit). All patients were assessed with Lysholm, Tegner scale, and MRI evaluation—preoperatively, at 6 months, at 12 moths, and followed-up for a minimum of 2 years. Second look arthroscopy and concomitant biopsy were performed in 7 and 12 patients of CMI and Actifit groups, respectively. Results: The CMI group at final follow-up showed improvement in Lysholm score from 58.4 ± 17.3 to 94.5 ± 6.0, while the Actifit group showed improvement from 67.0 ± 15.7 to 90.3 ± 13.1; the improvement was statistically significant in both the groups but intergroup difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.1061). Tegner Activity Scale score improved in both the groups, but intergroup difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.5918). MRI evaluation showed in situ scaffold and no progression of degenerative arthritis in both the groups at final follow-up. Histological evaluation showed more fibrous tissue with blood vessels in the CMI group and the Actift group showed avascular cartilaginous features. Conclusion: Both the scaffolds are effective in improving patients’ symptoms and joint function at short-term follow-up. PMID:26958315

  20. To compare the efficacy of two kinds of Zhizhu pills in the treatment of functional dyspepsia of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome:a randomized group sequential comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory, functional dyspepsia (FD) can be divided into different syndromes according to different clinical symptoms and signs, and the most common one is spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome that can be treated by Chinese traditional patent medicine ---- two kinds of Zhizhu pills, between which the primary difference in ingredients is that one contains immature orange fruit of Citrus aurantium L.(IFCA) and the other contains that of Citrus sinensis Osbeck (IFCS). The trial's objective was to compare the efficacy of two kinds of Zhizhu pills on symptom changes in patients with FD of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome. Methods A randomized, group sequential, double-blinded, multicenter trial was conducted in patients with FD of spleen-deficiency and qi-stagnation syndrome at 3 hospitals in Beijing between June 2003 and May 2005. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups (IFCA group and IFCS group) in a 1:1 ratio, and respectively took one of the two kinds of Zhizhu pills orally, 6 g each time, 3 times a day, for 4 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed with use of a group sequential method, the triangular test (TT). Results A total of 163 patients were randomized, and 3 patients were excluded from analysis because of early dropouts, leaving 160 patients (IFCA group: n = 82; IFCS group: n = 78) for statistical analysis. Three interim analyses were done after 62, 116, and 160 patients had completed their 4-week treatment, respectively. At the third interim analysis, the sample path crossed the upper boundary and the trial was stopped, the cure-markedly effective rates were 45% for IFCS group and 67% for IFCA group, respectively, the one-sided p-value was 0.0036, the median unbiased estimate of the odds ratio (OR) for the benefit of IFCA relative to IFCS was 2.91 with 95%CI: 1.40 to 6.06. No adverse events were observed in the two groups. Conclusions Zhizhu pills containing IFCA was superior

  1. Immunohistochemical analysis of the gingiva with periodontitis of type I plasminogen deficiency compared to gingiva with gingivitis and periodontitis and healthy gingiva.

    PubMed

    Kurtulus Waschulewski, Idil; Gökbuget, Aslan Y; Christiansen, Nina M; Ziegler, Maike; Schuster, Volker; Wahl, Gerhard; Götz, Werner

    2016-12-01

    Type I plasminogen deficiency (Plgdef) is an uncommon chronic inflammation of mucous membranes. Gingival enlargements usually proceed with progressive periodontal destruction and tooth-loss. Plasmin(ogen)-independent enzymatic mechanisms for fibrin clearance have already been discussed in the literature. Our primary objective was to verify, immunohistochemically, the occurrence of different enzymatic factors involved in tissue breakdown of inflamed compared to healthy gingiva. Secondly, we tried to find out, if these patients have a similar microbiological profile to the patients with known gingivitis and periodontitis. Immunohistochemical analysis of enzymes elastase, plasminogen (plg), cathepsin G, matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and MMP-7 and of glycoprotein fibrinogen were performed with gingival tissues from 3 healthy controls, 8 patients with Plgdef and 3 patients with gingivitis and periodontitis. Furthermore, plaque from 5 patients with plasminogen deficiency were also obtained to determine the microbiological profile. Significantly high numbers of elastase positive leukocytes were detected in all samples. Staining for MMP-3 and MMP-7 was seen in samples with gingivitis and periodontitis with a stronger staining in samples with periodontitis by Plgdef. Fibrinogen was detectable in all samples. Staining for plg was stronger in samples with periodontitis than in other samples. Staining for cathepsin G was weak in gingivitis and periodontitis. Subgingival microbial flora showed elevated colony forming units of Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens, Fusobacterium spp., Eikenella corrodens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and viridans streptococci. Strong staining of elastase, MMP-3 and MMP-7 and weak staining of plg in Plgdef samples supports the plasmin(ogen) - independent fibrin clearance. Similar subgingival microbiological flora was observed in periodontitis with Plgdef as in other periodontal diseases. Further investigations should determine the exact pathomechanism

  2. Disaccharidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bayless, T M; Christopher, N L

    1969-02-01

    This review of the literature and current knowledge concerning a nutritional disorder of disaccharidase deficiency discusses the following topics: 1) a description of disorders of disaccharide digestion; 2) some historical perspective on the laboratory and bedside advances in the past 10 years that have helped define a group of these digestive disorders; 3) a classification of conditions causing disaccharide intolerance; and 4) a discussion of some of the specific clinical syndromes emphasizing nutritional consequences of these syndromes. The syndromes described include congenital lactase deficiency, acquired lactase deficiency in teenagers and adults, acquired generalized disaccharidase deficiency secondary to diffuse mucosal damage, acquired lactose intolerance secondary to alterations in the intestinal transit, sucrase-isomaltase deficiencies, and other disease associations connected with lactase deficiency such as colitis.

  3. Pituitary deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes insipidus, arising from damage to or congenital abnormalities of the neurohypophysis, is the most common pituitary deficiency in animals. Hypopituitarism and isolated growth hormone or thyrotropin deficiency may result in growth abnormalities in puppies and kittens. In addition, treatment of associated hormone deficiencies, such as hypothyroidism and hypoadrenocorticism, in patients with panhypopituitarism is vital to restore adequate growth in dwarfed animals. Secondary hypoadrenocorticism is an uncommon clinical entity; however differentiation of primary versus secondary adrenal insufficiency is of utmost importance in determining optimal therapy. This article will focus on the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of hormone deficiencies of the pituitary gland and neurohypophysis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Contextual view of building A3 showing building A1 at left ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of building A3 showing building A1 at left background and building A3 to right (the last of three together); camera facing west. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Shell House No. 1, Railroad Avenue, west side near Maseda Road, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  5. Comparative tissue distribution profiles of five major bio-active components in normal and blood deficiency rats after oral administration of Danggui Buxue Decoction by UPLC-TQ/MS.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuqin; Tang, Yuping; Zhu, Huaxu; Li, Weixia; Li, Zhenhao; Li, Wei; Duan, Jin-ao

    2014-01-01

    Astragali Radix (AR) and Angelicae Sinensis Radix (ASR) were frequently combined and used in China as herbal pair called as Danggui Buxue Decoction (DBD) for treatment of blood deficiency syndrome, such as women's ailments. This study is to investigate the tissue distribution profiles of five major bio-active constituents (ferulic acid, caffeic acid, calycosin-7-O-β-glucoside, ononin and astragaloside IV) in DBD after oral administration of DBD in blood deficiency rats, and to compare the difference between normal and blood deficiency rats. The blood deficiency rats were induced by bleeding from orbit at the dosages of 5.0mLkg(-1) every day, and the experimental period was 12 days. At the finally day of experimental period, both normal and blood deficiency rats were orally administrated with DBD, and then the tissues samples were collected at different time points. Ferulic acid, caffeic acid, calycosin-7-O-β-glucoside, ononin and astragaloside IV in different tissues were detected simultaneously by UPLC-TQ/MS, and the histograms were drawn. The results showed that the overall trend was CLiver>CKidney>CHeart>CSpleen>CLung, CC-30min>CM-30min>CM-60min>CC-5min>CM-5min>CC-60min>CM-240min>CC-240min. The contents of the detected compounds in liver were more than that in other tissues no matter in normal or blood deficiency rats. Compared to normal rats, partial contents of the compounds in blood deficiency rats' tissues at different time points had significant difference (P<0.05). This study was the first report about tissue distribution investigation in blood deficiency animals which is conducted by bleeding. And the results demonstrated that the five DBD components in normal and blood deficiency rats had obvious differences in some organs and time points, suggesting that the blood flow and perfusion rate of the organ were altered in blood deficiency animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tuerk, Melanie J; Fazel, Nasim

    2009-03-01

    Zinc plays an essential role in numerous biochemical pathways. Zinc deficiency affects many organ systems, including the integumentary, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, immune, skeletal, and reproductive systems. This article aims to discuss zinc metabolism and highlights a few of the diseases associated with zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency results in dysfunction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity and increases the susceptibility to infection. Supplementation of zinc has been shown to reduce the incidence of infection as well as cellular damage from increased oxidative stress. Zinc deficiency is also associated with acute and chronic liver disease. Zinc supplementation protects against toxin-induced liver damage and is used as a therapy for hepatic encephalopathy in patients refractory to standard treatment. Zinc deficiency has also been implicated in diarrheal disease, and supplementation has been effective in both prophylaxis and treatment of acute diarrhea. This article is not meant to review all of the disease states associated with zinc deficiency. Rather, it is an introduction to the influence of the many roles of zinc in the body, with an extensive discussion of the influence of zinc deficiency in selected diseases. Zinc supplementation may be beneficial as an adjunct to treatment of many disease states.

  7. Frequency of colour vision deficiencies in melanoma patients: results of a prospective comparative screening study with the Farnsworth panel D 15 test including 300 melanoma patients and 100 healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Pföhler, Claudia; Tschöp, Sabine; König, Jochem; Rass, Knuth; Tilgen, Wolfgang

    2006-10-01

    Patients with melanoma may experience a variety of different vision symptoms, in part associated with melanoma-associated retinopathy. For several melanoma patients with or without melanoma-associated retinopathy, colour vision deficiencies, especially involving the tritan system, have been reported. The frequency of colour vision deficiencies in a larger cohort of melanoma patients has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of colour vision deficiencies in melanoma patients subject to stage of disease, prognostic factors such as tumour thickness or Clark level, S100-beta and predisposing diseases that may have an impact on colour vision (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, glaucoma or cataract). Three hundred melanoma patients in different tumour stages and 100 healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls were examined with the saturated Farnsworth panel D 15 test. Seventy out of 300 (23.3%) melanoma patients and 12/100 (12%) controls showed pathologic results in colour testing. This discrepancy was significant (P < 0.016; odds ratio = 2.23, 95% confidence interval 1.15-4.32). Increasing age was identified as a highly significant (P = 0.0005) risk factor for blue vision deficiency. Adjusting for the age and predisposing diseases, we could show that melanoma was associated with the risk of blue vision deficiency. The frequency of blue vision deficiency in 52/260 melanoma patients without predisposing diseases (20%) compared with 4/78 controls without predisposing diseases (5.1%) differed significantly (odds ratio 4.441; confidence interval 1.54-12.62; P < 0.004). In 260 melanoma patients without predisposing diseases, blue vision deficiency, as graded on a 6-point scale, showed a weak positive correlation (Spearman) with tumour stage (r = 0.147; P < 0.01), tumour thickness (r = 0.10; P = 0.0035), Clark level (r = 0.12; P = 0.04) and a weak negative correlation with time since initial diagnosis (r = -0.11; P = 0.0455). Blue

  8. A Comparative Study on Antioxidant System in Fish Hepatopancreas and Intestine Affected by Choline Deficiency: Different Change Patterns of Varied Antioxidant Enzyme Genes and Nrf2 Signaling Factors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The liver and intestine are susceptible to the oxidative damage which could result in several diseases. Choline deficiency induced oxidative damage in rat liver cells. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for choline deficiency-induced oxidative damage. Juvenile Jian carp were fed diets differing in choline content [165 (deficient group), 310, 607, 896, 1167 and 1820 mg/kg diet] respectively for 65 days. Oxidative damage, antioxidant enzyme activities and related gene expressions in the hepatopancreas and intestine were measured. Choline deficiency decreased choline and phosphatidylcholine contents, and induced oxidative damage in both organs, as evidenced by increased levels of oxidative-stress markers (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), coupled with decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes [Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)]. However, choline deficiency increased glutathione contents in the hepatopancreas and intestine. Furthermore, dietary choline deficiency downregulated mRNA levels of MnSOD, GPx1b, GST-rho, mGST3 and Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1b) in the hepatopancreas, MnSOD, GPx1b, GPx4a, GPx4b, GST-rho, GST-theta, GST-mu, GST-alpha, GST-pi and GST-kappa in the intestine, as well as intestinal Nrf2 protein levels. In contrast, choline deficiency upregulated the mRNA levels of GPx4a, GPx4b, mGST1, mGST2, GST-theta, GST-mu, Keap1a and PKC in the hepatopancreas, mGST3, nuclear factor erythoid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and Keap1a in the intestine, as well as hepatopancreatic Nrf2 protein levels. This study provides new evidence that choline deficiency-induced oxidative damage is associated with changes in the transcription of antioxidant enzyme and Nrf2/Keap1 signaling molecules in the hepatopancreas and intestine. Additionally, this study firstly

  9. A Comparative Study on Antioxidant System in Fish Hepatopancreas and Intestine Affected by Choline Deficiency: Different Change Patterns of Varied Antioxidant Enzyme Genes and Nrf2 Signaling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The liver and intestine are susceptible to the oxidative damage which could result in several diseases. Choline deficiency induced oxidative damage in rat liver cells. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for choline deficiency-induced oxidative damage. Juvenile Jian carp were fed diets differing in choline content [165 (deficient group), 310, 607, 896, 1167 and 1820 mg/kg diet] respectively for 65 days. Oxidative damage, antioxidant enzyme activities and related gene expressions in the hepatopancreas and intestine were measured. Choline deficiency decreased choline and phosphatidylcholine contents, and induced oxidative damage in both organs, as evidenced by increased levels of oxidative-stress markers (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), coupled with decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes [Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)]. However, choline deficiency increased glutathione contents in the hepatopancreas and intestine. Furthermore, dietary choline deficiency downregulated mRNA levels of MnSOD, GPx1b, GST-rho, mGST3 and Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1b) in the hepatopancreas, MnSOD, GPx1b, GPx4a, GPx4b, GST-rho, GST-theta, GST-mu, GST-alpha, GST-pi and GST-kappa in the intestine, as well as intestinal Nrf2 protein levels. In contrast, choline deficiency upregulated the mRNA levels of GPx4a, GPx4b, mGST1, mGST2, GST-theta, GST-mu, Keap1a and PKC in the hepatopancreas, mGST3, nuclear factor erythoid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and Keap1a in the intestine, as well as hepatopancreatic Nrf2 protein levels. This study provides new evidence that choline deficiency-induced oxidative damage is associated with changes in the transcription of antioxidant enzyme and Nrf2/Keap1 signaling molecules in the hepatopancreas and intestine. Additionally, this study firstly

  10. Osteointegration of titanium and hydroxyapatite rough surfaces in healthy and compromised cortical and trabecular bone: in vivo comparative study on young, aged, and estrogen-deficient sheep.

    PubMed

    Borsari, Veronica; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Rimondini, Lia; Consolo, Ugo; Chiusoli, Loris; Salito, Armando; Volpert, Andreas; Chiesa, Roberto; Giardino, Roberto

    2007-09-01

    The osteointegration rate of titanium (Ti; TI01) and duplex Ti plus HA (HT01) coating systems with high surface roughness was investigated in healthy, aged, and oestrogen-deficient sheep. After having evaluated the bone quality, TI01 and HT01 rods were implanted in the tibial diaphyses (two implants for each tibia) and epiphyses (1 implant for each tibia) of five young (YOUNG), five aged (AGED), and five aged and ovariectomized (OVX) sheep. The iliac crest trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) and number (Tb.N) in OVX sheep were respectively 33.5% and 28.5% lower than in YOUNG sheep (p < 0.005) and lower than in the AGED group (BV/TV, -17%; Tb.N, -13.5%; not significant); in the OVX group the trabecular separation was 77.9% higher than in YOUNG (p < 0.05) and 30.9% higher than in AGED animals. Lumbar vertebrae L5 bone mineral density was significantly lower in AGED (8.9%, p < 0.05) and OVX sheep (19.3%, p < 0.0005) when compared with YOUNG animals. Five samples of five sheep from each group were analyzed for each observation. At 3 months, in cortical bone both affinity index and pushout test results showed no significant differences between the two materials in each group of animals. In trabecular bone, the affinity index of HT01 was significantly higher than that of TI01 in each group of animals (YOUNG, 90.7%; AGED, 76.9%; OVX, 49.9%) with no significant differences between groups. In conclusion, the performance of TI01 and HT01 surfaces was high not only in YOUNG, but also in OVX animals and, therefore, they might be useful for aged and osteoporotic patients.

  11. High Light Response of the Thylakoid Proteome in Arabidopsis Wild Type and the Ascorbate-Deficient Mutant vtc2-2. A Comparative Proteomics Study1[W

    PubMed Central

    Giacomelli, Lisa; Rudella, Andrea; van Wijk, Klaas Jan

    2006-01-01

    The thylakoid proteome of chloroplasts contains multiple proteins involved in antioxidative defense, protein folding, and repair. To understand this functional protein network, we analyzed the quantitative response of the thylakoid-associated proteome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) wild type and the ascorbate-deficient mutant vtc2-2 after transition to high light (HL; 1,000 μmol photons m−2 s−1). The soluble thylakoid proteomes of wild type and vtc2-2 were compared after 0, 1, 3, and 5 d of HL using two-dimensional gels with three independent experiments, followed by a multivariant statistical analysis and tandem mass spectrometry. After 5 d of HL, both wild-type and vtc2-2 plants accumulated anthocyanins, increased their total ascorbate content, and lost 10% of photosystem II efficiency, but showed no bleaching. Anthocyanin and total ascorbate concentrations in vtc2-2 were respectively 34% and 20% of wild type, potentially leading to enhanced oxidative stress in vtc2-2. Forty-five protein spots significantly changed as a consequence of genotype, light treatment, or both. Independent confirmation was obtained from western blots. The most significant response was the up-regulation of thylakoid YCF37 likely involved in photosystem I assembly, and specific fibrillins, a flavin reductase-like protein, and an aldolase, each located in thylakoid-associated plastoglobules. Fe-superoxide dismutase was down-regulated in vtc2-2, while Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase was up-regulated. vtc2-2 also showed a systematic up-regulation of a steroid dehydrogenase-like protein. A number of other stress-related proteins, several thylakoid proteases, and lumenal isomerases did not change, while PsbS increased in wild type upon light stress. These findings are discussed in terms of plastid metabolism and oxidative stress defense, and emphasize that understanding of the chloroplast stress-response network must include the enzymatic role of plastoglobules. PMID:16648217

  12. Recognition of galactose-deficient O-glycans in the hinge region of IgA1 by N-acetylgalactosamine-specific snail lectins: a comparative binding study†

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Michelle M.; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Brooks, Monica T.; Tomana, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Mestecky, Jiri; Julian, Bruce A.; Novak, Jan; Herr, Andrew B.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrancies in IgA1 glycosylation have been linked to the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), a kidney disease characterized by deposits of IgA1-containing immune complexes in the glomerular mesangium. IgA1 from IgAN patients is characterized by the presence of galactose (Gal)-deficient O-glycans in the hinge region that can act as epitopes for anti-glycan IgG or IgA1 antibodies. The resulting circulating immune complexes are trapped in the glomerular mesangium of the kidney where they trigger localized inflammatory responses by activating mesangial cells. Certain lectins recognize the terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-containing O-glycans on Gal-deficient IgA1 and can be potentially used as diagnostic tools. To better understand GalNAc recognition by these lectins, we have carried out binding studies to assess the interaction of Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) and Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) with Gal-deficient IgA1. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy revealed that both HAA and HPA bind to a Gal-deficient synthetic hinge-region glycopeptide (HR-GalNAc) as well as various aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 myeloma proteins. Despite having six binding sites, both HAA and HPA bind IgA1 in a functionally bivalent manner, with the apparent affinity for IgA1 related to the number of exposed GalNAc groups in the IgA1 hinge. Finally, HAA and HPA were shown to discriminate very effectively between the IgA1 secreted by cell lines derived from peripheral blood cells of patients with IgAN and of healthy controls. These studies provide insight into lectin recognition of the Gal-deficient IgA1 hinge region and lay the groundwork for the development of reliable diagnostic tools for IgAN. PMID:20507092

  13. Cobalamin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Wolfgang; Obeid, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B12) consists of a corrinoid structure with cobalt in the centre of the molecule. Neither humans nor animals are able to synthesize this vitamin. Foods of animal source are the only natural source of cobalamin in human diet. There are only two enzymatic reactions in mammalian cells that require cobalamin as cofactor. Methylcobolamin is a cofactor for methionine synthase. The enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA-mutase requires adenosylcobalamin as a cofactor. Therefore, serum concentrations of homocysteine (tHcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) will increase in cobalamin deficiency. The cobalamin absorption from diet is a complex process that involves different proteins: haptocorrin, intrinsic factor and transcobalamin (TC). Cobalamin that is bound to TC is called holotranscobalamin (holoTC) which is the metabolically active vitamin B12 fraction. HoloTC consists 6 and 20% of total cobalamin whereas 80% of total serum cobalamin is bound to another binding protein, haptocorrin. Cobalamin deficiency is common worldwide. Cobalamin malabsorption is common in elderly subjects which might explain low vitamin status. Subjects who ingest low amount of cobalamin like vegetarians develop vitamin deficiency. No single parameter can be used to diagnose cobalamin deficiency. Total serum cobalamin is neither sensitive nor it is specific for cobalamin deficiency. This might explain why many deficient subjects would be overlooked by utilizing total cobalamin as status marker. Concentration of holotranscobalamin (holoTC) in serum is an earlier marker that becomes decreased before total serum cobalamin. Concentrations of MMA and tHcy increase in blood of cobalamin deficient subjects. Despite limitations of these markers in patients with renal dysfunction, concentrations of MMA and tHcy are useful functional markers of cobalamin status. The combined use of holoTC and MMA assays may better indicate cobalamin status than either of them. Because Cbl deficiency is a risk factor

  14. The co-occurrence of zinc deficiency and social isolation has the opposite effects on mood compared with either condition alone due to changes in the central norepinephrine system.

    PubMed

    Mitsuya, Hironori; Omata, Naoto; Kiyono, Yasushi; Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Murata, Tetsuhito; Mita, Kayo; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Wada, Yuji

    2015-05-01

    Nutritional and social environmental problems during the early stages of life are closely associated with the pathophysiology of mood disorders such as depression. Disruption or dysfunction of the central norepinephrine (NE) system is also considered to play a role in mood disorders. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of zinc deficiency and/or social isolation on mood and changes in the central NE system using rats. Compared with the controls, the rats subjected to zinc deficiency or social isolation alone exhibited increased anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze and greater depression-like behavior in the forced swim test. However, the co-occurrence of zinc deficiency and social isolation resulted in decreased anxiety-related behavior and control levels of depression-like behavior. Social isolation alone decreased the rats' cerebral NE concentrations. The expression of the NE transporter was not affected by social isolation alone, but its expression in the locus coeruleus was markedly decreased by the co-occurrence of social isolation and zinc deficiency, and this change was accompanied by an increase in the blood concentration of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, which is a marker of central NE system activity. These findings suggest that zinc deficiency or social isolation alone induce anxious or depressive symptoms, but the presence of both conditions has anxiolytic or antidepressive effects. Furthermore, these opposing effects of mood-related behaviors were found to be associated with changes in the central NE system. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Thyrotropic deficiency].

    PubMed

    Chanson, P

    1998-11-15

    Central hypothyroidism (thyrotropic deficiency) is due to a defect in TSH secretion by thyrotrophs (or alternatively to an altered bioactivity of TSH). Central hypothyroidism is rare and is often associated with other pituitary deficiencies as it is generally encountered in case of hypothalamo-pituitary tumoral process. Clinical symptoms are milder than those of primary thyroid failure. Diagnosis is based on free T4 measurement whose level is decreased while TSH concentration is normal or minimally increased, reflecting an alteration in the bioactivity of TSH. Replacement therapy is monitored by T4 level measurement: the objective is to obtain normal T4 levels. TSH concentration must not be taken into account for the adjustment of the thyroxine doses.

  16. Immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces a CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and confers a level of protection comparable to that of wild-type HSV-1.

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, M A; Bonneau, R H; Knipe, D M; Tevethia, S S

    1997-01-01

    Replication-deficient viruses provide an attractive alternative to conventional approaches used in the induction of antiviral immunity. We have quantitatively evaluated both the primary and memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses elicited by immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). In addition, we have examined the potential role of these CTL in protection against HSV infection. Using bulk culture analysis and limiting-dilution analysis, we have shown that a replication-deficient virus, d301, generates a strong primary CTL response that is comparable to the response induced by the wild type-strain, KOS1.1. Furthermore, the CTL induced by d301 immunization recognized the immunodominant, H-2Kb-restricted, CTL recognition epitope gB498-505 to a level similar to that for CTL from KOS1.1-immunized mice. The memory CTL response evoked by d301 was strong and persistent, even though the frequencies of CTL were slightly lower than the frequencies of CTL induced by KOS1.1. Adoptive transfer studies indicated that both the CD8+ and the CD4+ T-cell responses generated by immunization with d301 and KOS1.1 were able to limit the extent of a cutaneous HSV infection to comparable levels. Overall, these results indicate that viral replication is not necessary to elicit a potent and durable HSV-specific immune response and suggest that replication-deficient viruses may be effective in eliciting protection against viral pathogens. PMID:9094625

  17. Randomized clinical trial in vitamin D-deficient adults comparing replenishment with oral vitamin D3 with narrow-band UV type B light: effects on cholesterol and the transcriptional profiles of skin and blood.

    PubMed

    Ponda, Manish P; Liang, Yupu; Kim, Jaehwan; Hutt, Richard; Dowd, Kathleen; Gilleaudeau, Patricia; Sullivan-Whalen, Mary M; Rodrick, Tori; Kim, Dong Joo; Barash, Irina; Lowes, Michelle A; Breslow, Jan L

    2017-02-22

    Background: Vitamin D deficiency, defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration <20 ng/mL, is correlated with a more atherogenic lipid profile. However, oral vitamin D supplementation does not lower LDL-cholesterol concentrations or raise HDL-cholesterol concentrations. This uncoupling between association and causation may result from a failure of oral vitamin D to mimic the effect of dermally synthesized vitamin D in response to ultraviolet type B (UVB) light.Objective: We tested the hypothesis that, in vitamin D-deficient adults, the replenishment of vitamin D with UVB exposure would lower LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared with the effect of oral vitamin D3 supplementation.Design: We performed a randomized clinical trial in vitamin D-deficient adults and compared vitamin D replenishment between subjects who received oral vitamin D3 (n = 60) and those who received narrow-band UVB exposure (n = 58) ≤6 mo.Results: There was no difference in the change from baseline LDL-cholesterol concentrations between oral vitamin D3 and UVB groups (difference in median of oral vitamin D3 minus that of UVB: 1.5 mg/dL; 95% CI: -5.0, 7.0 mg/dL). There were also no differences within groups or between groups for changes in total or HDL cholesterol or triglycerides. Transcriptional profiling of skin and blood, however, revealed significant upregulation of immune pathway signaling with oral vitamin D3 but significant downregulation with UVB.Conclusions: Correcting vitamin D deficiency with either oral vitamin D3 or UVB does not improve the lipid profile. Beyond cholesterol, these 2 modalities of raising 25(OH)D have disparate effects on gene transcription. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01688102.

  18. Plasminogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Celkan, Tiraje

    2017-01-01

    Plasminogen plays an important role in fibrinolysis as well as wound healing, cell migration, tissue modeling and angiogenesis. Congenital plasminogen deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that leads to the development of thick, wood-like pseudomembranes on mucosal surfaces, mostly seen in conjunctivas named as ''ligneous conjunctivitis''. Local conjunctival use of fresh frozen plazma (FFP) in combination with other eye medications such as cyclosporin and artificial tear drops may relieve the symptoms. Topical treatment with plasminogen eye drops is the most promising treatment that is not yet available in Turkey.

  19. Comparative assessment of the bioavailability, efficacy and safety of a modified-release (MR) carbonyl iron tablet and oral conventional iron preparation in adult Indian patients with nutritional iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Adsul, B B; Desai, Anish; Gawde, Ashish; Baliga, Vidyagauri

    2005-06-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the bioavailability, efficacy and safety of a new modified-release (MR) formulation of carbonyl iron (45 mg) relative to a commercially available conventional formulation of ferrous fumarate (300 mg) in adult Indian patients with clinical and laboratory diagnosis of nutritional iron deficiency anaemia. This prospective, comparative, randomised, double-blind study was carried out among 60 patients received a single daily dose of either MR carbonyl iron or ferrous fumarate for 12 weeks. The effect of therapy on haematological parameters and iron status and estimation of bioavailability were the main efficacy outcomes. There was a significant (p<0.05) increase in mean haemoglobin levels, reticulocyte counts, haematocrit and mean corpuscular volume in MR carbonyl iron group compared to ferrous fumarate group. There was also an increase in mean serum iron and ferritin levels and a corresponding decrease in total iron binding capacity in MR carbonyl iron group compared to ferrous fumarate group at the end of 12 weeks therapy. The estimated overall bioavailability of MR carbonyl iron was about 147% that of ferrous fumarate. Both the formulations were equally well-tolerated and adverse events were mainly gastrointestinal in nature. The prevalence of adverse events was slightly more in the ferrous fumarate group. It can be concluded that the MR formulation of carbonyl iron was more efficacious than ferrous fumarate in correcting haematologic abnormalities and improving iron status in patients with nutritional iron deficiency anaemia. In conditions where efficacy is an important consideration, the higher bioavailability of MR carbonyl iron may make it the treatment of choice for nutritional iron deficiency anaemia.

  20. Organophosphates and monocyte esterase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    McClean, E; Mackey, H; Markey, G M; Morris, T C

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To examine the possibility that monocyte esterase deficiency (MED) could be caused by exposure to organophosphates. METHODS--Pseudocholinesterase, paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured in the serum and acetylcholinesterase activity was measured in the red cells of a group of monocyte esterase deficient subjects and compared with the enzyme activities of a control group of monocyte esterase positive subjects. RESULTS--No significant difference was found between the enzyme activities of the monocyte esterase deficient group and the control group for any of the esterases investigated. CONCLUSION--Current or recent exposure to organophosphorus is not the cause of MED. PMID:7560207

  1. Comparative genomics of aldehyde dehydrogenase 5a1 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase) and accumulation of gamma-hydroxybutyrate associated with its deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH; aldehyde dehydrogenase 5A1 [ALDH5A1]; locus 6p22) occupies a central position in central nervous system (CNS) neurotransmitter metabolism as one of two enzymes necessary for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) recycling from the synaptic cleft. Its importance is highlighted by the neurometabolic disease associated with its inherited deficiency in humans, as well as the severe epileptic phenotype observed in Aldh5a1-/- knockout mice. Expanding evidence now suggests, however, that even subtle decreases in human SSADH activity, associated with rare and common single nucleotide polymorphisms, may produce subclinical pathological effects. SSADH, in conjunction with aldo-keto reductase 7A2 (AKR7A2), represent two neural enzymes responsible for further catabolism of succinic semialdehyde, producing either succinate (SSADH) or γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB; AKR7A2). A GABA analogue, GHB is a short-chain fatty alcohol with unusual properties in the CNS and a long pharmacological history. Moreover, SSADH occupies a further role in the CNS as the enzyme responsible for further metabolism of the lipid peroxidation aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), an intermediate known to induce oxidant stress. Accordingly, subtle decreases in SSADH activity may have the capacity to lead to regional accumulation of neurotoxic intermediates (GHB, 4-HNE). Polymorphisms in SSADH gene structure may also associate with quantitative traits, including intelligence quotient and life expectancy. Further population-based studies of human SSADH activity promise to reveal additional properties of its function and additional roles in CNS tissue. PMID:19164088

  2. Comparative genomic study of arachnid immune systems indicates loss of beta-1,3-glucanase-related proteins and the immune deficiency pathway.

    PubMed

    Bechsgaard, J; Vanthournout, B; Funch, P; Vestbo, S; Gibbs, R A; Richards, S; Sanggaard, K W; Enghild, J J; Bilde, T

    2016-02-01

    Analyses of arthropod genomes have shown that the genes in the different innate humoral immune responses are conserved. These genes encode proteins that are involved in immune signalling pathways that recognize pathogens and activate immune responses. These immune responses include phagocytosis, encapsulation of the pathogen and production of effector molecules for pathogen elimination. So far, most studies have focused on insects leaving other major arthropod groups largely unexplored. Here, we annotate the immune-related genes of six arachnid genomes and present evidence for a conserved pattern of some immune genes, but also evolutionary changes in the arachnid immune system. Specifically, our results suggest that the family of recognition molecules of beta-1,3-glucanase-related proteins (βGRPs) and the genes from the immune deficiency (IMD) signalling pathway have been lost in a common ancestor of arachnids. These findings are consistent with previous work suggesting that the humoral immune effector proteins are constitutively produced in arachnids in contrast to insects, where these have to be induced. Further functional studies are needed to verify this. We further show that the full haemolymph clotting cascade found in the horseshoe crab is retrieved in most arachnid genomes. Tetranychus lacks at least one major component, although it is possible that this cascade could still function through recruitment of a different protein. The gel-forming protein in horseshoe crabs, coagulogen, was not recovered in any of the arachnid genomes; however, it is possible that the arachnid clot consists of a related protein, spätzle, that is present in all of the genomes. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  3. [Clinical symptoms in IgA deficiency].

    PubMed

    De Oliveira-Serra, Flavio Augusto; Mosca, Tainá; Santos de Menezes, Maria da Conceição; Carvalho-Neves Forte, Wilma

    2017-01-01

    IgA deficiency is the most common primary immunodeficiency. Early diagnosis and clinical follow-up may improve the quality of life of patients with IgA deficiency. To this end, IgA deficiency should be further studied and better understood on its clinical manifestations. To determine IgA deficiency clinical manifestations. Cross-sectional, retrospective, exploratory study, where the medical records of 39 patients with IgA deficiency were analyzed. Among the analyzed cases, 10 patients were diagnosed with total IgA deficiency and 29 patients with partial IgA deficiency. Partial and total IgA deficiency main clinical manifestations were allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma. In total IgA deficiency, in addition to allergic diseases, a statistically significant number (p < 0.05) of cases of infection-related rhinosinusitis, tonsillitis and conjunctivitis were also observed. This study showed that the main clinical manifestations in IgA deficiency were allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma. In addition, patients with total IgA deficiency showed a significant increase in infection-related rhinosinusitis, tonsillitis and conjunctivitis, when compared with patients with partial IgA deficiency.

  4. Comparative validation of the growth hormone-releasing hormone and arginine test for the diagnosis of adult growth hormone deficiency using a growth hormone assay conforming to recent international recommendations.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Cailleux-Bounacer, Anne; Kuhn, Jean-Marc; Weryha, Georges; Chabre, Olivier; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Dubois, Séverine; Vincent-Dejean, Caroline; Brue, Thierry; Fedou, Christine; Bresson, Jean-Louis; Demolis, Pierre; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude

    2010-08-01

    The GHRH plus arginine (GHRH+Arg) test is a promising alternative to the insulin tolerance test (ITT) for diagnosis of adult GH deficiency (AGHD). The objectives of the study were to validate the GHRH+Arg test for diagnosis of AGHD, using the ITT as comparator and a GH assay calibrated according to recent international recommendations, and to study the repeatability and tolerance of both tests. This was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase III study. The study was conducted at 10 French university hospitals. Sixty-nine subjects (38 and 15 with high and low probability of GH deficiency, respectively, and 16 healthy controls) were randomized: 35 to the GHRH+Arg-GHRH+Arg-ITT test sequence and 34 to the ITT-ITT-GHRH+Arg test sequence. Each subject underwent three tests of GH secretion separated by 24 h or more. The primary variable used for response assessments was serum peak GH response. Test results were compared with the final AGHD diagnosis. Peak GH responses in the two tests were strongly correlated. A cutoff value of 7.89 microg/liter for GHRH+Arg corresponding to 3 microg/liter for ITT was calculated. The cutoff value leading to 95% specificity with the GHRH+Arg test was measured at about 3.67 microg/liter (sensitivity 79.0%). Intermethod agreement and repeatability were high. Both tests were well tolerated. A preference for the GHRH+Arg test was expressed by 74% of subjects. The GHRH+Arg test demonstrated good accuracy and repeatability, was at least as sensitive as the ITT, and was associated with better subject acceptability. The GHRH+Arg test represents a good alternative to the ITT for the diagnosis of AGHD.

  5. Comparative Temporal Proteomics of a Response Regulator (SO2426)-Deficient Strain and Wild-Type Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 During Chromate Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Chourey, Karuna; Thompson, Melissa R; Shah, Manesh B; Zhang, Bing; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2009-01-01

    Predicted orphan response regulators encoded in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 genome are poorly understood from a cellular function perspective. Our previous transcriptomic and proteomic analyses demonstrated that an annotated DNA-binding response regulator, SO2426, was significantly up-regulated in wild-type S. oneidensis cells at both themRNAand protein levels in response to acute chromate [Cr(VI)] challenge, suggesting a potential regulatory role for this protein in metal stress pathways. To investigate the impact of SO2426 activity on chromate stress response at a genome-wide scale, we describe here comparative and temporal proteome characterizations using multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS and statistical analysis to identify differentially expressed proteins in biological replicates of wild-type S. oneidensis MR-1 and a so2426 deletion ( so2426) strain, which exhibited an impaired Cr(VI) transformation rate compared to that of the parental strain. Global protein profiles were examined at different time intervals (0, 1, 3, 4 h) following exogenous chromate challenge. Results indicated that deletion of the so2426 gene negatively affected expression of a small protein subset (27 proteins) including those with annotated functions in siderophore biosynthesis (SO3032), Fe uptake (SO4743), intracellular Fe storage (Bfr1), and other transport processes. Cr(VI) exposure and subsequent ransformation dramatically increased the number of differentially expressed proteins detected,with up-regulated bundance patterns observed largely for proteins involved in general stress protection and detoxification trategies, cell motility, and protein fate. In addition, the proteome data sets were mined for amino acids with otential post-translational modifications (PTMs) indicative of a level of gene expression regulation extending eyond the transcriptional control imposed by SO2426.

  6. Nutritional deficiency in oral candidosis.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, W M; Macfarlane, T W; Ferguson, M M; Mason, D K

    1977-08-01

    A retrospective study of 108 patients was carried out to investigate the possible relationship between infection of the mouth with Candida albicans and blood levels of iron, folic acid and vitamin B12. The patients were separated into two groups--those with hyperplastic and those with atrophic candidal lesions--and compared with separate control groups. Twenty-one patients had chronic hyperplastic candidosis and seven were iron deficient. Comparison with an age- and sex-matched control group showed the differences to be significant only at the p less than 0.1 level. Seven of the patients with hyperplastic lesions had folic acid deficiency and the difference between patients and controls was statistically significant (less than 0.05). However, no significant differences in iron or folic acid deficiency were noted between 87 patients with atrophic candidosis and 65 conttrols, and vitamin B12 deficiency was not statistically significant for either the hyperplastic or the atrophic group. It is concluded that deficiency of iron, folic acid or vitamin B12 alone does not promote growth of Candida albicans on the oral mucous membrane but that in some susceptible individuals, iron or folic deficiency may facilitate epithelial invasion by hyphae of Candida albicans.

  7. Phenotypic variation in biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B; Grier, R E; Allen, R J; Goodman, S I; Kien, C L; Parker, W D; Howell, D M; Hurst, D L

    1983-08-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is the usual biochemical defect in biotin-responsive late-onset multiple carboxylase deficiency. We reviewed the clinical features of six patients with the enzyme deficiency and compared them with features described in the literature in children with late-onset MCD. In all of the reported probands, MCD was diagnosed because they had metabolic ketoacidosis and organic aciduria in addition to various neurologic and cutaneous symptoms, such as seizures, ataxia, skin rash, and alopecia. Although in several of our patients biotinidase deficiency was also diagnosed because they manifested a similar spectrum of findings, others never had ketoacidosis or organic aciduria. Thus the initial features of biotinidase deficiency usually include neurologic or cutaneous symptoms, whereas organic aciduria and MCD are delayed, secondary manifestations of the disease. These findings suggest that biotinidase deficiency should be considered in any infant or child with any of these neurologic or cutaneous findings, with or without ketoacidosis or organic aciduria. If the diagnosis cannot be excluded, such individuals should be given a therapeutic trial of pharmacologic doses of biotin.

  8. Mast cell deficiency exacerbates inflammatory bowel symptoms in interleukin-10-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanying; Xue, Yansong; Wang, Hui; Huang, Yan; Du, Min; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test the role of mast cells in gut inflammation and colitis using interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice as an experimental model. METHODS: Mast cell-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh) mice were crossbred with IL-10-deficient mice to obtain double knockout (DKO) mice. The growth, mucosal damage and colitis status of DKO mice were compared with their IL-10-deficient littermates. RESULTS: DKO mice exhibited exacerbated colitis compared with their IL-10-deficient littermates, as shown by increased pathological score, higher myeloperoxidase content, enhanced Th1 type pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory signaling, elevated oxidative stress, as well as pronounced goblet cell loss. In addition, deficiency in mast cells resulted in enhanced mucosal damage, increased gut permeability, and impaired epithelial tight junctions. Mast cell deficiency was also linked to systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by higher serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interferon γ in DKO mice than that in IL-10-deficient mice. CONCLUSION: Mast cell deficiency in IL-10-deficient mice resulted in systematic and gut inflammation, impaired gut barrier function, and severer Th1-mediated colitis when compared to mice with only IL-10-deficiency. Inflammation and impaired gut epithelial barrier function likely form a vicious cycle to worsen colitis in the DKO mice. PMID:25083083

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ppGpp-deficient mutant to identify a novel virulence protein required for intracellular survival in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The global ppGpp-mediated stringent response in pathogenic bacteria plays an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), several genes, including virulence genes, are regulated by ppGpp when bacteria are under the stringent response. To understand the control of virulence genes by ppGpp in S. Typhimurium, agarose 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry was used and a comprehensive 2-DE reference map of amino acid-starved S. Typhimurium strain SH100, a derivative of ATCC 14028, was established. Results Of the 366 examined spots, 269 proteins were successfully identified. The comparative analysis of the wild-type and ppGpp0 mutant strains revealed 55 proteins, the expression patterns of which were affected by ppGpp. Using a mouse infection model, we further identified a novel virulence-associated factor, STM3169, from the ppGpp-regulated and Salmonella-specific proteins. In addition, Salmonella strains carrying mutations in the gene encoding STM3169 showed growth defects and impaired growth within macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, we found that expression of stm3169 was controlled by ppGpp and SsrB, a response regulator of the two-component system located on Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. Conclusions A proteomic approach using a 2-DE reference map can prove a powerful tool for analyzing virulence factors and the regulatory network involved in Salmonella pathogenesis. Our results also provide evidence of a global response mediated by ppGpp in S. enterica. PMID:21176126

  10. A Comparative Study of Age-Related Hearing Loss in Wild Type and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Raquel; Cediel, Rafael; Contreras, Julio; Lourdes, Rodriguez-de la Rosa; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Hernandez-Sanchez, Catalina; Zubeldia, Jose M.; Cerdan, Sebastian; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) belongs to the family of insulin-related peptides that fulfils a key role during the late development of the nervous system. Human IGF1 mutations cause profound deafness, poor growth and mental retardation. Accordingly, Igf1−/− null mice are dwarfs that have low survival rates, cochlear alterations and severe sensorineural deafness. Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is a common disorder associated with aging that causes social and cognitive problems. Aging is also associated with a decrease in circulating IGF-I levels and this reduction has been related to cognitive and brain alterations, although there is no information as yet regarding the relationship between presbycusis and IGF-I biodisponibility. Here we present a longitudinal study of wild type Igf1+/+ and null Igf1−/− mice from 2 to 12 months of age comparing the temporal progression of several parameters: hearing, brain morphology, cochlear cytoarchitecture, insulin-related factors and IGF gene expression and IGF-I serum levels. Complementary invasive and non-invasive techniques were used, including auditory brainstem-evoked response (ABR) recordings and in vivo MRI brain imaging. Igf1−/− null mice presented profound deafness at all the ages studied, without any obvious worsening of hearing parameters with aging. Igf1+/+ wild type mice suffered significant age-related hearing loss, their auditory thresholds and peak I latencies augmenting as they aged, in parallel with a decrease in the circulating levels of IGF-I. Accordingly, there was an age-related spiral ganglion degeneration in wild type mice that was not evident in the Igf1 null mice. However, the Igf1−/− null mice in turn developed a prematurely aged stria vascularis reminiscent of the diabetic strial phenotype. Our data indicate that IGF-I is required for the correct development and maintenance of hearing, supporting the idea that IGF-I-based therapies could contribute to prevent or

  11. A Comparative Study of N-glycolylneuraminic Acid (Neu5Gc) and Cytotoxic T Cell (CT) Carbohydrate Expression in Normal and Dystrophin-Deficient Dog and Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul T.; Golden, Bethannie; Okerblom, Jonathan; Camboni, Marybeth; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Xu, Rui; Varki, Ajit; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Kornegay, Joe N.

    2014-01-01

    The expression of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and the cytotoxic T cell (CT) carbohydrate can impact the severity of muscular dystrophy arising from the loss of dystrophin in mdx mice. Here, we describe the expression of these two glycans in skeletal muscles of dogs and humans with or without dystrophin-deficiency. Neu5Gc expression was highly reduced (>95%) in muscle from normal golden retriever crosses (GR, n = 3) and from golden retriever with muscular dystrophy (GRMD, n = 5) dogs at multiple ages (3, 6 and 13 months) when compared to mouse muscle, however, overall sialic acid expression in GR and GRMD muscles remained high at all ages. Neu5Gc was expressed on only a minority of GRMD satellite cells, CD8+ T lymphocytes and macrophages. Human muscle from normal (no evident disease, n = 3), Becker (BMD, n = 3) and Duchenne (DMD, n = 3) muscular dystrophy individuals had absent to very low Neu5Gc staining, but some punctate intracellular muscle staining was present in BMD and DMD muscles. The CT carbohydrate was localized to the neuromuscular junction in GR muscle, while GRMD muscles had increased expression on a subset of myofibers and macrophages. In humans, the CT carbohydrate was ectopically expressed on the sarcolemmal membrane of some BMD muscles, but not normal human or DMD muscles. These data are consistent with the notion that altered Neu5Gc and CT carbohydrate expression may modify disease severity resulting from dystrophin deficiency in dogs and humans. PMID:24505439

  12. Cross sectional, comparative study of serum erythropoietin, transferrin receptor, ferritin levels and other hematological indices in normal pregnancies and iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jai B; Bumma, Sirisha D; Saxena, Renu; Kumar, Sunesh; Roy, Kallol K; Singh, Neeta; Vanamail, P

    2016-08-01

    To test the correlation of the serum erythropoietin levels, serum transferrrin receptor levels and serum ferritin levels along with other hematological parameters in normal pregnant and anemic pregnant patients. In a prospective study, 120 pregnant women were recruited between 18 and 36 weeks of gestation; 53 normal pregnant patients, 67 anemic pregnant patients, in which, 17 had mild, 30 had moderate anemia, 20 had severe anemia. A blood sample was taken. The various hematological parameters, hemoglobin (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), serum ferritin, percentage saturation of iron, serum erythropoietin (SEPO) levels, serum transferrin receptors (STfRS) were performed. For statistics, Student's 't' test, Pearson's Chi test, Mann Whitney test and Bartlett test were used as per data. MCV was significantly reduced in anemic pregnancies as compared to non-anemic pregnancies (80.2±9.6 vs 94.12±9.8fl, p=0.001), MCHC was also reduced in them (30.2±3.38% vs 34.2±2.33%, p=0.176), TIBC was significantly increased in anemic pregnancies (343.31±28.54% vs 322.88±23.84%, p=0.001), serum ferritin was significantly reduced (24.9±10.48μg/L vs 31.03±9.98μg/L, p=0.001), percentage saturation of iron was also reduced (53.85±13.21% vs 62.04±15.79%, p=0.0024), serum erythropoietin levels were significantly higher in anemic women (26.24±26.61mU/ml vs 18.12±19.08mU/ml, p=0.064). The levels were significantly higher in severe anemia (46.5±46.8mU/ml than in moderate anemia 27.4±28.1mU/ml and mild anemia 22.8±22.8mU/ml. Serum transferrin receptors were significantly higher in anemic pregnancies than in non-anemic pregnancies (1.40±0.0802μg/ml vs 1.08±0.641μg/ml, p=0.019) with rise being higher in severe anemia (2.28±0.986μg/ml) than in moderate (1.4±0.816μg/ml) and mild anemia (1.16±0.702μg/ml). Various hematological parameters especially sTfR, serum erythropoietin, serum

  13. Pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the second most common cause, after glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency . PKD is found in people ... Read More Anemia Autosomal recessive Enzyme Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemolytic anemia Review Date 10/27/ ...

  14. Competitive Protein-binding assay-based Enzyme-immunoassay Method, Compared to High-pressure Liquid Chromatography, Has a Very Lower Diagnostic Value to Detect Vitamin D Deficiency in 9–12 Years Children

    PubMed Central

    Zahedi Rad, Maliheh; Neyestani, Tirang Reza; Nikooyeh, Bahareh; Shariatzadeh, Nastaran; Kalayi, Ali; Khalaji, Niloufar; Gharavi, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most reliable indicator of Vitamin D status is circulating concentration of 25-hydroxycalciferol (25(OH) D) routinely determined by enzyme-immunoassays (EIA) methods. This study was performed to compare commonly used competitive protein-binding assays (CPBA)-based EIA with the gold standard, high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Methods: Concentrations of 25(OH) D in sera from 257 randomly selected school children aged 9–11 years were determined by two methods of CPBA and HPLC. Results: Mean 25(OH) D concentration was 22 ± 18.8 and 21.9 ± 15.6 nmol/L by CPBA and HPLC, respectively. However, mean 25(OH) D concentrations of the two methods became different after excluding undetectable samples (25.1 ± 18.9 vs. 29 ± 14.5 nmol/L, respectively; P = 0.04). Based on predefined Vitamin D deficiency as 25(OH) D < 12.5 nmol/L, CPBA sensitivity and specificity were 44.2% and 60.6%, respectively, compared to HPLC. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the best cut-offs for CPBA was 5.8 nmol/L, which gave 82% sensitivity, but specificity was 17%. Conclusions: Though CPBA may be used as a screening tool, more reliable methods are needed for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26330983

  15. Competitive Protein-binding assay-based Enzyme-immunoassay Method, Compared to High-pressure Liquid Chromatography, Has a Very Lower Diagnostic Value to Detect Vitamin D Deficiency in 9-12 Years Children.

    PubMed

    Zahedi Rad, Maliheh; Neyestani, Tirang Reza; Nikooyeh, Bahareh; Shariatzadeh, Nastaran; Kalayi, Ali; Khalaji, Niloufar; Gharavi, Azam

    2015-01-01

    The most reliable indicator of Vitamin D status is circulating concentration of 25-hydroxycalciferol (25(OH) D) routinely determined by enzyme-immunoassays (EIA) methods. This study was performed to compare commonly used competitive protein-binding assays (CPBA)-based EIA with the gold standard, high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Concentrations of 25(OH) D in sera from 257 randomly selected school children aged 9-11 years were determined by two methods of CPBA and HPLC. Mean 25(OH) D concentration was 22 ± 18.8 and 21.9 ± 15.6 nmol/L by CPBA and HPLC, respectively. However, mean 25(OH) D concentrations of the two methods became different after excluding undetectable samples (25.1 ± 18.9 vs. 29 ± 14.5 nmol/L, respectively; P = 0.04). Based on predefined Vitamin D deficiency as 25(OH) D < 12.5 nmol/L, CPBA sensitivity and specificity were 44.2% and 60.6%, respectively, compared to HPLC. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the best cut-offs for CPBA was 5.8 nmol/L, which gave 82% sensitivity, but specificity was 17%. Though CPBA may be used as a screening tool, more reliable methods are needed for diagnostic purposes.

  16. Psychomotor development in children with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Pala, Emin; Erguven, Muferet; Guven, Sirin; Erdogan, Makbule; Balta, Tulin

    2010-09-01

    Iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia are the most common nutritional deficiencies in children, especially in developing countries. Iron-deficiency anemia in infancy is associated with impaired neurodevelopment. Studies have shown an association between iron deficiency without anemia and adverse effects on psychomotor development. To determine the effects of iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia on psychomotor development in childhood. . We evaluated psychomotor development in healthy children with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia with the use of the Denver II Developmental Screening Test (DDST-II). If the child score was more than 90th percentile compared to children in the same age group, the test was scored as "delay" it was scored as a "caution" if the child score was between the 75th and 90th percentiles. The test result was interpreted as "normal," if there was no delay and only one "caution" for any item. If the child had one or more "delays" or more than two "cautions," the result was classified as "abnormal." DDST-II scores were abnormal in 67.3% of subjects with iron-deficiency anemia, 21.6% of those with iron deficiency, and 15.0% of control subjects. The difference from the control group in the percentage of abnormal scores was significant for subjects with iron-deficiency anemia (p < .01) but not for those with iron deficiency (p = 0.203); p > .05. (p-value, post-hoc comparison of 2 groups.) Iron-deficiency anemia impaired psychomotor development during childhood. However, the evidence on the adverse effects of iron deficiency remains controversial. The Denver II Developmental Screening Test is a valuable test to detect early developmental delays, especially in infants with risk factors.

  17. Familial apolipoprotein E deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, E J; Gregg, R E; Ghiselli, G; Forte, T M; Ordovas, J M; Zech, L A; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    A unique kindred with premature cardiovascular disease, tubo-eruptive xanthomas, and type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) associated with familial apolipoprotein (apo) E deficiency was examined. Homozygotes (n = 4) had marked increases in cholesterol-rich very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL), which could be effectively lowered with diet and medication (niacin, clofibrate). Homozygotes had only trace amounts of plasma apoE, and accumulations of apoB-48 and apoA-IV in VLDL, IDL, and low density lipoproteins. Radioiodinated VLDL apoB and apoE kinetic studies revealed that the homozygous proband had markedly retarded fractional catabolism of VLDL apoB-100, apoB-48 and plasma apoE, as well as an extremely low apoE synthesis rate as compared to normals. Obligate heterozygotes (n = 10) generally had normal plasma lipids and mean plasma apoE concentrations that were 42% of normal. The data indicate that homozygous familial apoE deficiency is a cause of type III HLP, is associated with markedly decreased apoE production, and that apoE is essential for the normal catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein constituents. Images PMID:3771793

  18. Epidemiology of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vanderpump, Mark P

    2017-04-01

    Iodine is an essential component of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) produced by the thyroid gland. Iodine deficiency impairs thyroid hormone production and has adverse effects throughout life, particularly early in life as it impairs cognition and growth. Iodine deficiency remains a significant problem despite major national and international efforts to increase iodine intake, primarily through the voluntary or mandatory iodization of salt. Recent epidemiological data suggest that iodine deficiency is an emerging issue in industrialized countries, previously thought of as iodine-sufficient. International efforts to control iodine deficiency are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges.

  19. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  20. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  1. The response to growth hormone treatment in prepubertal children with growth hormone deficiency in Japan: Comparing three consecutive years of treatment data of The Foundation for Growth Science in Japan between the 1990s and 2000s.

    PubMed

    Isojima, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Yokoya, Susumu; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2017-09-30

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment for children with GH deficiency (GHD) is effective in improving adult height. To achieve favorable effects, GH treatment before puberty is very important, because prepubertal height gain is highly correlated with total height gain. However, no report has studied the effects by analyzing a nationwide data from recent GHD patients in Japan. We investigated the response to GH treatment using data compiled in the Foundation for Growth Science in Japan, and compared the effects between the 1990s and 2000s using analysis of covariance. We analyzed 534 prepubertal GHD subjects treated in the 2000s with three consecutive years of data from the start and investigated predictive factors for the effects. The cumulative height standard deviation score (SDS) change over three years of GH treatment was 0.91 ± 0.57 and 1.20 ± 0.62 in the 1990s and 2000s, respectively. Subjects in the 2000s were divided into three groups by severity, and the cumulative height SDS was 1.60 ± 0.93, 1.20 ± 0.54, and 1.00 ± 0.40 indicating severe, moderate, and mild GHD, respectively. Age and height SDS at the start and severity were identified as independent predictive factors. We also found a significant difference in the effects between the two cohorts after adjusting for the different factors (regression coefficient: -0.069, 95% confidence interval: -0.11 to -0.030, p = 0.0006), which might be due to the GH dose effect. We conclude that the effects of GH treatment in the 2000s had improved compared with those in the 1990s.

  2. A Phase III, randomized, open-label trial of ferumoxytol compared with iron sucrose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with a history of unsatisfactory oral iron therapy.

    PubMed

    Hetzel, David; Strauss, William; Bernard, Kristine; Li, Zhu; Urboniene, Audrone; Allen, Lee F

    2014-06-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common form of anemia worldwide. Although oral iron is used as first-line treatment, many patients are unresponsive to or cannot take oral iron. This Phase III, open-label, non-inferiority study compared the efficacy and safety of ferumoxytol, a rapid, injectable intravenous (IV) iron product with low immunological reactivity and minimal detectable free iron, with IV iron sucrose in adults with IDA of any cause. Patients (N = 605) were randomized 2:1 to receive ferumoxytol (n = 406, two doses of 510 mg 5 ± 3 days apart) or iron sucrose (n = 199, five doses of 200 mg on five nonconsecutive days over 14 days) and followed for 5 weeks. Ferumoxytol demonstrated noninferiority to iron sucrose at the primary endpoint, the proportion of patients achieving a hemoglobin increase of ≥2 g dL(-1) at any time from Baseline to Week 5 (ferumoxytol, 84.0% [n = 406] vs. iron sucrose, 81.4% [n = 199]), with a noninferiority margin of 15%. Ferumoxytol was superior to iron sucrose (2.7 g dL(-1) vs. 2.4 g dL(-1) ) in the mean change in hemoglobin from Baseline to Week 5 (the alternative preplanned primary endpoint) with P = 0.0124. Transferrin saturation, quality-of-life measures, and safety outcomes were similar between the two treatment groups. Overall, ferumoxytol demonstrated comparable safety and efficacy to iron sucrose, suggesting that ferumoxytol may be a useful treatment option for patients with IDA in whom oral iron was unsatisfactory or could not be used.

  3. Magnetic moments of neutron deficient yttrium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Berks; El Hajjaji, O.; Fahad, M.; Hassani, R.; Giroux, J.; Marest, G.; Marguier, G.; Stone, N.J.; Rikovska, J.; Green, V.R.; and others

    1987-12-10

    This paper describes recent low temperature nulcear orientation (LTNO) work on neutron deficient /sup 85m,86,86m/Y nuclei. Results are compared with experimental systematics of neighbouring nuclei and particle core coupling calculations.

  4. Colour vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, M P

    2010-05-01

    Colour vision deficiency is one of the commonest disorders of vision and can be divided into congenital and acquired forms. Congenital colour vision deficiency affects as many as 8% of males and 0.5% of females--the difference in prevalence reflects the fact that the commonest forms of congenital colour vision deficiency are inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. Until relatively recently, our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of colour vision deficiency largely rested on behavioural data; however, modern molecular genetic techniques have helped to elucidate its mechanisms. The current management of congenital colour vision deficiency lies chiefly in appropriate counselling (including career counselling). Although visual aids may be of benefit to those with colour vision deficiency when performing certain tasks, the evidence suggests that they do not enable wearers to obtain normal colour discrimination. In the future, gene therapy remains a possibility, with animal models demonstrating amelioration following treatment.

  5. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling the influence of vitamin D deficiency on cigarette smoke-induced emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Crane-Godreau, Mardi A.; Black, Candice C.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Dechen, Tenzin; Ryu, Jihan; Jukosky, James A.; Lee, Hong-Kee; Bessette, Katherine; Ratcliffe, Nora R.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Fiering, Steven; Kelly, John A.; Leiter, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the primary risk factor for COPD is cigarette smoke exposure, vitamin D deficiency has been epidemiologically implicated as a factor in the progressive development of COPD-associated emphysema. Because of difficulties inherent to studies involving multiple risk factors in the progression of COPD in humans, we developed a murine model in which to study the separate and combined effects of vitamin D deficiency and cigarette smoke exposure. During a 16-week period, mice were exposed to one of four conditions, control diet breathing room air (CD-NS), control diet with cigarette smoke exposure (CD-CSE), vitamin D deficient diet breathing room air (VDD-NS) or vitamin D deficient diet with cigarette smoke exposure (VDD-CSE). At the end of the exposure period, the lungs were examined by a pathologist and separately by morphometric analysis. In parallel experiments, mice were anesthetized for pulmonary function testing followed by sacrifice and analysis. Emphysema (determined by an increase in alveolar mean linear intercept length) was more severe in the VDD-CSE mice compared to control animals and animals exposed to VDD or CSE alone. The VDD-CSE and the CD-CSE mice had increased total lung capacity and increased static lung compliance. There was also a significant increase in the matrix metalloproteinase-9: tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) ratio in VDD-CSE mice compared with all controls. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) expression was reduced in VDD-CSE mice as well. In summary, vitamin D deficiency, when combined with cigarette smoke exposure, seemed to accelerate the appearance of emphysemas, perhaps by virtue of an increased protease-antiprotease ratio in the combined VDD-CSE animals. These results support the value of our mouse model in the study of COPD. PMID:23781205

  7. Vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Brito, Alex; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Miller, Joshua W; Molloy, Anne M; Nexo, Ebba; Stabler, Sally; Toh, Ban-Hock; Ueland, Per Magne; Yajnik, Chittaranjan

    2017-06-29

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age are also at high risk of deficiency in populations where dietary intake of B12-containing animal-derived foods is restricted. Deficiency is caused by either inadequate intake, inadequate bioavailability or malabsorption. Disruption of B12 transport in the blood, or impaired cellular uptake or metabolism causes an intracellular deficiency. Diagnostic biomarkers for B12 status include decreased levels of circulating total B12 and transcobalamin-bound B12, and abnormally increased levels of homocysteine and methylmalonic acid. However, the exact cut-offs to classify clinical and subclinical deficiency remain debated. Management depends on B12 supplementation, either via high-dose oral routes or via parenteral administration. This Primer describes the current knowledge surrounding B12 deficiency, and highlights improvements in diagnostic methods as well as shifting concepts about the prevalence, causes and manifestations of B12 deficiency.

  8. Effect of protein deficiency on suppressor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Khorshidi, M; Mohagheghpour, N

    1979-01-01

    The effects of moderate protein deficiency on the in vitro response of spleen cells to phytohemagglutinin in A/Jax mice were studied. The response of spleen cells from protein-deficient mice to phytohemagglutinin was found to be enhanced as compared with that of cells from control animals. Since inadequate development or function of suppressor cells in the protein-deficient mice offered a possible explanation for the enhanced lymphoproliferative activity, cocultures of spleen cells from protein-deficient and control animals were tested for their responses to phytohemagglutinin. Suppression of [3H]thymidine incorporation was detected in coculture of 25% mitomycin-treated spleen cells from control animals and 75% spleen cells from protein-deficient mice. The suppressor (regulator) elements in control spleens were found to reside in the adherent cell population. PMID:313906

  9. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  10. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  11. Biotinidase deficiency: presymptomatic treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, S J

    1985-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency presents with clinical signs of biotin deficiency at the age of 3 months, or soon after. In an infant in whom the diagnosis was made on cord blood, vision and hearing were normal before presymptomatic treatment with biotin. Physical and mental development are good at 14 months. PMID:4015175

  12. Biotinidase deficiency: presymptomatic treatment.

    PubMed

    Wallace, S J

    1985-06-01

    Biotinidase deficiency presents with clinical signs of biotin deficiency at the age of 3 months, or soon after. In an infant in whom the diagnosis was made on cord blood, vision and hearing were normal before presymptomatic treatment with biotin. Physical and mental development are good at 14 months.

  13. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  14. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  15. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most people with a vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia lack intrinsic factor — a protein secreted by the stomach that is necessary for ...

  16. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  17. Fetal polyol metabolism in copper deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G.; Beal, T. )

    1989-02-09

    Since pregnant rats consuming fructose, copper deficient diets fail to give birth, the relationship between maternal copper deficiency, polyol metabolism and fetal mortality was investigated. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were fed from conception one of the following diets: fructose, copper deficient; fructose, copper adequate; starch, copper deficient or starch, copper adequate. The deficient diets contained 0.6 ug Cu and the adequate 6.0 ug Cu/g diet. Pregnancy was terminated at day 19 of gestation. Glucose, sorbitol and fructose were measured in maternal blood, placenta and fetal liver. Fructose consumption during pregnancy resulted in higher levels of fructose and sorbitol in maternal blood when compared to starch. In the fructose dietary groups, the placenta and fetal liver contained extremely high levels of glucose, fructose and sorbitol compared to the corresponding metabolites from the starch dietary groups. Copper deficiency further elevated fructose and sorbitol concentrations in the placenta and fetal liver respectively. Since high tissue levels of glucose, fructose and sorbitol have been shown to have deleterious effects on cellular metabolism, these data suggest that when fructose was fed during pregnancy the combination of an aberration of carbohydrate metabolism with copper deficiency could be responsible for the pathology and mortality of the developing fetus.

  18. Prevalence of nutrient deficiencies in bariatric patients.

    PubMed

    Toh, Seok Yee; Zarshenas, Nazy; Jorgensen, John

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of nutrient deficiencies in patients who present for bariatric surgery, assess nutritional status after surgery, and compare these with preoperative levels. A retrospective study was conducted to identify preoperative and 1-year postoperative nutrition deficiencies in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The screening included serum ferritin, vitamin D, vitamin B(12), homocysteine, folate, red blood cell folate, and hemoglobin. Results were available for 232 patients preoperatively and 149 patients postoperatively. Two-tailed chi(2) tests and paired-sample t tests were used. Preoperatively, vitamin D deficiency was noted at 57%. The prevalence of abnormalities 1 year after roux-en-Y gastric bypass was higher compared with preoperative levels (P < .05). After surgery, anemia was detected in 17%, elevated homocysteine levels (women only) in 29%, low ferritin in 15%, low vitamin B(12) in 11%, and low RBC folate in 12%. Mean hemoglobin, ferritin, and RBC folate levels deteriorated significantly but remained well within normal ranges. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiencies decreased, but not significantly. In sleeve gastrectomy patients, mean ferritin levels decreased (P < .05), without any patient developing a deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is common among morbidly obese patients seeking bariatric surgery. Because the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies persists or worsens postoperatively, routine nutrition screening, recommendation of appropriate supplements, and monitoring adherence are imperative in this population.

  19. Ablation of ghrelin receptor in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice has paradoxical effects on glucose homeostasis when compared with ablation of ghrelin in ob/ob mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The orexigenic hormone ghrelin is important in diabetes because it has an inhibitory effect on insulin secretion. Ghrelin ablation in leptin-deficient ob/ob (Ghrelin(-/-):ob/ob) mice increases insulin secretion and improves hyperglycemia. The physiologically relevant ghrelin receptor is the growth ...

  20. Wound healing in Mac-1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Nagaraja, Sridevi; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Yan; Fine, David; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y; Reifman, Jaques; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2017-05-01

    Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) is a macrophage receptor that plays several critical roles in macrophage recruitment and activation. Because macrophages are essential for proper wound healing, the impact of Mac-1 deficiency on wound healing is of significant interest. Prior studies have shown that Mac-1(-/-) mice exhibit deficits in healing, including delayed wound closure in scalp and ear wounds. This study examined whether Mac-1 deficiency influences wound healing in small excisional and incisional skin wounds. Three millimeter diameter full thickness excisional wounds and incisional wounds were prepared on the dorsal skin of Mac-1 deficient (Mac-1(-/-) ) and wild type (WT) mice, and wound healing outcomes were examined. Mac-1 deficient mice exhibited a normal rate of wound closure, generally normal levels of total collagen, and nearly normal synthesis and distribution of collagens I and III. In incisional wounds, wound breaking strength was similar for Mac-1(-/-) and WT mice. Wounds of Mac-1 deficient mice displayed normal total macrophage content, although macrophage phenotype markers were skewed as compared to WT. Interestingly, amounts of TGF-β1 and its downstream signaling molecules, SMAD2 and SMAD3, were significantly decreased in the wounds of Mac-1 deficient mice compared to WT. The results suggest that Mac-1 deficiency has little impact on the healing of small excisional and incisional wounds. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that the effect of single genetic deficiencies on wound healing may markedly differ among wound models. These conclusions have implications for the interpretation of the many prior studies that utilize a single model system to examine wound healing outcomes in genetically deficient mice. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  1. Drugs producing vitamin deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Montenero, A S

    1980-01-01

    Many drugs produce vitamin deficiencies. They belong to the most important and common therapeutical classes: analgesics, antianemics, antibacterial and antiblastic agents, antibiotics, antidiabetics, antimalarials, antiphlogistics, antipyretics, diuretics, laxatives and purgatives, tranquilizers and anticonvulsives, radiomimetics, hormones and vitamins themselves. The vitamin deprivation processes may be produced by a variety of mechanisms and may involve all vitamins. Recent experiments indicate that there is a competition for binding sites on proteins between vitamin C and salicylate and between dicoumarol and vitamin K. Usually a drug exerts a "devitaminizing" action with respect to only one vitamin. However there are examples of multiple vitamin deficiencies induced by a single drug, like salicylate which deprives the organism of vitamins C, K and pantothenate. These deficiencies may develop either all at the same time or successively. A direct and concomitant vitamin depriving action occurs when an antibiotic blocks the production of vitamins by the enteric flora. A different mode of action occurs in the drug induced folic acid deficiency, which in turn induces a deficiency of vitamin B12. It has been reported that a vitamin deficiency may result from intake of high pharmacological doses of other vitamins. These data need confirmation in patients treated with high doses of nicotinic acid. The drug induced vitamin deficiencies are studied with the same methodology employed for avitaminoses in general; hence they can be diagnosed using the same criteria.

  2. Betaine deficiency in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Lerma, C. ); Rich, P.J.; Ju, G.C.; Yang, Wenju; Rhodes, D. ); Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency. This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline {r arrow} betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde.

  3. Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of anemia. The 2 main etiologies of iron deficiency are blood loss due to menstrual periods and blood loss due to gastrointestinal bleeding. Beyond anemia, lack of iron has protean manifestations, including fatigue, hair loss, and restless legs. The most efficient test for the diagnosis of iron deficiency is the serum ferritin. Iron replacement can be done orally, or in patients in whom oral iron is not effective or contraindicated, with intravenous iron. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Iodine deficiency: Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Niwattisaiwong, Soamsiri; Burman, Kenneth D; Li-Ng, Melissa

    2017-03-01

    Iodine is crucial for thyroid hormone synthesis and fetal neurodevelopment. Major dietary sources of iodine in the United States are dairy products and iodized salt. Potential consequences of iodine deficiency are goiter, hypothyroidism, cretinism, and impaired cognitive development. Although iodine status in the United States is considered sufficient at the population level, intake varies widely across the population, and the percentage of women of childbearing age with iodine deficiency is increasing. Physicians should be aware of the risks of iodine deficiency and the indications for iodine supplementation, especially in women who are pregnant or lactating.

  5. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... much as 20 years. AAT deficiency has no cure, but treatments are available. Treatments often are based on the type of disease you develop. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: October 11, 2011 Twitter Facebook YouTube ...

  6. Factor VII deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  7. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  8. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    Growth hormone deficiency means the pituitary gland does not make enough growth hormone. ... The pituitary gland is located at the base of the brain. This gland controls the body's balance of hormones. It ...

  9. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA- ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: June 7, 2017 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  10. DOCK8 Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... care at NIAID, visit the NIAID PIDD site . Credit: NIAID Scientist at microscope. Causes DOCK8 deficiency is ... The End of an Era Acknowledgments References Photo Credits Dr. Joseph Kinyoun: Selected Bibliography NIAID 60th Anniversary ...

  11. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bollée, Guillaume; Harambat, Jérôme; Bensman, Albert; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Daudon, Michel; Ceballos-Picot, Irène

    2012-09-01

    Complete adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is a rare inherited metabolic disorder that leads to the formation and hyperexcretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (DHA) into urine. The low solubility of DHA results in precipitation of this compound and the formation of urinary crystals and stones. The disease can present as recurrent urolithiasis or nephropathy secondary to crystal precipitation into renal parenchyma (DHA nephropathy). The diagnostic tools available-including stone analysis, crystalluria, and APRT activity measurement-make the diagnosis easy to confirm when APRT deficiency is suspected. However, the disease can present at any age, and the variability of symptoms can present a diagnostic challenge to many physicians. The early recognition and treatment of APRT deficiency are of crucial importance for preventing irreversible loss of renal function, which still occurs in a non-negligible proportion of cases. This review summarizes the genetic and metabolic mechanisms underlying stone formation and renal disease, along with the diagnosis and management of APRT deficiency.

  12. [Selenium deficiency in pregnancy?].

    PubMed

    Lechner, W; Jenewein, I; Ritzberger, G; Sölder, E; Waitz-Penz, A; Schirmer, M; Abfalter, E

    1990-07-15

    Selenium content was investigated by atomic absorbtion spectroscopy in 32 normal pregnant women in the 38th-42, week of pregnancy. In congruence with other investigations from middle and northern Europe, selenium deficiency was stated in all of the patients.

  13. Vitamin D deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Linsey Utami; How, Choon How

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common and may contribute to osteopenia, osteoporosis and falls risk in the elderly. Screening for vitamin D deficiency is important in high-risk patients, especially for patients who suffered minimal trauma fractures. Vitamin D deficiency should be treated according to the severity of the deficiency. In high-risk adults, follow-up serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration should be measured 3–4 months after initiating maintenance therapy to confirm that the target level has been achieved. All patients should maintain a calcium intake of at least 1,000 mg for women aged ≤ 50 years and men ≤ 70 years, and 1,300 mg for women > 50 years and men > 70 years. PMID:26311908

  14. Vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Oh, Robert; Brown, David L

    2003-03-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency is a common cause of macrocytic anemia and has been implicated in a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. The role of B12 deficiency in hyperhomocysteinemia and the promotion of atherosclerosis is only now being explored. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is typically based on measurement of serum vitamin B12 levels; however, about 50 percent of patients with subclinical disease have normal B12 levels. A more sensitive method of screening for vitamin B12 deficiency is measurement of serum methylmalonic acid and homocysteine levels, which are increased early in vitamin B12 deficiency. Use of the Schilling test for detection of pernicious anemia has been supplanted for the most part by serologic testing for parietal cell and intrinsic factor antibodies. Contrary to prevailing medical practice, studies show that supplementation with oral vitamin B12 is a safe and effective treatment for the B12 deficiency state. Even when intrinsic factor is not present to aid in the absorption of vitamin B12 (pernicious anemia) or in other diseases that affect the usual absorption sites in the terminal ileum, oral therapy remains effective.

  15. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  16. Progesterone Deficiency and Premature Labour

    PubMed Central

    Csapo, A. I.; Pohanka, O.; Kaihola, H. L.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma oestradiol 17β and progesterone levels in 11 patients admitted to hospital for threatened premature labour of unknown aetiology were compared with those of women at similar stages of gestation whose pregnancy was normal. Oestradiol levels in the study group were slightly higher than in the normal controls but their progesterone levels were significantly lower. This progesterone deficiency increased the oestradiol/progesterone ratio in the study group patients, and it increased still more as the progesterone withdrawal continued during premature labour. Since uterine activity during pregnancy is regulated by a balanced action of several factors a deficiency in progesterone, an opponent of uterine activity, creates a regulatory imbalance which, if uncorrected, provokes premature labour. An increase in uterine volume stimulates uterine activity, and the present study reinforced our previous conclusion that the uterine-volume/plasma-progesterone ratio is a more accurate measure of the state of regulatory balance than the progesterone level alone. The cause of the progesterone deficiency in these cases remains unexplained, but we suggest that placental growth and function are contributory factors. We are investigating ways of correcting the resulting imbalance in the regulatory mechanism. PMID:4812406

  17. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  18. Morphological alterations in protamine-deficient spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Utsuno, H; Miyamoto, T; Oka, K; Shiozawa, T

    2014-11-01

    How are protamine deficiencies associated with sperm head morphology in subfertile men? The prevalence of morphological variations and large nuclear vacuoles was slightly higher in protamine-deficient spermatozoa than in non-deficient spermatozoa. A protamine deficiency was previously reported to be associated with an abnormal sperm morphology; however, how they are related to each other remains unclear. This is further confounded by a number of protamine-deficient spermatozoa having a normal head morphology. This is a cross-sectional study, including 36 men diagnosed with male factor infertility or participating in an assisted reproduction program. To assess sperm head morphology, this study analyzed 2400 spermatozoa with a protamine deficiency and 2400 spermatozoa with a normal protamine status. An additional 21 men were analyzed to examine DNA fragmentation and its relationship with protamine deficiencies and sperm head morphologies. The morphology of the sperm head was evaluated based on its shape, size and nuclear vacuoles at a magnification of >6000×. Using elliptic Fourier analysis, the shape was summarized into four numeric variables. The protamine status was evaluated with chromomycin A3 (CMA3). Sperm head size, vacuoles and shape were compared between protamine-deficient and non-deficient spermatozoa. DNA fragmentation was evaluated with the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The percentages of protamine-deficient spermatozoa and DNA fragmentation were compared between spermatozoa with morphologically normal heads and those with abnormal heads. Variations in head size (P < 0.0001) and shape (P < 0.0001) were significantly higher, with narrower (P < 0.001), more fan-shaped (P < 0.01) and more square-shaped forms (P < 0.001) in protamine-deficient spermatozoa than in non-deficient spermatozoa; however, the distribution of morphological variations markedly overlapped. Protamine deficiencies were more

  19. Vitamin D Deficiency in Medical Inpatients: A Retrospective Study of Implications of Untreated Versus Treated Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Syed Asher Hussain; Singh, Gurjit; Owojori, Olukolade; Kela, Ram; Spoors, Shirley; Abbas, Mohamed; Barton, Florence; Rogers, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency may further increase fracture risk in patients with decreased bone mineral density. A cross-sectional study on serum vitamin D concentrations in medical inpatients was conducted at Bassetlaw District General Hospital between April 2014 and January 2015 (10 months), and the relationship of serum vitamin D concentrations with calcium and alkaline phosphatase was evaluated. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D immunoassays were used and analyzed in the local laboratory. The total number of patients analyzed was 200, age range 18–99 years, with mean age of 76 years. The most common presentation was found to be fall/collapse. The following cutoff points for serum vitamin D were used: levels ≤30 nmol/L for severe deficiency, >30–50 nmol/L for moderate deficiency, >50–75 nmol/L for mild deficiency, and anything above 75 nmol/L as normal. Of the 209 participants examined, 78 (37.3%) participants had mild vitamin D deficiency, 54 (25.8%) participants had moderate vitamin D deficiency, 68 (32.5%) participants had severe vitamin D deficiency, and 9 (4.3%) participants with low vitamin D levels died during their admission. Of the 122 moderate/severe patients, 70 (57.4%) patients had their vitamin D deficiency treated, according to local Trust guidelines. The study found no relationship between serum calcium levels and vitamin D deficiency, whereas patients’ alkaline phosphatase levels were found to be higher with increased severity of vitamin D deficiency. The study examined the implications of untreated severe/moderate vitamin D deficiency compared to treated deficiency, in terms of the frequency of readmission with similar complaints. It was found that the rate of readmission within one year in patients who were not treated was 57%, compared to 48% in patients whose vitamin D deficiency was treated. Presenting after falls was a recurring theme. It was concluded that even if moderate vitamin D deficiency can be asymptomatic, it is important to

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase deficiencies affect contact hypersensitivity: stromelysin-1 deficiency prevents the response and gelatinase B deficiency prolongs the response.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Qin, X; Mudgett, J S; Ferguson, T A; Senior, R M; Welgus, H G

    1999-06-08

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are expressed by T cells and macrophages, but there is a paucity of evidence for their role in immune responses. We have studied mice with deficiencies of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) or gelatinase B (MMP-9) in a dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced model of contact hypersensitivity (CHS). Stromelysin-1-deficient mice showed a markedly impaired CHS response to topical DNFB, although they responded normally to cutaneously applied phenol, an acute irritant. Lymphocytes from lymph nodes of DNFB-sensitized stromelysin-1-deficient mice did not proliferate in response to specific soluble antigen dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid, but did proliferate identically to lymph node lymphocytes from wild-type mice when presented with the mitogen Con A. An intradermal injection of stromelysin-1 immediately before DNFB sensitization rescued the impaired CHS response to DNFB in stromelysin-1-deficient mice. Unlike stromelysin-1-deficient mice, gelatinase B-deficient mice exhibited a CHS response comparable to wild-type controls at 1 day postchallenge, but the response persisted beyond 7 days in contrast to the complete resolution observed in wild-type mice by 7 days. However, gelatinase B-deficient mice had a normal rate of resolution of acute inflammation elicited by cutaneous phenol. Gelatinase B-deficient mice failed to show IL-10 production at the site of CHS, an essential feature of resolution in control mice. These results indicate that stromelysin-1 and gelatinase B serve important functions in CHS. Stromelysin-1 is required for initiation of the response, whereas gelatinase B plays a critical role in its resolution.

  1. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  2. Iodine deficiency in children.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is an essential trace mineral, required for the production of thyroid hormone. Iodine deficiency may result in goiter, hypothyroidism, miscarriage, stillbirth, congenital anomalies, infant and neonatal mortality, and impaired growth. Adequate thyroid hormone is critically important for normal growth and neurodevelopment in fetal life, infancy and childhood. The population iodine status is most commonly assessed using median urinary iodine concentration values, but goiter prevalence (determined by palpation or by ultrasound), serum thyroglobulin levels, and neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone values can also be used. Universal salt iodization programs have been the mainstay of public health efforts to eliminate iodine deficiency worldwide. However, in some regions targeted fortification of foods such as bread has been used to combat iodine deficiency. Iodine supplementation may be required in areas where dietary fortification is not feasible or where it is not sufficient for vulnerable groups such as pregnant women. Although international public health efforts over the past several decades have been highly effective, nearly one third of children worldwide remain at risk for iodine deficiency, and iodine deficiency is considered the leading preventable cause of preventable intellectual deficits.

  3. Congenital prothrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Stefano; De Cristofaro, Raimondo

    2009-06-01

    Prothrombin deficiency is among the rarest inherited coagulation disorders, with a prevalence of approximately 1:2,000,000. Two main phenotypes can be distinguished: (1) hypoprothrombinemia (type I deficiency), characterized by concomitantly low levels of activity and antigen; and (2) dysprothrombinemia (type II deficiency), characterized by the normal or near-normal synthesis of a dysfunctional protein. In some cases, hypoprothrombinemia associated with dysprothrombinemia was also described in compound heterozygous defects. No living patient with undetectable plasma prothrombin has been reported to date. Prothrombin is encoded by a gene of approximately 21 kb located on chromosome 11 and containing 14 exons. Forty different mutations have been identified and characterized in prothrombin deficiency. Many of them surround the catalytic site, whereas another "hot spot" is localized in the recognition domain called anion binding exosite I, also called fibrinogen recognition site. Recently, mutations were identified also in the Na (+)-binding loop and in the light A-chain of thrombin. Most hypoprothrombinemia-associated mutations are missense, but there are also nonsense mutations leading to stop codons and one single nucleotide deletion. Finally, the main aspects of clinical manifestations and therapy of congenital prothrombin deficiency are presented and discussed.

  4. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I; Wijeratne, Subhashinee SK

    2009-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role in transcriptional repression of genes and genome stability. Biotin deficiency may be caused by insufficient dietary uptake of biotin, drug–vitamin interactions and, perhaps, by increased biotin catabolism during pregnancy and in smokers. Biotin deficiency can also be precipitated by decreased activities of the following proteins that play critical roles in biotin homeostasis: the vitamin transporters sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter and monocarboxylate transporter 1, which mediate biotin transport in the intestine, liver and peripheral tissues, and renal reabsorption; holocarboxylase synthetase, which mediates the binding of biotin to carboxylases and histones; and biotinidase, which plays a central role in the intestinal absorption of biotin, the transport of biotin in plasma and the regulation of histone biotinylation. Symptoms of biotin deficiency include seizures, hypotonia, ataxia, dermatitis, hair loss, mental retardation, ketolactic acidosis, organic aciduria and also fetal malformations. This review focuses on the deficiencies of both biotin and biotinidase, and the medical management of such cases. PMID:19727438

  5. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I; Wijeratne, Subhashinee Sk

    2008-11-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role in transcriptional repression of genes and genome stability. Biotin deficiency may be caused by insufficient dietary uptake of biotin, drug-vitamin interactions and, perhaps, by increased biotin catabolism during pregnancy and in smokers. Biotin deficiency can also be precipitated by decreased activities of the following proteins that play critical roles in biotin homeostasis: the vitamin transporters sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter and monocarboxylate transporter 1, which mediate biotin transport in the intestine, liver and peripheral tissues, and renal reabsorption; holocarboxylase synthetase, which mediates the binding of biotin to carboxylases and histones; and biotinidase, which plays a central role in the intestinal absorption of biotin, the transport of biotin in plasma and the regulation of histone biotinylation. Symptoms of biotin deficiency include seizures, hypotonia, ataxia, dermatitis, hair loss, mental retardation, ketolactic acidosis, organic aciduria and also fetal malformations. This review focuses on the deficiencies of both biotin and biotinidase, and the medical management of such cases.

  6. [Vitamin deficiencies and hypervitaminosis].

    PubMed

    Mino, M

    1999-10-01

    There have recently been very few deficiencies with respect to fat soluble and water soluble vitamins in Japan All-trans-retinoic acid as induction or maintenance treatment improves disease free and overall survival against acute promyelocytic leukemia. In the isolated vitamin E deficiencies gene mutation has been cleared for alpha-tocopherol transferprotein. Recently, a relation of nutritional vitamin K intake and senile osteoporosis in women was epidemiologically demonstrated on a prospective study. Thiamin was yet noticed as development of deficiency in alcoholism, while the importance of supplemental folic acid during pregnancy has become especially clear in light of studies showing that folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects in the fetus. With respect to hypervitaminosis, the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), USA, has established safe intakes by identifying the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) and LOAEL (Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level). Summaries of NOAEL and LOAEL for individual vitamins were shown.

  7. Antepartum ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Yosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Takeda, Masako; Hara, Noriko; Nakanishi, Kazushige; Urita, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Risa; Miura, Ken; Taniguchi, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  8. Thiamine Deficiency and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahid; Freeman, C.; Barker, Narviar C.; Jabeen, Shagufta; Maitra, Sarbani; Olagbemiro, Yetunde; Richie, William; Bailey, Rahn K.

    2013-01-01

    Thiamine is an essential vitamin that plays an important role in cellular production of energy from ingested food and enhances normal neuronal actives. Deficiency of this vitamin leads to a very serious clinical condition known as delirium. Studies performed in the United States and other parts of the world have established the link between thiamine deficiency and delirium. This literature review examines the physiology, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, clinical manifestations (e.g., Wernicke’s encephalopathy, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, structural and functional brain injuries) and diagnosis of thiamine deficiency and delirium. Current treatment practices are also discussed that may improve patient outcome, which ultimately may result in a reduction in healthcare costs. PMID:23696956

  9. [Prevalence of iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Dupont, C

    2017-05-01

    Studies of prévalence in iron deficiency separate iron depletion (defined as decreased blood ferritin) and iron deficiency anemia (defined as blood decrease in both ferritin and hemoglobin). In Europe, most studies are outdated. Prevalence of iron depletion varies from 7 to 18 % and 24 to 36% in toddlers and adolescents, respectively. Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia varies from 2 to 8.5% and 7 to 10% in toddlers and adolescents. In French speaking African countries, Demography Health Surveys show that 80% of children aged 0 to 2 years are anemic, severely for 5 to 9% of them. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  10. Natural killer cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of persons who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically defined congenital immunodeficiency, of which there are more than 40 presently known to impair NK cells. However, the abnormality of NK cells in certain cases represents the majority immunologic defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in 3 genes that can cause NK cell deficiency, as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation.

  11. Multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Soong, B W; Casamassima, A C; Fink, J K; Constantopoulos, G; Horwitz, A L

    1988-08-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of several sulfatases and the accumulation of sulfatides, glycosaminoglycans, sphingolipids, and steroid sulfates in tissues and body fluids. The clinical manifestations represent the summation of two diseases: late infantile metachromatic leukodystrophy and mucopolysaccharidosis. We present a 9-year-old girl with a phenotype similar to a mucopolysaccharidosis: short stature, microcephaly, and mild facial dysmorphism, along with dysphagia, retinal degeneration, developmental arrest, and ataxia. We discuss the importance of measuring the sulfatase activities in the leukocytes, and the instability of sulfatases in the cultured skin fibroblasts.

  12. Formate Dehydrogenase, an Enzyme of Anaerobic Metabolism, Is Induced by Iron Deficiency in Barley Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Itai, Reiko; Suzuki, Koichiro; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko-Kishi; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Mori, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    To identify the proteins induced by Fe deficiency, we have compared the proteins of Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) roots by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Peptide sequence analysis of induced proteins revealed that formate dehydrogenase (FDH), adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the Ids3 gene product (for Fe deficiency-specific) increased in Fe-deficient roots. FDH enzyme activity was detected in Fe-deficient roots but not in Fe-sufficient roots. A cDNA encoding FDH (Fdh) was cloned and sequenced. Fdh expression was induced by Fe deficiency. Fdh was also expressed under anaerobic stress and its expression was more rapid than that induced by Fe deficiency. Thus, the expression of Fdh observed in Fe-deficient barley roots appeared to be a secondary effect caused by oxygen deficiency in Fe-deficient plants. PMID:9489019

  13. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  14. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  15. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  16. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rupar, C A; Gillett, J; Gordon, B A; Ramsay, D A; Johnson, J L; Garrett, R M; Rajagopalan, K V; Jung, J H; Bacheyie, G S; Sellers, A R

    1996-12-01

    Isolated sulfite oxidase (SO) deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited inborn error of sulfur metabolism. In this report of a ninth patient the clinical history, laboratory results, neuropathological findings and a mutation in the sulfite oxidase gene are described. The data from this patient and previously published patients with isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency and molybdenum cofactor deficiency are summarized to characterize this rare disorder. The patient presented neonatally with intractable seizures and did not progress developmentally beyond the neonatal stage. Dislocated lenses were apparent at 2 months. There was increased urine excretion of sulfite and S-sulfocysteine and a decreased concentration of plasma cystine. A lactic acidemia was present for 6 months. Liver sulfite oxidase activity was not detectable but xanthine dehydrogenase activity was normal. The boy died of respiratory failure at 32 months. Neuropathological findings of cortical necrosis and extensive cavitating leukoencephalopathy were reminiscent of those seen in severe perinatal asphyxia suggesting an etiology of energy deficiency. A point mutation that resulted in a truncated protein missing the molybdenum-binding site has been identified.

  17. CoQ10 Deficiency Is Not a Common Finding in GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barca, Emanuele; Tang, Maoxue; Kleiner, Giulio; Engelstad, Kristin; DiMauro, Salvatore; Quinzii, Catarina M; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2016-01-01

    CoQ10 deficiency has been recently described in tissues of a patient with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome. Here, we investigated patients and mice with GLUT1 deficiency in order to determine whether low CoQ is a recurrent biochemical feature of this disorder, to justify CoQ10 supplementation as therapeutic option.CoQ10 levels were investigated in plasma, white blood cells, and skin fibroblasts of 16 patients and healthy controls and in the brain, cerebellum, liver, kidney, muscle, and plasma of 4-month-old GLUT1 mutant and control mice.CoQ10 levels in plasma did not show any difference compared with controls. Since most of the patients studied were on a ketogenic diet, which can alter CoQ10 content in plasma, we also analyzed white blood cells and cultured skin fibroblasts. Again, we found no differences. In mice, we found slightly reduced CoQ in the cerebellum, likely an epiphenomenon, and activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes was normal.Our data from GLUT1 deficiency patients and from GLUT1 model mice fail to support CoQ10 deficiency as a common finding in GLUT1 deficiency, suggesting that CoQ deficiency is not a direct biochemical consequence of defective glucose transport caused by molecular defects in the SLC2A1 gene.

  18. Oxalate metabolism in magnesium-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Rattan, V; Thind, S K; Jethi, R K; Sidhu, H; Nath, R

    1993-06-01

    Male weanling rats were maintained on magnesium-deficient diet for 30 d and compared with pair-fed control rats fed magnesium-supplemented diet. Magnesium deficiency led to slow growth and finally to a significant decrease in body weight (P < 0.001) accompanied by a significant hypomagnesaemia, hypomagnesuria and hyperoxaluria (P < 0.001 in each case) in experimental rats as compared to the control rats. Magnesium deficiency altered the glyoxylate metabolism in the liver and kidney mitochondria by significantly decreasing glyoxylate oxidation (by 26 per cent in liver and 17 per cent in kidney) and activity of alpha-ketoglutarate:glyoxylate carboligase enzyme (by 35 per cent in liver and 27 per cent in kidney) in the experimental animals. A significant increase in the specific activities of glycolic acid oxidase (P < 0.001) and glycolic acid dehydrogenase (P < 0.01) and a significant decrease in alanine transaminase (P < 0.01) was also observed in magnesium-deficient rats. No change in liver and kidney lactate dehydrogenase was observed. Thus magnesium deficiency in rats leads to accumulation of glyoxylate in the tissues, a part of which is converted into oxalate, thereby promoting hyperoxaluria.

  19. Effect of riboflavin or pyridoxine deficiency on inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, R; Lakshmi, A V; Divan, P V; Bamji, M S

    1991-01-01

    Inflammatory response has been assessed in riboflavin or pyridoxine deficient rats. Edema was increased by 54% in pyridoxine deficiency as compared to weight-matched control rats. Food restriction per se reduced the volume of edema by 63%. In pyridoxine deficiency, concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (which indicate the extent of lipid peroxidation) increase by 30 and 43% respectively in the edematous tissues of the paw as well as in the wounded skin. Both these parameters were not affected by riboflavin deficiency. Activities of NADPH oxidase and superoxide dismutase in elicited leukocytes from peritoneal cavity were reduced by 54 and 52%, respectively, in riboflavin deficiency but were unaltered in pyridoxine deficiency. Superoxide level and acid phosphatase activity were not influenced by either of the deficiencies, whereas hydrogen peroxide level was increased by 48% in riboflavin deficiency. Food restriction did not affect leukocyte enzymes or the levels of reduced oxygen species. The data suggest that inflammation is enhanced in pyridoxine deficiency but not in riboflavin deficiency.

  20. High Prevalence of Vitamin B12 Deficiency and No Folate Deficiency in Young Children in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Ng'eno, Bernadette N; Perrine, Cria G; Whitehead, Ralph D; Subedi, Giri Raj; Mebrahtu, Saba; Dahal, Pradiumna; Jefferds, Maria Elena D

    2017-01-17

    Many children in low- and middle-income countries may have inadequate intake of vitamin B12 and folate; data confirming these inadequacies are limited. We used biochemical, demographic, behavioral and anthropometric data to describe the folate and vitamin B12 concentrations among six- to 23-month-old Nepalese children. Vitamin B12 (serum B12 < 150 pmol/L) and folate deficiencies (red blood cell (RBC) folate < 226.5 nmol/L) were assessed. We used logistic regression to identify predictors of vitamin B12 deficiency. The vitamin B12 geometric mean was 186 pmol/L; 30.2% of children were deficient. The mean RBC folate concentration was 13,612 nmol/L; there was no deficiency. Factors associated with vitamin B12 deficiency included: (a) age six to 11 months (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18, 1.92) or 12-17 months (aOR 1.38; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.72) compared to 18-23 months; (b) being stunted (aOR 1.24; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.50) compared to not being stunted; (c) and not eating animal-source foods (aOR 1.85; 95% CI: 1.42, 2.41) compared to eating animal-source foods the previous day. There was a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, but no folate deficiency. Improving early feeding practices, including the consumption of rich sources of vitamin B12, such as animal-source foods and fortified foods, may help decrease deficiency.

  1. High Prevalence of Vitamin B12 Deficiency and No Folate Deficiency in Young Children in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Ng’eno, Bernadette N.; Perrine, Cria G.; Whitehead, Ralph D.; Subedi, Giri Raj; Mebrahtu, Saba; Dahal, Pradiumna; Jefferds, Maria Elena D.

    2017-01-01

    Many children in low- and middle-income countries may have inadequate intake of vitamin B12 and folate; data confirming these inadequacies are limited. We used biochemical, demographic, behavioral and anthropometric data to describe the folate and vitamin B12 concentrations among six- to 23-month-old Nepalese children. Vitamin B12 (serum B12 < 150 pmol/L) and folate deficiencies (red blood cell (RBC) folate < 226.5 nmol/L) were assessed. We used logistic regression to identify predictors of vitamin B12 deficiency. The vitamin B12 geometric mean was 186 pmol/L; 30.2% of children were deficient. The mean RBC folate concentration was 13,612 nmol/L; there was no deficiency. Factors associated with vitamin B12 deficiency included: (a) age six to 11 months (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18, 1.92) or 12–17 months (aOR 1.38; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.72) compared to 18–23 months; (b) being stunted (aOR 1.24; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.50) compared to not being stunted; (c) and not eating animal-source foods (aOR 1.85; 95% CI: 1.42, 2.41) compared to eating animal-source foods the previous day. There was a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency, but no folate deficiency. Improving early feeding practices, including the consumption of rich sources of vitamin B12, such as animal-source foods and fortified foods, may help decrease deficiency. PMID:28106733

  2. Sanitary Surveys & Significant Deficiencies Presentation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Sanitary Surveys & Significant Deficiencies Presentation highlights some of the things EPA looks for during drinking water system site visits, how to avoid significant deficiencies and what to do if you receive one.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: prothrombin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... II deficiency University of Iowa Health Care: Prothrombin Gene Mutation (PDF) Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) Canadian Hemophilia Society National Hemophilia Foundation: Factor II Deficiency ClinicalTrials. ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: biotinidase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... links) Children Living With Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK): Biotinidase Deficiency (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: Biotinidase Deficiency Illinois ... Group Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK) National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) GeneReviews (1 ...

  5. Secretomic Analysis Identifies Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (A1AT) as a Required Protein in Cancer Cell Migration, Invasion, and Pericellular Fibronectin Assembly for Facilitating Lung Colonization of Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Lee, Shu-Hui; Liao, I-Chuang; Huang, Shin-Huei; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis is a major obstacle that must be overcome for the successful treatment of lung cancer. Proteins secreted by cancer cells may facilitate the progression of metastasis, particularly within the phases of migration and invasion. To discover metastasis-promoting secretory proteins within cancer cells, we used the label-free quantitative proteomics approach and compared the secretomes from the lung adenocarcinoma cell lines CL1-0 and CL1-5, which exhibit low and high metastatic properties, respectively. By employing quantitative analyses, we identified 660 proteins, 68 of which were considered to be expressed at different levels between the two cell lines. High levels of A1AT were secreted by CL1-5, and the roles of A1AT in the influence of lung adenocarcinoma metastasis were investigated. Molecular and pathological confirmation demonstrated that altered expression of A1AT correlates with the metastatic potential of lung adenocarcinoma. The migration and invasion properties of CL1-5 cells were significantly diminished by reducing the expression and secretion of their A1AT proteins. Conversely, the migration and invasion properties of CL1-0 cells were significantly increased through the overexpression and secretion of A1AT proteins. Furthermore, the assembly levels of the metastasis-promoting pericellular fibronectin (FN1), which facilitates colonization of lung capillary endothelia by adhering to the cell surface receptor dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), were higher on the surfaces of suspended CL1-5 cells than on those of the CL1-0 cells. This discovery reflects previous findings in breast cancer. In line with this finding, FN1 assembly and the lung colonization of suspended CL1-5 cells were inhibited when endogenous A1AT protein was knocked down using siRNA. The major thrust of this study is to demonstrate the effects of coupling the label-free proteomics strategy with the secretomes of cancer cells that differentially exhibit invasive and metastatic

  6. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  7. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  8. Corneal proteoglycan changes under vitamin A deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Twining, S.S.; Wilson, P.M.

    1986-05-01

    The vitamin A-deficient keratinized cornea is very susceptible to ulceration possibly due to altered stromal components. In this study the proteoglycans present in the corneal stroma of vitamin A-deficient, pair-fed and normal rabbits were compared. Rabbits after weaning were placed on a vitamin A deficient diet, the same diet with retinyl palmitate added (pair-fed) or normal rabbit chow. After 5 months, the corneas of the vitamin A-deficient animals became keratinized. The corneal components were then labeled by injection of /sup 3/H-leucine and Na/sup 35/SO/sub 4/ into the anterior chamber of the eyes on 3 successive days. On the 4th day the animals were sacrificed the corneas removed and dissected. The labeled corneal stromas were extracted with 4 M GuHCl and the components separated on a DEAE-Sepharose column. The proteoglycans were eluted with 0.5 M and 1.0 M NaCl. The 1.0 M NaCl fraction (mainly keratin sulfate proteoglycans) was increased 25% in the vitamin A-deficient corneas over that for the pair-fed and normal corneas. These proteoglycans from the deficient corneas gave a different elution pattern on Octyl-Sepharose eluted with a Triton X-100 gradient than those from the pair-fed corneas. The total labeled proteoglycans were similar in the stromas from the 3 types of rabbits. These results indicate the various corneal proteoglycan ratios differ under vitamin A deficiency conditions.

  9. Biotinidase deficiency: an atypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesh, Sujatha; Suresh, Beena; Seshadri, Suresh; Suzuki, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a rare metabolic disorder which can cause dermatological manifestations and lead to severe neurological sequelae if untreated. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency also has similar manifestations and needs to be differentiated. We present a neonate who had atypical early onset symptoms and was diagnosed to have biotinidase deficiency. Copyright 2012, NMJI.

  10. AMPD3-deficient mice exhibit increased erythrocyte ATP levels but anemia not improved due to PK deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jidong; Morisaki, Hiroko; Toyama, Keiko; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Morisaki, Takayuki

    2012-11-01

    AMP deaminase (AMPD) catalyzes AMP to IMP and plays an important role in energy charge and nucleotide metabolism. Human AMPD3 deficiency is a type of erythrocyte-specific enzyme deficiency found in individuals without clinical symptoms, although an increased level of ATP in erythrocytes has been reported. To better understand the physiological and pathological roles of AMPD3 deficiency, we established a line of AMPD3-deficient [A3(-/-)] mice. No AMPD activity and a high level of ATP were observed in erythrocytes of these mice, similar to human RBC-AMPD3 deficiency, while other characteristics were unremarkable. Next, we created AMPD3 and pyruvate kinase (PK) double-deficient [PKA(-/-,-/-)] mice by mating A3(-/-) mice with CBA-Pk-1slc/Pk-1slc mice [PK(-/-)], a spontaneous PK-deficient strain showing hemolytic anemia. In PKA(-/-,-/-) mice, the level of ATP in red blood cells was increased 1.5 times as compared to PK(-/-) mice, although hemolytic anemia in those animals was not improved. In addition, we observed osmotic fragility of erythrocytes in A3(-/-) mice under fasting conditions. In contrast, the ATP level in erythrocytes was elevated in A3(-/-) mice as compared to the control. In conclusion, AMPD3 deficiency increases the level of ATP in erythrocytes, but does not improve anemia due to PK deficiency and leads to erythrocyte dysfunction.

  11. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Relinque, B; Bardallo, L; Granero, M; Jiménez, P J; Luna, S

    2015-03-10

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is an uncommon metabolic disease. Only few cases of its isolated form have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe neonatal onset. A newborn baby of 41 weeks gestational age, weighted at birth of 3240 grams and had an Apgar score of 6-10-10. Fifty-three hours after being born, the baby started with seizures that were refractory to antiepileptic treatment. Brain function was monitored using a-EEG. Laboratory and imaging tests were performed. All of them were consistent with sulfite oxidase deficiency. The diagnosis was confirmed by genetic testing. We highlight the importance of this disease as part of the differential diagnosis of seizures during the neonatal period, as well as the importance of the therapeutic support based on dietary restrictions. It's also remarkable the possibility of prenatal diagnosis by quantifying enzyme activity and it's also possible carrying out DNA mutational analysis.

  12. Biotinidase deficiency in childhood.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Viswanathan; Balaji, Padma; Panigrahi, Debasis; Jamal, Rafat

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the clinical, laboratory profile and outcome in seven patients with biotinidase deficiency. The serum biotinidase activity was assayed using spectrophotometric analysis. The age at presentation varied from day 1 of life to the 5 th month. Seizures were the presenting complaint in six patients and clonic seizures were the predominant seizure type. Sparse hair was seen in four patients, while three did not have any cutaneous manifestation. None of the patients had acidosis or hyperammonemia. The clinical response to biotin was dramatic with seizure control in all patients. One patient had neurological deficit at follow-up, while none had optic atrophy or sensorineural hearing loss. Biotinidase deficiency, a potentially treatable condition, should be thought of in any child presenting with neurological symptoms, especially seizures, even in the absence of cutaneous or laboratory manifestations.

  13. [Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency].

    PubMed

    Binek, Alicja; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class A is the main protein of the mucosal immune system. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (sIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. sIGAD is strongly associated with the certain major histocompatibility complex region. Most individuals with sIgAD are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections, allergic disorders and autoimmune manifestations. Several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes mellitus type 1, Graves disease and celiac disease, are associated with an increased prevalence of sIgAD. Screening for sIgAD in coeliac disease is essential. Patients need treatment of associated diseases. It is also known that IgA deficiency may progress into a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Pathogenesis and molecular mechanism involved in sIgAD should be elucidated in the future.

  14. Language deficiency in children.

    PubMed

    Morehead, D M; Morehead, K E; Morehead, W A

    1980-01-01

    Research in cognition and language has provided useful constructs which suggests that specific deficits underlie language deficiencies in children. In addition, this research has provided procedures that the determine what a child knows about language at a particular level of development and has established a sequence of linguistic development that maps the specific content and structure of training programs. Two new areas of research offer additional approaches to assessment and remediation. One approach focuses on the actual principles and strategies that normal children use to learn language, making it possible to determine which methods are most efficient. The second research approach looks at the contextual conditions adults and children provide the first language learner. Preliminary work suggests that the natural conditions found universally in first language learning may be the best indicators of how to proceed with language-deficient children.

  15. Micronutrient deficiency in children.

    PubMed

    Bhan, M K; Sommerfelt, H; Strand, T

    2001-05-01

    Malnutrition increases morbidity and mortality and affects physical growth and development, some of these effects resulting from specific micronutrient deficiencies. While public health efforts must be targeted to improve dietary intakes in children through breast feeding and appropriate complementary feeding, there is a need for additional measures to increase the intake of certain micronutrients. Food-based approaches are regarded as the long-term strategy for improving nutrition, but for certain micronutrients, supplementation, be it to the general population or to high risk groups or as an adjunct to treatment must also be considered. Our understanding of the prevalence and consequences of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency in children and pregnant women has advanced considerably while there is still a need to generate more knowledge pertaining to many other micronutrients, including zinc, selenium and many of the B-vitamins. For iron and vitamin A, the challenge is to improve the delivery to target populations. For disease prevention and growth promotion, the need to deliver safe but effective amounts of micronutrients such as zinc to children and women of fertile age can be determined only after data on deficiency prevalence becomes available and the studies on mortality reduction following supplementation are completed. Individual or multiple micronutrients must be used as an adjunct to treatment of common infectious diseases and malnutrition only if the gains are substantial and the safety window sufficiently wide. The available data for zinc are promising with regard to the prevention of diarrhea and pneumonia. It should be emphasized that there must be no displacement of important treatment such as ORS in acute diarrhea by adjunct therapy such as zinc. Credible policy making requires description of not only the clinical effects but also the underlying biological mechanisms. As findings of experimental studies are not always feasible to extrapolate to

  16. Hearing Dysfunction in Xpa-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shinomiya, Hitomi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Fujita, Takeshi; Nakano, Eiji; Inokuchi, Go; Hasegawa, Shingo; Otsuki, Naoki; Nishigori, Chikako; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare recessive heredity disease caused by DNA repair impairment characterized by photosensitivity and neurologic symptoms in half of the cases. There are eight subtypes of XP: XP-A–XP-G and XP variant. Among eight subtypes, XP complementation group A (XP-A) display the lowest DNA repair ability and the severest cutaneous and neurologic symptoms. While its pathogenesis of skin symptoms have been well-studied, that of neurological symptoms, including sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) remains unknown. Basic studies have suggested that SNHL may be caused by inner ear damage, including damage to the spiral ganglion neurons and organ of Corti, and that the XP-A is associated with most severe form of SNHL in humans. Here, we report the occurrence of SNHL in Xpa-deficient mice. Xpa-deficient mice and wild-type mice underwent measurements for auditory brainstem response, and the results revealed that Xpa-deficient mice exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.01) ABR thresholds at 4, 8, and 16 kHz than the wild-type mice. Furthermore, the number of spiral ganglion neurons was reduced in Xpa-deficient mice compared with that in wild-type mice, indicating that hearing loss may be related to spiral ganglion neuron deficiency, consistent with the few reports published in human patients with XP. These results provide important insights into the pathogenesis of SNHL in patients with XP-A. PMID:28239347

  17. Immunoglobulin treatment in primary antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L J; Hoepelman, I M; Ellerbroek, P M

    2011-05-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are characterised by recurrent respiratory tract infections and the inability to produce effective immunoglobulin (Ig) responses. The best-known primary antibody deficiencies are common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA), immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass deficiency, and selective antibody deficiency with normal immunoglobulins (SADNI). Therapy in these patients consists of prophylactic antibiotics and/or Ig replacement therapy. Diagnostic delay remains common owing to limited awareness of the presenting features and may result in increased morbidity and mortality. Replacement therapy with immunoglobulins increases life expectancy and reduces the frequency and severity of infections, but the effect on end-organ damage is still unknown. Both intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg) treatment appear to be safe, with comparable efficacy. A starting dose of 300-400 mg/kg/month in IVIg and 100 mg/week for SCIg is recommended. IgG trough levels should be >5 g/L for patients with agammaglobulinaemia and 3 g/L greater than the initial IgG level for patients with CVID; however, the clinical response should be foremost in choosing the dose and trough level. Infusion-related adverse reactions are generally mild owing to improved manufacturing processes. In this paper, aspects of Ig replacement therapy in primary antibody-deficient patients will be addressed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M; Hreidarsson, A B; Andersen, S; Bülow Pedersen, I; Knudsen, N; Perrild, H; Jørgensen, T; Ovesen, L

    2000-11-01

    Comparative epidemiologic studies in areas with low and high iodine intake and controlled studies of iodine supplementation have demonstrated that the major consequence of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency for the health of the population is an extraordinarily high occurrence of hyperthyroidism in elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency should be corrected. However, there is evidence that a high iodine intake may be associated with more autoimmune hypothyroidism, and that Graves' disease may manifest at a younger age and be more difficult to treat. Hence, the iodine intake should be brought to a level at which iodine deficiency disorders are avoided but not higher. Iodine supplementation programs should aim at relatively uniform iodine intake, avoiding deficient or excessive iodine intake in subpopulations. To adopt such a strategy, surveillance programs are needed.

  19. Carnitine metabolism in the vitamin B-12-deficient rat.

    PubMed Central

    Brass, E P; Stabler, S P

    1988-01-01

    In vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) deficiency the metabolism of propionyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA are inhibited secondarily to decreased L-methylmalonyl-CoA mutase activity. Production of acylcarnitines provides a mechanism for removing acyl groups and liberating CoA under conditions of impaired acyl-CoA utilization. Carnitine metabolism was studied in the vitamin B-12-deficient rat to define the relationship between alterations in acylcarnitine generation and the development of methylmalonic aciduria. Urinary excretion of methylmalonic acid was increased 200-fold in vitamin B-12-deficient rats as compared with controls. Urinary acylcarnitine excretion was increased in the vitamin B-12-deficient animals by 70%. This increase in urinary acylcarnitine excretion correlated with the degree of metabolic impairment as measured by the urinary methylmalonic acid elimination. Urinary propionylcarnitine excretion averaged 11 nmol/day in control rats and 120 nmol/day in the vitamin B-12-deficient group. The fraction of total carnitine present as short-chain acylcarnitines in the plasma and liver of vitamin B-12-deficient rats was increased as compared with controls. When the rats were fasted for 48 h, relative or absolute increases were seen in the urine, plasma, liver and skeletal-muscle acylcarnitine content of the vitamin B-12-deficient rats as compared with controls. Thus vitamin B-12 deficiency was associated with a redistribution of carnitine towards acylcarnitines. Propionylcarnitine was a significant constituent of the acylcarnitine pool in the vitamin B-12-deficient animals. The changes in carnitine metabolism were consistent with the changes in CoA metabolism known to occur with vitamin B-12 deficiency. The vitamin B-12-deficient rat provides a model system for studying carnitine metabolism in the methylmalonic acidurias. PMID:3196310

  20. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia ...

  1. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John J; Trakadis, Yannis J; Scriver, Charles R

    2011-08-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in intolerance to the dietary intake of the essential amino acid phenylalanine. It occurs in approximately 1:15,000 individuals. Deficiency of this enzyme produces a spectrum of disorders including classic phenylketonuria, mild phenylketonuria, and mild hyperphenylalaninemia. Classic phenylketonuria is caused by a complete or near-complete deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase activity and without dietary restriction of phenylalanine most children will develop profound and irreversible intellectual disability. Mild phenylketonuria and mild hyperphenylalaninemia are associated with lower risk of impaired cognitive development in the absence of treatment. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency can be diagnosed by newborn screening based on detection of the presence of hyperphenylalaninemia using the Guthrie microbial inhibition assay or other assays on a blood spot obtained from a heel prick. Since the introduction of newborn screening, the major neurologic consequences of hyperphenylalaninemia have been largely eradicated. Affected individuals can lead normal lives. However, recent data suggest that homeostasis is not fully restored with current therapy. Treated individuals have a higher incidence of neuropsychological problems. The mainstay of treatment for hyperphenylalaninemia involves a low-protein diet and use of a phenylalanine-free medical formula. This treatment must commence as soon as possible after birth and should continue for life. Regular monitoring of plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine concentrations is necessary. Targets of plasma phenylalanine of 120-360 μmol/L (2-6 mg/dL) in the first decade of life are essential for optimal outcome. Phenylalanine targets in adolescence and adulthood are less clear. A significant proportion of patients with phenylketonuria may benefit from adjuvant therapy with 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin stereoisomer. Special consideration must be

  2. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Professional Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Matthew P; Lombardo, Stephen J; Kharrazi, F Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in several systems of the human body. Various studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to stress and insufficiency fractures, muscle recovery and function, and athletic performance. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elite athletic population has not been extensively studied, and very few reports exist among professional athletes. There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency among players attending the National Basketball Association (NBA) Combine. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. This is a retrospective review of data previously collected as part of the routine medical evaluation of players in the NBA Combines from 2009 through 2013. Player parameters evaluated were height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D level. Statistical analysis using t tests and analysis of variance was used to detect any correlation between the player parameters and vitamin D level. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (<20 ng/mL), insufficient (20-32 ng/mL), and sufficient (>32 ng/mL). After institutional review board approval was submitted to the NBA, the NBA released deidentified data on 279 players who participated in the combines from 2009 through 2013. There were 90 players (32.3%) who were deficient, 131 players (47.0%) who were insufficient, and 58 players (20.8%) who were sufficient. A total of 221 players (79.3%) were either vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Among all players included, the average vitamin D level was 25.6 ± 10.2 ng/mL. Among the players who were deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, the average vitamin D levels were 16.1 ± 2.1 ng/mL, 25.0 ± 3.4 ng/mL, and 41.6 ± 8.6 ng/mL, respectively. Player height and weight were significantly increased in vitamin D-sufficient players compared with players who were not sufficient (P = .0008 and .009, respectively). Player age and BMI did not significantly differ depending on vitamin D status (P = .15 and .77

  3. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Professional Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Matthew P.; Lombardo, Stephen J.; Kharrazi, F. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D plays an important role in several systems of the human body. Various studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to stress and insufficiency fractures, muscle recovery and function, and athletic performance. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elite athletic population has not been extensively studied, and very few reports exist among professional athletes. Hypothesis: There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency among players attending the National Basketball Association (NBA) Combine. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This is a retrospective review of data previously collected as part of the routine medical evaluation of players in the NBA Combines from 2009 through 2013. Player parameters evaluated were height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D level. Statistical analysis using t tests and analysis of variance was used to detect any correlation between the player parameters and vitamin D level. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (<20 ng/mL), insufficient (20-32 ng/mL), and sufficient (>32 ng/mL). Results: After institutional review board approval was submitted to the NBA, the NBA released deidentified data on 279 players who participated in the combines from 2009 through 2013. There were 90 players (32.3%) who were deficient, 131 players (47.0%) who were insufficient, and 58 players (20.8%) who were sufficient. A total of 221 players (79.3%) were either vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Among all players included, the average vitamin D level was 25.6 ± 10.2 ng/mL. Among the players who were deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, the average vitamin D levels were 16.1 ± 2.1 ng/mL, 25.0 ± 3.4 ng/mL, and 41.6 ± 8.6 ng/mL, respectively. Player height and weight were significantly increased in vitamin D–sufficient players compared with players who were not sufficient (P = .0008 and .009, respectively). Player age and BMI did not significantly

  4. Combined Vitamin C and Vitamin E Deficiency Worsens Early Atherosclerosis in ApoE-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Babaev, Vladimir R.; Li, Liying; Shah, Sanket; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae F.; May, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory condition associated with oxidative stress, but controversy persists regarding whether antioxidants such as vitamins C and E are preventative. To assess the role of combined deficiencies of vitamins C and E on the earliest stages of atherosclerosis, four combinations of vitamin supplementation (Low C/Low E, Low C/High E, High C/Low E, High C/High E) were studied in atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice also unable to synthesize their own vitamin C (gulo−/−). The effect of a more severe depletion of vitamin C alone was evaluated in a second experiment using gulo−/− mice carrying the hemizygous deletion of SVCT2, the vitamin C transporter. Methods and Results After 8 weeks on a high-fat diet (16% lard, 0.2% cholesterol), atherosclerosis developed in the aortic sinus areas of mice in all diet groups. Each vitamin-deficient diet significantly decreased liver and brain contents of the corresponding vitamin. Combined deficiency of both vitamins increased lipid peroxidation, doubled plaque size, and increased plaque macrophage content by 2-3-fold in males, although only plaque macrophage content was increased in females. A more severe deficiency of vitamin C in gulo−/− mice with defective cellular uptake of vitamin C increased both oxidative stress and atherosclerosis in apoE−/− mice compared to littermates on a diet replete in vitamin C, again most clearly in males. Conclusion Combined vitamin E and C deficiencies are required to worsen early atherosclerosis in an apoE-deficient mouse model. However, a more severe cellular deficiency of vitamin C alone promotes atherosclerosis when vitamin E is replete. PMID:20558818

  5. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  6. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  7. A link between premenopausal iron deficiency and breast cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Young breast cancer (BC) patients less than 45 years old are at higher risk of dying from the disease when compared to their older counterparts. However, specific risk factors leading to this poorer outcome have not been identified. Methods One candidate is iron deficiency, as this is common in young women and a clinical feature of young age. In the present study, we used immuno-competent and immuno-deficient mouse xenograft models as well as hemoglobin as a marker of iron status in young BC patients to demonstrate whether host iron deficiency plays a pro-metastatic role. Results We showed that mice fed an iron-deficient diet had significantly higher tumor volumes and lung metastasis compared to those fed normal iron diets. Iron deficiency mainly altered Notch but not TGF-β and Wnt signaling in the primary tumor, leading to the activation of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). This was revealed by increased expression of Snai1 and decreased expression of E-cadherin. Importantly, correcting iron deficiency by iron therapy reduced primary tumor volume, lung metastasis, and reversed EMT markers in mice. Furthermore, we found that mild iron deficiency was significantly associated with lymph node invasion in young BC patients (p<0.002). Conclusions Together, our finding indicates that host iron deficiency could be a contributor of poor prognosis in young BC patients. PMID:23800380

  8. Placental steroid deficiency: association with arylsulfatase A deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Vidgoff, J; Buxman, M M; Shapiro, L J; Dimond, R L; Wilson, T G; Hepburn, C A; Tabei, T; Heinrichs, W R

    1982-01-01

    A family with an obstetric history consistent with placental sulfatase deficiency has X-linked ichthyosis. Steroid sulfatase deficiency was confirmed in placenta, leukocytes, and cultured skin fibroblasts of affected males; arylsulfatase A diminution was also observed in these tissues of both affected males and 2 generations of related females. No symptoms of metachromatic leukodystrophy are present in any family members. In this family, placental sulfatase deficiency, and arylsulfatase A pseudodeficiency are nonallelic. PMID:6123259

  9. Wallerian degeneration in ICAM-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Vougioukas, V. I.; Roeske, S.; Michel, U.; Brück, W.

    1998-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration of the peripheral nervous system was studied in ICAM-1-deficient mice and compared with the phenomena observed in C57BL wild-type animals. There was a decrease in myelin density in both mice strains 4 and 6 days after transection of the sciatic nerve. The degenerating nerves were invaded by Mac-1-, LFA-1-, and F4/80-positive macrophages; significantly lower numbers of macrophages were present in ICAM-1-deficient nerves. Myelin loss decreased after nerve transection with a more prominent loss in ICAM-1-deficient animals. Schwann cells revealed a much higher myelin load in these animals when compared with wild-type nerves, and there was an increased proliferation of endoneurial cells in ICAM-1-deficient mice. These data indicate that ICAM-1 is involved in macrophage recruitment to injured peripheral nerves as well as in the proliferative and phagocytic response of Schwann cells after peripheral nerve transection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9422541

  10. In vivo analysis of Pim-1 deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Laird, P W; van der Lugt, N M; Clarke, A; Domen, J; Linders, K; McWhir, J; Berns, A; Hooper, M

    1993-01-01

    The Pim-1 proto-oncogene encodes a highly conserved serine/threonine phosphokinase which is predominantly expressed in hematopoietic organs and gonads in mammals. Overexpression of Pim-1 predisposes to lymphomagenesis in mice. To develop a further understanding of Pim-1 in molecular terms, as well as in terms of its potential role in hematopoietic development, we have generated mice deficient in Pim-1 function. Pim-1-deficient mice are ostensibly normal, healthy and fertile. Detailed comparative analyses of the hematopoietic systems of the mutant mice and their wild-type littermates showed that they are indistinguishable for most of the parameters studied. Our analyses revealed one unexpected phenotype that correlated with the level of Pim-1 expression: Pim-1 deficiency correlated with a erythrocyte microcytosis, whereas overexpression of Pim-1 in E mu-Pim-1-transgenic mice resulted in erythrocyte macrocytosis. In order to confirm that the observed decrease in erythrocyte Mean Cell Volume (MCV) was attributable to the Pim-1 deficiency, we developed mice transgenic for a Pim-1 gene construct with its own promoter and showed that this transgene could restore the low erythrocyte Mean Cell Volume observed in the Pim-1-deficient mice to near wild-type levels. These results might be relevant to the observed involvement of the Pim-1 gene in mouse erythroleukemogenesis. The surprising lack of a readily observed phenotype in the lymphoid compartment of the Pim-1-deficient mice, suggests a heretofore unrecognized degree of in vivo functional redundancy of this highly conserved proto-oncogene. Images PMID:8233823

  11. The interaction of type of dietary carbohydrates with copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fields, M; Ferretti, R J; Smith, J C; Reiser, S

    1984-02-01

    The present study was designed to determine if the more severe copper deficiency in rats fed sucrose and fructose, as compared to starch, is due to a specific effect of the fructose or to a nonspecific effect of any simple carbohydrate. Seventy weanling male rats were fed, for 9 wk, copper-deficient diets or copper-supplemented diets containing either 62% starch, fructose, or glucose. Decreased hematocrit, serum copper, and ceruloplasmin concentrations but increased heart and liver weights, total liver lipid, and hepatic iron concentrations were found in all copper-deficient rats regardless of the dietary carbohydrate. Feeding rats the high glucose diet decreased plasma albumin and liver glycogen but increased blood urea nitrogen when compared to rats fed starch. However, rats fed fructose generally exhibited a more severe copper deficiency as compared to rats fed either starch or glucose. The severity was characterized by lower (p less than 0.05) body weight, liver glycogen, hematocrit, serum copper, and albumin. Conversely, liver and heart weights, blood urea nitrogen, and plasma glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase were higher (p less than 0.05). Plasma cholesterol was increased by copper deficiency only in rats fed fructose or glucose. During the study, 17 of the 40 rats fed copper-deficient diets died; 66% of those fed fructose, 26% fed glucose, and 30% fed starch. These results suggest that the fructose moiety of sucrose is responsible for the increased severity of copper deficiency in rats fed sucrose as compared to starch.

  12. Comparative study on 2,2′,4,5,5′-pentachlorobiphenyl-mediated decrease in serum thyroxine level between C57BL/6 and its transthyretin-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yoshihisa; Tamaki, Sekihiro; Haraguchi, Koichi; Ikushiro, Shin-ichi; Sekimoto, Masashi; Ohta, Chiho; Endo, Tetsuya; Koga, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Shizuo; Degawa, Masakuni

    2012-09-15

    The relationships between the changes in the levels of serum total thyroxine (T{sub 4}), serum T{sub 4}-transthyretin (TTR) complex, and accumulation of T{sub 4} in tissues by 2,2′,4,5,5′-pentachlorobiphenyl (PentaCB) were examined using wild-type C57BL/6 (WT) and its TTR-deficient (TTR-null) mice. The constitutive level of serum total T{sub 4} was much higher in WT mice than in TTR-null mice. In WT mice 4 days after a single intraperitoneal injection with PentaCB (112 mg/kg), serum total T{sub 4} level was significantly decreased along with a decrease in serum T{sub 4}–TTR complex, and the levels of serum total T{sub 4} in the PentaCB-treated WT mice were almost the same to those in PentaCB-untreated (control) TTR-null mice. In addition, a slight decrease in serum total T{sub 4} by PentaCB treatment was observed in TTR-null mice. Furthermore, clearance of [{sup 125}I]T{sub 4} from the serum after [{sup 125}I]T{sub 4}-administration was promoted by the PentaCB-pretreatment in either strain of mice, especially WT mice. On the other hand, accumulation level of [{sup 125}I]T{sub 4} in the liver, but not in extrahepatic tissues, was strikingly enhanced in the PentaCB-pretreated WT and TTR-null mice. Furthermore, in both strains of mice, PentaCB-pretreatment led to significant increases in the steady-state distribution volume of [{sup 125}I]T{sub 4} and the concentration ratio of the liver to serum. The present findings demonstrate that PentaCB-mediated decrease in serum T{sub 4} level occurs mainly through increase in accumulation level of T{sub 4} in the liver and further indicate that the increased accumulation of T{sub 4} in the liver of WT mice is primarily dependent on the PentaCB-mediated inhibition of serum T{sub 4}–TTR complex formation.

  13. by Cu Deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tian-Ran; Li, Fu; Li, Jing-Feng

    2014-06-01

    This work revealed that the Cu-deficient ternary compounds Cu3- x SbSe4 free of Te and Pb exhibit enhanced thermoelectric performance. Cu3- x SbSe4 ( x = 0, 0.025, 0.050, 0.075) polycrystalline materials with high phase purity were fabricated by a facile method combining mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering. Effects of Cu deficiencies on crystal structures, microstructures, element chemical states, and thermoelectric properties were systematically studied. High carrier concentration was obtained for the compositions Cu2.95SbSe4 and Cu2.925SbSe4 due to additional Cu vacancies, contributing to a remarkable increase in electrical conductivity. Together with a satisfactorily large Seebeck coefficient above 300 μV/K, a high power factor of about 890 μW/m-K2 at 523 K was achieved for Cu2.95SbSe4 and Cu2.925SbSe4, almost 60% larger than that of the stoichiometric sample with x = 0. The maximum ZT value was increased to 0.50 at 673 K in the Cu2.925SbSe4 sample sintered at a high temperature (703 K); this is the highest value reported so far for the undoped Cu3SbSe4 system.

  14. Subclinical cobalamin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Ralph

    2012-03-01

    This review focuses on recent developments and controversies in the diagnosis, consequences, and management of subclinical cobalamin deficiency (SCCD), which affects many elderly persons. Diagnosis of SCCD depends exclusively on biochemical tests whose individual limitations suggest that combinations of tests are needed, especially in epidemiologic research. The causes of SCCD are unknown in more than 60% of cases, which limits prognostic predictions and identification of health consequences. After years of varying, often inconclusive associations, new clinical trials suggest that homocysteine reduction by high doses of folic acid, cobalamin, and pyridoxine may reduce progression of structural brain changes and cognitive impairment, especially in predisposed individuals. The causative or contributory roles, if any, of SCCD itself in cognitive dysfunction require direct study. If the findings are confirmed, high-dose supplementation with three vitamins will probably be more effective than fortification of the diet. The story of SCCD, which is severalfold times more common in the elderly than clinical cobalamin deficiency but also differs from it in arising only infrequently from severe malabsorption and thus being less likely to progress, continues to evolve. Preventive benefits need to be confirmed and expanded, and will require fuller understanding of SCCD pathophysiology, natural history, and health consequences.

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Alshishtawy, Moeness Moustafa

    2012-01-01

    Recently, scientists have generated a strong body of evidence providing new information about the preventive effect of vitamin D on a broad range of disorders. This evidence suggests that vitamin D is much more than a nutrient needed for bone health; it is an essential hormone required for regulation of a large number of physiological functions. Sufficient concentration of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is essential for optimising human health. This article reviews the present state-of-the-art knowledge about vitamin D’s status worldwide and refers to recent articles discussing some of the general background of vitamin D, including sources, benefits, deficiencies, and dietary requirements, especially in pregnancy. They offer evidence that vitamin D deficiency could be a major public health burden in many parts of the world, mostly because of sun deprivation. The article also discusses the debate about optimal concentration of circulating serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and explores different views on the amount of vitamin D supplementation required to achieve and maintain this concentration. PMID:22548132

  16. Iron-deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cook, J D

    1994-12-01

    Iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a common clinical problem throughout the world and an enormous public health problem in developing countries. The cornerstone of the laboratory identification of IDA is a low haemoglobin and serum ferritin concentration although a normal serum ferritin does exclude IDA. When the serum ferritin is normal in an anaemic patient with iron-deficient erythropoiesis, it is common practise to perform a bone marrow examination to diagnose IDA. The recent introduction of serum transferrin receptor measurements is a useful alternative for distinguishing IDA from the anaemia of chronic disease because the serum receptor concentration is usually elevated in patients with IDA but normal in patients with anaemia due to inflammation or neoplasia. It is helpful for the clinican to be aware of the causes of physiological IDA. The most important are increased rate of body growth, excessive menstrual blood loss, pregnancy, regular blood donation, intensive endurance training, chronic aspirin use and a vegetarian diet. Without these, a careful search for unsuspected gastrointestinal blood loss must be made and even when the suspicion of physiological IDA is high, it is prudent to screen for fecal occult blood. In most patients, IDA responds promptly to oral iron therapy. Patients who experience troublesome side-effects with oral iron might benefit from a gastric delivery system for oral iron which eliminates nausea and vomiting and improves iron absorption when given with food.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Heat shock protein response in phosphorus-deficient heat-stressed broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Edens, F W; Hill, C H; Wang, S

    1992-12-01

    1. During acute in vivo heat stress, a normal heat shock protein (HSP) response was not inducible in chickens deficient in inorganic phosphorus (P(i)-deficient). 2. Small quantities of HSP 70 and HSP 90 were induced, but little or no HSP 23 was induced in P(i)-deficient chickens compared to P(i)-adequate chickens. 3. Increased susceptibility of P(i)-deficient chickens to acute heat stress was attributed to their inability to produce an adequate HSP response.

  18. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    PubMed

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  19. SURF1 deficiency: a multi-centre natural history study.

    PubMed

    Wedatilake, Yehani; Brown, Ruth M; McFarland, Robert; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Morris, Andrew A M; Champion, Mike; Jardine, Phillip E; Clarke, Antonia; Thorburn, David R; Taylor, Robert W; Land, John M; Forrest, Katharine; Dobbie, Angus; Simmons, Louise; Aasheim, Erlend T; Ketteridge, David; Hanrahan, Donncha; Chakrapani, Anupam; Brown, Garry K; Rahman, Shamima

    2013-07-05

    SURF1 deficiency, a monogenic mitochondrial disorder, is the most frequent cause of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient Leigh syndrome (LS). We report the first natural history study of SURF1 deficiency. We conducted a multi-centre case notes review of 44 SURF1-deficient patients from ten different UK centres and two Australian centres. Survival data for LRPPRC-deficient LS and nuclear-encoded complex I-deficient LS patients were obtained from previous publications. The survival of SURF1-deficient patients was compared with these two groups using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and logrank test. The majority of patients (32/44, 73%) presented in infancy (median 9.5 months). Frequent symptoms were poor weight gain (95%, median age 10 months), hypotonia (93%, median age 14 months), poor feeding/vomiting (89%, median age 10 months), developmental delay (88%, median age 14 months), developmental regression (71%, median age 19 months), movement disorder (52%, median age 24 months), oculomotor involvement (52%, median age 29 months) and central respiratory failure (78%, median age 31 months). Hypertrichosis (41%), optic atrophy (23%), encephalopathy (20%), seizures (14%) and cardiomyopathy (2%) were observed less frequently. SURF1-deficient patients have a homogeneous clinical and biochemical phenotype. Early recognition is essential to expedite diagnosis and enable prenatal diagnosis.

  20. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hagmeyer, Simone; Haderspeck, Jasmin Carmen; Grabrucker, Andreas Martin

    2015-01-01

    Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies. PMID:25610379

  1. Vitamin D deficiency among healthy Egyptian females.

    PubMed

    Botros, Raif M; Sabry, Inas M; Abdelbaky, Rania S; Eid, Yara M; Nasr, Merihan S; Hendawy, Laila M

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is becoming endemic in many parts of the world. To study vitamin D status in Egyptian females of different age groups. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 404 females, who were categorized into group 1 (51 nursing females); group 2 (50 pregnant females); group 3 (208 females of childbearing age); group 4 (38 elderly females); and group 5 (57 geriatric females). Females completed a questionnaire regarding dietary calcium and vitamin D intake, sun exposure, and clothing habits, and performed laboratory tests including calcium, PO4, alkaline phosphatase, intact PTH, and 25-OH vitamin D levels. Median and IQR of vitamin D levels across groups 1, 2, 3 and 5 were in the deficient range, being lowest in groups 3, 5, and 1, respectively. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 72.6% of the nursing group, 54% of the pregnant group, 72% of the childbearing age group, 39.5% of the elderly group, and 77.2% of the geriatric group. Vitamin D was significantly higher in non-veiled females [23ng/dl] as compared to veiled females [16.7ng/dl]. Vitamin D levels with poor, fair, and good sun exposure were 14.1, 14, and 37ng/dl, respectively. These results show a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among healthy Egyptian females. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Monocyte esterase deficiency in malignant neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Markey, G M; McCormick, J A; Morris, T C; Alexander, H D; Nolan, L; Morgan, L M; Reynolds, M E; Edgar, S; Bell, A L; McCaigue, M D

    1990-01-01

    A survey of the incidence of monocyte esterase deficiency in 4000 inpatients (including 808 with malignant neoplastic disease) and 474 normal controls was performed using an automated esterase method. A highly significant excess of patients with malignant disease and the deficiency was evident when compared with normal controls or all other patients. Within the group of patients with malignant disease the demonstrable excess occurred in B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphoma, and carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract. There was also a significant excess of patients with the deficiency attending the renal unit, both among patients who had had renal transplants and those who had not. A familial incidence of monocyte esterase deficiency was found in 19 (35%) of first degree relatives of those patients in whom family studies were done. It is suggested that the reason for the increased prevalence of the anomaly in these disorders might be that the diminution of esterase activity has a role in their development. PMID:2341564

  3. Immune deficiency: changing spectrum of pathogens.

    PubMed

    Duraisingham, S S; Manson, A; Grigoriadou, S; Buckland, M; Tong, C Y W; Longhurst, H J

    2015-08-01

    Current UK national standards recommend routine bacteriology surveillance in severe antibody-deficient patients, but less guidance exists on virology screening and viral infections in these patients. In this retrospective audit, we assessed the proportion of positive virology or bacteriology respiratory and stool samples from patients with severe, partial or no immune deficiency during a 2-year period. Medical notes were reviewed to identify symptomatic viral infections and to describe the course of persistent viral infections. During the 2-year period, 31 of 78 (39·7%) severe immune-deficient patients tested had a positive virology result and 89 of 160 (55.6%) had a positive bacteriology result. The most commonly detected pathogens were rhinovirus (12 patients), norovirus (6), Haemophilus influenzae (24), Pseudomonas spp. (22) and Staphylococcus aureus (21). Ninety-seven per cent of positive viral detection samples were from patients who were symptomatic. Low serum immunoglobulin IgA levels were more prevalent in patients with a positive virology sample compared to the total cohort (P = 0·0078). Three patients had persistent norovirus infection with sequential positive isolates for 9, 30 and 16 months. Virology screening of symptomatic antibody-deficient patients may be useful as a guide to anti-microbial treatment. A proportion of these patients may experience persistent viral infections with significant morbidity.

  4. [Vitamin deficiencies in breastfed children due to maternal dietary deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kollée, L A A

    2006-03-04

    Dietary deficiencies of vitamin B12 and vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation may result in health problems in exclusively breastfed infants. Vitamin-B12 deficiency in these infants results in irritability, anorexia and failure to thrive during the first 4-8 months of life. Severe and permanent neurodevelopmental disturbances may occur. The most at risk for vitamin-B12 deficiency are breast-fed infants ofveganist and vegetarian mothers. Mothers who cover their skin prevent exposure to the sun and may consequently be at risk for vitamin-D deficiency, as well as putting their offspring at risk. In prenatal and perinatal care, it is important to take the maternal dietary history in order to be able to prevent or treat these disorders. Guidelines for obstetrical and neonatal care should include the topic of vitamin deficiency.

  5. Hereditary galactokinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J. G. H.; Don, N. A.; Mann, Trevor P.

    1971-01-01

    A baby with galactokinase deficiency, a recessive inborn error of galactose metabolism, is described. The case is exceptional in that there was no evidence of gypsy blood in the family concerned. The investigation of neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia led to the discovery of galactosuria. As noted by others, the paucity of presenting features makes early diagnosis difficult, and detection by biochemical screening seems desirable. Cataract formation, of early onset, appears to be the only severe persisting complication and may be due to the biosynthesis and accumulation of galactitol in the lens. Ophthalmic surgeons need to be aware of this enzyme defect, because with early diagnosis and dietary treatment these lens changes should be reversible. PMID:5109408

  6. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    PubMed

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  7. Peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P A; Chen, W W; Harris, C J; Hoefler, G; Hoefler, S; Blake, D C; Balfe, A; Kelley, R I; Moser, A B; Beard, M E

    1989-01-01

    Peroxisomal function was evaluated in a male infant with clinical features of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. Very long chain fatty acid levels were elevated in both plasma and fibroblasts, and beta-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids in cultured fibroblasts was significantly impaired. Although the level of the bile acid intermediate trihydroxycoprostanoic acid was slightly elevated in plasma, phytanic acid and L-pipecolic acid levels were normal, as was plasmalogen synthesis in cultured fibroblasts. The latter three parameters distinguish this case from classical neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. In addition, electron microscopy and catalase subcellular distribution studies revealed that, in contrast to neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, peroxisomes were present in the patient's tissues. Immunoblot studies of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes revealed that the bifunctional enzyme (enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) was deficient in postmortem liver samples, whereas acyl-CoA oxidase and the mature form of beta-ketothiolase were present. Density gradient centrifugation of fibroblast homogenates confirmed that intact peroxisomes were present. Immunoblots of fibroblasts peroxisomal fractions showed that they contained acyl-CoA oxidase and beta-ketothiolase, but bifunctional enzyme was not detected. Northern analysis, however, revealed that mRNA coding for the bifunctional enzyme was present in the patient's fibroblasts. These results indicate that the primary biochemical defect in this patient is a deficiency of peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme. It is of interest that the phenotype of this patient resembled neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy and would not have been distinguished from this disorder by clinical study alone. Images PMID:2921319

  8. Iodine deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Delange, F

    1995-01-18

    Iodine is a trace element present in the human body in minute amounts (15-20 mg in adults, i.e. 0.0285 x 10(-3)% of body weight). The only confirmed function of iodine is to constitute an essential substrate for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, tetraiodothyronine, thyroxine or T4 and triiodothyronine, T3 (1). In thyroxine, iodine is 60% by weight. Thyroid hormones, in turn, play a decisive role in the metabolism of all cells of the organism (2) and in the process of early growth and development of most organs, especially of the brain (3). Brain development in humans occurs from fetal life up to the third postnatal year (4). Consequently, a deficit in iodine and/or in thyroid hormones occurring during this critical period of life will result not only in the slowing down of the metabolic activities of all the cells of the organism but also in irreversible alterations in the development of the brain. The clinical consequence will be mental retardation (5). When the physiological requirements of iodine are not met in a given population, a series of functional and developmental abnormalities occur (Table 1), including thyroid function abnormalities and, when iodine deficiency is severe, endemic goiter and cretinism, endemic mental retardation, decreased fertility rate, increased perinatal death, and infant mortality. These complications, which constitute an hindrance to the development of the affected population, are grouped under the general heading of Iodine Deficiency Disorders, IDD (6). Broad geographic areas exist in which the population is affected by IDD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Iodine deficiency in vegetarians and vegans.

    PubMed

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Bucková, K; Klimes, I; Seboková, E

    2003-01-01

    Iodine content in food of plant origin is lower in comparison with that of animal origin due to a low iodine concentration in soil. Urinary iodine excretion was assessed in 15 vegans, 31 lacto- and lacto-ovovegetarians and 35 adults on a mixed diet. Iodine excretion was significantly lower in alternative nutrition groups - 172 microg/l in vegetarians and 78 microg/l in vegans compared to 216 microg/l in subjects on a mixed diet. One fourth of the vegetarians and 80% of the vegans suffer from iodine deficiency (iodine excretion value below 100 microg/l) compared to 9% in the persons on a mixed nutrition. The results show that under conditions of alternative nutrition, there is a higher prevalence of iodine deficiency, which might be a consequence of exclusive or prevailing consumption of food of plant origin, no intake of fish and other sea products, as well as reduced iodine intake in the form of sea salt.

  10. Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Research findings on college instruction and basic skills deficiencies are discussed in 12 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching. Titles and authors are as follows: "Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies" (Susanne D. Roueche, with responses by Gary B. Donart, Betty Harris, and James Nordyke); "Is Higher Education an…

  11. The Cardiomyopathy of Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Nikita; Rich, Michael W.; Gayomali, Charina

    2006-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia can have deleterious effects on the heart. Herein, we describe the effects of iron deficiency on the heart as corroborated with electrocardiography, radiology, echocardiography, and cardiac catheterization. We review the pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of iron-deficiency–induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:17041692

  12. Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Research findings on college instruction and basic skills deficiencies are discussed in 12 papers from the first Regional Conference on University Teaching. Titles and authors are as follows: "Basic Skills: Dealing with Deficiencies" (Susanne D. Roueche, with responses by Gary B. Donart, Betty Harris, and James Nordyke); "Is Higher Education an…

  13. Congenital deficiency of meibomian glands.

    PubMed Central

    Bron, A J; Mengher, L S

    1987-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with contact lens intolerance. She was found to have a marked deficiency of meibomian glands in the upper lids and almost total absence in the lower lids. Evidence of tear film instability was found and attributed to deficient lid oil production. A daily wear soft contact lens was later fitted and tolerated. PMID:3580344

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  15. Iron deficiency: definition and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cook, J D; Skikne, B S

    1989-11-01

    There has been a continuous refinement over the past several decades of methods to detect iron deficiency and assess its magnitude. The optimal combination of measurements differs for clinical and epidemiological assessment. Clinically, the major problem is to distinguish true iron deficiency from other causes of iron-deficient erythropoiesis, such as the anaemia of chronic disease. Epidemiologically, techniques that provide quantified estimates of body iron are preferable. For both purposes, the serum ferritin is the focal point of the laboratory detection of iron deficiency. Serum ferritin measurements provide a reliable index of body iron stores in healthy individuals, a cost-effective method of screening for iron deficiency, and a useful alternative to bone marrow examinations in the evaluation of anaemic patients. Preliminary studies indicate that measurement of the serum transferrin receptor may be the most reliable way to assess deficits in tissue iron supply.

  16. Chromatic VEP in children with congenital colour vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tekavčič Pompe, Manca; Stirn Kranjc, Branka; Brecelj, Jelka

    2010-09-01

    Visual evoked potentials to chromatic stimulus (cVEP) are believed to selectively test the parvocellular visual pathway which is responsible for processing information about colour. The aim was to evaluate cVEP in children with red-green congenital colour vision deficiency. VEP responses of 15 colour deficient children were compared to 31 children with normal colour vision. An isoluminant red-green stimulus composed of horizontal gratings was presented in an onset-offset manner. The shape of the waveform was studied, as well as the latency and amplitude of positive (P) and negative (N) waves. cVEP response did not change much with increased age in colour deficient children, whereas normative data showed changes from a predominantly positive to a negative response with increased age. A P wave was present in 87% of colour deficient children (and in 100% of children with normal colour vision), whereas the N wave was absent in a great majority of colour deficient children and was present in 80% of children with normal colour vision. Therefore, the amplitude of the whole response (N-P) decreased linearly with age in colour deficient children, whereas in children with normal colour vision it increased linearly. P wave latency shortened with increased age in both groups. cVEP responses differ in children with congenital colour vision deficiency compared to children with normal colour vision.

  17. How prevalent is vitamin B(12) deficiency among vegetarians?

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roman; Parrott, Scott James; Raj, Sudha; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Lucus, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    Vegetarians are at risk for vitamin B(12) (B12) deficiency due to suboptimal intake. The goal of the present literature review was to assess the rate of B12 depletion and deficiency among vegetarians and vegans. Using a PubMed search to identify relevant publications, 18 articles were found that reported B12 deficiency rates from studies that identified deficiency by measuring methylmalonic acid, holo-transcobalamin II, or both. The deficiency rates reported for specific populations were as follows: 62% among pregnant women, between 25% and almost 86% among children, 21-41% among adolescents, and 11-90% among the elderly. Higher rates of deficiency were reported among vegans compared with vegetarians and among individuals who had adhered to a vegetarian diet since birth compared with those who had adopted such a diet later in life. The main finding of this review is that vegetarians develop B12 depletion or deficiency regardless of demographic characteristics, place of residency, age, or type of vegetarian diet. Vegetarians should thus take preventive measures to ensure adequate intake of this vitamin, including regular consumption of supplements containing B12.

  18. Monocyte esterase deficiency in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Markey, G M; Curry, R C; Swain, D; Morris, T C; McCormick, J A; Alexander, H D; Edgar, S

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To substantiate the high incidence of monocyte esterase deficiency (MED) in gastrointestinal carcinoma already reported in a small group of patients; to compare the clinical findings in esterase deficient and esterase positive patients. METHODS--Peripheral blood smears (n = 22) or cytocentrifuge preparations (n = 52) of mononuclear cells from the peripheral blood of patients with gastrointestinal carcinoma were stained by the non-specific esterase stain (pH 5.8) using a batch technique. Samples containing > or = 85% esterase negative monocytes were identified at light microscopic examination. RESULTS--Seven of 74 patients were identified as having MED. This correlated exactly with the proportion (five of 46) found before, using an automated method, and was significantly higher than the 0.8% incidence in normal blood donors shown in that study. Comparison of the clinical details of the 12 MED patients with those of 105 esterase positive patients showed a significantly longer disease free survival in the MED cohort and increased occurrence of benign neoplasms--largely colorectal polyps--in this group also. Three patients had a borderline degree of deficiency and were excluded from comparisons, although they showed the same clinical tendencies as the MED group. CONCLUSIONS--There is a strong degree of association between monocyte esterase deficiency and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Further evidence must be sought to prove that the deficiency precedes the disease and therefore may predispose to it, or at least may identify subjects with such a predisposition. This could lead to early diagnosis and effective treatment of gastrointestinal carcinoma in a sizeable proportion of patients. PMID:8331174

  19. Omega-3 deficiency impairs honey bee learning.

    PubMed

    Arien, Yael; Dag, Arnon; Zarchin, Shlomi; Masci, Tania; Shafir, Sharoni

    2015-12-22

    Deficiency in essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly the long-chain form of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has been linked to health problems in mammals, including many mental disorders and reduced cognitive performance. Insects have very low long-chain PUFA concentrations, and the effect of omega-3 deficiency on cognition in insects has not been studied. We show a low omega-6:3 ratio of pollen collected by honey bee colonies in heterogenous landscapes and in many hand-collected pollens that we analyzed. We identified Eucalyptus as an important bee-forage plant particularly poor in omega-3 and high in the omega-6:3 ratio. We tested the effect of dietary omega-3 deficiency on olfactory and tactile associative learning of the economically highly valued honey bee. Bees fed either of two omega-3-poor diets, or Eucalyptus pollen, showed greatly reduced learning abilities in conditioned proboscis-extension assays compared with those fed omega-3-rich diets, or omega-3-rich pollen mixture. The effect on performance was not due to reduced sucrose sensitivity. Omega-3 deficiency also led to smaller hypopharyngeal glands. Bee brains contained high omega-3 concentrations, which were only slightly affected by diet, suggesting additional peripheral effects on learning. The shift from a low to high omega-6:3 ratio in the Western human diet is deemed a primary cause of many diseases and reduced mental health. A similar shift seems to be occurring in bee forage, possibly an important factor in colony declines. Our study shows the detrimental effect on cognitive performance of omega-3 deficiency in a nonmammal.

  20. Omega-3 deficiency impairs honey bee learning

    PubMed Central

    Arien, Yael; Dag, Arnon; Zarchin, Shlomi; Masci, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency in essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly the long-chain form of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has been linked to health problems in mammals, including many mental disorders and reduced cognitive performance. Insects have very low long-chain PUFA concentrations, and the effect of omega-3 deficiency on cognition in insects has not been studied. We show a low omega-6:3 ratio of pollen collected by honey bee colonies in heterogenous landscapes and in many hand-collected pollens that we analyzed. We identified Eucalyptus as an important bee-forage plant particularly poor in omega-3 and high in the omega-6:3 ratio. We tested the effect of dietary omega-3 deficiency on olfactory and tactile associative learning of the economically highly valued honey bee. Bees fed either of two omega-3–poor diets, or Eucalyptus pollen, showed greatly reduced learning abilities in conditioned proboscis-extension assays compared with those fed omega-3–rich diets, or omega-3–rich pollen mixture. The effect on performance was not due to reduced sucrose sensitivity. Omega-3 deficiency also led to smaller hypopharyngeal glands. Bee brains contained high omega-3 concentrations, which were only slightly affected by diet, suggesting additional peripheral effects on learning. The shift from a low to high omega-6:3 ratio in the Western human diet is deemed a primary cause of many diseases and reduced mental health. A similar shift seems to be occurring in bee forage, possibly an important factor in colony declines. Our study shows the detrimental effect on cognitive performance of omega-3 deficiency in a nonmammal. PMID:26644556

  1. Malaria, favism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huheey, J E; Martin, D L

    1975-10-15

    Although glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient individuals may suffer (sometimes fatally) from favism, a high incidence of this trait occurs in many Mediterranean populations. This apparent paradox is explained on the basis of a synergistic interaction between favism and G-6-PD deficiency that provides increased protection against malaria compared to that of the G-6-PD deficiency alone. This relationship is analogous to that between various hemoglobins and malaria in that there is selection for a more severe trait if it provides more protection against malaria.

  2. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. )

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  3. Effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Karli, R; Gül, A; Uğur, B

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between otoacoustic emission (OAE) values and cochlear function in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency and no evidence of symptomatic hearing loss. Two groups were studied: Group 1: patients with vitamin B12 deficiency; Group 2: a matched control group of patients with normal vitamin B12 levels. There was no evidence of symptomatic hearing loss in either group. Transiently evoked OAEs (TEOAEs) and spontaneous OAEs (SOAEs) were recorded. A comparative analysis of the studied parameters revealed that results at TEOAE 1000, SOAEs 1500 and SOAEs 4000 Hz were somewhat lower in the vitamin B12 deficient group compared with the control group. According to our findings, there was a significant association between vitamin B12 deficiency and cochlear dysfunction. We recommend that routine vitamin B12 serum levels be determined when evaluating patients for symptomatic hearing loss.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: lysosomal acid lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions lysosomal acid lipase deficiency lysosomal acid lipase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: protein C deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Thrombophilia, hereditary, due to protein C deficiency, autosomal dominant ... my area? Other Names for This Condition hereditary thrombophilia due to protein C deficiency PROC deficiency Related ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: familial HDL deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions familial HDL deficiency familial HDL deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial HDL deficiency is a condition characterized by low levels ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetic Testing (4 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Ateleiotic dwarfism Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal dominant isolated somatotropin deficiency ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition dwarfism, growth hormone deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency ...

  9. Prevention of iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    1994-12-01

    This chapter discusses different methods to prevent iron deficiency--to reduce iron losses (e.g. reducing menstrual iron losses by using a contraceptive pill or combating of hookworm infestation) or to increase iron absorption. Iron absorption can be increased (1) by modifying the composition of meals--increasing the content of dietary factors enhancing iron absorption (e.g. meat and ascorbic acid) or reducing the content of factors inhibiting iron absorption such as phytate and iron-binding phenolic compounds, (2) by increasing the iron content of the diet by fortification with iron, or by (3) supplementation with iron tablets. Several factors to consider in the choice of strategy are discussed such as the importance of the bioavailability of the diet for the efficacy of iron fortification, the choice of vehicle for iron fortification that is compatible with the iron compound used, the feasibility to increase the bioavailability of the dietary iron by modification of the composition of the diet and the short time available in pregnancy to ensure a sufficient supply of the extra iron needed limiting the effective measures available to supplementation with iron tablets.

  10. Iron deficiency and thrombocytosis.

    PubMed

    Holbro, A; Volken, T; Buser, A; Sigle, J P; Halter, J P; Passweg, J R; Tichelli, A; Infanti, L

    2017-01-01

    According to many textbooks, iron deficiency (ID) is associated with reactive thrombocytosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between serum ferritin levels and platelet counts in a large cohort of healthy blood donors. We included all whole blood and apheresis donors aged 18 years or older with at least one ferritin measurement and one platelet count performed at the same visit between 1996 and 2014. A total of 130 345 blood counts and ferritin measurements obtained from 22 046 healthy donors were analysed. Overall, no correlation between serum ferritin and platelet count was observed (r = -0.03, ρ = 0.04 for males, and r = 0.01, ρ = -0.02 for females, respectively). Associations remained clinically negligible after adjusting for age, time since previous blood donation, number of donations and restricting the analysis to ferritin deciles. In this large, retrospective single-centre study, correlations between low ferritin and platelet count in a large and homogeneous cohort of healthy donors were negligible. Further studies in patients with more severe anaemia and patients with inflammation are warranted.

  11. Lymphopoiesis in Protein Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bhuyan, U. N.; Ramalingaswami, V.

    1974-01-01

    In view of the depressed immunity in protein malnutrition, an assessment of the lymphoproliferative activity of the constantly stimulated mesenteric lymph node of the guinea pig was undertaken. A significant reduction of this activity was observed in protein deficiency. a) The germinal centers were reduced in number and size; new formation in the medulla was rarely seen. Lymphoid cells showed lowering of mitotic index and mitotic rate and prolongation of mitotic duration and turnover time. Nuclear labeling with 3H-thymidine was focal and localized to the peripheral zone. b) Mitotic activity and nuclear labeling were less pronounced in the outer cortex and medulla and least in the paracortical area. Specific uptake of 3H-thymidine paralleled the low labeling index. c) No appreciable reduction in the number of plasma cells in the medulla was observed. Serum γ-globulin levels were not significantly altered, but albumin levels were consistently reduced. This was suggestive of preferential preservation of plasma cell activity in the malnourished host. d) There were significant lymphopenia and neutropenia with relative increase of neutrophils in the peripheral blood. This might indicate more severe involvement of lymphopoiesis than myelopoiesis in protein malnutrition. ImagesFig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4 PMID:4132687

  12. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  13. Betaine Deficiency in Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Lerma, Claudia; Rich, Patrick J.; Ju, Grace C.; Yang, Wen-Ju; Hanson, Andrew D.; Rhodes, David

    1991-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a betaine-accumulating species, but certain maize genotypes lack betaine almost completely; a single recessive gene has been implicated as the cause of this deficiency (D Rhodes, PJ Rich [1988] Plant Physiol 88: 102-108). This study was undertaken to determine whether betaine deficiency in diverse maize germplasm is conditioned by the same genetic locus, and to define the biochemical lesion(s) involved. Complementation tests indicated that all 13 deficient genotypes tested shared a common locus. One maize population (P77) was found to be segregating for betaine deficiency, and true breeding individuals were used to produce related lines with and without betaine. Leaf tissue of both betaine-positive and betaine-deficient lines readily converted supplied betaine aldehyde to betaine, but only the betaine-containing line was able to oxidize supplied choline to betaine. This locates the lesion in betaine-deficient plants at the choline → betaine aldehyde step of betaine synthesis. Consistent with this location, betaine-deficient plants were shown to have no detectable endogenous pool of betaine aldehyde. PMID:16668098

  14. Iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, E J; Schwartz, G S

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a group of patients with limbal stem cell (SC) deficiency without prior diagnosis of a specific disease entity known to be causative of SC deficiency. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of the records of all patients with ocular surface disease presenting to the University of Minnesota between 1987 and 1996. Patients were categorized according to etiology of limbal deficiency. Patients who did not have a specific diagnosis previously described as being causative for limbal deficiency were analyzed. Risk factors, clinical findings and sequelae were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight eyes of six patients with stem cell deficiency not secondary to a known diagnosis were described. All eyes had prior ocular surgery involving the corneoscleral limbus. Six eyes had been on chronic topical medications and all eyes had concurrent external disease such as pterygium, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, rosacea or herpes simplex virus keratitis. All eyes had superior quadrants affected corresponding to areas of prior limbal surgery. Sequelae of disease included corneal scarring and neo-vascularization, and five eyes had with visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. CONCLUSIONS: Because the epitheliopathy started peripherally and extended centrally in all patients, we feel it represents a stem cell deficiency. The fact that all patients were affected superiorly, at sites of a prior limbal surgical incision, points to surgical trauma to the SC as the likely major etiologic factor for the deficiency. The surgical trauma to the limbal SC probably made these cells more susceptible to damage from other external disease influences and toxicity from chronic topical medications. Because the stem cell deficiency is secondary to prior ocular surgery and chronic topical medications, we propose the term "iatrogenic limbal stem cell deficiency". Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B PMID:9440165

  15. Use of reflectance spectroscopy for early detection of calcium deficiency in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bingqing; Wah, Liew Oi; Asundi, Anand K.

    2005-04-01

    This article investigates calcium deficiency symptoms of the plants grown under hydroponics conditions. Leaf reflectance data were collected from plants, and then transformed to L*, a*, b* values, which provide color information of the leaves. After comparing the color information of deficient plants to control plants, a set of deficiency criterion was established for early detection of calcium deficiency in the plants. Calcium deficiency could be detected as early as two days from the onset of stress in mature plants when optical data were collected from terminal young leaves. Young plants subjected to calcium stress for 9 days could not be distinguished from nutrient sufficient plants.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia National Blood Clot Alliance: Antithrombin Deficiency Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital antithrombin deficiency Patient Support and ...

  17. Leptin deficiency in maltreated children.

    PubMed

    Danese, A; Dove, R; Belsky, D W; Henchy, J; Williams, B; Ambler, A; Arseneault, L

    2014-09-23

    Consistent with findings from experimental research in nonhuman primates exposed to early-life stress, children exposed to maltreatment are at high risk of detrimental physical health conditions, such as obesity and systemic inflammation. Because leptin is a key molecule involved in the regulation of both energy balance and immunity, we investigated abnormalities in leptin physiology among maltreated children. We measured leptin, body mass index and C-reactive protein in 170 12-year-old children members of the Environmental-Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, for whom we had prospectively-collected information on maltreatment exposure. We found that maltreated children exhibited blunted elevation in leptin levels in relation to increasing levels of physiological stimuli, adiposity and inflammation, compared with a group of non-maltreated children matched for gender, zygosity and socioeconomic status. These findings were also independent of key potential artifacts and confounders, such as time of day at sample collection, history of food insecurity, pubertal maturation and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, using birth weight as a proxy measure for leptin, we found that physiological abnormalities were presumably not present at birth in children who went on to be maltreated but only emerged over the course of childhood, after maltreatment exposure. Leptin deficiency may contribute to onset, persistence and progression of physical health problems in maltreated children.

  18. Determining Functional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehloo, Niloofar; Vakili, Masoud; Hashemian, Zahra; Zare Zardini, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevated concentration of serum total homocysteine usually occurs in vitamin B-12 deficiency. This metabolite can be measured and used for screening functional vitamin B-12 deficiency. Objectives: We assessed functional vitamin B12 deficiency in Tehranian elderly admitted to elderly research center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences. Patients and Materials: A cross-sectional study was performed on 232 elderly admitted to elderly research center in Tehran, Iran in 2012. According to other studies, individuals were classified into two groups: high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency (< 220 pmol/L) and borderline vitamin B-12 (220–258 pmol/L) accompanied by elevated homocysteine (> 15 micmol/L). Results: Cut-off of 15.0 pmol/L for homocysteine was identified for persons with normal or elevated concentrations. Among persons aged 65–74 and ≥ 75 years, respectively, 56% and 93% were at high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Conclusions: The prevalence of B12 deficiency was higher in this study compared to other studies, so more attention and massive efficacious policy should be designed to reduce the deficiency of this vitamin. PMID:26430518

  19. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  20. Biochemical and molecular characteristics of citrin deficiency in Korean children.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seak Hee; Lee, Beom Hee; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2017-02-01

    Mutations in SLC25A13 cause citrin deficiency, which has three phenotypes: neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD), failure to thrive and dyslipidemia caused by citrin deficiency (FTTDCD) and adult-onset type 2 citrullinemia (CTLN2). The purpose of this study was to determine the mutation spectrum and the clinical and biochemical characteristics of citrin deficiency in Korean patients. Thirty-four patients were diagnosed with citrin deficiency based on mutations in SLC25A13, as verified by direct sequencing and long PCR screening of a large transposon insertion. A total of 66 alleles from 33 unrelated families of 34 patients with citrin deficiency (27 NICCD, 2 FTTDCD and 5 CTLN2) were retrospectively identified. The common pathogenic alleles were IVS16ins3kb (33%), c.851_854del (30%) and c.1177+1G>A (12%), and three novel variants were identified. Levels of citrulline, threonine, methionine, tyrosine and arginine and the threonine-to-serine ratio were higher in children with neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by NICCD compared with that in patients with idiopathic neonatal hepatitis (INH). We concluded that Korean patients with citrin deficiency showed the highest frequency of the IVS16ins3kb mutation and that plasma amino-acid profiles can be used to differentiate between NICCD and INH.

  1. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states. PMID:26154191

  2. Plasticity of the Arabidopsis root system under nutrient deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Benjamin D; Giehl, Ricardo F H; Friedel, Swetlana; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2013-09-01

    Plant roots show a particularly high variation in their morphological response to different nutrient deficiencies. Although such changes often determine the nutrient efficiency or stress tolerance of plants, it is surprising that a comprehensive and comparative analysis of root morphological responses to different nutrient deficiencies has not yet been conducted. Since one reason for this is an inherent difficulty in obtaining nutrient-deficient conditions in agar culture, we first identified conditions appropriate for producing nutrient-deficient plants on agar plates. Based on a careful selection of agar specifically for each nutrient being considered, we grew Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants at four levels of deficiency for 12 nutrients and quantified seven root traits. In combination with measurements of biomass and elemental concentrations, we observed that the nutritional status and type of nutrient determined the extent and type of changes in root system architecture (RSA). The independent regulation of individual root traits further pointed to a differential sensitivity of root tissues to nutrient limitations. To capture the variation in RSA under different nutrient supplies, we used principal component analysis and developed a root plasticity chart representing the overall modulations in RSA under a given treatment. This systematic comparison of RSA responses to nutrient deficiencies provides a comprehensive view of the overall changes in root plasticity induced by the deficiency of single nutrients and provides a solid basis for the identification of nutrient-sensitive steps in the root developmental program.

  3. Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, also known as alpha 1-antiprotease inhibitor deficiency, is a disease caused by genetically determined AAT deficiency. It occurs as a result of inheritance of two protease inhibitor (PI) deficiency alleles from the AAT gene locus (designated PI) on chromosomal segment 14q32.1. The most common deficiency allele is PI*Z and a large majority of individuals with severe AAT deficiency are PI type ZZ. The disease occurs predominantly in white persons of European origin and its frequency in Europe and North America is comparable to that of cystic fibrosis (1 in 2000 to 1 in 7000.) Persons with AAT deficiency may have no clinical manifestations. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a high frequency of panacinar emphysema is the most prevalent clinical disorder associated with AAT deficiency and the most frequent cause of disability and death. Tobacco smoking is the major risk factor for developing COPD, which generally begins by the third decade of life, much earlier than "usual" COPD that occurs in AAT-replete individuals. Liver disease, the second most frequent clinical manifestation of AAT deficiency, typically presents as cholestasis in infancy but is usually not severe and generally remits by adolescence. Chronic liver disease develops infrequently, although AAT deficiency is the commonest cause of chronic liver disease in childhood. Cirrhosis and carcinoma of the liver affect at least 25% of AAT-deficient adults over the age of 50 years. AAT deficiency appears to be widely underdiagnosed and based on predicted gene frequencies even in the most intensely studied populations, only a small proportion of those predicted to have AAT deficiency have been diagnosed. Human AAT is available in limited quantity for augmentation therapy. This Memorandum summarizes the discussions and recommendations made by participants at a WHO meeting held in Geneva on 18-20 March 1996 to review existing knowledge about this highly prevalent

  4. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    PubMed

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epub 2007 Dec 3. Citation on PubMed Liu TT, Chiang SH, Wu SJ, Hsiao KJ. Tetrahydrobiopterin-deficient ... Shen M, Zhou Z, Zhang Z, Shen S, Liu TT, Hsiao KJ. Long-term outcome and neuroradiological findings ...

  6. Reconstructive surgery for fibular deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shatilov, O E; Rozkov, A V; Cheminova, T V

    1991-08-01

    Three types of fibular deficiency are described which determine the nature of the surgery and prosthesis required. The surgical management of 50 patients who had a total of 103 operations is described.

  7. Ethylene response factor AtERF72 negatively regulates Arabidopsis thaliana response to iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Li, Qiwei; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ting; Yang, Yafei; Zhang, Xinzhong; Han, Zhenhai; Xu, Xuefeng

    2017-09-23

    Ethylene regulates the plant's response to stress caused by iron (Fe) deficiency. However, specific roles of ERF proteins in response to Fe deficiency remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of ERF72 in response to iron deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the levels of the ethylene response factor AtERF72 increased in leaves and roots induced under the iron deficient conditions. erf72 mutant plants showed increased growth compared to wild type (WT) when grown in iron deficient medium for 5 d. erf72 mutants had increased root H(+) velocity and the ferric reductase activity, and increase in the expression of the iron deficiency response genes iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) and H(+)-ATPase (HA2) levels in iron deficient conditions. Compared to WT plants, erf72 mutants retained healthy chloroplast structure with significantly higher Fe and Mg content, and decreased chlorophyll degradation gene pheophorbide a oxygenase (PAO) and chlorophyllase (CLH1) expression when grown in iron deficient media. Yeast one-hybrid analysis showed that ERF72 could directly bind to the promoter regions of iron deficiency responses genes IRT1, HA2 and CLH1. Based on our results, we suggest that ethylene released from plants under iron deficiency stress can activate the expression of ERF72, which responds to iron deficiency in the negative regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The neurology of biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder in which the enzyme, biotinidase, is defective and the vitamin, biotin, is not recycled. Individuals with biotinidase deficiency, if not treated with biotin, usually exhibit neurological and cutaneous abnormalities. Biotin treatment can ameliorate or prevent symptoms. Biotinidase deficiency meets the major criteria for inclusion in newborn screening programs. With the advent of universal newborn screening for the disorder, the "window-of-opportunity" to characterize the consequences of the untreated disease is essentially gone. To understand the neurology of biotinidase deficiency, we must depend on what is already known about symptomatic individuals with the disorder. Therefore, in this review, the neurological findings of symptomatic individuals with profound biotinidase deficiency have been compiled to catalog the characteristic features of the disorder and the consequences of biotin treatment on these findings. In addition, based on the available evidence, I have speculated on the cause of neurological problems associated with the disorder. Future studies in biotinidase-deficient animals should allow us to demonstrate more definitively if these speculations are correct. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vitamin A deficiency predisposes to Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedermann, U; Tarkowski, A; Bremell, T; Hanson, L A; Kahu, H; Dahlgren, U I

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the consequences of vitamin A deficiency in a rat model of T-cell-dependent and superantigen-mediated Staphylococcus aureus arthritis. After intravenous inoculation of enterotoxin A-producing staphylococci, the vitamin-A-deficient rats showed a decreased weight gain compared with the paired fed controls despite equal food consumption. The control rats developed arthritis in the first few days after bacterial inoculation, with a peak frequency at day 5, and then gradually recovered; however, the frequency of arthritis 18 days after bacterial inoculation was 86% among the vitamin A-deficient rats and 44% among the control rats. During this period, 3 of 10 deficient rats and 1 of 10 control rats died. Further in vitro analysis revealed that T-cell responses to S. aureus were significantly higher in the vitamin A-deficient rats than in the control animals. In contrast, B-cell reactivity, measured as immunoglobulin levels, autoantibody levels, and specific antibacterial antibody levels in serum, did not differ between the groups. Interestingly, the innate host defense mechanisms against S. aureus were also profoundly affected by vitamin A deficiency. Thus, despite a larger number of circulating phagocytic cells in the vitamin-A-deficient group, the capacity to phagocytize and exert intracellular killing of S. aureus was significantly decreased in comparison with the control rats. Furthermore, serum from the vitamin A-deficient rats inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus displayed decreased complement lysis activity. Our results suggest that the increased susceptibility to S. aureus infection observed in the vitamin-A-deficient rats is due to a concerted action of antigen-specific T-cell hyperactivity, impaired function of the phagocytes, and decreased complement activity. PMID:8557341

  10. Genetic basis of human complement C8[beta] deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, T.; Rittner, C.; Schneider, P.M. ); Haensch, G. ); Spaeth, P. ); Tedesco, F. )

    1993-06-01

    The eighth component of human complement (c8) is a serum protein consisting of three chains ([alpha], [beta], and [gamma]) and encoded by three different genes, C8A, C8B, and C8G. C8A and C8B are closely linked on chromosome 1p, whereas C8G is located on chromosome 9q. In the serum the [beta] subunit is non-covalently bound to the disulfide-linked [alpha]-[gamma] subunit. Patients with C8[beta] deficiency suffer from recurrent neisserial infections such as meningitis. Exon-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with primer pairs from the flanking intron sequences was used to amplify all 12 C8B exons separately. No difference regarding the exon sizes was observed in a C8[beta]-deficient patient compared with a normal person. Therefore, direct sequence analysis of all exon-specific PCR products from normal and C8[beta]-deficient individuals was carried out. As a cause for C8[beta] deficiency, we found a single C-T exchange in exon 9 leading to a stop codon. An allele-specific PCR system was designed to detect the normal and the deficiency allele simultaneously. Using this approach as well as PCR typing of the Taql polymorphism located in intron 11, five families with 7 C8[beta]-deficient members were investigated. The mutation was not found to be restricted to one of the two Taql RFLP alleles. The mutant allele was observed in all families investigated and can therefore be regarded as a major cause of C8[beta] deficiency in the Caucasian population. In addition, two C8[beta]-deficient patients were found to be heterozygous for the C-T exchange. The molecular basis of the alleles without this point mutation also causing deficiency has not yet been defined. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Elevated Serum S-Adenosylhomocysteine in Cobalamin Deficient Megaloblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Shinohara, Elvira M.; Morita, Olga E.; Pagliusi, Regina A.; Blaia-d’Avila, Vera L.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired methylation due to accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) may contribute to the pathophysiology of cobalamin deficient anemia. We assayed serum S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), SAH, total homocysteine (tHcy), and methylmalonic acid (MMA) in 15 subjects with cobalamin deficient megaloblastic anemia and compared results to 19 subjects with anemia/pancytopenia due to other causes. Cobalamin deficient subjects had a median hematocrit of 20% and mean cell volume of 111.7 fL. The median serum cobalamin was 37 pg/mL, MMA 3030 nmol/L and tHcy 62.0 umol/L. SAH was elevated in 13 of 15 subjects (median value 42 nmol/L) and the median SAM was normal (103 nmol/L) but SAM/SAH ratio was low, 2.5. The SAH was higher and SAM/SAH ratio lower in cobalamin deficient subjects as compared to those with other anemias after excluding 4 patients with renal insufficiency. SAM concentrations were not low in cobalamin deficiency. Cobalamin injections corrected anemia, MMA, tHcy, SAM/SAH ratio and SAH. Some hematologic variables were inversely correlated with SAH and cobalamin but not tHcy or MMA. In conclusion, serum SAH is elevated in cobalamin deficient subjects with megaloblastic anemia and corrects with parenteral cobalamin therapy. PMID:17292722

  12. Ensuring Effective Prevention of Iodine Deficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Völzke, Henry; Caron, Philippe; Dahl, Lisbeth; de Castro, João J; Erlund, Iris; Gaberšček, Simona; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjörg; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Ittermann, Till; Ivanova, Ludmila; Karanfilski, Borislav; Khattak, Rehman M; Kusić, Zvonko; Laurberg, Peter; Lazarus, John H; Markou, Kostas B; Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Nagy, Endre V; Peeters, Robin P; Pīrāgs, Valdis; Podoba, Ján; Rayman, Margaret P; Rochau, Ursula; Siebert, Uwe; Smyth, Peter P; Thuesen, Betina H; Troen, Aron; Vila, Lluís; Vitti, Paolo; Zamrazil, Vaclav; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2016-02-01

    Programs initiated to prevent iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) may not remain effective due to changes in government policies, commercial factors, and human behavior that may affect the efficacy of IDD prevention programs in unpredictable directions. Monitoring and outcome studies are needed to optimize the effectiveness of IDD prevention. Although the need for monitoring is compelling, the current reality in Europe is less than optimal. Regular and systematic monitoring surveys have only been established in a few countries, and comparability across the studies is hampered by the lack of centralized standardization procedures. In addition, data on outcomes and the cost of achieving them are needed in order to provide evidence of the beneficial effects of IDD prevention in countries with mild iodine deficiency. Monitoring studies can be optimized by including centralized standardization procedures that improve the comparison between studies. No study of iodine consumption can replace the direct measurement of health outcomes and the evaluation of the costs and benefits of the program. It is particularly important that health economic evaluation should be conducted in mildly iodine-deficient areas and that it should include populations from regions with different environmental, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds.

  13. Cellular glutathione peroxidase deficiency and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Forgione, Marc A; Weiss, Norbert; Heydrick, Stanley; Cap, André; Klings, Elizabeth S; Bierl, Charlene; Eberhardt, Robert T; Farber, Harrison W; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2002-04-01

    Cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) is the most abundant intracellular isoform of the GPx antioxidant enzyme family. In this study, we hypothesized that GPx-1 deficiency directly induces an increase in vascular oxidant stress, with resulting endothelial dysfunction. We studied vascular function in a murine model of homozygous deficiency of GPx-1 (GPx-1(-/-)). Mesenteric arterioles of GPx-1(-/-) mice demonstrated paradoxical vasoconstriction to beta-methacholine and bradykinin, whereas wild-type (WT) mice showed dose-dependent vasodilation in response to both agonists. One week of treatment of GPx-1(-/-) mice with L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC), which increases intracellular thiol pools, resulted in restoration of normal vascular reactivity in the mesenteric bed of GPx-1(-/-) mice. We observed an increase of the isoprostane iPF(2alpha)-III, a marker of oxidant stress, in the plasma and aortas of GPx-1(-/-) mice compared with WT mice, which returned toward normal after OTC treatment. Aortic sections from GPx-1(-/-) mice showed increased binding of an anti-3-nitrotyrosine antibody in the absence of frank vascular lesions. These findings demonstrate that homozygous deficiency of GPx-1 leads to impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilator function presumably due to a decrease in bioavailable nitric oxide and to increased vascular oxidant stress. These vascular abnormalities can be attenuated by increasing bioavailable intracellular thiol pools.

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print ... anemia, a common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body ...

  15. Increased malignancy incidence in IgE deficient patients not due to concomitant Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Ferastraoaru, Denisa; Gross, Rebecca; Rosenstreich, David

    2017-09-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) deficiency (<2.5 kU/L) has unclear clinical significance. Very little is known about the clinical characteristics of IgE deficiency in patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID). To evaluate the clinical and laboratory differences between patients with IgE deficiency and those with non-IgE deficiency with and without CVID diagnosis. This is a retrospective study of adult patients who had total serum IgE levels measured at our facility from 2010 through 2015. Patients with IgE levels lower than 2.5 kU/L composed the IgE deficiency group. We used Clinical Looking Glass software to identify laboratory results and comorbid conditions including CVID and malignancy. The IgE levels were measured in 2,339 patients and 63 (2.7%) had IgE deficiency. Of those with IgE deficiency, 14 of 63 (22%) had CVID diagnosis compared with only 62 of 2,276 patients (2.7%) with non-IgE deficiency and CVID. A significantly higher rate of prior malignancy was found in patients with IgE deficiency (21 of 63, 33%) compared with those with non-IgE deficiency (197 of 2,276, 8.7%; P = .001; odds ratio 5.51, 95% confidence interval 3.07-9.88). Six of 14 patients with CVID and IgE deficiency (43%) had a prior malignancy diagnosis compared with 8 of 62 patients (13%) with CVID and non-IgE deficiency (P = .009; odds ratio 10.65, 95% confidence interval 1.79-63.19). In addition to the higher rate of malignancy, patients with CVID and IgE deficiency did not have more severe disease than those with CVID and non-IgE deficiency. The rate of prior malignancy is significantly higher in patients with IgE deficiency than in those without IgE deficiency. Similarly, patients with CVID and IgE deficiency have a higher frequency of prior malignancy than those with CVID and non-IgE deficiency. However, patients with IgE deficiency have higher frequency of malignancy than patients with normal IgE levels even in the absence of CVID. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy

  16. Studies on essential fatty acid deficiency. Effect of the deficiency on the lipids in liver mitochondria and oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Biran, L. A.; Bartley, W.; Carter, C. W.; Renshaw, A.

    1965-01-01

    1. Dietary deficiency of essential fatty acids results in a twofold increase in the neutral lipid content of liver mitochondria as compared with the corresponding value for stock-fed rats. 2. Deficiency produces changes in the pattern of the constituent fatty acids of the main phospholipid fractions of liver mitochondria which are similar to those previously reported for the lipids of whole liver. There is a fall in the content of C18:2 acid and to a smaller extent of C20:4 acid associated with a rise of C16:1, C18:1 and C20:3 acids. 3. Deficiency results in small decreases in the phosphorylation quotients of liver mitochondria during oxidation of succinate and pyruvate, but the values lie within the range reported for normal mitochondria. Mitochondrial respiration with succinate is decreased as a result of deficiency but no change was observed with pyruvate as substrate. PMID:14342237

  17. SCID patients with ARTEMIS vs RAG deficiencies following HCT: increased risk of late toxicity in ARTEMIS-deficient SCID

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Sandrine; Ege, Markus J.; Pannicke, Ulrich; Schwarz, Klaus; Schulz, Ansgar S.; Hoenig, Manfred; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Gatz, Susanne A.; Denzer, Christian; Blanche, Stephane; Moshous, Despina; Picard, Capucine; Horn, Biljana N.; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Cavazzana, Marina; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Fischer, Alain; Cowan, Morton J.

    2014-01-01

    A subgroup of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) is characterized by lack of T and B cells and is caused by defects in genes required for T- and B-cell receptor gene rearrangement. Several of these genes are also involved in nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand break repair, the largest subgroup consisting of patients with T−B−NK+SCID due to DCLRE1C/ARTEMIS defects. We postulated that in patients with ARTEMIS deficiency, early and late complications following hematopoietic cell transplantation might be more prominent compared with patients with T−B−NK+SCID caused by recombination activating gene 1/2 (RAG1/2) deficiencies. We analyzed 69 patients with ARTEMIS and 76 patients with RAG1/2 deficiencies who received transplants from either HLA-identical donors without conditioning or from HLA-nonidentical donors without or with conditioning. There was no difference in survival or in the incidence or severity of acute graft-versus-host disease regardless of exposure to alkylating agents. Secondary malignancies were not observed. Immune reconstitution was comparable in both groups, however, ARTEMIS-deficient patients had a significantly higher occurrence of infections in long-term follow-up. There is a highly significant association between poor growth in ARTEMIS deficiency and use of alkylating agents. Furthermore, abnormalities in dental development and endocrine late effects were associated with alkylation therapy in ARTEMIS deficiency. PMID:24144642

  18. SCID patients with ARTEMIS vs RAG deficiencies following HCT: increased risk of late toxicity in ARTEMIS-deficient SCID.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Catharina; Neven, Benedicte; Dvorak, Christopher C; Leroy, Sandrine; Ege, Markus J; Pannicke, Ulrich; Schwarz, Klaus; Schulz, Ansgar S; Hoenig, Manfred; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Gatz, Susanne A; Denzer, Christian; Blanche, Stephane; Moshous, Despina; Picard, Capucine; Horn, Biljana N; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Cavazzana, Marina; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Fischer, Alain; Cowan, Morton J

    2014-01-09

    A subgroup of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) is characterized by lack of T and B cells and is caused by defects in genes required for T- and B-cell receptor gene rearrangement. Several of these genes are also involved in nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand break repair, the largest subgroup consisting of patients with T(-)B(-)NK(+)SCID due to DCLRE1C/ARTEMIS defects. We postulated that in patients with ARTEMIS deficiency, early and late complications following hematopoietic cell transplantation might be more prominent compared with patients with T(-)B(-)NK(+)SCID caused by recombination activating gene 1/2 (RAG1/2) deficiencies. We analyzed 69 patients with ARTEMIS and 76 patients with RAG1/2 deficiencies who received transplants from either HLA-identical donors without conditioning or from HLA-nonidentical donors without or with conditioning. There was no difference in survival or in the incidence or severity of acute graft-versus-host disease regardless of exposure to alkylating agents. Secondary malignancies were not observed. Immune reconstitution was comparable in both groups, however, ARTEMIS-deficient patients had a significantly higher occurrence of infections in long-term follow-up. There is a highly significant association between poor growth in ARTEMIS deficiency and use of alkylating agents. Furthermore, abnormalities in dental development and endocrine late effects were associated with alkylation therapy in ARTEMIS deficiency.

  19. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  20. Obesity and iron deficiency: a quantitative meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L; Zhang, X; Shen, Y; Fang, X; Wang, Y; Wang, F

    2015-12-01

    Hypoferraemia (i.e. iron deficiency) was initially reported among obese individuals several decades ago; however, whether obesity and iron deficiency are correlated remains unclear. Here, we evaluated the putative association between obesity and iron deficiency by assessing the concentration of haematological iron markers and the risks associated with iron deficiency in both obese (including overweight) subjects and non-overweight participants. We performed a systematic search in the databases PubMed and Embase for relevant research articles published through December 2014. A total of 26 cross-sectional and case-control studies were analysed, comprising 13,393 overweight/obese individuals and 26,621 non-overweight participants. Weighted or standardized mean differences of blood iron markers and odds ratio (OR) of iron deficiency were compared between the overweight/obese participants and the non-overweight participants using a random-effects model. Compared with the non-overweight participants, the overweight/obese participants had lower serum iron concentrations (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -8.37 μg dL(-1) ; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -11.38 to -5.36 μg dL(-1) ) and lower transferrin saturation percentages (WMD: 2.34%, 95% CI: -3.29% to -1.40%). Consistent with this finding, the overweight/obese participants had a significantly increased risk of iron deficiency (OR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.01-1.68). Moreover, subgroup analyses revealed that the method used to diagnose iron deficiency can have a critical effect on the results of the association test; specifically, we found a significant correlation between iron deficiency and obesity in studies without a ferritin-based diagnosis, but not in studies that used a ferritin-based diagnosis. Based upon these findings, we concluded that obesity is significantly associated with iron deficiency, and we recommend early monitoring and treatment of iron deficiency in overweight and obese individuals. Future

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    Williams, Olatundun; Gbadero, Daniel; Edowhorhu, Grace; Brearley, Ann; Slusher, Tina; Lund, Troy C

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (561 males and 561 females) aged 1 month to 15 years. The mean age was 7.4 ± 3.2 years. Children of Yoruba ethnicity made up the largest group (77.5%) followed by those Igbo descent (10.6%) and those of Igede (10.2%) and Tiv (1.8%) ethnicity. G6PD status was determined using the fluorescent spot method. We found that the overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency was 15.3% (24.1% in males, 6.6% in females). Yoruba children had a higher prevalence (16.9%) than Igede (10.5%), Igbo (10.1%) and Tiv (5.0%) children. The odds of G6PD deficiency were 0.38 times as high in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children (p=0.0500). The odds for Igede and Tiv children were not significantly different from Yoruba children (p=0.7528 and 0.9789 respectively). Mean oxygen saturation, heart rate and hematocrit were not significantly different in G6PD deficient and G6PD sufficient children. The odds of being G6PD deficient were 2.1 times higher in children with scleral icterus than those without (p=0.0351). In conclusion, we determined the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Nigerian sub-populations. The odds of G6PD deficiency were decreased in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children. There was no association between vital parameters or hematocrit and G6PD deficiency. We found that a history of scleral icterus may increase the odds of G6PD deficiency, but we did not exclude other common causes of icterus such as sickle cell disease or malarial infection.

  2. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: Current Perspective from Genetics to Diagnosis and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Simona; Scarlata, Simone; Poeta, Maria L; Bialas, Adam J; Paone, Gregorino; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is a 52-kDa, acute phase glycoprotein encoded by the protease inhibitor (PI) locus, located on the long arm of chromosome 14 (14q31-32.3). Its structure is composed of a total of 7 exons, 4 coding (II, III, IV, and V) and 3 non-coding (IA, IB, and IC). A1AT is produced primarily by hepatocytes and acts as a serine protease inhibitor with antiprotease and immunoregulatory activities. The main target of A1AT is neutrophil elastase (NE), an enzyme released during a neutrophil-mediated inflammatory process. When the enzyme is not adequately balanced by A1AT activity, it can cause tissue injury and destruction. A1AT deficiency (A1ATD) is a genetic autosomal recessive disease, characterized by low serum levels of A1AT. The condition may lead to liver disease, early-onset pulmonary emphysema and, rare multi-organ vasculitis, necrotizing panniculitis and fibromyalgia. At least 100 allelic variants of the polymorphic PI locus have been described with groups including associations with different A1AT plasma levels and functions. Treatments with purified A1AT preparations, obtained through pooled human plasma (augmentation therapy), have been proven to improve survival and disease-related quality of life, as well as, slow down the progression of organ damage. Furthermore, ongoing research is now focusing on the development of specifically targeted, new medications. The aim of this review is to summarize our knowledge of the genetic A1AT variants, focusing on their variable clinical manifestation, report routine and recently updated laboratory diagnostic techniques, and to highlight the relevance of early diagnosis of A1ATD. Moreover, we will review the role of augmentation therapy recommendations and future perspectives focusing on a personalized treatment of A1ATD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Serum homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentrations in Chinese Shar-Pei dogs with cobalamin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Grützner, Niels; Heilmann, Romy M; Stupka, Kenneth C; Rangachari, Venkat R; Weber, Katja; Holzenburg, Andreas; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2013-08-01

    Cobalamin deficiency is suspected to be hereditary in Chinese Shar-Pei dogs (Shar-Peis), and inherited causes of cobalamin deficiency may affect the cellular processing of cobalamin. In humans, a defect of the two main cobalamin-dependent intracellular enzymes (i.e., methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase) may lead to hyperhomocysteinemia and hypermethylmalonic acidemia. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate serum homocysteine (HCY) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) concentrations in cobalamin-deficient Shar-Peis and dogs of six other breeds. Serum samples (n=297) from cobalamin-deficient dogs (Shar-Peis, German Shepherd dogs, Labrador Retrievers, Yorkshire Terriers, Boxers, Cocker Spaniels, and Beagles) were analyzed for serum HCY and MMA concentrations. A Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate if cobalamin deficiency in Shar-Peis is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia. Serum HCY and MMA concentrations were higher in cobalamin-deficient Shar-Peis compared to cobalamin-deficient dogs of the six other breeds (P<0.0001). Hyperhomocysteinemia was associated with cobalamin deficiency in Shar-Peis (P=0.009). In addition, serum HCY and MMA concentrations did not differ between cobalamin-deficient German Shepherd dogs with and without exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), a potential cause of secondary cobalamin deficiency. These findings suggest that the function of the two intracellular cobalamin-dependent enzymes is impaired in Shar-Peis with cobalamin deficiency. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Maternal micronutrient deficiency leads to alteration in the kidney proteome in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shadab; Basak, Trayambak; Anand Kumar, K; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Lalitha, A; Yadav, Dilip K; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Raghunath, Manchala; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2015-09-08

    Maternal nutritional deficiency significantly perturbs the offspring's physiology predisposing them to metabolic diseases during adulthood. Vitamin B12 and folate are two such micronutrients, whose deficiency leads to elevated homocysteine levels. We earlier generated B12 and/or folate deficient rat models and using high-throughput proteomic approach, showed that maternal vitamin B12 deficiency modulates carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in the liver of pups through regulation of PPAR signaling pathway. In this study, using similar approach, we identified 26 differentially expressed proteins in the kidney of pups born to mothers fed with vitamin B12 deficient diet while only four proteins were identified in the folate deficient group. Importantly, proteins like calreticulin, cofilin 1 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase B that are involved in the functioning of the kidney were upregulated in B12 deficient group. Our results hint towards a larger effect of vitamin B12 deficiency compared to that of folate presumably due to greater elevation of homocysteine in vitamin B12 deficient group. In view of widespread vitamin B12 and folate deficiency and its association with several diseases like anemia, cardiovascular and renal diseases, our results may have large implications for kidney diseases in populations deficient in vitamin B12 especially in vegetarians and the elderly people.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters MK-801-induced behaviours in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; O'Loan, Jonathan C; Alexander, Suzanne; Deng, Chao; Huang, Xu-Feng; McGrath, John J; Eyles, Darryl W; Burne, Thomas H J

    2012-04-01

    Developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency is a candidate risk factor for developing schizophrenia in humans. In rodents DVD deficiency induces subtle changes in the way the brain develops. This early developmental insult leads to select behavioural changes in the adult, such as an enhanced response to amphetamine-induced locomotion in female DVD-deficient rats but not in male DVD-deficient rats and an enhanced locomotor response to the N-methyl-D: -aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801, in male DVD-deficient rats. However, the response to MK-801-induced locomotion in female DVD-deficient rats is unknown. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to further examine this behavioural finding in male and female rats and assess NMDA receptor density. DVD-deficient Sprague Dawley rats were assessed for locomotion, ataxia, acoustic startle response (ASR) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the ASR to multiple doses of MK-801. The NMDA receptor density in relevant brain regions was assessed in a drug-naive cohort. DVD deficiency increased locomotion in response to MK-801 in both sexes. DVD-deficient rats also showed an enhanced ASR compared with control rats, but PPI was normal. Moreover, DVD deficiency decreased NMDA receptor density in the caudate putamen of both sexes. These results suggest that a transient prenatal vitamin D deficiency has a long-lasting effect on NMDA-mediated signalling in the rodent brain and may be a plausible candidate risk factor for schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  6. Mineralocorticoid deficiency in hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Tolstoy, Nikolai S.; Aized, Majid; McMonagle, Morgan P.; Holena, Daniel N.; Pascual, Jose L.; Sonnad, Seema S.; Sims, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Background In the critically ill, mineralocorticoid deficiency (MD) is associated with greater disease severity, the development of acute renal insufficiency, and increased mortality. We hypothesized that severely injured trauma patients presenting with hemorrhagic shock would demonstrate a high degree of MD. We also hypothesized that MD in these patients would be associated with increased length of stay, hypotension, fluid requirements, and acute kidney injury (AKI). Materials and methods Thirty-two trauma patients in hemorrhagic shock on admission to the trauma bay (SBP <90 mm Hg × 2) were enrolled. Blood samples were obtained on ICU admission and 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours later. Plasma aldosterone (PA) and renin (PR) were assayed by radioimmunoassay. MD was defined as a ratio of PA/PR ≤2. Demographic data, injury severity score, ICU and hospital length of stay, fluid requirements, mean arterial pressure, serum sodium, hypotension, and risk for AKI were compared for patients with and without MD. Results At ICU admission, 48% of patients met criteria for MD. Patients with MD were significantly more likely to experience hypotension (MAP ≤60 mm Hg) during the study period. MD patients required significantly more units of blood in 48 h than non-MD patients (13 [7–22] versus 5 [2–7], P = 0.015) and had increased crystalloid requirements (18L [14–23] versus 9L [6–10], P < 0.001). MD patients were at higher risk for AKI according to RIFLE and AKIN criteria. Conclusions MD is a common entity in trauma patients presenting in hemorrhagic shock. Patients with MD required a more aggressive resuscitative effort, were more likely to experience hypotension, and had a higher risk of AKI than non-MD patients. Future studies are needed to fully understand the impact of MD following trauma and the potential role for hormonal replacement therapy. PMID:22683082

  7. Mineralocorticoid deficiency in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, Nikolai S; Aized, Majid; McMonagle, Morgan P; Holena, Daniel N; Pascual, Jose L; Sonnad, Seema S; Sims, Carrie A

    2013-04-01

    In the critically ill, mineralocorticoid deficiency (MD) is associated with greater disease severity, the development of acute renal insufficiency, and increased mortality. We hypothesized that severely injured trauma patients presenting with hemorrhagic shock would demonstrate a high degree of MD. We also hypothesized that MD in these patients would be associated with increased length of stay, hypotension, fluid requirements, and acute kidney injury (AKI). Thirty-two trauma patients in hemorrhagic shock on admission to the trauma bay (SBP <90 mm Hg × 2) were enrolled. Blood samples were obtained on ICU admission and 8, 16, 24, and 48 hours later. Plasma aldosterone (PA) and renin (PR) were assayed by radioimmunoassay. MD was defined as a ratio of PA/PR ≤2. Demographic data, injury severity score, ICU and hospital length of stay, fluid requirements, mean arterial pressure, serum sodium, hypotension, and risk for AKI were compared for patients with and without MD. At ICU admission, 48% of patients met criteria for MD. Patients with MD were significantly more likely to experience hypotension (MAP ≤60 mm Hg) during the study period. MD patients required significantly more units of blood in 48 h than non-MD patients (13 [7-22] versus 5 [2-7], P = 0.015) and had increased crystalloid requirements (18L [14-23] versus 9L [6-10], P < 0.001). MD patients were at higher risk for AKI according to RIFLE and AKIN criteria. MD is a common entity in trauma patients presenting in hemorrhagic shock. Patients with MD required a more aggressive resuscitative effort, were more likely to experience hypotension, and had a higher risk of AKI than non-MD patients. Future studies are needed to fully understand the impact of MD following trauma and the potential role for hormonal replacement therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neonatal screening for biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Forman, D T; Bankson, D D; Highsmith, W E

    1992-01-01

    Children with juvenile-onset multiple carboxylase deficiency lack biotinidase activity (biotinamide amidohydrolase, EC 3.5.1.12) in the liver and other tissues. Hence, little free biotin is metabolically available, resulting in seizures, acidosis, and serious neurological damage. As the absence of hepatic biotinidase activity is reflected in serum, assessment of biotinidase status can easily be made from a blood sample. A convenient qualitative procedure for screening infants has been employed in order to estimate serum levels of biotinidase in as little as 10 microliters of sample. This colorimetric procedure detects the formation of free p-aminobenzoate cleaved from the substrate, N-biotinyl-p-aminobenzoate at pH 6.0. The assay is easily performed and has a low incidence of false positive results. A kinetic assay for serum biotinidase has also been developed using biotinyl-p-nitroanilide (BpNA) as substrate. When 50 microliters of biotinidase positive serum was incubated with 0.2 mM BpNA in phosphate buffer at pH 6.0, an increase in absorbance was observed at 405 nm. The rate of change in absorbance was followed kinetically on the Roche Cobas BIO analyzer at 37 degrees C. Monitoring the increase in absorbance of para-nitroanilide every 60 seconds over 30 minutes demonstrated linearity from 10 to 30 minutes. In comparing results from this kinetic assay on 48 randomly selected sera with those obtained using a colorimetric procedure, a correlation coefficient of 0.85 was obtained. Several false positive results were observed in clearly lipemic sera.

  9. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanoi, Keitaro; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium ions (Mg2+) are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency. PMID:27135350

  10. Iodine deficiency and thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Boelaert, Kristien

    2015-04-01

    Iodine deficiency early in life impairs cognition and growth, but iodine status is also a key determinant of thyroid disorders in adults. Severe iodine deficiency causes goitre and hypothyroidism because, despite an increase in thyroid activity to maximise iodine uptake and recycling in this setting, iodine concentrations are still too low to enable production of thyroid hormone. In mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency, increased thyroid activity can compensate for low iodine intake and maintain euthyroidism in most individuals, but at a price: chronic thyroid stimulation results in an increase in the prevalence of toxic nodular goitre and hyperthyroidism in populations. This high prevalence of nodular autonomy usually results in a further increase in the prevalence of hyperthyroidism if iodine intake is subsequently increased by salt iodisation. However, this increase is transient because iodine sufficiency normalises thyroid activity which, in the long term, reduces nodular autonomy. Increased iodine intake in an iodine-deficient population is associated with a small increase in the prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity; whether these increases are also transient is unclear. Variations in population iodine intake do not affect risk for Graves' disease or thyroid cancer, but correction of iodine deficiency might shift thyroid cancer subtypes toward less malignant forms. Thus, optimisation of population iodine intake is an important component of preventive health care to reduce the prevalence of thyroid disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients’ outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron), before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented. PMID:23676549

  12. Inherited deficiency of the second component of complement. Rheumatic disease associations.

    PubMed Central

    Glass, D; Raum, D; Gibson, D; Stillman, J S; Schur, P H

    1976-01-01

    The prevalence of homozygous and heterozygous deficiency of the second component of complement (C2) was determined in patients with rheumatic disease including 137 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 274 with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and 134 with rheumatoid arthritis. 1 C2 homozygous deficient and 19 possible heterozygous deficient individuals were identified by using both immunochemical and functional assays to determine C2 levels. Of the 20, 8 had SLE (5.9%), 10 had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (3.7%), and 2 had rheumatoid arthritis (1.4%), the homozygous deficient individual having SLE. The prevalence of C2 deficiency in the SLE and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients was significantly increased (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.02, respectively) when compared with controls, 6 (1.2%) of 509 blood donors having C2 levels consistent with heterozygous deficiency. 15 of the 20 C2 deficient patients were HLA typed and found to have antigens A10(Aw25), B18, or both. The patients with C2 deficiency and SLE had earlier age of onset of disease and less antinuclear antibody when compared with the C2 normal SLE patients. 11 families of the propositi were studied and found to have one or more C2 heterozygous deficient individuals. The family members had an equal distribution of rheumatic disease and antinuclear antibody in the C2 deficient and C2 normal groups. C2 deficient individuals were found to have significantly lower levels of properdin Factor B (242 mug/ml+/-54) when compared with the non-C2 deficient family members (282 mug/ml+/-73). These data support the concept that inherited deficiency of C2 is significantly associated with both SLE and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:965492

  13. Atomic Bond Deficiency Defects in Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Aiwu; Shiflet, Gary J.; Poon, S. Joseph

    2012-10-01

    Atomic bond deficiency (BD) is considered to be characteristic structural defects in amorphous metals. They are the necessary feature of local atomic configurations that facilitate various atomic transports under different driving forces. Compared with vacancies in crystalline solids, they are "small" in terms of their formation energies, volume costs, and elementary steps involved in atomic transport. This article reviews the authors' recent efforts made to analyze how various local configurations containing BD are related to amorphous metal's unique characteristics, such as glass transition, diffusion, shear flow, and structural relaxation.

  14. Development of additional pituitary hormone deficiencies in pediatric patients originally diagnosed with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Blum, Werner F; Deal, Cheri; Zimmermann, Alan G; Shavrikova, Elena P; Child, Christopher J; Quigley, Charmian A; Drop, Stenvert L S; Cutler, Gordon B; Rosenfeld, Ron G

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the characteristics of children initially diagnosed with idiopathic isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) who later developed additional (multiple) pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD). Data were analyzed for 5805 pediatric patients with idiopathic IGHD, who were GH-naïve at baseline and GH-treated in the multinational, observational Genetics and Neuroendocrinology of Short Stature International Study. Development of MPHD was assessed from investigator diagnoses, adverse events, and concomitant medications. Analyses were performed for all patients and for those who developed MPHD within 4.5 years or had ≥3.5 years, follow-up and continued to have IGHD (4-year cohort). MPHD developed in 118/5805 (2.0%) children overall, and in 96/1757 (5.5%) in the 4-year cohort. Patients who developed MPHD had more profound GHD, with decreased height SDS, IGF1 SDS and peak stimulated GH, and greater height decrement vs target, compared with children who continued to have IGHD (P<0.001 for each variable). Delivery complications, congenital anomalies, and perinatal/neonatal adverse events occurred more frequently in patients who developed MPHD. The most frequent additional deficiency was TSH (82 patients overall); four patients developed two pituitary hormone deficiencies and one developed three deficiencies. Multivariable logistic regression indicated that years of follow-up (odds ratio 1.55), baseline age (1.17), baseline height SDS (0.69), and peak stimulated GH (0.64) were associated with the development of MPHD. MPHD is more likely to develop in patients with more severe idiopathic IGHD. Older baseline age, lower baseline height SDS, and longer follow-up duration are associated with increased risk of development of MPHD.

  15. Osteopontin Deficiency Suppresses Intestinal Tumor Development in Apc-Deficient Min Mice.

    PubMed

    Ishigamori, Rikako; Komiya, Masami; Takasu, Shinji; Mutoh, Michihiro; Imai, Toshio; Takahashi, Mami

    2017-05-14

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted phosphoglycoprotein, and is a transcriptional target of aberrant Wnt signaling. OPN is upregulated in human colon cancers, and is suggested to enhance cancer progression. In this study, the effect of deficiency of OPN on intestinal tumor development in Apc-deficient Min mice was investigated. At 16 weeks of age, the number of small intestinal polyps in Min/OPN(+/-) and Min/OPN(-/-) mice was lower than that of Min/OPN(+/+) mice. Colorectal tumor incidences and multiplicities in Min/OPN(+/-) and Min/OPN(-/-) mice were significantly lower than those in Min/OPN(+/+) mice, being 48% and 0.6 ± 0.8, 50% and 0.8 ± 0.9 vs. 80% and 1.6 ± 1.7, respectively. OPN expression in colorectal tumors was strongly upregulated in Min/OPN(+/+) compared to adjacent non-tumor parts, but was decreased in Min/OPN(+/-) and not detected in Min/OPN(-/-). Targets of OPN, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-3, -9, and -13 were lowered by OPN deficiency. Macrophage marker F4/80 in colorectal tumors was also lowered by OPN deficiency. MMP-9 expression was observed in tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating neutrophils. These results indicate that induction of OPN by aberrant Wnt signaling could enhance colorectal tumor development in part by upregulation of MMP-3, -9, and -13 and infiltration of macrophage and neutrophils. Suppression of OPN expression could contribute to tumor prevention, but complete deficiency of OPN may cause some adverse effects.

  16. Does estrogen deficiency cause lacrimal gland inflammation and aqueous-deficient dry eye in mice?

    PubMed

    Rahimi Darabad, Raheleh; Suzuki, Tomo; Richards, Stephen M; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Zakka, Fouad R; Barabino, Stefano; Sullivan, David A

    2014-10-01

    Researchers have proposed that estrogen deficiency will lead to a Sjögren's syndrome (SjS)-like lacrimal gland inflammation, aqueous tear deficiency and dry eye. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this proposal is correct. Lacrimal glands were obtained from adult, age-matched wild type (WT) and aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice, in which estrogen synthesis is completely eliminated. Tissues were also obtained from autoimmune MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) mice as inflammation controls. Tear volumes in WT and ArKO mice were measured and glands were processed for molecular biological and histological evaluation. Our results demonstrate that estrogen absence does not lead to a SjS-like inflammation in lacrimal tissue or to an aqueous-deficient dry eye. There was no upregulation of genes associated with inflammatory pathways in lacrimal glands of male or female ArKO mice. Such inflammatory activity was prominent in autoimmune MRL/lpr tissues. We also found no evidence of inflammation in lacrimal gland tissue sections of estrogen-deficient mice, and tear volumes of ArKO males were actually increased as compared to those WT controls. Interestingly, our study did show that estrogen absence influences the expression of thousands of lacrimal gland genes, and that this impact is sex- and genotype-specific. Our findings demonstrate that estrogen absence is not a risk factor for the development of SjS-like lacrimal gland inflammation or for aqueous-deficient dry eye in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Does estrogen deficiency cause lacrimal gland inflammation and aqueous-deficient dry eye in mice?

    PubMed Central

    Darabad, Raheleh Rahimi; Suzuki, Tomo; Richards, Stephen M.; Jakobiec, Frederick A.; Zakka, Fouad R.; Barabino, Stefano; Sullivan, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have proposed that estrogen deficiency will lead to a Sjögren's syndrome (SjS)-like lacrimal gland inflammation, aqueous tear deficiency and dry eye. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this proposal is correct. Lacrimal glands were obtained from adult, age-matched wild type (WT) and aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice, in which estrogen synthesis is completely eliminated. Tissues were also obtained from autoimmune MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) mice as inflammation controls. Tear volumes in WT and ArKO mice were measured and glands were processed for molecular biological and histological evaluation. Our results demonstrate that estrogen absence does not lead to a SjS-like inflammation in lacrimal tissue or to an aqueous-deficient dry eye. There was no upregulation of genes associated with inflammatory pathways in lacrimal glands of male or female ArKO mice. Such inflammatory activity was prominent in autoimmune MRL/lpr tissues. We also found no evidence of inflammation in lacrimal gland tissue sections of estrogen-deficient mice, and tear volumes of ArKO males were actually increased as compared to those WT controls. Interestingly, our study did show that estrogen absence influences the expression of thousands of lacrimal gland genes, and that this impact is sex- and genotype-specific. Our findings demonstrate that estrogen absence is not a risk factor for the development of SjS-like lacrimal gland inflammation or for aqueous-deficient dry eye in mice. PMID:25084452

  18. Peripartum anesthetic management of patients with Factor XI deficiency.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Alon; Orbach-Zinger, Sharon; Eidelman, Leonid A; Ginosar, Yehuda; Ioscovich, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Factor XI deficiency is predominantly found in the Ashkenazi Jewish population with a prevalence of 9%, but also seen in other ethnicities. Little information is available on obstetric anesthesia management in women with Factor XI deficiency. Therefore, we undertook a study to evaluate obstetric, anesthetic and perinatal outcomes in parturients with Factor XI deficiency. A retrospective study was conducted with chart reviews from 1996 to 2011 resulted in 74 women with Factor XI level deficiency. We compared anesthetic and obstetric management in parturients with low (≤30%) level of Factor XI to those with higher levels. Ninety-one pregnancy outcomes were reviewed in these 74 women with Factor XI deficiency. Forty-three women had levels ≤30% in 46 labors while 31 women had levels >30% in 45 labors. Women with low levels of Factor XI were significantly more likely to receive FFP and less likely to receive neuroaxial anesthesia. There were no anesthetic complications and no difference in mode of delivery or neonatal outcomes. This study is the first step in building a national database for anesthetic cases and outcomes of parturients with Factor XI deficiency. Further efforts must be made to provide safe analgesia for these women.

  19. Exacerbated experimental colitis in TNFAIP8-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Honghong; Lou, Yunwei; Porturas, Thomas; Morrissey, Samantha; Luo, George; Qi, Ji; Ruan, Qingguo; Shi, Songlin; Chen, Youhai H

    2015-06-15

    The TNF-α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8 or TIPE) is a risk factor for cancer and bacterial infection, and its expression is upregulated in a number of human cancers. However, its physiologic and pathologic functions are unclear. In this study, we describe the generation of TIPE-deficient mice and their increased sensitivity to colonic inflammation. TIPE-deficient mice were generated by germ line gene targeting and were born without noticeable developmental abnormalities. Their major organs, including lymphoid organs and intestines, were macroscopically and microscopically normal. However, after drinking dextran sodium sulfate-containing water, TIPE-deficient mice developed more severe colitis than wild type mice did, as demonstrated by decreased survival rates, increased body weight loss, and enhanced leukocyte infiltration, bacterial invasion, and inflammatory cytokine production in the colon. Bone marrow chimeric experiments revealed that TIPE deficiency in nonhematopoietic cells was responsible for the exacerbated colitis in TIPE-deficient mice. Consistent with this result, TIPE-deficient intestinal epithelial cells had increased rate of cell death and decreased rate of proliferation as compared with wild type controls. These findings indicate that TIPE plays an important role in maintaining colon homeostasis and in protecting against colitis.

  20. Exacerbated Experimental Colitis In TNFAIP8-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Honghong; Lou, Yunwei; Porturas, Thomas; Morrissey, Samantha; Luo, George; Qi, Ji; Ruan, Qingguo; Shi, Songlin; Chen, Youhai H.

    2015-01-01

    The TNF-α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8 or TIPE) is a risk factor for cancer and bacterial infection, and its expression is upregulated in a number of human cancers. However, its physiological and pathological functions are unclear. We describe here the generation of TIPE-deficient mice and their increased sensitivity to colonic inflammation. TIPE-deficient mice were generated by germ line gene targeting and were born without noticeable developmental abnormalities. Their major organs including lymphoid organs and intestines were macroscopically and microscopically normal. However, after drinking dextran sodium sulfate-containing water, TIPE-deficient mice developed more severe colitis than wild type mice, as demonstrated by decreased survival rates, increased body weight loss, and enhanced leukocyte infiltration, bacterial invasion, and inflammatory cytokine production in the colon. Bone marrow chimeric experiments revealed that TIPE deficiency in non-hematopoietic cells was responsible for the exacerbated colitis in TIPE-deficient mice. Consistent with this result, TIPE-deficient intestinal epithelial cells had increased rate of cell death and decreased rate of proliferation as compared to wild type controls. Taken together, these findings indicate that TIPE plays an important role in maintaining colon homeostasis and in protecting against colitis. PMID:25948814

  1. Selenium deficiency in subtropical littoral pampas: environmental and dietary aspects.

    PubMed

    Mirlean, N; Seus-Arrache, E R; Vlasova, O

    2017-04-11

    Se deficiency has a critical effect on human health. The littoral near Patos Lagoon in the south of Brazil is composed of Quaternary sandy deposits and nutrient-deficient soils, which contribute to Se deficiency in the surrounding environment. The average concentration of Se in littoral soils is six times lower than the metalloid deficiency threshold of 0.5 mg kg(-1) and is close to that in countries where Keshan disease is registered. The sediments in the Patos Estuary are also notably lower in Se than near-shore marine sediments. Foodstuffs produced in the littoral pampas are characterised by extremely low Se concentrations compared with the same alimentary products reported worldwide. The total daily dietary intake of Se in the region is 24 μg day(-1), which is half the Estimated Average Requirement for adults. Black beans in the local diet provide over 40% of daily Se intake. Prescriptive addition of Se to prevalent products seems the most effective solution to the problem of metalloid dietary deficiency in the region. Similar environmental conditions and significant concentration of the population in the littoral zone suggest that the problem of Se deficiency probably affects a large proportion of the population along the Atlantic coast of Brazil.

  2. Dietary protein deficiency in pregnant mice and offspring.

    PubMed

    Millis, Richard M; Offiah, Godwin U

    2007-03-06

    Previous studies suggest an association between dermal contact hypersensitivity and preterm delivery. We hypothesized that dietary protein deficiency produces cell-mediated immune hypersensitivity in pregnant animals and their offspring akin to those known to produce tissue damage. We compared the effects of feeding a 20% protein diet (controls) to those of feeding a 10% protein (deficient) diet ad libitum to pregnant BALB/c mice. We measured dermal contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) by the increment in ear skin thickness (swelling) 72 h after immunization and parity by the number of viable pups delivered. Dams fed the protein-deficient diet ingested less food, gained less weight and delivered fewer viable pups than the dams fed the control diet. Greater DNFB-stimulated increment in ear skin thickness was found in the protein-deficient mothers and in their offspring than in the control mothers and their offspring. We conclude that dietary protein deficiency limits parity and induces immune hypersensitivity. These findings suggest the potential for dietary protein deficiency to activate a T-cell-mediated branch of the immune response that may put pregnant animals at risk for preterm delivery.

  3. Enhanced breakdown of arylsulfatase A in multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Waheed, A; Hasilik, A; von Figura, K

    1982-04-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (mucosulfatidosis) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the decrease in activities of all known sulfatases. To measure the apparent rate of synthesis and the half-life of arylsulfatase A in multiple sulfatase deficiency, fibroblasts from patients with the disease and from controls were subjected to pulse-chase labelling with radioactive amino acids. Arylsulfatase A and cathepsin D, a lysosomal enzyme that is not affected in multiple sulfatase deficiency, were isolated from cells and media by immunoprecipitation. The labelled polypeptides were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, visualized by fluorography and quantified by liquid scintillation counting. Using single and double isotope techniques it was found that, as compared to cathepsin D, the apparent rate of synthesis of arylsulfatase A was 2--5 times lower and the half-life 4--9-times shorter in multiple sulfatase deficiency than in control fibroblasts. In multiple sulfatase deficiency fibroblasts the rates of endocytosis and the stabilities of endocytosed arylsulfatases A isolated from human urine and bovine tests were equal to those in metachromatic leucodystrophy fibroblasts. We postulate that in normal cells a gene product exists that affects the stability of sulfatases and that multiple sulfatase deficiency is due to a mutation in this gene.

  4. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue.

  5. [Vitamin A deficiency and xerophtalmia

    PubMed

    Diniz, A da S; Santos, L M

    2000-11-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review cases of vitamin A deficiency and the effects of vitamin A supplementation on child morbidity and mortality. METHODS: Articles published in scientific journals, technical and scientific books, and also publications by international organizations were used as source of information. RESULTS: Clinical manifestations of xerophthalmia affect the retina (night blindness), the conjunctiva (conjunctival xerosis, with or without Bitot spots), and the cornea (corneal xerosis). Corneal xerosis may lead to corneal ulceration and liquefactive necrosis (keratomalacia). A priori, these signs and symptoms are the best indicators of vitamin A deficiency; they are, however, extremely rare. Laboratory indicators include Conjunctival Impression Cytology and serum retinol concentrations. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the use of two biological markers in order to characterize vitamin A deficiency in a given population. If only one biological marker is used, this marker has to be backed up by a set of at least four additional risk factors. Corneal xerophthalmia should be treated as a medical emergency; In the event of suspected vitamin A deficiency, a 200,000 IU vitamin A dose should be administered orally, repeating the dose after 24 hours (half the dose for infants younger than one year). Vitamin A supplementation in endemic areas may cause a 23 to 30% reduction in the mortality rate of children aged between 6 months and five years, and attenuate the severity of diarrhea. The methods for the control of vitamin A deficiency are available in the short (supplementation with megadoses), medium (food fortification), and long run (diet diversification). CONCLUSION: There is evidence of vitamin A deficiency among Brazilian children. Pediatricians must be aware of the signs and symptoms of this disease, however sporadic they might be. It is of paramount importance that vitamin A be included in public policy plans so that we can ensure the survival of

  6. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  7. Examining the Association between Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Dementia in High-Risk Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Siswanto, O; Smeall, K; Watson, T; Donnelly-Vanderloo, M; O'Connor, C; Foley, N; Madill, J

    2015-12-01

    To explore the association between vitamin B12 deficiency and dementia in patients at high risk for vitamin B12 deficiency. Chart review. Emergency, critical care/ trauma, neurology, medicine, and rehabilitation units of two hospitals in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. Adult patients (n = 666) admitted from 2010 to 2012. Data collection included: reason for admission, gender, age, clinical signs and symptoms of B12 deficiency, serum B12 concentration, and B12 supplementation. Patients with dementia were identified based on their medication profile and medical history. Vitamin B12 deficiency (pmol/L) was defined as serum B12 concentration <148; marginal deficiency: ≥148-220 and adequate >220. Comparisons between B12-deficient patients with and without dementia were examined using parametric and non-parametric tests. Serum B12 values were available for 60% (399/666) of the patients, of whom 4% (16/399) were B12-deficient and 14% (57/399) were marginally deficient. Patients with dementia were not more likely to be B12-deficient or marginally deficient [21% (26/121)] compared to those with no dementia [17% (47/278), p=0.27)]. Based on documentation, 34% (25/73) of the B12-deficient and marginally-deficient patients did not receive B12 supplementation, of whom 40% (10/25) had dementia. In this sample of patients, there was no association between B12 deficiency and dementia. However, appropriate B12 screening protocols are necessary for high risk patient to identify deficiency and then receive B12 supplementation as needed.

  8. Urinary iodine as an iodine deficiency test in lung transplant recipients in order to prevent iodine deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Stanjek-Cichoracka, Anita; Żegleń, Sławomir; Woźniak-Grygiel, Elżbieta; Laszewska, Anna; Sindera, Piotr; Wojarski, Jacek; Ochman, Marek; Karolak, Wojtek; Zembala, Marian

    2014-10-07

    In Poland, lung transplantation (LTx) as a routine method began in 2004, and since then, the Silesian Center for Heart Disease in Zabrze 85 LTx has performed (54 single-lung transplantations, 30 double-lung transplantations, and 1 heart-lung) transplantation. The recommendation to take vitamin supplements (without specific indication of the iodine content) does not apply to another iodine prophylaxis in patients after lung transplantation, excluding patients with known thyroid disease. The aim of this study was to assess thyroid gland function based on hormones and urinary iodine (UI) concentration in patients after LTx. UI analysis was performed in 19 lung recipients (12 men and 7 women; mean age: 46.2 ± 12.47 years, BMI: 21 ± 2.25) and compared to TSH, free T3, and free T4. Sufficient UI was observed only in 2 (9%) samples. In 12 samples (54.5%), mild iodine deficiency was recorded, in 4 samples (18.2%) moderate iodine deficiency was noted, and in 3 (13.6%) severe iodine deficiency was found. No correlation between BMI and UI, as well as hormones concentration, was observed. No correlation was revealed when analyzed samples were divided by patient sex. Although thyroid gland hormones were in the normal range, we found moderate, mild, and severe iodine deficiency in the majority of analyzed samples. Measurements of urinary iodine in lung transplant recipients should accompany thyroid hormone measurements as an iodine deficiency test and in order to prevent iodine deficiency disorders.

  9. Glucagon deficiency and hyperaminoacidemia after total pancreatectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Boden, G; Master, R W; Rezvani, I; Palmer, J P; Lobe, T E; Owen, O E

    1980-01-01

    The first goal of this study was to investigate whether totally pancreatectomized patients are glucagon deficient and if so, to what degree. Immunoreactive glucagon (IRG) concentrations in peripheral plasma of nine pancreatectomized patients were not significantly different from those of 10 normal controls as measured by two antisera (30-K and RCS-5) both detecting the COOH-terminal portion of the molecule and one (RCS-5) postulated to be specific for pancreatic glucagon. Plasma from six of nine pancreatectomized patients were fractionated over Sephadex G-50 and IRG was measured with both antisera in the column eluates. Using 30-K, 80.8 +/- 9% of the IRG eluted within the void volume. This material was rechromatographed on Sephadex G-200 and found to have an apparent mol wt of approximately 200,000. Only 18.3 +/- 9% eluted in the IRG3500 region. IRG3500 was significantly reduced in pancreatectomized patients as compared to normal controls (49 +/- 9 vs. 18 +/- 9 pg/ml, P less than 0.05). Using RCS-5, all IRG (corresponding to 20 +/- 6 pg/ml of plasma) eluted in the IRG3500 region. The second goal of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic glucagon deficiency on plasma amino acids. In the nine pancreatectomized patients studied, postabsorptive plasma concentrations of serine, alanine, arginine, glycine, threonine, citrulline, alpha-aminobutyrate, and tryosine were significantly elevated compared to values obtained from 20 normal controls. Physiological glucagon increments produced in two pancreatectomized patients by infusion of glucagon (6.25 and 8.0 microgram/h, respectively) resulted in normalization of the hyperaminoacidemia within 22 h. We conclude (a) that pancreatectomized patients are partially glucagon deficient because of diminished basal as well as diminished stimulated glucagon secretion; (b) that fasting concentrations of certain glucogenic amino acids are elevated in pancreatectomized patients probably as result of reduce; hepatic

  10. Deficient and Null Variants of SERPINA1 Are Proteotoxic in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Erin E; O'Reilly, Linda P; King, Dale E; Silverman, Richard M; Miedel, Mark T; Luke, Cliff J; Perlmutter, David H; Silverman, Gary A; Pak, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD) predisposes patients to both loss-of-function (emphysema) and gain-of-function (liver cirrhosis) phenotypes depending on the type of mutation. Although the Z mutation (ATZ) is the most prevalent cause of ATD, >120 mutant alleles have been identified. In general, these mutations are classified as deficient (<20% normal plasma levels) or null (<1% normal levels) alleles. The deficient alleles, like ATZ, misfold in the ER where they accumulate as toxic monomers, oligomers and aggregates. Thus, deficient alleles may predispose to both gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes. Null variants, if translated, typically yield truncated proteins that are efficiently degraded after being transiently retained in the ER. Clinically, null alleles are only associated with the loss-of-function phenotype. We recently developed a C. elegans model of ATD in order to further elucidate the mechanisms of proteotoxicity (gain-of-function phenotype) induced by the aggregation-prone deficient allele, ATZ. The goal of this study was to use this C. elegans model to determine whether different types of deficient and null alleles, which differentially affect polymerization and secretion rates, correlated to any extent with proteotoxicity. Animals expressing the deficient alleles, Mmalton, Siiyama and S (ATS), showed overall toxicity comparable to that observed in patients. Interestingly, Siiyama expressing animals had smaller intracellular inclusions than ATZ yet appeared to have a greater negative effect on animal fitness. Surprisingly, the null mutants, although efficiently degraded, showed a relatively mild gain-of-function proteotoxic phenotype. However, since null variant proteins are degraded differently and do not appear to accumulate, their mechanism of proteotoxicity is likely to be different to that of polymerizing, deficient mutants. Taken together, these studies showed that C. elegans is an inexpensive tool to assess the proteotoxicity of different AT

  11. Deficiency of fat-soluble vitamins in chronic pancreatitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moneo, Emma; Stigliano, Serena; Hedström, Aleksandra; Kaczka, Aleksandra; Malvik, Marko; Waldthaler, Alexander; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Simon, Peter; Capurso, Gabriele

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients are at risk for fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) deficiency, but available studies are small and heterogeneous. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the prevalence of fat-soluble vitamins deficiency in CP patients. Medline was searched up to January 2016 for case series and case-control studies reporting prevalence of fat-soluble vitamin deficiency in CP patients. The prevalent deficiency rate was pooled for included studies, and deficiency rate between CP and controls, with relative odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) calculated for case-control studies. Twelve studies including 548 patients included. With a random-effect model, the pooled prevalence rate of vitamin A, D and E deficiency were 16.8% (95%CI 6.9-35.7), 57.6% (95%CI 43.9-70.4) and 29.2% (95%CI 8.6-64.5) respectively, with considerable heterogeneity (I(2) = 75%, 87.1% and 92%). Only one study evaluated vitamin K deficiency. The pooled OR for vitamin D deficiency in CP cases compared with controls was 1.17 (95% CI 0.77-1.78). Sensitivity analyses showed lower prevalence of vitamin A and E, and higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in high-quality studies. The rate of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency did not seem affect the deficiency rates, while the use of different cut-offs influences results and heterogeneity for vitamin E, but not A. Fat-soluble vitamins deficiency is frequent in CP patients, with considerable heterogeneity. There is, however, no apparent increased risk of vitamin D deficiency in CP compared to controls. Larger, high-quality studies are necessary to better estimate the prevalence of fat-soluble vitamins deficiency, including vitamin K. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Vitamin A deficiency modulates iron metabolism via ineffective erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcela S B; Siqueira, Egle M A; Trindade, Luciano S; Arruda, Sandra F

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin A modulates inflammatory status, iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Given that these factors modulate the expression of the hormone hepcidin (Hamp), we investigated the effect of vitamin A deficiency on molecular biomarkers of iron metabolism, the inflammatory response and the erythropoietic system. Five groups of male Wistar rats were treated: control (AIN-93G), the vitamin A-deficient (VAD) diet, the iron-deficient (FeD) diet, the vitamin A- and iron-deficient (VAFeD) diet or the diet with 12 mg atRA/kg diet replacing all-trans-retinyl palmitate by all-trans retinoic acid (atRA). Vitamin A deficiency reduced serum iron and transferrin saturation levels, increased spleen iron concentrations, reduced hepatic Hamp and kidney erythropoietin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels and up-regulated hepatic and spleen heme oxygenase-1 gene expression while reducing the liver HO-1 specific activity compared with the control. The FeD and VAFeD rats exhibited lower levels of serum iron and transferrin saturation, lower iron concentrations in tissues and lower hepatic Hamp mRNA levels compared with the control. The treatment with atRA resulted in lower serum iron and transferrin concentrations, an increased iron concentration in the liver, a decreased iron concentration in the spleen and in the gut, and decreased hepatic Hamp mRNA levels. In summary, these findings suggest that vitamin A deficiency leads to ineffective erythropoiesis by the down-regulation of renal erythropoietin expression in the kidney, resulting in erythrocyte malformation and the consequent accumulation of the heme group in the spleen. Vitamin A deficiency indirectly modulates systemic iron homeostasis by enhancing erythrophagocytosis of undifferentiated erythrocytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of micronutrient deficiencies on obesity.

    PubMed

    García, Olga P; Long, Kurt Z; Rosado, Jorge L

    2009-10-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies have been found in obese individuals across age groups worldwide. While the effects of micronutrient deficiencies on human functions have been studied widely in different populations, there is limited information on how these micronutrient deficiencies affect obese populations. An examination of the available literature suggests associations exist between micronutrient deficiencies and obesity in different populations. These associations and possible mechanisms of the deficiencies' metabolic effects, such as their influence on leptin and insulin metabolism, are discussed here. Further studies are needed to clarify the roles of the different micronutrient deficiencies with respect to obesity and its comorbid conditions.

  14. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  15. VISUAL DEFICIENCIES AND READING DISABILITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROSEN, CARL L.

    THE ROLE OF VISUAL SENSORY DEFICIENCIES IN THE CAUSATION READING DISABILITY IS DISCUSSED. PREVIOUS AND CURRENT RESEARCH STUDIES DEALING WITH SPECIFIC VISUAL PROBLEMS WHICH HAVE BEEN FOUND TO BE NEGATIVELY RELATED TO SUCCESSFUL READING ACHIEVEMENT ARE LISTED--(1) FARSIGHTEDNESS, (2) ASTIGMATISM, (3) BINOCULAR INCOORDINATIONS, AND (4) FUSIONAL…

  16. Growth hormone deficiency: an update.

    PubMed

    Audí, L; Fernández-Cancio, M; Camats, N; Carrascosa, A

    2013-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) in humans manifests differently according to the individual developmental stage (early after birth, during childhood, at puberty or in adulthood), the cause or mechanism (genetic, acquired or idiopathic), deficiency intensity and whether it is the only pituitary-affected hormone or is combined with that of other pituitary hormones or forms part of a complex syndrome. Growing knowledge of the genetic basis of GH deficiency continues to provide us with useful information to further characterise mutation types and mechanisms for previously described and new candidate genes. Despite these advances, a high proportion of GH deficiencies with no recognisable acquired basis continue to be labelled as idiopathic, although less frequently when they are congenital and/or familial. The clinical and biochemical diagnoses continue to be a conundrum despite efforts to harmonise biochemical assays for GH and IGF-1 analysis, probably because the diagnosis based on the so-called GH secretion stimulation tests will prove to be of limited usefulness for predicting therapy indications.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: arginase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of reactions that occurs in liver cells. This cycle processes excess nitrogen, generated when protein is used by the body, ... enzyme controls the final step of the urea cycle, which produces urea by removing nitrogen from arginine. In people with arginase deficiency , arginase ...

  18. Psychological Problems in Mental Deficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarason, Seymour B.; Doris, John

    A statement of goals and the rationale for organization precede a historical discussion of mental deficiency and society. The problem of labels like IQ and brain injured and the consequences of the diagnostic process are illustrated by case histories; case studies are also used to examine the criteria used to decide who is retarded and to discuss…

  19. Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Davies, D J; Baxter, J M; Baxter, J N

    2007-09-01

    A current review of nutritional complications following bariatric procedures is presented, focusing on the most common and clinically important deficiencies. A brief outline of nutritional supplementation protocol is presented, highlighting the need for a standardized, national or international set of guidelines for pre- and postoperative nutritional screening and appropriate supplementation.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: transcobalamin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epub 2008 Oct 29. Citation on PubMed Ratschmann R, Minkov M, Kis A, Hung C, Rupar T, Mühl A, Fowler B, Nexo E, Bodamer OA. Transcobalamin II deficiency at birth. Mol Genet Metab. 2009 Nov;98(3):285-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ymgme.2009.06.003. Epub 2009 Jun 6. ...

  1. Psychological Problems in Mental Deficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarason, Seymour B.; Doris, John

    A statement of goals and the rationale for organization precede a historical discussion of mental deficiency and society. The problem of labels like IQ and brain injured and the consequences of the diagnostic process are illustrated by case histories; case studies are also used to examine the criteria used to decide who is retarded and to discuss…

  2. Do diuretics cause magnesium deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D L; Fraser, R

    1993-01-01

    1. Controlled trials, of which there are few, do not substantiate claims that diuretics play a role in causing magnesium deficiency. Consequently, the vast majority of patients taking conventional doses of thiazide diuretics (i.e. bendrofluazide 2.5 mg day-1 or equivalent) do not need magnesium supplements. On balance, potassium-sparing diuretics tend to increase serum and intracellular magnesium content; this should not be taken as evidence of prior magnesium deficiency. It remains theoretically possible that large doses of loop diuretics given more than once daily for long periods could induce negative magnesium balance and magnesium deficiency. However, it has been difficult to run appropriately controlled trials in conditions where such therapy is needed (i.e. heart failure) and until more reliable information becomes available no absolute recommendation can be made. 2. Methods for the measurement of intracellular free magnesium levels are now available and are more relevant to the assessment of magnesium deficiency than total intracellular magnesium content; the complex relationship between intracellular free and total magnesium content remains to be defined. Future work involving the effect of diuretics on intracellular free magnesium measurements should make every attempt to avoid the errors of trial design and multiple publication that litter current and past literature. PMID:8373706

  3. Case report: pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J M

    1995-09-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency is a rare cause of congenital hemolytic anemia. Despite a paucity of reports, splenectomy resulted in successful outcomes for two siblings with this disorder. The sisters were diagnosed at birth with profound jaundice and congenital nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia.

  4. Iron deficiency: the global perspective.

    PubMed

    Cook, J D; Skikne, B S; Baynes, R D

    1994-01-01

    The prevelance of IDA in industrialized countries has declined in recent decades, but there has been little change in the worldwide prevalence. IDA is currently estimated to affect more than 500 million people. Recent studies have indicated that anemia per se, the most common manifestation of iron deficiency, is less important from a public health standpoint than liabilities associated with tissue iron deficiency. The most important of the latter are an impairment in psychomotor development and cognitive function in infants and preschoolers, a deficit in work performance in adults, and an increase in the frequency of low birth weight, prematurity, and perinatal mortality in pregnancy. There have been several recent advances in combatting nutritional iron deficiency. One of the major problems has been in distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia seen epidemiologically such as malaria, HIV infection, chronic inflammation, hemoglobinopathies, and protein energy malnutrition. When combined with serum ferritin and hemoglobin determinations, the serum transferrin receptor assay is a valuable addition in epidemiologic surveys because it provides a quantitative measure of functional iron deficiency and it distinguishes true IDA from the anemia of chronic disease. The most difficult challenge is to develop effective methods of supplying iron to large segments of a population. Supplementation with iron tablets is suitable for only brief periods of need such as during pregnancy. The poor compliance with existing supplementation programs is believed to be due mainly to the gastrointestinal side effects of oral iron which can be eliminated by the use of a gastric delivery system. The most effective long-term strategy is to increase the intake of bioavailable iron in the diet. The customary approach has been to fortify a food staple such as wheat, rice, sugar, or salt, and thereby increase the iron intake of the entire population. However, because of concerns

  5. Maternal zinc deficiency and congenital anomalies in newborns.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Mahmood; Ashrafzadeh, Sahar; Rassi, Sepehr; Naseh, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Zinc deficiency in pregnant women is common, especially in the third trimester of pregnancy. The available data, however, on the association between zinc deficiency and congenital malformations in the Iranian population are insufficient. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether maternal serum zinc deficiency is associated with major congenital malformations in newborns. This descriptive, case-control study involved mothers of 80 neonates with congenital anomalies (study group) admitted to the Mofid Children's Hospital, Tehran, Iran. During the same period (2014 and 2015), serum zinc was measured in 80 mothers who had delivered normal newborns without congenital malformations (control group). Mothers with serum zinc deficiency had a more than sevenfold risk of malformations in the fetus compared with mothers with normal serum zinc (OR, 7.013; 95%CI: 2.716-18.110). Newborns with malformation weighing ≤2500 g were associated with lower maternal serum zinc compared with the control group (P = 0.006). There is an association between congenital malformation in newborns and maternal zinc deficiency. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  7. Primary vs. secondary antibody deficiency: clinical features and infection outcomes of immunoglobulin replacement.

    PubMed

    Duraisingham, Sai S; Buckland, Matthew; Dempster, John; Lorenzo, Lorena; Grigoriadou, Sofia; Longhurst, Hilary J

    2014-01-01

    Secondary antibody deficiency can occur as a result of haematological malignancies or certain medications, but not much is known about the clinical and immunological features of this group of patients as a whole. Here we describe a cohort of 167 patients with primary or secondary antibody deficiencies on immunoglobulin (Ig)-replacement treatment. The demographics, causes of immunodeficiency, diagnostic delay, clinical and laboratory features, and infection frequency were analysed retrospectively. Chemotherapy for B cell lymphoma and the use of Rituximab, corticosteroids or immunosuppressive medications were the most common causes of secondary antibody deficiency in this cohort. There was no difference in diagnostic delay or bronchiectasis between primary and secondary antibody deficiency patients, and both groups experienced disorders associated with immune dysregulation. Secondary antibody deficiency patients had similar baseline levels of serum IgG, but higher IgM and IgA, and a higher frequency of switched memory B cells than primary antibody deficiency patients. Serious and non-serious infections before and after Ig-replacement were also compared in both groups. Although secondary antibody deficiency patients had more serious infections before initiation of Ig-replacement, treatment resulted in a significant reduction of serious and non-serious infections in both primary and secondary antibody deficiency patients. Patients with secondary antibody deficiency experience similar delays in diagnosis as primary antibody deficiency patients and can also benefit from immunoglobulin-replacement treatment.

  8. Primary vs. Secondary Antibody Deficiency: Clinical Features and Infection Outcomes of Immunoglobulin Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Duraisingham, Sai S.; Buckland, Matthew; Dempster, John; Lorenzo, Lorena; Grigoriadou, Sofia; Longhurst, Hilary J.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary antibody deficiency can occur as a result of haematological malignancies or certain medications, but not much is known about the clinical and immunological features of this group of patients as a whole. Here we describe a cohort of 167 patients with primary or secondary antibody deficiencies on immunoglobulin (Ig)-replacement treatment. The demographics, causes of immunodeficiency, diagnostic delay, clinical and laboratory features, and infection frequency were analysed retrospectively. Chemotherapy for B cell lymphoma and the use of Rituximab, corticosteroids or immunosuppressive medications were the most common causes of secondary antibody deficiency in this cohort. There was no difference in diagnostic delay or bronchiectasis between primary and secondary antibody deficiency patients, and both groups experienced disorders associated with immune dysregulation. Secondary antibody deficiency patients had similar baseline levels of serum IgG, but higher IgM and IgA, and a higher frequency of switched memory B cells than primary antibody deficiency patients. Serious and non-serious infections before and after Ig-replacement were also compared in both groups. Although secondary antibody deficiency patients had more serious infections before initiation of Ig-replacement, treatment resulted in a significant reduction of serious and non-serious infections in both primary and secondary antibody deficiency patients. Patients with secondary antibody deficiency experience similar delays in diagnosis as primary antibody deficiency patients and can also benefit from immunoglobulin-replacement treatment. PMID:24971644

  9. Decorin deficiency promotes hepatic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Zsolt; Kovalszky, Ilona; Fullár, Alexandra; Kiss, Katalin; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Iozzo, Renato V.; Baghy, Kornélia

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma represents one of the most-rapidly spreading cancers in the world. In the majority of cases, an inflammation-driven fibrosis or cirrhosis precedes the development of the tumor. During malignant transformation, the tumor microenvironment undergoes qualitative and quantitative changes that modulate the behavior of the malignant cells. A key constituent for the hepatic microenvironment is the small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin, known to interfere with cellular events of tumorigenesis mainly by blocking various receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) such as EGFR, Met, IGF-IR, PDGFR and VEGFR2. In this study, we characterized cell signaling events evoked by decorin deficiency in two experimental models of hepatocarcinogenesis using thioacetamide or diethyl nitrosamine as carcinogens. Genetic ablation of decorin led to enhanced tumor occurrence as compared to wild-type animals. These findings correlated with decreased levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and a concurrent elevation in retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation via cyclin dependent kinase 4. Decreased steady state p21Waf1/Cip1 levels correlated with enhanced expression of transcription factor AP4, a known transcriptional repressor of p21Waf1/Cip1, and enhanced c-Myc protein levels. In addition, translocation of β-catenin was a typical event in diethyl nitrosamine-evoked tumors. In parallel, decreased phosphorylation of both c-Myc and β-catenin was observed in Dcn−/− livers likely due to the hindered GSK3β-mediated targeting of these proteins to proteasomal degradation. We discovered that in a genetic background lacking decorin, four RTKs were constitutively activated (phosphorylated), including three known targets of decorin such as PDGFRα, EGFR, IGF-IR, and a novel RTK MSPR/RON. Our findings provide powerful genetic evidence for a crucial in vivo role of decorin during hepatocarcinogenesis as lack of decorin in the liver and hepatic stroma facilitates

  10. Genetics Home Reference: familial glucocorticoid deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... familial glucocorticoid deficiency type 1 lead to defective trafficking of the receptor to the cell surface. J ... short stature, and natural killer cell deficiency in humans. J Clin Invest. 2012 Mar;122(3):814- ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: beta-ureidopropionase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down N-carbamyl-beta-alanine to beta-alanine, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. Both beta-aminoisobutyric acid and ... beta-ureidopropionase deficiency Merck Manual Professional Version: Pyrimidine Metabolism Disorders Orphanet: Beta-ureidopropionase deficiency Patient Support and ...

  12. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) ... develop. The most common faulty gene that can cause AAT deficiency is called PiZ. If you inherit ...

  13. Iron deficiency--facts and fallacies.

    PubMed

    Oski, F A

    1985-04-01

    Iron deficiency occurs in all strata of society, is primarily a result of postnatal feeding practices and not due to congenital deficiencies of iron, can be prevented by appropriate dietary guidance, and, when present, produces important nonhematologic manifestations.

  14. Effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency on ageing and longevity.

    PubMed

    Laron, Zvi

    2002-01-01

    Present knowledge on the effects of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth hormone (IGF)1 deficiency on ageing and lifespan are reviewed. Evidence is presented that isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) including GH, as well as primary IGE1 deficiency (GH resistance, Laron syndrome) present signs of early ageing such as thin and wrinkled skin, obesity, hyperglycemia and osteoporosis. These changes do not seem to affect the lifespan, as patients reach old age. Animal models of genetic MPHD (Ames and Snell mice) and GH receptor knockout mice (primary IGF1 deficiency) also have a statistically significant higher longevity compared to normal controls. On the contrary, mice transgenic for GH and acromegalic patients secreting large amounts of GH have premature death. In conclusion longstanding GH/IGF1 deficiency affects several parameters of the ageing process without impairing lifespan, and as shown in animal models prolongs longevity. In contrast high GH/IGF1 levels accelerate death.

  15. Iodine deficiency in Danish pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Sørensen, Louise Kolding; Krejbjerg, Anne; Møller, Margrethe; Laurberg, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Maternal iodine requirements increase during pregnancy. Studies performed before the introduction of mandatory iodine fortification of salt in Denmark in 2000 showed that pregnant women with no intake of iodine-containing supplements were moderately iodine-deficient and showed signs of thyroidal stress. We investigated the intake of iodine-containing supplements and urinary iodine excretion in Danish pregnant women after the introduction of iodine fortification of salt. We conducted a cross-sectional study between June and August 2012 in an area of Denmark where iodine deficiency had previously been moderate. Pregnant women coming to Aalborg University Hospital for obstetric ultrasound were recruited consecutively. Participants filled in a questionnaire and handed in a spot urine sample for measurement of iodine and creatinine. Among the pregnant women included (n = 245) 84.1% reported an intake of iodine-containing supplements, and compared with those not taking iodine supplements the median urinary iodine concentration was significantly higher in this group: 109 g/l (25th-75th percentile: 66-191 µg/l). On the other hand, the median urinary iodine concentration was considerably below the recommended level, even for the non-pregnant state in pregnant women with no iodine supplement intake: 68 µg/l (35-93 µg/l), p < 0.001. The majority of pregnant women took iodine-containing supplements, but the subgroup of non-users was still iodine-deficient after the introduction of iodine fortification of salt. Iodine supplement intake during pregnancy in Denmark should be officially recommended. The study was supported by a grant from Musikforlæggerne Agnes og Knut Mørks Fond and from Speciallæge Heinrich Kopps Legat. not relevant.

  16. Dealing with deficient and missing data.

    PubMed

    Dohoo, Ian R

    2015-11-01

    Disease control decisions require two types of data: data describing the disease frequency (incidence and prevalence) along with characteristics of the population and environment in which the disease occurs (hereafter called "descriptive data"); and, data for analytical studies (hereafter called "analytical data") documenting the effects of risk factors for the disease. Both may be either deficient or missing. Descriptive data may be completely missing if the disease is a new and unknown entity with no diagnostic procedures or if there has been no surveillance activity in the population of interest. Methods for dealing with this complete absence of data are limited, but the possible use of surrogate measures of disease will be discussed. More often, data are deficient because of limitations in diagnostic capabilities (imperfect sensitivity and specificity). Developments in methods for dealing with this form of information bias make this a more tractable problem. Deficiencies in analytical data leading to biased estimates of effects of risk factors are a common problem, and one which is increasingly being recognized, but options for correction of known or suspected biases are still limited. Data about risk factors may be completely missing if studies of risk factors have not been carried out. Alternatively, data for evaluation of risk factors may be available but have "item missingness" where some (or many) observations have some pieces of information missing. There has been tremendous development in the methods to deal with this problem of "item missingness" over the past decade, with multiple imputation being the most prominent method. The use of multiple imputation to deal with the problem of item missing data will be compared to the use of complete-case analysis, and limitations to the applicability of imputation will be presented.

  17. Association between iron deficiency and febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Valia; Vargiami, Euthymia; Kontopoulos, Eleutherios; Kardaras, Panagiotis; Economou, Marina; Athanassiou-Mataxa, Miranta; Kirkham, Fenella; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between iron status and febrile seizures has been examined in various settings, mainly in the Developing World, with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to investigate any association between iron deficiency and febrile seizures (FS) in European children aged 6-60 months. Prospective, case-control study. Greek population in Thessaloniki. 50 patients with febrile seizures (cases) and 50 controls (children presenting with fever, without seizures). None. Haematologic parameters (haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, red cell distribution width), plasma iron, total iron-binding capacity, plasma ferritin, transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptors were compared in cases and controls. Plasma ferritin was lower (median [range]: 42.8 (3-285.7) vs 58.3 (21.4-195.3 ng/ml; p = 0.02) and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) higher (mean [Standard Deviation] 267 [58.9] vs 243 [58.45] μg/dl, p = 0.04) in cases than in controls. Results were similar for 12 complex FS cases (ferritin 30 (3-121 vs 89 (41.8-141.5ng/lL; TIBC 292.92 [68.0] vs 232.08 [36.27] μg/dL). Iron deficiency, defined as ferritin <30 ng/ml, was more frequent in cases (24%) than controls (4%; p = 0.004). Ferritin was lower and TIBC higher in 18 with previous seizures than in 32 with a first seizure although haemoglobin and mean cell haemoglobin concentration were higher. European children with febrile seizures have lower Ferritin than those with fever alone, and iron deficiency, but not anaemia, is associated with recurrence. Iron status screening should be considered as routine for children presenting with or at high risk for febrile seizures. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Werder, Steven F

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1) Which patients should be tested? (2) What test should be ordered? (3) How are inferences made from such testing? (4) In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5) Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6) What is to be expected from treatment? (7) How is B12 deficiency treated? Methods On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment) and then reviewed in answering the above questions. Results The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed. Discussion Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test: 200 picograms per milliliter or less is low, and 201 to 350 picograms per milliliter is borderline low. Other tests may be indicated, including plasma

  19. Carnitine deficiency in children receiving continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Sgambat, Kristen; Moudgil, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is known to occur in chronic hemodialysis; however, the effect of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on carnitine homeostasis has not been studied. We hypothesized that children receiving CRRT are at risk for deficiency because of continuous removal, absent intake, decreased production, and comorbidities related to critical illness. Records of patients with acute kidney injury receiving CRRT at Children's National Health System between 2011 and 2014 were reviewed for total carnitine (TC), free carnitine (FC), feeding modality, severity of illness, and survival outcome. The proportion of carnitine-deficient patients at baseline, 1, 2, and ≥3 weeks on CRRT were compared by chi-square, and relationships with other variables assessed by Pearson's correlation and logistic regression. The study group included 42 CRRT patients, age 7.9 + 1.1 years. At baseline, 30.7% and 35.7% of patients were TC and FC deficient. Within 1 week, 64.5% (P = 0.03) and 70% (P = 0.03) were TC and FC deficient, and prevalence of deficiency increased to 80% (P = 0.01) and 90% (P = 0.008) by 2 weeks; 100% of patients were TC and FC deficient after being on CRRT for ≥3 weeks (P = 0.005 and P = 0.01, respectively, vs. baseline). TC and FC levels negatively correlated with days on CRRT (r = -0.39, P = 0.001 and r = -0.35, P = 0.005). Patients with TC and FC deficiency had 5.9 and 4.9 greater odds of death than those with normal levels (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03). Carnitine is significantly and rapidly depleted with longer time on CRRT, and carnitine deficiency is associated with increased mortality. Consequences of deficiency and benefits of supplementation in the pediatric CRRT population should be investigated.

  20. Response of the iron-deficient erythrocyte in the rat to hyperoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, E. C.; Kimzey, S. L.; Siler, K.

    1978-01-01

    Normal and iron-deficient rats were exposed to 90% O2 at 760 Torr for 24 or 48 h. Erythrocyte response to hyperoxia was monitored by potassium (rubidium) influx studies, by storage stress, and by ultrastructural studies. Normal rat erythrocytes exhibited morphological changes and decrease of ouabain-sensitive potassium influx compared to unexposed controls. Both components of erythrocyte potassium influx were affected by iron deficiency. Erythrocytes from unexposed iron-deficient rats showed a 50% increase in ouabain-sensitive potassium influx compared to controls. Iron-deficient rats exposed to hyperoxia for 24 or 48 h, had erythrocytes with morphological changes. Erythrocytes of iron-deficient rats exposed for 24 h showned no influx change; those exposed for 48 h showed a decrease of ouabain-sensitive influx compared to erythrocytes of controls.

  1. Response of the iron-deficient erythrocyte in the rat to hyperoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, E. C.; Kimzey, S. L.; Siler, K.

    1978-01-01

    Normal and iron-deficient rats were exposed to 90% O2 at 760 Torr for 24 or 48 h. Erythrocyte response to hyperoxia was monitored by potassium (rubidium) influx studies, by storage stress, and by ultrastructural studies. Normal rat erythrocytes exhibited morphological changes and decrease of ouabain-sensitive potassium influx compared to unexposed controls. Both components of erythrocyte potassium influx were affected by iron deficiency. Erythrocytes from unexposed iron-deficient rats showed a 50% increase in ouabain-sensitive potassium influx compared to controls. Iron-deficient rats exposed to hyperoxia for 24 or 48 h, had erythrocytes with morphological changes. Erythrocytes of iron-deficient rats exposed for 24 h showned no influx change; those exposed for 48 h showed a decrease of ouabain-sensitive influx compared to erythrocytes of controls.

  2. Multiple Carboxylase Deficiency (Late Onset) Due to Deficiency of Biotinidase

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Debadatta; Das, Manoj Kumar; Dhar, Sandipan; Mukhopadhyay, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Biotinidase is a ubiquitous mammalian cell enzyme occurring in liver, serum and kidney. It cleaves biotin from biocytin, which is a cofactor for biotin dependent enzymes, namely the human carboxylases. Biotinidase deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological, dermatological, immunological and ophthalmological abnormalities. This is a case of a 3-year-old boy presenting with delayed developmental milestones, tachypnea, progressively increasing ataxia, alopecia and dermatitis, all which dramatically responded to high doses of biotin. PMID:25284861

  3. Studies on vitamin E and selenium deficiency in young pigs. I. Hematological and biochemical changes.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, M; Valli, V E; Young, L G; Lumsden, J H

    1977-01-01

    Pigs which were deficient in vitamin E and/or selenium had the following parameters weekly determined from six to 13 weeks of age: Packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration, red cell and white cell counts, red cell indices, reticulocyte count, serum iron, serum total iron binding capacity, myeloid: erythroid ratio, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and creatine phosphokinase activities and body weight. Except for the myeloid:erythroid ratio and serum creatine phosphokinase activity, these parameters were not found to be significantly affected by either vitamin E deficiency, selenium deficiency or deficiency of both. The myeloid:erythroid ratio was increased (p less than 0.01) in association with selenium deficiency, which tends to indicate decreased erythropoiesis but was not reflected in the peripheral red cell picture. Evidence of dyserythropoiesis was not found to be a significant feature in serial bone marrow aspiration biopsies of vitamin E and/or selenium deficient pigs. Even if the serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase activities were not found to be significantly affected by either vitamin E deficiency, selenium deficiency or deficiency in both as compared to replete animals, a few animals, especially in the group deficient in both vitamin E and selenium, presented quite marked transient increases of serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase activity which was interpreted to reflect the occurrence of acute episodes of hepatosis dietetica. Serum creatine phosphokinase activities were found to be increased in association with vitamin E deficiency (p less than 0.01), selenium deficiency (less than 0.05) and the interaction was also significant (p less than 0.01). It was concluded that the serum creatine phosphokinase activity increases reflect the occurrence of subclinical muscular dystrophy and that vitamin E and selenium deficiencies have marked additive effects in the induction of skeletal muscular dystrophy.

  4. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia in women.

    PubMed

    Percy, Laura; Mansour, Diana; Fraser, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide with >20% of women experiencing it during their reproductive lives. Hepcidin, a peptide hormone mostly produced by the liver, controls the absorption and regulation of iron. Understanding iron metabolism is pivotal in the successful management of ID and iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) using oral preparations, parenteral iron or blood transfusion. Oral preparations vary in their iron content and can result in gastrointestinal side effects. Parenteral iron is indicated when there are compliance/tolerance issues with oral iron, comorbidities which may affect absorption or ongoing iron losses that exceed absorptive capacity. It may also be the preferred option when rapid iron repletion is required to prevent physiological decompensation or given preoperatively for non-deferrable surgery. As gynaecologists, we focus on managing women's heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) and assume that primary care clinicians are treating the associated ID/IDA. We now need to take the lead in diagnosing, managing and initiating treatment for ID/IDA and treating HMB simultaneously. This dual management will significantly improve their quality of life. In this chapter we will summarise the importance of iron in cellular functioning, describe how to diagnose ID/IDA and help clinicians choose between the available treatment options. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Deficiency of Adenosine Deaminase 2 Causes Antibody Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schepp, Johanna; Bulashevska, Alla; Mannhardt-Laakmann, Wilma; Cao, Hongzhi; Yang, Fang; Seidl, Maximilian; Kelly, Susan; Hershfield, Michael; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2016-04-01

    Determining the monogenic cause of antibody deficiency and immune dysregulation in a non-consanguineous family with healthy parents, two affected children, and one unaffected child. Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) was performed in the index family. WES results were confirmed by Sanger Sequencing. Dried plasma spots of the male patient and his mother were analyzed for ADA2 enzymatic activity. Following data analysis of WES, we found a compound heterozygous mutation in CECR1 (encoding adenosine deaminase 2, ADA2) that segregated in the two affected children. Enzyme activity measurement confirmed a severely diminished ADA2 activity in our patient. The 32 year old index patient was suffering from recurrent respiratory infections and was previously diagnosed with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), showing no signs of vasculitis. His sister had a systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like phenotype and died at age 17. Deficiency of ADA2 (DADA2) has been reported to cause vasculopathy and early-onset stroke. Our case suggests that it should also be considered when evaluating patients with antibody deficiencies and immune dysregulation syndromes.

  6. Iron deficiency state in resistant oral aphthosis of Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Dormohammadi Toosi, Taraneh; Shahram, Farhad; Ghodsi, S Zahra; Nadji, Abdolhadi; Tehrani Banihashemi, Arash; Larimi, Seyyedeh Roghieh; Davatchi, Fereydoun

    2014-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate iron deficiency as a predisposing factor for resistant oral aphthosis in patients with Behcet's disease (BD). In a case control study 220 consecutive BD patients with oral aphthosis were enrolled. All patients had been treated for at least 3 months. They were divided into two groups according to their treatment response (75 patients in the Case and 145 in the Control group). Demographic and clinical characteristics of the disease, serum iron, total iron binding capacity and serum ferritin were determined in each patient. We used independent t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test to compare the quantitative variables and chi-square test for qualitative variables. Odds ratio (OR) and confidence interval at 95% (95% CI) were calculated for each item. There was no significant difference between the two groups in demographics or clinical characteristics of the disease. We found iron deficiency in 72 patients (32.7%, 95% CI: 6.2), higher in the Case group than Control (39.2% vs. 30.1%; P = 0.17). Despite the higher frequency of iron deficiency in men (26.8% vs. 14.5%), the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.09). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that none of the iron deficiency or sex variables could predict the development of resistant oral aphthosis. The OR for iron deficiency was 1.52 (95% CI: 0.81-2.86) and for male sex was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.56-1.91). Despite the higher frequency of iron deficiency in BD patients with resistant oral aphthosis, we were not able to attribute this resistance to this deficiency. © 2013 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Assessment of insulin sensitivity in glucokinase-deficient subjects.

    PubMed

    Clément, K; Pueyo, M E; Vaxillaire, M; Rakotoambinina, B; Thuillier, F; Passa, P; Froguel, P; Robert, J J; Velho, G

    1996-01-01

    The chronic hyperglycaemia of glucokinase-deficient diabetes results from a glucose-sensing defect in pancreatic beta cells and abnormal hepatic glucose phosphorylation. We have evaluated the contribution of insulin resistance to this form of chronic hyperglycaemia. Insulin sensitivity, assessed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) method in 35 kindreds with glucokinase mutations, was found to be significantly decreased in 125 glucokinase-deficient subjects as compared to 141 unaffected first-degree relatives. Logistic regression analysis showed that in glucokinase-deficient subjects a decrease in insulin sensitivity was associated with deterioration of the glucose tolerance status. A euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp was performed in 14 glucokinase-deficient subjects and 12 unrelated control subjects. In six patients and six control subjects the clamp was coupled to dideutero-glucose infusion to measure glucose turnover. Average glucose infusion rates (GIR) at 1 and 5 mU.kg body weight.min-1 insulin infusion rates were significantly lower in (the glucokinase-deficient) patients than in control subjects. Although heterogeneous results were observed, in 8 out of the 14 patients GIRs throughout the experiment were lower than 1 SD below the mean of the control subjects. Hepatic glucose production at 1 mU.kg body weight-1.min-1 insulin-infusion rate was significantly higher in patients than in control subjects. In conclusion, insulin resistance correlates with the deterioration of glucose tolerance and contributes to the hyperglycaemia of glucokinase-deficient diabetes. Taken together, our results are most consistent with insulin resistance being considered secondary to the chronic hyperglycaemia and/or hypoinsulinaemia of glucokinase-deficiency. Insulin resistance might also result from interactions between the unbalanced glucose metabolism and susceptibility gene(s) to low insulin sensitivity likely to be present in this population.

  8. Vitamin D deficiency in Swiss elite wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Flueck, J L; Hartmann, K; Strupler, M; Perret, C

    2016-11-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of total serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) in Swiss elite wheelchair athletes. The aim was to investigate the occurrence of vitamin D deficiency in Swiss elite wheelchair athletes over the whole year and to detect differences between winter and summer months, and between indoor and outdoor athletes. This study was conducted in Switzerland. A total of 164 blood samples from 72 Swiss elite wheelchair athletes (mean±s.d.: age 32±13 years) were analyzed for total serum 25[OH]D. All participants were members of the national team in their discipline. The following disciplines have been included: rugby, athletics, cycling, tennis, ski alpine, curling and basketball. According to general guidelines, insufficient vitamin D status was defined between 50 and 75 nmol l(-1), deficiency below 50 nmol l(-1) and severe deficiency below 27.5 nmol l(-1). In all, 73.2% of all samples showed an insufficiency/deficiency in vitamin D status. Total serum 25[OH]D was significantly higher during summer compared with winter months (69.5±21.4 nmol l(-1) vs 51.5±21.9 nmol l(-1); P<0.001). Indoor sports showed a higher amount of vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency (80.9%) than outdoor sports (70.1%), with a significantly higher 25[OH]D concentration in outdoor sports (P=0.042). A high percentage of vitamin D deficiency was found among Swiss elite wheelchair athletes. Conclusively, we recommend supplementation with vitamin D-especially during winter-to prevent a deficiency and an impairment of performance.

  9. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  10. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  11. Iron-induced nickel deficiency in pecan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency can occur in horticultural and agronomic crops. This study assesses impact of excessive iron (Fe) on expression of Ni deficiency in pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Field and greenhouse experiments found Ni deficiency to be inducible by ei...

  12. Hematopoietic Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Lyase Deficiency Decreases Atherosclerotic Lesion Development in LDL-Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Martine; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Johnson, Jason; Nijstad, Niels; Van Santbrink, Peter J.; Westra, Marijke M.; Van Der Hoeven, Gerd; Gijbels, Marion J.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Varga, Georg; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuiper, Johan; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2013-01-01

    Aims Altered sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) homeostasis and signaling is implicated in various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. As S1P levels are tightly controlled by S1P lyase, we investigated the impact of hematopoietic S1P lyase (Sgpl1−/−) deficiency on leukocyte subsets relevant to atherosclerosis. Methods and Results LDL receptor deficient mice that were transplanted with Sgpl1−/− bone marrow showed disrupted S1P gradients translating into lymphopenia and abrogated lymphocyte mitogenic and cytokine response as compared to controls. Remarkably however, Sgpl1−/− chimeras displayed mild monocytosis, due to impeded stromal retention and myelopoiesis, and plasma cytokine and macrophage expression patterns, that were largely compatible with classical macrophage activation. Collectively these two phenotypic features of Sgpl1 deficiency culminated in diminished atherogenic response. Conclusions Here we not only firmly establish the critical role of hematopoietic S1P lyase in controlling S1P levels and T cell trafficking in blood and lymphoid tissue, but also identify leukocyte Sgpl1 as critical factor in monocyte macrophage differentiation and function. Its, partly counterbalancing, pro- and anti-inflammatory activity spectrum imply that intervention in S1P lyase function in inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis should be considered with caution. PMID:23700419

  13. Iron deficiency and brain development.

    PubMed

    Lozoff, Betsy; Georgieff, Michael K

    2006-09-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is common in pregnant women and infants worldwide. Rodent models show that ID during gestation/lactation alters neurometabolism, neurotransmitters, myelination, and gene/protein profiles before and after iron repletion at weaning. Human infants with iron deficiency anemia test lower in cognitive, motor, social-emotional, and neurophysiologic development than comparison group infants. Iron therapy does not consistently improve developmental outcome, with long-term differences observed. Poorer outcome has also been shown in human and monkey infants with fetal/neonatal ID. Recent randomized trials of infant iron supplementation show benefits, indicating that adverse effects can be prevented and/or reversed with iron earlier in development or before ID becomes severe or chronic. This body of research emphasizes the importance of protecting the developing brain from ID.

  14. [Is iodine deficiency still relevant?].

    PubMed

    Gärtner, R

    2007-02-22

    In Germany, iodine deficiency and its consequences is still a problem, although it is of less importance than it was twenty years ago. In accordance with the WHO definition, Germany still belongs among those countries with mild iodine deficiency and too low an intake of iodine. As a result groups at particular risk, such as pregnant and nursing women, must still receive iodine supplementation, since, in the absence of supplemental iodine,the amount of iodine in the mother's milk continues to be below average throughout Germany. Both in private households and in the food industry, the aim is to increase the use of iodized salt to more than go%. This entails no risk of an iodine overdose. The current average daily uptake of iodine of approximately 120 micrograms is responsible neither for the development or progression of an autoimmune disease nor a functional disorder of the thyroid gland.

  15. Iodine: deficiency and therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Lyn

    2008-06-01

    Iodine deficiency is generally recognized as the most commonly preventable cause of mental retardation and the most common cause of endocrinopathy (goiter and primary hypothyroidism). Iodine deficiency becomes particularly critical in pregnancy due to the consequences for neurological damage during fetal development as well as during lactation. The safety of therapeutic doses of iodine above the established safe upper limit of 1 mg is evident in the lack of toxicity in the Japanese population that consumes 25 times the median intake of iodine consumption in the United States. Japan's population suffers no demonstrable increased incidence of autoimmune thyroiditis or hypothyroidism. Studies using 3.0- to 6.0-mg doses to effectively treat fibrocystic breast disease may reveal an important role for iodine in maintaining normal breast tissue architecture and function. Iodine may also have important antioxidant functions in breast tissue and other tissues that concentrate iodine via the sodium iodide symporter.

  16. Iodine deficiency disorders in Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Delange, F.; Bürgi, H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent data on iodine excretion in the urine of adults, adolescents and newborns and on the iodine content of breast milk indicate a high prevalence of iodine deficiency (moderate in many cases and severe in a few) in many European countries. These cases may manifest as subclinical hypothyroidism in neonates and as goitre in adolescents and adults. Lack of iodine causes not only goitre, but also mental deficiency, hearing loss and other neurological impairments, and short stature due to thyroid insufficiency during fetal development and childhood. Although iodinated salt is available theoretically in most countries where it is needed, its quality and share of the market are often unsatisfactory. In many countries where only household salt is iodinated the iodine content has been set too low owing to an overestimation of household salt consumption. Governments are therefore urged to pass legislation and provide means for efficient iodination of salt wherever this is necessary. PMID:2670299

  17. Relative carnitine deficiency in autism.

    PubMed

    Filipek, Pauline A; Juranek, Jenifer; Nguyen, Minh T; Cummings, Christa; Gargus, J Jay

    2004-12-01

    A random retrospective chart review was conducted to document serum carnitine levels on 100 children with autism. Concurrently drawn serum pyruvate, lactate, ammonia, and alanine levels were also available in many of these children. Values of free and total carnitine (p < 0.001), and pyruvate (p = 0.006) were significantly reduced while ammonia and alanine levels were considerably elevated (p < 0.001) in our autistic subjects. The relative carnitine deficiency in these patients, accompanied by slight elevations in lactate and significant elevations in alanine and ammonia levels, is suggestive of mild mitochondrial dysfunction. It is hypothesized that a mitochondrial defect may be the origin of the carnitine deficiency in these autistic children.

  18. Oestrogen deficiency after tubal ligation.

    PubMed

    Cattanach, J

    1985-04-13

    4 of 7 women who had undergone tubal ligation within the past seven years were found to have oestrogen excretion concentrations at ovulation below the tenth percentile. A disturbance in the oestrogen/progesterone ratio as a consequence of localised hypertension at the ovary, when the utero-ovarian arterial loop is occluded at tubal ligation, is proposed as a possible cause of oestrogen deficiency syndrome, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, and menorrhagia after tubal ligation. Similar pathophysiology may occur after hysterectomy with ovarian conservation.

  19. Ophthalmologic findings in biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Salbert, B A; Astruc, J; Wolf, B

    1993-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder characterized by neurological and cutaneous manifestations and metabolic abnormalities. We studied 78 symptomatic children and found that 51% had ophthalmologic abnormalities. These include infections (30%), optic neuropathies and visual disturbances (13%), motility disturbances (13%), retinal pigment changes (4%) and pupillary findings (1%). The most commonly reported findings are optic atrophy and keratoconjunctivities. Although the disorder can be effectively treated with biotin therapy, untreated children are at risk of developing permanent neuro-ophthalmic damage.

  20. Congenital deficiency of factor VII.

    PubMed

    Sikka, M; Gomber, S; Madan, N; Rusia, U; Sharma, S

    1996-01-01

    A case of congenital factor VII deficiency in a five-year-old child is reported. The patient, born of a non-consanguineous marriage, presented with repeated bouts of epistaxis since childhood. The prothrombin time (PT) was markedly prolonged with a normal bleeding time (BT), partial thromboplastin time with Kaolin (PTTK) and platelet count. The patient has been on follow up for the last four years and is doing apparently well.

  1. HepG2 cells develop signs of riboflavin deficiency within four days of culture in riboflavin-deficient medium*

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Ricarda; Manthey, Karoline C.; Griffin, Jacob B.; Zempleni, Janos

    2006-01-01

    Flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide are essential coenzymes in redox reactions. For example, flavin adenine dinucleotide is a coenzyme for both glutathione reductase and enzymes that mediate the oxidative folding of secretory proteins. Here we investigated short-term effects of moderately riboflavin-deficient culture medium on flavin-related responses in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells. Cells were cultured in riboflavin-deficient (3.1 nmol/L) medium for up to six days; controls were cultured in riboflavin-sufficient (532 nmol/L) medium. The activity of glutathione reductase decreased by 98% within four days of riboflavin-deficient culture. Transport rates of riboflavin increased in response to riboflavin depletion, whereas expression of enzymes mediating flavocoenzyme synthesis (flavokinase and flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetase) decreased in response to depletion. The oxidative folding and synthesis of plasminogen and apolipoprotein B-100, respectively, was impaired within four days of culture in riboflavin-deficient medium; this is consistent with impaired processing of secretory proteins in riboflavin-deficient cells. Riboflavin depletion was associated with increased DNA-binding activities of transcription factors with affinity for endoplasmic reticulum stress elements and NF-κB consensus elements, suggesting cell stress. Moreover, the abundance of the stress-induced protein GADD153 was greater in riboflavin-deficient cells compared with controls. Riboflavin deficiency was associated with decreased rates of cell proliferation caused by arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle. These studies are consistent with the hypothesis that HepG2 cells have a great demand for riboflavin, and that cell stress develops rapidly if riboflavin supply is marginally low. PMID:16081269

  2. HepG2 cells develop signs of riboflavin deficiency within 4 days of culture in riboflavin-deficient medium.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ricarda; Manthey, Karoline C; Griffin, Jacob B; Zempleni, Janos

    2005-10-01

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are essential coenzymes in redox reactions. For example, FAD is a coenzyme for both glutathione reductase and enzymes that mediate the oxidative folding of secretory proteins. Here we investigated short-term effects of moderately riboflavin-deficient culture medium on flavin-related responses in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells. Cells were cultured in riboflavin-deficient (3.1 nmol/l) medium for up to 6 days; controls were cultured in riboflavin-sufficient (532 nmol/l) medium. The activity of glutathione reductase decreased by 98% within 4 days of riboflavin-deficient culture. Transport rates of riboflavin increased in response to riboflavin depletion, whereas expression of enzymes mediating flavocoenzyme synthesis (flavokinase and FAD synthetase) decreased in response to depletion. The oxidative folding and synthesis of plasminogen and apolipoprotein B-100 was impaired within 4 days of culture in riboflavin-deficient medium; this is consistent with impaired processing of secretory proteins in riboflavin-deficient cells. Riboflavin depletion was associated with increased DNA-binding activities of transcription factors with affinity for endoplasmic reticulum stress elements and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) consensus elements, suggesting cell stress. Moreover, the abundance of the stress-induced protein GADD153 was greater in riboflavin-deficient cells compared with controls. Riboflavin deficiency was associated with decreased rates of cell proliferation caused by arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle. These studies are consistent with the hypothesis that HepG2 cells have a great demand for riboflavin and that cell stress develops rapidly if riboflavin supply is marginally low.

  3. Adult neurogenesis in serotonin transporter deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, A; Benninghoff, J; Moessner, R; Rizzi, M; Paizanis, E; Doenitz, C; Gross, S; Hermann, M; Gritti, A; Lanfumey, L; Fritzen, S; Reif, A; Hamon, M; Murphy, D L; Vescovi, A; Lesch, K-P

    2007-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a regulator of morphogenetic activities during early brain development and neurogenesis, including cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and synaptogenesis. The 5-HT transporter (5-HTT, SLC6A4) mediates high-affinity reuptake of 5-HT into presynaptic terminals and thereby fine-tunes serotonergic neurotransmission. Inactivation of the 5-HTT gene in mice reduces 5-HT clearance resulting in persistently increased concentrations of synaptic 5-HT. In the present study, we investigated the effects of elevated 5-HT levels on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus of 5-HTT deficient mice, including stem cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Using an in vivo approach, we showed an increase in proliferative capacity of hippocampal adult neural stem cells in aged 5-HTT knockout mice (approximately 14.5 months) compared to wildtype controls. In contrast, in vivo and additional in vitro analyses of younger adult 5-HTT knockout mice (approximately 7 weeks and approximately 3.0 months) did not reveal significant changes in proliferation of neural stem cells or survival of newborn cells. We showed that the cellular fate of newly generated cells in 5-HTT knockout mice is not different with respect to the total number and percentage of neurons or glial cells from wildtype controls. Our findings indicate that elevated synaptic 5-HT concentration throughout early development and later life of 5-HTT deficient mice does not induce adult neurogenesis in adult mice, but that elevated 5-HT levels in aged mice influence stem cell proliferation.

  4. Copper deficiency in neonatal mice alters brain catecholamine levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.R.; Prohaska, J.R. )

    1991-03-15

    Copper (Cu) deficiency was investigated in Swiss albino mice to develop a model that alters brain catecholamine metabolism without serious growth impairment. Cu deficiency was induced by feeding a diet low in Cu to dams beginning either 7 days (d) prior, 4d prior, 4d after, or on the day of parturition. All 4-week-old male Cu-deficient ({minus}Cu) offspring were anemic and exhibited biochemical characteristics of Cu deficiency when compared to their respective +Cu control mice. However, the best model, which resulted in altered catecholamine metabolism characterized by elevation of dopamine (DA) and depression in norepinephrine (NE) in brain, heart, and spleen, was when treatment began 4d prior to birth. Body and brain weight were not altered. However, levels of Cu in brain and liver of {minus}Cu mice were markedly reduced to 21% and 31% of those measured in +Cu controls, respectively. Furthermore, brain NE and DA concentrations of {minus}Cu mice were 72% and 132% of those quantified in +Cu offspring, respectively. A plausible explanation is that dietary Cu deficiency results in lower activity of brain dopamine-{beta}-monooxygenase, the Cu dependent enzyme that catalyzes conversion of DA to NE. It is not yet known if these changes in Ne and DA pool size altered the quantity or characteristics of the neuronal catecholamine receptors, and more importantly, whether or not the observed changes are reversible by nutritional intervention.

  5. Bovine monocyte-derived macrophage function in induced copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cerone, S; Sansinanea, A; Streitenberger, S; García, C; Auza, N

    2000-03-01

    The effect of molybdenum-induced copper deficiency on monocyte-derived macrophage function was examined. Five female calves were given molybdenum (30 ppm) and sulphate (225 ppm) to induce experimental secondary copper deficiency. Oxidant production by bovine macrophages was measured after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonized zymosan (OpZ). Lipoperoxidative effects inside of macrophage, superoxide dismutase activity, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide formation were determined. Copper deficiency was confirmed from decreased serum copper levels, and animals with values less than 5.9 micromol/l were considered deficient. The content of intracellular copper decreased about 40% in deficient cells compared with the controls. The respiratory burst activity determined by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction was significantly impaired with both stimulants used. Superoxide anion formation was less affected than hydrogen peroxide generation. In addition, increased lipid peroxidation was observed. It could be concluded that the effect of these changes may impair the monocyte-derived macrophage function in the immune system.

  6. Informing disinvestment with limited evidence: cobalamin deficiency in the fatigued.

    PubMed

    Mnatzaganian, George; Karnon, Jonathan; Moss, John R; Elshaug, Adam G; Metz, Michael; Frank, Oliver R; Hiller, Janet E

    2015-01-01

    Health technology reassessment and disinvestment can be difficult due to uncertainties regarding available evidence. Pathology testing to investigate cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is a strong case in point. We conducted a 3-month economic evaluation of five strategies for diagnosing and treating cobalamin deficiency in adult patients hypothetically presenting with new unexplained fatigue in the primary care setting. The first consultation per patient was considered. Screening tests other than serum cobalamin were not included. A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken using a decision tree to represent the diagnostic / treatment pathways, with relevant cost and utility scores assigned to different stages in the evaluation process. Input parameter values were estimated from published evidence, supplemented by expert opinion, with sensitivity analysis undertaken to represent parameter uncertainty. Ordering serum vitamin B12 to assess cobalamin deficiency among patients with unexplained fatigue was not cost-effective in any patient population, irrespective of pretest prevalence of this deficiency. For patients with a pretest prevalence above 1 percent, treating all with oral vitamin B12 supplements without testing was most cost-effective, whereas watchful waiting with symptoms monitoring was most cost-effective for patients with lower pretest prevalence probabilities. Substantial evidence gaps exist for parameter estimation: questionable cobalamin deficiency levels in the fatigued; debatable treatment methods; unknown natural history of the condition. Despite this, we reveal a robust path for disinvestment decision making in the face of a paradox between the evidence required to inform disinvestment compared with its paucity in informing initial funding decisions.

  7. Ferric carboxymaltose: a review of its use in iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject(®), Injectafer(®)) is an intravenous iron preparation approved in numerous countries for the treatment of iron deficiency. A single high dose of ferric carboxymaltose (up to 750 mg of iron in the US and 1,000 mg of iron in the EU) can be infused in a short time frame (15 min). Consequently, fewer doses of ferric carboxymaltose may be needed to replenish iron stores compared with some other intravenous iron preparations (e.g. iron sucrose). Ferric carboxymaltose improved self-reported patient global assessment, New York Heart Association functional class and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency in two randomized, placebo-controlled trials (FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF). In other randomized controlled trials, ferric carboxymaltose replenished iron stores and corrected anaemia in various populations with iron-deficiency anaemia, including patients with chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease or heavy uterine bleeding, postpartum iron-deficiency anaemia and perioperative anaemia. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose was generally well tolerated, with a low risk of hypersensitivity reactions. It was generally better tolerated than oral ferrous sulfate, mainly reflecting a lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects. The most common laboratory abnormality seen in ferric carboxymaltose recipients was transient, asymptomatic hypophosphataemia. The higher acquisition cost of ferric carboxymaltose appeared to be offset by lower costs for other items, with the potential for cost savings. In conclusion, ferric carboxymaltose is an important option for the treatment of iron deficiency.

  8. Audiologic findings in children with biotinidase deficiency in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Genc, G A; Sivri-Kalkanoğlu, H S; Dursun, A; Aydin, H I; Tokatli, A; Sennaroglu, L; Belgin, E; Wolf, B; Coşkun, T

    2007-02-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by neurological and cutaneous features, including sensorineural hearing loss. Although many features of the disorder are reversible following treatment with biotin, the hearing loss appears to be irreversible. In the present study, hearing status of patients with biotinidase deficiency is characterized in a Turkish population. Subjective and objective audiologic tests were performed on 20 children with profound biotinidase deficiency. Sensorineural hearing loss occurs in approximately 55% of the children with biotinidase deficiency. The hearing loss varies in severity from mild to profound hearing loss. In children diagnosed immediately after birth because they had an older sibling with the disorder, statistically significant differences were found between ABR results and age of diagnosis (p<0.05). Greater prolongation in ABR latencies were observed in the late-diagnosed children compared to that in the early-diagnosed children (p<0.05). Early diagnosis is important to prevent peripheral and central hearing loss. Children with biotinidase deficiency who have hearing loss are likely at increased risk for having speech and language problems. If hearing aids do not provide sufficient amplification, cochlear implantation may be indicated in these children. Therefore, it is important to test the hearing thresholds of these children with hearing aids and evaluate their language development.

  9. Analysis of Gait Disturbance in Glut 1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blumenschine, Michelle; Montes, Jacqueline; Rao, Ashwini K; Engelstad, Kristin; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2016-11-01

    Anticipating potential therapies for Glut 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1DS) emphasizes the need for effective clinical outcome measures. The 6-minute walk test is a well-established outcome measure that evaluates walking ability in neurological diseases. Twenty-one children with Glut 1 deficiency syndrome and 21 controls performed the 6-minute walk test. Fatigue was determined by comparing distance walked in the first and sixth minutes. Gait was analyzed by stride length, velocity, cadence, base of support, and percentage time in double support. Independent sample t-tests examined differences between group. Repeated-measures analysis of variance evaluated gait parameters over time. Glut 1 deficiency syndrome patients walked less (P < .05), had slower velocities (P < .0001), had shorter stride lengths (P < .0001), spent more time in double support (P < .001), and had increasing variability in base of support (P = .009). Glut 1 deficiency syndrome patients have impaired motor performance, walk more slowly, and have poor balance. The 6-minute walk test with gait analysis may serve as a useful outcome measure in clinical trials in Glut 1 deficiency syndrome.

  10. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare.

  11. [Diagnosis of magnesium deficiency in intensive care patients].

    PubMed

    Saur, P M; Zielmann, S; Roth, A T; Frank, L; Warneke, G; Radke, A; Ensink, F B; Kettler, D

    1996-02-01

    Magnesium deficiency was investigated in critically ill patients, comparing measurements of plasma concentrations with the results obtained by the magnesium tolerance test. 20 critically ill patients (5 females, 15 males) between the ages of 27 and 86 were investigated. Magnesium plasma concentrations were determined before the magnesium tolerance test according to Ryzen was performed. For this purpose, magnesium sulfate (0.1 mmol/kg) was infused intravenously over four hours. Renal magnesium excretion was measured in the 24 h urine beginning at the start of the infusion. Magnesium concentrations in plasma and urine were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In 12 patients magnesium plasma concentrations were decreased to 0.58-0.79 mmol/l. 6 patients showed values within the normal range of 0.80 to 1.0 mmol/l. In 2 patients the plasma concentration was increased to 1.07 and 1.27 mmol/l. Parenteral magnesium tolerance testing revealed a considerable magnesium deficiency by retention of 65-100% of the loading dose in 14 of the 20 patients. The remaining 6 patients retained 23-48% of the loading dose, thus demonstrating a moderate magnesium deficiency. Determination of magnesium plasma concentration appears suitable as an informative preliminary survey, since low values are reliable indicating a magnesium deficiency. However, this study confirms that normal magnesium plasma concentrations do not exclude a considerable magnesium deficiency, which is more sensitively determined by the magnesium tolerance test.

  12. Association between celiac disease and primary lactase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Basso, M S; Luciano, R; Ferretti, F; Muraca, M; Panetta, F; Bracci, F; Ottino, S; Diamanti, A

    2012-12-01

    Primary lactase deficiency (PLD) is a common inherited condition caused by a reduced activity of lactase. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms C/T(-13910) and G/A(-22018) upstream of the lactase gene are associated with lactase nonpersistence. In celiac disease (CD) patients, lactose intolerance could be due to secondary lactase deficiency and to PLD. The aim of this study were to evaluate the association of PLD and CD using genetic test, and to define the prevalence of PLD in celiac subjects compared with a control population. A total of 188 controls and 92 biopsy-proven CD patients were included in the study. More than 70% of all subjects were found homozygous for the polymorphisms. Differences in the prevalence of PLD were not found between CD patients and controls.In conclusions, the hereditary lactase deficiency is frequent in Italian CD children as in control population.

  13. Gestational magnesium deficiency is deleterious to fetal outcome.

    PubMed

    Almonte, R A; Heath, D L; Whitehall, J; Russell, M J; Patole, S; Vink, R

    1999-07-01

    A number of recent epidemiological findings have implicated magnesium as being essential to fetal well-being. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship between maternal requirements for dietary magnesium and subsequent mortality and morbidity in offspring. The present study uses a rodent model of dietary-induced hypomagnesemia to investigate the effects of magnesium deficiency prior to and during gestation on neonatal morbidity and mortality. Magnesium deficiency during gestation significantly increased neonatal mortality and morbidity. Such increases were associated with a reduced free magnesium concentration in both maternal and offspring blood and an increased incidence of periventricular hemorrhage and edema in newborn pups as observed by magnetic resonance imaging and histology. Animals fed a magnesium-deficient diet before mating but given magnesium supplementation during gestation did not demonstrate a significant change in neonatal mortality and morbidity when compared to control animals. The significant improvement in fetal outcome with dietary magnesium supports the concept of magnesium supplementation during pregnancy.

  14. Proteomics dissection of plant responses to mineral nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cuiyue; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

    2013-02-01

    Plants require at least 17 essential nutrients to complete their life cycle. Except for carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, other essential nutrients are mineral nutrients, which are mainly acquired from soils by roots. In natural soils, the availability of most essential mineral nutrients is very low and hard to meet the demand of plants. Developing crops with high nutrient efficiency is essential for sustainable agriculture, which requires more understandings of crop responses to mineral nutrient deficiency. Proteomic techniques provide a crucial and complementary tool to dissect molecular mechanisms underlying crop adaptation to mineral nutrient deficiency in the rapidly processing postgenome era. This review gives a comparative overview about identification of mineral nutrient deficiency responsive proteins using proteomic analysis, and discusses the current status for crop proteomics and its challenges to be integrated into systems biology approaches for developing crops with high mineral nutrient efficiency.

  15. Effect of chronic iron deficiency on neuropsychological domains in infants.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Navarro, Beatriz; Matute, Esmeralda; Vásquez-Garibay, Edgar; Zarabozo, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of chronic iron deficiency on neuropsychological traits in infants. We established the nutritional iron status and assessed the neuropsychological characteristics of 58 Mexican 14- to 18-month-old infants. The Bayley Scales of Infant Development, preschool language scales and an environmental sound perception task designed expressly for the study, were used. The infants' mothers were asked to fill out 2 questionnaires concerning their child's sociodemographic background. Six different neuropsychological domains were analyzed. Results showed that the chronic iron deficiency group did show significantly lower scores on language, environmental sound perception, and motor measures, when compared with infants with normal nutritional iron status at 6 and 14 to 18 months. Our conclusion is that the development of language and motor skills and environmental sound perception appeared to be sensitive to the effects of chronic iron deficiency in infants.

  16. Parenteral magnesium tolerance testing in the evaluation of magnesium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ryzen, E; Elbaum, N; Singer, F R; Rude, R K

    1985-01-01

    Magnesium deficiency is a common clinical condition, frequently present even with normal serum magnesium (S-Mg) concentrations. We have studied retention of a low-dose (0.2 mEq/kg lean body weight), intravenously administered magnesium load in 6 hypomagnesemic patients and 18 normomagnesemic alcoholics as compared with 16 normal subjects. Both normomagnesemic and hypomagnesemic subjects retained significantly greater amounts of the administered magnesium than did the normal subjects. In patients who were restudied following parenteral magnesium repletion, retention of the magnesium load normalized. We conclude that increased retention of a magnesium load is a more sensitive index of magnesium deficiency than is the S-Mg concentration, and suggest that low-dose magnesium tolerance testing be used more frequently as a clinical tool in the evaluation of states of normomagnesemic magnesium deficiency.

  17. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance of studying different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  18. Current issues in iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R D; Cook, J D

    1996-03-01

    This brief review of developments relating to iron deficiency during the past year covers three main areas: iron supplementation, the regulation of iron absorption, and the use of the serum transferrin receptor for the assessment of iron status. The intermittent administration of iron supplement once or twice weekly rather than daily has been advocated by international health agencies in recent years, but radioiron absorption studies in human subjects have failed to demonstrate any absorptive advantage of the intermittent schedule. The value of prophylactic iron supplementation in elderly blood donors was evaluated and shown to offer limited benefit in maintaining donation frequency. A recent model of the regulation of iron absorption involving erythropoietic and store regulators is discussed and a recent article indicating a potential non-hematopoietic effect of hematopoietic growth factors on iron absorption by the gastrointestinal mucosal cell is reviewed. A new measure of functional iron deficiency, namely the serum transferrin receptor, is discussed, with particular reference to its mechanism of production and its great value in distinguishing iron deficiency anemia from the anemia of chronic disease.

  19. Vitamin D deficiency and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2017-03-24

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to the onset of diabetes. This review summarizes the role of Vitamin D in maintaining the normal release of insulin by the pancreatic beta cells (β-cells). Diabetes is initiated by the onset of insulin resistance. The β-cells can overcome this resistance by releasing more insulin, thus preventing hyperglycaemia. However, as this hyperactivity increases, the β-cells experience excessive Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling that results in cell death and the onset of diabetes. Vitamin D deficiency contributes to both the initial insulin resistance and the subsequent onset of diabetes caused by β-cell death. Vitamin D acts to reduce inflammation, which is a major process in inducing insulin resistance. Vitamin D maintains the normal resting levels of both Ca(2+) and ROS that are elevated in the β-cells during diabetes. Vitamin D also has a very significant role in maintaining the epigenome. Epigenetic alterations are a feature of diabetes by which many diabetes-related genes are inactivated by hypermethylation. Vitamin D acts to prevent such hypermethylation by increasing the expression of the DNA demethylases that prevent hypermethylation of multiple gene promoter regions of many diabetes-related genes. What is remarkable is just how many cellular processes are maintained by Vitamin D. When Vitamin D is deficient, many of these processes begin to decline and this sets the stage for the onset of diseases such as diabetes.

  20. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Allison J.; Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Yanke, Adam B.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cole, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  1. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance to study different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy. PMID:26846578

  2. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  3. Citrin deficiency and current treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Takeyori; Inoue, Kanako; Tushima, Anmi; Mutoh, Kozo; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the historical aspects of citrin and citrin deficiency, characteristic food preference and food aversion of citrin-deficient subjects, and carbohydrate toxicity in relation to ureogenesis and issues of the conventional treatment procedures for hyperammonemia in citrin deficiency, leading to current treatment concepts for citrin deficiency. We also emphasize the importance of a citrin deficiency mouse model in elucidating the pathophysiology and developing novel therapeutics based on the pathophysiology, such as sodium pyruvate. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Maternal marginal iodine deficiency affects the expression of relative proteins during brain development in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhui; Zhang, Le; Li, Jing; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2013-04-01

    Marginal iodine deficiency is a major health problem in pregnant women, but its impact on nerve and intelligence development in offspring has been rarely reported. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of maternal marginal iodine deficiency on nerve and cognitive development in offspring and the related mechanisms. Marginal iodine-deficient rats were given 3  μg iodine per day, while normal control rats were given 4  μg iodine daily. Western blot was used to detect the amounts of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) in the hippocampus of each group. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure c-jun and c-fos expression in the hippocampal CA1 region. Finally, the water maze method was used to measure spatial performance. Free thyroxine (FT₄) levels in marginal iodine-deficient rats decreased by about 30%. Seven days after birth, EGR1 and BDNF protein levels significantly decreased in the hippocampus of marginal iodine deficiency rats compared with the normal control group. In addition, c-jun and c-fos expression in the hippocampus of 40-day-old rats was decreased in marginal iodine-deficient rats, compared with control. The spatial learning and memory ability of 40-day-old marginal iodine-deficient rats had a downward trend compared with the normal control group. FT₄ significantly decreased after pregnancy in rats with marginal iodine deficiency, affecting the expression of related proteins in the brain of offspring.

  5. New Data on Vaccine Antigen Deficient Bordetella pertussis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bouchez, Valérie; Hegerle, Nicolas; Strati, Francesco; Njamkepo, Elisabeth; Guiso, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of Bordetella pertussis is driven by natural and vaccine pressures. Isolates circulating in regions with high vaccination coverage present multiple allelic and antigenic variations as compared to isolates collected before introduction of vaccination. Furthermore, during the last epidemics reported in regions using pertussis acellular vaccines, isolates deficient for vaccine antigens, such as pertactin (PRN), were reported to reach high proportions of circulating isolates. More sporadic filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) or pertussis toxin (PT) deficient isolates were also collected. The whole genome of some recent French isolates, deficient or non-deficient in vaccine antigens, were analyzed. Transcription profiles of the expression of the main virulence factors were also compared. The invasive phenotype in an in vitro human tracheal epithelial (HTE) cell model of infection was evaluated. Our genomic analysis focused on SNPs related to virulence genes known to be more likely to present allelic polymorphism. Transcriptomic data indicated that isolates circulating since the introduction of pertussis vaccines present lower transcription levels of the main virulence genes than the isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Furthermore, isolates not producing FHA present significantly higher expression levels of the entire set of genes tested. Finally, we observed that recent isolates are more invasive in HTE cells when compared to the reference strain, but no multiplication occurs within cells. PMID:26389958

  6. Partial biotinidase deficiency: clinical and biochemical features.

    PubMed

    McVoy, J R; Levy, H L; Lawler, M; Schmidt, M A; Ebers, D D; Hart, P S; Pettit, D D; Blitzer, M G; Wolf, B

    1990-01-01

    Neonatal screening for profound biotinidase deficiency (less than 10% of the mean normal activity level) has identified a group of children with partial biotinidase deficiency (10% to 30% of mean normal activity). Because partial biotinidase deficiency may result in clinical consequences that may be prevented by treatment with biotin, we evaluated such individuals and their family members (1) to determine whether partial biotinidase deficiency is associated with symptoms and (2) to determine the inheritance pattern. We quantified serum biotinidase activity levels and obtained medical histories of probands, their parents and siblings, and additional family members. All children with partial deficiency were healthy at the time of diagnosis. One child, who was not initially treated with biotin, later developed hypotonia, hair loss, and skin rash, which resolved with biotin therapy. Four adults and three children with partial biotinidase deficiency were identified among family members of infants identified by neonatal screening. All these individuals were healthy, although one sibling had elevated urinary lactate excretion. A fifth adult with partial deficiency, found among clinically normal adult volunteers, later showed minor symptoms that resolved after biotin therapy. Like children with profound biotinidase deficiency, children with partial biotinidase deficiency are symptoms free at birth. However, the subsequent occurrence of symptoms of profound biotinidase deficiency in some persons with partial deficiency suggests that biotin therapy for this condition may be warranted.

  7. Oxidative Stress, Hepcidin and Nesfatin-I Status in Childhood Iron and Vitamin B12 Deficiency Anemias.

    PubMed

    Aşkar, Tünay Kontaş; Büyükleblebici, Olga; Hismioğulları, Adnan Adil; Hünkerler, Zeynep

    2017-06-27

    Anemia is a disease that is long and often repetitive and can result in great burden to the national economy. The most frequent nutritional deficiency anemias in children are related with iron and vitamin B12 deficiencies. The aim of this study was to determine the oxidative stress, hepcidin, and nesfatin-I levels in childhood iron and vitamin B12 deficiency anemias. The study had three groups of 15 children, iron anemia deficiency group, vitamin B12 deficiency group and a control group. The TBARS and nesfatin-I levels were significantly higher in the iron and vitamin B12 deficiency groups and the total antioxidant levels were significantly lower when compared to the control group. In contrast the plasma hepcidin levels were significantly lower in the iron deficiency group (p<0.01) when compared to the control group, however no significant differences were observed in vitamin B12 deficiency group. Plasma homocysteine levels were signifıcantly higher in the vitamin B12 deficiency group when compared to the control group (p<0.001), but no differences were determined between the iron deficiency and control groups. Our results showed that there is high levels of oxidative stress in childhood iron and vitamin B12 deficiency anemias. And we propose that plasma hepcidin and homocycteine levels may be useful in the differential diagnosis of childhood nutritional deficiency anemias. And nesfatin-1 hormone levels were identified for the first time in childhood iron deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency anemias within this study and this hormone may also be useful in differential diagnosis of anemias.

  8. C1q Deficiency and Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    van Schaarenburg, Rosanne A; Magro-Checa, César; Bakker, Jaap A; Teng, Y K Onno; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Huizinga, Tom W; Steup-Beekman, Gerda M; Trouw, Leendert A

    2016-01-01

    C1q deficiency is a rare immunodeficiency, which is strongly associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A mutation in one of the C1q genes can either lead to complete deficiency or to low C1q levels with C1q polypeptide in the form of low-molecular weight (LMW) C1q. Patients with C1q deficiency mainly present with cutaneous and renal involvement. Although less frequent, neuropsychiatric (NP) involvement has also been reported in 20% of the C1q-deficient patients. This involvement appears to be absent in other deficiencies of early components of the complement classical pathway (CP) (C1r/C1s, C2, or C4 deficiencies). We describe a new case with C1q deficiency with a homozygous G34R mutation in C1qC-producing LMW-C1q presenting with a severe SLE flare with NP involvement. The serum of this patient contained very low levels of a LMW variant of C1q polypeptides. Cell lysates contained the three chains of C1q, but no intact C1q was detected, consistent with the hypothesis of the existence of a LMW-C1q. Furthermore, we provide a literature overview of NP-SLE in C1q deficiency and hypothesize about the potential role of C1q in the pathogenesis of NP involvement in these patients. The onset of NP-SLE in C1q-deficient individuals is more severe when compared with complement competent NP-SLE patients. An important number of cases present with seizures and the most frequent findings in neuroimaging are changes in basal ganglia and cerebral vasculitis. A defective CP, because of non-functional C1q, does not protect against NP involvement in SLE. The absence of C1q and, subsequently, some of its biological functions may be associated with more severe NP-SLE.

  9. C1q Deficiency and Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    van Schaarenburg, Rosanne A.; Magro-Checa, César; Bakker, Jaap A.; Teng, Y. K. Onno; Bajema, Ingeborg M.; Huizinga, Tom W.; Steup-Beekman, Gerda M.; Trouw, Leendert A.

    2016-01-01

    C1q deficiency is a rare immunodeficiency, which is strongly associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A mutation in one of the C1q genes can either lead to complete deficiency or to low C1q levels with C1q polypeptide in the form of low-molecular weight (LMW) C1q. Patients with C1q deficiency mainly present with cutaneous and renal involvement. Although less frequent, neuropsychiatric (NP) involvement has also been reported in 20% of the C1q-deficient patients. This involvement appears to be absent in other deficiencies of early components of the complement classical pathway (CP) (C1r/C1s, C2, or C4 deficiencies). We describe a new case with C1q deficiency with a homozygous G34R mutation in C1qC-producing LMW-C1q presenting with a severe SLE flare with NP involvement. The serum of this patient contained very low levels of a LMW variant of C1q polypeptides. Cell lysates contained the three chains of C1q, but no intact C1q was detected, consistent with the hypothesis of the existence of a LMW-C1q. Furthermore, we provide a literature overview of NP-SLE in C1q deficiency and hypothesize about the potential role of C1q in the pathogenesis of NP involvement in these patients. The onset of NP-SLE in C1q-deficient individuals is more severe when compared with complement competent NP-SLE patients. An important number of cases present with seizures and the most frequent findings in neuroimaging are changes in basal ganglia and cerebral vasculitis. A defective CP, because of non-functional C1q, does not protect against NP involvement in SLE. The absence of C1q and, subsequently, some of its biological functions may be associated with more severe NP-SLE. PMID:28082982

  10. Two-center two-electron covalent bonds with deficient bonding densities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang

    2012-10-18

    Electron-deficient covalent bonds are a type of covalent bonds without electron accumulation at their bonding regions. Compared with normal covalent bonds, they are quite sensitive to chemical environments. Electron-deficient and normal covalent bonds are not isolated from each other. An electron-deficient bond may change to a normal one upon the change of substituting groups. Neither bond elongation nor atom electronegativity is directly related to the electron deficiency in an electron-deficient bond. Atoms in molecules (AIM) analyses suggest that electron-deficient bonds are characterized by positive Laplacians and small ρ(BCP) values. The positive Laplacian is caused by insignificant electron accumulation perpendicular to the bond path. On the basis of electron localization function (ELF) descriptors, electron-deficient bonds have small basin populations, low η values and high relative fluctuations. There may be one or two bond basins for an electron-deficient bond. In addition, such a bond may correlate with two more valence basins close to the two participating atoms. Electron-deficient bonds are usually weak and long. This is consistent with the low s characters in their natural bond orbitals (NBOs).

  11. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Berg, G.J.; de Goeij, J.J.; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendriks, H.F. )

    1991-08-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (less than 1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver, anemia, low plasma ceruloplasmin oxidase activity and increased 64Cu whole-body retention. Freshly isolated liver parenchymal cells from copper-deficient rats showed a higher 64Cu influx, which was associated with a higher apparent Vmax of 45 {plus minus} 4 pmol Cu.mg protein-1.min-1 as compared with 30 {plus minus} 3 pmol Cu.mg protein-1.min-1 for cells isolated from copper-sufficient rats. No significant difference in the apparent Km (approximately 30 mumol/L) was observed. Relative 64Cu efflux from cells from copper-deficient rats was significantly smaller than the efflux from cells from copper-sufficient rats after prelabeling as determined by 2-h efflux experiments. Analysis of the medium after efflux from cells from copper-deficient rats showed elevated protein-associated 64Cu, suggesting a higher incorporation of radioactive copper during metalloprotein synthesis. Effects of copper deficiency persist in primary cultures of parenchymal cells derived from copper-deficient rats, and short-term cultures of these cells offer a prospect for the study of cell biological aspects of the metabolic adaptation of the liver to copper deficiency.

  12. Influences of calcium deficiency and cerium on growth of spinach plants.

    PubMed

    Chao, Liu; Bofu, Pan; Weiqian, Cao; Yun, Lu; Hao, Huang; Liang, Chen; Xiaoqing, Liu; Xiao, Wu; Fashui, Hong

    2008-03-01

    The main aim of the study was to determine the role of cerium in the amelioration of calcium-deficiency effects in spinach plants. Spinach plants were cultivated in Hoagland's solution. They were subjected to calcium-deficiency and to cerium chloride administered in the calcium-present Hoagland's media and calcium-deficient Hoagland's media. Within 3 weeks, young leaves developed distinct calcium-deficient symptoms, and plant growth significantly inhibited to calcium deprivation as would be expected; cerium-treated groups grown in the same conditions did not develop calcium-deficient symptoms; fresh weight, dry weight and chlorophyll content of spinach plants were increased by 35.9, 45 and 64.05% compared to those of plants cultivated in calcium-deficient media. In addition, calcium deprivation in spinach plants caused the reduction of photosynthetic rate, oxygen evolution rate and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity. The reduction of activities of nitrate reductase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate synthase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase was observed under calcium-deficient media. However, cerium treatment under calcium-deficient media could significantly improve photosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism of spinach plants. This is viewed as evidence that cerium added to calcium-deficient media in the spinach plants could substitute for calcium and improve spinach growth.

  13. Prevalence of anaemia, deficiencies of iron and folic acid and their determinants in Ethiopian women.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Jemal

    2010-08-01

    A cross-sectional community-based study with analytic component was conducted among Ethiopian women during June-July 2005 to assess the magnitude of anaemia and deficiencies of iron and folic acid and to compare the factors responsible for anaemia among anaemic and non-anaemic cases. In total, 970 women, aged 15-19 years, were selected systematically for haematological and other important parameters. The overall prevalence of anaemia, iron deficiency, iron-deficiency anaemia, deficiency of folic acid, and parasitic infestations was 30.4%, 50.1%, 18.1%, 31.3%, and 13.7% respectively. Women who had more children aged less than five years but above two years, open-field toilet habits, chronic illnesses, and having intestinal parasites were positively associated with anaemia. Women who had no formal education and who did not use contraceptives were negatively associated with anaemia. The major determinants identified for anaemia were chronic illnesses [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-1.55), deficiency of iron (AOR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.35-0.64), and deficiency of folic acid (AOR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.50-0.90). The odds for developing anaemia was 1.1 times more likely among women with chronic illnesses, 60% more likely in the iron-deficient and 40% more likely in the folic acid-deficient than their counterparts. One in every three women had anaemia and deficiency of folic acid while one in every two had iron deficiency, suggesting that deficiencies of both folic acid and iron constitute the major micronutrient deficiencies in Ethiopian women. The risk imposed by anaemia to the health of women ranging from impediment of daily activities and poor pregnancy outcome calls for effective public-health measures, such as improved nutrient supplementation, health education, and timely treatment of illnesses.

  14. Interleukin-10 deficiency aggravates angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Woo-Young; Cha, Hye-Na; Heo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Jang, Byung Ik; Lee, In-Kye; Park, So-Young

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the role of interleukin (IL)-10 in angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling. Angiotensin II was infused subcutaneously (1.1mg/kg/day) for one week in IL-10 knockout and wild-type mice, after which cardiac function and hypertrophy were assessed by echocardiogram. IL-10 gene expression in the heart was increased by angiotensin II infusion. Plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and gene expression of BNP in the heart were increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II, and plasma BNP levels were further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. IL-10 deficiency increased the left ventricular dimension, whereas treatment with angiotensin II increased heart weight. Angiotensin II significantly reduced cardiac function in IL-10 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. Gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II infusion, and these increases were further enhanced by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Gene expression of collagen I/III and collagen III protein levels were increased by angiotensin II but not by IL-10 deficiency. Gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase2/9 was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II, and this expression was further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Akt phosphorylation was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II and further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Phosphorylation of p38 was increased by IL-10 deficiency. These results suggest that IL-10 deficiency causes deterioration in cardiac functions in angiotensin II-infused mice, suggesting that IL-10 plays a protective role against angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Protective effects of zinc on oxidative stress enzymes in liver of protein-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Garg, M L; Dhawan, D K

    2005-01-01

    Persons afflicted with protein malnutrition are generally deficient in a variety of essential micronutrients like zinc, copper, iron, and selenium, which in turn affects number of metabolic processes in the body. To evaluate the protective effects of zinc on the enzymes involved in oxidative stress induced in liver of protein-deficient rats, the current study was designed. Zinc sulfate at a dose level of 227 mg/L zinc in drinking water was administered to female Sprague-Dawley normal control as well as protein-deficient rats for a total duration of 8 weeks. The effects of zinc treatment in conditions of protein deficiency were studied on rat liver antioxidant enzymes, which included catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reduced (GSH), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Protein deficiency in normal rats resulted in a significant increase in hepatic activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase and the levels of lipid peroxidation. A significant inhibition in the levels of reduced glutathione and the enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase has been observed after protein deficiency in normal rats. Interestingly, Zn treatment to protein-deficient animals lowered already raised activity catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase and levels of lipid peroxidation to significant levels when compared to protein-deficient animals. Also, Zn treatment to the protein-deficient animals resulted in a significant elevation in the levels of GSH and SOD activity as compared to their respective controls, thereby indicating its effectiveness in regulating their levels in adverse conditions. It has also been observed that concentrations of zinc, copper, iron, and selenium were found to be decreased significantly in protein-deficient animals. However, the levels of these elements came back to within normal limits when zinc was administrated

  16. Factor XI deficiency is associated with lower risk for cardiovascular and venous thromboembolism events.

    PubMed

    Preis, Meir; Hirsch, Julianna; Kotler, Antonio; Zoabi, Ahmad; Stein, Nili; Rennert, Gad; Saliba, Walid

    2017-03-02

    Factor XI deficiency is one of the rare inherited coagulation factor deficiencies. However, its incidence is high within the Ashkenazi Jewish community. Because factor XI displays both procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activities, it has been postulated that an underlying cardiovascular benefit may exist with factor XI deficiency. This historical cohort study was performed using the electronic database of Clalit Health Services, the largest health care provider in Israel. All adults tested for factor XI activity between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Factor XI activity was classified into 3 categories: normal (activity >50%), mild deficiency (activity = 30%-50%), and moderate-severe deficiency (activity ≤30%). The cohort was followed until 31 December 2015 for incidence of cardiovascular events (composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, and transient ischemic attack) and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Of the 10 193 included patients, 8958 (88.9%) had normal factor XI activity, 690 (6.8%) had mild deficiency, and 542 (5.3%) had moderate-severe deficiency. Compared with individuals with normal activity, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for cardiovascular events was 0.52 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.87) in those with mild deficiency, and 0.57 (95% CI, 0.35-0.93) in those with moderate-severe factor XI deficiency. The incidence of VTE was lower in those with factor XI deficiency (activity <50%) compared with those with normal activity; adjusted HR = 0.26 (95% CI, 0.08-0.84). In summary, factor XI deficiency is associated with decreased incidence of cardiovascular events and VTE. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values.

  18. Hypothesis and case reports: possible thiamin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, D

    1990-02-01

    Three family members are reported with functional symptoms considered to be caused by intracellular deficiency of thiamin. Persistence of desaturation of erythrocyte transketolase in the face of megadose thiamin hydrochloride (THCl), accompanied by a balanced multivitamin and mineral formula, suggested a familial thiamin dependency state. Each of three individuals responded clinically to the administration of thiamin tetrahydrofurfuryl disulfide (TTFD), and erythrocyte transketolase (TKA) became fully saturated with thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP). Dysautonomic symptoms observed are compared with those seen in classical beriberi, the nutritional prototype for dysautonomia, and changes in blood pressure are described which support this premise. Although there is no proof from the laboratory, it is hypothesized that the biochemical lesion might be due either to malabsorption of thiamin or its inadequate phosphorylation.

  19. Iodine deficiency in pregnant women in Austria.

    PubMed

    Lindorfer, H; Krebs, M; Kautzky-Willer, A; Bancher-Todesca, D; Sager, M; Gessl, A

    2015-03-01

    In Austria, iodine deficiency has been considered to be eliminated owing to table salt fortification with iodine, but whether this also applies to pregnant women is unclear. Even mild iodine deficiency during gestation may lead to neurocognitive sequelae in the offspring. This is a cross-sectional investigation of urinary iodine excretion in 246 pregnant women (first trimester n=2, second trimester n=53, third trimester n=191, gestational diabetes mellitus n=115, no gestational diabetes mellitus n=131). The iodine content of morning spot urine samples was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Pregnant women in the Vienna area had a median urinary iodine concentration (UIC) of 87 μg/l. Only 13.8% of the cohort were in the recommended range of 150-249 μg/l, whereas 21.5% had a UIC of 0-49 μg/l, 40.2% had a UIC of 50-99 μg/l and 19.5% had a UIC of 100-149 μg/l. In all, 4.9% had a UIC over 250 μg/l. A total of 137 women of foreign origin had a significantly higher iodine excretion compared with Austrian-born women. Maternal or gestational age had no influence on UIC. Although 79 women on iodine supplementation had a significantly higher iodine concentration compared with women without iodine supplementation (97.3 vs 80.1 μg/l, P=0,006), their UIC was below the recommended range, indicating that doses of 100-150 μg per day are not sufficient to normalize iodine excretion. Sodium and iodine concentrations in the urine were tightly correlated (R=0.539, n=61), suggesting that low intake of iodized salt might contribute to insufficient iodine supply. This study shows that pregnant women in the Vienna area have a potentially clinically significant iodine deficiency and that currently recommended doses of iodine supplementation may not be sufficient.

  20. Toward reassessing data-deficient species.

    PubMed

    Bland, Lucie M; Bielby, Jon; Kearney, Stephen; Orme, C David L; Watson, James E M; Collen, Ben

    2016-10-03

    One in 6 species (13,465 species) on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List is classified as data deficient due to lack of information on their taxonomy, population status, or impact of threats. Despite the chance that many are at high risk of extinction, data-deficient species are typically excluded from global and local conservation priorities, as well as funding schemes. The number of data-deficient species will greatly increase as the IUCN Red List becomes more inclusive of poorly known and speciose groups. A strategic approach is urgently needed to enhance the conservation value of data-deficient assessments. To develop this, we reviewed 2879 data-deficient assessments in 6 animal groups and identified 8 main justifications for assigning data-deficient status (type series, few records, old records, uncertain provenance, uncertain population status or distribution, uncertain threats, taxonomic uncertainty, and new species). Assigning a consistent set of justification tags (i.e., consistent assignment to assessment justifications) to species classified as data deficient is a simple way to achieve more strategic assessments. Such tags would clarify the causes of data deficiency; facilitate the prediction of extinction risk; facilitate comparisons of data deficiency among taxonomic groups; and help prioritize species for reassessment. With renewed efforts, it could be straightforward to prevent thousands of data-deficient species slipping unnoticed toward extinction.

  1. The changing epidemiology of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Eastman, Creswell J

    2012-04-03

    Globally, about 2 thousand million people are affected by iodine deficiency. Although endemic goitre is the most visible sign of iodine deficiency, its most devastating consequence is brain damage causing mental retardation in children. The relationship between iodine deficiency and brain damage was not clearly established until the 1980s when the term iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs), which encompass a spectrum of conditions caused by iodine deficiency, was introduced. This paradigm shift in the understanding of the clinical consequences of iodine deficiency led to a change in iodine deficiency assessment. The median urinary iodine excretion level has been recommended as the preferred indicator for monitoring population iodine deficiency status since 2001. The 2007 WHO urinary iodine data in schoolchildren from 130 countries revealed that iodine intake is still insufficient in 47 countries. Furthermore, about one-third of countries lack national estimates of the prevalence of iodine deficiency. The picture that has emerged from available data worldwide over the past two decades is that IDDs are not confined to remote, mountainous areas in developing countries, but are a global public health problem that affects most countries, including developed countries and island nations. The recognition of the universality of iodine deficiency highlights the need to develop and apply new strategies to establish and maintain sustainable IDD elimination and strengthen regular monitoring programmes.

  2. DNA Repair Deficiency in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby causing Huntington’s disease. Single-strand breaks are common DNA lesions and are associated with the neurodegenerative diseases, ataxia-oculomotor apraxia-1 and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1. DNA double-strand breaks are toxic lesions and two main pathways exist for their repair: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage may be linked with the age-associated neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Mutation in the WRN protein leads to the premature aging disease Werner syndrome, a disorder that features neurodegeneration. In this article we review the evidence linking deficiencies in the DNA repair pathways with neurodegeneration. PMID:21550379

  3. Impact of Fetal-Neonatal Iron Deficiency on Recognition Memory at 2 Months of Age.

    PubMed

    Geng, Fengji; Mai, Xiaoqin; Zhan, Jianying; Xu, Lin; Zhao, Zhengyan; Georgieff, Michael; Shao, Jie; Lozoff, Betsy

    2015-12-01

    To assess the effects of fetal-neonatal iron deficiency on recognition memory in early infancy. Perinatal iron deficiency delays or disrupts hippocampal development in animal models and thus may impair related neural functions in human infants, such as recognition memory. Event-related potentials were used in an auditory recognition memory task to compare 2-month-old Chinese infants with iron sufficiency or deficiency at birth. Fetal-neonatal iron deficiency was defined 2 ways: high zinc protoporphyrin/heme ratio (ZPP/H > 118 μmol/mol) or low serum ferritin (<75 μg/L) in cord blood. Late slow wave was used to measure infant recognition of mother's voice. Event related potentials patterns differed significantly for fetal-neonatal iron deficiency as defined by high cord ZPP/H but not low ferritin. Comparing 35 infants with iron deficiency (ZPP/H > 118 μmol/mol) to 92 with lower ZPP/H (iron-sufficient), only infants with iron sufficiency showed larger late slow wave amplitude for stranger's voice than mother's voice in frontal-central and parietal-occipital locations, indicating the recognition of mother's voice. Infants with iron sufficiency showed electrophysiological evidence of recognizing their mother's voice, whereas infants with fetal-neonatal iron deficiency did not. Their poorer auditory recognition memory at 2 months of age is consistent with effects of fetal-neonatal iron deficiency on the developing hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. B12 deficiency is common in infants and is accompanied by serious neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Irevall, T; Axelsson, I; Naumburg, E

    2017-01-01

    Adverse neurological symptoms have been linked to vitamin B12 deficiency in infants. This explorative study described the clinical presentation associated with vitamin B12 deficiency in this age group. The study comprised infants who were born between 2004 and 2012 and were tested for vitamin B12 levels after they were admitted to a hospital with neurological symptoms at less than one year of age. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as low cobalamin in serum and/or increased homocysteine and/or increased methylmalonate. It was diagnosed according to the applicable International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, and recorded as vitamin B12 deficiency in the medical records. All information was retrieved from medical records and compared to symptomatic infants with normal levels. Of the 121 infants tested, 35 had vitamin B12 deficiency and 86 had normal levels. Vitamin B12 deficiency was diagnosed at an average age of 1.7 months and was more common among boys. Seizures and apparent life-threatening events were the most common symptoms among infants with B12 deficiency compared to infants with normal levels. Vitamin B12 deficiency was more common in infants than we expected and presented with severe symptoms, such as seizures and apparent life-threatening events. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Impact of fetal-neonatal iron deficiency on recognition memory at two months of age

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Fengji; Mai, Xiaoqin; Zhan, Jianying; Xu, Lin; Zhao, Zhengyan; Georgieff, Michael; Shao, Jie; Lozoff, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of fetal-neonatal iron deficiency on recognition memory in early infancy. Perinatal iron deficiency delays or disrupts hippocampal development in animal models and thus may impair related neural functions in human infants, such as recognition memory. Study design Event-related potentials were used in an auditory recognition memory task to compare 2-month-old Chinese infants with iron sufficiency or deficiency at birth. Fetal- neonatal iron deficiency was defined two ways: high zinc protoporphyrin/heme ratio (ZPP/H > 118 μmol/mol) or low serum ferritin (< 75 μg/l) in cord blood. Late slow wave (LSW) was used to measure infant recognition of mother’s voice. Results ERP patterns differed significantly for fetal-neonatal iron deficiency as defined by high cord ZPP/H but not low ferritin. Comparing 35 infants with iron deficiency (ZPP/H > 118 μmol/mol) to 92 with lower ZPP/H (iron-sufficient), only infants with iron sufficiency showed larger LSW amplitude for stranger’s voice than mother’s voice in frontal-central and parietal-occipital locations, indicating the recognition of mother’s voice. Conclusions Infants with iron sufficiency showed electrophysiological evidence of recognizing their mother’s voice, whereas infants with fetal-neonatal iron deficiency did not. Their poorer auditory recognition memory at two months of age is consistent with effects of fetal-neonatal iron deficiency on the developing hippocampus. PMID:26382625

  6. The severity of copper deficiency in rats is determined by the type of dietary carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Fields, M; Ferretti, R J; Reiser, S; Smith, J C

    1984-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the interaction between copper and dietary carbohydrates on clinical and enzymatic indices associated with copper deficiency. Copper deficiency was produced in rats by feeding diets adequate in all nutrients including selenium and chromium, but marginal in copper (1.2 micrograms/g diet) containing 62% of either starch, fructose, or glucose. During the fifth week, the fructose of the copper-deficient diet (20 rats) was replaced by either starch (10 rats) or by glucose (10 rats). The experiment was terminated after 11 weeks. Copper deficiency in rats fed fructose significantly lowered body weight and hematocrit, but increased liver weight, blood urea nitrogen, ammonia, cholesterol, and triglycerides when compared to rats fed starch or glucose. The copper metalloenzyme, superoxide dismutase, the selenoenzyme, glutathione peroxidase, and hepatic ATP were decreased in the copper-deficient rats fed fructose as compared to copper-deficient rats fed starch or glucose. These results indicate that fructose may be the dietary component which has a deleterious effect on copper and selenium status. Changing the type of dietary carbohydrate in copper-deficient rats from fructose to either starch or glucose ameliorated the severity of the deficiency. The protective effects were more pronounced with starch than with glucose.

  7. Lubricin restoration in a mouse model of congenital deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Adele; Waller, Kimberly A.; Cui, Yajun; Allen, Justin M.; Smits, Patrick; Zhang, Ling X.; Ayturk, Ugur M.; Hann, Steven; Lessard, Samantha G.; Zurakowski, David; Warman, Matthew L.; Jay, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Congenital deficiency of the principal boundary lubricant in cartilage (lubricin, encoded by the gene PRG4) increases joint friction and causes progressive joint failure. This study was undertaken to determine whether restoring lubricin expression would prevent, delay, or reverse the disease process caused by congenital deficiency. Methods Using genetically engineered lubricin deficient mice, we restored gene function before conception or at 3 weeks, 2 months, or 6 months after birth. We evaluated the effect of restoring gene function (i.e., expressing lubricin) on the tibial-femoral-patellar joints of mice, histologically and by ex vivo biomechanical testing. Results Restoring gene function prior to conception prevented disease. Restoring gene function at 3 weeks of age improved, but did not normalize, joint histology and whole joint friction; cyclic loading produced fewer activated caspase-3 containing chondrocytes when lubricin expression was restored at three weeks of age compared to non-restored littermates. Restoring lubricin expression in 2-month-old or 6-month-old mice had no beneficial effect on histology, whole joint friction, or activation of caspase-3 compared to non-restored littermates. Conclusions When boundary lubrication is congenitally deficient and cartilage becomes damaged, the window of opportunity for restoring lubrication and slowing disease progression is limited. PMID:26216721

  8. Thymic deficiency in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Levin, S; Schlesinger, M; Handzel, Z; Hahn, T; Altman, Y; Czernobilsky, B; Boss, J

    1979-01-01

    Children with Down's syndrome (DS) often have small and abnormal thymuses, with lymphocyte depletion, diminution of the cortex, and loss of corticomedullary demarcation--a picture resembling thymic involution. Besides this, they have markedly enlarged Hassall's corpuscles, some surrounded by a sheath of lymphocytes. Patients with DS are known to have increased numbers of respiratory infections; they also have a higher incidence of lymphatic leukemia than do individuals who do not have DS. Studies of cell-mediated (thymic-dependent) immunity demonstrate that children with DS have both diminished numbers of T cells as well as functional deficiency of these cells.

  9. Alcoholic Myelopathy and Nutritional Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Haruki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Ikeda, Shohei; Takahashi, Mie; Kawagashira, Yuichi; Iijima, Masahiro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2017-01-01

    A patient with chronic alcoholism presented with myelopathy and low serum folate and cobalamin levels. A 42-year-old alcoholic man had gait disturbance for 4 months. A neurological examination revealed marked spasticity with increased deep tendon reflexes and extensor plantar responses of the lower limbs. His cobalamin level was decreased and his serum folate level was particularly low. His plasma ammonia level was not increased. Abstinence and folic acid and cobalamin supplementation stopped the progression of his neurological deficits. This case indicates that nutritional deficiency should be monitored closely in patients with chronic alcoholism who present with myelopathy. PMID:28049986

  10. How Can We Improve the Detection of Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Maria Teresa; Dresel, Marc; Koczulla, Rembert; Ottaviani, Stefania; Baldo, Raffaele; Gorrini, Marina; Sala, Giorgia; Cavallon, Luana; Welte, Tobias; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Luisetti, Maurizio; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    The Z deficiency in α1-antitrypsin (A1ATD) is an under-recognized condition. Alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is the main protein in the α1-globulin fraction of serum protein electrophoresis (SPE); however, evaluation of the α1-globulin protein fraction has received very little attention. Serum Z-type A1AT manifests in polymeric forms, but their interference with quantitative immunoassays has not been reported. Here, 214 894 samples were evaluated by SPE at the G. Fracastoro Hospital of Verona, Italy. Patients with an A1AT level ≤ 0.92 g/L were recalled to complete A1ATD diagnosis. In parallel, to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize A1AT, sera samples from 10 PiZZ and 10 PiMM subjects obtained at the National Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Warsaw, Poland, were subjected to non-denaturing 7.5% PAGE and 7.5% SDS-PAGE followed by Western blot. Moreover, purified A1AT was heated at 60°C and analyzed by a non-denaturing PAGE and 4–15% gradient SDS-PAGE followed by Western blot as well as by isolelectrofocusing and nephelometry. A total of 966 samples manifested percentages ≤ 2.8 or a double band in the alpha1-zone. According to the nephelometry data, 23 samples were classified as severe (A1AT ≤ 0.49 g/L) and 462 as intermediate (A1AT >0.49≤ 1.0 g/L) A1ATD. Twenty subjects agreed to complete the diagnosis and an additional 21 subjects agreed to family screening. We detected 9 cases with severe and 26 with intermediate A1ATD. Parallel experiments revealed that polymerization of M-type A1AT, when measured by nephelometry or isolelectrofocusing, yields inaccurate results, leading to the erroneous impression that it was Z type and not M-type A1AT. We illustrate the need for confirmation of Z A1AT values by “state of the art” method. Clinicians should consider a more in-depth investigation of A1ATD in patients when they exhibit serum polymers and low α1-globulin protein levels by SPE. PMID:26270547

  11. Protein deficiency, but not zinc deficiency, reduces recovery of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibre diameters in the gastrocnemius muscle of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Prescod, Alexia L V; Halliday, William C; Taylor, Carla G

    2011-09-01

    The present study examines the effects of protein- and energy-type malnutrition in combination with Zn deficiency on the growth, serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), gastrocnemius muscle mass and fibre diameter of growing rats during a deficiency phase followed by nutritional rehabilitation. Rats (3-weeks old) were randomly assigned to baseline, or Zn-deficient (Z, < 1 mg Zn/kg), protein-deficient (P, 20 g protein/kg), combined Zn- and protein-deficient (ZP), energy-deficient (E, feed intake pair-fed to Z) or control (C, 30 mg Zn/kg and 170 g protein/kg) groups for a 3-week deficiency phase, followed by a 3-week repletion phase with the control diet. ATPase histochemical staining at pH 9·4 was used to differentiate type 1 and type 2 muscle fibres. After the deficiency phase, the ZP and P groups had lower body weight and smaller gastrocnemius muscle mass than the Z and E groups. Type 1 and 2 muscle fibre diameters (T1- and T2-MFD, respectively) were reduced in the ZP, P and Z groups compared with the E and C groups. Serum Zn was reduced in the ZP, P and Z groups, but serum IGF-1 was lowest in the Z and E groups. After the repletion phase, T1-MFD did not recover in the P and E groups nor T2-MFD in the P group, despite the P and E groups having a better recovery of body weight. In summary, previous protein deficiency, but not Zn deficiency, limited the recovery of both T1- and T2-MFD during nutritional repletion. The quality of skeletal muscle recovery in the malnourished groups was not associated with body weight, muscle mass, serum Zn or IGF-1 concentrations.

  12. Behavioral consequences of developmental iron deficiency in infant rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Germann, Stacey L.; Capitanio, John P.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Human studies have shown that iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in infants are associated with behavioral impairment, but the periods of brain development most susceptible to iron deficiency have not been established. In the present study, rhesus monkeys were deprived of iron by dietary iron restriction during prenatal (n = 14, 10 μg Fe/g diet) or early postnatal (n = 12, 1.5 mg Fe/L formula) brain development and compared to controls (n = 12, 100 μg Fe/g diet, 12 mg Fe/L formula) in behavioral evaluations conducted during the first four months of life in the nonhuman primate nursery. Iron deficiency anemia was detected in the pregnant dams in the third trimester and compromised iron status was seen in the prenatally iron-deprived infants at birth, but no iron deficiency was seen in either the prenatally or postnatally iron-deprived infants during the period of behavioral evaluation. Neither prenatal nor postnatal iron deprivation led to significant delays in growth, or gross or fine motor development. Prenatally deprived infants demonstrated a 20% reduced spontaneous activity level, lower inhibitory response to novel environments, and more changes from one behavior to another in weekly observation sessions. Postnatally deprived infants demonstrated poorer performance of an object concept task, and greater emotionality relative to controls. This study indicates that different syndromes of behavioral effects are associated with prenatal and postnatal iron deprivation in rhesus monkey infants and that these effects can occur in the absence of concurrent iron deficiency as reflected in hematological measures. PMID:16343844

  13. Potential role of vitamin D deficiency on Fabry cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, Christiane; Schmiedeke, Benjamin; Niemann, Markus; Schmiedeke, Daniel; Krämer, Johannes; Turkin, Irina; Blouin, Katja; Emmert, Andrea; Pilz, Stefan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Weidemann, Frank; Breunig, Frank; Wanner, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Patients with Fabry disease frequently develop left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and renal fibrosis. Due to heat intolerance and an inability to sweat, patients tend to avoid exposure to sunlight. We hypothesized that subsequent vitamin D deficiency may contribute to Fabry cardiomyopathy. This study investigated the vitamin D status and its association with LV mass and adverse clinical symptoms in patients with Fabry disease. 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) was measured in 111 patients who were genetically proven to have Fabry disease. LV mass and cardiomyopathy were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography. In cross-sectional analyses, associations with adverse clinical outcomes were determined by linear and binary logistic regression analyses, respectively, and were adjusted for age, sex, BMI and season. Patients had a mean age of 40 ± 13 years (42% males), and a mean 25(OH)D of 23.5 ± 11.4 ng/ml. Those with overt vitamin D deficiency (25[OH]D ≤ 15 ng/ml) had an adjusted six fold higher risk of cardiomyopathy, compared to those with sufficient 25(OH)D levels >30 ng/ml (p = 0.04). The mean LV mass was distinctively different with 170 ± 75 g in deficient, 154 ± 60 g in moderately deficient and 128 ± 58 g in vitamin D sufficient patients (p = 0.01). With increasing severity of vitamin D deficiency, the median levels of proteinuria increased, as well as the prevalences of depression, edema, cornea verticillata and the need for medical pain therapy. In conclusion, vitamin D deficiency was strongly associated with cardiomyopathy and adverse clinical symptoms in patients with Fabry disease. Whether vitamin D supplementation improves complications of Fabry disease, requires a randomized controlled trial.

  14. Vitamin B12 deficiency: Characterization of psychometrics and MRI morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yen-Hsuan; Huang, Ching-Feng; Lo, Chung-Ping; Wang, Tzu-Lan; Tu, Min-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 is essential for the integrity of the central nervous system. However, performances in different cognitive domains relevant to vitamin B12 deficiency remain to be detailed. To date, there have been limited studies that examined the relationships between cognitions and structural neuroimaging in a single cohort of low-vitamin B12 status. The present study aimed to depict psychometrics and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) morphometrics among patients with vitamin B12 deficiency, and to examine their inter-relations. We compared 34 consecutive patients with vitamin B12 deficiency (serum level ≤ 250 pg/ml) to 34 demographically matched controls by their cognitive performances and morphometric indices of brain MRI. The correlations between psychometrics and morphometrics were analyzed. The vitamin B12 deficiency group had lower scores than the controls on total scores of Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI) (both P < 0.05), language (P < 0.01), orientation (P < 0.01), and mental manipulation (P < 0.05). The patients also showed a greater frontal horn ratio than the controls (P < 0.05). Bicaudate ratio, fronto-occipital ratio, uncotemporal index, and normalized interuncal distance all showed a strong correlation with the total score of MMSE and CASI (all P < 0.01). Among these psychometric and morphometric indices, pronounced correlations between bicaudate ratio and long-term memory, mental manipulation, orientation, language, and verbal fluency were noted (all P < 0.01). Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with a global cognition decline with language, orientation, and mental manipulation selectively impaired. Preferential atrophy in frontal regions is the main neuroimaging feature. Although the frontal ratio highlights the relevant atrophy among patients, the bicaudate ratio might be the best index on the basis of its strong association with global cognition and related cognitive domains, implying

  15. Effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Derin, Serhan; Koseoglu, Sabri; Sahin, Cem; Sahan, Murat

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin B12 plays a major role in the maintenance of central and peripheral nervous systems. Vitamin B12 deficiency may affect the spinal cord, brain, optic nerve, and peripheral nerve functions; however, the effect of vitamin B12 deficiency on olfactory function has not been studied, so our study aimed to investigate that. Thirty-nine patients with low vitamin B12 levels and 34 controls were included in the study. All participants had detailed otorhinolaryngological examinations and laboratory tests. The Sniffin' Stick test was used for analysis of olfactory function. The 2 groups were compared for smell test results. Correlations of smell test results with demographic and laboratory data were investigated in the vitamin B12-deficient group. The threshold discrimination identification scores were (mean ± standard deviation) 28.04 ± 5.58 and 35.10 ± 2.84 in the vitamin B12-deficient and control groups, respectively (p < 0.001). In the vitamin B12-deficient group, hyposmia and anosmia were evident in 56.4% and 5.1% of the patients, respectively, but no subjects in the control group had olfactory dysfunction (p < 0.001). Correlation analysis showed that age and odor identification score showed a negative correlation (p < 0.001); however, there was a positive correlation between threshold, discrimination and identification (TDI) score and vitamin B12 levels. In this study, we showed for the first time that olfactory dysfunction may be present in patients with vitamin B12 deficiency. Apart from a negative correlation of age with odor identification score, none of the other parameters studied showed correlations with olfactory dysfunction. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  16. Behavioral consequences of developmental iron deficiency in infant rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Germann, Stacey L; Capitanio, John P; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Human studies have shown that iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in infants are associated with behavioral impairment, but the periods of brain development most susceptible to iron deficiency have not been established. In the present study, rhesus monkeys were deprived of iron by dietary iron restriction during prenatal (n=14, 10 microg Fe/g diet) or early postnatal (n=12, 1.5 mg Fe/L formula) brain development and compared to controls (n=12, 100 microg Fe/g diet, 12 mg Fe/L formula) in behavioral evaluations conducted during the first four months of life in the nonhuman primate nursery. Iron deficiency anemia was detected in the pregnant dams in the third trimester and compromised iron status was seen in the prenatally iron-deprived infants at birth, but no iron deficiency was seen in either the prenatally or postnatally iron-deprived infants during the period of behavioral evaluation. Neither prenatal nor postnatal iron deprivation led to significant delays in growth, or gross or fine motor development. Prenatally deprived infants demonstrated a 20% reduced spontaneous activity level, lower inhibitory response to novel environments, and more changes from one behavior to another in weekly observation sessions. Postnatally deprived infants demonstrated poorer performance of an object concept task, and greater emotionality relative to controls. This study indicates that different syndromes of behavioral effects are associated with prenatal and postnatal iron deprivation in rhesus monkey infants and that these effects can occur in the absence of concurrent iron deficiency as reflected in hematological measures.

  17. [Effects of zinc deficiency and vitamin D deficiency on bone calcification and development of rats].

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Zheng, D; Qian, Y; Wu, K

    1992-09-01

    Zinc deficiency rat model was made by feeding zinc deficiency diet. The level of bone calcium of the zinc deficiency rats was significantly lower than that of the control rats. Their bone cortex was thinner and bone density decreased. The counts of their cartilage cells and hypertrophic cells of epiphyseal plate were less frequent, and the diameter of their hypertrophic cells was smaller than that of the controls. It suggested that zinc deficiency caused defective bone calcification which was similar to that in vitamin D deficiency. Zinc deficiency seemed to hinder the linear growth of long bone and might be the cause of dwarf.

  18. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Exaggerates Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice: Involvement of Intrahepatic and Extrahepatic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J.; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency. PMID:24155903

  19. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerates ethanol-induced liver injury in mice: involvement of intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Yantao; Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency.

  20. Management of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Lamance, Kerri; Sutton, V Reid; Aagaard-Tillery, Kjersti; Van den Veyver, Ignatia

    2010-11-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common enzymatic deficiency in the urea cycle. In catabolic states, such as the intrapartum and immediate postpartum periods, hyperammonemic comas with permanent neurological damage and death can develop. We report six cases of OTC deficiency during pregnancy managed at our institution and review the literature on OTC deficiency during pregnancy. Using the patient database from our Metabolic Clinic, pregnant OTC deficiency carriers were identified. The antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum periods were analyzed. Corresponding literature was reviewed and an extensive multidisciplinary management plan developed. All six pregnant women had favorable outcomes. No hyperammonemic episodes occurred, and intensive care unit admissions and hemodialysis were not required. Although risk to women with OTC deficiency during the intra- and postpartum period exists, multidisciplinary management and a coherent plan usually result in successful labor, delivery, and postpartum. A comprehensive plan for patients who develop hyperammonemia is recommended.

  1. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and art].

    PubMed

    Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Collado-Vazquez, Susana

    2010-07-16

    Disability is a complex phenomenon, and the ways it has been conceived, explained and treated have varied notably throughout history. As the years go by, human beings have evolved and, at the same time, so have medicine and art. And therein lies the extraordinary value, from the ontological point of view, of many works of art, which would never have been produced without the intervention of disease and the practice of the medical art. The aim of this work is to address the study of some deficiencies, disabilities and neurological pathologies that have been represented in paintings at different times in history. This article begins with the study of pictures that deal with dwarves and other misnamed freaks of nature that have been represented by painters from Velazquez to Titian or Rubens. The study looks at paintings of cripples, pictures containing the mentally disabled, with examples by Bruegel the Elder or Munch, as well as certain neurological disorders that have been portrayed in paintings, such as Escaping criticism by Pere Borrell or Sad inheritance by Sorolla. Likewise, we also reflect on the trite concept of disease and artistic creativity. The artistic representation of deficiency and disability has evolved in parallel to the feelings of men and women in each period of history and, at the same time, their social evolution. Nowadays, this concept continues to advance and some artists no longer represent the sick person, but instead the illness itself.

  2. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  3. Developmental Vitamin D Deficiency Affects Spatial Learning in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Anwar N; Khan, Khalid M; Rahman, Abdur

    2017-09-01

    Background: Vitamin D deficiency is a global problem. Recent evidence suggests that vitamin D is involved in brain development and function. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with poor cognitive function in adults, but the effect of developmental vitamin D deficiency (DVDD) on cognitive function and brain development in children has not been well established.Objective: We explored the effects of DVDD on cognitive functions and brain morphology of rat pups.Methods: Wistar rat pups born to control and vitamin D-deficient dams were divided into 4 groups: control (C), deficient during gestation (dG), deficient during lactation (dL), and deficient during gestation and lactation (dGL). Spatial learning and memory were assessed by the Morris water maze test at postnatal day (PND) 24 and PND 45. Cortical thickness at the level of the hippocampus was measured at PND 63, and synapses were counted in specified areas of the hippocampus at PND 32 and PND 63.Results: Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed that at PND 24, learning (escape latency) was impaired (by 42%) in the dGL group, whereas at PND 45, both the dL and the dGL groups showed learning impairment (by 47% and 45%, respectively) compared with their respective C groups (P < 0.05). Short-term or long-term memory was largely unaffected by DVDD either at PND 24 or PND 45. Compared with the C group, all the DVDD groups had fewer synapses in the molecular layer of the hippocampus (P < 0.001). The synapse number decreased by 54% in the dGL group at PND 33 and by 70% in the dL and dGL groups at PND 63. All the DVDD groups at PND 63 showed a reduced cortical thickness (by 22%) compared with the C group (P < 0.05).Conclusion: These results suggest that a combined prenatal and postnatal DVDD for ≥6 wk in rat pups affects learning but not memory. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Biotinidase deficiency: a novel vitamin recycling defect.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B; Grier, R E; Secor McVoy, J R; Heard, G S

    1985-01-01

    The recent finding that biotinidase deficiency is the primary biochemical defect in late-onset multiple carboxylase deficiency was stimulated new interest in the inherited disorders of biotin-dependent carboxylases. The clinical and biochemical features of biotinidase deficiency are discussed. We also speculate about two exciting areas currently being investigated: the localization of action biotinidase, and the possible role of the enzyme as a binding or carrier protein for biotin.

  5. PD-1 Blockade in Tumors with Mismatch-Repair Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Le, D.T.; Uram, J.N.; Wang, H.; Bartlett, B.R.; Kemberling, H.; Eyring, A.D.; Skora, A.D.; Luber, B.S.; Azad, N.S.; Laheru, D.; Biedrzycki, B.; Donehower, R.C.; Zaheer, A.; Fisher, G.A.; Crocenzi, T.S.; Lee, J.J.; Duffy, S.M.; Goldberg, R.M.; de la Chapelle, A.; Koshiji, M.; Bhaijee, F.; Huebner, T.; Hruban, R.H.; Wood, L.D.; Cuka, N.; Pardoll, D.M.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K.W.; Zhou, S.; Cornish, T.C.; Taube, J.M.; Anders, R.A.; Eshleman, J.R.; Vogelstein, B.; Diaz, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    mismatch repair–deficient tumors, as compared with 73 in mismatch repair–proficient tumors (P = 0.007), and high somatic mutation loads were associated with prolonged progression-free survival (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS This study showed that mismatch-repair status predicted clinical benefit of immune checkpoint blockade with pembrolizumab. (Funded by Johns Hopkins University and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01876511.) PMID:26028255

  6. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-02-13

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated.

  8. Do all the patients with vitamin B12 deficiency have pernicious anemia?

    PubMed

    Sun, Andy; Chang, Julia Y-F; Wang, Yi-Ping; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency may result in pernicious anemia (PA). This study evaluated whether all the patients with vitamin B12 deficiency had PA. The blood hemoglobin (Hb), iron, vitamin B12, folic acid, and homocysteine concentrations and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) in 90 vitamin B12-deficient patients were measured and compared with the corresponding data in 180 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. PA was defined by World Health Organization (WHO) as having an Hb concentration <13 g/dl for men and <12 g/dl for women, an MCV ≧ 100 fl, a serum vitamin B12 level <200 pg/ml, and serum gastric parietal cell antibody (GPCA) positivity. We found that 35 (38.9%) and 20 (22.2%) patients with vitamin B12 deficiency had deficiencies of Hb (men <13 g/dl, women <12 g/dl) and iron (<60 μg/dl), respectively. Moreover, 65 (72.2%) and 37 (41.1%) patients with vitamin B12 deficiency had abnormally high blood homocysteine level (>12.7 μM) and high MCV (≧100 fl), respectively. In addition, 43 (47.8%) vitamin B12-deficient patients with had GPCA positivity. Patients with vitamin B12 deficiency had a significantly higher frequency of Hb or iron deficiency, of abnormally elevated blood homocysteine level or high MCV, and of GPCA positivity than healthy control subjects (all P-values < 0.001). However, only 17 (18.9%) of 90 vitamin B12-deficient patients were diagnosed as having PA by the WHO definition. Only 18.9% of patients with vitamin B12 deficiency are discovered to have PA by the WHO definition. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Phenotypic expression of hemoglobin A2 in beta-thalassemia trait with iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Madan, N; Sikka, M; Sharma, S; Rusia, U

    1998-09-01

    Iron status was estimated in 463 heterozygous beta-thalassemics to delineate the effect of iron deficiency on the expression of hemoglobin A2 (HbA2) in these patients. One hundred and twenty-six (27.2%) patients with the trait were iron deficient. These iron-deficient patients had a significantly (p < 0.0002) higher prevalence of anemia (90.5%) compared with iron-replete patients with the trait (71.5%). The mean hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, MCV, and MCH were significantly (p < 0.0001) lower in patients with beta-thalassemia traits (BTT) who had iron deficiency than in those without iron deficiency. Mean RBC count and MCHC did not differ in the two groups. Mean HbA2 was not significantly different in the two groups of patients with the trait and was elevated (>3.5%) in all but one heterozygote investigated. Mean HbA2/cell was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in BTT patients with iron deficiency than in patients without iron deficiency. The presence of iron deficiency did not preclude the detection of BTT in this population. The effect of iron deficiency in BTT was apparent as a significant lowering of the Hb concentration and an increased prevalence of anemia. Iron therapy is warranted for BTT patients with iron-deficiency traits and would help to significantly raise their Hb concentration. The elevation of HbA2 was striking and could be used with reliability in making the diagnosis of BTT even in the presence of iron deficiency.

  10. Iron deficiency in infancy: applying a physiologic framework for prediction2

    PubMed Central

    Lozoff, Betsy; Kaciroti, Niko; Walter, Tomás

    2007-01-01

    Background Infants aged 6–24 mo are at high risk of iron deficiency. Numerous studies worldwide have sought to identify predictors of iron deficiency in this age group. Objective The objectives of the study were to apply a physiologic model to identify risk factors for iron deficiency and to consider those risk factors under different conditions of iron supplementation. We predicted that factors related to iron status at birth (lower gestational age and lower birth weight), postnatal needs for iron (more rapid growth), and bioavailable iron (more cow milk) would be major risk factors. Design The physiologic framework was assessed in 1657 Chilean infants (aged 12 mo) with birth weights ≥3 kg who were randomly assigned at age 6 mo to high or low iron supplementation or no added iron. Based on venous blood, the analysis used mean corpuscular volume and concentrations of hemoglobin, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, and ferritin. Logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of iron deficiency anemia and iron deficiency without anemia. Results The prevalence of iron deficiency (≥2 abnormal iron measures) was 34.9% at age 12 mo. Of 186 infants with hemoglobin concentrations <110 g/L, 158 (84.9%) were iron deficient. The only consistent (and the strongest) predictor of iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia was lower 6-mo hemoglobin. Factors related to poorer iron status at birth (lower birth weight, shorter gestation though full-term, or both) were predictors in the no-added-iron and high-iron groups. Otherwise, predictors varied by iron supplementation. Conclusion Variations in predictors of iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia according to iron supplementation suggest that direct comparisons across studies are tenuous at best without data on early iron status and certainty that specific conditions are comparable. PMID:17158425

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... In people with familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency , increased fat levels can also cause neurological features, such as depression, memory loss, and mild intellectual decline (dementia). These problems are ...

  12. Iron deficiency anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2013-07-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are quite prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF) and may overlap. Both anemia and iron deficiency are associated with worse symptoms and adverse clinical outcomes. In the past few years, there has been an enormous interest in the subject of iron deficiency and its management in patients with HF. In this review, the etiology and relevance of iron deficiency, iron metabolism in the setting of HF, studies on iron supplementation in patients with HF and potential cardiovascular effects of subclinical iron overload are discussed.

  13. Biotinidase deficiency: novel mutations in Algerian patients.

    PubMed

    Tiar, A; Mekki, A; Nagara, M; Rhouma, F Ben; Messaoud, O; Halim, N Ben; Kefi, R; Hamlaoui, M T; Lebied, A; Abdelhak, S

    2014-02-15

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism leading to varying degrees of neurologic and cutaneous symptoms when untreated. In the present study, we report the clinical features and the molecular investigation of biotinidase deficiency in four unrelated consanguineous Algerian families including five patients with profound biotinidase deficiency and one child characterized as partial biotinidase deficiency. Mutation analysis revealed three novel mutations, c.del631C and c.1557T>G within exon 4 and c.324-325insTA in exon 3. Since newborn screening is not available in Algeria, cascade screening in affected families would be very helpful to identify at risk individuals.

  14. Atypical B12 Deficiency with Nonresolving Paraesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Haider, S.; Ahmad, N.; Anaissie, E. J.; Abdel Karim, N.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can present with various hematological, gastrointestinal and neurological manifestations. We report a case of elderly female who presented with neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency where the final work-up revealed polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS). This case suggests that, although POEMS syndrome is a rare entity, it can present with vitamin-B12 deficiency and thus specific work up for early diagnosis of POEMS should be considered in patients with B12 deficiency unresponsive to therapy. PMID:24349810

  15. Neurologic aspects of cobalamin (B12) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Optimal functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system is dependent on a constant supply of appropriate nutrients. Particularly important for optimal functioning of the nervous system is cobalamin (vitamin B12). Cobalamin deficiency is particularly common in the elderly and after gastric surgery. Many patients with clinically expressed cobalamin deficiency have intrinsic factor-related malabsorption such as that seen in pernicious anemia. The commonly recognized neurological manifestations of cobalamin deficiency include a myelopathy with or without an associated neuropathy. This review deals with neurological aspects of vitamin B12 deficiency and attempts to highlight recent developments. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cryptosporidiosis in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D A; Wodak, A; Marriot, D J; Harkness, J L; Ralston, M; Hill, A; Penny, R

    1984-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis was found in a patient with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The microbiological and morphological features of this newly recognized opportunistic infection are distinctive and diagnostic.

  17. Generalised hyperpigmentation in vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Santra, Gouranga; Paul, Rudrajit; Ghosh, Sumit Kr; Chakraborty, Debojyoti; Das, Shubhabrata; Pradhan, Sourav; Das, Abhishek

    2014-08-01

    In developing countries like India, nutritional deficiencies are prevalent and hyperpigmentation due to protein energy malnutrition, zinc deficiency and pellagra are common. Indian women, especially vegetarian are prone to vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 deficiency can present as anaemia, neurological defect, gastrointestinal symptoms or dementia. Hyperpigmentation as the first presentation of Vitamin B12 deficiency is rare. Our patient, a 45 year-old Hindu vegetarian female presented to us with generalized hyperpigmentation. Examination revealed associated anaemia and peripheral neuropathy. Laboratory investigation confirmed vitamin B12 deficiency. Clinical features along with hyperpigmentation improved with vitamin B12 supplementation. We report this case to highlight this rare manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. A high index of clinical suspicion is warranted to diagnose the case. Since India is a country with a large number of potential vitamin B12 deficiency cases, the physicians need to be aware of all the varied manifestations of this vitamin deficiency. In case of hyperpigmentation, nutritional aspect must be ruled out as it is reversible. Early replacement therapy may also help to prevent morbidities like dementia and neuropathy.

  18. Zinc deficiency and toxicity in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Jennifer L; Bowen, Christine N

    2014-10-01

    Zinc is a commonly overlooked deficiency in developed countries, occurring in infants, children, and adolescents during critical growth periods. The purpose of this review is to present the evidence of zinc deficiencies and toxicities as well as treatment in pediatrics. During the last decade, the significance of zinc deficiency in childhood growth, morbidity, and mortality has been recognized by a number of large-scale supplementation trials in underdeveloped countries. Recognition of the recent nationwide shortage of injectable zinc available for total parenteral nutrition supplementation over the last 2 years focused attention on the possibility of zinc deficiency in the United States. Although primarily thought of as a problem reserved for underdeveloped countries, zinc deficiency has increasing pediatric prevalence in the USA. Zinc is an essential trace element in the body that is responsible for numerous structural, catalytic, and biochemical functions. Deficiencies can occur because of poor dietary intake, long-term parenteral nutrition without supplementation, and enteral causes such as malabsorption. Zinc deficiency is closely associated with stunting, respiratory infections, diarrhea, and dermatitis. Deficiency is hard to define solely by the serum levels. Clinicians should utilize a combination of serum zinc levels, presenting signs and symptoms, and nutritional intake via oral, enteral, and parenteral routes to accurately assess the deficiency risk and diagnosis.

  19. Increased intake of water and NaCl solutions in omega-3 fatty acid deficient monkeys.

    PubMed

    Reisbick, S; Neuringer, M; Connor, W E; Iliff-Sizemore, S

    1991-06-01

    We previously reported that long-term omega-3 fatty acid deficiency is associated with increased water intake in rhesus monkeys. To determine whether the increase was specific to water, intakes of salt solutions were measured in 15-minute single-bottle tests. Deficient monkeys drank at least twice as much of all NaCl concentrations as controls. Overall intake decreased as salt concentration increased. In 2-bottle preference tests, deficient monkeys again drank more total fluid but neither preferred nor avoided normal saline compared to controls. When deprived of water, deficient monkeys concentrated urine as well as controls, demonstrating that the increased intake was not a result of renal failure or diabetes insipidus. Omega-3 fatty acids have roles both in neural membrane function and in metabolism of prostaglandins and other eicosanoids. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency may affect drinking through changes in one or both of these functions.

  20. Presence of arylsulfatase A (ARS A) in multiple sulfatase deficiency disorder fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fluharty, A L; Stevens, R L; Davis, L L; Shapiro, L J; Kihara, H

    1978-05-01

    Multiple deficiency disorder fibroblasts cultured in MEM-CO2 showed deficiencies of arylsulfatase A(ARS A) comparable to the deficiency in metachromatic leukodystrophy fibroblasts. However, the MSDD fibroblasts cultured in MEM-HEPES contained near normal levels of ARS A. Moreover, the enzyme from the latter fibroblasts was indistinguishable from ARS A of control fibroblasts on DEAE-cellulose chromatography, ratio of activity with several substrates, thermal inactivation, sensitivity to inhibitors, and precipitation by antiserum to human ARS A. These data support the conclusion that the ARS A genome is intact in MSDD fibroblasts and, by extension, in MSDD patients. Other sulfatases were present at levels ranging from mildly deficient to near normal but never as low as seen in the corresponding specific sulfatase deficient disorders.

  1. SURF1 deficiency: a multi-centre natural history study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background SURF1 deficiency, a monogenic mitochondrial disorder, is the most frequent cause of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient Leigh syndrome (LS). We report the first natural history study of SURF1 deficiency. Methods We conducted a multi-centre case notes review of 44 SURF1-deficient patients from ten different UK centres and two Australian centres. Survival data for LRPPRC-deficient LS and nuclear-encoded complex I-deficient LS patients were obtained from previous publications. The survival of SURF1-deficient patients was compared with these two groups using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and logrank test. Results The majority of patients (32/44, 73%) presented in infancy (median 9.5 months). Frequent symptoms were poor weight gain (95%, median age 10 months), hypotonia (93%, median age 14 months), poor feeding/vomiting (89%, median age 10 months), developmental delay (88%, median age 14 months), developmental regression (71%, median age 19 months), movement disorder (52%, median age 24 months), oculomotor involvement (52%, median age 29 months) and central respiratory failure (78%, median age 31 months). Hypertrichosis (41%), optic atrophy (23%), encephalopathy (20%), seizures (14%) and cardiomyopathy (2%) were observed less frequently. Lactate was elevated in CSF (mean 4.3 mmol/L) in all patients (30/30) and in blood (mean 4.4 mmol/L) in 31/38 (81%). Fibroblast COX activity was universally decreased (25/25). Normal COX histochemistry was noted in 30% of biopsies, whereas muscle COX activity was reduced in 96% (25/26). Neuroimaging demonstrated lesions characteristic of LS in 28/33 (85%) and atypical findings in 3/33 (9%). Peripheral neuropathy was present in 13/16 (81%) (demyelinating 7/16, axonal 2/16). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that SURF1-deficient patients experience longer survival (median 5.4 years, p < 0.001) compared to LRPPRC deficiency (median 1.8 years) and nuclear-encoded complex I-deficient LS (median 1.6 years). Survival >10

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) as a risk factor of male neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rostami-Far, Z; Ghadiri, K; Rostami-Far, M; Shaveisi-Zadeh, F; Amiri, A; Rahimian Zarif, B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction.Neonatal sepsis is a disease process, which represents the systemic response of bacteria entering the bloodstream during the first 28 days of life. The prevalence of sepsis is higher in male infants than in females, but the exact cause is unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, which leads to the production of NADPH. NADPH is required for the respiratory burst reaction in white blood cells (WBCs) to destroy microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in neonates with sepsis. Materials and methods.This study was performed on 76 neonates with sepsis and 1214 normal neonates from February 2012 to November 2014 in the west of Iran. The G6PD deficiency status was determined by fluorescent spot test. WBCs number and neutrophils percentages were measured and compared in patients with and without G6PD deficiency. Results.The prevalence of the G6PD deficiency in neonates with sepsis was significantly higher compared to the control group (p=0.03). WBCs number and neutrophils percentages in G6PD deficient patients compared with patients without G6PD deficiency were decreased, but were not statistically significant (p=0.77 and p=0.86 respectively). Conclusions.G6PD deficiency is a risk factor of neonatal sepsis and also a justification for more male involvement in this disease. Therefore, newborn screening for this disorder is recommended.

  3. Structural Insights into Sulfite Oxidase Deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Wilson, H.; Graf, T.; Xiang, S.; Jaramillo-Busquets, S.; Rajagopalan, K.; Kisker, C.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is a lethal genetic disease that results from defects either in the genes encoding proteins involved in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis or in the sulfite oxidase gene itself. Several point mutations in the sulfite oxidase gene have been identified from patients suffering from this disease worldwide. Although detailed biochemical analyses have been carried out on these mutations, no structural data could be obtained because of problems in crystallizing recombinant human and rat sulfite oxidases and the failure to clone the chicken sulfite oxidase gene. We synthesized the gene for chicken sulfite oxidase de novo, working backward from the amino acid sequence of the native chicken liver enzyme by PCR amplification of a series of 72 overlapping primers. The recombinant protein displayed the characteristic absorption spectrum of sulfite oxidase and exhibited steady state and rapid kinetic parameters comparable with those of the tissue-derived enzyme. We solved the crystal structures of the wild type and the sulfite oxidase deficiency-causing R138Q (R160Q in humans) variant of recombinant chicken sulfite oxidase in the resting and sulfate-bound forms. Significant alterations in the substrate-binding pocket were detected in the structure of the mutant, and a comparison between the wild type and mutant protein revealed that the active site residue Arg-450 adopts different conformations in the presence and absence of bound sulfate. The size of the binding pocket is thereby considerably reduced, and its position relative to the cofactor is shifted, causing an increase in the distance of the sulfur atom of the bound sulfate to the molybdenum.

  4. Unresponsiveness to tetrahydrobiopterin of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ponzone, Alberto; Porta, Francesco; Mussa, Alessandro; Alluto, Alessandra; Ferraris, Silvio; Spada, Marco

    2010-05-01

    Conflicting results have been reported concerning the efficacy of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), the cofactor of phenylalanine hydroxylase, for reducing phenylalanine (Phe) concentration in phenylketonuria (PKU). We aimed to test quantitatively the effects of BH4 in PKU patients. Seven fully characterized patients were selected among a population of 130 PKU subjects as harboring PKU mutations predicted as BH4 responsive and previously considered responsive to a cofactor challenge. They received a simple Phe (100 mg/kg) and 2 combined Phe (100 mg/kg) and BH4 (20 mg/kg) oral loading tests. Cofactor was administered either before or after the amino acid. The concentrations of Phe, tyrosine (Tyr), and biopterin were measured over 24 hours after loading. The comparative analysis of the loading tests showed that in all patients plasma Phe concentrations peaked within 3 hours, and fell within 24 hours by about 50% in benign, 20% in mild, and 15% in severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency regardless of BH4 administration. A consistent or moderate increase of plasma Tyr, again independent of the cofactor challenge, was observed only in the less severe forms of PAH deficiency. Mean blood biopterin concentration increased 6 times after simple Phe and 34 to 39 times after combined loading tests. The administration of BH4 does not alter Phe and Tyr metabolism in PKU patients. The clearance of plasma Phe after oral loading and, as well as Tyr production, is not related to cofactor challenge but to patient's phenotype. The assessment of BH4 responsiveness by the methods so far used is not reliable, and the occurrence of BH4-responsive forms of PKU still has to be definitely proven.

  5. Structural insights into sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Erkan; Wilson, Heather L; Graf, Tyler N; Xiang, Song; Jaramillo-Busquets, Sandra; Rajagopalan, K V; Kisker, Caroline

    2005-09-30

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is a lethal genetic disease that results from defects either in the genes encoding proteins involved in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis or in the sulfite oxidase gene itself. Several point mutations in the sulfite oxidase gene have been identified from patients suffering from this disease worldwide. Although detailed biochemical analyses have been carried out on these mutations, no structural data could be obtained because of problems in crystallizing recombinant human and rat sulfite oxidases and the failure to clone the chicken sulfite oxidase gene. We synthesized the gene for chicken sulfite oxidase de novo, working backward from the amino acid sequence of the native chicken liver enzyme by PCR amplification of a series of 72 overlapping primers. The recombinant protein displayed the characteristic absorption spectrum of sulfite oxidase and exhibited steady state and rapid kinetic parameters comparable with those of the tissue-derived enzyme. We solved the crystal structures of the wild type and the sulfite oxidase deficiency-causing R138Q (R160Q in humans) variant of recombinant chicken sulfite oxidase in the resting and sulfate-bound forms. Significant alterations in the substrate-binding pocket were detected in the structure of the mutant, and a comparison between the wild type and mutant protein revealed that the active site residue Arg-450 adopts different conformations in the presence and absence of bound sulfate. The size of the binding pocket is thereby considerably reduced, and its position relative to the cofactor is shifted, causing an increase in the distance of the sulfur atom of the bound sulfate to the molybdenum.

  6. Perforin deficiency attenuates collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Kristin; Knipper, Annika; Tu-Rapp, Hoang; Koczan, Dirk; Kreutzer, Hans-Jürgen; Nizze, Horst; Mix, Eilhard; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Holmdahl, Rikard; Ibrahim, Saleh M

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an approved animal model for rheumatoid arthritis, is thought to be a T cell-dependent disease. There is evidence that CD8+ T cells are a major subset controlling the pathogenesis of CIA. They probably contribute to certain features of disease, namely tissue destruction and synovial hyperplasia. In this study we examined the role of perforin (pfp), a key molecule of the cytotoxic death pathway that is expressed mainly in CD8+ T cells, for the pathogenesis of CIA. We generated DBA/1J mice suffering from mutations of the pfp molecule, DBA/1J-pfp-/-, and studied their susceptibility to arthritis. As a result, pfp-deficient mice showed a reduced incidence (DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 64%; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 54%), a slightly delayed onset (onset of disease: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 53 ± 3.6; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 59 ± 4.9 (mean ± SEM), and milder form of the disease (maximum disease score: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 7.3 ± 1.1; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 3.4 ± 1.4 (mean ± SEM); P < 0.05). Concomitantly, peripheral T cell proliferation in response to the specific antigen bovine collagen II was increased in pfp-/- mice compared with pfp+/+ mice, arguing for an impaired killing of autoreactive T cells caused by pfp deficiency. Thus, pfp-mediated cytotoxicity is involved in the initiation of tissue damage in arthritis, but pfp-independent cytotoxic death pathways might also contribute to CIA. PMID:15987490

  7. SAP deficiency mitigated atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lingyun; Wu, Teng; Zeng, Cuiling; Li, Xiangli; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wen, Dingwen; Ji, Tianxing; Lan, Tian; Xing, Liying; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid P conpoent (SAP), a member of the pentraxin family, interact with pathogens and cell debris to promote their removal by macrophages and neutrophils and is co-localized with atherosclerotic plaques in patients. However, the exact mechanism of SAP in atherogenesis is still unclear. We investigated whether SAP influence macrophage recruitment and foam cell formation and ultimately affect atherosclerotic progression. we generated apoE(-/-); SAP(-/-) (DKO) mice and fed them western diet for 4 and 8 weeks to characterize atherosclerosis development. SAP deficiency effectively reduced plaque size both in the aorta (p = 0.0006 for 4 wks; p = 0.0001 for 8 wks) and the aortic root (p = 0.0061 for 4 wks; p = 0.0079 for 8wks) compared with apoE(-/-) mice. Meanwhile, SAP deficiency inhibited oxLDL-induced foam cell formation (p = 0.0004) compared with apoE(-/-) mice and SAP treatment increases oxLDL-induced foam cell formation (p = 0.002) in RAW cells. Besides, SAP deficiency reduced macrophages recruitment (p = 0.035) in vivo and in vitro (p = 0.026). Furthermore, SAP treatment enhanced CD36 (p = 0.007) and FcγRI (p = 0.031) expression induced by oxLDL through upregulating JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation whereas specific JNK1/2 inhibitor reduced CD36 (p = 0.0005) and FcγRI (P = 0.0007) expression in RAW cell. SAP deficiency also significantly decreased the expression of M1 and M2 macrophage markers and inflammatory cytokines in oxLDL-induced macrophages. SAP deficiency mitigated foam cell formation and atherosclerotic development in apoE(-/-) mice, due to reduction in macrophages recruitment, polarization and pro-inflammatory cytokines and inhibition the CD36/FcγR-dependent signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Agrawal, Anshu; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency.

  9. Biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory response of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble biotin (vitamin B7) is indispensable for normal human health. The vitamin acts as a cofactor for five carboxylases that are critical for fatty acid, glucose, and amino acid metabolism. Biotin deficiency is associated with various diseases, and mice deficient in this vitamin display enhanced inflammation. Previous studies have shown that biotin affects the functions of adaptive immune T and NK cells, but its effect(s) on innate immune cells is not known. Because of that and because vitamins such as vitamins A and D have a profound effect on dendritic cell (DC) function, we investigated the effect of biotin levels on the functions of human monocyte-derived DCs. Culture of DCs in a biotin-deficient medium (BDM) and subsequent activation with LPS resulted in enhanced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-12p40, IL-23, and IL-1β compared with LPS-activated DCs cultured in biotin-sufficient (control) and biotin-oversupplemented media. Furthermore, LPS-activated DCs cultured in BDM displayed a significantly higher induction of IFN-γ and IL-17 indicating Th1/Th17 bias in T cells compared with cells maintained in biotin control or biotin-oversupplemented media. Investigations into the mechanisms suggested that impaired activation of AMP kinase in DCs cultured in BDM may be responsible for the observed increase in inflammatory responses. In summary, these results demonstrate for the first time that biotin deficiency enhances the inflammatory responses of DCs. This may therefore be one of the mechanism(s) that mediates the observed inflammation that occurs in biotin deficiency. PMID:27413170

  10. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in pregnant Korean women: the first trimester and the winter season as risk factors for vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Rihwa; Kim, Seonwoo; Yoo, Heejin; Cho, Yoon Young; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon; Oh, Soo-young; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2015-05-11

    We investigated the vitamin D status of Korean women during pregnancy and assessed the effects of vitamin D deficiency on two pregnancy outcomes; preterm births and the births of small for gestational age. We measured the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in 220 pregnant Korean women who were recruited prospectively and compared these levels with those of 500 healthy non-pregnant women. We analyzed vitamin D status according to patient demographics, season, and obstetrical characteristics; moreover, we also assessed pregnancy outcomes. The overall prevalence of vitamin D deficiency(<20 ng/mL) in pregnant women and healthy non-pregnant women was 77.3% and 79.2%; respectively; and the prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (<10 ng/mL) was 28.6% and 7.2%; respectively (p < 0.05). Vitamin D deficiency was more prevalent in the winter (100%) than in the summer (45.5%) in pregnant Korean women. A higher risk of vitamin D deficiency was observed in the first trimester than in the third trimester (adjusted OR 4.3; p < 0.05). No significant association was observed between vitamin D deficiency and any of the pregnancy outcomes examined. Further research focusing on the long-term consequences of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy in Korean women is warranted.

  11. Impaired Posterior Frontal Sutural Fusion in the Biglycan/Decorin Double Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Sunil; Bi, Yanming; Ortiz, Ana T.; Embree, Mildred C.; Kilts, Tina; Iozzo, Renato; Opperman, Lynne A.; Young, Marian F.

    2007-01-01

    Biglycan (Bgn) and decorin (Dcn) are highly expressed in numerous tissues in the craniofacial complex. However, their expression and function in the cranial sutures is unknown. In order to study this, we first examined the expression of biglycan and decorin in the posterior frontal suture (PFS), which predictably fuses between 21–45 days post-natal and in the non-fusing sagittal (S) suture from wildtype (Wt) mice. Our data showed that Bgn and Dcn were expressed in both cranial sutures. We then characterized the cranial suture phenotype in Bgn deficient, Dcn deficient, Bgn/Dcn double deficient, and Wt mice. At embryonic day 18.5, alizarin red/ alcian blue staining showed that the Bgn/Dcn double deficient mice had hypomineralization of the frontal and parietal craniofacial bones. Histological analysis of adult mice (45–60 days post natal) showed that the Bgn or Dcn deficient mice had no cranial suture abnormalities and immunohistochemistry staining showed increased production of Dcn in the PFS from Bgn deficient mice. To test possible compensation of Dcn in the Bgn deficient sutures we examined the Bgn/Dcn double deficient mice and found they had impaired fusion of the PFS. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of RNA from 35 day-old mice revealed increased expression of Bmp-4 and Dlx-5 in the PFS compared to their non-fusing S suture in Wt tissues and decreased expression of Dlx-5 in both PF and S sutures in the Bgn/Dcn double deficient mice compared to the Wt mice. Failure of PFS fusion and hypomineralization of the calvaria in the Bgn/Dcn double deficient mice demonstrate these extracellular matrix proteoglycans could have a role in controlling the formation and growth of the cranial vault. PMID:17188951

  12. The effect of iron deficiency anemia on intelligence quotient (IQ) in under 17 years old students.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, A; Mehrabi, M R; Goudarzi, K

    2008-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of iron deficiency on intelligence of 11-17 years students. This study conducted on the 540 students (11-17 years) that educated at guidance and high school of Boroujerd city. Laboratory investigations were included serum iron, TIBC (total iron binding capacity) and ferretin. Riven matrix was used in order to determine intelligence quotient. Data were analyzed using SPSS 13 and chi2 and t-tests. Results showed that 78 (14.4%) students had iron deficiency and 14 (25.9%) had iron deficiency anemia. There was no significant difference between different sexes for iron deficiency distribution (p > 0.05), while iron deficiency anemia was significantly higher in girls as compared with boys (p > 0.05). Mean quotient was 115 +/- 12.1 in iron deficiency students, while it was 113.7 +/- 13.9 in patients without iron deficiency. There was also no significant difference between normal and iron deficient students for intelligence quotient (p > 0.05).

  13. Pronuclear epigenetic modification of protamine deficient human sperm following injection into mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Hoda; Mohseni-Kouchesfehani, Homa; Mohammadi-Sangcheshmeh, Abdollah; Farifteh-Nobijari, Fattaneh; Salehi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities and abnormal chromatin structure in sperm may lead to male infertility. Protamine deficiency is among the disorders of chromatin structure in sperm. The study of epigenetic changes in male pronuclei is necessary since abnormal sperm is sometimes used to create embryos using assisted reproductive techniques. The present study was carried out to compare epigenetic global marks in male pronuclei derived from normal and protamine deficient sperm cells. To do so, interspecies fertilization was used to obtain the male pronucleus. Normal and protamine deficient sperm cells, which were identified by chromomycin A3 staining, were injected into mouse oocytes. Oocytes were cultured until pronuclear formation and were then labeled with different antibodies (anti 5-methylcytosine, anti 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, and anti acetyl H4K12). Based on the fluorescence intensity, the level of each of these epigenetic factors was determined and they revealed a significant relationship between the level of sperm protamine deficiency and sperm epigenetic factors. Protamine deficiency was found to be associated with an increased methylation (p=0) and decreased hydroxymethylation rate (p=0.015) of the male pronucleus chromatin. However, no association was found between protamine deficiency and the level of H4K12 acetylation (p=0.548). Also, the efficiency of fertilization in protamine deficient sperm cells was less than normal. These results suggest that protamine deficient sperm cells lead to the formation of epigenetically altered pronuclei.

  14. Anemia in patients with coinherited thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pornprasert, Sakorn; Phanthong, Siratcha

    2013-01-01

    Thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency are genetic disorders that cause hemolytic anemia. In areas with high frequencies of both hematological disorders, coinheritance of G-6-PD deficiency with thalassemia can be found. Whether G-6-PD deficiency, coinherited with thalassemia, enhances severe anemia is still unclear. Hematological parameters between thalassemia carriers with G-6-PD deficiency and those without G-6-PD deficiency were compared. The G-6-PD deficiency was diagnosed in 410 blood samples from thalassemia patients using a fluorescent spot test. The levels of hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and Hb A2/Hb E [β26(B8)Glu→Lys; HBB: c.79G>A] were measured using an automated blood counter and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. The G-6-PD deficiency was found in 37 samples (9.02%). Mean levels of Hb, PCV, MCV and Hb A2/E were similar between the two groups. Thus, G-6-PD deficiency did not enhance red blood cell pathology or induce more anemic severity in thalassemia patients.

  15. Pathology of Bursae of Fabricius in Methionine-Deficient Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bangyuan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Cui, Wei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this 42-day study was to investigate the effects of methionine (Met) deficiency on immune function by determining the relative weight, morphological and ultrastructural changes of bursae of Fabricius, cell cycle, and apoptosis of bursa cells. One hundred and twenty one-day-old avian broilers were randomly divided into two groups and fed on a control diet (starter diet, Met 0.50%; grower diet, Met 0.40%) and Met-deficient diet (starter diet, Met 0.26%; grower diet, Met 0.28%) for six weeks. The relative weight of bursae was decreased with Met deficiency when compared to that of the control group. Lesions were also observed in the Met-deficient group. Histopathologically, the numbers of lymphocytes in the follicles were decreased. Ultrastructurally, the mitochondria of lymphocytes were swollen in the Met-deficient group. As measured by flow cytometry, bursal cells in the G0G1 phase were significantly higher (P < 0.01), and bursal cells in the S, G2M phases and proliferating index were obviously lower (P < 0.01) with Met deficiency than in the control group. Moreover, the percentage of apoptotic cells in the bursae were significantly increased in Met-deficient birds (P < 0.01). It was concluded that Met deficiency restrained the development of the bursae of Fabricius and affected the humoral immunity of the chickens. PMID:23486195

  16. Identifying factors predicting iron deficiency in United States adolescent females using the ferritin and the body iron models

    PubMed Central

    Sekhar, Deepa L.; Murray-Kolb, Laura E.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Paul, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional deficiency in the United States affecting 9–16% of female adolescents. With the primary purpose of detecting iron deficiency, primary care screening consists of a hemoglobin or hematocrit laboratory test. This method is simple and inexpensive, but tests for anemia, and is neither sensitive nor specific for iron deficiency. Alternate methods for diagnosing iron deficiency using the ferritin and body iron models are not widely utilized. The study objective was to compare iron deficiency risk factors among adolescent females defined by the ferritin and body iron models to better characterize those who may benefit from iron deficiency testing as opposed to the current anemia-based screen. Methods This cross-sectional study of female adolescents aged 12–21 years utilized National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003–2006 data. Anemia was defined by standard hemoglobin cutoffs. The ferritin model defines iron deficiency through transferrin saturation, ferritin and erythrocyte protoporphyrin laboratory testing. Body iron calculates iron status with a formula involving transferrin receptor and ferritin. Bivariate and multivariable analyses examined associations between questionnaire responses and iron deficiency defined by each model. Results Among 1765 participants, 2.7% were anemic. Iron deficiency prevalence was 13.1% and 9.1% by the ferritin and body iron models, respectively. Based on the model, anemia-based screening had a sensitivity of 15.6–18.8% for iron deficiency. Multivariable associations for ferritin model iron deficiency included age, race/ethnicity, activity level and medroxyprogresterone acetate injection. Age and food insecurity were significant using the body iron model. Conclusions Universal anemia-based screening misses the majority of iron-deficient adolescent females. The common risk factor identified here, adolescent age, may both inform preventive care guidelines on

  17. Batch biological treatment of nitrogen deficient synthetic wastewater using Azotobacter supplemented activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Kargi, Fikret; Ozmihçi, Serpil

    2004-09-01

    Biological treatment of nitrogen deficient wastewaters are usually accomplished by external addition of nitrogen sources to the wastewater which is an extra cost item. As an alternative for effective biological treatment of nitrogen deficient wastewaters, the nitrogen fixing bacterium, Azotobacter vinelandii, was used in activated sludge and also in pure culture. Total organic carbon (TOC) removal performances of Azotobacter-added and free activated sludge cultures were compared at different initial TN/TOC ratios. The rate and extent of TOC removal were comparable for all cultures when initial TN/TOC ratio was larger than 0.12; however, both the rate and extent of TOC removal from nitrogen deficient (TN/TOC<12%) synthetic wastewater were improved by using Azotobacter-added activated sludge as compared to the Azotobacter-free activated sludge culture. More than 90% TOC removal was obtained with pure Azotobacter or Azotobacter-added activated sludge culture from a nitrogen deficient synthetic wastewater. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Behavioral Defects in Chaperone-Deficient Alzheimer's Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Juhi; Karmegam, Rajalakshmi V.; Masilamoni, J. Gunasingh; Terry, Alvin V.; Cashikar, Anil G.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular chaperones protect cells from the deleterious effects of protein misfolding and aggregation. Neurotoxicity of amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregates and their deposition in senile plaques are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We observed that the overall content of αB-crystallin, a small heat shock protein molecular chaperone, decreased in AD model mice in an age-dependent manner. We hypothesized that αB-crystallin protects cells against Aβ toxicity. To test this, we crossed αB-crystallin/HspB2 deficient (CRYAB-/-HSPB2-/-) mice with AD model transgenic mice expressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein. Transgenic and non-transgenic mice in chaperone-sufficient or deficient backgrounds were examined for representative behavioral paradigms for locomotion and memory network functions: (i) spatial orientation and locomotion was monitored by open field test; (ii) sequential organization and associative learning was monitored by fear conditioning; and (iii) evoked behavioral response was tested by hot plate method. Interestingly, αB-crystallin/HspB2 deficient transgenic mice were severely impaired in locomotion compared to each genetic model separately. Our results highlight a synergistic effect of combining chaperone deficiency in a transgenic mouse model for AD underscoring an important role for chaperones in protein misfolding diseases. PMID:21379584

  19. Iron deficiency in frequent and first time female blood donors.

    PubMed

    Boulahriss, M; Benchemsi, N

    2008-12-01

    Blood donation has a marked influence on the body iron stores especially in female blood donors. Iron deficiency anaemia is an important limiting factor for the number of donations in female regular blood donors. This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of iron deficiency and relevant factors in frequent and first time female blood donors at Casablanca blood transfusion centre, Morocco. Between November 2005 and April 2006, twenty-one female first time and twenty-one frequent female blood donors were selected randomly. In frequent blood donors, only females with at least 10 donations were included. Haemoglobin concentration. serum ferritin, serum iron and total transferrine binding capacity were measured and analysed. The results of haemoglobin concentration, serum ferritin, serum iron were significant lower in frequent female blood donors when compared with the results of same parameters in first time female blood donors. The results show that the frequency of iron deficiency in frequent female blood donors is 43% and in the first time female blood donors is 14%. Iron deficiency is very common in regular female blood donors at Casablanca's transfusion centre. Frequent blood donation has marked influence on the body iron stores in frequent female blood donors. It is therefore recommended that blood transfusion centres focused on maintaining iron balance by measuring serum ferritin and total transferrine binding capacity in frequent female blood donors. They have also to educate the donors about iron supplementation and yearly ferritin checking.

  20. Different Neurologic Aspects of Nutritional B12 Deficiency in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Serdaroglu, Gul; Tekgul, Hasan; Gokben, Sarenur

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate neurologic problems caused by nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy. Twenty-four cases between 2 and 18 months of age with neurologic symptoms and/or signs and diagnosed as nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency were analyzed. The most common symptoms were developmental retardation, afebrile seizures, and involuntary movements. The mean vitamin B12 levels were lower in patients with both neurologic and extraneurologic involvement when compared to those with only neurologic symptoms. All of the cases were treated with vitamin B12. In patients with severe deficiencies, involuntary movements were observed during vitamin B12 treatment using cyanocobalamin form. At the 1-year follow-up, all but 3 patients were considered neurodevelopmentally normal. The 3 patients that did not fully recover, on admission, had the lowest vitamin B12 levels. It is of great importance to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin B12 deficiency promptly to prevent the long-term neurologic problems. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Primary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Emily Cornforth; di San Filippo, Cristina Amat; Ndukwe Erlingsson, Uzochi C.; Ardon, Orly; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Primary carnitine deficiency is caused by defective OCTN2 carnitine transporters encoded by the SLC22A5 gene. Lack of carnitine impairs fatty acid oxidation resulting in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, hepatic encephalopathy, skeletal and cardiac myopathy. Recently, asymptomatic mothers with primary carnitine deficiency were identified by low carnitine levels in their infant by newborn screening. Here we evaluate mutations in the SLC22A5 gene and carnitine transport in fibroblasts from symptomatic patients and asymptomatic women. Carnitine transport was significantly reduced in fibroblasts obtained from all patients with primary carnitine deficiency, but was significantly higher in the asymptomatic women’s than in the symptomatic patients’ fibroblasts (p<0.01). By contrast, ergothioneine transport (a selective substrate of the OCTN1 transporter, tested here as a control) was similar in cells from controls and patients with carnitine deficiency. DNA sequencing indicated an increased frequency of nonsense mutations in symptomatic patients (p<0.001). Expression of the missense mutations in CHO cells indicated that many mutations retained residual carnitine transport activity, with no difference in the average activity of missense mutations identified in symptomatic versus asymptomatic patients. These results indicate that cells from asymptomatic women have on average higher levels of residual carnitine transport activity as compared to that of symptomatic patients due to the presence of at least one missense mutation. PMID:21922592

  2. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  3. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ubiquinone-deficient mutants.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J R; Clarke, C F

    1999-01-01

    Ubiquinol (QH2) is a lipid-soluble molecule that participates in cellular redox reactions. Previous studies have shown that yeast mutants lacking QH2 are hypersensitive to treatment with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) indicating that QH2 can function as an antioxidant in vivo. In this study the effect of 1 mM linolenic acid on levels of Q6 and Q6H2 is assessed in both wild-type and respiration-deficient (atp2 delta) strains. The response of Q-deficient mutants to other forms of oxidative stress is further characterized to define those conditions where QH2 acts as an antioxidant. Endogenous antioxidant defense systems were also assessed in wild-type, Q-deficient, and atp2 delta strains. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity decreased and catalase activity increased in both Q-deficient and atp2 delta mutants compared to wild-type cells, suggesting that such changes result from the loss of respiration rather than the lack of Q.

  4. Betaine rescue of an animal model with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) catalyses the synthesis of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, the folate derivative utilized in homocysteine remethylation to methionine. A severe deficiency of MTHFR results in hyperhomocysteinaemia and homocystinuria. Betaine supplementation has proven effective in ameliorating the biochemical abnormalities and the clinical course in patients with this deficiency. Mice with a complete knockout of MTHFR serve as a good animal model for homocystinuria; early postnatal death of these mice is common, as with some neonates with low residual MTHFR activity. We attempted to rescue Mthfr−/− mice from postnatal death by betaine supplementation to their mothers throughout pregnancy and lactation. Betaine decreased the mortality of Mthfr−/− mice from 83% to 26% and significantly improved somatic development from postnatal day 1, compared with Mthfr−/− mice from unsupplemented dams. Biochemical evaluations demonstrated higher availability of betaine in suckling pups, decreased accumulation of homocysteine, and decreased flux through the trans-sulphuration pathway in liver and brain of Mthfr−/− pups from betaine-supplemented dams. We observed disturbances in proliferation and differentiation in the cerebellum and hippocampus in the knockout mice; these changes were ameliorated by betaine supplementation. The dramatic effects of betaine on survival and growth, and the partial reversibility of the biochemical and developmental anomalies in the brains of MTHFR-deficient mice, emphasize an important role for choline and betaine depletion in the pathogenesis of homocystinuria due to MTHFR deficiency. PMID:15217352

  5. Iron deficiency anemia in newly diagnosed celiac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Sanseviero, Maria T; Mazza, Giuseppe A; Pullano, Maria N; Oliveiro, Antonella C; Altomare, Federica; Pedrelli, Luca; Dattilo, Bruno; Miniero, Roberto; Meloni, Gianfranco; Giancotti, Laura; Talarico, Valentina

    2016-02-01

    Celiac disease (CD) in children may occur with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations: anemia is the most frequent extraintestinal manifestation, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the common presentation. In our study we aimed to assess IDA condition in a large cohort of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed CD. Our study includes a cohort of 518 children (340 females and 178 males), 6 months-18 years old, joined between January 1990 and January 2013. We have analyzed hematological parameters and iron balance: serum iron, serum ferritin and serum transferrin levels. The diagnosis of IDA was considered on the basis of hemoglobin levels below -2SD, associated with serum iron and ferritin reduction, serum transferrin increase; all compared with the normal reference values for age. Of all patients, 156 patients (30.1%) had anemia, including 103 females (19.8%) and 53 males (10.2%); of these, 112 (21.62%) had IDA (in 18 cases associated with α- or β-thalassemia trait), 22 were thalassemic trait without iron deficiency and the remaining 19 suffered from other forms of anemia. One hundred fifteen patients (22.20%) with low ferritin levels but normal hemoglobin levels were considered as preanemic iron deficient patients. Our data confirm that iron depletion and IDA represent a frequent finding at the diagnosis of CD. This significant relation existing between CD and iron deficiency should be considered by pediatricians at the diagnosis of CD in order to treat the patients.

  6. Selected Systems Engineering Process Deficiencies and Their Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence Dale

    2006-01-01

    The systems engineering process is well established and well understood. While this statement could be argued in the light of the many systems engineering guidelines and that have been developed, comparative review of these respective descriptions reveal that they differ primarily in the number of discrete steps or other nuances, and are at their core essentially common. Likewise, the systems engineering textbooks differ primarily in the context for application of systems engineering or in the utilization of evolved tools and techniques, not in the basic method. Thus, failures in systems engineering cannot credibly be attributed to implementation of the wrong systems engineering process among alternatives. However, numerous systems failures can be attributed to deficient implementation of the systems engineering process. What may clearly be perceived as a system engineering deficiency in retrospect can appear to be a well considered system engineering efficiency in real time - an efficiency taken to reduce cost or meet a schedule, or more often both. Typically these efficiencies are grounded on apparently solid rationale, such as reuse of heritage hardware or software. Over time, unintended consequences of a systems engineering process deficiency may begin to be realized, and unfortunately often the consequence is system failure. This paper describes several actual cases of system failures that resulted from deficiencies in their systems engineering process implementation, including the Ariane 5 and the Hubble Space Telescope.

  7. Behavioral defects in chaperone-deficient Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Juhi; Karmegam, Rajalakshmi V; Masilamoni, J Gunasingh; Terry, Alvin V; Cashikar, Anil G

    2011-02-17

    Molecular chaperones protect cells from the deleterious effects of protein misfolding and aggregation. Neurotoxicity of amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregates and their deposition in senile plaques are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We observed that the overall content of αB-crystallin, a small heat shock protein molecular chaperone, decreased in AD model mice in an age-dependent manner. We hypothesized that αB-crystallin protects cells against Aβ toxicity. To test this, we crossed αB-crystallin/HspB2 deficient (CRYAB⁻/⁻HSPB2⁻/⁻) mice with AD model transgenic mice expressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein. Transgenic and non-transgenic mice in chaperone-sufficient or deficient backgrounds were examined for representative behavioral paradigms for locomotion and memory network functions: (i) spatial orientation and locomotion was monitored by open field test; (ii) sequential organization and associative learning was monitored by fear conditioning; and (iii) evoked behavioral response was tested by hot plate method. Interestingly, αB-crystallin/HspB2 deficient transgenic mice were severely impaired in locomotion compared to each genetic model separately. Our results highlight a synergistic effect of combining chaperone deficiency in a transgenic mouse model for AD underscoring an important role for chaperones in protein misfolding diseases.

  8. Iron deficiency anemia and increased urinary norepinephrine excretion.

    PubMed

    Voorhess, M L; Stuart, M J; Stockman, J A; Oski, F A

    1975-04-01

    Chronic iron deficiency in rats resulted in decreased MAO activity both in vitro and in vivo. Since MAO is an important enzyme in inactivation of catecholamines, urinary excretion of DA, NE, E, MN-NMN, and VMA was measured in 24-hour samples from 11 iron-deficient children before and after treatment with intramuscular iron. Pretreatment NE excretion was abnormally high and returned to normal (P=0.001) within one week of therapy. VMA excretion also was higher before than after treatment (P greater than 0.05), but most values were within the normal range for healthy children of comparable size. There was no significant difference between DA, E, and MN-NMN excretion before and after iron therapy. Anemic, non-iron-deficient children had normal urinary NE, E, and VMA excretion before and after transfusion. These findings suggest that the irritability, lack of attentiveness, and low performance scores of iron-deficient children may be related to alterations in catecholamine metabolic pathways secondary to dependence of MAO on adequate iron stores.

  9. Serum transferrin receptors in detection of iron deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rusia, U; Flowers, C; Madan, N; Agarwal, N; Sood, S K; Sikka, M

    1999-08-01

    A prospective hospital-based study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of serum transferrin receptors in the detection of iron deficiency in pregnant women. The iron status of 100 pregnant women with single uncomplicated term pregnancies in the first stage of labor was established using standard laboratory measures. These included complete hemogram, red cell indices, serum iron, percent transferrin saturation, and serum ferritin. In addition, serum transferrin receptor (STFR) was estimated. The results of 81 women with complete laboratory profiles were analyzed. Thirty-five (43.2%) women were anemic (hemoglobin <11 g/dl). Hemoglobin (Hb) showed a significant correlation with MCH, MCHC, serum iron, and percent transferrin saturation, suggesting that the anemia was likely to be due to iron deficiency. The mean STFR level was 18.05+/-9.9 mg/l in the anemic women and was significantly raised (p<0.001) compared with that of the nonanemic women. STFR correlated significantly with Hb (p<0.001), MCH (p<0.05), MCHC (p<0.01), serum iron (p<0.01), and percent transferrin saturation (p<0.01) and also showed a highly significant correlation with the degree of anemia. Serum ferritin in these women did not correlate with Hb, and only 54.4% of the women had levels <12 ng/ml, which does not reflect the true prevalence of iron deficiency. Serum transferrin receptor estimation is thus a useful measure for detecting iron deficiency in pregnancy.

  10. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affected with the disease may present with acute metabolic decompensation during infancy or with severe cardiomyopathy in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and treatment with L-carnitine may be life-saving. In this review article, the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of PCD are discussed, with a focus on cardiac involvements. PMID:24385988

  11. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease. Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient.

  12. Autoimmunity in Primary Antibody Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Ahmadi, Moslem; Abolhassani, Hassan; Yazdani, Reza; Mohammadi, Hamed; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common inherited primary immunodeficiencies in humans, characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, an inability to produce specific antibodies, and recurrent infections mainly caused by encapsulated bacteria. However, it has been shown that inflammatory disorders, granulomatous lesions, lymphoproliferative diseases, cancer, and autoimmunity are associated with the various types of PAD. Both systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases could be attributed to B-cell defects in PAD patients. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia are the most common autoimmune disorders in this group of patients. The aim of this review is to describe the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity and to review the literature with respect to the reported autoimmune disorders in each type of PAD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Perspectives on nutritional iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency (ID) is caused by an intake of dietary iron insufficient to cover physiological iron requirements. Studies on iron absorption from whole diets have examined relationships between dietary iron bioavailability/absorption, iron losses, and amounts of stored iron. New insights have been obtained into regulation of iron absorption and expected rates of changes of iron stores or hemoglobin iron deficits when bioavailability or iron content of the diet has been modified and when losses of iron occur. Negative effects of ID are probably related to age, up to about 20 years, explaining some of earlier controversies. Difficulties in establishing the prevalence of mild ID are outlined. The degree of underestimation of the prevalence of mild ID when using multiple diagnostic criteria is discussed. It is suggested that current low-energy lifestyles are a common denominator for the current high prevalence not only of ID but also of obesity, diabetes, and osteoporosis.

  14. Carnitine deficiency disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    ; tissue levels may become low enough to limit fatty acid oxidation, although no cases of illness due to carnitine deficiency have been described. There is speculation that carnitine supplements might be beneficial in other settings (such as genetic acyl-CoA oxidation defects--"secondary carnitine deficiency", chronic ischemia, hyperalimentation, nutritional carnitine deficiency), but efficacy has not been documented. The formation of abnormal acylcarnitines has been helpful in expanded newborn screening programs using tandem mass-spectrometry of blood spot acylcarnitine profiles to detect genetic fatty acid oxidation defects in neonates. Carnitine-deficient diets (vegetarian) do not have much effect on carnitine pools in adults. A modest 50% reduction in carnitine levels is associated with hyperalimentation in newborn infants, but is of doubtful significance. The above considerations indicate that carnitine does not become rate-limiting unless extremely low; testing the benefits of nutritional supplements may require invasive endurance studies of fasting ketogenesis or muscle and cardiovascular work.

  15. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania; Bedair, Said; Kassem, Islam

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH) and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH) 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products), encouraging adequate exposure

  16. Vitamin A deficiency in quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nestler, R.B.; Bailey, W.W.

    1943-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the symptoms of avitaminosis A in growing and adolescent bobwhites. Chicks from parents that have received a diet rich in vitamin A may have enough stored to carry them a week or ten days on a growing diet deficient in vitamin A before symptoms of deficiency occur. The first sign is ruffled feathering, with the wing primaries standing out from the body and drooping. Ophthalmia in one or both eyes occurs and may close the eyes completely, but this condition is not severe in all cases and may not even be noticeable. Birds show poor growth, loss of appetite, and weakness before death. Under the conditions of the experiments discussed herein, death may occur in the fourth or fifth week, and mortality is high......Postmortem examination may reveal visceral gout with thick deposits of urates on the kidneys, in the ureters, on the heart, in the proventriculus, and occasionally covering all the viscera. There may also be hemorrhage of the heart and other organs....Adolescent quail reared on a diet rich in vitamin A may be able to live through the winter on a maintenance diet low in this vitamin without showing symptoms of avitaminosis, but some individuals whose storage of vitamin A in the liver is not as great as that of others may succumb to visceral gout.....A growing mash for quail which contains sufficient vitamin A when fresh may, after a period of storage, lose enough of the vitamin to cause the characteristic symptoms of avitaminosis A to appear.

  17. Relationship between vitamin D deficiency, bone remodelling and iron status in iron-deficient young women consuming an iron-fortified food.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Pérez-Granados, Ana M; Toxqui, Laura; Zazo, Pilar; de la Piedra, Concepción; Vaquero, M Pilar

    2013-03-01

    Iron and vitamin D deficiencies are two of the most widespread nutritional disorders in the world. Our aim was to know whether the consumption of an iron-fortified fruit juice modifies bone remodelling and the possible influence of baseline vitamin D status on the recovery of iron status in a group of iron-deficient women. Iron biomarkers, 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and dietary intake were measured in 123 iron-deficient menstruating women. A subgroup (n = 41) participated in a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study of 16-weeks during winter. They consumed a placebo fruit juice (P) or iron-fortified fruit juice (F). Dietary intake, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathormone (PTH), bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aminoterminal telopeptide of collagen I (NTX) and iron biomarkers were determined. Ninety-two per cent of the iron-deficient women were vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Transferrin saturation and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were positively correlated. Iron status improved in F, 25-hydroxyvitamin D decreased in F and P, and PTH, ALP and NTX levels were within the normal range and did not vary. Women with 25-hydroxyvitamin D ≥ 50 nmol/L compared with 25-hydroxyvitamin D < 50 nmol/L showed a higher increase in transferrin saturation (a marker of iron supply to tissues) during iron recovery. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency is very high in iron-deficient women. The recovery of iron status by consuming an iron-fortified food does not affect 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels; however, the increase in iron supply to tissues is lower if the women also present vitamin D deficiency. Although bone health does not seem to be affected in this group of women, correction of iron and vitamin D deficiencies should be promoted in young women to improve present and future health.

  18. Frequent development of combined pituitary hormone deficiency in patients initially diagnosed as isolated growth hormone deficiency: a long term follow-up of patients from a single center.

    PubMed

    Otto, Aline P; França, Marcela M; Correa, Fernanda A; Costalonga, Everlayny F; Leite, Claudia C; Mendonca, Berenice B; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Carvalho, Luciani R S; Jorge, Alexander A L

    2015-08-01

    Children initially diagnosed with isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) have a variable rate to progress to combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) during follow-up. To evaluate the development of CPHD in a group of childhood-onset IGHD followed at a single tertiary center over a long period of time. We retrospectively analyzed data from 83 patients initially diagnosed as IGHD with a mean follow-up of 15.2 years. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the temporal progression and to identify risk factors to development of CPHD over time. From 83 patients initially with IGHD, 37 (45%) developed CPHD after a median time of follow up of 5.4 years (range from 1.2 to 21 years). LH and FSH deficiencies were the most common pituitary hormone (38%) deficiencies developed followed by TSH (31%), ACTH (12%) and ADH deficiency (5%). ADH deficiency (3.1 ± 1 years from GHD diagnosis) presented earlier and ACTH deficiency (9.3 ± 3.5 years) presented later during follow up compared to LH/FSH (8.3 ± 4 years) and TSH (7.5 ± 5.6 years) deficiencies. In a Cox regression model, pituitary stalk abnormalities was the strongest risk factor for the development of CPHD (hazard ratio of 3.28; p = 0.002). Our study indicated a high frequency of development of CPHD in patients initially diagnosed as IGHD at childhood. Half of our patients with IGHD developed the second hormone deficiency after 5 years of diagnosis, reinforcing the need for lifelong monitoring of pituitary function in these patients.

  19. Functional Reflective Polarizer for Augmented Reality and Color Vision Deficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-03

    Functional reflective polarizer for augmented reality and color vision deficiency Ruidong Zhu, Guanjun Tan, Jiamin Yuan, and Shin-Tson Wu* College...polarizer that can be incorporated into a compact augmented reality system. The design principle of the functional reflective polarizer is explained and...augment reality system is relatively high as compared to a polarizing beam splitter or a conventional reflective polarizer. Such a functional reflective

  20. Human beta-mannosidase deficiency associated with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Graber, D; Flurin, V; Delisle, M B; Pieraggi, M T; Testut, M F; Carrière, J P; Salvayre, R

    1994-01-01

    Human beta-mannosidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder described in only seven families. We present a further case in a black African 14-year-old boy with severely deficient beta-mannosidase activity, bilateral thenar and hypothenar amyotrophy, electrophysiologically demonstrable demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, and cytoplasmic vacuolation of skin fibroblasts and lymphoid cells. The clinical and biochemical features of our patient are compared to those of previously reported patients.

  1. [Tongue play and manganese deficiency in dairy cattle].

    PubMed

    Karatzias, H; Roubies, N; Polizopoulou, Z; Papasteriades, A

    1995-09-01

    The present paper discusses "tongue rolling" observed in dairy cattle farms of a region in northern Greece associated with manganese deficiency. In these animals total body manganese status was evaluated by determining hair, as well as feed manganese content. Cows exhibiting tongue rolling had significantly lower hair manganese content, compared to non-tongue rolling control animals from other farms; in addition, feedstuff analysis demonstrated that manganese and inorganic phosphorus intake of affected cows was also significantly lower.

  2. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 deficiency leads to cytokine resistance and protection against atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Wang, Hui; Ohman, Miina K; Guo, Chiao; Shi, Kate; Wang, Julia; Eitzman, Daniel T

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive interactions between endothelial cells and leukocytes contribute to atherosclerotic plaque growth. However, mechanism(s) responsible for endothelial priming and deactivation in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis are not clear. Apolipoprotein E deficient mice were generated with deficiency of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (Psgl-1(-/-), ApoE(-/-)). On both standard chow and Western diet, Psgl-1(-/-), ApoE(-/-) mice were protected against atherosclerosis compared to Psgl-1(+/+), ApoE(-/-) controls. Psgl-1(-/-), ApoE(-/-) mice also showed reduced leukocyte rolling and firm attachment on endothelial cells, however, adoptively transferred Psgl-1(+/+), ApoE(-/-) leukocytes into Psgl-1(-/-), ApoE(-/-) hosts displayed similar reduced rolling as Psgl-1(-/-), ApoE(-/-) leukocytes. Hematopoietic deficiency of Psgl-1 conferred resistance to the effects of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) on leukocyte rolling along with reduced circulating levels of sP-sel and sE-sel. Antibody blockade of Psgl-1 also reduced endothelial activation in response to IL-1β, eliminated leukocyte rolling, and was protective against atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice. Monocyte depletion with clodronate restored the endothelial response to IL-1β in Psgl-1(-/-) mice. This study suggests that Psgl-1 deficiency leads to reduced atherosclerosis and adhesive interactions between endothelial cells and leukocytes by indirectly regulating endothelial responses to cytokine stimulation. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Academic Deficiency: Student Experiences of Institutional Labeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barouch-Gilbert, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Limited existing research examines how undergraduate students in the United States experience the process of being identified as deficient due to their academic performance. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of college students on academic probation who were labeled academically deficient. Students…

  4. Iron deficiency and new insights into therapy.

    PubMed

    Low, Michael Sy; Grigoriadis, George

    2017-07-17

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anaemia remain prevalent in Australia. The groups at highest risk are pre-menopausal women, socially disadvantaged people and those of Indigenous background. Diagnosing iron deficiency using a full blood examination and iron studies can be difficult and can be further complicated by concomitant inflammation. Results of iron studies should always be interpreted as an overall picture rather than focusing on individual parameters. In difficult clinical scenarios, soluble transferrin receptor assays can be useful. Management of iron deficiency involves identification and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, as well as effective iron replacement. Clinicians should always take a detailed history and perform a comprehensive physical examination of a patient with iron deficiency. Patients should be monitored even if a likely cause of iron deficiency is identified. Patients who fail to respond to iron replacement or maintain iron status should be referred for further investigation, including endoscopy to exclude internal bleeding. Both enteral and parenteral iron are effective at replacing iron. For most adult patients, we recommend trialling daily oral iron (30-100 mg of elemental iron) as the first-line therapy. Safety and efficacy of intravenous iron infusions have improved with the availability of a newer formulation, ferric carboxymaltose. Patients who fail to respond to oral iron replacement can be safely managed with intravenous iron. Blood transfusion for iron deficiency anaemia should be reserved for life-threatening situations and should always be followed by appropriate iron replacement.

  5. Boron deficiency and transcript level changes.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J; Rexach, Jesús; Herrera-Rodríguez, M Begoña; Navarro-Gochicoa, M Teresa; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2011-08-01

    Boron (B) is an essential element for plant growth whose deficiency causes an alteration in the expression of a wide range of genes involved in several physiological processes. However, our understanding of the signal transduction pathways that trigger the B-deficiency responses in plants is still poor. The aims of this review are (i) to summarize the genes whose transcript levels are affected by B deficiency and (ii) to provide an update on recent findings that could help to understand how the signal(s) triggered by B deficiency is transferred to the nucleus to modulate gene expression. In this contribution we review the effects of B deficiency on the transcript level of genes related to B uptake and translocation, maintenance of cell wall and membrane function, nitrogen assimilation and stress response. In addition, we discuss the possible mediation of calcium, arabinogalactan-proteins and other cis-diol containing compounds in the signaling mechanisms that transfer the signal of B deficiency to nuclei. Finally, we conclude that the advance in the knowledge of the molecular basis of B deficiency response in plants will allow improving the tolerance of crops to B deficiency stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency presenting as hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Paul L; Mistry, Rakesh D

    2011-06-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism that commonly presents as hyperammonemia in neonates. We present a case of a 2-year-old girl who was referred to a pediatric emergency department for evaluation of hepatitis, an uncommon presentation of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency. Recognition of late presentations of this disease is important for survival and neurological outcome.

  7. Recurrent pancreatitis in ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prada, Carlos E; Kaul, Ajay; Hopkin, Robert J; Page, Kimberley I; Nathan, Jaimie D; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Cohen, Mitchell B; Heubi, James E; Leslie, Nancy D; Burrow, T Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is a urea cycle defect with varying frequency and severity of episodes of hyperammonemia. We report three patients with OTC deficiency with recurrent pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in this patient population requires further elucidation. Pancreatitis significantly affected dietary/metabolic management and increased frequency of hospitalizations.

  8. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  9. How common is vitamin B12 deficiency?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In considering the vitamin B-12 fortification of flour, it is important to know who is at risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency and whether those individuals would benefit from flour fortification.This article reviews current knowledge of the prevalence and causes of vitamin B-12 deficiency and considers ...

  10. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  11. Potassium, magnesium, and calcium deficiency symptoms

    Treesearch

    Edward I. Sucoff

    1961-01-01

    A loblolly pine or Virginia pine tree that shows visible symptoms of nutrient deficiency is sick. This means that the life processes of the tree are malfunctioning and that, among other things, the growth rate is probably less than normal, and the life of the tree may be threatened. However, if the deficiency can be identified, treatment with the proper fertilizer may...

  12. Micronutrient deficiencies in developing and affluent countries.

    PubMed

    Díaz, J R; de las Cagigas, A; Rodríguez, R

    2003-09-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies, also known as 'hidden hunger', are determining and aggravating factors for health status and quality of life. Three nutritional problems that have serious consequences are deficiencies of iron, vitamin A and iodine. It is estimated that in today's world, iron deficiency anemia affects two billion people, mostly women and children. Blindness due to vitamin A deficiency affects 2.8 million children under 5 years of age. Iodine deficiency disorders affect 740 million people. Cuba is employing various programs to deal with these micronutrient deficiencies. Dietary diversification, fortification of foods and supplementation with pharmaceutical preparations are included in Cuba's response to these deficiencies. Urban agriculture is one strategy to increase dietary diversity. The aim is to increase both the availability and consumption of vegetables and fruits. Food fortification takes many forms in Cuba today and various supplementation programs are carried out. The most common supplemental program in the country is the prenatal program. This program provides four essential nutrients: iron, ascorbic acid, vitamin A and folic acid. At present, iodination covers more than 90% of the total amount of salt used for human consumption. Results of research carried out in Cuba have shown that vitamin A deficiency is nonexistent in children up to 7 y of age. Foods and preparations for these programs are delivered gratuitously or at very low prices.

  13. MARGINAL IODINE DEFICIENCY EXACERBATES PERCHLORATE THYROID TOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental contaminant perchlorate disrupts thyroid homeostasis via inhibition of iodine uptake into the thyroid. This work tested whether iodine deficiency exacerbates the effects of perchlorate. Female 27 day-old LE rats were fed a custom iodine deficient diet with 0, 50...

  14. Fetal anaemia due to pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Gilsanz, F; Vega, M A; Gómez-Castillo, E; Ruiz-Balda, J A; Omeñaca, F

    1993-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency was diagnosed in an infant by umbilical vessel sampling at 30 weeks' gestation. Although three previous hydropic siblings had been stillborn or died in the neonatal period, this infant survived with transfusion dependent haemolytic anaemia. Prompt fetal diagnosis of pyruvate kinase deficiency is feasible and allows better management of hydrops fetalis due to this disorder. PMID:8285758

  15. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  16. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  17. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  18. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  19. 30 CFR 57.5015 - Oxygen deficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oxygen deficiency. 57.5015 Section 57.5015..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Underground Only § 57.5015 Oxygen deficiency. Air in all active workings shall contain at least 19.5 volume percent oxygen....

  20. MARGINAL IODINE DEFICIENCY EXACERBATES PERCHLORATE THYROID TOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental contaminant perchlorate disrupts thyroid homeostasis via inhibition of iodine uptake into the thyroid. This work tested whether iodine deficiency exacerbates the effects of perchlorate. Female 27 day-old LE rats were fed a custom iodine deficient diet with 0, 50...

  1. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  2. Copper deficiency in calves in northcentral Manitoba.

    PubMed

    Smart, M E; Gudmundson, J; Brockman, R P; Cymbaluk, N; Doige, C

    1980-12-01

    Four seven month old Simmental calves were examined because of unthriftiness, a persistent cough, stiffness and lameness. The calves had gastrointestinal and pulmonary parasitism. Analysis of the blood copper levels of these calves and of cows and calves on the farm indicated a generalized deficiency. Only the calves affected with parasitism showed signs of clinical copper deficiency.

  3. [Selenium deficiency and infertility. Andrologic aspects].

    PubMed

    Szöllosi, János; Závaczki, Zoltán; Pál, Attila

    2008-09-14

    Absolute selenium deficiency in human is very rare, although suboptimal daily selenium intake may lead to an unrecognized relative deficiency. Among the many consequences ascribed to decreased selenium level, the effect on male fertility is summarised by the authors. Implications from biochemical, animal experimental and human research are discussed.

  4. Iron deficiency and iron excess damage mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in rats.

    PubMed

    Walter, Patrick B; Knutson, Mitchell D; Paler-Martinez, Andres; Lee, Sonia; Xu, Yu; Viteri, Fernando E; Ames, Bruce N

    2002-02-19

    Approximately two billion people, mainly women and children, are iron deficient. Two studies examined the effects of iron deficiency and supplementation on rats. In study 1, mitochondrial functional parameters and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage were assayed in iron-deficient (< or =5 microg/day) and iron-normal (800 microg/day) rats and in both groups after daily high-iron supplementation (8,000 microg/day) for 34 days. This dose is equivalent to the daily dose commonly given to iron-deficient humans. Iron-deficient rats had lower liver mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and increased levels of oxidants in polymorphonuclear-leukocytes, as assayed by dichlorofluorescein (P < 0.05). Rhodamine 123 fluorescence of polymorphonuclear-leukocytes also increased (P < 0.05). Lowered respiratory control ratios were found in daily high-iron-supplemented rats regardless of the previous iron status (P < 0.05). mtDNA damage was observed in both iron-deficient rats and rats receiving daily high-iron supplementation, compared with iron-normal rats (P < 0.05). Study 2 compared iron-deficient rats given high doses of iron (8,000 microg) either daily or every third day and found that rats given iron supplements every third day had less mtDNA damage on the second and third day after the last dose compared to daily high iron doses. Both inadequate and excessive iron (10 x nutritional need) cause significant mitochondrial malfunction. Although excess iron has been known to cause oxidative damage, the observation of oxidant-induced damage to mitochondria from iron deficiency has been unrecognized previously. Untreated iron deficiency, as well as excessive-iron supplementation, are deleterious and emphasize the importance of maintaining optimal iron intake.

  5. Molecular diagnosis of coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yubero, Delia; Montero, Raquel; Armstrong, Judith; Espinós, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Salviati, Leonardo; Navas, Placido; Artuch, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) deficiency syndromes comprise a growing number of neurological and extraneurological disorders. Primary-genetic but also secondary CoQ deficiencies have been reported. The biochemical determination of CoQ is a good tool for the rapid identification of CoQ deficiencies but does not allow the selection of candidate genes for molecular diagnosis. Moreover, the metabolic pathway for CoQ synthesis is an intricate and not well-understood process, where a large number of genes are implicated. Thus, only next-generation sequencing techniques (either genetic panels of whole-exome and -genome sequencing) are at present appropriate for a rapid and realistic molecular diagnosis of these syndromes. The potential treatability of CoQ deficiency strongly supports the necessity of a rapid molecular characterization of patients, since primary CoQ deficiencies may respond well to CoQ treatment.

  6. Thiamin Deficiency in People with Obesity12

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, Jennifer C; Arundel, Cherinne; Chawla, Lakhmir S

    2015-01-01

    Although obesity has been viewed traditionally as a disease of excess nutrition, evidence suggests that it may also be a disease of malnutrition. Specifically, thiamin deficiency was found in 15.5–29% of obese patients seeking bariatric surgery. It can present with vague signs and symptoms and is often overlooked in patients without alcohol use disorders. This review explores the relatively new discovery of high rates of thiamin deficiency in certain populations of people with obesity, including the effects of thiamin deficiency and potential underlying mechanisms of deficiency in people with obesity. The 2 observational studies that examined the prevalence in preoperative bariatric surgery patients and gaps in our current knowledge (including the prevalence of thiamin deficiency in the general obese population and whether the current RDA for thiamin meets the metabolic needs of overweight or obese adults) are reviewed. Suggestions for future areas of research are included. PMID:25770253

  7. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Ogura, Hiromi

    2015-07-01

    In the past 10 years, we have diagnosed congenital hemolytic anemia in 294 patients, approximately 33% of whom were found to have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. It is becoming more common for Japanese to marry people of other ethnic origins, such that G6PD deficiency is becoming more prevalent