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Sample records for a1b a2 b1

  1. Decays B(s)→a1(b1)D(s), a1(b1)D(s)* in the perturbative QCD approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Within the framework of the perturbative QCD approach, we study the branching ratios of the two-body charmed decays B(s)→a1(b1)D(s), a1(b1)D(s)*, which, including Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa, allowed and suppressed decays. Our calculations are consistent with the currently available data and the experimental upper limits. Certainly, many of these predicted channels have not been measured by experiments and can be confronted with the future experimental data. We also discuss the polarization factions of the decays B(s)→a1(b1)D(s)*, some of which are sensitive to the distinct Gegenbauer moments of the wave functions and the decay constants of mesons a1 and b1.

  2. Projected dynamics of abiotic risks in boreal forest ecosystems (SRES A1B, B1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panferov, O.; Ahrends, B.; Doering, C.; Sogachev, A.

    2009-04-01

    The ongoing climate change causes an increasing frequency of weather extremes (Leckebusch et al., 2008), which can result in wide area damage events (drought, windthrows/breaks) within boreal forest ecosystem. The damage effects, however, depend not only on the strength of a driving force itself (e.g. wind speed) but also on combinations of effecting agents and forest structure. Thus, the present study investigates the projected future developments of abiotic risks in different boreal forests during the 21st Century under conditions of SRES scenarios A1B and B1. Climate scenario data of coupled ECHAM5-MPIOM were downscaled by the regional climate model (CLM) to the spatial resolution of 0.2° x 0.2°, using daily time- steps. With these input data the small-scale modelling with coupled process based sub-models (Jansen et al., 2008) was carried out e.g. for Solling region, (Germany) calculating the water and energy balance of forest ecosystems with modified BROOK 90 (Ahrends et al., 2009) and wind loading on trees with 3D ABL model SCADIS (Panferov and Sogachev, 2008). Norway spruce and Scots pine of various ages were chosen as typical tree species for boreal forest ecosystems and cambisols, podzolic cambisols and stagnosols as typical soil types. The risks of drought and windthrow/breaks for a certain forest stand result from daily combinations of soil water characteristics, static and gust wind loads and soil texture. Damaged stands show higher vulnerability and thus - positive feedback to climate forcing (Vygodskaya et al., 2008). Therefore differences of microclimatological conditions in the remaining stand after changes in forest structure (Radler et al, 2008) were taken into account. Modell output was aggregated to 30-years periods and compared to "present conditions" of 1981-2010. The results show an increment of drought risks towards 2100 caused by changes in precipitation pattern and increase of mean air temperature, whereas the A1B scenario is

  3. Trends of abiotic damage in forest ecosystems in Germany at regional scale under SRES A1B, B1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panferov, O.; Doering, C.; Sogachev, A.; Merklein, J.; Ahrends, B.

    2009-09-01

    Current climate projections indicate that the ongoing climate change may cause an increase of frequency of weather extremes (Leckebusch et al., 2008), which can result in wide area abiotic and consequent biotic damage events (e.g. drought and following insect attacks) within forest ecosystems. The type and degree of damage depends not only on the strength of a primary driving force itself (e.g. wind speed) but also on complex interactions between combinations of effecting agents with above- and belowground forest structure characteristics. The present study investigates the projected trends of abiotic risks factors and their combinations on coniferous and deciduous forests during the 21st Century under conditions of SRES scenarios A1B and B1. The downscaling of ECHAM5-MPIOM by the regional climate model (CLM) to the spatial resolution of 0.2° x 0.2° with daily time-steps is used for the analysis of future climate extremes and their combinations. With these input data the small-scale modeling with coupled process based sub-models (Jansen et al., 2008) was carried out for Solling region, (Central Germany) calculating the water and energy balance of spruce and beech forest ecosystems on cambisols and podzols with BROOK90 (Federer et al. 2003) and wind loading on trees with 3D ABL model SCADIS (Panferov and Sogachev, 2008). The risks of drought or wind damage for a certain forest stand result from combinations of soil water characteristics, static and gust wind loads, which in turn depend on current above- and belowground tree structure and on soil texture. The actual soil water content and forest structure depends on climate-soil-vegetation interactions in previous years. Therefore, differences of microclimatological conditions in the remaining stand after changes in forest structure are taken into account. Model outputs are aggregated to 30-years periods and compared to "present” conditions of 1971-2000. The results demonstrate an increment of abiotic risks

  4. Haemocoel injection of PirA1B1 to Galleria mellonella larvae leads to disruption of the haemocyte immune functions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gongqing; Yi, Yunhong

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens produces a number of insecticidal proteins to kill its larval prey. In this study, we cloned the gene coding for a binary toxin PirA1B1 and purified the recombinant protein using affinity chromatography combined with desalination technology. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the recombinant protein against the haemocytes of Galleria mellonella larvae was investigated. We found that the protein had haemocoel insecticidal activity against G. mellonella with an LD50 of 131.5 ng/larva. Intrahaemocoelic injection of PirA1B1 into G. mellonella resulted in significant decreases in haemocyte number and phagocytic ability. In in vitro experiments, PirA1B1 inhibited the spreading behaviour of the haemocytes of G. mellonella larvae and even caused haemocyte degeneration. Fluorescence microscope analysis and visualization of haemocyte F-actin stained with phalloidin-FITC showed that the PirA1B1 toxin disrupted the organization of the haemocyte cytoskeleton. Our results demonstrated that the PirA1B1 toxin disarmed the insect cellular immune system. PMID:27734915

  5. Vibrational energies for the X1A1, A1B1, and B1A1 states of SiH2/SiD2 and related transition probabilities based on global potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tokue, Ikuo; Yamasaki, Katsuyoshi; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2005-04-01

    Transition probabilities were evaluated for the X(1)A(1)-A(1)B(1) and A(1)B(1)-B(1)A(1) systems of SiH(2) and SiD(2) to analyze the X-->A-->B photoexcitation. The Franck-Condon factors (FCFs) and Einstein's B coefficients were computed by quantum vibrational calculations using the three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the SiH(2)(X(1)A(1),A(1)B(1),B(1)A(1)) electronic states and the electronic transition moments for the X-A, X-B, and A-B system. The global PESs were determined by the multireference configuration interaction calculations with the Davidson correction and the interpolant moving least-squares method combined with the Shepard interpolation. The obtained FCFs for the X-A and A-B systems exhibit that the bending mode is strongly enhanced in the excitation since the equilibrium bond angle greatly varies with the three states; the barrier to linearity is evaluated to be 21,900 cm(-1) for the X state, 6400 cm(-1) for the A state, and 230-240 cm(-1) for the B state. The theoretical lifetimes for the pure bending levels of the A and B states were calculated from the fluorescence decay rates for the A-X, B-A, and B-X emissions.

  6. High Resolution Spectroscopy of A^1B1u ← X^1A_g 8^1_04^1_0 Band of Naphthalene Referenced to AN Optical Frequency Comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Kazuki; Nishiyama, Akiko; Misono, Masatoshi

    2016-06-01

    In the excited vibronic states of naphthalene, there exist various interesting interactions such as intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR), intersystem crossing (ISC), and internal conversion (IC). More than thirty yeas ago, Beck et al. showed that IVR became remarkable when the excess energy exceeded about 2000 cm-1^, ^a. In the present study, we observe Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectra of A^1B1u ← X^1A_g 8^1_04^1_0 band of naphthalene around 34281 cm-1. The excess energy is 2261 cm-1, which is just above the threshold of IVR. Thus we expect this band is suitable to analyze the dynamics in the excited vibronic states. In our experiment, the spectral resolution is about 100 kHz, and rovibronic lines are well-resolved. To decide the transition frequencies, frequency shifts, and spectral linewidths with high accuracy and precision, we employed the comb-referenced Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectroscopic system^b. We proceed to assign the rovibronic lines in ^qQ transition, and to determine molecular constants in the excited vibronic state. ^a S. M. Beck, J. B. Hopkins, D. E. Powers, and R. E. Smalley, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 43(1981). ^b A. Nishiyama, K. Nakashima, A. Matsuba, and M. Misono, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 318, 40 (2015).

  7. Tiam1 mediates neurite outgrowth induced by ephrin-B1 and EphA2

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Ohashi, Riuko; Nakamura, Ritsuko; Shinmura, Kazuya; Kamo, Takaharu; Sakai, Ryuichi; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2004-01-01

    Bidirectional signals mediated by Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane-bound ligands, ephrins, play pivotal roles in the formation of neural networks by induction of both collapse and elongation of neurites. However, the downstream molecular modules to deliver these cues are largely unknown. We report here that the interaction of a Rac1-specific guanine nucleotide-exchanging factor, Tiam1, with ephrin-B1 and EphA2 mediates neurite outgrowth. In cells coexpressing Tiam1 and ephrin-B1, Rac1 is activated by the extracellular stimulation of clustered soluble EphB2 receptors. Similarly, soluble ephrin-A1 activates Rac1 in cells coexpressing Tiam1 and EphA2. Cortical neurons from the E14 mouse embryos and neuroblastoma cells significantly extend neurites when placed on surfaces coated with the extracellular domain of EphB2 or ephrin-A1, which were abolished by the forced expression of the dominant-negative mutant of ephrin-B1 or EphA2. Furthermore, the introduction of a dominant-negative form of Tiam1 also inhibits neurite outgrowth induced by the ephrin-B1 and EphA2 signals. These results indicate that Tiam1 is required for neurite outgrowth induced by both ephrin-B1-mediated reverse signaling and EphA2-mediated forward signaling. PMID:14988728

  8. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 as a Target Antigen in Han Chinese for BD Patients.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinghui; Yang, Weikang; Meng, Xiangyu; Chen, Peng; Du, Hongwu

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a recurrent pathema with a typical symptom of inflammation involved in many organs. Previous report indicated that the serum of Korean patients with BD stimulates membrane expression of hnRNP A2/B1 in endothelial cells. In this study, the target 35 kDa recombinant human hnRNP A2/B1 were over-expressed and purified, then sequenced with MALDI-TOF- TOF mass spectrometry. Western blotting and ELISA were applied to detect serum reactivity against hnRNP A2/B1 respectively. The results demonstrate that hnRNP A2/B1 is an autoantigen of BD in Han Chinese population. PMID:25925770

  9. A 2A2<--X 2B1 absorption and Raman spectra of the OClO molecule: A three-dimensional time-dependent wave packet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhigang; Lou, Nanquan; Nyman, Gunnar

    2005-02-01

    Time-dependent wave packet calculations of the (A 2A2←X 2B1) absorption and Raman spectra of the OClO molecule are reported. The Fourier grid Hamiltonian method in three dimensions is employed. The X 2B1 ground state ab initio potential energy surface reported by Peterson [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 8864 (1998)] is used together with his corresponding A 2A2 state surface or the revised surface of the A 2A2 state by Xie and Guo [Chem. Phys. Lett. 307, 109 (1999)]. Radau coordinates are used to describe the vibrations of a nonrotating OClO molecule. The split-operator method combined with fast Fourier transform is applied to propagate the wave function. We find that the ab initio A 2A2 potential energy surface better reproduces the detailed structures of the absorption spectrum at long wavelength, while the revised surface of the A 2A2 state, consistent with the work of Xie and Guo, better reproduces the overall shape and the energies of the vibrational levels. Both surfaces of the A 2A2 state can reasonably reproduce the experimental Raman spectra but neither does so in detail for the numerical model employed in the present work.

  10. Novel role of hnRNP-A2/B1 in modulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cho, See-Wun; Suzuki, Ken-ichi; Miura, Yoshiaki; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Nose, Masato; Iwata, Hisato; Kim, Eun-Young

    2015-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is responsible for susceptibility to its ligand-dependent responses. However, the effect of non-AHR factors is less clear. To explore the non-AHR factors, we used two mouse strains with different AHR genetic variants, namely C3H/lpr and MRL/lpr strains with Ala and Val as the 375th amino acid residue, respectively. To assess the contribution of AHR alone, COS-7 cells transiently expressing AHR from each strain were treated with 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE)-driven reporter gene activities were measured. FICZ-EC50 values for the C3H/lpr and MRL/lpr AHR-mediated transactivation were 0.023 and 0.046 nM, respectively, indicating a similar susceptibility in both AHR genotypes. In contrast, C3H/lpr AHR was fourfold more sensitive to TCDD than MRL/lpr AHR. By a pull-down assay using a XRE-containing PCR product as bait and the hepatic nuclear extracts of both FICZ-treated mouse strains, we identified two interacting proteins as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP-A2) and its splicing variant (hnRNP-A2b). Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the AHR interaction with hnRNP-A2/B1. When hnRNP-A2 was co-expressed with the MRL/lpr or C3H/lpr AHR in COS-7, FICZ treatment decreased EC50 to about threefold in both AHR genotypes, compared with EC50 in AHR alone. Similarly, hnRNP-A2b co-expression also lowered the FICZ-EC50 values. In TCDD-treated COS-7, responses depended on the AHR genotype; while no change in TCDD-EC50 was observed for C3H/lpr AHR when hnRNP-A2 was co-expressed, the value was reduced to nearly tenfold for MRL/lpr AHR. Co-transfection with hnRNP-A2b attenuated the AHR sensitivity to TCDD. In conclusion, the hnRNP-A2/B1 interacting with AHR may be a modulator of the AHR ligand sensitivity.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA copy number and hnRNP A2/B1 protein: biomarkers for direct exposure of benzene.

    PubMed

    Eom, Ha-Young; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Hwan-Young; Han, Dong-Kyun; Baek, Hee-Jo; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Moon, Jai Dong; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook; Kook, Hoon; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2011-12-01

    The present study was performed to identify biomarkers for exposure of benzene in blood cells and hematopoietic tissues. Peripheral mononuclear cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and leukemia cell lines were cultured in RPMI 1640 media with the addition of 0, 1, and 10 mM of benzene. Hydrogen peroxide was measured using an enzyme immunoassay. Mitochondrial mass, membrane potential, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number were measured using MitoTracker Green/Red probes, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) technology were performed to identify protein markers. The mitochondrial contents and membrane potentials were dramatically increased after three weeks of direct benzene exposure. The hydrogen peroxide level increased significantly after two weeks of treatment with benzene (4.4 ± 1.9 µM/mg protein) compared to the non-benzene treatment group (1.2 ± 1.0; p = 0.001). The mtDNA copy number gradually increased after exposure to benzene. Numerous protein markers showed significant aberrant expression after exposure to benzene. Among them, the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2/B1 was markedly decreased after exposure to benzene. Thus, increased mitochondrial mass, mtDNA copy number, and the hnRNP A2/B1 protein were biomarkers for benzene-related toxicity and hematotoxicity.

  12. New hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotyping system that allows for identification of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4, 5a, and 6a.

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, O; Mizokami, M; Wu, R R; Saleh, M G; Ohba, K; Orito, E; Mukaide, M; Williams, R; Lau, J Y

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on whether different hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes are associated with different profiles of pathogenicity, infectivity, and response to antiviral therapy. The establishment of a simple and precise genotyping system for HCV is essential to address these issues. A new genotyping system based on PCR of the core region with genotype-specific PCR primers for the determination of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4, 5a, and 6a was developed. A total of 607 samples (379 from Japan, 63 from the United States, 53 from Korea, 35 from Taiwan, 32 from China, 20 from Hong Kong, 15 from Australia, 6 from Egypt, 3 from Bangladesh, and 1 from South Africa) were tested by both the assay of Okamoto et al. (H. Okamoto, Y. Sugiyama, S. Okada, K. Kurai, Y. Akahane, Y. Sugai, T. Tanaka, K. Sato, F. Tsuda, Y. Miyamura, and M. Mayumi, J. Gen. Virol. 73:673-679, 1992) and this new genotyping system. Comparison of the results showed concordant results for 539 samples (88.8%). Of the 68 samples with discordant results, the nucleotide sequences of the HCV isolates were determined in 23, and their genotypes were determined by molecular evolutionary analysis. In all 23 samples, the assignment of genotype by our new genotyping system was correct. This genotyping system may be useful for large-scale determination of HCV genotypes in clinical studies. PMID:8968908

  13. Thiomethylstilbenes as inhibitors of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 activities.

    PubMed

    Mikstacka, Renata; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda; Wieczorek, Marcin; Sobiak, Stanislaw

    2008-06-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a natural stilbene derivative occurring in grapes, peanuts and red wine. Its chemopreventive action has been established in studies on animal models. Recently, numerous classes of compounds with stilbene backbone have been investigated for their biological activity concerning cancer prevention; e. g. resveratrol methyl ethers appeared to be specific and potent inhibitors of cytochromes P450 (CYP) family 1 involved in the activation of procarcinogens. Since the replacement of the 4'-hydroxyl with a thiomethyl group is supposed to reduce toxicity of stilbene derivatives, the purpose of this study was the synthesis and evaluation of a series of 4-thiomethyl-trans-stilbene derivatives differing in a number and position of additional methoxy groups. Their inhibitory potency toward human recombinant CYPs: CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 have been studied and compared with the effect of resveratrol and its analogues. Among compounds tested, 2-methoxy-4'-thiomethyl-trans-stilbene and 3-methoxy-4'-thiomethyl-trans-stilbene demonstrated the most potent and selective inhibitory effect on CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 activities. The results of our study indicate that modification of stilbene derivatives with thiomethyl group may influence the selectivity and inhibitory potency of these compounds toward P450 isozymes. Thus, it should be considered in developing new chemopreventive agents based on their mechanism of action.

  14. Immunogenetic profile of psoriasis vulgaris: association with haplotypes A2,B13,Cw6,DR7,DQA1*0201 and A1,B17,Cw6,DR7,DQA1*0201.

    PubMed

    Ikaheimo, I; Silvennoinen-Kassinen, S; Karvonen, J; Jarvinen, T; Tiilikainen, A

    1996-02-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a skin disease with an immunological and genetic background present in 1-3% of the population. We studied the genetic susceptibility to psoriasis vulgaris in Finns with serological HLA typing and genomic HLA class II typing of the DQ and DP loci to evaluate the risk of developing psoriasis. The haplotypes most frequently distinguishing between psoriatics and controls were those that carried Cw6 (P < 10(-8)), DQA1*0201 (P = 9.3 x 10(-6)) and DR7 (P = 3.9 x 10(-5)). The two most frequent marker haplotypes were A2,B13,Cw6,DR7, DQA1*0201 and A1,B17,Cw6,DR7,DQA1*0201, which were not found among the control subjects. A deficit of haplotype B8,DR3,DQ2 (2 out of 124 in the patients versus 15 out of 106 in the controls, P = 1.5 x 10(-4)) was found, and this was in accordance with a slightly decreased frequency of DQA1*0501 (P = 3.1 x 10(-2)), which was usually linked with this haplotype. These results stimulate the research for a genetic resistance factor in psoriasis. Thus, this report sheds further light on the immunogenetic background of psoriasis in Finland. We conclude that the inheritance of psoriasis has a polygenic mode, in which the Cw6,DR7,DQA1*0201 combination seems to be important (P = 7.5 x 10(-7), relative risk 24.4, aetiological factor 0.29).

  15. 26 CFR 1.509(a)-2 - Exclusion for certain organizations described in section 170(b)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... United States. (b) Medical research organizations. In order to qualify under section 509(a)(1) as a medical research organization described in section 170(b)(1)(A)(iii), an organization must meet the... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Exclusion for certain organizations described...

  16. 26 CFR 1.509(a)-2 - Exclusion for certain organizations described in section 170(b)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... United States. (b) Medical research organizations. In order to qualify under section 509(a)(1) as a medical research organization described in section 170(b)(1)(A)(iii), an organization must meet the... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Exclusion for certain organizations described...

  17. AB167. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) caused by mutations in the CYP21A2 and CYP11B1 gene of Vietnamese children patients

    PubMed Central

    Le, Bac Viet; Nguyen, Thi Kim Lien; Tran, Phuong Thao; Nguyen, Thu Hien; Nguyen, Huy Hoang

    2015-01-01

    21-hydroxylase (CYP21A2) and 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1) are two important enzymes catalyzing conversion of adrenal and steroid hormone biosynthesis. While CYP11B1 only participates in cortisol synthesis pathway, CYP21A2 catalyzes conversion of both cortisol and aldosterone. Mutations in these two genes lead to congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) which is a genetic disease resulting from autosomal recessive traits. The typical manifestations of this disease are virilization, salting loss, dehydration, hypertension and even gonad deformation in severe female inborn patients. Mutations in the CYP21A2 gene which occupy about 90% cases are the main cause contributing in CAH meanwhile CYP11B1 gene mutants accounting for just 5-8% cases are the second main cause of this disease. In our study, entire CYP21A2 and CYP11B1 gene were amplified by PCR and directly sequenced to detect mutations. In further research, the effect of mutations was predicted and evaluated by protein 3D modelling analysis and enzyme assay in COS-1 cell line. As the results, three novel mutations (IVS6+5G>T, R51K and Y395X) in the CYP11B1 gene were detected in Vietnamese children diagnosed suffering from CAH. In terms of CYP21A2 gene, three mutations including 30 kb deletion, I2 splicing and E246 frameshift were found and also described previously. In conclusion, the results of our study have considerable significance in early diagnosis through understanding the relationship between genotype and phenotype of patients. Furthermore, mutagenesis detection and analysis could assist doctors bring out genetic consultants for patients as well as their parents.

  18. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 1B1, 1A1 and 1A2 by antigenotoxic compounds, purpurin and alizarin.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eizo; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Kamataki, Tetsuya; Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Negishi, Tomoe

    2002-10-31

    Recently we have shown that anthraquinone food pigments such as purpurin and alizarin suppress the genotoxic activities of several mutagens including heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Drosophila DNA repair test and in the Ames test. To investigate the mechanism of this inhibition, we have now examined the effects of these anthraquinone pigments on enzymes that metabolize xenobiotics. The activities of eight human recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes were measured in the presence of purpurin, alizarin or carminic acid. Purpurin and alizarin strongly inhibited the activities of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1, and weakly suppressed those of CYP2A6 and CYP2E1 in a dose-dependent manner, but did not inhibit those of CYP2C19, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. Carminic acid did not affect the activities of any CYPs tested. CYP1B1 was the most strongly affected CYP molecule by purpurin and alizarin among CYPs examined in this study. From kinetic analysis, it was shown that the inhibition by purpurin on CYP1B1 was both competitive and non-competitive, and that by alizarin was competitive. The values of slopes obtained from Lineweaver-Burk plots are proportional to the square of purpurin concentration. This observation suggests that two molecules of purpurin are interacting with one molecule of CYP1B1. The K(m) value of CYP1B1 was 11 microM, and the K(i) value of purpurin and alizarin against CYP1B1 was 0.7 microM(2) and 0.5 microM, respectively. We also examined the effects of these pigments on the mutagenicities of MeIQx and B[a]P in the Ames test, using Salmonella typhimurium TA1538 co-expressing each form of human CYP and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (OR). The mutagenicity of MeIQx in TA1538 1A2/OR or 1B1/OR was suppressed by purpurin and alizarin but not by carminic acid. Purpurin also reduced the mutagenicity of B[a]P in TA1538 1A1/OR or 1B1/OR. These results suggest that the antigenotoxic activities of purpurin and alizarin can be explained by

  19. Genetic modification of potato against microbial diseases: in vitro and in planta activity of a dermaseptin B1 derivative, MsrA2.

    PubMed

    Osusky, Milan; Osuska, Lubica; Kay, William; Misra, Santosh

    2005-08-01

    Dermaseptin B1 is a potent cationic antimicrobial peptide found in skin secretions of the arboreal frog Phyllomedusa bicolor. A synthetic derivative of dermaseptin B1, MsrA2 (N-Met-dermaseptin B1), elicited strong antimicrobial activities against various phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria in vitro. To assess its potential for plant protection, MsrA2 was expressed at low levels (1-5 microg/g of fresh tissue) in the transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cv. Desiree. Stringent challenges of these transgenic potato plants with a variety of highly virulent fungal phytopathogens--Alternaria, Cercospora, Fusarium, Phytophthora, Pythium, Rhizoctonia and Verticillium species--and with the bacterial pathogen Erwinia carotovora demonstrated that the plants had an unusually broad-spectrum and powerful resistance to infection. MsrA2 profoundly protected both plants and tubers from diseases such as late blight, dry rot and pink rot and markedly extended the storage life of tubers. Due to these properties in planta, MsrA2 is proposed as an ideal antimicrobial peptide candidate to significantly increase resistance to phytopathogens and improve quality in a variety of crops worldwide with the potential to obviate fungicides and facilitate storage under difficult conditions.

  20. Discovery of Western European R1b1a2 Y chromosome variants in 1000 genomes project data: an online community approach.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Richard A; Magoon, Gregory; Reynolds, David F; Krahn, Thomas; Tilroe, Vincent O; Op den Velde Boots, Peter M; Grierson, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    The authors have used an online community approach, and tools that were readily available via the Internet, to discover genealogically and therefore phylogenetically relevant Y-chromosome polymorphisms within core haplogroup R1b1a2-L11/S127 (rs9786076). Presented here is the analysis of 135 unrelated L11 derived samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. We were able to discover new variants and build a much more complex phylogenetic relationship for L11 sub-clades. Many of the variants were further validated using PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The identification of these new variants will help further the understanding of population history including patrilineal migrations in Western and Central Europe where R1b1a2 is the most frequent haplogroup. The fine-grained phylogenetic tree we present here will also help to refine historical genetic dating studies. Our findings demonstrate the power of citizen science for analysis of whole genome sequence data. PMID:22911832

  1. Predicting drug metabolism by CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1: insights from MetaSite, molecular docking and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Pragyan, Preeti; Kesharwani, Siddharth S; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Rathod, Vijay; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2014-11-01

    Recently, CYP1 enzymes are documented for selective metabolism of anticancer leads in cancer prevention and/or progression. Elucidation of specificity of substrates/inhibitors of CYP1 isoforms plays a vital role in design of more selective and potent anticancer leads. However, an area of concern is the broad range of substrate specificities and planar nature of substrates with limited dataset which makes it difficult to predict their site of metabolism (SOM) accurately. In the present study, various models for prediction of site of metabolism in case of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 substrates were developed using MetaSite, molecular docking, and quantum chemical descriptors. The predictive accuracy of MetaSite, molecular docking, and quantum chemical descriptors in identifying experimental site of metabolism was analyzed at three levels; top rank, top three ranks, and top five ranks. Two quantum chemical descriptors, chemical hardness and local nucleophilicity are proposed for the prediction of CYP-mediated SOM for the first time. The predictive accuracy shown by chemical hardness at top three ranks was 83.3, 85.7, and 84.6 % for CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1, respectively, whereas local nucleophilicity gave poor predictions of 50, 42.8, and 46.2 %, respectively. The predictability of chemical hardness descriptor outperformed at all three levels of ranks for CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1. Hence, we propose chemical hardness as an useful quantum chemical descriptor for prediction of metabolically vulnerable prints in CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 mediated metabolism and support the optimization efforts in drug discovery and development programs.

  2. Vavilosides A1/A2-B1/B2, new furostane glycosides from the bulbs of Allium vavilovii with cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Zolfaghari, Behzad; Sadeghi, Masoud; Troiano, Raffaele; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2013-04-01

    A phytochemical analysis of the bulbs of Allium vavilovii M. Pop. & Vved. was attained for the first time extensively, affording to the isolation of four new furostanol saponins, named vavilosides A1/A2-B1/B2 (1a/b-2a/2b), as two couple of isomers in equilibrium, together with ascalonicoside A1/A2 (3a/3b) and 22-O-methyl ascalonicoside A1/A2 (4a/4b), previously isolated from shallot, Allium ascalonicum. High concentrations of kaempferol, kaempferide, and kaempferol 4(I)-glucoside were also isolated. The chemical structures of the new compounds, established through a combination of extensive nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry and chemical analyses, were identified as (25R)-furost-5(6)-en-1β,3β,22α,26-tetraol 1-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl 26-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (vaviloside A1), (25R)-furost-5(6)-en-1β,3β,22β,26-tetraol 1-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl 26-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (vaviloside A2), (25R)-furost-5(6)-en-1β,3β,22α,26-tetraol 1-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl 26-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (vaviloside B1), (25R)-furost-5(6)-en-1β,3β,22β,26-tetraol 1-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-d-xylopyranosyl 26-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (vaviloside B2). The isolated saponins showed cytotoxic activity on J-774, murine monocyte/macrophage, and WEHI-164, murine fibrosarcoma, cell lines with the following rank: vaviloside B1/B2>ascalonicoside A1/A2>vaviloside A1/A2. PMID:23415085

  3. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yimeng; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun

    2014-01-20

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation. - Highlights: • Cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza viral protein NS1. • hnRNP A2/B1 suppresses the levels of NS1 protein, vRNA and mRNA in infected cells. • hnRNP A2/B1 protein is associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits the nuclear export of NS1 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits influenza virus replication.

  4. Enzymatic characterization of in vitro-expressed Baikal seal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, 1A2, and 1B1: implication of low metabolic potential of CYP1A2 uniquely evolved in aquatic mammals.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hisato; Yamaguchi, Keisuke; Takeshita, Yoko; Kubota, Akira; Hirakawa, Shusaku; Isobe, Tomohiko; Hirano, Masashi; Kim, Eun-Young

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the catalytic function of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1 enzymes in aquatic mammals. Alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (AROD) activities including methoxy- (MROD), ethoxy- (EROD), pentoxy- (PROD), and benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylation (BROD), and 2- and 4-hydroxylation activities of 17β-estradiol (E2) were measured by using yeast-expressed Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica) CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 proteins. Heterologous protein expression of the Baikal seal CYP1s (bsCYP1s) in yeast microsomes was confirmed by reduced CO-difference spectra and immunoblotting. Heterologously expressed human CYP1 enzyme (hCYP1) activities were simultaneously measured and compared with those of bsCYP1 isozymes. Recombinant bsCYP1A1 protein showed the highest Vmax of EROD, followed by MROD, PROD, and BROD, similar to that of hCYP1A1. Vmax/Km ratios of all AROD activities catalyzed by bsCYP1A1 were lower than those catalyzed by hCYP1A1, suggesting less potential for AROD by bsCYP1A1. Enzymatic assays for bsCYP1A2 showed no or minimal AROD activities, while hCYP1A2 displayed MROD and EROD activities. bsCYP1B1 showed an AROD profile (EROD>BROD>MROD>PROD) similar to that of hCYP1B1; however, Vmax/Km ratios of all AROD activities by bsCYP1B1 were higher. Yeast microsomes containing bsCYP1A1 and 1B1 and hCYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 metabolized E2 to 2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2, whereas bsCYP1A2 showed no such activity. Comparison of 4- and 2-hydroxylations of E2 by CYP1As suggests that bsCYP1A1, hCYP1A1, and 1A2 preferentially catalyze 2- rather than 4-hydroxylation. As for CYP1B1, the Vmax/Km ratios suggest that both Baikal seal and human CYPs catalyze 4- rather than 2-hydroxylation. Interspecies comparison showed that bsCYP1B1 has higher metabolic potencies for both E2 hydroxylations than does hCYP1B1, whereas the activity of bsCYP1A1 was lower than that of hCYP1A1. Messenger RNA expression levels of bsCYP1s in the liver of Baikal seals indicated that bsCYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes contributed to 16

  5. A widespread sequence-specific mRNA decay pathway mediated by hnRNPs A1 and A2/B1.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Rene; Simkin, Alfred; Floss, Doreen; Patel, Ravi; Fogarty, Elizabeth A; Scheller, Jürgen; Grimson, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) specify post-transcriptional fates of mammalian messenger RNAs (mRNAs), yet knowledge of the underlying sequences and mechanisms is largely incomplete. Here, we identify two related novel 3' UTR motifs in mammals that specify transcript degradation. These motifs are interchangeable and active only within 3' UTRs, where they are often preferentially conserved; furthermore, they are found in hundreds of transcripts, many encoding regulatory proteins. We found that degradation occurs via mRNA deadenylation, mediated by the CCR4-NOT complex. We purified trans factors that recognize the motifs and identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) A1 and A2/B1, which are required for transcript degradation, acting in a previously unknown manner. We used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to confirm hnRNP A1 and A2/B1 motif-dependent roles genome-wide, profiling cells depleted of these factors singly and in combination. Interestingly, the motifs are most active within the distal portion of 3' UTRs, suggesting that their role in gene regulation can be modulated by alternative processing, resulting in shorter 3' UTRs.

  6. A widespread sequence-specific mRNA decay pathway mediated by hnRNPs A1 and A2/B1

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Rene; Simkin, Alfred; Floss, Doreen; Patel, Ravi; Fogarty, Elizabeth A.; Scheller, Jürgen; Grimson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) specify post-transcriptional fates of mammalian messenger RNAs (mRNAs), yet knowledge of the underlying sequences and mechanisms is largely incomplete. Here, we identify two related novel 3′ UTR motifs in mammals that specify transcript degradation. These motifs are interchangeable and active only within 3′ UTRs, where they are often preferentially conserved; furthermore, they are found in hundreds of transcripts, many encoding regulatory proteins. We found that degradation occurs via mRNA deadenylation, mediated by the CCR4–NOT complex. We purified trans factors that recognize the motifs and identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) A1 and A2/B1, which are required for transcript degradation, acting in a previously unknown manner. We used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to confirm hnRNP A1 and A2/B1 motif-dependent roles genome-wide, profiling cells depleted of these factors singly and in combination. Interestingly, the motifs are most active within the distal portion of 3′ UTRs, suggesting that their role in gene regulation can be modulated by alternative processing, resulting in shorter 3′ UTRs. PMID:27151978

  7. Identification of hnRNPs K, L and A2/B1 as candidate proteins involved in the nutritional regulation of mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Brian N.; Walsh, Callee M.; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Timperman, Aaron T.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Nutrient regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) expression occurs through changes in the rate of splicing of G6PD pre-mRNA. This posttranscriptional mechanism accounts for the 12- to 15-fold increase in G6PD expression in livers of mice that were starved and then refed a high-carbohydrate diet. Regulation of G6PD pre-mRNA splicing requires a cis-acting element in exon 12 of the pre-mRNA. Using RNA probes to exon 12 and nuclear extracts from livers of mice that were starved or refed, proteins of 60 kDa and 37 kDa were detected bound to nucleotides 65–79 of exon 12 and this binding was decreased by 50% with nuclear extracts from refed mice. The proteins were identified as hnRNP K, and L, and hnRNP A2/B1 by LC-MS/MS. The decrease in binding of these proteins to exon 12 during refeeding was not accompanied by a decrease in the total amount of these proteins in total nuclear extract. HnRNPs K, L and A2/B1 have known roles in the regulation of mRNA splicing. The decrease in binding of these proteins during treatments that increase G6PD expression is consistent with a role for these proteins in the inhibition of G6PD mRNA splicing. PMID:17095106

  8. 76 FR 69707 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...: 124 M1151A1-B1 Up-Armored High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs) and 99 M1152A1-B2 Up... requested a possible sale of 124 M1151A1-B1 Up-Armored High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs... and light combat vehicle capability enabling the Royal Saudi Land Forces (RSLF) to rapidly engage...

  9. Higher gene expression of CYP1A2, 2B1 and 2D2 in the brain of female compared with male rats.

    PubMed

    Nagai, K; Fukuno, S; Suzuki, H; Konishi, H

    2016-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) in the brain plays an essential role in the local metabolism of various compounds, including clinically used drugs, toxins, and endogenous substances. In the present study, we compared the expression profiles of mRNAs for several CYP subtypes in the brain between male and female rats. The expression of CYP1A2, CYP2B1, and CYP2D2 in females was significantly higher than that in males. On the other hand, the expression level of the other CYP subtypes examined in the male brain was similar to that in the female brain. These results strongly suggest that marked gender differences exist in the expression profiles of some CYP subtypes in rat brain. PMID:27455552

  10. Higher gene expression of CYP1A2, 2B1 and 2D2 in the brain of female compared with male rats.

    PubMed

    Nagai, K; Fukuno, S; Suzuki, H; Konishi, H

    2016-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) in the brain plays an essential role in the local metabolism of various compounds, including clinically used drugs, toxins, and endogenous substances. In the present study, we compared the expression profiles of mRNAs for several CYP subtypes in the brain between male and female rats. The expression of CYP1A2, CYP2B1, and CYP2D2 in females was significantly higher than that in males. On the other hand, the expression level of the other CYP subtypes examined in the male brain was similar to that in the female brain. These results strongly suggest that marked gender differences exist in the expression profiles of some CYP subtypes in rat brain.

  11. Differential cellular expression of organic anion transporting peptides OATP1A2 and OATP2B1 in the human retina and brain: implications for carrier-mediated transport of neuropeptides and neurosteriods in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Vavricka, Stephan R; Meier, Peter J; Stieger, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are polyspecific organic anion transporters, which are expressed in the blood-brain barrier, the choroid plexus, and other organs. The physiologic function of OATPs in extrahepatic tissues remains ambiguous. In rat retina, members of the OATP family are expressed. We therefore investigated the human retina for the expression of OATP1A2 and OATP2B1 and extended the study to human brain. Furthermore, we searched for peptide neurotransmitters as novel OATP substrates. OATP1A2 displayed a broad expression pattern in human retina as assessed by immunofluorescence localization. It is expressed in photoreceptor bodies and somas of amacrine cells. OATP1B2 expression is restricted to the inner nuclear layer and to the inner plexiform layer. Using paraffin sections from human cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus, OATP1A2 was localized to neurons and neuronal processes, while OATP2B1 is expressed in endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide were identified as substrates for OATP1A2 and OATP2B1. Double-labeling immunofluorescence of human retina demonstrated the presence of substance P and of vasoactive intestinal peptides in neurons expressing OATP1A2 and OATP2B1, respectively. The expression of OATP1A2 and OATP2B1 in retinal neurons implies a role of these transporters in the reuptake of peptide neurotransmitters released from retinal neurons. The abundant expression of OATP1A2 in brain neurons points to the possibility that OATP1A2 could be involved in the homeostasis of neurosteroids. The high expression of OATP2B1 in brain capillaries supports an important function of OATPs in substance penetration across the blood-brain barrier.

  12. Design synthesis and evaluation of the inhibitory selectivity of novel trans-resveratrol analogues on human recombinant CYP1A1 CYP1A2 and CYP1B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of trans-stilbene derivatives containing 4’-thiomethyl substituent were synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activities on human recombinant cytochrome P450(s): CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1. CYP1A2-related metabolism of stilbene derivatives was estimated by using NADPH oxidation assay. A...

  13. The lipid flippase heterodimer ATP8B1-CDC50A is essential for surface expression of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (SLC10A2/ASBT) in intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    van der Mark, Vincent A; de Waart, D Rudi; Ho-Mok, Kam S; Tabbers, Merit M; Voogt, Heleen W; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Knisely, A S; Paulusma, Coen C

    2014-12-01

    Deficiency of the phospholipid flippase ATPase, aminophospholipid transporter, class I, type 8B, member 1 (ATP8B1) causes progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1) and benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (BRIC1). Apart from cholestasis, many patients also suffer from diarrhea of yet unknown etiology. Here we have studied the hypothesis that intestinal ATP8B1 deficiency results in bile salt malabsorption as a possible cause of PFIC1/BRIC1 diarrhea. Bile salt transport was studied in ATP8B1-depleted intestinal Caco-2 cells. Apical membrane localization was studied by a biotinylation approach. Fecal bile salt and electrolyte contents were analyzed in stool samples of PFIC1 patients, of whom some had undergone biliary diversion or liver transplantation. Bile salt uptake by the apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter solute carrier family 10 (sodium/bile acid cotransporter), member 2 (SLC10A2) was strongly impaired in ATP8B1-depleted Caco-2 cells. The reduced SLC10A2 activity coincided with strongly reduced apical membrane localization, which was caused by impaired apical membrane insertion of SLC10A2. Moreover, we show that endogenous ATP8B1 exists in a functional heterodimer with transmembrane protein 30A (CDC50A) in Caco-2 cells. Analyses of stool samples of post-transplant PFIC1 patients demonstrated that bile salt content was not changed, whereas sodium and chloride concentrations were elevated and potassium levels were decreased. The ATP8B1-CDC50A heterodimer is essential for the apical localization of SLC10A2 in Caco-2 cells. Diarrhea in PFIC1/BRIC1 patients has a secretory origin to which SLC10A2 deficiency may contribute. This results in elevated luminal bile salt concentrations and consequent enhanced electrolyte secretion and/or reduced electrolyte resorption.

  14. Active Site Mutations as a Suitable Tool Contributing to Explain a Mechanism of Aristolochic Acid I Nitroreduction by Cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Milichovský, Jan; Bárta, František; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Frei, Eva; Stiborová, Marie; Martínek, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acid I (AAI) is a plant drug found in Aristolochia species that causes aristolochic acid nephropathy, Balkan endemic nephropathy and their associated urothelial malignancies. AAI is activated via nitroreduction producing genotoxic N-hydroxyaristolactam, which forms DNA adducts. The major enzymes responsible for the reductive bioactivation of AAI are NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase and cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1A2. Using site-directed mutagenesis we investigated the possible mechanisms of CYP1A1/1A2/1B1-catalyzed AAI nitroreduction. Molecular modelling predicted that the hydroxyl groups of serine122/threonine124 (Ser122/Thr124) amino acids in the CYP1A1/1A2-AAI binary complexes located near to the nitro group of AAI, are mechanistically important as they provide the proton required for the stepwise reduction reaction. In contrast, the closely related CYP1B1 with no hydroxyl group containing residues in its active site is ineffective in catalyzing AAI nitroreduction. In order to construct an experimental model, mutant forms of CYP1A1 and 1A2 were prepared, where Ser122 and Thr124 were replaced by Ala (CYP1A1-S122A) and Val (CYP1A2-T124V), respectively. Similarly, a CYP1B1 mutant was prepared in which Ala133 was replaced by Ser (CYP1B1-A133S). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed using a quickchange approach. Wild and mutated forms of these enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and isolated enzymes characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy to verify correct protein folding. Their catalytic activity was confirmed with CYP1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 marker substrates. Using 32P-postlabelling we determined the efficiency of wild-type and mutant forms of CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 reconstituted with NADPH:CYP oxidoreductase to bioactivate AAI to reactive intermediates forming covalent DNA adducts. The S122A and T124V mutations in CYP1A1 and 1A2, respectively, abolished the efficiency of CYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes to generate AAI-DNA adducts. In contrast

  15. Suppression of HPV-16 late L1 5′-splice site SD3632 by binding of hnRNP D proteins and hnRNP A2/B1 to upstream AUAGUA RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoze; Johansson, Cecilia; Glahder, Jacob; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Schwartz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) 5′-splice site SD3632 is used exclusively to produce late L1 mRNAs. We identified a 34-nt splicing inhibitory element located immediately upstream of HPV-16 late 5′-splice site SD3632. Two AUAGUA motifs located in these 34 nt inhibited SD3632. Two nucleotide substitutions in each of the HPV-16 specific AUAGUA motifs alleviated splicing inhibition and induced late L1 mRNA production from episomal forms of the HPV-16 genome in primary human keratinocytes. The AUAGUA motifs bind specifically not only to the heterogeneous nuclear RNP (hnRNP) D family of RNA-binding proteins including hnRNP D/AUF, hnRNP DL and hnRNP AB but also to hnRNP A2/B1. Knock-down of these proteins induced HPV-16 late L1 mRNA expression, and overexpression of hnRNP A2/B1, hnRNP AB, hnRNP DL and the two hnRNP D isoforms hnRNP D37 and hnRNP D40 further suppressed L1 mRNA expression. This inhibition may allow HPV-16 to hide from the immune system and establish long-term persistent infections with enhanced risk at progressing to cancer. There is an inverse correlation between expression of hnRNP D proteins and hnRNP A2/B1 and HPV-16 L1 production in the cervical epithelium, as well as in cervical cancer, supporting the conclusion that hnRNP D proteins and A2/B1 inhibit HPV-16 L1 mRNA production. PMID:24013563

  16. 75 FR 910 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CF34-1A, -3A, -3A1, -3A2, -3B, and -3B1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ...-42-AD; Amendment 39-16144; AD 2009-26-09] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric... existing airworthiness directive (AD) for General Electric Company (GE) CF34-1A, -3A, -3A1, -3A2, -3B, and... General Electric Company via Lockheed Martin Technology Services, 10525 Chester Road, Suite C,...

  17. Polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 genes CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP11A1, CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and colorectal cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Bethke, Lara; Webb, Emily; Sellick, Gabrielle; Rudd, Matthew; Penegar, Stephen; Withey, Laura; Qureshi, Mobshra; Houlston, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes have the potential to affect colorectal cancer (CRC) risk by determining the genotoxic impact of exogenous carcinogens and levels of sex hormones. Methods To investigate if common variants of CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP11A1, CYP17A1 and CYP19A1 influence CRC risk we genotyped 2,575 CRC cases and 2,707 controls for 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have not previously been shown to have functional consequence within these genes. Results There was a suggestion of increased risk, albeit insignificant after correction for multiple testing, of CRC for individuals homozygous for CYP1B1 rs162558 and heterozygous for CYP1A2 rs2069522 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03–1.80 and OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.00–1.79 respectively). Conclusion This study provides some support for polymorphic variation in CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 playing a role in CRC susceptibility. PMID:17615053

  18. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 2; WLE Small-Scale Fiberglass Panel Flat Multi-Layer Targets A-1, A-2, and B-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Targets A-1, A-2, and B-2 was to study hypervelocity impacts through multi-layered panels simulating Whipple shields on spacecraft. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  19. Vitamin B1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Flash 6 » Sound: No High score: Yes Credits » Chicken Farm Game - Why do we need vitamin B1? - ... save lives. You have one minute to feed chickens suffering from beriberi with the correct food to ...

  20. [Vitamin B1 (thiamine)].

    PubMed

    Guilland, Jean-Claude

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin B1 (or thiamine) plays a key role in energy production from glucose. Since the main fuel of the nervous system is glucose, thiamine deficiency causes severe neurological symptoms. The biological exploration of vitamin B1 status is based on the measurement of thiamine pyrophosphate concentration or of the activity of a thiamine-dependent enzyme, transketolase, in erythrocytes. Severe deficiency states can be observed in chronic alcoholics, after protracted vomiting during pregnancy and after bariatric surgery. Mild deficiencies are common in the general population, but their clinical consequences are still unclear. PMID:24298824

  1. Increased exposure of vitamin A by Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat extract in rat was not via induction of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP2B1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Pan, Xian; Chen, Guanming; Li, Jia; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong; Jin, Shi; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guangji

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat (CM) extract on the pharmacokinetics of retinol and activities of cytochrome P450s (CYP450s) related to retinoid metabolism. Rats were treated with CM extract for 15 d. Plasma concentrations of retinol were measured following oral administration of retinol (45 mg/kg). Basal levels of retinol and retinoic acid in serum and liver were also measured. 7-Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity, phenacetin-O-deethylase activity, and 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activities were used to assay the activities of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP2B1 in hepatic microsomes of rats, respectively. Protein expressions of the 3 CYP450s were measured by western blot. Our studies demonstrated that CM extract dose-dependently increased basal level of retinol in serum. In pharmacokinetic experiment, CM extract dose-dependently increased plasma concentrations of retinol after oral administration of retinol to rats treated with CM extract. But activities and expressions of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP2B1 in hepatic microsomes of rats were also induced by CM extract.

  2. Avermectin B1

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Avermectin B1 ; CASRN 65195 - 55 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  3. Interleukin 18 augments growth ability via NF-κB and p38/ATF2 pathways by targeting cyclin B1, cyclin B2, cyclin A2, and Bcl-2 in BRL-3A rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihong; Pan, Cuiyun; Xu, Tiantian; Niu, Zhipeng; Ma, Chengkai; Xu, Cunshuan

    2015-05-25

    Interleukin 18 (IL-18) is a pleiotropic cytokine and capable of stimulating proliferation of certain cell types. Nonetheless, its effect on normal liver cells cultured remains unclear. In the present study, we discovered that IL-18 expression level was remarkably elevated at 3.3 and 8.6h after synchronized BRL-3A rat liver cells (G0 phase) re-entering the cell cycle. In addition, recombinant rat IL-18 (rrIL-18) at dosages 5-10 ng/ml increased the cell viability compared to untreated cells (with medium only) at 24 and 48 h (P<0.05). At the same time, the percentage of BrdU-labeling cells was also significantly increased (P<0.01). On the other hand, knockdown of IL-18 expression with short interference RNA (siRNA), the cell viability began to decline at 24h and significantly decreased compared to negative control (NC) at 48 and 72 h after transfection (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the number of cells in division phase (G2/M) was reduced in parallel. Further, after treatment with rrIL-18 (5 ng/ml), IL-18 and its receptor subunit IL-18Rα increased both at mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, the expression levels of adaptor molecule MyD88, transcription factor NF-κB and its downstream targets cyclin B1 and cyclin B2 were remarkably enhanced in BRL-3A cells stimulated by rrIL-18. Furthermore, transcription factor ATF2 and its targeted genes cyclin A2, Bcl-2 were also markedly increased after treatment with rrIL-18. These results demonstrated that IL-18 can augment cell proliferation via NF-κB and p38/ATF2 pathway by targeting cyclin B1, cyclin B2, cyclin A2 and Bcl-2 in BRL-3A rat liver cells.

  4. Induction of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, increased oxidative stress and inflammation in the lung and liver tissues of rats exposed to incense smoke.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tajamul; Al-Attas, Omar S; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Mohammed, Arif A; De Rosas, Edgard; Ibrahim, Shebl; Vinodson, Benjamin; Ansari, Mohammed G; El-Din, Khaled I Alam

    2014-06-01

    Incense smoke is increasingly being recognized as a potential environmental contaminant and is linked to malignant and non-malignant respiratory diseases. The detoxification of environmental contaminants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) involves the induction of cytochrome P-450 family enzymes (CYPs) by PAHs. However, the detoxification of PAHs also results in the generation of reactive and unstable intermediary metabolites which are implicated in the oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammation. It is unclear whether CYPs are similarly induced by incense smoke, which incidentally contains substantial amounts of PAHs. Here, we examined the impact of long-term incense smoke exposure on the induction of CYPs in male Wister Albino rats. Incense smoke exposure significantly induced the expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 mRNAs in both lung and liver tissues. The extent of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 induction was significantly higher in the liver compared to that in the lung, while that of CYP1A2 was greater in the lung than in liver. Incense smoke exposure also increased malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels in lung and liver tissues, and the catalase activity in the liver tissues to significant levels. Furthermore incense smoke exposure led to a marked increase in TNF-α and IL-4 levels. The data demonstrate for the first time the capacity of incense smoke to induce CYP1 family enzymes in the target and non-target tissues. Induction of CYPs increased oxidative stress and inflammation appear to be intimately linked to promote the carcinogenesis and health complications in people chronically exposed to incense smoke.

  5. Construction of HEK293 cells stably expressing wild-type organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1*1a) and variant OATP1B1*1b and OATP1B1*15.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Qu, B X; Chen, X L; Hu, H H; Jiang, H D; Yu, L S; Zhou, Q; Zeng, S

    2016-06-01

    A transgenic cell line stably expressing the human organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP1B1) was established. Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cell line stably expressing OATP1B1*1a sequence was amplified through PCR with the extracted total RNA as templates from human liver, then subcloned into the plasmid pMD19-T and verified by sequencing. OATP1B1*1b/OATP1B1*15 mutant sequences were obtained by site-directed mutation PCR with pMD19-T/ OATP1B1*1a as templates. The plasmids pcDNA3.1(+)/OATP1B1*1a, *1b and *15 were constructed and transfected into HEK293 cell line using Lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent. Several stable transfected clones were obtained after selection with G418. Using rosuvastatin as a probe substrate of OATP1B1, the intracellular rosuvastatin accumulation in HEK293 and HEK-OATP1B1*1a, *1b and *15 monoclone cells were validated by a ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. OATP1B1 mRNA and protein expression were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results from RT-PCR, rosuvastatin uptake and Western blot assay indicated that human OATP1B1 was highly expressed in transfected cells compared with controls. The HEK-293 cell lines stably expressing human OATP1B1-wild and variant (HEK-OATP1B1, *1b and *15) are potential models to study drug transport in vitro. PMID:27455553

  6. Construction of HEK293 cells stably expressing wild-type organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1*1a) and variant OATP1B1*1b and OATP1B1*15.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Qu, B X; Chen, X L; Hu, H H; Jiang, H D; Yu, L S; Zhou, Q; Zeng, S

    2016-06-01

    A transgenic cell line stably expressing the human organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP1B1) was established. Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cell line stably expressing OATP1B1*1a sequence was amplified through PCR with the extracted total RNA as templates from human liver, then subcloned into the plasmid pMD19-T and verified by sequencing. OATP1B1*1b/OATP1B1*15 mutant sequences were obtained by site-directed mutation PCR with pMD19-T/ OATP1B1*1a as templates. The plasmids pcDNA3.1(+)/OATP1B1*1a, *1b and *15 were constructed and transfected into HEK293 cell line using Lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent. Several stable transfected clones were obtained after selection with G418. Using rosuvastatin as a probe substrate of OATP1B1, the intracellular rosuvastatin accumulation in HEK293 and HEK-OATP1B1*1a, *1b and *15 monoclone cells were validated by a ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. OATP1B1 mRNA and protein expression were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results from RT-PCR, rosuvastatin uptake and Western blot assay indicated that human OATP1B1 was highly expressed in transfected cells compared with controls. The HEK-293 cell lines stably expressing human OATP1B1-wild and variant (HEK-OATP1B1, *1b and *15) are potential models to study drug transport in vitro.

  7. Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1): Serving as the prototype for the F2B-1 shipboard fighter, the XF2B-1 differed visually in having a pointed spinner and an unbalanced rudder. Like many aircraft of its day, the Boeing model 69 was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

  8. Boeing F3B-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Boeing F3B-1: While most Boeing F3B-1s served aboard the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers Lexington and Saratoga, this example flew in NACA hands at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in the late 1920's. Also known as the Boeing Model 77, the aircraft was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

  9. 76 FR 56637 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines Model IO-720-A1B Reciprocating Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Model IO-720-A1B Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... model IO-720-A1B Lycoming Engines reciprocating engines. This AD requires a crankshaft inspection...

  10. Vibrations of the low energy states of toluene (tilde X 1A1 and tilde A 1B2) and the toluene cation (tilde X 2B1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adrian M.; Green, Alistair M.; Tamé-Reyes, Victor M.; Wilton, Victoria H. K.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2013-04-01

    We commence by presenting an overview of the assignment of the vibrational frequencies of the toluene molecule in its ground (S0) state. The assignment given is in terms of a recently proposed nomenclature, which allows the ring-localized vibrations to be compared straightforwardly across different monosubstituted benzenes. The frequencies and assignments are based not only on a range of previous work, but also on calculated wavenumbers for both the fully hydrogenated (toluene-h8) and the deuterated-methyl group isotopologue (α3-toluene-d3), obtained from density functional theory (DFT), including artificial-isotope shifts. For the S1 state, one-colour resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy was employed, with the vibrational assignments also being based on previous work and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculated values; but also making use of the activity observed in two-colour zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. The ZEKE experiments were carried out employing a (1 + 1') ionization scheme, using various vibrational levels of the S1 state with an energy <630 cm-1 as intermediates; as such we only discuss in detail the assignment of the REMPI spectra at wavenumbers <700 cm-1, referring to the assignment of the ZEKE spectra concurrently. Comparison of the ZEKE spectra for the two toluene isotopologues, as well as with previously reported dispersed-fluorescence spectra, and with the results of DFT calculations, provide insight both into the assignment of the vibrations in the S1 and D0+ states, as well as the couplings between these vibrations. In particular, insight into the nature of a complicated Fermi resonance feature at ˜460 cm-1 in the S1 state is obtained, and Fermi resonances in the cation are identified. Finally, we compare activity observed in both REMPI and ZEKE spectroscopy for both toluene isotopologues with that for fluorobenzene and chlorobenzene.

  11. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a... pipelines, electric utilities and hydroelectric projects....

  12. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a... pipelines, electric utilities and hydroelectric projects....

  13. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a... pipelines, electric utilities and hydroelectric projects....

  14. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a... pipelines, electric utilities and hydroelectric projects....

  15. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a... pipelines, electric utilities and hydroelectric projects....

  16. B-1 AFT Nacelle Flow Visualization Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celniker, Robert

    1975-01-01

    A 2-month program was conducted to perform engineering evaluation and design tasks to prepare for visualization and photography of the airflow along the aft portion of the B-1 nacelles and nozzles during flight test. Several methods of visualizing the flow were investigated and compared with respect to cost, impact of the device on the flow patterns, suitability for use in the flight environment, and operability throughout the flight. Data were based on a literature search and discussions with the test personnel. Tufts were selected as the flow visualization device in preference to several other devices studied. A tuft installation pattern has been prepared for the right-hand aft nacelle area of B-1 air vehicle No.2. Flight research programs to develop flow visualization devices other than tufts for use in future testing are recommended. A design study was conducted to select a suitable motion picture camera, to select the camera location, and to prepare engineering drawings sufficient to permit installation of the camera. Ten locations on the air vehicle were evaluated before the selection of the location in the horizontal stabilizer actuator fairing. The considerations included cost, camera angle, available volume, environmental control, flutter impact, and interference with antennas or other instrumentation.

  17. Fumonisin toxicity in a transgenic mouse model lacking the mdr1a/1b P-glycoprotein genes.

    PubMed

    Sharma; Bhandari; Tsunoda; Riley; Voss; Meredith

    2000-03-01

    The toxicity of fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) was investigated in male mdr1a/1b double knockout (MDRK) mice, lacking the drug-transporting P-glycoproteins. These transgenic animals are deficient in their blood:brain barrier and accumulate different drugs in brain and other tissues. The MDRK and their wild-type counterparts, FVB mice, were injected subcutaneously with 2.25 mg/kg per day of FB(1) for 5 days and sampled one day after the last treatment in a protocol that has resulted in marked hepatic and renal damage in other strains. FB(1) caused liver enlargement in both FVB and MDRK. Hematological parameters were not affected in either strain. Plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, measures of liver damage, were increased by FB(1) in both FVB and MDRK mice. Histopathological evaluation of liver corroborated this finding. Kidney lesions were induced by FB(1) in both types of mice. Concentrations of free sphingosine and sphinganine increased in liver and kidney of both strains after the FB(1) treatment, although the increase in liver sphingoid bases was half as much in MDRK as compared to FVB. The levels of sphinganine-containing complex sphingolipids were increased in kidney. The levels of sphingosine-containing complex sphingolipids in kidney were unaffected by FB(1) treatment but were significantly lower in control MDRK than in FVB mice. The levels of neurotransmitters and their metabolites were similarly affected in both strains by FB(1), suggesting no influence of disrupted blood:brain barrier on FB(1)-induced neurotoxicity. In both strains, the liver mRNA for tumor necrosis factor alpha was increased; however, the increase was statistically significant only in FVB. It was apparent that mice deficient in P-glycoprotein do not exhibit greater sensitivity to FB(1), the cellular or brain transport of FB(1) appears to be independent of this multidrug transporting system.

  18. 76 FR 39254 - Airworthiness Directives; Schweizer Aircraft Corporation (Schweizer) Model 269A, A-1, B, C, C-1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation... Corporation (Schweizer) Model 269A, A-1, B, C, C-1, and TH-55 Series Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation... reviewed Schweizer Service Bulletins No. B-295 for Model 269A, A-1, B, and C helicopters, and No....

  19. Cyclin B1 Vaccine Delays Spontaneous Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Laura A, Vella; Min, Yu; Amy, Phillips; Olivera J, Finn

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified cyclin B1-specific T cells and antibodies in cancer patients with cyclin B1+ tumors and also in some healthy individuals. We also demonstrated that these responses may be important in cancer immunosurveillance by showing that vaccination against cyclin B1 prevents growth of transplantable cyclin B1+ tumors in mice. Constitutive overexpression of cyclin B1 was determined to correlate with the lack of p53 function. This allowed us to use p53−/− mice as a model that better approximates human disease. p53−/− mice spontaneously develop cyclin B1+ tumors. At 5–6 weeks of age, when the mice were still healthy with no evidence of tumor, they received the cyclin B1 vaccine and were then observed for tumor growth. We demonstrate that cyclin B1 vaccination can delay spontaneous cyclin B1+ tumor growth and increases median survival of tumor bearing p53−/− mice. PMID:19769738

  20. 8 CFR 343b.1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the form designated by USCIS with the fee specified in 8 CFR 103.7(b)(1) and in accordance with the form instructions. He shall not be furnished with verification of his naturalization for such purpose... NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.1 Application. A naturalized citizen who desires...

  1. 8 CFR 343b.1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the form designated by USCIS with the fee specified in 8 CFR 103.7(b)(1) and in accordance with the form instructions. He shall not be furnished with verification of his naturalization for such purpose... NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.1 Application. A naturalized citizen who desires...

  2. 8 CFR 343b.1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the form designated by USCIS with the fee specified in 8 CFR 103.7(b)(1) and in accordance with the form instructions. He shall not be furnished with verification of his naturalization for such purpose... NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.1 Application. A naturalized citizen who desires...

  3. 18 CFR 3b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Purpose. 3b.1 Section 3b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF IDENTIFIABLE...

  4. 18 CFR 3b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Purpose. 3b.1 Section 3b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF IDENTIFIABLE...

  5. 18 CFR 3b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 3b.1 Section 3b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF IDENTIFIABLE...

  6. 18 CFR 3b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Purpose. 3b.1 Section 3b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF IDENTIFIABLE...

  7. 18 CFR 3b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Purpose. 3b.1 Section 3b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF IDENTIFIABLE...

  8. Association of Endophilin B1 with Cytoplasmic Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhui; Barylko, Barbara; Eichorst, John P; Mueller, Joachim D; Albanesi, Joseph P; Chen, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Endophilins are SH3- and BAR domain-containing proteins implicated in membrane remodeling and vesicle formation. Endophilins A1 and A2 promote the budding of endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane, whereas endophilin B1 has been implicated in vesicle budding from intracellular organelles, including the trans-Golgi network and late endosomes. We previously reported that endophilins A1 and A2 exist almost exclusively as soluble dimers in the cytosol. Here, we present results of fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy analyses indicating that, in contrast, the majority of endophilin B1 is present in multiple copies on small, highly mobile cytoplasmic vesicles. Formation of these vesicles was enhanced by overexpression of wild-type dynamin 2, but suppressed by expression of a catalytically inactive dynamin 2 mutant. Using dual-color heterospecies partition analysis, we identified the epidermal growth factor receptor on endophilin B1 vesicles. Moreover, a proportion of endophilin B1 vesicles also contained caveolin, whereas clathrin was almost undetectable on those vesicles. These results raise the possibility that endophilin B1 participates in dynamin 2-dependent formation of a population of transport vesicles distinct from those generated by A-type endophilins. PMID:27508440

  9. Distribution of fluorescence decay times for 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate in human oxyhemoglobin A1b solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drazdou, A. S.; Sobchuk, A. N.; Syakhovich, V. E.; Bokut, O. S.; Kvasyuk, E. I.; Bushuk, B. A.; Bokut, S. B.

    2012-07-01

    We have studied complex formation between molecules of the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (1,8-ANS) and the major form (A1) and a minor form (Ab) of hemoglobin. The contribution of the longlived component f3 to the kinetic curves for fluorescence decay in HbA1b solutions is 0.021-0.036, which indicates a dramatic decrease (compared with HbA1) in the accessibility of the central cavity of HbA1b for binding 1,8-ANS. Disappearance of the long-lived component f3 in the fluorescence decay kinetics of 1,8-ANS in HbA1b solutions in the presence of inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) suggests that the regulatory region of HbA1b is completely inaccessible for interaction both with the negatively charged molecules of the probe and with natural regulators of the transport function for this form of the heme protein.

  10. Observation of B Meson decays to b1pi and b1K.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-12-14

    We present the results of searches for decays of B mesons to final states with a b1 meson and a charged pion or kaon. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 382x10(6) BB[over ] pairs produced in e+e- annihilation. The results for the branching fractions are, in units of 10(-6), B(B+-->b1(0)pi+)=6.7+/-1.7+/-1.0, B(B+-->b1(0)K+)=9.1+/-1.7+/-1.0, B(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=10.9+/-1.2+/-0.9, and B(B0-->b1(-)K+)=7.4+/-1.0+/-1.0, with the assumption that B(b1-->omega pi)=1. We also measure charge and flavor asymmetries A(ch)(B+-->b1(0)pi+)=0.05+/-0.16+/-0.02, Ach(B+-->b1(0)K+)=-0.46+/-0.20+/-0.02, A(ch)(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=-0.05+/-0.10+/-0.02, C(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=-0.22+/-0.23+/-0.05, DeltaC(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=-1.04+/-0.23+/-0.08, and A(ch)(B0-->b1(-)K+)=-0.07+/-0.12+/-0.02. The first error quoted is statistical, and the second systematic. PMID:18233439

  11. 1a/1b subtype profiling of nonnucleoside polymerase inhibitors of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Nyanguile, Origène; Devogelaere, Benoit; Vijgen, Leen; Van den Broeck, Walter; Pauwels, Frederik; Cummings, Maxwell D; De Bondt, Hendrik L; Vos, Ann M; Berke, Jan M; Lenz, Oliver; Vandercruyssen, Geneviève; Vermeiren, Katrien; Mostmans, Wendy; Dehertogh, Pascale; Delouvroy, Frédéric; Vendeville, Sandrine; VanDyck, Koen; Dockx, Koen; Cleiren, Erna; Raboisson, Pierre; Simmen, Kenneth A; Fanning, Gregory C

    2010-03-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an unusually attractive target for drug discovery since it contains five distinct drugable sites. The success of novel antiviral therapies will require nonnucleoside inhibitors to be active in at least patients infected with HCV of subtypes 1a and 1b. Therefore, the genotypic assessment of these agents against clinical isolates derived from genotype 1-infected patients is an important prerequisite for the selection of suitable candidates for clinical development. Here we report the 1a/1b subtype profiling of polymerase inhibitors that bind at each of the four known nonnucleoside binding sites. We show that inhibition of all of the clinical isolates tested is maintained, except for inhibitors that bind at the palm-1 binding site. Subtype coverage varies across chemotypes within this class of inhibitors, and inhibition of genotype 1a improves when hydrophobic contact with the polymerase is increased. We investigated if the polymorphism of the palm-1 binding site is the sole cause of the reduced susceptibility of subtype 1a to inhibition by 1,5-benzodiazepines by using reverse genetics, X-ray crystallography, and surface plasmon resonance studies. We showed Y415F to be a key determinant in conferring resistance on subtype 1a, with this effect being mediated through an inhibitor- and enzyme-bound water molecule. Binding studies revealed that the mechanism of subtype 1a resistance is faster dissociation of the inhibitor from the enzyme.

  12. 1a/1b Subtype Profiling of Nonnucleoside Polymerase Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Virus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nyanguile, Origène; Devogelaere, Benoit; Vijgen, Leen; Van den Broeck, Walter; Pauwels, Frederik; Cummings, Maxwell D.; De Bondt, Hendrik L.; Vos, Ann M.; Berke, Jan M.; Lenz, Oliver; Vandercruyssen, Geneviève; Vermeiren, Katrien; Mostmans, Wendy; Dehertogh, Pascale; Delouvroy, Frédéric; Vendeville, Sandrine; VanDyck, Koen; Dockx, Koen; Cleiren, Erna; Raboisson, Pierre; Simmen, Kenneth A.; Fanning, Gregory C.

    2010-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an unusually attractive target for drug discovery since it contains five distinct drugable sites. The success of novel antiviral therapies will require nonnucleoside inhibitors to be active in at least patients infected with HCV of subtypes 1a and 1b. Therefore, the genotypic assessment of these agents against clinical isolates derived from genotype 1-infected patients is an important prerequisite for the selection of suitable candidates for clinical development. Here we report the 1a/1b subtype profiling of polymerase inhibitors that bind at each of the four known nonnucleoside binding sites. We show that inhibition of all of the clinical isolates tested is maintained, except for inhibitors that bind at the palm-1 binding site. Subtype coverage varies across chemotypes within this class of inhibitors, and inhibition of genotype 1a improves when hydrophobic contact with the polymerase is increased. We investigated if the polymorphism of the palm-1 binding site is the sole cause of the reduced susceptibility of subtype 1a to inhibition by 1,5-benzodiazepines by using reverse genetics, X-ray crystallography, and surface plasmon resonance studies. We showed Y415F to be a key determinant in conferring resistance on subtype 1a, with this effect being mediated through an inhibitor- and enzyme-bound water molecule. Binding studies revealed that the mechanism of subtype 1a resistance is faster dissociation of the inhibitor from the enzyme. PMID:20071590

  13. 8 CFR 343b.1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.1 Application. A naturalized citizen who desires to... Form N-565. He shall not be furnished with verification of his naturalization for such purpose in...

  14. 8 CFR 343b.1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.1 Application. A naturalized citizen who desires to... Form N-565. He shall not be furnished with verification of his naturalization for such purpose in...

  15. Large dynamic range relative B1+ mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Aaron T.; Aljabar, Paul; Malik, Shaihan J.; Jezzard, Peter; Robson, Matthew D.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Koopmans, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Parallel transmission (PTx) requires knowledge of the B1+ produced by each element. However, B1+ mapping can be challenging when transmit fields exhibit large dynamic range. This study presents a method to produce high quality relative B1+ maps when this is the case. Theory and Methods The proposed technique involves the acquisition of spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images at multiple radiofrequency drive levels for each transmitter. The images are combined using knowledge of the SPGR signal equation using maximum likelihood estimation, yielding an image for each channel whose signal is proportional to the B1+ field strength. Relative B1+ maps are then obtained by taking image ratios. The method was tested using numerical simulations, phantom imaging, and through in vivo experiments. Results The numerical simulations demonstrated that the proposed method can reconstruct relative transmit sensitivities over a wide range of B1+ amplitudes and at several SNR levels. The method was validated at 3 Tesla (T) by comparing it with an alternative B1+ mapping method, and demonstrated in vivo at 7T. Conclusion Relative B1+ mapping in the presence of large dynamic range has been demonstrated through numerical simulations, phantom imaging at 3T and experimentally at 7T. The method will enable PTx to be applied in challenging imaging scenarios at ultrahigh field. Magn Reson Med 76:490–499, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26308375

  16. MR fingerprinting with simultaneous B1 estimation

    PubMed Central

    Sawiak, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose MR fingerprinting (MRF) can be used for quantitative estimation of physical parameters in MRI. Here, we extend the method to incorporate B1 estimation. Methods The acquisition is based on steady state free precession MR fingerprinting with a Cartesian trajectory. To increase the sensitivity to the B1 profile, abrupt changes in flip angle were introduced in the sequence. Slice profile and B1 effects were included in the dictionary and the results from two‐ and three‐dimensional (3D) acquisitions were compared. Acceleration was demonstrated using retrospective undersampling in the phase encode directions of 3D data exploiting redundancy between MRF frames at the edges of k‐space. Results Without B1 estimation, T2 and B1 were inaccurate by more than 20%. Abrupt changes in flip angle improved B1 maps. T1 and T2 values obtained with the new MRF methods agree with classical spin echo measurements and are independent of the B1 field profile. When using view sharing reconstruction, results remained accurate (error <10%) when sampling under 10% of k‐space from the 3D data. Conclusion The methods demonstrated here can successfully measure T1, T2, and B1. Errors due to slice profile can be substantially reduced by including its effect in the dictionary or acquiring data in 3D. Magn Reson Med 76:1127–1135, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:26509746

  17. Characterisation and mutational analysis of an ORF 1a-encoding proteinase domain responsible for proteolytic processing of the infectious bronchitis virus 1a/1b polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Liu, D X; Brown, T D

    1995-06-01

    Coronavirus gene expression involves proteolytic processing of the mRNA 1-encoded polyproteins by viral and cellular proteinases. Recently, we have demonstrated that an ORF 1b-encoded 100-kDa protein is proteolytically cleaved from the 1a/1b fusion polyprotein by a viral-specific proteinase of the picornavirus 3C proteinase group (3C-like proteinase). In this report, the 3C-like proteinase has been further analysed by internal deletion of a 2.3-kb fragment between the 3C-like proteinase-encoding region and ORF 1b and by substitution mutations of its catalytic centre as well as the two predicted cleavage sites flanking the 100-kDa protein. The results show that internal deletion of ORF 1a sequences from nucleotide 9911 to 12227 does not influence the catalytic activity of the proteinase in processing of the 1a/1b polyprotein to the 100-kDa protein species. Site-directed mutagenesis studies have confirmed that the predicted nucleophilic cysteine residue (Cys2922) and a histidine residue encoded by ORF 1a from nucleotide 8985 to 8987 (His2820) are essential for the catalytic activity of the proteinase, and that the QS(G) dipeptide bonds are its target cleavage sites. Substitution mutations of the third component of the putative catalytic triad, the glutamic acid 2843 (Glu2843) residue, however, do not affect the processing to the 100-kDa protein. In addition, cotransfection experiment shows that the 3C-like proteinase is capable of trans-cleavage of the 1a/1b polyprotein. These studies have confirmed the involvement of the 3C-like proteinase domain in processing of the 1a/1b polyprotein, the predicted catalytic centre of the proteinase, and its cleavage sites. PMID:7778277

  18. NR0B1A: an alternatively spliced form of NR0B1.

    PubMed

    Ho, John; Zhang, Yao-Hua; Huang, Bing-Ling; McCabe, Edward R B

    2004-12-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor DAX1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal-AHC critical region on the X chromosome gene 1), encoded by the NR0B1 gene, plays important roles in the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/gonadal (HPAG) axis as well as in sex determination. Mutations in NR0B1 cause the X-linked cytomegalic form of adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC), and associated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). Over-expression of NR0B1 results in sex reversal in mice and duplication of the 160kb DSS locus in human patients results in a sex-reversed phenotype (XY females). The purpose of these investigations was to determine if alternatively spliced forms of NR0B1 existed. Analysis of expressed sequence tag data predicted a truncated isoform of DAX1. We confirmed the presence of an alternatively spliced form of NR0B1, which we will refer to as NR0B1A, by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and will refer to the deduced protein isoform as DAX1A. Sequencing of the NR0B1A cDNA revealed slight differences from the recently described splice form, DAX1alpha. NR0B1A is encoded by NR0B1 exon 1 and exon 2A located within the 3385 nt intron between NR0B1 exons 1 and 2. Exon 2A includes 35 nt of coding sequence. NR0B1A encodes a deduced protein sequence, DAX1A, of 400 amino acids compared with 470 amino acids for DAX1. RT-PCR detected expression of NR0B1A in adrenal gland, testis, ovary, and pancreas. The identification of NR0B1A and the deduced DAX1A requires reinterpretation of many previous experiments involving expression and knockout of NR0B1 and DAX1.

  19. Neurotransmitters in rats fed fumonisin B1.

    PubMed

    Porter, J K; Voss, K A; Chamberlain, W J; Bacon, C W; Norred, W P

    1993-03-01

    Fumonisin B1, a toxin produced by Fusarium moniliforme, has been associated with a neurotoxic syndrome in horses known as equine leukoencephlomalacia. Previous investigations showed that F. moniliforme cultured on corn and incorporated into rat chow increased brain 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA) and 5HIAA: serotonin (5HT) ratios in these animals. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine whether fumonisin B1 would produce related neurochemical effects in the brain and pineal gland of male and female rats. Rats were fed fumonisin B1 at 15, 50, and 150 ppm for 4 weeks. No differences occurred in brain concentrations of norepinephrine, dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-methoxytyramine, homovanillic acid, 5HT, 5HIAA, and the 5HIAA to 5HT ratios in either male or female rats, nor where there differences between the sexes. When compared across sexes, the norepinephrine to dopamine ratios were decreased (P < 0.05) in the 150-ppm-treated animals. This may suggest a fumonisin B1-induced imbalance in brain norepinephrine and/or dopamine. No differences were observed in pineal norepinephrine, 5HT, 5HIAA, and the 5HIAA to 5HT ratios. Since fumonisin B1 failed to duplicate the effects of the F. moniliforme-induced imbalances in 5HT and 5HIAA metabolism in the brains of rats, other mycotoxins from F. moniliforme may be responsible for these effects.

  20. A1B scenario simulations of future natural snow conditions in Tyrol and Styria (Austrian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, U.; Marke, T.; Hanzer, F.; Ragg, H.; Kleindienst, H.; Wilcke, R.; Gobiet, A.

    2012-04-01

    We use four different realizations of the IPCC A1B emission scenario based climate simulations provided by the ENSEMBLES project for the study regions Tyrol and Styria. They represent average as well as above average cold/warm and wet/dry conditions in the winter half year (November to April). The scenario and control run simulations were downscaled and error corrected to station locations with a quantile based empirical-statistical method on a daily time basis. To provide 3-hourly meteorological snow model input data, diurnal variations have been extracted from uncorrected RCM simulations to disaggregate the downscaled and bias corrected daily data. The resulting time series of meteorological parameters are spatially interpolated on the basis of existing parameter-elevation relations, and by means of a kriging technique. The control simulations (1971-2000) and scenario simulations (2021-2050) are applied as meteorological forcing for two snow models: The process based snow model AMUNDSEN includes physical descriptions of all snow relevant surface processes, is therefore transferable in space and time, and provides results at high spatial resolution (50 m). Due to its computational demands its application is limited to the two test regions Kitzbuehel (Tyrol) and Schladming (Styria). To establish a regional snow simulation, the conceptual model SNOWREG is used. The temperature-index-approach requires only few input variables, is efficient in terms of computational costs and allows a large-scale application for the provinces of Tyrol and Styria at a spatial resolution of 250 m. SNOWREG is trained by means of assimilating natural snow cover patterns provided by remotely sensed snow coverage and station recordings. Indicators for skiing conditions are used to quantify and compare changes in future natural snow conditions. The moderate increase in average area mean winter temperature (up to 2,6 °C in Tyrol and 2.3 °C in Styria) and changes in area mean winter

  1. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History and name. The Congress of the United States in the Uniformed... to conduct the business of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and designated this body “the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences,”...

  2. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History and name. The Congress of the United States in the Uniformed... to conduct the business of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and designated this body “the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences,”...

  3. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History and name. The Congress of the United States in the Uniformed... to conduct the business of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and designated this body “the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences,”...

  4. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History and name. The Congress of the United States in the Uniformed... to conduct the business of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and designated this body “the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences,”...

  5. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History and name. The Congress of the United States in the Uniformed... to conduct the business of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and designated this body “the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences,”...

  6. B1 bradykinin receptors and sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. L.; Naeem, S.; Phagoo, S. B.; Campbell, E. A.; Urban, L.; Burgess, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The location of the B1 bradykinin receptors involved in inflammatory hyperalgesia was investigated. 2. No specific binding of the B1 bradykinin receptor ligand [3H]-des-Arg10-kallidin was detected in primary cultures of rat dorsal root ganglion neurones, even after treatment with interleukin-1 beta (100 iu ml-1). 3. In dorsal root ganglion neurones, activation of B2 bradykinin receptors stimulated polyphosphoinositidase C. In contrast, B1 bradykinin receptor agonists (des-Arg9-bradykinin up to 10 microM and des-Arg10-kallidin up to 1 microM) failed to activate polyphosphoinositidase C, even in neurones that had been treated with interleukin-1 beta (100 iu ml-1), prostaglandin E2 (1 microM) or prostaglandin I2 (1 microM). 4. Dorsal root ganglion neurones removed from rats (both neonatal and 14 days old) that had been pretreated with inflammatory mediators (Freund's complete adjuvant, or carrageenan) failed to respond to B1 bradykinin receptor selective agonists (des-Arg9-bradykinin up to 10 microM and des-Arg10-kallidin up to 1 microM). 5. Bradykinin (25 nM to 300 nM) evoked ventral root responses when applied to peripheral receptive fields or central terminals of primary afferents in the neonatal rat spinal cord and tail preparation. In contrast, des-Arg9-bradykinin (50 nM to 500 nM) failed to evoke ventral root depolarizations in either control rats or in animals that developed inflammation following ultraviolet irradiation of the tail skin. 6. The results of the present study imply that the B1 bradykinin receptors that contribute to hypersensitivity in models of persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia are located on cells other than sensory neurones where they may be responsible for releasing mediators that sensitize or activate the nociceptors. PMID:8832074

  7. 26 CFR 1.404(a)-5 - Pension and annuity plans; limitations under section 404(a)(1)(B).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pension and annuity plans; limitations under... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.404(a)-5 Pension and annuity plans; limitations under section 404(a)(1)(B). (a)...

  8. Dual effects of phloretin on aflatoxin B1 metabolism: activation and detoxification of aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang Shang; Chen, Xiao Yan; Zhu, Ri Zhe; Choi, Byung-Min; Kim, Sun Jun; Kim, Bok-Ryang

    2012-01-01

    Typically, chemopreventive agents involve either induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes and/or inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) that are required for the activation of procarcinogens. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of phloretin against aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) activation to the ultimate carcinogenic intermediate, AFB(1)-8, 9-epoxide (AFBO), and its subsequent detoxification. Phloretin markedly inhibited formation of the epoxide with human liver microsomes in a dose-dependent manner. Phloretin also inhibited the activities of nifedipine oxidation and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) in human liver microsomes. These data show that phloretin strongly inhibits CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 activities, which are involved in the activation of AFB1. Phloretin increased glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity of alpha mouse liver 12 (AML 12) cells in a dose-dependent manner. GST activity toward AFBO in cell lysates treated with 20 μM phloretin was 23-fold that of untreated control cell lysates. The expression of GSTA3, GSTA4, GSTM1, GSTP1 and GSTT1 was induced by phloretin in a dose-dependent manner in AML 12 cells. GSTP1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 were able to significantly increase the conjugation of AFBO with glutathione. Concurrently, induction of the GST isozyme genes was partially associated with the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Taken together, the results demonstrate that phloretin has a strong chemopreventive effect against AFB1 through its inhibitory effect on CYP1A2, CYP3A4, and its inductive effect on GST activity. PMID:22253071

  9. Effects of Temperature on Heteromeric Kv11.1a/1b and Kv11.3 Channels.

    PubMed

    Mauerhöfer, Maike; Bauer, Christiane K

    2016-08-01

    Kv11.1 channels are crucial in cardiac physiology, and there is increasing evidence of physiological roles of different Kv11 channels outside the heart. The HERG (human Kv11.1a) channel has previously been shown to carry substantially more current at elevated temperatures, and we have now comparably investigated the temperature dependence of neuronal Kv11.3 channels and the more ubiquitous heteromeric Kv11.1a/1b channels. Transiently expressed rat Kv11 channels were studied at 21°C, 30°C, and 35°C. At near-physiological temperature, the maximal sustained outward current density was almost three times the mean value obtained at room temperature for Kv11.1a/1b, and increased by ∼150% for Kv11.3. For both channels, reduced inactivation contributed to the current increase at higher temperature. Elevated temperature moved Kv11.1a/1b isochronal activation curves to more negative potentials, but shifted the potential of half-maximal Kv11.3 channel activation to more depolarized values and reduced its voltage sensitivity. Thus, increased temperature stabilized the open state over the closed state of Kv11.1a/1b channels and exerted the opposite effect on Kv11.3 channel activation. Both Kv11 channels exhibited an overall high temperature sensitivity of most gating parameters, with remarkably high Q10 factors of ∼5 for the rate of Kv11.1a/1b activation. The Q10 factors for Kv11.3 gating were more uniform, but still higher for activation than for inactivation kinetics. The results demonstrate that characteristic differences between Kv11.1a/1b and Kv11.3 determined at room temperature do not necessarily apply to physiological conditions. The data provided here can aid in the design of models that will enhance our understanding of the role of Kv11 currents in excitable cells. PMID:27508435

  10. B-1B excels in conventional role

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.B.

    1992-07-01

    A report is presented of an observational flight performed in a USAF B-1B to better understand the operational aspects of the aircraft's new conventional bombing mission as an integral element of a multiaircraft tactical strike package. The basic flight plan consisted of a standard takeoff and climb, cruising to the training area at 22,000 ft, descending for a 400 ft low-level run, making two simulated bomb drops, and climbing back to 25,000 ft for the return to base. Attention is given the new/enhanced avionics, the ALQ-161 defensive electronic warfare system and ripple-release Mk. 82 bombing procedures.

  11. Phylogeography of E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and analysis of its subclades in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Reguig, Ahmed; Harich, Nourdin; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Rouba, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed 295 unrelated Berber-speaking men from northern, central, and southern Morocco to characterize frequency of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and to refine the phylogeny of its subclades: E1b1b1b1-M107, E1b1b1b2-M183, and E1b1b1b2a-M165. For this purpose, we typed four biallelic polymorphisms: M81, M107, M183, and M165. A large majority of the Berber-speaking male lineages belonged to the Y-chromosomal E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup. The frequency ranged from 79.1% to 98.5% in all localities sampled. E1b1b1b2-M183 was the most dominant subclade in our samples, ranging from 65.1% to 83.1%. In contrast, the E1b1b1b1-M107 and E1b1b1b2a-M165 subclades were not found in our samples. Our results suggest a predominance of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup among Moroccan Berber-speaking males with a decreasing gradient from south to north. The most prevalent subclade in this haplogroup was E1b1b1b2-M183, for which diffferences among these three groups were statistically significant between central and southern groups. PMID:25397701

  12. 118-B-1 excavation treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Hanford 118-B-1 Burial Ground Treatability Study has been required by milestone change request {number_sign}M-15-93-04, dated September 30, 1993. The change request requires that a treatability test be conducted at the 100-B Area to obtain additional engineering information for remedial design of burial grounds receiving waste from 100 Area removal actions. This treatability study has two purposes: (1) to support development of the Proposed Plan (PP) and Record of Decision (ROD), which will identify the approach to be used for burial ground remediation, and (2) to provide specific engineering information for receiving waste generated from the 100 Area removal actions. Data generated from this test also will provide critical performance and cost information necessary for remedy evaluation in the detailed analysis of alternatives during preparation of the focused feasibility study (FFS). This treatability testing supports the following 100 Area alternatives: (1) excavation and disposal, and (2) excavation, sorting, (treatment), and disposal.

  13. 118-B-1 excavation treatability test procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Frain, J.M.

    1994-08-01

    This treatability study has two purposes: to support development of the approach to be used for burial ground remediation, and to provide specific engineering information for the design of burial grounds receiving waste generated from the 100 Area removal actions. Data generated from this test will also provide performance and cost information necessary for detailed analysis of alternatives for burial ground remediation. Further details on the test requirements, milestones and data quality objectives are described in detail in the 118-B-1 Excavation Treatability Test Plan (DOE/RL-94-43). These working procedures are intended for use by field personnel to implement the requirements of the milestone. A copy of the detailed Test Plan will be kept on file at the on-site field support trailer, and will be available for review by field personnel.

  14. Effect of vitamin B1 and mixtures of B1 with other vitamins on cytostatic efficiency of sanazole under irradiation. A study in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Edith; Getoff, Nikola

    2003-06-01

    Experiments in vitro, using bacteria Escherichia coli (AB 1157) as a biological model, showed that the cytostatic efficiency of sanazole (AK-2123, a nitrotriazole-type radiosensitizer) in radiation treatment can be strongly influenced by the presence of various vitamins. In airfree media the sanazole action is increased by a factor of 2.5 in the presence of vitamin (vit.) B1, vit. C E-acetate and β-carotene, whereas vit. B1 used individually possesses a 2.7-times higher cytostatic activity than sanazole itself. In media containing air the highest increase of sanazole action is observed in the presence of vit. B1 and C, whereas the individual use of vit. B1 shows a radiation protection effect. In media saturated with N 2O the addition of the vit. B1 and C causes a 1.8-times larger sanazole activity, but the application of vit. B1 alone brings about a very high radiation protection. From studies of vit. B1-radiolysis it can be concluded that OH radicals are the major primary transients leading to substrate degradation. The results are of interest for the radiation therapy of cancer.

  15. Dysregulated YAP1/TAZ and TGF-β signaling mediate hepatocarcinogenesis in Mob1a/1b-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Miki; Sugimachi, Keishi; Goto, Hiroki; Wang, Jia; Morikawa, Takumi; Miyachi, Yosuke; Takano, Yusuke; Hikasa, Hiroki; Itoh, Tohru; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Kurihara, Hiroki; Aishima, Shinichi; Leask, Andrew; Sasaki, Takehiko; Nakano, Toru; Nishina, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Yuji; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Nakao, Kazuwa; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Mimori, Koshi; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Mps One Binder Kinase Activator (MOB)1A/1B are core components of the Hippo pathway that coactivate large tumor suppressor homolog (LATS) kinases. Mob1a/1b double deficiency in mouse liver (LMob1DKO) results in hyperplasia of oval cells and immature cholangiocytes accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrosis. More than half of mutant mice die within 3 wk of birth. All survivors eventually develop liver cancers, particularly combined hepatocellular and cholangiocarcinomas (cHC-CCs) and intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinomas (ICCs), and die by age 60 wk. Because this phenotype is the most severe among mutant mice lacking a Hippo signaling component, MOB1A/1B constitute the critical hub of Hippo signaling in mammalian liver. LMob1DKO liver cells show hyperproliferation, increased cell saturation density, hepatocyte dedifferentiation, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell migration, and elevated transforming growth factor beta(TGF-β)2/3 production. These changes are strongly dependent on Yes-Associated Protein-1 (Yap1) and partially dependent on PDZ-binding motif (Taz) and Tgfbr2, but independent of connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf). In human liver cancers, YAP1 activation is frequent in cHC-CCs and ICCs and correlates with SMAD family member 2 activation. Drug screening revealed that antiparasitic macrocyclic lactones inhibit YAP1 activation in vitro and in vivo. Targeting YAP1/TAZ with these drugs in combination with inhibition of the TGF-β pathway may be effective treatment for cHC-CCs and ICCs.

  16. Dysregulated YAP1/TAZ and TGF-β signaling mediate hepatocarcinogenesis in Mob1a/1b-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Miki; Sugimachi, Keishi; Goto, Hiroki; Wang, Jia; Morikawa, Takumi; Miyachi, Yosuke; Takano, Yusuke; Hikasa, Hiroki; Itoh, Tohru; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Kurihara, Hiroki; Aishima, Shinichi; Leask, Andrew; Sasaki, Takehiko; Nakano, Toru; Nishina, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Yuji; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Nakao, Kazuwa; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Mimori, Koshi; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Mps One Binder Kinase Activator (MOB)1A/1B are core components of the Hippo pathway that coactivate large tumor suppressor homolog (LATS) kinases. Mob1a/1b double deficiency in mouse liver (LMob1DKO) results in hyperplasia of oval cells and immature cholangiocytes accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrosis. More than half of mutant mice die within 3 wk of birth. All survivors eventually develop liver cancers, particularly combined hepatocellular and cholangiocarcinomas (cHC-CCs) and intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinomas (ICCs), and die by age 60 wk. Because this phenotype is the most severe among mutant mice lacking a Hippo signaling component, MOB1A/1B constitute the critical hub of Hippo signaling in mammalian liver. LMob1DKO liver cells show hyperproliferation, increased cell saturation density, hepatocyte dedifferentiation, enhanced epithelial–mesenchymal transition and cell migration, and elevated transforming growth factor beta(TGF-β)2/3 production. These changes are strongly dependent on Yes-Associated Protein-1 (Yap1) and partially dependent on PDZ-binding motif (Taz) and Tgfbr2, but independent of connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf). In human liver cancers, YAP1 activation is frequent in cHC-CCs and ICCs and correlates with SMAD family member 2 activation. Drug screening revealed that antiparasitic macrocyclic lactones inhibit YAP1 activation in vitro and in vivo. Targeting YAP1/TAZ with these drugs in combination with inhibition of the TGF-β pathway may be effective treatment for cHC-CCs and ICCs. PMID:26699479

  17. In vivo Metabolism of Hydrolyzed Fumonisin B1 and Fumonisin B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is the most prevalent fumonisin mycotoxin found in corn and corn-based foods. It inhibits ceramide synthase, disrupts sphingolipid metabolism and function, is toxic to animals, causes cancer in rodents, and induces neural tube defects in some mouse strains. Its human health effect...

  18. Tay-Sachs disease: B1 variant.

    PubMed

    Gordon, B A; Gordon, K E; Hinton, G G; Cadera, W; Feleki, V; Bayleran, J; Hechtman, P

    1988-01-01

    This first child of non-Jewish parents had nystagmus at 4 months of age, bilateral cherry-red macular spots at 7 months of age, and hyperacusis at 8 months of age; the patient has deteriorated progressively following a clinical course typical of Tay-Sachs disease B variant. Total beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase assayed with 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-glucosamine (4 MU GlcNAc) as substrate was within the normal range in plasma and cultured dermal fibroblasts and 2/3 the normal mean in leukocytes. The hexosaminidase A activity, assayed with the same substrate in plasma and cultured fibroblasts, approximated Tay-Sachs disease heterozygote levels; however, the activity of hexosaminidase A assayed with 4 MU Glc NAc-6-sulfate in the plasma, leukocytes, and cultured fibroblasts was less than 8, 2, and 1%, respectively of the control mean. This female infant with the B1 variant of Tay-Sachs disease demonstrated an earlier onset and more rapidly progressive course than was observed in 4 of the 5 previously reported patients with this Tay-Sachs disease variant.

  19. Analysis of fumonisin B1-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C; Ciacci-Zanella, J R; Zhang, Y; Henderson, G; Dickman, M

    2001-01-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium moniliforme, a prevalent fungus that infects corn and other cereal grains. Fumonisin B1(FB1 is the most common mycotoxin produced by F. moniliforme, suggesting it has toxicologic significance. The structure of FB1 resembles sphingoid bases, and it inhibits ceramide synthase. Because sphingoid bases regulate cell growth, differentiation, transformation, and apoptosis, it is not surprising to find that FB1 can alter growth of certain mammalian cells. Previous studies concluded FB1-induced apoptosis, or cell cycle arrest, in African green monkey kidney fibroblasts (CV-1). In this study we have identified genes that inhibit FB1 induced apoptosis in CV-1 cells and two mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF). A baculovirus gene, inhibitor of apoptosis (CpIAP), protected these cells from apoptosis. CpIAP blocks apoptosis induced by the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) pathway as well as other mechanisms. Further support for the involvement of the TNF signal transduction pathway in FB1 induced apoptosis was the cleavage of caspase 8. Inhibition of caspases by the baculovirus gene (italic)p35 also inhibited FB1-induced apoptosis. The tumor suppressor gene p53 was not required for FB1 induced apoptosis because p53-/- MEF undergo apoptosis following FB1 treatment. Furthermore, Bcl-2 was not an effective inhibitor of FB1-induced apoptosis in CV-1 cells or p53+/+ MEF. In summary, these results provide new information to help understand the mechanism by which FB1 induces apoptosis. PMID:11359701

  20. Fumonisin B(1): a neurotoxic mycotoxin.

    PubMed

    Domijan, Ana-Marija

    2012-12-01

    Fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium spp. moulds that contaminate crop, predominantly maize, all around the world. More than 15 types of fumonisins have been indentified so far, but FB(1) is the most abundant and toxicologically the most significant one. FB(1) has a wide range of toxic effects, depending on animal species. In horses FB(1) causes equine leukoencephalomalacia (ELEM), in pigs pulmonary oedema and in experimental rodents nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. In humans exposure to FB(1) is linked with higher incidence of primary liver cancer and oesophageal cancer, which are frequent in certain regions of the world (such as Transkei region in South Africa) where maize is staple food. The occurrence of neural tube defect in children in some countries of Central America (such as Mexico and Honduras) is connected with the consumption of FB(1)-contaminated maize-based food. However, possible involvement of FB(1) in the development of human diseases is not clear. Nevertheless, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified FB(1) as a possible carcinogen to humans (group 2B). FB(1) is a causative agent of ELEM, a brain disorder in equines, indicating that brain is a target organ of FB(1) toxicity. Several studies on experimental animals or on cell cultures of neural origin have established that FB(1) has a neurodegenerative potential, although the mechanism of its neurotoxicity is still vague. The aim of this article is to give an overview of available literature on FB(1) neurotoxicity and involved mechanisms, and to offer a new perspective for future studies.

  1. Saponins, Esculeosides B-1 and B-2, in Tomato Juice and Sapogenol, Esculeogenin B1.

    PubMed

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Zhou, Jian-Rong; Urata, Jun; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Kotaro; El-Aasr, Mona; Ono, Masateru

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that commercial tomato juice packaged in 900 g plastic bottles contains rare, naturally occurring steroidal solanocapsine-type tomato glycosides in which the saponins consist of esculeosides B-1 (2) and B-2 (3) in 0.041% as major components lacking esculeoside A. We suggest that these saponins are derived from esculeoside A (1) when the juice in plastic bottles is prepared by treatment with boiling water, similar to the process used in preparing canned tomatoes. Herein, the obtained tomato saponins (2) and (3) provided sapogenols esculeogenin B1 (4) and B2 (5), respectively, by acid hydrolysis. The former was identical to esculeogenin B previously reported, and the latter was a new sapogenol characterized to be (5α,22S,23S,25S)-22,26-epimino-16β,23-epoxy-3β,23,27-trihydroxycholestane. PMID:26423043

  2. 75 FR 69938 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of... BILLING CODE 5001-06-C...

  3. 40 CFR Figure B-1 to Subpart B of... - Example

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Example B Figure B-1 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Fig. B-1 Figure B-1 to Subpart B...

  4. 40 CFR Figure B-1 to Subpart B of... - Example

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Example B Figure B-1 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Fig. B-1 Figure B-1 to Subpart B...

  5. 40 CFR Figure B-1 to Subpart B of... - Example

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Example B Figure B-1 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Fig. B-1 Figure B-1 to Subpart B...

  6. 26 CFR 1.672(b)-1 - Nonadverse party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonadverse party. 1.672(b)-1 Section 1.672(b)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.672(b)-1 Nonadverse party. A nonadverse party is any person who is not an adverse party....

  7. 26 CFR 1.672(b)-1 - Nonadverse party.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonadverse party. 1.672(b)-1 Section 1.672(b)-1...) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.672(b)-1 Nonadverse party. A nonadverse party is any person who is not an adverse party....

  8. 12 CFR 261b.1 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis and scope. 261b.1 Section 261b.1 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM RULES REGARDING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS § 261b.1 Basis and scope. This part is issued by the Board...

  9. 26 CFR 48.4061(b)-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Imposition of tax. 48.4061(b)-1 Section 48.4061(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS... Taxable Fuel Automotive and Related Items § 48.4061(b)-1 Imposition of tax. (a) In general. Section...

  10. 76 FR 40709 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section... Pursuant to Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, as Amended (i) Prospective Purchaser: Iraq...

  11. 26 CFR 301.7701(b)-1 - Resident alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resident alien. 301.7701(b)-1 Section 301.7701... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Definitions § 301.7701(b)-1 Resident alien. (a) Scope. Section 301.7701(b)-1(b) provides rules for determining whether an alien individual is a lawful permanent...

  12. 26 CFR 301.7701(b)-1 - Resident alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resident alien. 301.7701(b)-1 Section 301.7701... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Definitions § 301.7701(b)-1 Resident alien. (a) Scope. Section 301.7701(b)-1(b) provides rules for determining whether an alien individual is a lawful permanent...

  13. 26 CFR 301.7701(b)-1 - Resident alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resident alien. 301.7701(b)-1 Section 301.7701... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Definitions § 301.7701(b)-1 Resident alien. (a) Scope. Section 301.7701(b)-1(b) provides rules for determining whether an alien individual is a lawful permanent...

  14. 26 CFR 301.7701(b)-1 - Resident alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resident alien. 301.7701(b)-1 Section 301.7701... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Definitions § 301.7701(b)-1 Resident alien. (a) Scope. Section 301.7701(b)-1(b) provides rules for determining whether an alien individual is a lawful permanent...

  15. Future projections of insured losses in the German private building sector following the A1B climatic change scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, H.; Gerstengarbe, F.-W.; Hattermann, F.; Pinto, J. G.; Ulbrich, U.; Böhm, U.; Born, K.; Büchner, M.; Donat, M. G.; Kücken, M.; Leckebusch, G. C.; Nissen, K.; Nocke, T.; Österle, H.; Pardowitz, T.; Werner, P. C.; Burghoff, O.; Broecker, U.; Kubik, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present an overview of a complementary-approaches impact project dealing with the consequences of climate change for the natural hazard branch of the insurance industry in Germany. The project was conducted by four academic institutions together with the German Insurance Association (GDV) and finalized in autumn 2011. A causal chain is modeled that goes from global warming projections over regional meteorological impacts to regional economic losses for private buildings, hereby fully covering the area of Germany. This presentation will focus on wind storm related losses, although the method developed had also been applied in part to hail and flood impact losses. For the first time, the GDV supplied their collected set of insurance cases, dating back for decades, for such an impact study. These data were used to calibrate and validate event-based damage functions which in turn were driven by three different types of regional climate models to generate storm loss projections. The regional models were driven by a triplet of ECHAM5 experiments following the A1B scenario which were found representative in the recent ENSEMBLES intercomparison study. In our multi-modeling approach we used two types of regional climate models that conceptually differ at maximum: a dynamical model (CCLM) and a statistical model based on the idea of biased bootstrapping (STARS). As a third option we pursued a hybrid approach (statistical-dynamical downscaling). For the assessment of climate change impacts, the buildings' infrastructure and their economic value is kept at current values. For all three approaches, a significant increase of average storm losses and extreme event return levels in the German private building sector is found for future decades assuming an A1B-scenario. However, the three projections differ somewhat in terms of magnitude and regional differentiation. We have developed a formalism that allows us to express the combined effect of multi-source uncertainty on return

  16. Search for B-meson decays to b1ρ and b1K*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Chavez, A.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-09-01

    We present a search for decays of B mesons to final states with a b1 meson and a ρ or K*(892) meson. The search is based on a data sample consisting of 465 million B Bmacr pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We do not observe any statistically significant signal. The upper limits we set on the branching fractions range from 1.4 to 8.0×10-6 at the 90% confidence level, including systematic uncertainties.

  17. [The interactions between natural products and OATP1B1].

    PubMed

    Shi, Mei-zhi; Liu, Yu; Bian, Jia-lin; Jin, Meng; Gui, Chun-shan

    2015-07-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) is an important liver-specific uptake transporter, which mediates transport of numerous endogenous substances and drugs from blood into hepatocytes. To identify and investigate potential modulators of OATP1B1 from natural products, the effect of 21 frequently used natural compounds and extracts on OATP1B1-mediated fluorescein methotrexate transport was studied by using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing OATP1B1 (CHO-OATP1B1) in 96-well plates. This method could be used for the screening of large compound libraries. Our studies showed that some flavonoids (e.g., quercetin, quercitrin, rutin, chrysanthemum flavonoids and mulberrin) and triterpenoids (e.g., glycyrrhetinic acid and glycyrrhizic acid) were inhibitors of OATP1B1 with IC50 values less than 16 µmol · L(-1). The IC50 value of glycyrrhetinic acid on OATP1B1 was comparable to its blood concentration in clinics, indicating an OATPlB1-mediated drug-drug interaction could occur. Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that flavonoids had much higher inhibitory activity than their glycosides. Furthermore, the type and length of saccharides had a significant effect on their activity. In addition, we used OATP1B1 substrates fluvastatin and rosuvastatin as probe drugs to investigate the substrate-dependent effect of several natural compounds on the function of OATP1B1 in vitro. Our results demonstrated that the effect of these natural products on the function of OATPlB1 was substrate-dependent. In summary, this study would be conducive to predicting and avoiding potential OATP1B1-mediated drug-drug and drug-food interactions and thus provide the experimental basis and guidance for rational drug use. PMID:26552146

  18. HCV inter-subtype 1a/1b recombinant detected by complete-genome next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gaspareto, Karine Vieira; Ribeiro, Roberto Marques; de Mello Malta, Fernanda; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Muto, Nair Hideko; Mendes-Correa, Maria Cassia; Rozanski, Andrei; Carrilho, Flair José; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) provides a practical approach to HCV complete-genome sequencing, detecting low-frequency variants and allowing analysis of viral genetic diversity (quasispecies) in the sample, and so far, it is very useful for identifying preexisting drug-resistant mutants and emerging escape mutations, as well as detecting viral recombinants containing genomic regions from different genotypes and subtypes. The aim of this study was to analyze the complete coding region of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 (subtypes 1a and 1b) from patients with chronic infection who were direct-acting antiviral (DAA) naïve. Next-generation sequencing (Ion Torrent™ PGM) was used to determine the sequence of the complete coding region of 100 HCV-monoinfected DAA-naïve patients (51 and 49 subtypes 1a and 1b, respectively). We report the first description of nearly complete HCV genome sequences of subtype 1a and 1b isolates from a large population of Brazilian patients with chronic hepatitis C, and HCV-1a grouped in two different clades. Using this methodology, an inter-subtype 1a/1b recombinant was identified in this study. PMID:27194536

  19. HLA-B17 and the HLA-A1, B17 haplotype in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heise, E; Parrish, E; Cooper, R

    1979-08-01

    Seventy-nine Caucasians with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were genotyped to determine whether AML, the induction of remission or patient survival were associated with particular HLA phenotypes or haplotypes. HLA-B17 and B27 were increased in AML patients over 40 years of age. Combined analysis of four independent studies indicates that HLA-B17 is significantly but weakly associated with AML, relative risk = 1.48 (.01 less than P less than .025). The A1, B17 and Aw24, Bw35 haplotypes occurred more frequently in the AML group as compared to racial and geographic controls (uncorrected P = 0.0068 and 0.0098, respectively Fisher's Exact Test). Induction of remission occurred less frequently in patients with the B17 phenotype as compared to patients lacking this antigen (P = 0.047). Patient survival was associated with remission status (P = 0.002) but was not significantly associated with particular HLA phenotypes or haplotypes. These results indicate that a gene or genes in the HLA-B region of the major histocompatibility complex can influence susceptibility to AML and also the response to chemotherapy.

  20. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-1 - Other transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... transaction described in § 1.367(b)-5(c) or 1.367(b)-5(d) and that is either— (A) A section 1248 shareholder... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Other transfers. 1.367(b)-1 Section 1.367(b)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Effects on Corporation § 1.367(b)-1 Other transfers. (a) Scope. The...

  1. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-1 - Other transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... transaction described in § 1.367(b)-5(c) or 1.367(b)-5(d) and that is either— (A) A section 1248 shareholder... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Other transfers. 1.367(b)-1 Section 1.367(b)-1...) INCOME TAXES (Continued) Effects on Corporation § 1.367(b)-1 Other transfers. (a) Scope. The...

  2. MAN1B1 deficiency: an unexpected CDG-II.

    PubMed

    Rymen, Daisy; Peanne, Romain; Millón, María B; Race, Valérie; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Mills, Philippa; Clayton, Peter; Asteggiano, Carla G; Quelhas, Dulce; Cansu, Ali; Martins, Esmeralda; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Topaloglu, Haluk; Jaeken, Jaak; Foulquier, François; Matthijs, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of rare metabolic diseases, due to impaired protein and lipid glycosylation. In the present study, exome sequencing was used to identify MAN1B1 as the culprit gene in an unsolved CDG-II patient. Subsequently, 6 additional cases with MAN1B1-CDG were found. All individuals presented slight facial dysmorphism, psychomotor retardation and truncal obesity. Generally, MAN1B1 is believed to be an ER resident alpha-1,2-mannosidase acting as a key factor in glycoprotein quality control by targeting misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). However, recent studies indicated a Golgi localization of the endogenous MAN1B1, suggesting a more complex role for MAN1B1 in quality control. We were able to confirm that MAN1B1 is indeed localized to the Golgi complex instead of the ER. Furthermore, we observed an altered Golgi morphology in all patients' cells, with marked dilatation and fragmentation. We hypothesize that part of the phenotype is associated to this Golgi disruption. In conclusion, we linked mutations in MAN1B1 to a Golgi glycosylation disorder. Additionally, our results support the recent findings on MAN1B1 localization. However, more work is needed to pinpoint the exact function of MAN1B1 in glycoprotein quality control, and to understand the pathophysiology of its deficiency. PMID:24348268

  3. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo . E-mail: sueokae@post.saga-med.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression.

  4. Loss of endophilin-B1 exacerbates Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, David B; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Uo, Takuma; Sopher, Bryce L; Cudaback, Eiron; Keene, C Dirk; Bilousova, Tina; Gylys, Karen; Case, Amanda; Jayadev, Suman; Wang, Hong-Gang; Garden, Gwenn A; Morrison, Richard S

    2015-07-01

    Endophilin-B1, also known as Bax-interacting factor 1 (Bif-1, and encoded by SH3GLB1), is a multifunctional protein involved in apoptosis, autophagy and mitochondrial function. We recently described a unique neuroprotective role for neuron-specific alternatively spliced isoforms of endophilin-B1. To examine whether endophilin-B1-mediated neuroprotection could be a novel therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease we used a double mutant amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 (APPswe/PSEN1dE9) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and observed that expression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms declined with disease progression. To determine if this reduction in endophilin-B1 has a functional role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, we crossed endophilin-B1(-/-) mice with APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Deletion of endophilin-B1 accelerated disease onset and progression in 6-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9/endophilin-B1(-/-) mice, which showed more plaques, astrogliosis, synaptic degeneration, cognitive impairment and mortality than APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. In mouse primary cortical neuron cultures, overexpression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms protected against amyloid-β-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, protein and mRNA levels of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms were also selectively decreased in the cerebral cortex and in the synaptic compartment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Flow sorting of synaptosomes from patients with Alzheimer's disease demonstrated a negative correlation between amyloid-β and endophilin-B1 levels. The importance of endophilin-B1 in neuronal function was further underscored by the development of synaptic degeneration and cognitive and motor impairment in endophilin-B1(-/-) mice by 12 months. Our findings suggest that endophilin-B1 is a key mediator of a feed-forward mechanism of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis where amyloid-β reduces neuron-specific endophilin-B1, which in turn enhances amyloid

  5. Loss of endophilin-B1 exacerbates Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, David B; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Uo, Takuma; Sopher, Bryce L; Cudaback, Eiron; Keene, C Dirk; Bilousova, Tina; Gylys, Karen; Case, Amanda; Jayadev, Suman; Wang, Hong-Gang; Garden, Gwenn A; Morrison, Richard S

    2015-07-01

    Endophilin-B1, also known as Bax-interacting factor 1 (Bif-1, and encoded by SH3GLB1), is a multifunctional protein involved in apoptosis, autophagy and mitochondrial function. We recently described a unique neuroprotective role for neuron-specific alternatively spliced isoforms of endophilin-B1. To examine whether endophilin-B1-mediated neuroprotection could be a novel therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease we used a double mutant amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 (APPswe/PSEN1dE9) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and observed that expression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms declined with disease progression. To determine if this reduction in endophilin-B1 has a functional role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, we crossed endophilin-B1(-/-) mice with APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Deletion of endophilin-B1 accelerated disease onset and progression in 6-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9/endophilin-B1(-/-) mice, which showed more plaques, astrogliosis, synaptic degeneration, cognitive impairment and mortality than APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. In mouse primary cortical neuron cultures, overexpression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms protected against amyloid-β-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, protein and mRNA levels of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms were also selectively decreased in the cerebral cortex and in the synaptic compartment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Flow sorting of synaptosomes from patients with Alzheimer's disease demonstrated a negative correlation between amyloid-β and endophilin-B1 levels. The importance of endophilin-B1 in neuronal function was further underscored by the development of synaptic degeneration and cognitive and motor impairment in endophilin-B1(-/-) mice by 12 months. Our findings suggest that endophilin-B1 is a key mediator of a feed-forward mechanism of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis where amyloid-β reduces neuron-specific endophilin-B1, which in turn enhances amyloid

  6. Susceptibilities of Genotype 1a, 1b, and 3 Hepatitis C Virus Variants to the NS5A Inhibitor Elbasvir

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Stephanie; McMonagle, Patricia; Yeh, Wendy W.; Ludmerer, Steven W.; Jumes, Patricia A.; Marshall, William L.; Kong, Stephanie; Ingravallo, Paul; Black, Stuart; Pak, Irene; DiNubile, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Elbasvir is an investigational NS5A inhibitor with in vitro activity against multiple HCV genotypes. Antiviral activity of elbasvir was measured in replicons derived from wild-type or resistant variants of genotypes 1a, 1b, and 3. The barrier to resistance was assessed by the number of resistant colonies selected by exposure to various elbasvir concentrations. In a phase 1b dose-escalating study, virologic responses were determined in 48 noncirrhotic adult men with chronic genotype 1 or 3 infections randomized to placebo or elbasvir from 5 to 50 mg (genotype 1) or 10 to 100 mg (genotype 3) once daily for 5 days. The NS5A gene was sequenced from plasma specimens obtained before, during, and after treatment. Elbasvir suppressed the emergence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Variants selected by exposure to high elbasvir concentrations typically encoded multiple amino acid substitutions (most commonly involving loci 30, 31, and 93), conferring high-level elbasvir resistance. In the monotherapy study, patients with genotype 1b had greater reductions in HCV RNA levels than patients with genotype 1a at all elbasvir doses; responses in patients with genotype 3 were generally less pronounced than for genotype 1, particularly at lower elbasvir doses. M28T, Q30R, L31V, and Y93H in genotype 1a, L31V and Y93H in genotype 1b, and A30K, L31F, and Y93H in genotype 3 were the predominant RAVs selected by elbasvir monotherapy. Virologic findings in patients were consistent with the preclinical observations. NS5A-RAVs emerged most often at amino acid positions 28, 30, 31, and 93 in both the laboratory and clinical trial. (The MK-8742 P002 trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01532973.) PMID:26303801

  7. Determination of Aflatoxin B1 in Smokeless Tobacco Products by Use of UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zitomer, Nicholas; Rybak, Michael E; Li, Zhong; Walters, Matthew J; Holman, Matthew R

    2015-10-21

    This work developed a UHPLC-MS/MS method for the detection and quantitation of aflatoxins in smokeless tobacco products, which was then used to determine aflatoxin B1 concentrations in 32 smokeless tobacco products commercially available in the United States. Smokeless tobacco products were dried, milled, and amended with (13)C17-labeled internal standards, extracted in water/methanol solution in the presence of a surfactant, isolated through use of immunoaffinity column chromatography, and reconstituted in mobile phase prior to UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. The method was capable of baseline separation of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in a 2.5 min run by use of a fused core C18 column and a water/methanol gradient. MS/MS transition (m/z) 313.3 → 241.2 was used for aflatoxin B1 quantitation, with 313.3 → 285.1 used for confirmation. The limit of detection (LOD) for aflatoxin B1 was 0.007 parts per billion (ppb). Method imprecision for aflatoxin B1 (expressed as coefficient of variation) ranged from 5.5 to 9.4%. Spike recoveries were 105-111%. Aflatoxin B1 concentrations in the smokeless tobacco products analyzed ranged from B1 was most frequently detected in dry snuffs and chews, whereas all moist snuff products tested were below LOD. The amounts of aflatoxin B1 detected were low relative to the 20 ppb regulatory limit established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for foods and feeds.

  8. 26 CFR 1.669(b)-1 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Information requirements. 1.669(b)-1 Section 1... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.669(b)-1 Information requirements. The election of a beneficiary who is... following information with respect to the operation and accounts of the foreign trust created by a...

  9. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction...

  10. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction...

  11. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction...

  12. 17 CFR 260.10b-1 - Calculation of percentages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calculation of percentages. 260.10b-1 Section 260.10b-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Calculation of percentages. The percentages of voting securities and other securities specified in section...

  13. 26 CFR 1.652(b)-1 - Character of amounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Character of amounts. 1.652(b)-1 Section 1.652(b... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Trusts Which Distribute Current Income Only § 1.652(b)-1 Character of amounts. In determining the gross income of a beneficiary, the amounts includible under § 1.652(a)-1 have the...

  14. 75 FR 69971 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section....029 TN16NO10.030 BILLING CODE 5001-06-C...

  15. 75 FR 69953 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section... ] TN16NO10.055 BILLING CODE 5001-06-C...

  16. 75 FR 69960 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section... ] TN16NO10.065 ] TN16NO10.066 BILLING CODE 5001-06-C...

  17. 75 FR 69922 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of... ] TN16NO10.043 ] TN16NO10.044 BILLING CODE 5001-06-C...

  18. 75 FR 69926 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of... ] TN16NO10.038 ] TN16NO10.039 ] TN16NO10.040 BILLING CODE 5001-06-C...

  19. 75 FR 69957 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section... ] TN16NO10.034 BILLING CODE 5001-06-C...

  20. 49 CFR 178.33b-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33b-1 Section 178.33b-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for...

  1. 49 CFR 178.33b-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33b-1 Section 178.33b-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for...

  2. 49 CFR 178.33b-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33b-1 Section 178.33b-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for...

  3. 49 CFR 178.33b-1 - Compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compliance. 178.33b-1 Section 178.33b-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for...

  4. 26 CFR 1.643(b)-1 - Definition of income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of income. 1.643(b)-1 Section 1.643(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... of subparts A through D, part I, subchapter J, chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code, “income,”...

  5. 26 CFR 48.4061(b)-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Imposition of tax. 48.4061(b)-1 Section 48.4061... EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Motor Vehicles, Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Automotive and Related Items § 48.4061(b)-1 Imposition of tax. (a) In general. Section...

  6. 26 CFR 48.4061(b)-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Imposition of tax. 48.4061(b)-1 Section 48.4061... EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Motor Vehicles, Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Automotive and Related Items § 48.4061(b)-1 Imposition of tax. (a) In general. Section...

  7. 26 CFR 48.4061(b)-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Imposition of tax. 48.4061(b)-1 Section 48.4061... EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Motor Vehicles, Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Automotive and Related Items § 48.4061(b)-1 Imposition of tax. (a) In general. Section...

  8. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., the term structure means a building, as defined in § 1.48-1(e)(1), including the structural components... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In...

  9. 75 FR 74011 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  10. 75 FR 60424 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law...

  11. 77 FR 46423 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of... support. (iv) Military Department: Army (WBL) (v) Prior Related Cases, if any: None (vi) Sales...

  12. 75 FR 81993 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  13. 76 FR 29212 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements...

  14. 76 FR 28956 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  15. 76 FR 26707 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements...

  16. 76 FR 37078 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  17. 75 FR 20571 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law...

  18. 76 FR 38371 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  19. 76 FR 37075 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  20. 76 FR 37071 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  1. 75 FR 74014 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  2. 75 FR 48646 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD... 36(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law...

  3. 77 FR 68738 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  4. 77 FR 53182 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  5. 77 FR 49432 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  6. 76 FR 30676 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  7. 76 FR 107 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  8. 76 FR 35188 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  9. 75 FR 107 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703)...

  10. 77 FR 65185 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  11. 75 FR 114 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703)...

  12. 77 FR 49434 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  13. 76 FR 66044 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  14. 76 FR 40703 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...

  15. 75 FR 47275 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164, dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703)...

  16. 75 FR 5971 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703)...

  17. 76 FR 72182 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  18. 76 FR 30667 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  19. 77 FR 68740 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  20. 77 FR 52698 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  1. 76 FR 55651 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  2. 75 FR 42708 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD... 36(b)(1) arms sales notifications to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164, dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703)...

  3. 77 FR 74832 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  4. 76 FR 30670 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  5. 76 FR 32958 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  6. 77 FR 49436 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  7. 76 FR 103 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  8. Genome Sequences of Five B1 Subcluster Mycobacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Barrus, E. Zane; Benedict, Alex B.; Brighton, Alicia K.; Fisher, Joshua N. B.; Gardner, Adam V.; Kartchner, Brittany J.; Ladle, Kara C.; Lunt, Bryce L.; Merrill, Bryan D.; Morrell, John D.; Burnett, Sandra H.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages infect members of the Mycobacterium genus in the phylum Actinobacteria and exhibit remarkable diversity. Genome analysis groups the thousands of known mycobacteriophages into clusters, of which the B1 subcluster is currently the third most populous. We report the complete genome sequences of five additional members of the B1 subcluster. PMID:24285667

  9. Genome sequences of five b1 subcluster mycobacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Breakwell, Donald P; Barrus, E Zane; Benedict, Alex B; Brighton, Alicia K; Fisher, Joshua N B; Gardner, Adam V; Kartchner, Brittany J; Ladle, Kara C; Lunt, Bryce L; Merrill, Bryan D; Morrell, John D; Burnett, Sandra H; Grose, Julianne H

    2013-11-27

    Mycobacteriophages infect members of the Mycobacterium genus in the phylum Actinobacteria and exhibit remarkable diversity. Genome analysis groups the thousands of known mycobacteriophages into clusters, of which the B1 subcluster is currently the third most populous. We report the complete genome sequences of five additional members of the B1 subcluster.

  10. 26 CFR 11.410(b)-1 - Minimum coverage requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum coverage requirements. 11.410(b)-1 Section 11.410(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY...

  11. Interaction of aflatoxin B1 and cyclopiazonic acid toxicities.

    PubMed

    Yates, I E; Cole, R J; Giles, J L; Dorner, J W

    1987-01-01

    Toxic properties of the mycotoxins cyclopiazonic acid and aflatoxin B1 have been analyzed separately and in combination by monitoring their effects on luminescence in the marine bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum, Strain NCMB 844. Genotoxicity was analyzed with a dark mutant of this organism whose reversion to the bioluminescent condition is stimulated by compounds attacking guanine sites in deoxyribonucleic acids. In this assay, cyclopiazonic acid, unlike aflatoxin B1, is not enhanced by cyclopiazonic acid when the two mycotoxins are assayed in combination. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the diminution of bioluminescence in a separate assay system with strain NRRLB-1177 of P. phosphoreum. Cyclopiazonic acid is more cytotoxic than aflatoxin B1, and concentrations of cyclopiazonic acid required for cytotoxicity decreases with time, whereas aflatoxin B1 cytotoxic expression does not change significantly with time under most assay conditions. Aflatoxin B1 and cyclopiazonic acid assayed as a dose pair indicate that these mycotoxins elicit their effects by independent modes of action.

  12. Substrate- and pH-Specific Antifolate Transport Mediated by Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide 2B1 (OATP2B1-SLCO2B1)

    PubMed Central

    Visentin, Michele; Chang, Min-Hwang; Romero, Michael F.; Zhao, Rongbao

    2012-01-01

    Human organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 2B1 (OATP-B; SLCO2B1) is expressed in the apical membrane of the small intestine and the hepatocyte basolateral membrane and transports structurally diverse organic anions with a wide spectrum of pH sensitivities. This article describes highly pH-dependent OATP2B1-mediated antifolate transport and compares this property with that of sulfobromophthalein (BSP), a preferred OATP2B1 substrate. At pH 5.5 and low substrate concentrations (∼2.5 μM), only [3H]pemetrexed influx [in contrast to methotrexate (MTX), folic acid, and reduced folates] could be detected in OATP2B1-transfected HeLa R1-11 cells that lack endogenous folate-specific transporters. Influx was optimal at pH 4.5 to 5.5, falling precipitously with an increase in pH >6.0; BSP influx was independent of pH. Influx of both substrates at low pH was markedly inhibited by the proton ionophore 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone; BSP influx was also suppressed at pH 7.4. At 300 μM MTX, influx was one-third that of pemetrexed; influx of folic acid, (6S)5-methyltetrahydrofolate, or (6S)5-formyltetrahydrofolate was not detected. There were similar findings in OATP2B1-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes. The pemetrexed influx Km was ∼300 μM; the raltitrexed influx Ki was ∼70 μM at pH 5.5. Stable expression of OAPT2B1 in HeLa R1-11 cells resulted in substantial raltitrexed, but modest pemetrexed, growth inhibition consistent with their affinities for this carrier. Hence, OATP2B1 represents a low-affinity transport route for antifolates (relative affinities: raltitrexed > pemetrexed > MTX) at low pH. In contrast, the high affinity of this transporter for BSP relative to antifolates seems to be intrinsic to its binding site and independent of the proton concentration. PMID:22021325

  13. The role of B-1 cells in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Monowar; Holodick, Nichol E; Rothstein, Thomas L; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    B-1 lymphocytes exhibit unique phenotypic, ontogenic, and functional characteristics that differ from the conventional B-2 cells. B-1 cells spontaneously secrete germline-like, repertoire-skewed polyreactive natural antibody, which acts as a first line of defense by neutralizing a wide range of pathogens before launching of the adaptive immune response. Immunomodulatory molecules such as interleukin-10, adenosine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3, and interleukin-35 are also produced by B-1 cells in the presence or absence of stimulation, which regulate acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Considerable progress has been made during the past three decades since the discovery of B-1 cells, which has improved not only our understanding of their phenotypic and ontogenic uniqueness but also their role in various inflammatory diseases including influenza, pneumonia, sepsis, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmunity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Recent identification of human B-1 cells widens the scope of this field, leading to novel innovations that can be implemented from bench to bedside. Among the vast number of studies on B-1 cells, we have carried out a literature review highlighting current trends in the study of B-1 cell involvement during inflammation, which may result in a paradigm shift toward sustainable therapeutics in various inflammatory diseases.

  14. The role of B-1 cells in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Monowar; Holodick, Nichol E; Rothstein, Thomas L; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    B-1 lymphocytes exhibit unique phenotypic, ontogenic, and functional characteristics that differ from the conventional B-2 cells. B-1 cells spontaneously secrete germline-like, repertoire-skewed polyreactive natural antibody, which acts as a first line of defense by neutralizing a wide range of pathogens before launching of the adaptive immune response. Immunomodulatory molecules such as interleukin-10, adenosine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3, and interleukin-35 are also produced by B-1 cells in the presence or absence of stimulation, which regulate acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Considerable progress has been made during the past three decades since the discovery of B-1 cells, which has improved not only our understanding of their phenotypic and ontogenic uniqueness but also their role in various inflammatory diseases including influenza, pneumonia, sepsis, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmunity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Recent identification of human B-1 cells widens the scope of this field, leading to novel innovations that can be implemented from bench to bedside. Among the vast number of studies on B-1 cells, we have carried out a literature review highlighting current trends in the study of B-1 cell involvement during inflammation, which may result in a paradigm shift toward sustainable therapeutics in various inflammatory diseases. PMID:26427372

  15. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    PubMed

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management. PMID:25658124

  16. Formation of B-1 B Cells from Neonatal B-1 Transitional Cells Exhibits NF-κB Redundancy

    PubMed Central

    Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The stages of development leading up to the formation of mature B-1 cells have not been identified. As a result, there is no basis for understanding why various genetic defects, and those in the classical or alternative NF-κB pathways in particular, differentially affect the B-1 and B-2 B cell lineages. Here, we demonstrate that B-1 B cells are generated from transitional cell intermediates that emerge in a distinct neonatal wave of development that is sustained for approximately two weeks after birth and then declines as B-2 transitional cells predominate. We further show that, in contrast to the dependence of B-2 transitional cells on the alternative pathway, the survival of neonatal B-1 transitional cells and their maturation into B-1 B cells occurs as long as either alternative or classical NF-κB signaling is intact. Based on these results, we have generated a model of B-1 development that allows the defects in B-1 and B-2 cell production observed in various NF-κB deficient strains of mice to be placed into a coherent cellular context. PMID:22031760

  17. Properties of L=1 B(1) and B(2)* mesons.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Martins, C De Oliveira; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Williams, M R J; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-10-26

    This Letter presents the first strong evidence for the resolution of the excited B mesons B(1) and B(2)* as two separate states in fully reconstructed decays to B(+)(*)pi(-). The mass of B(1) is measured to be 5720.6+/-2.4+/-1.4 MeV/c(2) and the mass difference DeltaM between B(2)* and B(1) is 26.2+/-3.1+/-0.9 MeV/c;{2}, giving the mass of the B(2)* as 5746.8+/-2.4+/-1.7 MeV/c(2). The production rate for B(1) and B(2)* mesons is determined to be a fraction (13.9+/-1.9+/-3.2)% of the production rate of the B+ meson. PMID:17995320

  18. B-1 cells as a source of IgA.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundantly produced immunoglobulin found primarily on mucosal surfaces. The generation of IgA and its involvement in mucosal immune responses have been intensely studied over the past years. IgA can be generated in T cell-dependent and T cell-independent pathways, and it has an important impact on maintaining homeostasis within the mucosal immune system. There is good evidence that B-1 cells contribute substantially to the production of mucosal IgA and thus play an important role in regulating commensal microbiota. However, whether B-1 cells produce antigen-specific or only nonspecific IgA remains to be determined. This review will discuss what is currently known about IgA production by B-1 cells and the functional relevance of B-1 cell-derived IgA both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. 78 FR 76825 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  20. 78 FR 76822 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  1. Analysis of CYP27B1 in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jay P; Bernales, Cecily Q; Lee, Joshua D; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of genetic variability in CYP27B1 and its effect on risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) has yielded conflicting results. Here we describe a study to genetically characterize CYP27B1 and elucidate its role on MS risk in the Canadian population. Sequencing CYP27B1 failed to identify mutations known to cause loss of enzymatic activity, however genotyping of p.R389H in cases and controls identified the mutation in one multi-incident family (allele frequency = 0.03%) in which the p.R389H mutation segregates with disease in five family members diagnosed with MS, thus providing additional support for CYP27B1 p.R389H in the pathogenicity of MS. PMID:24308945

  2. ACTH Regulation of Adrenal SR-B1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Jun; Azhar, Salman; Kraemer, Fredric B

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal gland is one of the prominent sites for steroid hormone synthesis. Lipoprotein-derived cholesterol esters (CEs) delivered via SR-B1 constitute the dominant source of cholesterol for steroidogenesis, particularly in rodents. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulates steroidogenesis through downstream actions on multiple components involved in steroidogenesis. Both acute and chronic ACTH treatments can modulate SR-B1 function, including its transcription, posttranscriptional stability, phosphorylation and dimerization status, as well as the interaction with other protein partners, all of which result in changes in the ability of SR-B1 to mediate HDL-CE uptake and the supply of cholesterol for conversion to steroids. Here, we provide a review of the recent findings on the regulation of adrenal SR-B1 function by ACTH. PMID:27242666

  3. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Aflatoxin B 1 from Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research describes the development of a Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) method to recover aflatoxin B1 from fortified soil. The effects of temperature, pressure, modifier (identity and percentage), and extraction type were assessed. Using the optimized SFE conditions, ...

  4. ACTH Regulation of Adrenal SR-B1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen-Jun; Azhar, Salman; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal gland is one of the prominent sites for steroid hormone synthesis. Lipoprotein-derived cholesterol esters (CEs) delivered via SR-B1 constitute the dominant source of cholesterol for steroidogenesis, particularly in rodents. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulates steroidogenesis through downstream actions on multiple components involved in steroidogenesis. Both acute and chronic ACTH treatments can modulate SR-B1 function, including its transcription, posttranscriptional stability, phosphorylation and dimerization status, as well as the interaction with other protein partners, all of which result in changes in the ability of SR-B1 to mediate HDL-CE uptake and the supply of cholesterol for conversion to steroids. Here, we provide a review of the recent findings on the regulation of adrenal SR-B1 function by ACTH. PMID:27242666

  5. 75 FR 69947 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of... ] TN16NO10.047 TN16NO10.048 ] TN16NO10.049 ] TN16NO10.050 ] TN16NO10.051 BILLING CODE 5001-06-C...

  6. 75 FR 69931 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of... ] TN16NO10.011 ] TN16NO10.012 ] TN16NO10.013 ] TN16NO10.014 ] TN16NO10.015 BILLING CODE 5001-06-C...

  7. Thymoma type B1 arising in a giant supradiaphragmatic thymolipoma.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Han, Serdar; Han, Unsal; Atac, Gokce Kaan; Yanik, Serdar

    2014-11-01

    Thymolipomas are uncommon tumors of the anterior mediastinum. They may extend into, but rarely stem from, the chest cavity. Furthermore, thymoma arising in a thymolipoma is extremely rare. We report a unique case of thymoma type B1 that originated form a giant thymolipoma located in the chest cavity, which was resected by a lateral thoracotomy in a 23-year-old woman. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of thymoma type B1 arising within a giant thymolipoma.

  8. Regulation of EphB1 expression by dopamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Halladay, A K; Yue, Y; Michna, L; Widmer, D A; Wagner, G C; Zhou, R

    2000-12-28

    The Eph family tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands have been implicated in axon guidance and neuronal migration during development of the nervous system. In the current study, we aim to characterize the nature of changes in EphB1 receptor expression following increases or decreases in dopamine activity. Neonatal mice (P3) were injected with 6-hydroxydopamine and allowed 13 days to recover. These animals show a profound depletion of dopamine in all areas assayed, with a corresponding dose-dependent decrease in EphB1 expression. Day 3 pups were also injected either chronically (P3-P16) or acutely (P3 only) with cocaine to determine how enhancing dopamine signaling would affect EphB1 signal density. It was found that both treatments significantly increased expression of EphB1 in the cortex, striatum and substantia nigra. Finally, animals were treated prenatally (E15-E17) with cocaine and sacrificed on P7. These animals also showed an increase in EphB1 signal density, but only in the dopaminergic terminal areas in the cortex and striatum. These studies indicate that dopamine activity regulates developmental expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor EphB1. PMID:11146119

  9. The 1990 vertical distribution of two important halons (F-12B1 and F-13B1) in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, O. N.; Borchers, R.; Lal, Shyam; Subbarya, B. H.; Krueger, Bernd C.; Fabian, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The first vertical profiles of F-12B1 and F-13B1 had been obtained in the tropical troposphere and stratosphere by us in 1987. The measurement of these substances responsible for almost the entire anthropogenic contribution to the stratospheric BrO(x) budget is important in the tropics, as tropical upwelling provides their injection along with that of other pollutants, into the stratosphere. To ascertain the trends of these distributions and foster the data, the 1987 experiment was repeated in April 1990. Like 1987, the MPAE cryogenic whole air sampler was launched on a balloon from Hyderabad, India (17.5 deg N), and 14 samples were collected between 10 and 35 km altitude. The results obtained by means of GC and GC-MS analyses showed that the atmospheric abundance of both F-12B1 and F-13B1 is increasing at a fast rate, respectively by about 15 percent and 10 percent per year. From 1987 to 1990, F-12B1 and F-13B1 tropospheric mixing ratios have been growing from 1.2 and 1.3 ppt to 1.8 and 1.7 ppt, respectively. The vertical profiles will be discussed.

  10. Occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in natural products.

    PubMed

    Prado, Guilherme; Altoé, Aline F; Gomes, Tatiana C B; Leal, Alexandre S; Morais, Vanessa A D; Oliveira, Marize S; Ferreira, Marli B; Gomes, Mateus B; Paschoal, Fabiano N; von S Souza, Rafael; Silva, Daniela A; Cruz Madeira, Jovita E G

    2012-10-01

    The media claims for the consumption of natural resource-based food have gradually increased in both developing and developed countries. The interest in the safety of these products is partially due to the possible presence of toxigenic fungi acting as mycotoxin producers, such as aflatoxins produced during the secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. Aflatoxins, mainly aflatoxin B1, are directly associated with liver cancer in human beings. This paper is aimed at evaluating the presence of aflatoxin B1 in a few vegetable drugs, dried plant extracts and industrialized products traded in 2010 in the city of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The method used for the quantification of aflatoxin B1 was based on extraction through acetone:water (85:15), immunoaffinity column purification followed by separation and detection in high efficiency liquid chromatography. Under the conditions of analysis, the Limits of Detection and Quantification were 0.6 µg kg(-1) and 1.0 µg kg(-1) respectively. The complete sets of analyses were carried out in duplicate. Aflatoxin B1 was noticed in a single sample (< 1.0 µg kg(-1)). The results revealed low aflatoxin B1 contamination in the products under analysis. However, it is required to establish a broad monitoring program in order to obtain additional data and check up on the actual extension of contamination. PMID:24031973

  11. Occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in natural products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Guilherme; Altoé, Aline F.; Gomes, Tatiana C. B.; Leal, Alexandre S.; Morais, Vanessa A. D.; Oliveira, Marize S.; Ferreira, Marli B.; Gomes, Mateus B.; Paschoal, Fabiano N.; von S. Souza, Rafael; Silva, Daniela A.; Cruz Madeira, Jovita E. G.

    2012-01-01

    The media claims for the consumption of natural resource-based food have gradually increased in both developing and developed countries. The interest in the safety of these products is partially due to the possible presence of toxigenic fungi acting as mycotoxin producers, such as aflatoxins produced during the secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. Aflatoxins, mainly aflatoxin B1, are directly associated with liver cancer in human beings. This paper is aimed at evaluating the presence of aflatoxin B1 in a few vegetable drugs, dried plant extracts and industrialized products traded in 2010 in the city of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The method used for the quantification of aflatoxin B1 was based on extraction through acetone:water (85:15), immunoaffinity column purification followed by separation and detection in high efficiency liquid chromatography. Under the conditions of analysis, the Limits of Detection and Quantification were 0.6 µg kg-1 and 1.0 µg kg-1 respectively. The complete sets of analyses were carried out in duplicate. Aflatoxin B1 was noticed in a single sample (< 1.0 µg kg-1). The results revealed low aflatoxin B1 contamination in the products under analysis. However, it is required to establish a broad monitoring program in order to obtain additional data and check up on the actual extension of contamination. PMID:24031973

  12. B1 Mapping by Bloch-Siegert Shift

    PubMed Central

    Sacolick, Laura I.; Wiesinger, Florian; Hancu, Ileana; Vogel, Mika W.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method for B1+ field mapping based on the Bloch-Siegert shift is presented. Unlike conventionally applied double-angle or other signal magnitude-based methods it encodes the B1 information into signal phase, resulting in important advantages in terms of acquisition speed, accuracy and robustness. The Bloch Siegert frequency shift is caused by irradiating with an off-resonance RF pulse following conventional spin excitation. When applying the off-resonance RF in the kHz range, spin nutation can be neglected and the primarily observed effect is a spin precession frequency shift. This shift is proportional to the square of the RF field magnitude B12. Adding gradient image encoding following the off-resonance pulse allows one to acquire spatially resolved B1 maps. The frequency shift from the Bloch-Siegert effect gives a phase shift in the image that is proportional to B12. The phase difference of two acquisitions, with the RF pulse applied at two frequencies symmetrically around the water resonance is used to eliminate undesired off-resonance effects due to B0 inhomogeneity and chemical shift. In-vivo Bloch Siegert B1 mapping with 25 seconds / slice is demonstrated to be quantitatively comparable to a 21 minute double-angle map. As such this method enables robust, high resolution B1+ mapping in a clinically acceptable time frame. PMID:20432302

  13. Isolation and structure of a cDNA encoding the B1 (CD20) cell-surface antigen of human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, T F; Streuli, M; Schlossman, S F; Saito, H

    1988-01-01

    The B1 (CD20) molecule is a Mr 33,000 phosphoprotein on the surface of human B lymphocytes that may serve a central role in the humoral immune response by regulating B-cell proliferation and differentiation. In this report, a cDNA clone that encodes the B1 molecule was isolated and the amino acid sequence of B1 was determined. B-cell-specific cDNA clones were selected from a human tonsillar cDNA library by differential hybridization with labeled cDNA derived from either size-fractionated B-cell mRNA or size-fractionated T-cell mRNA. Of the 261 cDNA clones isolated, 3 cross-hybridizing cDNA clones were chosen as potential candidates for encoding B1 based on their selective hybridization to RNA from B1-positive cell lines. The longest clone, pB1-21, contained a 2.8-kilobase insert with an 891-base-pair open reading frame that encodes a protein of 33 kDa. mRNA synthesized from the pB1-21 cDNA clone in vitro was translated into a protein of the same apparent molecular weight as B1. Limited proteinase digestion of the pB1-21 translation product and B1 generated peptides of the same sizes, indicating that the pB1-21 cDNA encodes the B1 molecule. Gel blot analysis indicated that pB1-21 hybridized with two mRNA species of 2.8 and 3.4 kilobases only in B1-positive cell lines. The amino acid sequence deduced from the pB1-21 nucleotide sequence apparently lacks a signal sequence and contains three extensive hydrophobic regions. The deduced B1 amino acid sequence shows no significant homology with other known proteins. Images PMID:2448768

  14. Transmission and Demographic Dynamics of Coxsackievirus B1.

    PubMed

    Chu, Pei-Yu; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Lu, Po-Liang; Chen, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Bao-Chen; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Wang, Chu-Feng; Su, Hui-Ju; Shi, Yong-Ying; Sanno-Duanda, Bintou; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Motomura, Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    The infectious activity of coxsackievirus B1 (CV-B1) in Taiwan was high from 2008 to 2010, following an alarming increase in severe neonate disease in the United States (US). To examine the relationship between CV-B1 strains isolated in Taiwan and those from other parts of the world, we performed a phylodynamic study using VP1 and partial 3Dpol (414 nt) sequences from 22 strains of CV-B1 isolated in Taiwan (1989-2010) and compared them to sequences from strains isolated worldwide. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods. Four genotypes (GI-IV) in the VP1 region of CV-B1 and three genotypes (GA-C) in the 3Dpol region of enterovirus B were identified and had high support values. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that the GI and GIII strains in VP1 were geographically distributed in Taiwan (1993-1994) and in India (2007-2009). On the other hand, the GII and GIV strains appear to have a wider spatiotemporal distribution and ladder-like topology A stair-like phylogeny was observed in the VP1 region indicating that the phylogeny of the virus may be affected by different selection pressures in the specified regions. Further, most of the GI and GII strains in the VP1 tree were clustered together in GA in the 3D tree, while the GIV strains diverged into GB and GC. Taken together, these data provide important insights into the population dynamics of CV-B1 and indicate that incongruencies in specific gene regions may contribute to spatiotemporal patterns of epidemicity for this virus. PMID:26053872

  15. Transmission and Demographic Dynamics of Coxsackievirus B1

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Pei-Yu; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Lu, Po-Liang; Chen, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Bao-Chen; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Wang, Chu-Feng; Su, Hui-Ju; Shi, Yong-Ying; Sanno-Duanda, Bintou; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Motomura, Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    The infectious activity of coxsackievirus B1 (CV-B1) in Taiwan was high from 2008 to 2010, following an alarming increase in severe neonate disease in the United States (US). To examine the relationship between CV-B1 strains isolated in Taiwan and those from other parts of the world, we performed a phylodynamic study using VP1 and partial 3Dpol (414 nt) sequences from 22 strains of CV-B1 isolated in Taiwan (1989–2010) and compared them to sequences from strains isolated worldwide. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods. Four genotypes (GI–IV) in the VP1 region of CV-B1 and three genotypes (GA–C) in the 3Dpol region of enterovirus B were identified and had high support values. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that the GI and GIII strains in VP1 were geographically distributed in Taiwan (1993–1994) and in India (2007–2009). On the other hand, the GII and GIV strains appear to have a wider spatiotemporal distribution and ladder-like topology A stair-like phylogeny was observed in the VP1 region indicating that the phylogeny of the virus may be affected by different selection pressures in the specified regions. Further, most of the GI and GII strains in the VP1 tree were clustered together in GA in the 3D tree, while the GIV strains diverged into GB and GC. Taken together, these data provide important insights into the population dynamics of CV-B1 and indicate that incongruencies in specific gene regions may contribute to spatiotemporal patterns of epidemicity for this virus. PMID:26053872

  16. 26 CFR 1.167(b)-1 - Straight line method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Straight line method. 1.167(b)-1 Section 1.167(b... Straight line method. (a) In general. Under the straight line method the cost or other basis of the... may be reduced to a percentage or fraction. The straight line method may be used in determining...

  17. 26 CFR 1.167(b)-1 - Straight line method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Straight line method. 1.167(b)-1 Section 1.167(b... Straight line method. (a) In general. Under the straight line method the cost or other basis of the... may be reduced to a percentage or fraction. The straight line method may be used in determining...

  18. 26 CFR 1.512(b)-1 - Modifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.512(b)-1... from notional principal contracts (as defined in Treasury Regulations 26 CFR 1.863-7 or regulations... foregoing items of income shall be excluded in computing unrelated business taxable income. (2)...

  19. 78 FR 62588 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  20. 78 FR 62590 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  1. 78 FR 62600 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  2. 78 FR 62592 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  3. 78 FR 15004 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  4. 78 FR 72066 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  5. 76 FR 72180 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, as amended (i) Prospective Purchaser: Malaysia. (ii... Arms Export Control Act. Policy Justification Malaysia--AIM-9X-2 SIDEWINDER Missiles The Government of Malaysia has requested a possible sale of 20 AIM- 9X-2 SIDEWINDER Block II All-Up-Round Missiles, 8...

  6. 78 FR 48424 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... data, personnel training and training equipment, site surveys, Quality Assurance Teams, U.S. Government... data, personnel training and training equipment, site surveys, Quality Assurance Teams, U.S....

  7. 26 CFR 1.677(b)-1 - Trusts for support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.677(b)-1 Trusts for support... the child of the grantor, whom the grantor or his spouse is legally obligated to support. If income of... extent income of the current year is actually applied for the support or maintenance of his spouse....

  8. 78 FR 66338 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, as amended (i) Prospective Purchaser: Republic of Korea... Section 47(6) of the Arms Export Control Act. ] POLICY JUSTIFICATION The Republic of Korea--Patriot Anti-Tactical Missiles The Republic of Korea (ROK) has requested a possible sale to procure 112 Patriot...

  9. 77 FR 70151 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, as amended (i) Prospective Purchaser: Indonesia. (ii.... ] POLICY JUSTIFICATION Government of Indonesia--Javelin Missiles The Government of Indonesia has requested... progress in Southeast Asia. The proposed sale provides Indonesia with assets vital to protect its...

  10. 75 FR 11865 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...)(1) arms sales notification to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated...

  11. 76 FR 18731 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of...

  12. 76 FR 8716 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of...

  13. 75 FR 9182 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...)(1) arms sales notification to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated...

  14. 76 FR 18726 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD...)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of...

  15. 75 FR 30787 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b... July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740. The...

  16. 75 FR 51445 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b... July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740....

  17. 75 FR 4785 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b... July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740....

  18. 75 FR 48947 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b... July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740....

  19. 26 CFR 1.7702B-1 - Consumer protection provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) In general. Under sections 7702B(b)(1)(F), 7702B(g), and 4980C, qualified long-term care...-Term Care Insurance Model Act (Model Act) and Long-Term Care Insurance Model Regulation (Model... January 1993. The requirements for qualified long-term care insurance contracts under section...

  20. 26 CFR 1.669(b)-1 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....669(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning... 666(a): (a) The gross income of the trust: The gross income should be separated to show the amount...

  1. 78 FR 26326 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section.../DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740. The following is a copy of a letter to the Speaker of the House...

  2. 78 FR 26328 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ..., Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of..., DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740. The following is a copy of a letter to the Speaker of the House...

  3. 78 FR 26324 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ..., Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of..., DSCA/DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740. The following is a copy of a letter to the Speaker of the House...

  4. 78 FR 46579 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section.../DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740. The following is a copy of a letter to the Speaker of the House...

  5. 78 FR 78941 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section.../DBO/CFM, (703) 601-3740. The following is a copy of a letter to the Speaker of the House...

  6. In vivo formation of N-acyl-fumonisin B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are fungal toxins found in corn and in corn-based foods. Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is the most common and is toxic to animals, causes cancer in rodents, and is a suspected risk factor for cancer and birth defects in humans. The hydrolyzed form of FB1 (HFB1) also occurs in foods and is metabolize...

  7. 77 FR 35363 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Representatives, Transmittals 12-25 with attached transmittal, policy justification, and Sensitivity of Technology.... (vi) Sales Commission, Fee, etc., Paid, Offered, or Agreed to be Paid: None. (vii) Sensitivity of... Pursuant to Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act Annex Item No. vii (vii) Sensitivity...

  8. 77 FR 46415 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... Representatives, Transmittals 12-46 with attached transmittal, policy justification, and Sensitivity of Technology...) Sensitivity of Technology Contained in the Defense Article or Defense Services Proposed to be Sold: See Annex... Pursuant to Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act Annex Item No. vii (vii) Sensitivity...

  9. 78 FR 36534 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, as amended (i) Prospective Purchaser: Thailand (ii) Total... Article or Defense Services Proposed to be Sold: None (viii) Date Report Delivered to Congress: 7 June 2013 *as defined in Section 47(6) of the Arms Export Control Act. POLICY JUSTIFICATION...

  10. 26 CFR 301.6223(b)-1 - Notice group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... If a group of partners having in the aggregate a 5 percent or more interest in the profits of a... identification number, and profits interest of each member of the group; and (v) Be signed by all partners... October 4, 2001. For years beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6223(b)-1T contained in 26...

  11. 78 FR 69073 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, as amended (i) Prospective Purchaser: Romania (ii) Total... JUSTIFICATION Romania--Weapons, Equipment, and Support for F-16 Block 15 MLU Aircraft The Government of Romania... sale of weapons, equipment, and support for the transferred F-16s will support Romania's needs for...

  12. Loss of Slc4a1b chloride/bicarbonate exchanger function protects mechanosensory hair cells from aminoglycoside damage in the zebrafish mutant persephone.

    PubMed

    Hailey, Dale W; Roberts, Brock; Owens, Kelly N; Stewart, Andrew K; Linbo, Tor; Pujol, Remy; Alper, Seth L; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2012-01-01

    Mechanosensory hair cell death is a leading cause of hearing and balance disorders in the human population. Hair cells are remarkably sensitive to environmental insults such as excessive noise and exposure to some otherwise therapeutic drugs. However, individual responses to damaging agents can vary, in part due to genetic differences. We previously carried out a forward genetic screen using the zebrafish lateral line system to identify mutations that alter the response of larval hair cells to the antibiotic neomycin, one of a class of aminoglycoside compounds that cause hair cell death in humans. The persephone mutation confers resistance to aminoglycosides. 5 dpf homozygous persephone mutants are indistinguishable from wild-type siblings, but differ in their retention of lateral line hair cells upon exposure to neomycin. The mutation in persephone maps to the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger slc4a1b and introduces a single Ser-to-Phe substitution in zSlc4a1b. This mutation prevents delivery of the exchanger to the cell surface and abolishes the ability of the protein to import chloride across the plasma membrane. Loss of function of zSlc4a1b reduces hair cell death caused by exposure to the aminoglycosides neomycin, kanamycin, and gentamicin, and the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. Pharmacological block of anion transport with the disulfonic stilbene derivatives DIDS and SITS, or exposure to exogenous bicarbonate, also protects hair cells against damage. Both persephone mutant and DIDS-treated wild-type larvae show reduced uptake of labeled aminoglycosides. persephone mutants also show reduced FM1-43 uptake, indicating a potential impact on mechanotransduction-coupled activity in the mutant. We propose that tight regulation of the ionic environment of sensory hair cells, mediated by zSlc4a1b activity, is critical for their sensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  13. Seasonal changes in the regional hydrological cycle and resulting potential vegetation changes in an aggressive mitigation scenario compared to SRES A1B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebener, H.; Höschel, I.; Körber, J.; Sanderson, M.; Johns, T. C.; Royer, J.-F.; Melia, D. Salas Y.; Roeckner, E.; Giorgetta, M.; Manzini, E.

    2010-09-01

    An aggressive mitigation scenario named E1 was developed in the EU FP6 Project ENSEMBLES, starting from current concentration levels (scenario path of SRES A1B) and leading to an eventual stabilization of CO2-eq. concentrations at 450 ppm beyond 2100. A set of 10 GCM and ESM was used to simulate climate change until 2100 under the E1 scenario, compared to the baseline A1B scenario. Previous analysis has shown that the ensemble mean warming stays below the 2K-target. In this presentation, focus will be on monthly and seasonal analyses of changes in the hydrological cycle and resulting potential vegetation changes, represented by biomes. For selected regions (from the 26 Giorgy-Regions) the annual cycles of precipitation, cloudiness and evapotranspiration and related biome changes will be shown. The results will be compared between the two scenarios and particularly vulnerable regions will be identified. Results will be discussed with special focus on the avoided climate change under the E1 scenario as compared to the A1B scenario. This allows assessing both, profits of keeping the 2K-target and changes that are unavoidable even under the aggressive mitigation path necessary to keep the 2K-target. Biome changes for both scenarios reflect shifts to a warmer climate but are more pronounced in the A1B scenario compared to the E1 scenario. For example, in North-Eastern Europe, an expansion of Temperate Mixed Forest and Cool Mixed forests is simulated replacing Cool Conifer Forests and Taiga. Further south, in the Mediterranean Basin temperate Mixed Forests are replaced by Xerophytic Woodland, Warm Grassland and Warm Mixed Forest.

  14. Additive effects of levonorgestrel and ethinylestradiol on brain aromatase (cyp19a1b) in zebrafish specific in vitro and in vivo bioassays.

    PubMed

    Hinfray, N; Tebby, C; Garoche, C; Piccini, B; Bourgine, G; Aït-Aïssa, S; Kah, O; Pakdel, F; Brion, F

    2016-09-15

    Estrogens and progestins are widely used in combination in human medicine and both are present in aquatic environment. Despite the joint exposure of aquatic wildlife to estrogens and progestins, very little information is available on their combined effects. In the present study we investigated the effect of ethinylestradiol (EE2) and Levonorgestrel (LNG), alone and in mixtures, on the expression of the brain specific ER-regulated cyp19a1b gene. For that purpose, recently established zebrafish-derived tools were used: (i) an in vitro transient reporter gene assay in a human glial cell line (U251-MG) co-transfected with zebrafish estrogen receptors (zfERs) and the luciferase gene under the control of the zebrafish cyp19a1b gene promoter and (ii) an in vivo bioassay using a transgenic zebrafish expressing GFP under the control of the zebrafish cyp19a1b gene promoter (cyp19a1b-GFP). Concentration-response relationships for single chemicals were modeled and used to design the mixture experiments following a ray design. The results from mixture experiments were analyzed to predict joint effects according to concentration addition and statistical approaches were used to characterize the potential interactions between the components of the mixtures (synergism/antagonism). We confirmed that some progestins could elicit estrogenic effects in fish brain. In mixtures, EE2 and LNG exerted additive estrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that some environmental progestin could exert effects that will add to those of environmental (xeno-)estrogens. Moreover, our zebrafish specific assays are valuable tools that could be used in risk assessment for both single chemicals and their mixtures. PMID:27491593

  15. Effect-directed analysis for estrogenic compounds in a fluvial sediment sample using transgenic cyp19a1b-GFP zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Fetter, Eva; Krauss, Martin; Brion, François; Kah, Olivier; Scholz, Stefan; Brack, Werner

    2014-09-01

    Xenoestrogens may persist in the environment by binding to sediments or suspended particulate matter serving as long-term reservoir and source of exposure, particularly for organisms living in or in contact with sediments. In this study, we present for the first time an effect-directed analysis (EDA) for identifying estrogenic compounds in a sediment sample using embryos of a transgenic reporter fish strain. In the tg(cyp19a1b-GFP) transgenic zebrafish strain, the expression of GFP (green fluorescent protein) in the brain is driven by an oestrogen responsive element in the promoter of the cyp19a1b (aromatase) gene. The selected sediment sample of the Czech river Bilina had already been analysed in a previous EDA using the yeast oestrogen screening assay and had revealed fractions containing estrogenic compounds. When normal phase HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) fractionation was used for the separation of the sediment sample, the biotest with transgenic fish embryos revealed two estrogenic fractions. Chemical analysis of candidate compounds in these sediment fractions suggested alkylphenols and estrone as candidate compounds responsible for the observed estrogenic effect. Alkylphenol concentrations could partially explain the estrogenicity of the fractions. However, xenoestrogens below the analytical detection limit or non-targeted estrogenic compounds have probably also contributed to the sample's estrogenic potency. The results indicated the suitability of the tg(cyp19a1b-GFP) fish embryo for an integrated chemical-biological analysis of estrogenic effects.

  16. SLCO1B1 Variants and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor (Enalapril) -Induced Cough: a Pharmacogenetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian-Quan; He, Fa-Zhong; Wang, Zhen-Min; Sun, Ning-Ling; Wang, Lu-Yan; Tang, Gen-Fu; Liu, Mou-Ze; Li, Qing; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations suggest that incidence of cough in Chinese taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors is much higher than other racial groups. Cough is the most common adverse reaction of enalapril. We investigate whether SLCO1B1 genetic polymorphisms, previously reported to be important determinants of inter-individual variability in enalapril pharmacokinetics, are associated with the enalapril-induced cough. A cohort of 450 patients with essential hypertension taking 10 mg enalapril maleate were genotyped for the functional SLCO1B1 variants, 388A > G (Asn130Asp, rs2306283) and 521T > C (Val174Ala, rs4149056). The primary endpoint was cough, which was recorded when participants were bothered by cough and respiratory symptoms during enalapril treatment without an identifiable cause. SLCO1B1 521C allele conferred a 2-fold relative risk of enalapril-induced cough (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.34–3.04, P = 6.2 × 10−4), and haplotype analysis suggested the relative risk of cough was 6.94-fold (95% CI = 1.30–37.07, P = 0.020) in SLCO1B1*15/*15 carriers. Furthermore, there was strong evidence for a gene-dose effect (percent with cough in those with 0, 1, or 2 copy of the 521C allele: 28.2%, 42.5%, and 71.4%, trend P = 6.6 × 10−4). Our study highlights, for the first time, SLCO1B1 variants are strongly associated with an increased risk of enalapril-induced cough. The findings will be useful to provide pharmacogenetic markers for enalapril treatment. PMID:26607661

  17. Total synthesis of avermectin B1a revisited.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shuji; Hayashi, Daisuke; Nakano, Aoi; Hayashi, Yujiro; Hirama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Avermectins were isolated as compounds possessing anthelmintic activity from the culture broth of Streptomycesavermitilis by Ōmura and co-workers. Owing to their potent anthelmintic and insecticidal activities, as well as their unique pentacyclic architecture, the avermectin family attracted keen interest from synthetic organic chemists. We have recently completed a more efficient and straightforward total synthesis of avermectin B1a, as compared with previous syntheses. PMID:26350782

  18. SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms and Statin-Induced Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Statin drugs are highly effective in lowering blood concentrations of LDL-cholesterol, with concomitant reduction in risk of major cardiovascular events. Although statins are generally regarded as safe and well-tolerated, some users develop muscle symptoms that are mostly mild but in rare cases can lead to life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. The SEARCH genome-wide association study, which has been independently replicated, found a significant association between the rs4149056 (c.521T>C) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the SLCO1B1 gene, and myopathy in individuals taking 80 mg simvastatin per day, with an odds ratio of 4.5 per rs4149056 C allele. The purpose of this paper is to assemble evidence relating to the analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility of using SLCO1B1 rs4149056 genotyping to inform choice and dose of statin treatment, with the aim of minimising statin-induced myopathy and increasing adherence to therapy. Genotyping assays for the rs4149056 SNP appear to be robust and accurate, though direct evidence for the performance of array-based platforms in genotyping individual SNPs was not found. Using data from the SEARCH study, calculated values for the clinical sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values of a test for the C allele to predict definite or incipient myopathy during 5 years of 80 mg/day simvastatin use were 70.4%, 73.7%, 4.1% and 99.4% respectively. There is a need for studies comparing the clinical validity of SLCO1B1 rs4149056 genotyping with risk scores for myopathy based on other factors such as racial background, statin type and dose, gender, body mass index, co-medications and co-morbidities. No direct evidence was found for clinical utility of statin prescription guided by SLCO1B1 genotype. PMID:24459608

  19. Improving MRI surface coil decoupling to reduce B1 distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Christian

    As clinical MRI systems continue to advance, larger focus is being given to image uniformity. Good image uniformity begins with generating uniform magnetic fields, which are easily distorted by induced currents on receive-only surface coils. It has become an industry standard to combat these induced currents by placing RF blocking networks on surface coils. This paper explores the effect of blocking network impedance of phased array surface coils on B1 distortion. It has been found and verified, that traditional approaches for blocking network design in complex phased arrays can leave undesirable B1 distortions at 3 Tesla. The traditional approach of LC tank blocking is explored, but shifts from the idea that higher impedance equals better B1 distortion at 3T. The result is a new design principle for a tank with a finite inductive reactance at the Larmor Frequency. The solution is demonstrated via simulation using a simple, single, large tuning loop. The same loop, along with a smaller loop, is used to derive the new design principle, which is then applied to a complex phased array structure.

  20. Protection against aflatoxin B1-induced cytotoxicity by expression of the cloned aflatoxin B1-aldehyde reductases rat AKR7A1 and human AKR7A3.

    PubMed

    Bodreddigari, Sridevi; Jones, Laundette Knight; Egner, Patricia A; Groopman, John D; Sutter, Carrie Hayes; Roebuck, Bill D; Guengerich, F Peter; Kensler, Thomas W; Sutter, Thomas R

    2008-05-01

    The reduction of the aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1) dialdehyde metabolite to its corresponding mono and dialcohols, catalyzed by aflatoxin B 1-aldehyde reductase (AFAR, rat AKR7A1, and human AKR7A3), is greatly increased in livers of rats treated with numerous chemoprotective agents. Recombinant human AKR7A3 has been shown to reduce the AFB 1-dialdehyde at rates greater than those of the rat AKR7A1. The activity of AKR7A1 or AKR7A3 may detoxify the AFB 1-dialdehyde, which reacts with proteins, and thereby inhibits AFB 1-induced toxicity; however, direct experimental evidence of this hypothesis was lacking. Two human B lymphoblastoid cell lines, designated pMF6/1A2/AKR7A1 and pMF6/1A2, were genetically engineered to stably express AKR7A1 and/or cytochrome P4501A2 (1A2). The pMF6/1A2/AKR7A1 cells were refractory to the cytotoxic effects of 3 ng/mL AFB 1, in comparison to pM6/1A2 cells, which were more sensitive. Diminished protection occurred at higher concentrations of AFB 1 in pMF6/1A2/AKR7A1 cells, suggesting that additional factors were influencing cell survival. COS-7 cells were transfected with either vector control, rat AKR7A1, or human AKR7A3, and the cells were treated with AFB 1-dialdehyde. There was a 6-fold increase in the dialdehyde LC 50, from 66 microM in vector-transfected cells to 400 microM in AKR7A1-transfected cells, and an 8.5-fold increase from 35 microM in vector-transfected cells to 300 microM in AKR7A3-transfected cells. In both cases, this protective effect of the AFAR enzyme was accompanied by a marked decrease in protein adducts. Fractionation of the cellular protein showed that the mitochondria/nuclei and microsomal fractions contained the highest concentration of protein adducts. The levels of human AKR7A3 and AKR7A2 were measured in 12 human liver samples. The expression of AKR7A3 was detectable in all livers and lower than those of AKR7A2 in 11 of the 12 samples. Overall, these results provide the first direct evidence of a role for rat AKR7A1

  1. 26 CFR 48.6416(b)(1)-1 - Price readjustments causing overpayments of manufacturers tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... manufacturers tax. 48.6416(b)(1)-1 Section 48.6416(b)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... § 48.6416(b)(1)-1 Price readjustments causing overpayments of manufacturers tax. In the case of any... within the meaning of section 6416(b)(1) and § 48.6416(b)(1)-2 or § 48.6416(b)(1)-3, the person who...

  2. 26 CFR 48.6416(b)(1)-1 - Price readjustments causing overpayments of manufacturers tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... manufacturers tax. 48.6416(b)(1)-1 Section 48.6416(b)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... § 48.6416(b)(1)-1 Price readjustments causing overpayments of manufacturers tax. In the case of any... within the meaning of section 6416(b)(1) and § 48.6416(b)(1)-2 or § 48.6416(b)(1)-3, the person who...

  3. Basal and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl-induced expression of cytochrome P450 1A, 1B and 1C genes in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Joensson, Maria E. . E-mail: mjonsson@whoi.edu; Orrego, Rodrigo; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2007-05-15

    The cytochrome P4501C (CYP1C) gene subfamily was recently discovered in fish, and zebrafish (Danio rerio) CYP1C1 transcript has been cloned. Here we cloned the paralogous CYP1C2, showing that the amino acid sequence is 78% identical to CYP1C1, and examined gene structure and expression of CYP1A, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and CYP1C2. Xenobiotic response elements were observed upstream of the coding regions in all four genes. Zebrafish adults and embryos were exposed (24 h) to 100 nM 3,3',4,4',5-polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB126) or 20 ppm acetone and subsequently held in clean water for 24 h (adults) or 48 h (embryos). All adult organs examined (eye, gill, heart, liver, kidney, brain, gut, and gonads) and embryos showed basal expression of the four genes. CYP1A was most strongly expressed in liver, whereas CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and CYP1C2 were most strongly expressed in heart and eye. CYP1B1 and the CYP1C genes showed an expression pattern similar to one another and to mammalian CYP1B1. In embryos CYP1C1 and CYP1C2 tended to have a higher basal expression than CYP1A and CYP1B1. PCB126 induced CYP1A in all organs, and CYP1B1 and CYP1C1 in all organs except gonads, or gonads and brain, respectively. CYP1C2 induction was significant only in the liver. However, in embryos all four genes were induced strongly by PCB126. The results are consistent with CYP1C1 and CYP1C2, as well as CYP1A and CYP1B1, being regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. While CYP1A may have a protective role against AHR agonists in liver and gut, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and CYP1C2 may also play endogenous roles in eye and heart and possibly other organs, as well as during development.

  4. Determination of aflatoxin B1 in medical herbs: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Isabel; Sizoo, Eric; van Egmond, Hans; Kroeger, Katy; Legarda, Teresa M; Burdaspal, Pedro; Reif, Klaus; Stroka, Joerg

    2006-01-01

    A method was developed for the determination of aflatoxin B1 in medical herbs (senna pods, botanical name Cassia angustifolia; devil's claw, botanical name Harpagophytum procumbens; and ginger roots, botanical name Zingiber officinale). The method, which was tested in a mini-collaborative study by 4 laboratories, is based on an immunoaffinity cleanup followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography separation and fluorescence detection after post-column derivatization. It allows the quantitation of aflatoxin B1 at levels lower than 2 ng/g. A second extractant (acetone-water) was tested and compared to the proposed methanol-water extractant. Several post-column derivatization options (electrochemically generated bromine, photochemical reaction, and chemical bromination) as well as different integration modes (height versus area) were also investigated. No differences were found depending on the choice of derivatization system or the signal integration mode used. The method was tested for 3 different matrixes: senna pods, ginger root, and devil's claw. Performance characteristics were established from the results of the study and resulted in HorRat values ranging from 0.12 to 0.75 with mean recoveries from 78 to 91% for the extraction with methanol-water and HorRat values ranging from 0.10-1.03 with mean recoveries from 98 to 103% for the extraction with acetone-water. As a result, the method, with all tested variations, was found to be fit-for-purpose for the determination of aflatoxin B1 in medical herbs at levels of 1 microg/kg and above. PMID:16792057

  5. Decrease of aflatoxin B1 in yoghurt and acidified milks.

    PubMed

    Rasić, J L; Skrinjar, M; Markov, S

    1991-02-01

    Fermentation of yoghurt and acidified milks containing aflatoxin B1 (AB1) were studied. AB1 added to milk before fermentation at concentrations of 600, 1000 and 1400 micrograms/kg was reduced in yoghurts (pH 4.0) by 97, 91 and 90%, respectively. Coagulation time was approximately the same as in the controls. Streptococci had longer chains than those in the controls. The main decrease of AB1 occurred during the milk fermentation. A decrease of AB1 (conc. 1000 micrograms/kg) in milks acidified with citric, lactic and acetic acids (pH 4.0) was 90, 84 and 73%, respectively.

  6. (HFR-B1 experiment reporting and capsule disassembly)

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.

    1991-02-22

    The traveler visited the Joint Research Centre (JRC), Petten, The Netherlands, the Forschungszentrum GmbH (KFA), Juelich, Germany; and the Zentralinstitut fuer Kernforschung (ZfK), Rossendorf, Germany, during the period January 28 through February 9. At JRC, the analysis of the experiment HFR-B1 was discussed; a new schedule for issuance of the final data report was established. Other discussions at JRC concerned the capabilities of Petten to conduct two reactor experiments being proposed under the US/FRG cooperative program and the initial results of a proof test of Germany fuel spheres. At KFA, the main emphasis was on the disassembly of capsules 2 and 3 of the HFR-B1 experiment and agreement on the examinations and tests to be conducted with the disassembled components. The disassembly of capsule 3 was observed. Extensive discussions were conducted on the work, both experimental and analytical, being conducted in the Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktor Technologie. A major portion of the experimental work is being conducted at ZfK and a visit to this laboratory, sponosored by the KFA, was made on February 6 and 7. Cooperation with the US on the experimental and analytical work in the safety area was strongly emphasized. 1 tab.

  7. The CHESS survey of the L1157-B1 shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busquet, G.; Lefloch, B.; Benedettini, M.; Codella, C.; Cabrit, S.; Ceccarelli, C.; Vasta, M.; Viti, S.; Giannini, T.; Nisini, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Lorenzani, A.

    2012-03-01

    Outflows generated by protostars heavily affect the kinematics and chemistry of the hosting molecular cloud due to strong shocks. These shocks heats and compress the ambient dense gas switching on a complex chemistry that leads to an enhancement of the abundance of several species, as reported in ``chemically active'' outflows, whose archetype is the outflow of the low-mass Class 0 protostar L1157. We present the results of the spectral survey of the shock region L1157-B1 carried out with PACS, SPIRE and HIFI instruments in the framework of the Herschel key program CHESS. The high spectral resolution data from HIFI show that different excitation conditions coexist in the B1 shock while the high PACS spatial resolution data shows a different spatial distribution of the the detected specie. We will discuss the properties of the different gas components and present the physical conditions derived from different species. We will present a first comparison with shock models highlighting the complex structure of this shocked region.

  8. Basal and 3-methylcholanthrene-induced expression of cytochrome P450 1A, 1B and 1C genes in the Brazilian guppy, Poecilia vivipara.

    PubMed

    Dorrington, Tarquin; Zanette, Juliano; Zacchi, Flávia L; Stegeman, John J; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2012-11-15

    In fish there are four cytochrome P450 (CYP1) subfamilies: CYP1A, CYP1B, CYP1C, and CYP1D. Here we cloned Poecilia vivipara CYP1A, with an inferred amino acid sequence 91% identical to CYP1A from the killifish Fundulus heteroclitus, another member of the Cypriniformes, and an important model in ecotoxicology. In addition, we examined the expression of CYP1A, CYP1B1, and CYP1C1 by qPCR in liver, gill, and intestine of adult P. vivipara injected with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) or held in clean water (control group) for 24h. All three tissues examined showed basal expression of the three CYP1 genes. CYP1A was most strongly expressed in the liver, while CYP1B1, and CYP1C1 were most strongly expressed in the gill and intestine respectively. 3-MC induced CYP1A, CYP1B1, and CYP1C1 significantly (20-120-fold) in the three organs, consistent with the regulation of CYP1A, CYP1B1 and CYP1C1 via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Validation of CYP1 gene biomarkers in fish collected from a contaminated urban mangrove environment was confirmed with significant induction of CYP1A and CYP1C1 in gills (10-15-fold) and CYP1B1 in liver (23-fold), relative to fish from a control site. The responsiveness of these CYP1 genes indicates P. vivipara is suitable as a model for environmental toxicology studies and environmental assessment in Brazil.

  9. Interpretive geologic bedrock map of the Tanana B-1 Quadrangle, Central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reifenstuh, Rocky R.; Dover, James H.; Newberry, Rainer J.; Calutice, Karen H.; Liss, Shirley A.; Blodgett, Robert B.; Budtzen, Thomas K.; Weber, Florence R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides detailed (1:63,360-scale) mapping of the Tanana B-1 Quadrangle (250 square miles; equivalent to four 7.5 minute quadrangles). The area is part of the Manley Hot Springs-Tofty mining districts and adjacent to the Rampart mining district to the north of the Tanana A-1 and A-2 Quadrangles. This report includes detailed bedrock, structural, stratigraphic, and geochronologic data. Based on the resulting geologic maps, field investigations, and laboratory materials analyses, the project has also generated derivative maps of geologic construction materials and geologic hazards.

  10. 8 CFR 204.3 - Orphan cases under section 101(b)(1)(F) of the Act (non-Convention cases).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... effective date, as defined in 8 CFR 204.301, on behalf of a child who is habitually resident in a Convention... paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a child who meets the definition of orphan contained in section 101(b)(1... U.S. citizen seeking the child's immigration can document that the citizen (and his or her...

  11. 8 CFR 204.3 - Orphan cases under section 101(b)(1)(F) of the Act (non-Convention cases).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... effective date, as defined in 8 CFR 204.301, on behalf of a child who is habitually resident in a Convention... paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a child who meets the definition of orphan contained in section 101(b)(1... U.S. citizen seeking the child's immigration can document that the citizen (and his or her...

  12. 8 CFR 204.3 - Orphan cases under section 101(b)(1)(F) of the Act (non-Convention cases).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... effective date, as defined in 8 CFR 204.301, on behalf of a child who is habitually resident in a Convention... paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a child who meets the definition of orphan contained in section 101(b)(1... U.S. citizen seeking the child's immigration can document that the citizen (and his or her...

  13. 8 CFR 204.3 - Orphan cases under section 101(b)(1)(F) of the Act (non-Convention cases).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... effective date, as defined in 8 CFR 204.301, on behalf of a child who is habitually resident in a Convention... paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a child who meets the definition of orphan contained in section 101(b)(1... U.S. citizen seeking the child's immigration can document that the citizen (and his or her...

  14. 8 CFR 204.3 - Orphan cases under section 101(b)(1)(F) of the Act (non-Convention cases).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... effective date, as defined in 8 CFR 204.301, on behalf of a child who is habitually resident in a Convention... paragraph (a)(2) of this section, a child who meets the definition of orphan contained in section 101(b)(1... U.S. citizen seeking the child's immigration can document that the citizen (and his or her...

  15. Ephrin-B1 transduces signals to activate integrin-mediated migration, attachment and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Do, Uyen; Vindis, Cécile; Liu, Hua; Cerretti, Douglas Pat; McGrew, Jeffrey T; Enriquez, Miriam; Chen, Jin; Daniel, Thomas O

    2002-08-01

    Ephrin-B/EphB family proteins are implicated in bidirectional signaling and were initially defined through the function of their ectodomain sequences in activating EphB receptor tyrosine kinases. Ephrin-B1-3 are transmembrane proteins sharing highly conserved C-terminal cytoplasmic sequences. Here we use a soluble EphB1 ectodomain fusion protein (EphB1/Fc) to demonstrate that ephrin-B1 transduces signals that regulate cell attachment and migration. EphB1/Fc induced endothelial ephrin-B1 tyrosine phosphorylation, migration and integrin-mediated (alpha(v)beta(3) and alpha(5)beta(1)) attachment and promoted neovascularization, in vivo, in a mouse corneal micropocket assay. Activation of ephrin-B1 by EphB1/Fc induced phosphorylation of p46 JNK but not ERK-1/2 or p38 MAPkinases. By contrast, mutant ephrin-B1s bearing either a cytoplasmic deletion (ephrin-B1DeltaCy) or a deletion of four C-terminal amino acids (ephrin-B1DeltaPDZbd) fail to activate p46 JNK. Transient expression of intact ephin-B1 conferred EphB1/Fc migration responses on CHO cells, whereas the ephrin-B1DeltaCy and ephrin-B1DeltaPDZbd mutants were inactive. Thus ephrin-B1 transduces 'outside-in' signals through C-terminal protein interactions that affect integrin-mediated attachment and migration. PMID:12118063

  16. 16 CFR Appendix B1 to Part 305 - Upright Freezers With Manual Defrost

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Upright Freezers With Manual Defrost B1 Appendix B1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF...) Pt. 305, App. B1 Appendix B1 to Part 305—Upright Freezers With Manual Defrost Range...

  17. The impact of climate change on summer maize phenology in the northwest plain of Shandong province under the IPCC SRES A1B scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Liu, Y.

    2014-03-01

    Climate change will affect agricultural production. Combining a climate model and a crop growth model furnishes a good approach for analyzing this effect quantitatively. The purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of climate change on summer maize phenology in northwest Shandong province under the A1B climate scenario using a regional climate model and the CERES-Maize growth model. The results showed that the temperature would increase significantly during the maize growth season in the study region, that the increased temperature would shorten the maize growth stage and result in a potential yield loss using the current cultivar, and that it is critical to breed a heat-resistant and late-maturing cultivar to maintain the yield.

  18. Generation and characterization of a Cyp4b1 null mouse and the role of CYP4B1 in the activation and toxicity of Ipomeanol.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Oliver T; Liggitt, H Denny; Rettie, Allan E; Kelly, Edward J

    2013-08-01

    4-Ipomeanol (IPO) is a prototypical pulmonary toxin that requires P450-mediated metabolic activation to reactive intermediates in order to elicit its toxic effects. CYP4B1 is a pulmonary enzyme that has been shown, in vitro, to have a high capacity for bioactivating IPO. In order to determine, unambiguously, the role of CYP4B1 in IPO bioactivation in vivo, we generated Cyp4b1 null mice following targeted disruption of the gene downstream of exon 1. Cyp4b1 (-/-) mice are viable and healthy, with no overt phenotype, and no evidence of compensatory upregulation of other P450 isoforms in any of the tissues examined. Pulmonary and renal microsomes prepared from male Cyp4b1 (-/-) mice exhibited no detectable expression of the protein and catalyzed the in vitro bioactivation of IPO at < 10% of the rates observed in tissue microsomes from Cyp4b1 (+/+) animals. Administration of IPO (20mg/kg) to Cyp4b1 (+/+) mice resulted in characteristic lesions in the lung, and to a lesser extent in the kidney, which were completely absent in Cyp4b1 (-/-) mice. We conclude that CYP4B1 is a critical enzyme for the bioactivation of IPO in vivo and that the Cyp4b1 (-/-) mouse is a useful model for studying CYP4B1-dependent metabolism and toxicity. PMID:23748241

  19. Generation and Characterization of a Cyp4b1 Null Mouse and the Role of CYP4B1 in the Activation and Toxicity of Ipomeanol

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    4-Ipomeanol (IPO) is a prototypical pulmonary toxin that requires P450-mediated metabolic activation to reactive intermediates in order to elicit its toxic effects. CYP4B1 is a pulmonary enzyme that has been shown, in vitro, to have a high capacity for bioactivating IPO. In order to determine, unambiguously, the role of CYP4B1 in IPO bioactivation in vivo, we generated Cyp4b1 null mice following targeted disruption of the gene downstream of exon 1. Cyp4b1 −/− mice are viable and healthy, with no overt phenotype, and no evidence of compensatory upregulation of other P450 isoforms in any of the tissues examined. Pulmonary and renal microsomes prepared from male Cyp4b1 −/− mice exhibited no detectable expression of the protein and catalyzed the in vitro bioactivation of IPO at < 10% of the rates observed in tissue microsomes from Cyp4b1 +/+ animals. Administration of IPO (20mg/kg) to Cyp4b1 +/+ mice resulted in characteristic lesions in the lung, and to a lesser extent in the kidney, which were completely absent in Cyp4b1 −/− mice. We conclude that CYP4B1 is a critical enzyme for the bioactivation of IPO in vivo and that the Cyp4b1 −/− mouse is a useful model for studying CYP4B1-dependent metabolism and toxicity. PMID:23748241

  20. Sequence specificity in aflatoxin B1--DNA interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Muench, K F; Misra, R P; Humayun, M Z

    1983-01-01

    The activated form of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) causes covalent modification primarily of guanine residues, leading to alkali-labile sites in DNA. A simple extension of the Maxam-Gilbert procedure for sequence analysis permits the identification of alkali-labile sites induced by AFB1 and determination of the frequency of alkali-labile AFB1 modifications at particular sites on a DNA fragment of known sequence. Using this strategy, we have investigated the influence of flanking nucleotide sequences on AFB1 modification in a number of DNA fragments of known sequence. Our results show that certain guanine residues in double-stranded DNA are preferentially attacked by AFB1 over others in a manner predictable from a knowledge of vicinal nucleotide sequences. The observed in vitro sequence specificity is independent of a number of tested parameters and is likely to occur in vivo. Images PMID:6218504

  1. Stability of Aflatoxin B1 and Ochratoxin A in Brewing

    PubMed Central

    Chu, F. S.; Chang, C. C.; Ashoor, Samy H.; Prentice, N.

    1975-01-01

    The stability of aflatoxin B1 and ochratoxin A in brewing was investigated by adding the purified toxins to the raw materials at 1 and 10 μg/g levels during mashing in a conventional micro-brewing process. The results indicate that both toxins are stable to heat and are insensitive to cooker mash treatment. Both mycotoxins were partially removed in the mashing and brewing processes. About 14 to 18% and 27 to 28% of the added toxins were found in the final beers brewed from starting materials containing 1 and 10 μg, respectively, of either toxin per g. The possible route of transmission of mycotoxins into beer is discussed. PMID:1115503

  2. First Observation of the Hadronic Transition ϒ(4S)→ηh(b)(1P) and New Measurement of the h(b)(1P) and η(b)(1S) Parameters.

    PubMed

    Tamponi, U; Mussa, R; Abdesselam, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Atmacan, H; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Hedges, M T; Hou, W-S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Julius, T; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, S H; Kinoshita, K; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Lange, J S; Lewis, P; Libby, J; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mori, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ostrowicz, W; Oswald, C; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y-S; Sokolov, A; Starič, M; Steder, M; Stypula, J; Tanida, K; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, M-Z; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-10-01

    Using a sample of 771.6×10(6) ϒϒ(4S) decays collected by the Belle experiment at the KEKB e(+)e(-) collider, we observe, for the first time, the transition ϒ(4S)→ηh(b)(1P) with the branching fraction B[ϒ(4S)→ηh(b)(1P)]=(2.18±0.11±0.18)×10(-3) and we measure the h(b)(1P) mass M(h(b)(1P))=(9899.3±0.4±1.0)  MeV/c(2), corresponding to the hyperfine (HF) splitting ΔM(HF)(1P)=(0.6±0.4±1.0)  MeV/c(2). Using the transition h(b)(1P)→γη(b)(1S), we measure the η(b)(1S) mass M(η(b)(1S))=(9400.7±1.7±1.6)  MeV/c(2), corresponding to ΔM(HF)(1S)=(59.6±1.7±1.6)  MeV/c(2), the η(b)(1S) width Γ(η(b)(1S))=(8(-5)(+6)±5)  MeV/c(2) and the branching fraction B[h(b)(1P)→γη(b)(1S)]=(56±8±4)%. PMID:26551806

  3. Immobilization of anti-aflatoxin B1 antibody by UV polymerization of aniline and aflatoxin B1 detection via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dinçkaya, Erhan; Kinik, Özer; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal; Altuğ, Çağri; Akkoca, Aylin

    2012-12-01

    In the study, we investigated the practicality of the UV polymerization of aniline for anti-aflatoxin B1 antibody immobilization, and utilization of the resulting biosensor in the impedimetric determination of aflatoxin B1. The anti-aflatoxin B 1 antibody was physically immobilized on gold electrodes by UV polymerization of aniline at a fixed wavelength. The biosensor was based on specific interaction anti-aflatoxin B1 - aflatoxin B1 recognition and investigation of this recognition event by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A calibration curve was obtained in a linear detection range 1-20 ng/mL aflatoxin B1. Finally, the biosensor was applied to analysis of a real food sample.

  4. Linking vitamin B1 with cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The resurgence of interest in cancer metabolism has linked alterations in the regulation and exploitation of metabolic pathways with an anabolic phenotype that increases biomass production for the replication of new daughter cells. To support the increase in the metabolic rate of cancer cells, a coordinated increase in the supply of nutrients, such as glucose and micronutrients functioning as enzyme cofactors is required. The majority of co-enzymes are water-soluble vitamins such as niacin, folic acid, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, biotin, riboflavin and thiamine (Vitamin B1). Continuous dietary intake of these micronutrients is essential for maintaining normal health. How cancer cells adaptively regulate cellular homeostasis of cofactors and how they can regulate expression and function of metabolic enzymes in cancer is underappreciated. Exploitation of cofactor-dependent metabolic pathways with the advent of anti-folates highlights the potential vulnerabilities and importance of vitamins in cancer biology. Vitamin supplementation products are easily accessible and patients often perceive them as safe and beneficial without full knowledge of their effects. Thus, understanding the significance of enzyme cofactors in cancer cell metabolism will provide for important dietary strategies and new molecular targets to reduce disease progression. Recent studies have demonstrated the significance of thiamine-dependent enzymes in cancer cell metabolism. Therefore, this review discusses the current knowledge in the alterations in thiamine availability, homeostasis, and exploitation of thiamine-dependent pathways by cancer cells. PMID:24280319

  5. Amide temperature coefficients in the protein G B1 domain.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Jennifer H; Williamson, Mike P

    2012-01-01

    Temperature coefficients have been measured for backbone amide (1)H and (15)N nuclei in the B1 domain of protein G (GB1), using temperatures in the range 283-313 K, and pH values from 2.0 to 9.0. Many nuclei display pH-dependent coefficients, which were fitted to one or two pK(a) values. (1)H coefficients showed the expected behaviour, in that hydrogen-bonded amides have less negative values, but for those amides involved in strong hydrogen bonds in regular secondary structure there is a negative correlation between strength of hydrogen bond and size of temperature coefficient. The best correlation to temperature coefficient is with secondary shift, indicative of a very approximately uniform thermal expansion. The largest pH-dependent changes in coefficient are for amides in loops adjacent to sidechain hydrogen bonds rather than the amides involved directly in hydrogen bonds, indicating that the biggest determinant of the temperature coefficient is temperature-dependent loss of structure, not hydrogen bonding. Amide (15)N coefficients have no clear relationship with structure.

  6. Genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 and its ammonium derivatives.

    PubMed

    Márquez Márquez, R; Tejada de Hernandez, I; Madrigal Bujaidar, E

    1995-01-01

    Aflatoxin (AF) B1 is a main contaminant in diverse agricultural products. In an attempt to reduce this problem and the hazards to human health, an AFB1 inactivating system with ammonia has been developed. In this work we evaluated the efficiency of the system in mice using micronucleus (MN) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis. Four groups of animals were fed for 8 weeks with a special diet mainly composed of maize: (1) uncontaminated; (2) uncontaminated/inactivated; (3) contaminated/inactivated; and (4) contaminated. We evaluated MN at weekly intervals in peripheral blood, and in weeks 4 and 8 SCE frequencies were quantified in bone marrow cells. The results shows that animals fed with AFB1 contaminated/inactivated maize had a 45% lower level of induced cytogenetic damage than those animals fed with AFB1 contaminated but not inactivated maize. A residual amount of AFB1 after the inactivating treatment and reconversion back to AFB1 in the organism may account for the remaining increased levels of SCE and MN. PMID:7664938

  7. PHOSPHORUS CHEMISTRY IN THE SHOCKED REGION L1157 B1

    SciTech Connect

    Aota, T.; Aikawa, Y.

    2012-12-10

    We study the evolution of phosphorus-bearing species in one-dimensional C-shock models. We find that the abundances of P-bearing species depend sensitively on the elemental abundance of P in the gas phase and on the abundance of N atoms in the pre-shock gas. The observed abundance of PN and the non-detection of PO toward L1157 B1 are reproduced in C-shock models with shock velocity v = 20 km s{sup -1} and pre-shock density n(H{sub 2}) 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, if the elemental abundance of P in the gas phase is {approx}10{sup -9} and the N-atom abundance is n(N)/n{sub H} {approx}10{sup -5} in the pre-shock gas. We also find that P-chemistry is sensitive to O- and N-chemistry because N atoms are destroyed mainly by OH and NO. We identify the reactions of O-bearing and N-bearing species that significantly affect P-chemistry.

  8. Transonic aeroelastic analysis of the B-1 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, G. P.; Goorjian, P. M.; Ide, H.; Miller, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    The flow over the B-1 wing is studied computationally, including the aeroelastic response of the wing. Computed results are compared with results from wind tunnel and flight tests for both low- and high-sweep cases, at 25.0 and 67.5 deg, respectively, for selected transonic Mach numbers. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic computations are made by using the transonic unsteady code ATRAN3S. Steady aerodynamic computations compare well with wind tunnel results for the 25.0 deg sweep case and also for small angles of attack at 67.5 deg sweep case. The aeroelastic response results show that the wing is stable at the low-sweep angle for the calculation at the Mach number at which there is a shock wave. In the higher-sweep case, for the higher angle of attack at which oscillations were observed in the flight and wind tunnel tests, the calculations do not show any shock waves. Their absence lends support to the hypothesis that the observed oscillations are due to the presence of leading-edge separation vortices and not to shock wave motion, as was previously proposed.

  9. In vitro metabolism of fumonisin B1 by ruminal microflora.

    PubMed

    Caloni, F; Spotti, M; Auerbach, H; Op den Camp, H; Gremmels, J F; Pompa, G

    2000-09-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium moniliforme and F. proliferatum. Little is known of its metabolic fate after oral ingestion in ruminants, but these animals are reported to be tolerant towards FB1. The metabolism of this mycotoxin was evaluated following incubation (1 microg/ml) in ruminal fluid for up to 72 h, in the presence or absence of alfalfa as a substrate for microbial growth, using a model rumen (sealed flask, anaerobic conditions, exclusion of light, gentle agitation, 39 degrees C). The decrease in FB1 concentration and the production of short-chain fatty acids were determined. FB1 had no effect on SCFA production. After 72 h incubation, FB1 depletion was 12% and 18% in samples with and without alfalfa, respectively. No hydrolysed metabolites (aminopolyols or aminopentol) were detected. These results indicate that FB1 is poorly metabolized in the rumen and suggest that such metabolism is not the cause of the tolerance to this toxin displayed by ruminants.

  10. Aflatoxin B1 transfer and metabolism in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Partanen, Heidi A; El-Nezami, Hani S; Leppänen, Jukka M; Myllynen, Päivi K; Woodhouse, Heather J; Vähäkangas, Kirsi H

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a common dietary contaminant, is a major risk factor of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Early onset of HCC in some countries in Africa and South-East Asia indicates the importance of early life exposure. Placenta is the primary route for various compounds, both nutrients and toxins, from the mother to the fetal circulation. Furthermore, placenta contains enzymes for xenobiotic metabolism. AFB1, AFB1-metabolites, and AFB1-albumin adducts have been detected in cord blood of babies after maternal exposure during pregnancy. However, the role that the placenta plays in the transfer and metabolism of AFB1 is not clear. In this study, placental transfer and metabolism of AFB1 were investigated in human placental perfusions and in in vitro studies. Eight human placentas were perfused with 0.5 or 5microM AFB1 for 2-4 h. In vitro incubations with placental microsomal and cytosolic proteins from eight additional placentas were also conducted. Our results from placental perfusions provide the first direct evidence of the actual transfer of AFB1 and its metabolism to aflatoxicol (AFL) by human placenta. In vitro incubations with placental cytosolic fraction confirmed the capacity of human placenta to form AFL. AFL was the only metabolite detected in both perfusions and in vitro incubations. Since AFL is less mutagenic, but putatively as carcinogenic as AFB1, the formation of AFL may not protect the fetus from the toxicity of AFB1.

  11. Aflatoxin B1 in poultry: toxicology, metabolism and prevention.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Sumit; Kim, Ji Eun; Coulombe, Roger

    2010-12-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are ubiquitous in corn-based animal feed and causes hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic effects. The most important AF in terms of toxic potency and occurrence is aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Poultry, especially turkeys, are extremely sensitive to the toxic and carcinogenic action of AFB1, resulting in millions of dollars in annual losses to producers due to reduced growth rate, increased susceptibility to disease, reduced egg production and other adverse effects. The extreme sensitivity of turkeys and other poultry to AFB1 is associated with efficient hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated bioactivation and deficient detoxification by glutathione S-transferases (GST). Discerning the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of this extreme sensitivity of poultry to AFB1, will contribute in the development of novel strategies to increase aflatoxin resistance. Since AFB1 is an unavoidable contaminant of corn-based poultry feed, chemoprevention strategies aimed at reducing AFB1 toxicity in poultry and in other animals have been the subject of numerous studies. This brief review summarizes many of the key recent findings regarding the action of aflatoxins in poultry.

  12. Genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 and its ammonium derivatives.

    PubMed

    Márquez Márquez, R; Tejada de Hernandez, I; Madrigal Bujaidar, E

    1995-01-01

    Aflatoxin (AF) B1 is a main contaminant in diverse agricultural products. In an attempt to reduce this problem and the hazards to human health, an AFB1 inactivating system with ammonia has been developed. In this work we evaluated the efficiency of the system in mice using micronucleus (MN) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis. Four groups of animals were fed for 8 weeks with a special diet mainly composed of maize: (1) uncontaminated; (2) uncontaminated/inactivated; (3) contaminated/inactivated; and (4) contaminated. We evaluated MN at weekly intervals in peripheral blood, and in weeks 4 and 8 SCE frequencies were quantified in bone marrow cells. The results shows that animals fed with AFB1 contaminated/inactivated maize had a 45% lower level of induced cytogenetic damage than those animals fed with AFB1 contaminated but not inactivated maize. A residual amount of AFB1 after the inactivating treatment and reconversion back to AFB1 in the organism may account for the remaining increased levels of SCE and MN.

  13. Aflatoxin B1 binding to sorbents in bovine ruminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Spotti, M; Fracchiolla, M L; Arioli, F; Caloni, F; Pompa, G

    2005-08-01

    A recent approach to the problem of contamination of agricultural products by aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) is to add non-nutritional adsorbents to animal diets in order to sequester ingested aflatoxins. We conducted in vitro experiments to develop a rapid and cheap model using ruminal fluid to assess the ability of sorbent materials to bind AFB(1). Seven sorbents (hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate; clinoptilolite; zeolite; two types of bentonite; sepiolite; and PHIL 75), commonly added to bovine diets were incubated in water and ruminal fluid in the presence of AFB(1). Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate, sepiolite and one of the bentonites bound 100% of the AFB(1) in the presence of both ruminal fluid and water; clinoptilolite bound about 80% of AFB(1) in both liquids; whereas the affinities for the mycotoxin of zeolite (50%) and the other sample of bentonite (60%) in water seem to be increased by about 40% in ruminal fluid incubations. PHIL 75 had the poorest binding ability: about 30% in water and 45% in ruminal fluid. In view of the differences in toxin binding in water and ruminal fluid, it is preferable to use the ruminal fluid model for the in vitro pre-screening of sorbent materials potentially useful as adjuvants to ruminant feeds. PMID:16215841

  14. Fumonisin B1 neurotoxicity in young carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Kovacić, Sanja; Pepeljnjak, Stjepan; Petrinec, Zdravko; Klarić, Maja Segvić

    2009-12-01

    For years scientists have suspected that the environment plays a role in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. Mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) is produced by several Fusarium species, mainly by Fusarium verticilioides, which is one of the most common fungi associated with corn worldwide. Fumonisins are known to cause equine leukoencephalomalacia, a disease associated with the consumption of corn-based feeds contaminated with FB1. Here we have reported chronic experimental toxicosis in one-year-old carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) receiving feed containing 100 mg kg-1 or 10 mg kg-1 of added FB1 for 42 days. We focused on fumonisin toxicity in the fish brain. After staining with hemalaun-eosin, histology of the fish brain revealed vacuolated, degenerate, or necrotic neural cells, scattered around damaged blood capillaries and in the periventricular area. These findings suggest that fumonisin, although it is a hydrophilic molecule, permeated the blood-brain barrier of young carp and had a toxic effect on neuronal cells.

  15. Spatio-temporal prediction of leaf area index of rubber plantation using HJ-1A/1B CCD images and recurrent neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bangqian; Wu, Zhixiang; Wang, Jikun; Dong, Jinwei; Guan, Liming; Chen, Junming; Yang, Kai; Xie, Guishui

    2015-04-01

    Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations are one of the most important economic forest in tropical area. Retrieving leaf area index (LAI) and its dynamics by remote sensing is of great significance in ecological study and production management, such as yield prediction and post-hurricane damage evaluation. Thirteen HJ-1A/1B CCD images, which possess the spatial advantage of Landsat TM/ETM+ and 2-days temporal resolution of MODIS, were introduced to predict the spatial-temporal LAI of rubber plantation on Hainan Island by Nonlinear AutoRegressive networks with eXogenous inputs (NARX) model. Monthly measured LAIs at 30 stands by LAI-2000 between 2012 and 2013 were used to explore the LAI dynamics and their relationship with spectral bands and seven vegetation indices, and to develop and validate model. The NARX model, which was built base on input variables of day of year (DOY), four spectral bands and weight difference vegetation index (WDVI), possessed good accuracies during the model building for the data set of training (N = 202, R2 = 0.98, RMSE = 0.13), validation (N = 43, R2 = 0.93, RMSE = 0.24) and testing (N = 43, R2 = 0.87, RMSE = 0.31), respectively. The model performed well during field validation (N = 24, R2 = 0.88, RMSE = 0.24) and most of its mapping results showed better agreement (R2 = 0.54-0.58, RMSE = 0.47-0.71) with the field data than the results of corresponding stepwise regression models (R2 = 0.43-0.51, RMSE = 0.52-0.82). Besides, the LAI statistical values from the spatio-temporal LAI maps and their dynamics, which increased dramatically from late March (2.36 ± 0.59) to early May (3.22 ± 0.64) and then gradually slow down until reached the maximum value in early October (4.21 ± 0.87), were quite consistent with the statistical results of the field data. The study demonstrates the feasibility and reliability of retrieving spatio-temporal LAI of rubber plantations by an artificial neural network (ANN) approach, and provides some insight on the

  16. Coffee Beverage Quality Assessment Based on ETA/CPTEC-HadCM3 Model (A1B-IPCC/SRES Scenario), Southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarolla, A.; Resende, N.; Chou, S. C.; Tavares, P. S.; Rodrigues, D. C.

    2012-04-01

    Environmental factors influence the coffee beverage quality and air temperature has a significant importance in this process. The grain maturation occurs very quickly in regions that present high temperatures and sometimes there is not enough time to complete all this phase adequately. In the other hand, with mild temperatures, the grain maturation occurs more slowly and it promotes a better quality beverage. The aim of this study was to assess the coffee beverage quality in the southeastern Brazil, based on climate projections using the Eta-CPTEC regional model driven by four members of an ensemble of the Met Office Hadley Centre Global Coupled climate model (HadCM3). The global model ensemble was run over the 21st century according to IPCC SRES, A1B emissions scenario. Each ensemble member presented different climate sensitivity in the analysis. The Eta-CPTEC-HadCM3 model was configured with a 40-km grid size and was run over the period of 1961-90 to represent a baseline climate, and over the period of 2011-2100 to simulate possible future changes and the effects on the coffee beverage quality. A coffee beverage quality classification, which depends on the annual air temperature proposed by Bressani (2007) and also, a quality coffee beverage sensory classification, based on Camargo and Cortez (1998) were considered in this study. An evaluation of the systematic errors (BIAS) for each member for the period from 1961 to 1990 was made. The results presented by Eta/CPTEC-HadCM3 model indicated that in the case of an occurrence of A1B emission scenario, the coffee beverage quality could be affected in this region due to the fact that the flavor may become stronger and unpleasant caused by rising air temperatures. The BIAS evaluation and subsequent errors removal demonstrated improvement in the scenarios simulations. A short review concerning agronomic techniques to mitigate extreme meteorological events or global warming on coffee crop based on Camargo (2010) also is

  17. Tracking radiometric responsivity of optical sensors without on-board calibration systems-case of the Chinese HJ-1A/1B CCD sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Chen, Xiaoling; Tian, Liqiao; Feng, Lian

    2015-01-26

    The radiometric stability of satellite sensors is crucial for generating highly consistent remote sensing measurements and products. We have presented a radiometric responsivity tracking method designed especially for optical sensors without on-board calibration systems. Using a temporally stable desert site with high reflectance, the sensor responsivity was simulated using the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer model (RTM) with information from validated MODIS atmospheric data. Next, radiometric responsivity drifting was identified using a linear regression of the time series bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) normalized coefficients. The proposed method was applied to Chinese HJ-1A/1B charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, which have been on-orbit operations for more than 5 years without continuous assessment of their radiometric performance. Results from the Dunhuang desert site between 2008 and 2013 indicated that the CCD sensors degraded at various rates, with the most significant degradation occurring in the blue bands, ranging from 2.8% to 4.2% yr-1. The red bands were more stable, with a degradation rate of 0.7-3.1% yr-1. A cross-sensor comparison revealed the least degradation for the HJ-1A CCD1 (blue: 2.8%; green: 2.8%; red: 0.7%; and NIR: 0.9% yr-1), whereas the degradation of HJ-1B CCD1 was most pronounced (blue: 3.5%; green: 4.1%; red: 2.3%; and NIR: 3.4% yr-1). The uncertainties of the method were evaluated theoretically based on the propagation of uncertainties from all possible sources of the RT simulations. In addition, a cross comparison with matchup ground-based absolute calibration results was conducted. The comparison demonstrated that the method was useful for continuously monitoring the radiometric performance of remote sensors, such as HJ-1A/1B CCD and GaoFen (GF) series (China's latest high-definition Earth observation

  18. 77 FR 71401 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... in support of M1A2 Abrams Tanks, M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicles, High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled... Abrams Tanks, M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicles, High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs... fleet of M1A2S Abrams Tanks, M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicles, and High Mobility Multipurpose...

  19. 26 CFR 53.4942(b)-1 - Operating foundations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... similar exempt purpose equal in value to: (i) For taxable years beginning before January 1, 1982, substantially all of the foundation's adjusted net income (as defined in § 53.4942(a)-2(d)); and (ii) For... adjusted net income (as defined in § 53.4942(a)-2(d)) or minimum investment return (as defined in §...

  20. 26 CFR 53.4942(b)-1 - Operating foundations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... similar exempt purpose equal in value to: (i) For taxable years beginning before January 1, 1982, substantially all of the foundation's adjusted net income (as defined in § 53.4942(a)-2(d)); and (ii) For... adjusted net income (as defined in § 53.4942(a)-2(d)) or minimum investment return (as defined in §...

  1. The body vitamin B1 levels of rats fed a diet containing the minimum requirement of vitamin B1 is reduced by exercise.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    It is thought that increasing energy expenditure increases consumption of vitamin B1, leading to an increase in the requirement of vitamin B1. However, evidence supporting this hypothesis is lacking. To examine the hypothesis, initially, we determined the minimum requirement of vitamin B1 for weaning rats. We found that the minimum requirement of vitamin B1 for optimum growth of weaning rats was around 0.786 mg thiamin/kg diet. Next, rats fed a diet containing the minimum requirement of vitamin B1 were forced to swim until exhaustion. Concentrations of vitamin B1 in the blood and liver as well as urinary excretion of swimming rats decreased significantly compared with those of non-swimming rats (p<0.05), while in rats fed the diet containing a sufficient amount of vitamin B1 (4.720 mg thiamin/kg diet), vitamin B1 amounts in the blood, liver and urine were not affected by swimming. We clearly and firstly showed the reduction of body vitamin B1 following increases in energy expenditure. PMID:23727637

  2. Co-expression of CYP27B1 enzyme with the 1.5kb CYP27B1 promoter-luciferase transgene in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Paul H; Hendrix, Ivanka; Sawyer, Rebecca K; Zarrinkalam, Reza; Manavis, Jim; Sarvestani, Ghafar T; May, Brian K; Morris, Howard A

    2008-03-26

    The renal enzyme 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), responsible for the synthesis of circulating. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D), is also expressed in a number of non-renal tissues. The regulation of CYP27B1 expression by the short flanking promoter outside the kidney is, however, largely unknown. We have used a transgenic mice expressing the 1.5kb promoter of the human CYP27B1 gene fused to the firefly luciferase gene in order to investigate tissue-specific CYP27B1 expression. These transgenic animals demonstrated co-localised luciferase and endogenous CYP27B1 expression in kidney proximal convoluted tubular cells. Strong co-expression of luciferase and CYP27B1 also occurred in neurons and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in Leydig and Sertoli cells of the testes. Other tissues to exhibit CYP27B1-promoter directed luciferase activity included lung, prostate, trabecular bone and jejunum as well as the choroid epithelium. The tissue specific changes in luciferase activity were age-related. These findings demonstrate that the proximal 1.5kb 5' flanking region of the CYP27B1 gene directs the expression of CYP27B1 in a number of known and novel tissues in a specific manner. PMID:18313834

  3. Evaluation of surface water budget and assessment the global water cycle for the IPCC AR4 A1B scenario simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, H.; Park, E.; Kwon, W.

    2009-12-01

    Water balance calculations are becoming increasingly important for earth-system studies, because humans require water for their survival. Especially, the relationship between climate change and freshwater resources is of primary concern to human society and also has implications for all living species. The goal of this study is to assess the closure and annual variations of the water cycles based on the multi-model ensemble approach. In this study, the projection results of the previous works focusing on global and six sub-regions are updated using sixteen atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) simulations based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A1B scenario. Before projecting future climate, model performances are evaluated on the simulation of the present-day climate. From the result, we construct and use mainly multi-model ensembles (MMEs), which is referred to as MME9, defined from nine selected AOGCMs of higher performance. Analyzed variables include annual and seasonal precipitation, evaporation, and runoff. The overall projection results from MME9 show that most regions will experience warmer and wetter climate at the end of 21st century. The evaporation shows a very similar trend to precipitation, but not in the runoff projection. The internal and inter-model variabilities are larger in the runoff than both precipitation and evaporation. Moreover, the runoff is notably reduced in Europe at the end of 21st century.

  4. Impact of climate change on soil thermal and moisture regimes in Serbia: An analysis with data from regional climate simulations under SRES-A1B.

    PubMed

    Mihailović, D T; Drešković, N; Arsenić, I; Ćirić, V; Djurdjević, V; Mimić, G; Pap, I; Balaž, I

    2016-11-15

    We considered temporal and spatial variations to the thermal and moisture regimes of the most common RSGs (Reference Soil Groups) in Serbia under the A1B scenario for the 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 periods, with respect to the 1961-1990 period. We utilized dynamically downscaled global climate simulations from the ECHAM5 model using the coupled regional climate model EBU-POM (Eta Belgrade University-Princeton Ocean Model). We analysed the soil temperature and moisture time series using simple statistics and a Kolmogorov complexity (KC) analysis. The corresponding metrics were calculated for 150 sites. In the future, warmer and drier regimes can be expected for all RSGs in Serbia. The calculated soil temperature and moisture variations include increases in the mean annual soil temperature (up to 3.8°C) and decreases in the mean annual soil moisture (up to 11.3%). Based on the KC values, the soils in Serbia are classified with respect to climate change impacts as (1) less sensitive (Vertisols, Umbrisols and Dystric Cambisols) or (2) more sensitive (Chernozems, Eutric Cambisols and Planosols). PMID:27473773

  5. Broad screening of the legume family for variability in seed insecticidal activities and for the occurrence of the A1b-like knottin peptide entomotoxins.

    PubMed

    Louis, Sandrine; Delobel, Bernard; Gressent, Frédéric; Duport, Gabrielle; Diol, Ousmane; Rahioui, Isabelle; Charles, Hubert; Rahbé, Yvan

    2007-02-01

    Pea albumin 1b (PA1b) is a small sulphur-rich peptide from pea seeds, also named leginsulin because of the binding characteristics of its soybean orthologue. Its insecticidal properties were discovered more recently. By using a combination of molecular, biochemical and specific insect bioassays on seed extracts, we characterised genes from numerous Papilionoideae, but not from Caesalpinioideae or Mimosoideae, although the last group harboured species with partially positive cues (homologous biological activities). The A1b defence peptide family, therefore, appears to have evolved relatively late in the legume lineage, maybe from the sophoroid group (e.g. Styphnolobium japonicum). However, unambiguous sequence information is restricted to a group of tribes within the subfamily Papilionoideae (Psoraleae, Millettieae, Desmodieae, Hedysareae, Phaseoleae, Vicieae, and the now clearly polyphyletic "Trifolieae" and "Galegeae"). Recent diversification by gene duplications has occurred in many species, or longer ago in some lineages (Medicago truncatula), as well as probable gene or expression losses at different taxonomic levels (Loteae, Vigna subterranea). PMID:17222873

  6. Material Specific Rational Design of A1B2C3O7 High-Tc Superconductors without Copper [A, B, C = Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isikaku-Ironkwe, O'paul; Schaffer, Michael J.

    Soon after the discovery of YBa2Cu3O7 with Tc = 93K, a similar structured system with Ag replacing Cu was discovered with a Tc = 50K. Also, the discovery of Ba0 . 6 K0 . 4 BiO3 with Tc = 30K indicated that Cu was not indispensable for high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). Latter, the discoveries of the Pnictide and Chalcogenide high-Tc superconductors confirmed those earlier experimental indications. Using our recently developed Material Specific Characterization Dataset (MSCD) model for analysis and design of superconductors, we have computed many designs that satisfy the MSCD characteristics of YBa2Cu3O7 as a design model. Our design recognizes the valence state characteristics that make YBa2Cu3O6 a semiconductor, while YBa2Cu3O7is a superconductor. Here we present ten material specific rational design examples of potential A1B2C3O7 HTSCs without Cu, using the YBa2Cu3O7 design model. This MSCD design model opens the possibility for search and discovery of high-Tc oxide superconductor systems without copper.

  7. Impact of climate change on soil thermal and moisture regimes in Serbia: An analysis with data from regional climate simulations under SRES-A1B.

    PubMed

    Mihailović, D T; Drešković, N; Arsenić, I; Ćirić, V; Djurdjević, V; Mimić, G; Pap, I; Balaž, I

    2016-11-15

    We considered temporal and spatial variations to the thermal and moisture regimes of the most common RSGs (Reference Soil Groups) in Serbia under the A1B scenario for the 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 periods, with respect to the 1961-1990 period. We utilized dynamically downscaled global climate simulations from the ECHAM5 model using the coupled regional climate model EBU-POM (Eta Belgrade University-Princeton Ocean Model). We analysed the soil temperature and moisture time series using simple statistics and a Kolmogorov complexity (KC) analysis. The corresponding metrics were calculated for 150 sites. In the future, warmer and drier regimes can be expected for all RSGs in Serbia. The calculated soil temperature and moisture variations include increases in the mean annual soil temperature (up to 3.8°C) and decreases in the mean annual soil moisture (up to 11.3%). Based on the KC values, the soils in Serbia are classified with respect to climate change impacts as (1) less sensitive (Vertisols, Umbrisols and Dystric Cambisols) or (2) more sensitive (Chernozems, Eutric Cambisols and Planosols).

  8. Molecular ions in the protostellar shock L1157-B1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podio, L.; Lefloch, B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Codella, C.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: We perform a complete census of molecular ions with an abundance greater than ~10-10 in the protostellar shock L1157-B1. This allows us to study the ionisation structure and chemistry of the shock. Methods: An unbiased high-sensitivity survey of L1157-B1 performed with the IRAM-30 m and Herschel/HIFI as part of the CHESS and ASAI large programmes allows searching for molecular ions emission. Then, by means of a radiative transfer code in the large velocity gradient approximation, the gas physical conditions and fractional abundances of molecular ions are derived. The latter are compared with estimates of steady-state abundances in the cloud and their evolution in the shock calculated with the chemical model Astrochem. Results: We detect emission from HCO+, H13CO+, N2H+, HCS+, and for the first time in a shock, from HOCO+ and SO+. The bulk of the emission peaks at blue-shifted velocity, ~0.5-3 km s -1 with respect to systemic, has a width of ~3-7 km s-1 and is associated with the outflow cavities (Tkin ~ 20-70 K, nH2 ~ 105 cm-3). A high-velocity component up to -40 km s-1, associated with the primary jet, is detected in the HCO+ 1-0 line. Observed HCO+ and N2H+ abundances (XHCO+ ~ 0.7-3 × 10-8, XN2H+ ~ 0.4-8 × 10-9) agree with steady-state abundances in the cloud and with their evolution in the compressed and heated gas in the shock for cosmic rays ionisation rate ζ = 3 × 10-16 s-1. HOCO+, SO+, and HCS+ observed abundances (XHOCO+ ~ 10-9, XSO+ ~ 8 × 10-10, XHCS+ ~ 3-7 × 10-10), instead, are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than predicted in the cloud; on the other hand, they are strongly enhanced on timescales shorter than the shock age (~2000 years) if CO2, S or H2S, and OCS are sputtered off the dust grains in the shock. Conclusions: The performed analysis indicates that HCO+ and N2H+ are a fossil record of pre-shock gas in the outflow cavity, whilst HOCO+, SO+, and HCS+ are effective shock tracers that can be used to infer the amount of CO2 and sulphur

  9. Fumonisin B1 facilitates seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol in mice.

    PubMed

    Poersch, Alice Bertotto; Trombetta, Francielle; Souto, Naiéli Schiefelbein; de Oliveira Lima, Camilla; Braga, Ana Cláudia Monteiro; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Furian, Ana Flávia

    2015-01-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a Fusarium spp. mycotoxin which constitutes a major public health issue because of its worldwide distribution and diversity of toxic effects.While the liver and kidney are considered the major target organs of FB1 toxicity in several species, evidence indicates that FB1 may be toxic to the brain. To further investigate the effects of FB1 on the central nervous system the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that acute FB1 exposure causes brain hyperexcitability and the potential underlying mechanisms. For these purposes, adult male C57BL/6 mice were injected with FB1 (8 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle and 30 min thereafter received with a low dose of the classical convulsant pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle. After behavioral evaluation the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus were collected for analysis of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and mitochondrial complex I and II activities. We found that FB1 reduced the latency for PTZ-induced myoclonic jerks and increased the number of these events. After exposure to FB1 total and α1 Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activities increased in cerebral cortex, whereas the same enzyme activities decreased in the hippocampus. Although no changes in mitochondrial complex I and II activities were found, acute exposure to FB1 increased ΔΨm in the cerebral cortex. Altogether, present results indicate that FB1 causes brain hyperexcitability in vivo, and that mitochondrial dysfunction may represent a potential underlying mechanism. PMID:26342287

  10. Aflatoxin B1 is toxic to porcine oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Han, Jun; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-07-01

    As a toxic secondary metabolite of Aspergillus species, Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a major food and feed contaminant in tropical and sub-tropical regions with high temperature and humidity. It has been reported to be toxic to the female reproductive system in laboratory and domestic animals. In the present study, the influence of acute exposure to AFB1 (10 and 50 μM, 44h) on porcine oocyte maturation and its possible mechanism were investigated. The maturation rates of oocytes decreased significantly in the presence of 50 μM of AFB1. Cell cycle analysis showed that most oocytes were arrested at germinal vesicle breakdown or meosis I stage. However, actin assembly, spindle structure and chromosome alignment were not disrupted after exposure to 50 μM AFB1. Further study showed that DNA methylation levels increased in treated oocytes (50 μM). Histone methylation levels were also analysed after treatment (50 μM): H3K27me3 and H3K4me2 levels decreased, whereas H3K9me3 level increased, indicating that epigenetic modification was affected. AFB1 treatment (50 μM) also induced oxidative stress and further led to autophagy, as shown by accumulation of reactive oxygen species, up-regulated LC3 protein expression and increased mRNA levels of ATG3, ATG5 and ATG7. Annexin V-FITC staining assay revealed that AFB1 treatment (50 μM) resulted in oocyte early apoptosis, which was confirmed by increased Bak, Bax, Bcl-xl mRNA levels. Collectively, our results suggest that AFB1 disrupts porcine oocyte maturation through changing epigenetic modifications as well as inducing oxidative stress, excessive autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:25778688

  11. Aflatoxin B1 Degradation by a Pseudomonas Strain

    PubMed Central

    Sangare, Lancine; Zhao, Yueju; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Chang, Jinghua; Li, Jinhan; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), one of the most potent naturally occurring mutagens and carcinogens, causes significant threats to the food industry and animal production. In this study, 25 bacteria isolates were collected from grain kernels and soils displaying AFB1 reduction activity. Based on its degradation effectiveness, isolate N17-1 was selected for further characterization and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa N17-1 could degrade AFB1, AFB2 and AFM1 by 82.8%, 46.8% and 31.9% after incubation in Nutrient Broth (NB) medium at 37 °C for 72 h, respectively. The culture supernatant of isolate N17-1 degraded AFB1 effectively, whereas the viable cells and intra cell extracts were far less effective. Factors influencing AFB1 degradation by the culture supernatant were investigated. Maximum degradation was observed at 55 °C. Ions Mn2+ and Cu2+ were activators for AFB1 degradation, however, ions Mg2+, Li+, Zn2+, Se2+, Fe3+ were strong inhibitors. Treatments with proteinase K and proteinase K plus SDS significantly reduced the degradation activity of the culture supernatant. No degradation products were observed based on preliminary LC-QTOF/MS analysis, indicating AFB1 was metabolized to degradation products with chemical properties different from that of AFB1. The results indicated that the degradation of AFB1 by P. aeruginosa N17-1 was enzymatic and could have a great potential in industrial applications. This is the first report indicating that the isolate of P. aeruginosa possesses the ability to degrade aflatoxin. PMID:25341538

  12. Aflatoxin B1 is toxic to porcine oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Han, Jun; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-07-01

    As a toxic secondary metabolite of Aspergillus species, Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a major food and feed contaminant in tropical and sub-tropical regions with high temperature and humidity. It has been reported to be toxic to the female reproductive system in laboratory and domestic animals. In the present study, the influence of acute exposure to AFB1 (10 and 50 μM, 44h) on porcine oocyte maturation and its possible mechanism were investigated. The maturation rates of oocytes decreased significantly in the presence of 50 μM of AFB1. Cell cycle analysis showed that most oocytes were arrested at germinal vesicle breakdown or meosis I stage. However, actin assembly, spindle structure and chromosome alignment were not disrupted after exposure to 50 μM AFB1. Further study showed that DNA methylation levels increased in treated oocytes (50 μM). Histone methylation levels were also analysed after treatment (50 μM): H3K27me3 and H3K4me2 levels decreased, whereas H3K9me3 level increased, indicating that epigenetic modification was affected. AFB1 treatment (50 μM) also induced oxidative stress and further led to autophagy, as shown by accumulation of reactive oxygen species, up-regulated LC3 protein expression and increased mRNA levels of ATG3, ATG5 and ATG7. Annexin V-FITC staining assay revealed that AFB1 treatment (50 μM) resulted in oocyte early apoptosis, which was confirmed by increased Bak, Bax, Bcl-xl mRNA levels. Collectively, our results suggest that AFB1 disrupts porcine oocyte maturation through changing epigenetic modifications as well as inducing oxidative stress, excessive autophagy and apoptosis.

  13. Aflatoxin B(1) adsorption by natural and copper modified montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Daković, Aleksandra; Matijasević, Srdan; Rottinghaus, George E; Ledoux, David R; Butkeraitis, Paula; Sekulić, Zivko

    2008-10-01

    Adsorption of aflatoxin B(1) (AFB1) by natural montmorillonite (MONT) and montmorillonite modified with copper ions (Cu-MONT) was investigated. Both MONTs were characterized using the X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis, thermal analysis (DTA/TGA) and scanning electron miscroscopy/electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The results of XRPD and SEM/EDS analyses of Cu-MONT suggested partial ion exchange of native inorganic cations in MONT with copper occurred. Investigation of AFB1 adsorption by MONT and Cu-MONT, at pH 3, 7 or 9, showed that adsorption of this toxin by both MONTs was high (over 93%). Since AFB1 is nonionizable, no differences in AFB1 adsorption by both MONTs, at different pHs, were observed, as expected. Futhermore, it was determined that adsorption of AFB1 by both MONTs followed a non-linear (Langmuir) type of isotherm, at pH 3. The calculated maximum adsorbed amounts of AFB1 by MONT (40.982mg/g) and Cu-MONT (66.225mg/g), derived from Langmuir plots of isotherms, indicate that Cu-MONT was much effective in adsorbing AFB1. Since, the main cation in an exchangeable position in MONT is calcium, and in Cu-MONT both calcium and copper, the fact that ion exchange of inorganic cations in MONT with copper increases adsorption of AFB1 suggests that additional interactions between AFB1 and copper ions in Cu-MONT caused greater adsorption. PMID:18585010

  14. Bioactivation of 4-ipomeanol by CYP4B1: adduct characterization and evidence for an enedial intermediate.

    PubMed

    Baer, Brian R; Rettie, Allan E; Henne, Kirk R

    2005-05-01

    4-Ipomeanol (IPO) is a pneumotoxin that is bioactivated to a reactive intermediate that binds to DNA and other cellular macromolecules. Despite over 30 years of research in this area, detailed structural information on the nature of the IPO reactive intermediate is still lacking. In the present study, we reacted IPO with rabbit CYP4B1 in the presence of exogenous nucleophiles and analyzed the products by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Coincubation of IPO and rabbit CYP4B1 with glutathione gave rise to multiple products due likely to the presence of both sulfur and nitrogen nucleophiles in the same trapping molecule. Reaction mixtures containing equimolar N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and N-acetyl lysine (NAL) provided a major NADPH- and CYP4B1-dependent product. A combination of high-resolution mass spectrometry and two-dimensional NMR analysis following large-scale isolation of the biologically derived material provided evidence for an N-substituted cysteinyl pyrrole derivative of IPO, analogous to that characterized previously in model chemical studies conducted with cis-2-butene-1,4-dial. Purified native rabbit lung CYP4B1 and purified recombinant rabbit CYP4B1 produced the trapped NAC/NAL-IPO pyrrole adduct at rates of 600-700 nmol/nmol P450/30 min. A panel of 14 commercially available recombinant human CYPs was also studied, and substantial rates of IPO bioactivation (>100 nmol/nmol/30 min) were observed with CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4. These studies provide evidence for the formation of an enedial reactive intermediate during CYP-mediated IPO bioactivation, identify multiple human liver P450s capable of IPO bioactivation, and demonstrate that the same reactive intermediate is formed by both rabbit CYP4B1 and human P450s. PMID:15892579

  15. Protection against aflatoxin-B1-induced liver mutagenesis by Scutellaria baicalensis.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Johan G; Quiney, Brendan; Walter, Patrick B; Thomas, Cynthia; Hodgson, Kimberley; Murch, Susan J; Saxena, Praveen K

    2005-10-15

    We have measured the inhibition of the mutagenicity of the mycotoxin aflatoxin-B(1) in the liver of the rat by plant material of Scutellaria baicalensis, or Huang-qin. The addition of one percent dried Huang-qin to the feed of the animals reduced the mutant frequency of a subsequent administration of aflatoxin-B1 by approximately 60 and 77%, respectively, for two different batches of the plant material. The addition of Huang-qin also increased the expression of the gene for glutathione S-transferase A5 subunit by 2.5-3.0-fold, and decreased expression of P450 cytochrome 3A2 by 1.8-2.0-fold. The greater increase of the expression of the GST gene may result in the protection shown by Huang-qin. The sensitivity of the hepatic mitochondria to swelling, a measure of the mitochondrial permeability transition, is increased significantly in animals that are on a diet containing Huang-qin. This may lead to increased sensitivity to apoptosis on treatment with toxic compounds. The two batches of Huang-qin material show differences in both chemical composition and preventive potential. This study demonstrates how a combination of generating and analysis of plant varieties together with a mammalian assay for efficacy may improve the search for better plant-based prevention of cancer initiation. PMID:16202794

  16. Hyperglycemic activity of the recombinant crustacean hyperglycemic hormone B1 isoform (CHH-B1) of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Jiménez, Laura; Sánchez-Castrejón, Edna; Ponce-Rivas, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Márquez, Ma Enriqueta; Aguilar, Manuel B; Re, Ana Denisse; Díaz, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is the most abundant neuropeptide produced by the X-organ/sinus gland (XO/SG) complex in the crustacean eyestalk. CHH plays a principal role in the control of glucose metabolism. The CHH-B1 isoform is produced in the eyestalk of Litopenaeus vannamei by alternative splicing of the chhB gene and its cDNA sequence has revealed that this isoform has a non-amidated C-terminal residue (CHH-like peptide). In this work, a recombinant CHH-B1 (rCHH-B1) with a sequence identical to the native hormone was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris X-33 and purified from the culture medium by RP-HPLC. The identity of the purified rCHH-B1 was confirmed by N-terminal sequencing and by using an anti-CHH-B1 polyclonal antibody. An in vivo assay showed that the hyperglycemic effect was dependant of the dosage of rCHH-B1, and the maximal hyperglycemic response was obtained with 250pmol treatment. These results suggest that the amino acid sequence of the C-terminus and its correct structure are both important for the hyperglycemic activity of naturally occurring non-amidated CHH peptides, such as CHH-B1. CHH-B1 appears to be the first reported CHH-like peptide with significant hyperglycemic activity produced in the sinus gland of a penaeid shrimp.

  17. B-1a, B-1b and B-2 B cells display unique VHDJH repertoires formed at different stages of ontogeny and under different selection pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Tornberg, U C; Holmberg, D

    1995-01-01

    Analyses of VHDJH rearrangements isolated from murine peritoneal B-1a cells (CD5+, IgMhi, B220lo), peritoneal B-1b cells (CD5-, IgMhi, B220lo), and conventional splenic B cells provide evidence that a unique repertoire of VH regions is displayed by each of these B-cell subsets. The B-1a subset is characterized by a low N-region diversity, by a high frequency of sequence homologies in the VH-D and D-JH junctions, and by a limited exonuclease nibbling of the terminals of the joining gene segments. Through expansion in ageing mice, B-1a clones with these properties are favoured. B-1b cells are similar to conventional B-2 cells with respect to N-region diversity, but are unique in terms of D gene expression. Thus, while most murine pre-B and B cells preferentially use DSP and DFL gene segments in a given reading frame (RF1), B-1b cells frequently express D genes in another reading frame (RF2). Together, these findings provide structural evidence for a model where B-1a, B-1b and B-2 cells are produced by separate progenitors that are active at different stages of ontogeny. Images PMID:7737121

  18. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(1)-1 - $3,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false $3,000 limitation. 31.3306(b)(1)-1 Section 31.3306(b)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3306(b)(1)-1...

  19. 26 CFR 1.415(b)-1 - Limitations for defined benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations for defined benefit plans. 1.415(b)-1 Section 1.415(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.415(b)-1 Limitations for defined benefit plans....

  20. 26 CFR 301.6104(b)-1 - Publicity of information on certain information returns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Publicity of information on certain information returns. 301.6104(b)-1 Section 301.6104(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Returns and Records § 301.6104(b)-1 Publicity of information on certain information returns. (a)...

  1. 26 CFR 1.6050B-1 - Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... unemployment compensation payments. 1.6050B-1 Section 1.6050B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.6050B-1 Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 1978, every person who makes payments of unemployment compensation (as...

  2. 26 CFR 1.6050B-1 - Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... unemployment compensation payments. 1.6050B-1 Section 1.6050B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.6050B-1 Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 1978, every person who makes payments of unemployment compensation (as...

  3. 26 CFR 1.6050B-1 - Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... unemployment compensation payments. 1.6050B-1 Section 1.6050B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.6050B-1 Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 1978, every person who makes payments of unemployment compensation (as...

  4. 26 CFR 1.6050B-1 - Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... unemployment compensation payments. 1.6050B-1 Section 1.6050B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.6050B-1 Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 1978, every person who makes payments of unemployment compensation (as...

  5. 26 CFR 48.4062(b)-1 - Rebuilt parts or accessories sold on an exchange basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Rebuilt parts or accessories sold on an exchange basis. 48.4062(b)-1 Section 48.4062(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE..., Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Automotive and Related Items § 48.4062(b)-1 Rebuilt...

  6. 26 CFR 11.401(b)-1 - Certain retroactive changes in plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certain retroactive changes in plan. 11.401(b)-1 Section 11.401(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 § 11.401(b)-1...

  7. 26 CFR 1.6045B-1 - Returns relating to actions affecting basis of securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returns relating to actions affecting basis of securities. 1.6045B-1 Section 1.6045B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6045B-1 Returns relating to actions affecting basis...

  8. 26 CFR 11.401(b)-1 - Certain retroactive changes in plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certain retroactive changes in plan. 11.401(b)-1 Section 11.401(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 § 11.401(b)-1...

  9. 26 CFR 1.415(b)-1 - Limitations for defined benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations for defined benefit plans. 1.415(b)-1 Section 1.415(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.415(b)-1 Limitations for defined benefit...

  10. 26 CFR 1.6045B-1 - Returns relating to actions affecting basis of securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Returns relating to actions affecting basis of securities. 1.6045B-1 Section 1.6045B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6045B-1 Returns relating to actions affecting basis...

  11. 26 CFR 53.4941(b)-1 - Imposition of additional taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imposition of additional taxes. 53.4941(b)-1...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Taxes on Self-Dealing § 53.4941(b)-1 Imposition of additional taxes. (a) Tax on self-dealer. Section 4941(b)(1) of the Code imposes an excise...

  12. 17 CFR 270.57b-1 - Exemption for downstream affiliates of business development companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... affiliates of business development companies. 270.57b-1 Section 270.57b-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....57b-1 Exemption for downstream affiliates of business development companies. Notwithstanding... to any person (a) solely because that person is directly or indirectly controlled by a...

  13. 17 CFR 270.57b-1 - Exemption for downstream affiliates of business development companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... affiliates of business development companies. 270.57b-1 Section 270.57b-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....57b-1 Exemption for downstream affiliates of business development companies. Notwithstanding... to any person (a) solely because that person is directly or indirectly controlled by a...

  14. 42 CFR 52b.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 52b.1 Section 52b.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.1 To what programs do these regulations apply? (a)...

  15. 42 CFR 52b.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false To what programs do these regulations apply? 52b.1 Section 52b.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH CONSTRUCTION GRANTS § 52b.1 To what programs do these regulations apply? (a)...

  16. Proteasomal degradation of human CYP1B1: effect of the Asn453Ser polymorphism on the post-translational regulation of CYP1B1 expression.

    PubMed

    Bandiera, Silvio; Weidlich, Simone; Harth, Volker; Broede, Peter; Ko, Yun; Friedberg, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Allelic variations in CYP1B1 are reported to modulate the incidence of several types of cancer. To provide a mechanistic basis for this association, we investigated the impact of nonsilent allelic changes on the intracellular levels and post-translational regulation of CYP1B1 protein. When transiently expressed in COS-1 cells, either in the presence or absence of recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, the cellular level of the CYP1B1.4 allelic variant (containing a Ser at the amino acid position 453; Ser453) was 2-fold lower compared with the other four allelic CYP1B1 proteins (containing Asn453), as analyzed by both immunoblotting and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity. This difference was caused by post-translational regulation; as in the presence of cycloheximide, the rate of degradation of immunodetectable and enzymatically active CYP1B1.4 was distinctly faster than that of CYP1B1.1. Pulse-chase analysis revealed that the half-life of CYP1B1.4 was a mere 1.6 h compared with 4.8 h for CYP1B1.1. The presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 [N-benzoyloxycarbonyl (Z)-Leu-Leuleucinal] increased the stability not only of immunodetectable CYP1B1, but also--unexpectedly given the size of the proteasome access channel--increased the stability of enzymatically active CYP1B1. The data presented herein also demonstrate that CYP1B1 is targeted for its polymorphism-dependent degradation by polyubiquitination but not phosphorylation. Our results importantly provide a mechanism to explain the recently reported lower incidence of endometrial cancer in individuals carrying the CYP1B1*4 compared with the CYP1B1*1 haplo-type. In addition, the mechanistic paradigms revealed herein may explain the strong overexpression of CYP1B1 in tumors compared with nondiseased tissues. PMID:15486049

  17. Observations and Light Curve Solutions of the Eclipsing Binaries USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Popov, V. A.; Vasileva, D.; Petrov, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present follow-up photometric observations in Sloan filters g', i' of the newly discovered eclipsing stars USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731. Our data revealed that their orbital periods are considerably bigger than the previous values. This result changed the classification of USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 from ultrashort-period binary (P=0.197 d) to short-period system (P=0.251 d). The light curve solutions of our observations revealed that USNO-B1.0 1395-0370184 and USNO-B1.0 1395-0370731 are overcontact binaries in which components are K dwarfs, close in masses and radii. The light curve distortions were reproduced by cool spots with angular radius of around 20°.

  18. Prophylactic effects of asiaticoside-based standardized extract of Centella asiatica (L.) Urban leaves on experimental migraine: Involvement of 5HT1A/1B receptors.

    PubMed

    Bobade, Vijeta; Bodhankar, Subhash L; Aswar, Urmila; Vishwaraman, Mohan; Thakurdesai, Prasad

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed at evaluation of prophylactic efficacy and possible mechanisms of asiaticoside (AS) based standardized extract of Centella asiatica (L.) Urban leaves (INDCA) in animal models of migraine. The effects of oral and intranasal (i.n.) pretreatment of INDCA (acute and 7-days subacute) were evaluated against nitroglycerine (NTG, 10 mg·kg(-1), i.p.) and bradykinin (BK, 10 μg, intra-arterial) induced hyperalgesia in rats. Tail flick latencies (from 0 to 240 min) post-NTG treatment and the number of vocalizations post-BK treatment were recorded as a measure of hyperalgesia. Separate groups of rats for negative (Normal) and positive (sumatriptan, 42 mg·kg(-1), s.c.) controls were included. The interaction of INDCA with selective 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT1D receptor antagonists (NAN-190, Isamoltane hemifumarate, and BRL-15572 respectively) against NTG-induced hyperalgesia was also evaluated. Acute and sub-acute pre-treatment of INDCA [10 and 30 mg·kg(-1) (oral) and 100 μg/rat (i.n.) showed significant anti-nociception activity, and reversal of the NTG-induced hyperalgesia and brain 5-HT concentration decline. Oral pre-treatment with INDCA (30 mg·kg(-1), 7 d) showed significant reduction in the number of vocalization. The anti-nociceptive effects of INDCA were blocked by 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B but not 5-HT1D receptor antagonists. In conclusion, INDCA demonstrated promising anti-nociceptive effects in animal models of migraine, probably through 5-HT1A/1B medicated action.

  19. Climate response to projected changes in short-lived species under an A1B scenario from 2000-2050 in the GISS climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Shindell, Drew T.; Faluvegi, Greg; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy M.; Unger, Nadine; Menon, Surabi; Miller, Ron L.; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Streets, David G.

    2007-03-26

    We investigate the climate forcing from and response to projected changes in short-lived species and methane under the A1B scenario from 2000-2050 in the GISS climate model. We present a meta-analysis of new simulations of the full evolution of gas and aerosol species and other existing experiments with variations of the same model. The comparison highlights the importance of several physical processes in determining radiative forcing, especially the effect of climate change on stratosphere-troposphere exchange, heterogeneous sulfate-nitrate-dust chemistry, and changes in methane oxidation and natural emissions. However, the impact of these fairly uncertain physical effects is substantially less than the difference between alternative emission scenarios for all short-lived species. The net global mean annual average direct radiative forcing from the short-lived species is .02 W/m{sup 2} or less in our projections, as substantial positive ozone forcing is largely offset by negative aerosol direct forcing. Since aerosol reductions also lead to a reduced indirect effect, the global mean surface temperature warms by {approx}0.07 C by 2030 and {approx}0.13 C by 2050, adding 19% and 17%, respectively, to the warming induced by long-lived greenhouse gases. Regional direct forcings are large, up to 3.8 W/m{sup 2}. The ensemble-mean climate response shows little regional correlation with the spatial pattern of the forcing, however, suggesting that oceanic and atmospheric mixing generally overwhelms the effect of even large localized forcings. Exceptions are the polar regions, where ozone and aerosols may induce substantial seasonal climate changes.

  20. Cyp1b1 exerts opposing effects on intestinal tumorigenesis via exogenous and endogenous substrates

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, Richard B.; Larsen, Michele Campaigne; Elmergreen, Tammy L.; Ko, Alex Y.; Irving, Amy A.; Clipson, Linda; Jefcoate, Colin R.

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (Cyp1b1) metabolism contributes to physiological functions during embryogenesis, but also to carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). We generated Cyp1b1-deficient mice carrying the Min allele of the Adenomatous polyposis coli gene. These Cyp1b1-deficient Min mice developed twice as many tumors as Min controls, which, however, remained similar in size and histology. Tumors from older (130 day) Cyp1b1-deficient Min mice exhibited focal areas of nuclear atypia associated with less organized epithelia. The metabolism of endogenous substrates by Cyp1b1, therefore, suppresses tumor initiation, but also affects progression. Treatment of Min mice with 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) doubled both tumor multiplicity and size within 20 days, but not when mice lacked Cyp1b1. This was paralleled by an abnormal staining of crypts with β catenin, phospho-IKK, and ReIA, which may represent an early stage of tumorigenesis similar to aberrant crypt formation. Cyp1b1 deletion did not affect circulating DMBA and metabolites. Cyp1b1 expression was higher in the tumors compared to normal small intestines. Increased tumorigenesis may, therefore, arise from generation of DMBA metabolites by Cyp1b1 in the developing tumors. Benzo(a)pyrene (BP), which is similarly activated by Cyp1b1 in vitro, did not affect tumorigenesis in Min mice. By contrast, BP and DMBA each suppressed tumor multiplicity in absence of Cyp1b1. Cyp1b1 metabolism of DMBA and endogenous oxygenation products may each impact a tumor promoting NF-κB. activation, whereas Ah receptor activation by PAH effects suppression. Tumorigenesis may, therefore, depend on activation of PAH by Cyp1b1, and on off-setting suppression by Cyp1b1 of endogenous tumor-enhancing substrates. PMID:18794127

  1. Laboratory detection of a new interstellar free radical CH2CN(2B1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, Shuji; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Irvine, W. M.; Ziurys, L. M.; Suzuki, Hiroko

    1988-01-01

    An asymmetric-top free radical CH2CN with a 2B1 ground state was detected by laboratory microwave spectroscopy. The radical was produced in a free-space absorption cell by a DC glow discharge in pure CH3CN gas. About 60 fine-structure components were observed for the N = 11-10 to 14-13 a-type rotational transitions in the frequency region of 220-260 GHz. Hyperfine resolved components for the N = 4-3 and 5-4 transitions were resolved in the 80 and 100 GHz regions, respectively. Molecular constants were determined and U100602 and U80484 from Sgr B2, and U40240 and U20120 from TMC-1 were assigned to the N = 5-4, 4-3, 2-1, and 1-0 transitions with K(-1) = 0 of the CH2CN radical.

  2. CYP1B1 expression, a potential risk factor for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Erdmann, Christine A.; Russell, Marion

    2001-05-31

    CYP1B1 expression in non-tumor breast tissue from breast cancer patients and cancer-free individuals was determined to test the hypothesis that high CYP1B1 expression is a risk factor for breast cancer. Large interindividual variations in CYP1B1 expression were found with CYP1B1 levels notably higher in breast cancer patients than cancer-free individuals. The results indicate that CYP1B1 might play a role in breast cancer either through increased PAH activation or through metabolism of endogenous estrogen to a carcinogenic derivative.

  3. Cancer-associated SF3B1 mutations affect alternative splicing by promoting alternative branchpoint usage

    PubMed Central

    Alsafadi, Samar; Houy, Alexandre; Battistella, Aude; Popova, Tatiana; Wassef, Michel; Henry, Emilie; Tirode, Franck; Constantinou, Angelos; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Dutertre, Martin; Stern, Marc-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Hotspot mutations in the spliceosome gene SF3B1 are reported in ∼20% of uveal melanomas. SF3B1 is involved in 3′-splice site (3′ss) recognition during RNA splicing; however, the molecular mechanisms of its mutation have remained unclear. Here we show, using RNA-Seq analyses of uveal melanoma, that the SF3B1R625/K666 mutation results in deregulated splicing at a subset of junctions, mostly by the use of alternative 3′ss. Modelling the differential junctions in SF3B1WT and SF3B1R625/K666 cell lines demonstrates that the deregulated splice pattern strictly depends on SF3B1 status and on the 3'ss-sequence context. SF3B1WT knockdown or overexpression do not reproduce the SF3B1R625/K666 splice pattern, qualifying SF3B1R625/K666 as change-of-function mutants. Mutagenesis of predicted branchpoints reveals that the SF3B1R625/K666-promoted splice pattern is a direct result of alternative branchpoint usage. Altogether, this study provides a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying splicing alterations induced by mutant SF3B1 in cancer, and reveals a role for alternative branchpoints in disease. PMID:26842708

  4. Dependence of B1+ and B1− Field Patterns of Surface Coils on the Electrical Properties of the Sample and the MR Operating Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Manushka V.; Collins, Christopher M.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan; Wiggins, Graham C.; Lattanzi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    In high field MRI, the spatial distribution of the radiofrequency magnetic (B1) field is usually affected by the presence of the sample. For hardware design and to aid interpretation of experimental results, it is important both to anticipate and to accurately simulate the behavior of these fields. Fields generated by a radiofrequency surface coil were simulated using dyadic Green’s functions, or experimentally measured over a range of frequencies inside an object whose electrical properties were varied to illustrate a variety of transmit (B1+) and receive (B1−) field patterns. In this work, we examine how changes in polarization of the field and interference of propagating waves in an object can affect the B1 spatial distribution. Results are explained conceptually using Maxwell’s equations and intuitive illustrations. We demonstrate that the electrical conductivity alters the spatial distribution of distinct polarized components of the field, causing “twisted” transmit and receive field patterns, and asymmetries between |B1+| and |B1−|. Additionally, interference patterns due to wavelength effects are observed at high field in samples with high relative permittivity and near-zero conductivity, but are not present in lossy samples due to the attenuation of propagating EM fields. This work provides a conceptual framework for understanding B1 spatial distributions for surface coils and can provide guidance for RF engineers.

  5. CYP1B1 mRNA inducibility due to benzo(a)pyrene is modified by the CYP1B1 L432V gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Helmig, Simone; Wenzel, Sibylle; Maxeiner, Hagen; Schneider, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), a primary component of tobacco smoke, is activated by cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1). Smokers homozygous for the C-allele (*1/*1) at the CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism have shown increased CYP1B1 expression, compared to smokers homozygous for the G-allele *3/*3. Since no difference has been shown in CYP1B1 expression between both genotypes in non-smokers, we assumed that the genetic impact is produced in combination with an exogenous induction (e.g. BaP). To confirm this theory and to quantify the effect, we induced human leucocytes with increasing BaP concentrations and determined CYP1B1 mRNA expression with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We incubated human leucocytes from 27 healthy donors with BaP concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 250 µM. We identified the CYP1B1 genotypes by melting curve analysis and assessed relative CYP1B1 mRNA expression using real-time PCR. Expression was related to β-2-microglobulin with the 2(-ΔΔCT) method. Inducibility of CYP1B1 mRNA by BaP was higher in leucocytes carrying the CYP1B1*1/*1 genotype than in leucocytes carrying the CYP1B1*3/*3 genotype (P = 0.012). We revealed significant differences, with BaP concentrations of 2.5 µM (P = 0.0094), 5 µM (P = 0.027), 10 µM (P = 0.0006), 25 µM (P = 0.0007) and 50 µM (P = 0.017). Homozygous carriers of the C-allele (*1/*1) at the CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism show a higher response to environmental factors, such as carcinogenic BaP, than homozygous carriers of the G-allele *3/*3.

  6. Haemoprotein b-590 (Escherichia coli), a reducible catalase and peroxidase: evidence for its close relationship to hydroperoxidase I and a 'cytochrome a1b' preparation.

    PubMed

    Poole, R K; Baines, B S; Appleby, C A

    1986-06-01

    ) and that a similar haemoprotein was mistaken for a cytochrome a1 b complex by Barrett & Sinclair (Abstracts of the 7th International Congress of Biochemistry, Tokyo, H-107, p. 907, 1967).

  7. SLCO1B1 Variants and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor (Enalapril)-Induced Cough: a Pharmacogenetic Study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Quan; He, Fa-Zhong; Wang, Zhen-Min; Sun, Ning-Ling; Wang, Lu-Yan; Tang, Gen-Fu; Liu, Mou-Ze; Li, Qing; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-26

    Clinical observations suggest that incidence of cough in Chinese taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors is much higher than other racial groups. Cough is the most common adverse reaction of enalapril. We investigate whether SLCO1B1 genetic polymorphisms, previously reported to be important determinants of inter-individual variability in enalapril pharmacokinetics, are associated with the enalapril-induced cough. A cohort of 450 patients with essential hypertension taking 10 mg enalapril maleate were genotyped for the functional SLCO1B1 variants, 388A > G (Asn130Asp, rs2306283) and 521T > C (Val174Ala, rs4149056). The primary endpoint was cough, which was recorded when participants were bothered by cough and respiratory symptoms during enalapril treatment without an identifiable cause. SLCO1B1 521C allele conferred a 2-fold relative risk of enalapril-induced cough (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.34-3.04, P = 6.2 × 10(-4)), and haplotype analysis suggested the relative risk of cough was 6.94-fold (95% CI = 1.30-37.07, P = 0.020) in SLCO1B1*15/*15 carriers. Furthermore, there was strong evidence for a gene-dose effect (percent with cough in those with 0, 1, or 2 copy of the 521C allele: 28.2%, 42.5%, and 71.4%, trend P = 6.6 × 10(-4)). Our study highlights, for the first time, SLCO1B1 variants are strongly associated with an increased risk of enalapril-induced cough. The findings will be useful to provide pharmacogenetic markers for enalapril treatment.

  8. Defining the membrane disruption mechanism of kalata B1 via coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nawae, Wanapinun; Hannongbua, Supa; Ruengjitchatchawalya, Marasri

    2014-01-01

    Kalata B1 has been demonstrated to have bioactivity relating to membrane disruption. In this study, we conducted coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to gain further insight into kB1 bioactivity. The simulations were performed at various concentrations of kB1 to capture the overall progression of its activity. Two configurations of kB1 oligomers, termed tower-like and wall-like clusters, were detected. The conjugation between the wall-like oligomers resulted in the formation of a ring-like hollow in the kB1 cluster on the membrane surface. Our results indicated that the molecules of kB1 were trapped at the membrane-water interface. The interfacial membrane binding of kB1 induced a positive membrane curvature, and the lipids were eventually extracted from the membrane through the kB1 ring-like hollow into the space inside the kB1 cluster. These findings provide an alternative view of the mechanism of kB1 bioactivity that corresponds with the concept of an interfacial bioactivity model. PMID:24492660

  9. Characterization of ursodeoxycholic and norursodeoxycholic acid as substrates of the hepatic uptake transporters OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OATP2B1 and NTCP.

    PubMed

    König, Jörg; Klatt, Sabine; Dilger, Karin; Fromm, Martin F

    2012-08-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only approved treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis, and norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) is currently tested in clinical trials for future treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis because of beneficial effects in cholestatic Mdr2 knock-out mice. Uptake of UDCA and norUDCA into hepatocytes is believed to be a prerequisite for subsequent metabolism and therapeutic action. However, the molecular determinants of hepatocellular uptake of UDCA and norUDCA are poorly understood. We therefore investigated whether UDCA and norUDCA are substrates of the hepatic uptake transporters OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OATP2B1 and Na(+) -taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), which are localized in the basolateral membrane of hepatocytes. Uptake of [(3) H]UDCA and [(14) C]norUDCA into Human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells stably expressing OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OATP2B1 or NTCP was investigated and compared with uptake into vector control cells. Uptake ratios were calculated by dividing uptake into transporter-transfected cells by uptake into respective control cells. Uptake ratios of OATP1B1-, OATP1B3- and OATP2B1-mediated UDCA and norUDCA uptake were at maximum 1.23 and 1.49, respectively. Uptake of UDCA was significantly higher into HEK-NTCP cells only at the lowest tested concentration (1 μM, p < 0.001) compared with the control cells with an uptake ratio of 1.34-fold. NorUDCA was not significantly transported by NTCP. The low uptake rates suggest that OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OATP2B1 and NTCP are not relevant for hepatocellular uptake and effects of UDCA and norUDCA in human beings.

  10. Managing Vancouver B1 fractures by cerclage system compared to locking plate fixation - a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Katharina; Winkler, Martin; Hofstädter, Thomas; Dorn, Ulrich; Augat, Peter

    2016-06-01

    With increasing life expectancy and number of total hip arthroplasties (THA), the need for revision surgery is increasing too. The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal fracture treatment for a clinically characteristic Vancouver B1 fracture. We hypothesized that locking plate fixation has biomechanical advantages over fixation with a simple cerclage system. Additionally, we hypothesized that removal of the primary short stem and revision with a long stem would show biomechanical benefit. The biomechanical testing was performed with a static and a dynamic loading protocol on twenty 4th Generation sawbones. These were divided into four different groups (n = 5 each). In group 1, the primary uncemented short stem remained and the fracture was stabilized with a locking plate. In group 2, the primary stem remained and the fracture was stabilized with a cerclage stabilization system containing two stabilizers and four cerclages. In group 3, the primary stem was replaced by an uncemented long revision stem and the fracture was fixed with a locking plate. In group 4, the short stem was replaced by a long revision stem and the fracture was fixed with the cerclage system. Static testing revealed that the revision of the short stem with the long stem caused a 2-fold (p < 0.001, ANOVA) increase of axial stiffness. In dynamic testing, the number of cycles to failure was 4 times (p < 0.001, ANOVA) higher with the long revision stem. Compared to locked plating cerclage wiring demonstrated a 26% more cycles to failure (p = 0.031, ANOVA). The load to failure was 91% larger (p < 0.001, ANOVA) with the long revision stem and 11% smaller with locked plating (p < 0.001, ANOVA). In conclusion, the present biomechanical study indicates that periprosthetic Vancouver B1 fractures can be sufficiently fixed by simple cerclage systems. Revision with a long replacement stem provides a superior mechanical stability regardless of type of osteosynthesis fixation and is therefore a viable

  11. Montelukast Disposition: No Indication of Transporter-Mediated Uptake in OATP2B1 and OATP1B1 Expressing HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brännström, Marie; Nordell, Pär; Bonn, Britta; Davis, Andrew M.; Palmgren, Anna-Pia; Hilgendorf, Constanze; Rubin, Katarina; Grime, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies with montelukast show variability in effect and polymorphic OATP2B1-dependent absorption has previously been implicated as a possible cause. This claim has been challenged with conflicting data and here we used OATP2B1-transfected HEK293 cells to clarify the mechanisms involved. For montelukast, no significant difference in cell uptake between HEK-OATP2B1 and empty vector cell lines was observed at pH 6.5 or pH 7.4, and no concentration-dependent uptake was detected. Montelukast is a carboxylic acid, a relatively potent inhibitor of OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1, and has previously been postulated to be actively transported into human hepatocytes. Using OATP1B1-transfected HEK293 cells and primary human hepatocytes in the presence of OATP inhibitors we demonstrate for the first time that active OATP-dependent transport is unlikely to play a significant role in the human disposition of montelukast. PMID:26694455

  12. Montelukast Disposition: No Indication of Transporter-Mediated Uptake in OATP2B1 and OATP1B1 Expressing HEK293 Cells.

    PubMed

    Brännström, Marie; Nordell, Pär; Bonn, Britta; Davis, Andrew M; Palmgren, Anna-Pia; Hilgendorf, Constanze; Rubin, Katarina; Grime, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies with montelukast show variability in effect and polymorphic OATP2B1-dependent absorption has previously been implicated as a possible cause. This claim has been challenged with conflicting data and here we used OATP2B1-transfected HEK293 cells to clarify the mechanisms involved. For montelukast, no significant difference in cell uptake between HEK-OATP2B1 and empty vector cell lines was observed at pH 6.5 or pH 7.4, and no concentration-dependent uptake was detected. Montelukast is a carboxylic acid, a relatively potent inhibitor of OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1, and has previously been postulated to be actively transported into human hepatocytes. Using OATP1B1-transfected HEK293 cells and primary human hepatocytes in the presence of OATP inhibitors we demonstrate for the first time that active OATP-dependent transport is unlikely to play a significant role in the human disposition of montelukast. PMID:26694455

  13. Effect of high sucrose diet on liver enzyme content and activity and aflatoxin B1-induced mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Peters, Leandra P; Teel, Robert W

    2003-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a fungal toxin and contaminant that has been implicated in human liver carcinogenesis. In this study we evaluated the effect of a 65% of total calories from sucrose diet (HSD) for 90 days on hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity compared to rats maintained on standard lab chow (0% sucrose). There was a statistically significant increase in the number of S. typhimurium His+ revertants (p < 0.001) generated from the incubation of AFB1 with hepatic microsomes from rats fed a HSD. The HSD did not affect the total microsomal CYP450 content nor content of CYP450 1A2, 2B1, 2 isoforms which activate AFB1. Alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activity (MROD, PROD) of microsomes from animals fed HSD was decreased by 73% and 49%, respectively. MROD activity is linked to CYP 1A2 activity while PROD is linked to CYP 2B1,2 activity. Although the amount of CYP 3A was significantly decreased in rats fed a HSD, its activity, determined by the presence of the fluorometric metabolite 7-hydroxyquinidine, was unchanged. GST activity was significantly lower in the rats fed HSD.

  14. Flavonoids exhibit diverse effects on CYP11B1 expression and cortisol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann

    2012-02-01

    CYP11B1 catalyzes the final step of cortisol biosynthesis. The effects of flavonoids on transcriptional expression and enzyme activity of CYP11B1 were investigated using the human adrenocortical H295R cell model. All tested nonhydroxylated flavones including 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone, α-naphthoflavone, and β-naphthoflavone upregulated CYP11B1 expression and cortisol production, whereas apigenin and quercetin exhibited potent cytotoxicity and CYP11B1 repression at high concentrations. Nonhydroxylated flavones stimulated CYP11B1-catalyzed cortisol formation at transcriptional level. Resveratrol increased endogenous and substrate-supported cortisol production like nonhydroxylated flavones tested, but it had no effect on CYP11B1 gene expression and enzyme activity. Resveratrol appeared to alter cortisol biosynthesis at an earlier step. The Ad5 element situated in the − 121/− 106 region was required for basal and flavone-induced CYP11B1 expression. Overexpression of COUP-TFI did not improve the responsiveness of Ad5 to nonhydroxylated flavones. Although COUP-TFI overexpression increased CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 promoter activation, its effect was not mediated through the common Ad5 element. Treating cells with PD98059 (a flavone-type MEK1 inhibitor) increased CYP11B1 promoter activity, but not involving ERK signaling because phosphorylation of ERK1/2 remained unvarying throughout the course of treatment. Likewise, AhR was not responsible for the CYP11B1-modulating effects of flavonoids because inconsistency with their effects on AhR activation. 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone and 8-Br-cAMP additively activated CYP11B1 promoter activity. H-89 reduced 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone-induced CYP11B1 promoter activation but to a lesser extent as compared to its inhibition on cAMP-induced transactivation. Our data suggest that constant exposure to nonhydroxylated flavones raises a potential risk of high basal and cAMP-induced cortisol synthesis in consequence of increased CYP11B1

  15. Survey of maize from south-western Nigeria for zearalenone, alpha- and beta-zearalenols, fumonisin B1 and enniatins produced by Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Adejumo, T O; Hettwer, U; Karlovsky, P

    2007-09-01

    A survey for the natural occurrence of Fusarium mycotoxins in maize for human consumption in four south-western states of Nigeria using High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectroscopy (HPLC/MS) showed that 93.4% of the samples were contaminated with zearalenone (ZON), alpha- and beta-zearalenols (alpha- and beta-ZOL), fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) or enniatins (ENNs). The fractions of contaminated samples were 73% for FB(1) (mean:117 microg kg(-1), range:10-760 microg kg(-1)); 57% for ZON (mean:49 microg kg(-1), range:115-779 microg kg(-1)) and 13% for alpha-ZOL (mean: 63.6 microg kg(-1), range:32-181 microg kg(-1)), while ENNs A1, B and B(1) were present in 3, 7 and 3% of the samples respectively. There was no beta-ZOL present above the quantification limits of 50 microg kg(-1). Only the FB(1) content was significantly different at the 95% confidence level among the four states. The Fusarium species most frequently isolated from maize seeds were F. verticillioides (70%), followed by F. sporotrichioides (42%), F. graminearum (30%), F. pallidoroseum (15%), F. compactum (12%), F. proliferatum (12%), F. equiseti (9%), F. acuminatum (8%) and F. subglutinans (4%). This is the first report of the occurrence of alpha-zearalenol and enniatins in Nigerian maize.

  16. 26 CFR 1.50B-1 - Definitions of WIN expenses and WIN employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Definitions of WIN expenses and WIN employees. 1.50B-1 Section 1.50B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Expenses of Work Incentive Programs § 1.50B-1 Definitions of WIN expenses and WIN employees. (a)...

  17. Functional characterisation of a TLR accessory protein, UNC93B1, in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Lee, P T; Zou, J; Holland, J W; Martin, S A M; Scott, C J W; Kanellos, T; Secombes, C J

    2015-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are indispensable components of the innate immune system, which recognise conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and induce a series of defensive immune responses to protect the host. Biosynthesis, localisation and activation of TLRs are dependent on TLR accessory proteins. In this study, we identified the accessory protein, UNC93B1, from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) whole-genome shotgun (WGS) contigs aided by the conserved gene synteny of genes flanking UNC93B1 in fish, birds and mammals. Phylogenetic analysis showed that salmon UNC93B1 grouped with other vertebrate UNC93B1 molecules, and had highest amino acid identity and similarity to zebrafish UNC93B1. The salmon UNC93B1 gene organisation was also similar in structure to mammalian UNC93B1. Our gene expression studies revealed that salmon UNC93B1 was more highly expressed in spleen, liver and gill tissues but was expressed at a lower level in head kidney tissue in post-smolts relative to parr. Moreover, salmon UNC93B1 mRNA transcripts were up-regulated in vivo in spleen tissue from polyI:C treated salmon and in vitro in polyI:C or IFNγ stimulated Salmon Head Kidney-1 (SHK-1) cells. Initial studies into the functional role of salmon UNC93B1 in fish TLR signalling found that both wild type salmon UNC93B1 and a molecule with a site-directed mutation (H424R) co-immunoprecipitated with salmon TLR19, TLR20a and TLR20d. Overall, these data illustrate the potential importance of UNC93B1 as an accessory protein in fish TLR signalling.

  18. Modeling SF3B1 Mutations in Cancer: Advances, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daichi; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-09-12

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Obeng et al. identify the consequences of expressing the most common mutation in the spliceosomal gene SF3B1 on hematopoiesis. The knockin mouse model described represents a valuable tool to dissect the effects of SF3B1 mutations on transformation, splicing, and less well-characterized functions of SF3B1. PMID:27622329

  19. Downregulation of kinin B1 receptor function by B2 receptor heterodimerization and signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianming; Brovkovych, Viktor; Zhang, Yongkang; Tan, Fulong; Skidgel, Randal A

    2015-01-01

    Signaling through the G protein-coupled kinin receptors B1 (kB1R) and B2 (kB2R) plays a critical role in inflammatory responses mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. The kB2R is constitutively expressed and rapidly desensitized in response to agonist whereas kB1R expression is upregulated by inflammatory stimuli and it is resistant to internalization and desensitization. Here we show that the kB1R heterodimerizes with kB2Rs in co-transfected HEK293 cells and natively expressing endothelial cells, resulting in significant internalization and desensitization of the kB1R response in cells pre-treated with kB2R agonist. However, pre-treatment of cells with kB1R agonist did not affect subsequent kB2R responses. Agonists of other G protein-coupled receptors (thrombin, lysophosphatidic acid) had no effect on a subsequent kB1R response. The loss of kB1R response after pretreatment with kB2R agonist was partially reversed with kB2R mutant Y129S, which blocks kB2R signaling without affecting endocytosis, or T342A, which signals like wild type but is not endocytosed. Co-endocytosis of the kB1R with kB2R was dependent on β-arrestin and clathrin-coated pits but not caveolae. The sorting pathway of kB1R and kB2R after endocytosis differed as recycling of kB1R to the cell surface was much slower than that of kB2R. In cytokine-treated human lung microvascular endothelial cells, pre-treatment with kB2R agonist inhibited kB1R-mediated increase in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) caused by kB1R stimulation (to generate nitric oxide) and blocked the profound drop in TER caused by kB1R activation in the presence of pyrogallol (a superoxide generator). Thus, kB1R function can be downregulated by kB2R co-endocytosis and signaling, suggesting new approaches to control kB1R signaling in pathological conditions. PMID:25289859

  20. Apoptotic extinction of germ cells in testes of Cyp26b1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Glenn; Li, Hui; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Petkovich, Martin

    2007-10-01

    Cyp26b1 encodes a retinoic acid (RA) metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzyme that is expressed in embryonic tissues undergoing morphogenesis, including the testes. We have generated transgenic mice lacking Cyp26b1 and have observed increased RA levels in embryonic testes. Cyp26b1(-/-) germ cells prematurely enter meiosis at embryonic d 13.5 and appear to arrest at pachytene stage. Furthermore, after embryonic d 13.5, a rapid increase in apoptosis is observed in male germ cells derived from Cyp26b1(-/-) embryos; germ cells are essentially absent in mutant male neonates. In contrast, testicular somatic cells appear to develop normally in the absence of Cyp26b1. Moreover, ovarian germ and somatic cells appear unaffected by the lack of CYP26B1. We also show that the synthetic retinoid Am580, which is resistant to CYP26 metabolism, induces meiosis of male germ cells in cultured gonads, suggesting that abnormal development of germ cells in the Cyp26b1(-/-) testes results from excess RA rather than the absence of CYP26B1-generated metabolites of RA. These results provide evidence that CYP26B1 maintains low levels of RA in the developing testes that blocks entry into meiosis and acts as a survival factor to prevent apoptosis of male germ cells.

  1. Loss of endophilin-B1 exacerbates Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David B.; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Uo, Takuma; Sopher, Bryce L.; Cudaback, Eiron; Keene, C. Dirk; Bilousova, Tina; Gylys, Karen; Case, Amanda; Jayadev, Suman; Wang, Hong-Gang; Garden, Gwenn A.

    2015-01-01

    Endophilin-B1, also known as Bax-interacting factor 1 (Bif-1, and encoded by SH3GLB1), is a multifunctional protein involved in apoptosis, autophagy and mitochondrial function. We recently described a unique neuroprotective role for neuron-specific alternatively spliced isoforms of endophilin-B1. To examine whether endophilin-B1-mediated neuroprotection could be a novel therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease we used a double mutant amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 (APPswe/PSEN1dE9) mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease and observed that expression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms declined with disease progression. To determine if this reduction in endophilin-B1 has a functional role in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis, we crossed endophilin-B1−/− mice with APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Deletion of endophilin-B1 accelerated disease onset and progression in 6-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9/endophilin-B1−/− mice, which showed more plaques, astrogliosis, synaptic degeneration, cognitive impairment and mortality than APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. In mouse primary cortical neuron cultures, overexpression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms protected against amyloid-β-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, protein and mRNA levels of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms were also selectively decreased in the cerebral cortex and in the synaptic compartment of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Flow sorting of synaptosomes from patients with Alzheimer’s disease demonstrated a negative correlation between amyloid-β and endophilin-B1 levels. The importance of endophilin-B1 in neuronal function was further underscored by the development of synaptic degeneration and cognitive and motor impairment in endophilin-B1−/− mice by 12 months. Our findings suggest that endophilin-B1 is a key mediator of a feed-forward mechanism of Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis where amyloid-β reduces neuron-specific endophilin-B1, which in turn

  2. Radiation-resistant B-1 cells: A possible initiating cells of neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Cunha, Caroline Ferreira; Alvares-Saraiva, Anuska Marcelino; de Souza Apostolico, Juliana; Popi, Ana Flavia

    2016-07-01

    The role of B-1 cells in the hyperproliferative hematologic disease has been described. Several reports bring evidences that B-1 cells are the main cell population in the chronic lymphatic leukemia. It is also described that these cells have an important involvement in the lupus erythematous systemic. The murine model used to investigate both disease models is NZB/NZW. Data from literature point that mutation in micro-RNA 15a and 16 are the responsible for the B-1 hyperplasia in these mice. Interestingly, it was demonstrated that NZB/NZW B-1 cells are radioresistant, contrariwise to observe in other mouse lineage derived B-1 cells and B-2 cells. However, some reports bring evidences that a small percentage of B-1 cells in healthy mice are also able to survive to irradiation. Herein, we aim to investigate the malignant potential of ionizing-radiation resistant B-1 cells in vitro. Our main goal is to establish a model that mimics the neoplastic transformation originate to a damage exposure of DNA, and not only related to intrinsic mutations. Data shown here demonstrated that radiation-resistant B-1 cells were able to survive long periods in culture. Further, these cells show proliferation index increase in relation to non-irradiated B-1 cells. In addition, radiation resistant B-1 cells showed hyperploid, morphologic alterations, increased induction of apoptosis after anti-IgM stimulation. Based on these results, we could suggest that radiation resistant B-1 cells showed some modifications in that could be related to induction of malignant potential. PMID:26898918

  3. SH2B1 in β-Cells Promotes Insulin Expression and Glucose Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Morris, David L.; Jiang, Lin; Liu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Insulin deficiency drives the progression of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic β-cell insulin expression and secretion are tightly regulated by nutrients and hormones; however, intracellular signaling proteins that mediate nutrient and hormonal regulation of insulin synthesis and secretion are not fully understood. SH2B1 is an SH2 domain-containing adaptor protein. It enhances the activation of the Janus tyrosine kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways in response to a verity of hormones, growth factors, and cytokines. Here we identify SH2B1 as a new regulator of insulin expression. In rat INS-1 832/13 β-cells, SH2B1 knockdown decreased, whereas SH2B1 overexpression increased, both insulin expression and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. SH2B1-deficent islets also had reduced insulin expression, insulin content, and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Heterozygous deletion of SH2B1 decreased pancreatic insulin content and plasma insulin levels in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, thus exacerbating hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. In addition, overexpression of JAK2 increased insulin promoter activity, and SH2B1 enhanced the ability of JAK2 to activate the insulin promoter. Overexpression of SH2B1 also increased the expression of Pdx1 and the recruitment of Pdx1 to the insulin promoter in INS-1 832/13 cells, whereas silencing of SH2B1 had the opposite effects. Consistently, Pdx1 expression was lower in SH2B1-deficient islets. These data suggest that the SH2B1 in β-cells promotes insulin synthesis and secretion at least in part by enhancing activation of JAK2 and/or Pdx1 pathways in response to hormonal and nutritional signals. PMID:24645678

  4. Global gene profiling of aging lungs in Atp8b1 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Ramani; Stearns, Timothy M.; Czachor, Alexander; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Turn, Christina; Westermann-Clark, Emma; Breitzig, Mason; Tan, Lee; Lockey, Richard F.; King, Benjamin L.; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent studies implicate cardiolipin oxidation in several age-related diseases. Atp8b1 encoding Type 4 P-type ATPases is a cardiolipin transporter. Mutation in Atp8b1 gene or inflammation of the lungs impairs the capacity of Atp8b1 to clear cardiolipin from lung fluid. However, the link between Atp8b1 mutation and age-related gene alteration is unknown. Therefore, we investigated how Atp8b1 mutation alters age-related genes. Methods We performed Affymetrix gene profiling of lungs isolated from young (7-9 wks, n=6) and aged (14 months, 14 M, n=6) C57BL/6 and Atp8b1 mutant mice. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was performed. Differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results Global transcriptome analysis revealed 532 differentially expressed genes in Atp8b1 lungs, 157 differentially expressed genes in C57BL/6 lungs, and 37 overlapping genes. IPA of age-related genes in Atp8b1 lungs showed enrichment of Xenobiotic metabolism and Nrf2-mediated signaling pathways. The increase in Adamts2 and Mmp13 transcripts in aged Atp8b1 lungs was validated by qRT-PCR. Similarly, the decrease in Col1a1 and increase in Cxcr6 transcripts was confirmed in both Atp8b1 mutant and C57BL/6 lungs. Conclusion Based on transcriptome profiling, our study indicates that Atp8b1 mutant mice may be susceptible to age-related lung diseases. PMID:27689529

  5. SH2B1 in β-cells promotes insulin expression and glucose metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Morris, David L; Jiang, Lin; Liu, Yong; Rui, Liangyou

    2014-05-01

    Insulin deficiency drives the progression of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic β-cell insulin expression and secretion are tightly regulated by nutrients and hormones; however, intracellular signaling proteins that mediate nutrient and hormonal regulation of insulin synthesis and secretion are not fully understood. SH2B1 is an SH2 domain-containing adaptor protein. It enhances the activation of the Janus tyrosine kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways in response to a verity of hormones, growth factors, and cytokines. Here we identify SH2B1 as a new regulator of insulin expression. In rat INS-1 832/13 β-cells, SH2B1 knockdown decreased, whereas SH2B1 overexpression increased, both insulin expression and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. SH2B1-deficent islets also had reduced insulin expression, insulin content, and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Heterozygous deletion of SH2B1 decreased pancreatic insulin content and plasma insulin levels in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, thus exacerbating hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. In addition, overexpression of JAK2 increased insulin promoter activity, and SH2B1 enhanced the ability of JAK2 to activate the insulin promoter. Overexpression of SH2B1 also increased the expression of Pdx1 and the recruitment of Pdx1 to the insulin promoter in INS-1 832/13 cells, whereas silencing of SH2B1 had the opposite effects. Consistently, Pdx1 expression was lower in SH2B1-deficient islets. These data suggest that the SH2B1 in β-cells promotes insulin synthesis and secretion at least in part by enhancing activation of JAK2 and/or Pdx1 pathways in response to hormonal and nutritional signals.

  6. Measuring electron-impact cross sections of water: elastic scattering and electronic excitation of the ã3B1 and Ã1B1 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Midori; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Kato, Hidetoshi; Ferreira da Silva, Fillipe; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron scattering from water in the incident energy range of 2-100 eV. Furthermore, we present a complete study on the electronic excitation of the ã3B1 and Ã1B1 states at electron impact energies of 15, 20, and 30 eV and in the scattering angle range of 10° - 130°. Integral cross sections (ICSs) are determined from the DCSs. Measuring elastic DCSs in various experimental conditions confirmed the reproducibility of the data. The present results agree with the data previously obtained from a conventional collimating tube gas source. Ambiguities associated with the unfolding procedure of the electron energy loss (EEL) spectra for the electronic excitations have been reduced by comparison against the EEL spectrum at high electron impact energy and for small scattering angle. The reliability of the extracted DCSs is improved significantly for optically forbidden contributions from the overlap of the ã3B1 and Ã1B1 electronic states. The BEf-scaling model is also confirmed to produce the integral cross section for the optical allowed transition of the Ã1B1 state in the intermediate electron energy region above 15 eV.

  7. Evidence for the h_b(1P) meson in the decay Upsilon(3S) --> pi0 h_b(1P)

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2011-08-12

    Using a sample of 122 million {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC, we search for the h{sub b}(1P) spin-singlet partner of the P-wave {chi}{sub b}(1P) states in the sequential decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup 0}h{sub b}(1P), h{sub b}(1P) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S). We observe an excess of events above background in the distribution of the recoil mass against the {pi}{sup 0} at mass 9902 {+-} 4(stat.) {+-} 1(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. The width of the observed signal is consistent with experimental resolution, and its significance is 3.0 {sigma}, including systematic uncertainties. We obtain the value (3.7 {+-} 1.1 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4} for the product branching fraction {Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup 0}h{sub b}) x {Beta}(h{sub b} {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}).

  8. Nucleotide sequences of an important functional gene hnRNPA2/B1 from Ailuropoda melanoleuca and Ursus thibetanus mupinensis and its potential value in phylogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Du, Yu-jie; Hou, Yi-ling; Hou, Wan-ru

    2014-01-01

    The cDNA fragments of hnRNPA2/B1 were cloned from the giant panda and black bear using RT-PCR method, which were, respectively, 1029bp and 1026bp in length encoding 343 and 341 amino acids. Analysis indicated the cDNA cloned from the giant panda encoded variant B1 while the cDNA cloned from black bear encoded variant A2. Analyzing the hnRNPA2B1 peptide of the giant panda and black bear, 76 glycine residues and 86 glycine residues were, respectively, found, and moreover, most glycine are concentrated in the latter halves of the hnRNPA2B1 peptides. Functional sites prediction also showed many N-myristoylation sites existed in the glycine-rich domain, which is probably related to the role of telomere maintenance. From base bias and substitution analysis, we can conclude that the ORF of hnRNPA2/B1 biased G while hated C, and transition of the third site did not achieve the level of saturation. Orthology analysis indicated that both the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence showed high identity to other 26 hnRNPA2/B1 sequences from mammals and nonmammals reported. These sequences were used to construct phylogenetic trees employing the NJ method with 1000 bootstrap, and the obtained tree demonstrated similar topology with the classical systematics, which suggested the potential value of hnRNPA2/B1 in phylogenetic analysis. This report will be the first step to the study function of hnRNPA2/B1 in the giant panda and black bear, and will provide a scientific basis to disease surveillance, captive breeding, and conservation of the endangered species. PMID:24588753

  9. Novel CYP27B1 Gene Mutations in Patients with Vitamin D-Dependent Rickets Type 1A.

    PubMed

    Demir, Korcan; Kattan, Walaa E; Zou, Minjing; Durmaz, Erdem; BinEssa, Huda; Nalbantoğlu, Özlem; Al-Rijjal, Roua A; Meyer, Brian; Özkan, Behzat; Shi, Yufei

    2015-01-01

    The CYP27B1 gene encodes 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase. Mutations of this gene cause vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A (VDDR-IA, OMIM 264700), which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. To investigate CYP27B1 mutations, we studied 8 patients from 7 unrelated families. All coding exons and intron-exon boundaries of CYP27B1 gene were amplified by PCR from peripheral leukocyte DNA and subsequently sequenced. Homozygous mutations in the CYP27B1 gene were found in all the patients and heterozygous mutations were present in their normal parents. One novel single nucleotide variation (SNV, c.1215 T>C, p.R379R in the last nucleotide of exon 7) and three novel mutations were identified:, a splice donor site mutation (c.1215+2T>A) in intron 7, a 16-bp deletion in exon 6 (c.1022-1037del16), and a 2-bp deletion in exon 5 (c.934_935delAC). Both c.1215 T>C and c.1215+2T>A were present together in homozygous form in two unrelated patients, and caused exon 7 skipping. However, c.1215 T>C alone has no effect on pre-mRNA splicing. The skipping of exon 7 resulted in a shift of downstream reading frame and a premature stop codon 57 amino acids from L380 (p.L380Afs*57). The intra-exon deletions of c.1022-1037del16 and c.934_935delAC also resulted in a frameshift and the creation of premature stop codons at p.T341Rfs*5, and p.T312Rfs*19, respectively, leading to the functional inactivation of the CYP27B1 gene. Clinically, all the patients required continued calcitriol treatment and the clinical presentations were consistent with the complete loss of vitamin D1α-hydroxylase activity. In conclusion, three novel mutations have been identified. All of them caused frameshift and truncated proteins. The silent c.1215 T>C SNV has no effect on pre-mRNA splicing and it is likely a novel SNP. The current study further expands the CYP27B1 mutation spectrum.

  10. miR-23 regulation of lamin B1 is crucial for oligodendrocyte development and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Ting; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Duplication of the gene encoding lamin B1 (LMNB1) with increased mRNA and protein levels has been shown to cause severe myelin loss in the brains of adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy patients. Similar to many neurodegenerative disorders, patients with adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy are phenotypically normal until adulthood and the defect is specific to the central nervous system despite the ubiquitous expression pattern of lamin B1. We set out to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying this demyelinating phenotype. Increased lamin B1 expression results in disturbances of inner nuclear membrane proteins, chromatin organization and nuclear pore transport in vitro. It also leads to premature arrest of oligodendrocyte differentiation, which might be caused by reduced transcription of myelin genes and by mislocalization of myelin proteins. We identified the microRNA miR-23 as a negative regulator of lamin B1 that can ameliorate the consequences of excessive lamin B1 at the cellular level. Our results indicate that regulation of lamin B1 is important for myelin maintenance and that miR-23 contributes to this process, at least in part, by downregulating lamin B1, therefore establishing novel functions of lamin B1 and miR-23 in the regulation of oligodendroglia development and myelin formation in vitro. PMID:19259393

  11. 26 CFR 1.802(b)-1 - Tax on life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tax on life insurance companies. 1.802(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Life Insurance Companies § 1.802(b)-1 Tax on life..., and ending after August 16, 1954, section 802(b) imposes a tax on the 1954 life insurance...

  12. 26 CFR 1.802(b)-1 - Tax on life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tax on life insurance companies. 1.802(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Life Insurance Companies § 1.802(b)-1 Tax on life..., and ending after August 16, 1954, section 802(b) imposes a tax on the 1954 life insurance...

  13. Natural and induced B-1 cell immunity to infections raises questions of nature versus nurture.

    PubMed

    Baumgarth, Nicole; Waffarn, Elizabeth E; Nguyen, Trang T T

    2015-12-01

    Mouse B-1 cells are not only major producers of steady-state natural antibodies but also rapid responders to infections and inflammation. These discrete functions may be the outcomes of distinct environmental or developmental triggers that drive B-1 cells toward IgM production or an effector cell fate. Alternatively, distinct B-1 cell subsets may exist, which differ in their functional plasticity. In this paper, we summarize existing data suggesting that B-1 cells form a heterogeneous group of cells with distinct developmental requirements and nonoverlapping functions. Most spleen B-1 cells differ in development from that of bone marrow and peritoneal cavity B-1 cells, in that they develop in the absence of natural IgM. Functional heterogeneity is revealed by findings that B-1 cells in the bone marrow and spleen, but not the peritoneal cavity, generate natural serum IgM, while the latter are rapid responders to inflammatory and infectious insults, resulting in their relocation to secondary lymphoid tissues. A clearer understanding of the developmental and functional differences within the B-1 cell pool may reveal how they might be harnessed for prophylaxis or therapy. PMID:26060895

  14. 26 CFR 301.6514(b)-1 - Credit against barred liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit against barred liability. 301.6514(b)-1... Collection § 301.6514(b)-1 Credit against barred liability. Any credit against a liability in respect of any... of limitations at the time such credit is made. Mitigation of Effect of Period of Limitations...

  15. 26 CFR 301.6514(b)-1 - Credit against barred liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit against barred liability. 301.6514(b)-1... Collection § 301.6514(b)-1 Credit against barred liability. Any credit against a liability in respect of any... of limitations at the time such credit is made. Mitigation of Effect of Period of Limitations...

  16. 26 CFR 301.6514(b)-1 - Credit against barred liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Credit against barred liability. 301.6514(b)-1... Collection § 301.6514(b)-1 Credit against barred liability. Any credit against a liability in respect of any... of limitations at the time such credit is made. Mitigation of Effect of Period of Limitations...

  17. 26 CFR 48.6416(b)(1)-2 - Determination of price readjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Determination of price readjustments. 48.6416(b)(1)-2 Section 48.6416(b)(1)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... models are introduced, or a general price reduction affecting articles held in stock by the vendee as...

  18. [Distribution of orally administered aflatoxin B 1 in the tissues and organs of the goat (Capra)].

    PubMed

    Veselý, D; Veselá, D; Kusák, V; Nesnídal, P

    1978-09-01

    In the experiment the goat was administered an amount of 450 mg aflatoxin B1. The milk taken during the experiment was lyophilized and aflatoxins B1 and M1 were isolated. After the death of the goat some tissues, blood and bile of the experimental animal were analyzed to find out the aflatoxin content.

  19. Dynamic transition states of ErbB1 phosphorylation predicted by spatial stochastic modeling.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Meghan McCabe; Low-Nam, Shalini T; Halász, Adám M; Lidke, Diane S; Wilson, Bridget S; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2013-09-17

    ErbB1 overexpression is strongly linked to carcinogenesis, motivating better understanding of erbB1 dimerization and activation. Recent single-particle-tracking data have provided improved measures of dimer lifetimes and strong evidence that transient receptor coconfinement promotes repeated interactions between erbB1 monomers. Here, spatial stochastic simulations explore the potential impact of these parameters on erbB1 phosphorylation kinetics. This rule-based mathematical model incorporates structural evidence for conformational flux of the erbB1 extracellular domains, as well as asymmetrical orientation of erbB1 cytoplasmic kinase domains during dimerization. The asymmetric dimer model considers the theoretical consequences of restricted transactivation of erbB1 receptors within a dimer, where the N-lobe of one monomer docks with the C-lobe of the second monomer and triggers its catalytic activity. The dynamic nature of the erbB1 phosphorylation state is shown by monitoring activation states of individual monomers as they diffuse, bind, and rebind after ligand addition. The model reveals the complex interplay between interacting liganded and nonliganded species and the influence of their distribution and abundance within features of the membrane landscape.

  20. 26 CFR 31.3306(b)(1)-1 - $3,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... a common paymaster, see § 31.3306(p)-1. Example 1. During 1955 employer D pays to employee C a... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false $3,000 limitation. 31.3306(b)(1)-1 Section 31.3306(b)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  1. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power...

  2. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power...

  3. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power...

  4. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power over income,...

  5. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power...

  6. Preparation and application of new fluorescein-labeled fumonisins B1 in fluorescence polarization analysis technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To prepare a new fluorescent tracer against common mycotoxins such as fumonisin B1 in order to replace 6-(4,6-Dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (6-DTAF), an expensive marker, and to develop a technique for quick detection of fumonisin B1 based on the principle of fluorescence polarizati...

  7. 26 CFR 48.4222(b)-1 - Exceptions to the requirement for registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the purchaser are registered under the provisions of § 48.4222(a)-1. The article also may, on or after.... 48.4222(b)-1 Section 48.4222(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... governments. The Internal Revenue Service will not register State or local governments under section 4222....

  8. 26 CFR 1.6045B-1 - Returns relating to actions affecting basis of securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... securities. 1.6045B-1 Section 1.6045B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... to actions affecting basis of securities. (a) In general—(1) Information required. An issuer of a specified security (within the meaning of § 1.6045-1(a)(14)) that takes an organizational action...

  9. 26 CFR 1.6038B-1 - Reporting of certain transfers to foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting of certain transfers to foreign corporations. 1.6038B-1 Section 1.6038B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... either: (1) The transferor (or one or more successors) properly entered into a gain recognition...

  10. 26 CFR 1.669(b)-1A - Tax on distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on distribution. 1.669(b)-1A Section 1.669(b)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable...

  11. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1A - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1A...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1A Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  12. 26 CFR 1.666(b)-1 - Total taxes deemed distributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(b)-1 Total taxes deemed distributed. (a) If...

  13. 26 CFR 1.668(b)-1A - Tax on distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on distribution. 1.668(b)-1A Section 1.668(b)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable...

  14. 26 CFR 1.6050B-1 - Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... unemployment compensation payments. 1.6050B-1 Section 1.6050B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Information returns by person making unemployment compensation payments. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 1978, every person who makes payments of unemployment compensation (as defined in section...

  15. 16 CFR Appendix B1 to Part 305 - Upright Freezers With Manual Defrost

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Upright Freezers With Manual Defrost B1 Appendix B1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME...

  16. 26 CFR 1.802(b)-1 - Tax on life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on life insurance companies. 1.802(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Life Insurance Companies § 1.802(b)-1 Tax on life..., and ending after August 16, 1954, section 802(b) imposes a tax on the 1954 life insurance...

  17. 26 CFR 1.802(b)-1 - Tax on life insurance companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on life insurance companies. 1.802(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Life Insurance Companies § 1.802(b)-1 Tax on life insurance companies... August 16, 1954, section 802(b) imposes a tax on the 1954 life insurance company taxable income of...

  18. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Biocontrol Strain Pantoea sp. OXWO6B1

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea sp. strain OXWO6B1 inhibits the growth of the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. We determined the 5.2-Mbp genome sequence of this strain, which featured at least 3 confirmed plasmids of up to 250 kbp. The genome sequence of OXWO6B1 is different from that of all previously sequenced strains of Pantoea. PMID:27340064

  19. 26 CFR 31.3302(b)-1 - Additional credit against tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional credit against tax. 31.3302(b)-1...) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3302(b)-1...

  20. Natural and induced B-1 cell immunity to infections raises questions of nature versus nurture.

    PubMed

    Baumgarth, Nicole; Waffarn, Elizabeth E; Nguyen, Trang T T

    2015-12-01

    Mouse B-1 cells are not only major producers of steady-state natural antibodies but also rapid responders to infections and inflammation. These discrete functions may be the outcomes of distinct environmental or developmental triggers that drive B-1 cells toward IgM production or an effector cell fate. Alternatively, distinct B-1 cell subsets may exist, which differ in their functional plasticity. In this paper, we summarize existing data suggesting that B-1 cells form a heterogeneous group of cells with distinct developmental requirements and nonoverlapping functions. Most spleen B-1 cells differ in development from that of bone marrow and peritoneal cavity B-1 cells, in that they develop in the absence of natural IgM. Functional heterogeneity is revealed by findings that B-1 cells in the bone marrow and spleen, but not the peritoneal cavity, generate natural serum IgM, while the latter are rapid responders to inflammatory and infectious insults, resulting in their relocation to secondary lymphoid tissues. A clearer understanding of the developmental and functional differences within the B-1 cell pool may reveal how they might be harnessed for prophylaxis or therapy.

  1. The use of MR B+1 imaging for validation of FDTD electromagnetic simulations of human anatomies.

    PubMed

    Van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Bartels, Lambertus W; van den Bergen, Bob; Kroeze, Hugo; de Leeuw, Astrid A C; Van de Kamer, Jeroen B; Lagendijk, Jan J W

    2006-10-01

    In this study, MR B(+)(1) imaging is employed to experimentally verify the validity of FDTD simulations of electromagnetic field patterns in human anatomies. Measurements and FDTD simulations of the B(+)(1) field induced by a 3 T MR body coil in a human corpse were performed. It was found that MR B(+)(1) imaging is a sensitive method to measure the radiofrequency (RF) magnetic field inside a human anatomy with a precision of approximately 3.5%. A good correlation was found between the B(+)(1) measurements and FDTD simulations. The measured B(+)(1) pattern for a human pelvis consisted of a global, diagonal modulation pattern plus local B(+)(1) heterogeneties. It is believed that these local B(+)(1) field variations are the result of peaks in the induced electric currents, which could not be resolved by the FDTD simulations on a 5 mm(3) simulation grid. The findings from this study demonstrate that B(+)(1) imaging is a valuable experimental technique to gain more knowledge about the dielectric interaction of RF fields with the human anatomy.

  2. 26 CFR 1.415(b)-1 - Limitations for defined benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...(b)-1 Limitations for defined benefit plans. (a) General rules—(1) Maximum limitations. Except as... paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section) accrued by a participant (whether or not the benefit is vested) or the..., contract, or account to which section 415 applies pursuant to § 1.415(a)-1(a) or (b) (or any...

  3. 26 CFR 1.475(b)-1 - Scope of exemptions from mark-to-market requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... actively traded stock from related party. (A) Facts. Corporation P is the parent of a consolidated group...)(2), a security is held for investment (within the meaning of section 475(b)(1)(A)) or not held for... se held for investment within the meaning of section 475(b)(1)(A) and are deemed to be...

  4. 26 CFR 1.415(b)-1 - Limitations for defined benefit plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... § 1.415(b)-1 Limitations for defined benefit plans. (a) General rules—(1) Maximum limitations. Except... in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section) accrued by a participant (whether or not the benefit is... is any plan, contract, or account to which section 415 applies pursuant to § 1.415(a)-1(a) or (b)...

  5. 26 CFR 1.475(b)-1 - Scope of exemptions from mark-to-market requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... actively traded stock from related party. (A) Facts. Corporation P is the parent of a consolidated group...)(2), a security is held for investment (within the meaning of section 475(b)(1)(A)) or not held for... se held for investment within the meaning of section 475(b)(1)(A) and are deemed to be...

  6. 26 CFR 1.475(b)-1 - Scope of exemptions from mark-to-market requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... actively traded stock from related party. (A) Facts. Corporation P is the parent of a consolidated group...)(2), a security is held for investment (within the meaning of section 475(b)(1)(A)) or not held for... se held for investment within the meaning of section 475(b)(1)(A) and are deemed to be...

  7. Effect of Ginkgo biloba extract on procarcinogen-bioactivating human CYP1 enzymes: Identification of isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin as potent inhibitors of CYP1B1

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Thomas K.H. . E-mail: tchang@interchange.ubc.ca; Chen Jie; Yeung, Eugene Y.H.

    2006-05-15

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of Ginkgo biloba extracts and some of its individual constituents on the catalytic activity of human cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP1B1, CYP1A1, and CYP1A2. G. biloba extract of known abundance of terpene trilactones and flavonol glycosides inhibited 7-ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylation catalyzed by human recombinant CYP1B1, CYP1A1, and CYP1A2, and human liver microsomes, with apparent K {sub i} values of 2 {+-} 0.3, 5 {+-} 0.5, 16 {+-} 1.4, and 39 {+-} 1.2 {mu}g/ml (mean {+-} SE), respectively. In each case, the mode of inhibition was of the mixed type. Bilobalide, ginkgolides A, B, C, and J, quercetin 3-O-rutinoside, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside, and isorhamentin 3-O-rutinoside were not responsible for the inhibition of CYP1 enzymes by G. biloba extract, as determined by experiments with these individual chemicals at the levels present in the extract. In contrast, the aglycones of quercetin, kaempferol, and isorhamentin inhibited CYP1B1, CYP1A1, and CYP1A2. Among the three flavonol aglycones, isorhamentin was the most potent in inhibiting CYP1B1 (apparent K {sub i} = 3 {+-} 0.1 nM), whereas quercetin was the least potent in inhibiting CYP1A2 (apparent K {sub i} 418 {+-} 50 nM). The mode of inhibition was competitive, noncompetitive, or mixed, depending on the enzyme and the flavonol. G. biloba extract also reduced benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylation, and the effect was greater with CYP1B1 than with CYP1A1 as the catalyst. Overall, our novel findings indicate that G. biloba extract and the flavonol aglycones isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin preferentially inhibit the in vitro catalytic activity of human CYP1B1.

  8. Product identification and safety evaluation of aflatoxin B1 decontaminated by electrolyzed oxidizing water.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ke; Liu, Hai jie; Li, Li te

    2012-09-26

    In this study with aflatoxin-contaminated peanuts, the effectiveness of electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) in the decontamination of aflatoxin B(1) was investigated. The aflatoxin B(1) content was markedly reduced upon treatment with EOW, particularly with neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water (NEW). The conversion product of EOW treatment was isolated and identified as 8-chloro-9-hydroxy aflatoxin B(1) (compound 1), which is an amphiphilic molecule, in contrast to fat-soluble aflatoxin B(1). A mutagenic response study revealed that the number of revertants per plate after treatment of bacterial strains TA-97, TA-98, TA-100, and TA-102 with NEW was within the standard value range. The HepG2 cell viability assay yielded an IC(50) value of compound 1 approximately 150 mM. This study indicates that EOW had the ability to decontaminate aflatoxin B(1), and the conversion product, compound 1, did not exhibit mutagenic activity or cytotoxic effects.

  9. CYP7B1 Enzyme Deletion Impairs Reproductive Behaviors in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oyola, Mario G.; Zuloaga, Damian G.; Carbone, David; Malysz, Anna M.; Acevedo-Rodriguez, Alexandra; Handa, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to androgenic properties mediated via androgen receptors, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) also regulates estrogenic functions via an alternate pathway. These estrogenic functions of DHT are mediated by its metabolite 5α-androstane-3β, 17β-diol (3β-diol) binding to estrogen receptor β (ERβ). CYP7B1 enzyme converts 3β-diol to inactive 6α- or 7α-triols and plays an important role as a regulator of estrogenic functions mediated by 3β-diol. Using a mutant mouse carrying a null mutation for the CYP7B1 gene (CYP7B1KO), we examined the contribution of CYP7B1 on physiology and behavior. Male, gonadectomized (GDX) CYP7B1KO and their wild type (WT) littermates were assessed for their behavioral phenotype, anxiety-related behavioral measures, and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis reactivity. No significant effects of genotype were evident in anxiety-like behaviors in open field (OFA), light-dark (L/D) exploration, and elevated plus maze (EPM). T significantly reduced open arm time on the EPM while not affecting L/D exploratory and OFA behaviors in CYP7B1KO and WT littermates. T also attenuated the corticosterone response to EPM in both genotypes. In GDX animals, T was able to reinstate male-specific reproductive behaviors (latencies and number of mounts, intromission, and ejaculations) in the WT but not in the CYP7B1KO mice. The male reproductive behavior defect in CYP7B1KO seems to be due to their inability to distinguish olfactory cues from a behavioral estrus female. CYP7B1KO mice also showed a reduction in androgen receptor mRNA expression in the olfactory bulb. Our findings suggest a novel role for the CYP7B1 enzyme in the regulation of male reproductive behaviors. PMID:25849728

  10. Cinnamtannin B-1 Promotes Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Accelerates Wound Healing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kosuke; Kuge, Katsunori; Ozawa, Noriyasu; Sahara, Shunya; Zaiki, Kaori; Nakaoji, Koichi; Hamada, Kazuhiko; Takenaka, Yukiko; Tanahashi, Takao; Tamai, Katsuto; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Maeda, Akito

    2015-01-01

    Substances that enhance the migration of mesenchymal stem cells to damaged sites have the potential to improve the effectiveness of tissue repair. We previously found that ethanol extracts of Mallotus philippinensis bark promoted migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improved wound healing in a mouse model. We also demonstrated that bark extracts contain cinnamtannin B-1, a flavonoid with in vitro migratory activity against mesenchymal stem cells. However, the in vivo effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on the migration of mesenchymal stem cells and underlying mechanism of this action remain unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on in vivo migration of mesenchymal stem cells and wound healing in mice. In addition, we characterized cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells pharmacologically and structurally. The mobilization of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells into the blood circulation was enhanced in cinnamtannin B-1-treated mice as shown by flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cells. Whole animal imaging analysis using luciferase-expressing mesenchymal stem cells as a tracer revealed that cinnamtannin B-1 increased the homing of mesenchymal stem cells to wounds and accelerated healing in a diabetic mouse model. Additionally, the cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells was pharmacologically susceptible to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phospholipase C, lipoxygenase, and purines. Furthermore, biflavonoids with similar structural features to cinnamtannin B-1 also augmented the migration of mesenchymal stem cells by similar pharmacological mechanisms. These results demonstrate that cinnamtannin B-1 promoted mesenchymal stem cell migration in vivo and improved wound healing in mice. Furthermore, the results reveal that cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells may be mediated by specific signaling pathways, and the flavonoid skeleton may be relevant to its effects on

  11. Cinnamtannin B-1 Promotes Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Accelerates Wound Healing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kosuke; Kuge, Katsunori; Ozawa, Noriyasu; Sahara, Shunya; Zaiki, Kaori; Nakaoji, Koichi; Hamada, Kazuhiko; Takenaka, Yukiko; Tanahashi, Takao; Tamai, Katsuto; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Maeda, Akito

    2015-01-01

    Substances that enhance the migration of mesenchymal stem cells to damaged sites have the potential to improve the effectiveness of tissue repair. We previously found that ethanol extracts of Mallotus philippinensis bark promoted migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improved wound healing in a mouse model. We also demonstrated that bark extracts contain cinnamtannin B-1, a flavonoid with in vitro migratory activity against mesenchymal stem cells. However, the in vivo effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on the migration of mesenchymal stem cells and underlying mechanism of this action remain unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on in vivo migration of mesenchymal stem cells and wound healing in mice. In addition, we characterized cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells pharmacologically and structurally. The mobilization of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells into the blood circulation was enhanced in cinnamtannin B-1-treated mice as shown by flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cells. Whole animal imaging analysis using luciferase-expressing mesenchymal stem cells as a tracer revealed that cinnamtannin B-1 increased the homing of mesenchymal stem cells to wounds and accelerated healing in a diabetic mouse model. Additionally, the cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells was pharmacologically susceptible to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phospholipase C, lipoxygenase, and purines. Furthermore, biflavonoids with similar structural features to cinnamtannin B-1 also augmented the migration of mesenchymal stem cells by similar pharmacological mechanisms. These results demonstrate that cinnamtannin B-1 promoted mesenchymal stem cell migration in vivo and improved wound healing in mice. Furthermore, the results reveal that cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells may be mediated by specific signaling pathways, and the flavonoid skeleton may be relevant to its effects on

  12. Role of transmembrane domain 10 for the function of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Chunshan; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The liver-specific organic anion transporting polypeptides OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 are highly homologous and share numerous substrates. However, at low concentrations OATP1B1 shows substrate selectivity for estrone-3-sulfate. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism for this substrate selectivity of OATP1B1 by constructing OATP1B1/1B3 chimeric transporters and by site-directed mutagenesis. Functional studies of chimeras showed that transmembrane domain 10 is critical for the function of OATP1B1. We further identified four amino acid residues, namely L545, F546, L550, and S554 in TM10, whose simultaneous mutation caused almost complete loss of OATP1B1-mediated estrone-3-sulfate transport. Comparison of the kinetics of estrone-3-sulfate transport confirmed a biphasic pattern for OATP1B1, but showed a monophasic pattern for the quadruple mutant L545S/F546L/L550T/S554T. This mutant also showed reduced transport for other OATP1B1 substrates such as bromosulfophthalein and [d-penicillamine2,5]enkephalin. Helical wheel analysis and molecular modeling suggest that L545 is facing the substrate translocation pathway, whereas F546, L550, and S554 are located inside the protein. These results indicate that L545 might contribute to OATP1B1 function by interacting with substrates, whereas F546, L550, and S554 seem important for protein structure. In conclusion, our results show that TM10 is critical for the function of OATP1B1. PMID:19760661

  13. Cyp26b1 within the growth plate regulates bone growth in juvenile mice

    SciTech Connect

    Minegishi, Yoshiki; Sakai, Yasuo; Yahara, Yasuhito; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hosokawa, Ko; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Retinoic acid and Cyp26b1 were oppositely localized in growth plate cartilage. • Cyp26b1 deletion in chondrocytes decreased bone growth in juvenile mice. • Cyp26b1 deletion reduced chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate height. • Vitamin A-depletion partially reversed growth plate abnormalities caused by Cyp26b1 deficiency. • Cyp26b1 regulates bone growth by controlling chondrocyte proliferation. - Abstract: Retinoic acid (RA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A and plays important roles in embryonic development. CYP26 enzymes degrade RA and have specific expression patterns that produce a RA gradient, which regulates the patterning of various structures in the embryo. However, it has not been addressed whether a RA gradient also exists and functions in organs after birth. We found localized RA activities in the diaphyseal portion of the growth plate cartilage were associated with the specific expression of Cyp26b1 in the epiphyseal portion in juvenile mice. To disturb the distribution of RA, we generated mice lacking Cyp26b1 specifically in chondrocytes (Cyp26b1{sup Δchon} cKO). These mice showed reduced skeletal growth in the juvenile stage. Additionally, their growth plate cartilage showed decreased proliferation rates of proliferative chondrocytes, which was associated with a reduced height in the zone of proliferative chondrocytes, and closed focally by four weeks of age, while wild-type mouse growth plates never closed. Feeding the Cyp26b1 cKO mice a vitamin A-deficient diet partially reversed these abnormalities of the growth plate cartilage. These results collectively suggest that Cyp26b1 in the growth plate regulates the proliferation rates of chondrocytes and is responsible for the normal function of the growth plate and growing bones in juvenile mice, probably by limiting the RA distribution in the growth plate proliferating zone.

  14. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency: functional consequences of four CYP11B1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Menabò, Soara; Polat, Seher; Baldazzi, Lilia; Kulle, Alexandra E; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Grötzinger, Joachim; Fanelli, Flaminia; Balsamo, Antonio; Riepe, Felix G

    2014-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is one of the most common autosomal recessive inherited endocrine disease. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency (11β-OHD) is the second most common form of CAH. The aim of the study was to study the functional consequences of three novel and one previously described CYP11B1 gene mutations (p.(Arg143Trp), p.(Ala306Val), p.(Glu310Lys) and p.(Arg332Gln)) detected in patients suffering from classical and non-classical 11β-OHD. Functional analyses were performed by using a HEK293 cell in vitro expression system comparing wild type (WT) with mutant 11β-hydroxylase activity. Mutant proteins were examined in silico to study their effect on the three-dimensional structure of the protein. Two mutations (p.(Ala306Val) and p.(Glu310Lys)) detected in patients with classical 11β-OHD showed a nearly complete loss of 11β-hydroxylase activity. The mutations p.(Arg143Trp) and p.(Arg332Gln) detected in patients with non-classical 11β-OHD showed a partial functional impairment with approximately 8% and 6% of WT activity, respectively. Functional mutation analysis allows the classification of novel CYP11B1 mutations as causes of classical and non-classical 11β-OHD. The detection of patients with non-classical phenotypes underscores the importance to screen patients with a phenotype comparable to non-classical 21-hydroxylase deficiency for mutations in the CYP11B1 gene in case of a negative analysis of the CYP21A2 gene. As CYP11B1 mutations are most often individual for a family, the in vitro analysis of novel mutations is essential for clinical and genetic counselling. PMID:24022297

  15. A common CYP1B1 polymorphism is associated with 2-OHE1/16-OHE1 urinary estrone ratio.

    PubMed

    Paracchini, Valentina; Pedotti, Paola; Raimondi, Sara; Garte, Seymour; Bradlow, H Leon; Sepkovic, Daniel W; Taioli, Emanuela

    2005-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) is a multigene family of enzymes involved in important life functions; some of these genes are inducible and are implicated in the oxidative metabolic activation and detoxification of many endogenous and exogenous compounds. CYP1B1 codes for an enzyme that catalyses the production of a 2- and 4-hydroxyl group in estrone and estradiol, while CYP1A1 catalyzes the 2-hydroxylation of estradiol in endometrium. The two genes were evaluated in a cohort of 150 subjects: African-American women had significantly lower 2-hydroxyl estrone/16-hydroxyl estrone (2-OHE1/16-OHE1) urinary metabolite ratios than Caucasian women (2.06+/-1.05 vs. 1.43+/-0.56; p=0.0002). A common polymorphism in the CYP1B1 gene (leucine to valineat codon 432) was associated with changes in urinary estrogen levels: both Caucasian and African-American women carrying the variant allele showed higher urinary metabolite ratios than women with the wild-type allele. No effect of the CYP1A1 MspI was observed. The 4-OHE1/2-OHE1 ratio was lower in subjects carrying the variant allele (Leu). The percentage change in 2-OHE1/16-OHE1 urinary ratio after indole treatment was significant in both Caucasian and African-American women carrying the wild-type CYP1B1 genotype, although it was more evident in African-Americans than in Caucasians. These results suggest that the Leu/Val CYP1B1 polymorphism may modify estradiol metabolism.

  16. Laboratory detection of a new interstellar free radical CH2CN(2B1).

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Yamamoto, S; Irvine, W M; Ziurys, L M; Suzuki, H; Ohishi, M; Kaifu, N

    1988-11-15

    An asymmetric-top free radical CH2CN, which as a 2B1 ground state, was detected for the first time by laboratory microwave spectroscopy. The radical was produced in a free-space absorption cell by a DC glow discharge in pure CH3CN gas. About 60 fine-structure components were observed for the N = 11-10 to 14-13 a-type rotational transitions in the frequency region of 220-260 GHz, and many hyperfine resolved components for the N = 4-3 and 5-4 transitions in the 80 and 100 GHz regions, respectively. The molecular constants, including the rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and spin-rotation coupling constants with centrifugal distortion correction terms were determined from the fine-structure resolved transitions, and the hyperfine coupling constants due to the hydrogen and nitrogen nuclei were obtained from the low-N transitions. As a result we assigned U100602 and U80484 from Sgr B2, and U40240 and U20120 from TMC-1, to the N = 5-4, 4-3, 2-1, and 1-0 transitions with K-1 = 0 of the CH2CN radical.

  17. A novel strain of Cellulosimicrobium funkei can biologically detoxify aflatoxin B1 in ducklings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lv-Hui; Zhang, Ni-Ya; Sun, Ran-Ran; Gao, Xin; Gu, Changqin; Krumm, Christopher Steven; Qi, De-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to screen microorganisms with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ) removal potential from soils and to evaluate their ability in reducing the toxic effects of AFB1 in ducklings. In experiment 1, we screened 11 isolates that showed the AFB1 biodegradation ability, and the one exhibited the highest AFB1 removal ability (97%) was characterized and identified as Cellulosimicrobium funkei (C. funkei). In experiment 2, 80 day-old Cherry Valley ducklings were divided into four groups with four replicates of five birds each and were used in a 2 by 2 factorial trial design, in which the main factors included administration of AFB1 versus solvent and C. funkei versus solvent for 2 weeks. The AFB1 treatment significantly decreased the body weight gain, feed intake and impaired feed conversion ratio. AFB1 also decreased serum albumin and total protein concentration, while it increased activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and liver damage in the ducklings. Supplementation of C. funkei alleviated the adverse effects of AFB1 on growth performance, and provided protective effects on the serum biochemical indicators, and decreased hepatic injury in the ducklings. Conclusively, our results suggest that the novel isolated C. funkei strain could be used to mitigate the negative effects of aflatoxicosis in ducklings.

  18. Aflatoxin B1 contamination in maize in Europe increases due to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battilani, P.; Toscano, P.; van der Fels-Klerx, H. J.; Moretti, A.; Camardo Leggieri, M.; Brera, C.; Rortais, A.; Goumperis, T.; Robinson, T.

    2016-04-01

    Climate change has been reported as a driver for emerging food and feed safety issues worldwide and its expected impact on the presence of mycotoxins in food and feed is of great concern. Aflatoxins have the highest acute and chronic toxicity of all mycotoxins; hence, the maximal concentration in agricultural food and feed products and their commodities is regulated worldwide. The possible change in patterns of aflatoxin occurrence in crops due to climate change is a matter of concern that may require anticipatory actions. The aim of this study was to predict aflatoxin contamination in maize and wheat crops, within the next 100 years, under a +2 °C and +5 °C climate change scenario, applying a modelling approach. Europe was virtually covered by a net, 50 × 50 km grids, identifying 2254 meshes with a central point each. Climate data were generated for each point, linked to predictive models and predictions were run consequently. Aflatoxin B1 is predicted to become a food safety issue in maize in Europe, especially in the +2 °C scenario, the most probable scenario of climate change expected for the next years. These results represent a supporting tool to reinforce aflatoxin management and to prevent human and animal exposure.

  19. Up-regulation of vitamin B1 homeostasis genes in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zastre, Jason A; Hanberry, Bradley S; Sweet, Rebecca L; McGinnis, A Cary; Venuti, Kristen R; Bartlett, Michael G; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2013-09-01

    An increased carbon flux and exploitation of metabolic pathways for the rapid generation of biosynthetic precursors is a common phenotype observed in breast cancer. To support this metabolic phenotype, cancer cells adaptively regulate the expression of glycolytic enzymes and nutrient transporters. However, activity of several enzymes involved in glucose metabolism requires an adequate supply of cofactors. In particular, vitamin B1 (thiamine) is utilized as an essential cofactor for metabolic enzymes that intersect at critical junctions within the glycolytic network. Intracellular availability of thiamine is facilitated by the activity of thiamine transporters and thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK-1). Therefore, the objective of this study was to establish if the cellular determinants regulating thiamine homeostasis differ between breast cancer and normal breast epithelia. Employing cDNA arrays of breast cancer and normal breast epithelial tissues, SLC19A2, SLC25A19 and TPK-1 were found to be significantly up-regulated. Similarly, up-regulation was also observed in breast cancer cell lines compared to human mammary epithelial cells. Thiamine transport assays and quantitation of intracellular thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate established a significantly greater extent of thiamine transport and free thiamine levels in breast cancer cell lines compared to human mammary epithelial cells. Overall, these findings demonstrate an adaptive response by breast cancer cells to increase cellular availability of thiamine.

  20. Aflatoxin B1 contamination in maize in Europe increases due to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Battilani, P.; Toscano, P.; Van der Fels-Klerx, H. J.; Moretti, A.; Camardo Leggieri, M.; Brera, C.; Rortais, A.; Goumperis, T.; Robinson, T.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change has been reported as a driver for emerging food and feed safety issues worldwide and its expected impact on the presence of mycotoxins in food and feed is of great concern. Aflatoxins have the highest acute and chronic toxicity of all mycotoxins; hence, the maximal concentration in agricultural food and feed products and their commodities is regulated worldwide. The possible change in patterns of aflatoxin occurrence in crops due to climate change is a matter of concern that may require anticipatory actions. The aim of this study was to predict aflatoxin contamination in maize and wheat crops, within the next 100 years, under a +2 °C and +5 °C climate change scenario, applying a modelling approach. Europe was virtually covered by a net, 50 × 50 km grids, identifying 2254 meshes with a central point each. Climate data were generated for each point, linked to predictive models and predictions were run consequently. Aflatoxin B1 is predicted to become a food safety issue in maize in Europe, especially in the +2 °C scenario, the most probable scenario of climate change expected for the next years. These results represent a supporting tool to reinforce aflatoxin management and to prevent human and animal exposure. PMID:27066906

  1. A novel strain of Cellulosimicrobium funkei can biologically detoxify aflatoxin B1 in ducklings

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lv-Hui; Zhang, Ni-Ya; Sun, Ran-Ran; Gao, Xin; Gu, Changqin; Krumm, Christopher Steven; Qi, De-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to screen microorganisms with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) removal potential from soils and to evaluate their ability in reducing the toxic effects of AFB1 in ducklings. In experiment 1, we screened 11 isolates that showed the AFB1 biodegradation ability, and the one exhibited the highest AFB1 removal ability (97%) was characterized and identified as Cellulosimicrobium funkei (C. funkei). In experiment 2, 80 day-old Cherry Valley ducklings were divided into four groups with four replicates of five birds each and were used in a 2 by 2 factorial trial design, in which the main factors included administration of AFB1 versus solvent and C. funkei versus solvent for 2 weeks. The AFB1 treatment significantly decreased the body weight gain, feed intake and impaired feed conversion ratio. AFB1 also decreased serum albumin and total protein concentration, while it increased activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and liver damage in the ducklings. Supplementation of C. funkei alleviated the adverse effects of AFB1 on growth performance, and provided protective effects on the serum biochemical indicators, and decreased hepatic injury in the ducklings. Conclusively, our results suggest that the novel isolated C. funkei strain could be used to mitigate the negative effects of aflatoxicosis in ducklings. PMID:25616109

  2. Wind tunnel study of wake downwash behind A 6% scale model B1-B aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Tadios, E.L.; Powers, D.A.

    1990-05-01

    Parachute system performance issues such a turnover and wake recontact may be strongly influenced by velocities induced by the wake of the delivering aircraft, especially if the aircraft is maneuvering at the time of parachute deployment. The effect of the aircraft on the parachute system is a function of the aircraft size, weight, and flight path. In order to provide experimental data for validation of a computer code to predict aircraft wake velocities, a test was conducted in the NASA 14 {times} 22 ft wind tunnel using a 5.78% model of the B-1B strategic bomber. The model was strut mounted through the top of its fuselage by a mechanism which was capable of pitching the model at moderate rates. In this series of tests, the aircraft was pitched at 10{degree}/sec from a cruise angle of attack of 5.3{degree} to an angle of attack of 11{degree} in order to simulate a 2.2g pullup. Data were also taken for the subsequent pitch down sequence back to the cruise angle of attack. Instantaneous streamwise and vertical velocities were measured in the wake at a number of points using a hot wire anemometer. These data have been reduced to the form of downwash coefficients which are a function of the aircraft angle of attack time-history. Unsteady effects are accounted for by use of a wake convection lag-time correlation. 12 refs., 59 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Aflatoxin B1 contamination in maize in Europe increases due to climate change.

    PubMed

    Battilani, P; Toscano, P; Van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Moretti, A; Camardo Leggieri, M; Brera, C; Rortais, A; Goumperis, T; Robinson, T

    2016-01-01

    Climate change has been reported as a driver for emerging food and feed safety issues worldwide and its expected impact on the presence of mycotoxins in food and feed is of great concern. Aflatoxins have the highest acute and chronic toxicity of all mycotoxins; hence, the maximal concentration in agricultural food and feed products and their commodities is regulated worldwide. The possible change in patterns of aflatoxin occurrence in crops due to climate change is a matter of concern that may require anticipatory actions. The aim of this study was to predict aflatoxin contamination in maize and wheat crops, within the next 100 years, under a +2 °C and +5 °C climate change scenario, applying a modelling approach. Europe was virtually covered by a net, 50 × 50 km grids, identifying 2254 meshes with a central point each. Climate data were generated for each point, linked to predictive models and predictions were run consequently. Aflatoxin B1 is predicted to become a food safety issue in maize in Europe, especially in the +2 °C scenario, the most probable scenario of climate change expected for the next years. These results represent a supporting tool to reinforce aflatoxin management and to prevent human and animal exposure. PMID:27066906

  4. Aflatoxin B1 contamination in maize in Europe increases due to climate change.

    PubMed

    Battilani, P; Toscano, P; Van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Moretti, A; Camardo Leggieri, M; Brera, C; Rortais, A; Goumperis, T; Robinson, T

    2016-04-12

    Climate change has been reported as a driver for emerging food and feed safety issues worldwide and its expected impact on the presence of mycotoxins in food and feed is of great concern. Aflatoxins have the highest acute and chronic toxicity of all mycotoxins; hence, the maximal concentration in agricultural food and feed products and their commodities is regulated worldwide. The possible change in patterns of aflatoxin occurrence in crops due to climate change is a matter of concern that may require anticipatory actions. The aim of this study was to predict aflatoxin contamination in maize and wheat crops, within the next 100 years, under a +2 °C and +5 °C climate change scenario, applying a modelling approach. Europe was virtually covered by a net, 50 × 50 km grids, identifying 2254 meshes with a central point each. Climate data were generated for each point, linked to predictive models and predictions were run consequently. Aflatoxin B1 is predicted to become a food safety issue in maize in Europe, especially in the +2 °C scenario, the most probable scenario of climate change expected for the next years. These results represent a supporting tool to reinforce aflatoxin management and to prevent human and animal exposure.

  5. Interaction of vitamin B1 with bovine serum albumin investigation using vitamin B1-selective electrode: potentiometric and molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Khorsandi, Khatereh

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin B1 or thiamin is one of the B vitamins. All B vitamins help the body to convert food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose), which produces energy. The B vitamins are necessary for healthy skin, eyes, hair, and liver. It also could help the nervous system function properly, and is necessary for brain functions. Drug interactions with protein can affect the distribution of the drug and eliminate the drug in living systems. In this study, the binding of thiamine hydrochloride (vitamin B1) to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was evaluated using a new proposed vitamin B1 (thiamine)-selective membrane electrode under various experimental conditions, such as pH, ionic strength, and protein concentration; in addition molecular modeling was applied as well. The binding isotherms plotted based on potentiometric data and analyzed using the Wyman binding potential concept. The apparent binding constant was determined and used for the calculation of intrinsic Gibbs free energy of binding. According to the electrochemical and molecular docking results, it can be concluded that the hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen binding are major interactions between BSA and vitamin B1.

  6. Interaction of vitamin B1 with bovine serum albumin investigation using vitamin B1-selective electrode: potentiometric and molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Khorsandi, Khatereh

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin B1 or thiamin is one of the B vitamins. All B vitamins help the body to convert food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose), which produces energy. The B vitamins are necessary for healthy skin, eyes, hair, and liver. It also could help the nervous system function properly, and is necessary for brain functions. Drug interactions with protein can affect the distribution of the drug and eliminate the drug in living systems. In this study, the binding of thiamine hydrochloride (vitamin B1) to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was evaluated using a new proposed vitamin B1 (thiamine)-selective membrane electrode under various experimental conditions, such as pH, ionic strength, and protein concentration; in addition molecular modeling was applied as well. The binding isotherms plotted based on potentiometric data and analyzed using the Wyman binding potential concept. The apparent binding constant was determined and used for the calculation of intrinsic Gibbs free energy of binding. According to the electrochemical and molecular docking results, it can be concluded that the hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen binding are major interactions between BSA and vitamin B1. PMID:26372107

  7. Subtyping of Y-chromosomal haplogroup E-M78 (E1b1b1a) by SNP assay and its forensic application.

    PubMed

    Caratti, S; Gino, S; Torre, C; Robino, C

    2009-07-01

    The continual discovery of new single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has led to an increased resolution of the Y chromosome phylogeny. Some of these Y-SNPs have shown to be restricted to small geographical regions and therefore may prove useful in the forensic field as tools for the prediction of population of origin of unknown casework samples. Here, we describe a system for the molecular dissection of haplogroup E-M78 (E1b1b1a), consisting of multiplex polymerase chain reaction and minisequencing of M78 and nine population-informative Y-SNPs (M148, M224, V12, V13, V19, V22, V27, V32, V65) in a single reaction. Sensitivity and admixture studies demonstrated that the SNP protocol allows robust genotyping from as little as 50 pg of male DNA, even in the presence of 500-fold amounts of female DNA. In order to evaluate the suitability of E1b1b1a, subhaplogrouping for population-of-origin prediction, the distribution of E-M78 and its derived variants was determined in an Italian population sample (n = 326). PMID:19430804

  8. Subtyping of Y-chromosomal haplogroup E-M78 (E1b1b1a) by SNP assay and its forensic application.

    PubMed

    Caratti, S; Gino, S; Torre, C; Robino, C

    2009-07-01

    The continual discovery of new single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has led to an increased resolution of the Y chromosome phylogeny. Some of these Y-SNPs have shown to be restricted to small geographical regions and therefore may prove useful in the forensic field as tools for the prediction of population of origin of unknown casework samples. Here, we describe a system for the molecular dissection of haplogroup E-M78 (E1b1b1a), consisting of multiplex polymerase chain reaction and minisequencing of M78 and nine population-informative Y-SNPs (M148, M224, V12, V13, V19, V22, V27, V32, V65) in a single reaction. Sensitivity and admixture studies demonstrated that the SNP protocol allows robust genotyping from as little as 50 pg of male DNA, even in the presence of 500-fold amounts of female DNA. In order to evaluate the suitability of E1b1b1a, subhaplogrouping for population-of-origin prediction, the distribution of E-M78 and its derived variants was determined in an Italian population sample (n = 326).

  9. Lamin B1 mediates cell-autonomous neuropathology in a leukodystrophy mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Mary Y.; Lin, Shu-Ting; Verret, Laure; Huang, Yong; Kamiya, Sherry; Padiath, Quasar S.; Tong, Ying; Palop, Jorge J.; Huang, Eric J.; Ptácχek, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Adult-onset autosomal-dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is a progressive and fatal neurological disorder characterized by early autonomic dysfunction, cognitive impairment, pyramidal tract and cerebellar dysfunction, and white matter loss in the central nervous system. ADLD is caused by duplication of the LMNB1 gene, which results in increased lamin B1 transcripts and protein expression. How duplication of LMNB1 leads to myelin defects is unknown. To address this question, we developed a mouse model of ADLD that overexpresses lamin B1. These mice exhibited cognitive impairment and epilepsy, followed by age-dependent motor deficits. Selective overexpression of lamin B1 in oligodendrocytes also resulted in marked motor deficits and myelin defects, suggesting these deficits are cell autonomous. Proteomic and genome-wide transcriptome studies indicated that lamin B1 overexpression is associated with downregulation of proteolipid protein, a highly abundant myelin sheath component that was previously linked to another myelin-related disorder, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. Furthermore, we found that lamin B1 overexpression leads to reduced occupancy of Yin Yang 1 transcription factor at the promoter region of proteolipid protein. These studies identify a mechanism by which lamin B1 overexpression mediates oligodendrocyte cell–autonomous neuropathology in ADLD and implicate lamin B1 as an important regulator of myelin formation and maintenance during aging. PMID:23676464

  10. Host kinin B1 receptor plays a protective role against melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Maria, Andrea G; Dillenburg-Pilla, Patrícia; Reis, Rosana I; Floriano, Elaine M; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Ramos, Simone G; Pesquero, João B; Nahmias, Clara; Costa-Neto, Claudio M

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a very aggressive tumor that arises from melanocytes. Late stage and widely spread diseases do not respond to standard therapeutic approaches. The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) participates in biological processes such as vasodilatation, pain and inflammatory response. However, the role of KKS in tumor formation and progression is not completely understood. The role of the host kinin B1 receptor in melanoma development was evaluated using a syngeneic melanoma model. Primary tumors and metastasis were respectively induced by injecting B16F10 melanoma cells, which are derived from C57BL/6 mice, subcutaneously or in the tail vein in wild type C57BL/6 and B1 receptor knockout mice (B1(-/-)). Tumors developed in B1(-/-) mice presented unfavorable prognostic factors such as increased incidence of ulceration, higher levels of IL-10, higher activation of proliferative pathways such as ERK1/2 and Akt, and increased mitotic index. Furthermore, in the metastasis model, B1(-/-) mice developed larger metastatic colonies in the lung and lower CD8(+)immune effector cells when compared with WT animals. Altogether, our results provide evidences that B1(-/-) animals developed primary tumors with multiple features associated with poor prognosis and unfavorable metastatic onset, indicating that the B1 receptor may contribute to improve the host response against melanoma progression. PMID:26898917

  11. Host kinin B1 receptor plays a protective role against melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Andrea G.; Dillenburg-Pilla, Patrícia; Reis, Rosana I.; Floriano, Elaine M.; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Ramos, Simone G.; Pesquero, João B.; Nahmias, Clara; Costa-Neto, Claudio M.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a very aggressive tumor that arises from melanocytes. Late stage and widely spread diseases do not respond to standard therapeutic approaches. The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) participates in biological processes such as vasodilatation, pain and inflammatory response. However, the role of KKS in tumor formation and progression is not completely understood. The role of the host kinin B1 receptor in melanoma development was evaluated using a syngeneic melanoma model. Primary tumors and metastasis were respectively induced by injecting B16F10 melanoma cells, which are derived from C57BL/6 mice, subcutaneously or in the tail vein in wild type C57BL/6 and B1 receptor knockout mice (B1−/−). Tumors developed in B1−/− mice presented unfavorable prognostic factors such as increased incidence of ulceration, higher levels of IL-10, higher activation of proliferative pathways such as ERK1/2 and Akt, and increased mitotic index. Furthermore, in the metastasis model, B1−/− mice developed larger metastatic colonies in the lung and lower CD8+immune effector cells when compared with WT animals. Altogether, our results provide evidences that B1−/− animals developed primary tumors with multiple features associated with poor prognosis and unfavorable metastatic onset, indicating that the B1 receptor may contribute to improve the host response against melanoma progression. PMID:26898917

  12. Comparative Oral Bioavailability, Toxicokinetics, and Biotransformation of Enniatin B1 and Enniatin B in Broiler Chickens.

    PubMed

    Fraeyman, Sophie; Devreese, Mathias; Antonissen, Gunther; De Baere, Siegrid; Rychlik, Michael; Croubels, Siska

    2016-09-28

    A toxicokinetic study of the Fusarium mycotoxins enniatin B1 (ENN B1) and enniatin B (ENN B) was performed in broiler chickens. Each animal received ENN B1 or B orally via an intracrop bolus and intravenously at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg body weight. Both enniatins were poorly absorbed after oral administration, with absolute oral bioavailabilities of 0.05 and 0.11 for ENNs B1 and B, respectively. Both enniatins were readily distributed to the tissues, with mean volumes of distribution of 25.09 and 33.91 L/kg for ENNs B1 and B, respectively. The mean total body clearance was rather high, namely, 6.63 and 7.10 L/h/kg for ENNs B1 and B, respectively. Finally, an UHPLC-HRMS targeted approach was used to investigate the phase I and II biotransformations of both mycotoxins. Oxygenation was the major phase I biotransformation pathway for both ENNs B1 and B. Neither glucuronide nor sulfate phase II metabolites were detected. PMID:27632250

  13. Roles of EphB3/Ephrin-B1 Interactions in Feather Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suksaweang, Sanong; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Roybal, Paul; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Widelitz, Randall

    2013-01-01

    Background The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ephrin ligands are involved in morphogenesis during organ formation. Methods We studied their role in feather morphogenesis, focusing on ephrin-B1 and its receptor EphB3. Results Early in feather development ephrin-B1 is expressed in the dermal condensation, not inter-bud mesenchyme. Later, in feather buds, it is in both epithelium and mesenchyme. In the feather follicle, it is enriched in the feather filament epithelium and marginal plate that sets the boundary between barb ridges. EphB3 also is expressed in epithelia. In the feather bud, its expression is restricted to the posterior bud. In the follicle, its expression forms a circle at the bud base which may set the boundary between bud and inter-bud domains. Perturbation with ephrin-B1-Fc altered feather primordia segregation and feather bud elongation. Conclusion Analyses reveal ephrin-B1-Fc caused three types of changes: blurred placode boundaries with loose dermal condensations, incomplete follicle invagination with less compact dermal papillae, and aberrant barb ridge patterning in feather filament morphogenesis. Thus, while ephrin-B1 suppression does not inhibit the initial emergence of a new epithelial domain, Eph/ephrin-B1 interaction is required for its proper completion. We propose that interaction between ephrin B1 and its receptor is involved in boundary stabilization during feather morphogenesis. PMID:23319347

  14. Specificity and Sufficiency of EphB1 in Driving the Ipsilateral Retinal Projection

    PubMed Central

    Petros, Timothy J.; Shrestha, Brikha R.; Mason, Carol

    2009-01-01

    At the optic chiasm, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons make the decision to either avoid or traverse the midline, a maneuver that establishes the binocular pathways. In mice, the ipsilateral retinal projection arises from RGCs in the peripheral ventrotemporal (VT) crescent of the retina. These RGCs express the guidance receptor EphB1, which interacts with ephrin-B2 on radial glia cells at the optic chiasm to repulse VT axons away from the midline and into the ipsilateral optic tract. However, since VT RGCs express more than one EphB receptor, the sufficiency and specificity of the EphB1 receptor in directing the ipsilateral projection is unclear. In this study, we utilize in utero retinal electroporation to demonstrate that ectopic EphB1 expression can redirect RGCs with a normally crossed projection to an ipsilateral trajectory. Moreover, EphB1 is specifically required for rerouting RGC projections ipsilaterally, as introduction of the highly similar EphB2 receptor is much less efficient in redirecting RGC fibers, even when expressed at higher surface levels. Introduction of EphB1-EphB2 chimeric receptors into RGCs reveals that both extracellular and juxtamembrane domains of EphB1 are required to efficiently convert RGC projections ipsilaterally. Taken together, these data describe for the first time functional differences between two highly similar Eph receptors at a decision point in vivo, with EphB1 displaying unique properties that efficiently drives the uncrossed retinal projection. PMID:19295152

  15. Activity of cyclin B1 in HL-60 cells treated with etoposide.

    PubMed

    Żuryń, Agnieszka; Krajewski, Adrian; Szulc, Dawid; Litwiniec, Anna; Grzanka, Alina

    2016-06-01

    Cyclin B1 triggers G2/M phase transition phosphorylating with its catalytical partner - Cdc2 many of the molecular targets essential for cell cycle progression. Human leukemia cell line HL-60 were treated with increasing doses of etoposide (ETP) (0.5; 0.75; 1μM) to investigate how the drug affects cell morphology, viability, cell cycle distribution and expression of cyclin B1. To achieve this aim we applied light and transmission electron microscopy to observe morphological and ultra structural changes, image-based cytometry for apoptosis evaluation and cell cycle analysis, and then we conducted immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence staining to visualize cyclin localization and expression. Quantitive data about cyclin B1 expression were obtained from flow cytometry. Etoposide caused decrease in cell viability, induced apoptosis and G2/M arrest accompanied by enhanced expression of cyclin B1. Changes in expression and localization of cyclin B1 may constitute a part of the mechanism responsible for resistance of HL-60 cells to etoposide. Our results may reflect involvement of cyclin B1 in opposite processes - apoptosis induction and maintenance of cell viability in leukemia cells. We hypothesized possible roles and pathways by which cyclin B1 takes part in drug treatment response and chemosensitivity. PMID:27297620

  16. Pathogenesis-Related Protein 1b1 (PR1b1) Is a Major Tomato Fruit Protein Responsive to Chilling Temperature and Upregulated in High Polyamine Transgenic Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Tahira; Topuz, Muhamet; Bernadec, Anne; Sicher, Richard; Handa, Avtar K.; Mattoo, Autar K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants execute an array of mechanisms in response to stress which include upregulation of defense-related proteins and changes in specific metabolites. Polyamines – putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm) – are metabolites commonly found associated with abiotic stresses such as chilling stress. We have generated two transgenic tomato lines (556HO and 579HO) that express yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and specifically accumulate Spd and Spm in fruits in comparison to fruits from control (556AZ) plants (Mehta et al., 2002). Tomato fruits undergo chilling injury at temperatures below 13°C. The high Spd and Spm tomato together with the control azygous line were utilized to address role(s) of polyamines in chilling-injury signaling. Exposure to chilling temperature (2°C) led to several-fold increase in the Put content in all the lines. Upon re-warming of the fruits at 20°C, the levels of Spd and Spm increased further in the fruit of the two transgenic lines, the higher levels remaining stable for 15 days after re-warming as compared to the fruit from the control line. Profiling their steady state proteins before and after re-warming highlighted a protein of ∼14 kD. Using proteomics approach, protein sequencing and immunoblotting, the ∼14-kD protein was identified as the pathogenesis related protein 1b1 (PR1b1). The PR1b1 protein accumulated transiently in the control fruit whose level was barely detectable at d 15 post-warming while in the fruit from both the 556HO and 579HO transgenic lines PR1b1 abundance increased and remained stable till d 15 post warming. PR1b1 gene transcripts were found low in the control fruit with a visible accumulation only on d 15 post warming; however, in both the transgenic lines it accumulated and increased soon after rewarming being several-fold higher on day 2 while in 556HO line this increase continued until d 6 than the control fruit. The chilling-induced increase in PR1b1 protein seems independent

  17. Pathogenesis-Related Protein 1b1 (PR1b1) Is a Major Tomato Fruit Protein Responsive to Chilling Temperature and Upregulated in High Polyamine Transgenic Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravinder K; Fatima, Tahira; Topuz, Muhamet; Bernadec, Anne; Sicher, Richard; Handa, Avtar K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2016-01-01

    Plants execute an array of mechanisms in response to stress which include upregulation of defense-related proteins and changes in specific metabolites. Polyamines - putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm) - are metabolites commonly found associated with abiotic stresses such as chilling stress. We have generated two transgenic tomato lines (556HO and 579HO) that express yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and specifically accumulate Spd and Spm in fruits in comparison to fruits from control (556AZ) plants (Mehta et al., 2002). Tomato fruits undergo chilling injury at temperatures below 13°C. The high Spd and Spm tomato together with the control azygous line were utilized to address role(s) of polyamines in chilling-injury signaling. Exposure to chilling temperature (2°C) led to several-fold increase in the Put content in all the lines. Upon re-warming of the fruits at 20°C, the levels of Spd and Spm increased further in the fruit of the two transgenic lines, the higher levels remaining stable for 15 days after re-warming as compared to the fruit from the control line. Profiling their steady state proteins before and after re-warming highlighted a protein of ∼14 kD. Using proteomics approach, protein sequencing and immunoblotting, the ∼14-kD protein was identified as the pathogenesis related protein 1b1 (PR1b1). The PR1b1 protein accumulated transiently in the control fruit whose level was barely detectable at d 15 post-warming while in the fruit from both the 556HO and 579HO transgenic lines PR1b1 abundance increased and remained stable till d 15 post warming. PR1b1 gene transcripts were found low in the control fruit with a visible accumulation only on d 15 post warming; however, in both the transgenic lines it accumulated and increased soon after rewarming being several-fold higher on day 2 while in 556HO line this increase continued until d 6 than the control fruit. The chilling-induced increase in PR1b1 protein seems independent of

  18. Pathogenesis-Related Protein 1b1 (PR1b1) Is a Major Tomato Fruit Protein Responsive to Chilling Temperature and Upregulated in High Polyamine Transgenic Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravinder K; Fatima, Tahira; Topuz, Muhamet; Bernadec, Anne; Sicher, Richard; Handa, Avtar K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2016-01-01

    Plants execute an array of mechanisms in response to stress which include upregulation of defense-related proteins and changes in specific metabolites. Polyamines - putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm) - are metabolites commonly found associated with abiotic stresses such as chilling stress. We have generated two transgenic tomato lines (556HO and 579HO) that express yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and specifically accumulate Spd and Spm in fruits in comparison to fruits from control (556AZ) plants (Mehta et al., 2002). Tomato fruits undergo chilling injury at temperatures below 13°C. The high Spd and Spm tomato together with the control azygous line were utilized to address role(s) of polyamines in chilling-injury signaling. Exposure to chilling temperature (2°C) led to several-fold increase in the Put content in all the lines. Upon re-warming of the fruits at 20°C, the levels of Spd and Spm increased further in the fruit of the two transgenic lines, the higher levels remaining stable for 15 days after re-warming as compared to the fruit from the control line. Profiling their steady state proteins before and after re-warming highlighted a protein of ∼14 kD. Using proteomics approach, protein sequencing and immunoblotting, the ∼14-kD protein was identified as the pathogenesis related protein 1b1 (PR1b1). The PR1b1 protein accumulated transiently in the control fruit whose level was barely detectable at d 15 post-warming while in the fruit from both the 556HO and 579HO transgenic lines PR1b1 abundance increased and remained stable till d 15 post warming. PR1b1 gene transcripts were found low in the control fruit with a visible accumulation only on d 15 post warming; however, in both the transgenic lines it accumulated and increased soon after rewarming being several-fold higher on day 2 while in 556HO line this increase continued until d 6 than the control fruit. The chilling-induced increase in PR1b1 protein seems independent of

  19. Functional expression of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors in neonatal rat trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Aya; Sato, Masaki; Kimura, Maki; Yamazaki, Takaki; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Tazaki, Masakazu; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) and its receptors (B1 and B2 receptors) play important roles in inflammatory nociception. However, the patterns of expression and physiological/pathological functions of B1 and B2 receptors in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons remain to be fully elucidated. We investigated the functional expression of BK receptors in rat TG neurons. We observed intense immunoreactivity of B2 receptors in TG neurons, while B1 receptors showed weak immunoreactivity. Expression of the B2 receptor colocalized with immunoreactivities against the pan-neuronal marker, neurofilament H, substance P, isolectin B4, and tropomyosin receptor kinase A antibodies. Both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]o), BK application increased the concentration of intracellular free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i). The amplitudes of BK-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase in the absence of [Ca(2+)]o were significantly smaller than those in the presence of Ca(2+). In the absence of [Ca(2+)]o, BK-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases were sensitive to B2 receptor antagonists, but not to a B1 receptor antagonist. However, B1 receptor agonist, Lys-[Des-Arg(9)]BK, transiently increased [Ca(2+)]i in primary cultured TG neurons, and these increases were sensitive to a B1 receptor antagonist in the presence of [Ca(2+)]o. These results indicated that B2 receptors were constitutively expressed and their activation induced the mobilization of [Ca(2+)]i from intracellular stores with partial Ca(2+) influx by BK. Although constitutive B1 receptor expression could not be clearly observed immunohistochemically in the TG cryosection, cultured TG neurons functionally expressed B1 receptors, suggesting that both B1 and B2 receptors involve pathological and physiological nociceptive functions.

  20. Ligand-dependent EphB1 signaling suppresses glioma invasion and correlates with patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lei; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Furuyama, Natsuki; Sabit, Hemragul; Furuta, Takuya; Hayashi, Yutaka; Takino, Takahisa; Dong, Yu; Sato, Hiroshi; Sai, Yoshimichi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Berens, Michael E.; Zhao, Shi-Guang; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Extensive evidence implicates the Eph receptor family of tyrosine kinases and its ligand, ephrin, in glioma invasion, but it remains incompletely understood how these receptors affect chemotactic behavior of glioma. We sought to identify the Eph family members that correlate with patients' survival and to reveal the function of Eph in glioma invasion. Methods Clinical relevance of EphB genes was confirmed in a clinically annotated expression data set of 195 brain biopsy specimens. The function of EphB was analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results Levels of mRNA of certain EphB members were significantly different in histological grades of glioma. According to Kaplan–Meier analysis, only the EphB1 level among 5 members of EphB emerged to be a powerful predictor of favorable survival in malignant glioma (n = 97, P = .0048), although the levels of EphB1 expression did not vary across the tumor grades. Immunoprecipitation showed that tyrosine phosphorylated EphB1 was not detected in all glioma cells tested. Forced overexpression and autophosphorylation of EphB1 in low expressor cell lines (U251, U87) did not affect cell migration or invasion in vitro, whereas EphB1 phosphorylation induced by ephrin-B2/Fc significantly decreased migration and invasion. Cells expressing ephrin-B2 showed noteworthy morphological changes consistent with migration induction; this alteration was negated by EphB1 overexpression. Concomitantly, overexpression of EphB1 abrogated the increased migration and invasion induced by ephrin-B2 in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions These data suggest that ligand-dependent EphB1 signaling negatively regulates glioma cell invasion, identifying EphB1 as a favorable prognostic factor in malignant glioma. PMID:24121831

  1. SH2B1 regulation of energy balance, body weight, and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-01-01

    The Src homology 2B (SH2B) family members (SH2B1, SH2B2 and SH2B3) are adaptor signaling proteins containing characteristic SH2 and PH domains. SH2B1 (also called SH2-B and PSM) and SH2B2 (also called APS) are able to form homo- or hetero-dimers via their N-terminal dimerization domains. Their C-terminal SH2 domains bind to tyrosyl phosphorylated proteins, including Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), TrkA, insulin receptors, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1), and IRS2. SH2B1 enhances leptin signaling by both stimulating JAK2 activity and assembling a JAK2/IRS1/2 signaling complex. SH2B1 promotes insulin signaling by both enhancing insulin receptor catalytic activity and protecting against dephosphorylation of IRS proteins. Accordingly, genetic deletion of SH2B1 results in severe leptin resistance, insulin resistance, hyperphagia, obesity, and type 2 diabetes in mice. Neuron-specific overexpression of SH2B1β transgenes protects against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. SH2B1 in pancreatic β cells promotes β cell expansion and insulin secretion to counteract insulin resistance in obesity. Moreover, numerous SH2B1 mutations are genetically linked to leptin resistance, insulin resistance, obesity, and type 2 diabetes in humans. Unlike SH2B1, SH2B2 and SH2B3 are not required for the maintenance of normal energy and glucose homeostasis. The metabolic function of the SH2B family is conserved from insects to humans. PMID:25126397

  2. SF3B1 haploinsufficiency leads to formation of ring sideroblasts in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Visconte, Valeria; Rogers, Heesun J; Singh, Jarnail; Barnard, John; Bupathi, Manoj; Traina, Fabiola; McMahon, James; Makishima, Hideki; Szpurka, Hadrian; Jankowska, Anna; Jerez, Andres; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Advani, Anjali S; Copelan, Edward; Koseki, Haruhiko; Isono, Kyoichi; Padgett, Richard A; Osman, Sami; Koide, Kazunori; O'Keefe, Christine; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Tiu, Ramon V

    2012-10-18

    Whole exome/genome sequencing has been fundamental in the identification of somatic mutations in the spliceosome machinery in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and other hematologic disorders. SF3B1, splicing factor 3b subunit 1 is mutated in 60%-80% of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) and RARS associated with thrombocytosis (RARS-T), 2 distinct subtypes of MDS and MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDSs/MPNs). An idiosyncratic feature of RARS/RARS-T is the presence of abnormal sideroblasts characterized by iron overload in the mitochondria, called RS. Based on the high frequency of mutations of SF3B1 in RARS/RARS-T, we investigated the consequences of SF3B1 alterations. Ultrastructurally, SF3B1 mutants showed altered iron distribution characterized by coarse iron deposits compared with wild-type RARS patients by transmission electron microscopy. SF3B1 knockdown experiments in K562 cells resulted in down-regulation of U2-type intron-splicing by RT-PCR. RNA-sequencing analysis of SF3B1 mutants showed differentially used genes relevant in MDS pathogenesis, such as ASXL1, CBL, EZH, and RUNX families. A SF3B pharmacologic inhibitor, meayamycin, induced the formation of RS in healthy BM cells. Further, BM aspirates of Sf3b1 heterozygous knockout mice showed RS by Prussian blue. In conclusion, we report the first experimental evidence of the association between SF3B1 and RS phenotype. Our data suggest that SF3B1 haploinsufficiency leads to RS formation.

  3. Aflatoxin B1 metabolism by 3-methylcholanthrene-induced hamster hepatic cytochrome P-450s.

    PubMed

    Lai, T S; Chiang, J Y

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the activation of aflatoxin B1 by hamster liver microsomes and purified hamster cytochrome P-450 isozymes using a umu mutagen test. The hamster liver microsomes or S-9 fractions were much more active than rat liver microsomes or S-9 fractions in the activation of umu gene expression by aflatoxin B1 metabolites. 3-Methyl-cholanthrene treatment increased aflatoxin B1 activation by hamster liver microsomes. Two major 3-methylcholanthrene-inducible cytochrome P-450 isozymes, P-450 MC1 (IIA) and P-450 MC4 (IA2), were purified from 3-methylcholanthrene-treated hamster liver microsomes, and the metabolism of aflatoxin B1 by these two cytochromes was studied. In the reconstituted enzyme system, both P-450 MC1 and P-450 MC4 were highly active in the activation of aflatoxin B1, and antibodies against these P-450s specifically inhibited these activities. Antibody against P-450 MC1 inhibited the activation of aflatoxin B1 by 20% in the presence of 3-methyl-cholanthrene-treated hamster liver microsomes. In contrast, antibody against P-450 MC4 stimulated the activity by 175%. These results indicated that hamster P-450 MC1 might convert aflatoxin B1 to more toxic metabolite(s), whereas P-450 MC4 might convert aflatoxin B1 to less toxic metabolite(s), than aflatoxin B1 in liver microsomes. The metabolite(s) produced by both hamster cytochrome P-450 MC1 and MC4 were genotoxic in the umu mutagen test. PMID:2126562

  4. Rhythmic control of activity and sleep by class B1 GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Kunst, Michael; Tso, Matthew C F; Ghosh, D Dipon; Herzog, Erik D; Nitabach, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    Members of the class B1 family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) whose ligands are neuropeptides have been implicated in regulation of circadian rhythms and sleep in diverse metazoan clades. This review discusses the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which class B1 GPCRs, especially the mammalian VPAC2 receptor and its functional homologue PDFR in Drosophila and C. elegans, regulate arousal and daily rhythms of sleep and wake. There are remarkable parallels in the cellular and molecular roles played by class B1 intercellular signaling pathways in coordinating arousal and circadian timekeeping across multiple cells and tissues in these very different genetic model organisms.

  5. Regioselective 2-hydroxylation of 17{beta}-estradiol by rat cytochrome P4501B1

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Mostafizur; Hayes Sutter, Carrie; Emmert, Gary L.; Sutter, Thomas R. . E-mail: tsutter@memphis.edu

    2006-11-01

    Previous work demonstrated that human cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1) forms predominantly 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), a metabolite which is carcinogenic in animal models. Here, we present results from kinetic studies characterizing the formation of 4-OHE2 and 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) by rat CYP1B1 using 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) as a substrate. K {sub m} and K {sub cat} values were estimated using the Michaelis-Menten equation. For rat CYP1B1, the apparent K {sub m} values for the formation of 4-OHE2 and 2-OHE2 were 0.61 {+-} 0.23 and 1.84 {+-} 0.73 {mu}M; the turnover numbers (K {sub cat}) were 0.23 {+-} 0.02 and 0.46 {+-} 0.05 pmol/min/pmol P450; and the catalytic efficiencies (K {sub cat}/K {sub m}) were 0.37 and 0.25, respectively. For human CYP1B1, the apparent K {sub m} values for the formation of 4-OHE2 and 2-OHE2 were 1.22 {+-} 0.25 and 1.10 {+-} 0.26; the turnover numbers were 1.23 {+-} 0.06 and 0.33 {+-} 0.02; and the catalytic efficiencies were 1.0 and 0.30, respectively. The turnover number ratio of 4- to 2-hydroxylation was 3.7 for human CYP1B1 and 0.5 for rat CYP1B1. These results indicate that, although rat CYP1B1 is a low K {sub m} E2 hydroxylase, its product ratio, unlike the human enzyme, favors 2-hydroxylation. The K {sub i} values of the inhibitor 2,4,3',5'-tetramethoxystilbene (TMS) for E2 4- and 2-hydroxylation by rat CYP1B1 were 0.69 and 0.78 {mu}M, respectively. The K {sub i} values of 7,8-benzoflavone ({alpha}-NF) for E2 4- and 2-hydroxylation by rat CYP1B1 were 0.01 and 0.02 {mu}M, respectively. The knowledge gained from this study will support the rational design of CYP1B1 inhibitors and clarify results of CYP1B1 related carcinogenesis studies performed in rats.

  6. Rhythmic control of activity and sleep by class B1 GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Kunst, Michael; Tso, Matthew C.F.; Ghosh, D. Dipon; Herzog, Erik D.; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the class B1 family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) whose ligands are neuropeptides have been implicated in regulation of circadian rhythms and sleep in diverse metazoan clades. This review discusses the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which class B1 GPCRs, especially the mammalian VPAC2 receptor and its functional homologue PDFR in Drosophila and C. elegans, regulate arousal and daily rhythms of sleep and wake. There are remarkable parallels in the cellular and molecular roles played by class B1 intercellular signaling pathways in coordinating arousal and circadian timekeeping across multiple cells and tissues in these very different genetic model organisms. PMID:25410535

  7. Use of gamma irradiation to prevent aflatoxin B 1 production in smoked dried fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbadu, G. H.

    Smoked dried fish bought from the Nigerian market was inoculated with spores of barAspergillus flavus (U.I. 81) and irradiated with doses of 0.625, 1.25, 2.50 and 5.00 KGy gamma irradiation. The effect of aflatoxin B 1 production on subsequent incubation for 8 days as stationary cultures was measured. The amount of aflatoxin B 1 produced was found to decrease with increased gamma irradiation dose levels. While the non-irradiated control produced significantly (at 1% level) greater amounts of aflatoxin B 1 as compared to the treated cultures.

  8. Comparative oncology: ErbB-1 and ErbB-2 homologues in canine cancer are susceptible to cetuximab and trastuzumab targeting.

    PubMed

    Singer, Josef; Weichselbaumer, Marlene; Stockner, Thomas; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Sobanov, Yury; Bajna, Erika; Wrba, Friedrich; Horvat, Reinhard; Thalhammer, Johann G; Willmann, Michael; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2012-04-01

    To facilitate comparative oncology trials we compared the biological and molecular homologies of canine (dog; Canis lupus familiaris) and human tumor-associated antigens ErbB-1 and -2. Further, we investigated whether they could serve as targets for anti-ErbB-1 (cetuximab) and anti-ErbB-2 antibodies (trastuzumab), which are highly relevant in human clinical oncology. Immunohistochemistry of canine mammary cancer showed ErbB-1 overexpression in 3/10 patients and ErbB-2 in 4/10. We report 91% amino acid homology for ErbB-1 and 92% for ErbB-2 between canine and human molecules. Modeling of canine on human ErbB-1 revealed that the cetuximab epitope only differs by 4 amino acids: Lys443 is replaced by Arg, Ser468 by Asn, Gly471 by Asp, and Asn473 by Lys in canines. The trastuzumab binding site is identical in human and canine ErbB-2 apart from a single amino acid change (Pro557 to Ser). Binding of cetuximab and trastuzumab to canine mammary carcinoma cells CF33, CF41, Sh1b and P114 was confirmed by flow cytometry. Both antibodies significantly inhibited canine tumor cell proliferation partly due to growth arrest in G(0)/G(1) phase. We explain the lower efficiency on the tested canine than on human SKBR3 and A431 cells, by a 2-log lower expression level of the canine ErbB-1 and -2 molecules. Our results indicate significant homology of human and canine Erb-1 and -2 tumor associated antigens. The fact that the canine homologues express the cetuximab and trastuzumab epitopes may facilitate antibody-based immunotherapy in dogs. Importantly, the striking similarities of ErbB-1 and -2 molecules open up avenues towards comparative strategies for targeted drug development. PMID:22424313

  9. Dietary modulation of the biotransformation and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B(1).

    PubMed

    Gross-Steinmeyer, Kerstin; Eaton, David L

    2012-09-28

    Diet and its various components are consistently identified as among the most important 'risk factors' for cancer worldwide, yet great uncertainty remains regarding the relative contribution of nutritive (e.g., vitamins, calories) vs. non-nutritive (e.g., phytochemicals, fiber, contaminants) factors in both cancer induction and cancer prevention. Among the most potent known human dietary carcinogens is the mycotoxin, aflatoxin B(1) (AFB). AFB and related aflatoxins are produced as secondary metabolites by the molds Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus that commonly infect poorly stored foods including peanuts, pistachios, corn, and rice. AFB is a potent hepatocarcinogenic agent in numerous animal species, and has been implicated in the etiology of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Recent research has shown that many diet-derived factors have great potential to influence AFB biotransformation, and some efficiently protect from AFB-induced genotoxicity. One key mode of action for reducing AFB-induced carcinogenesis in experimental animals was shown to be the induction of detoxification enzymes such as certain glutathione-S-transferases that are regulated through the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway. Although initial studies utilized the dithiolthione drug, oltipraz, as a prototypical inducer of antioxidant response, dietary components such as suforaphane (SFN) are also effective inducers of this pathway in rodent models. However, human GSTs in general do not appear to be extensively induced by SFN, and GSTM1 - the only human GST with measurable catalytic activity toward aflatoxin B(1)-8,9-epoxide (AFBO; the genotoxic metabolite of AFB), does not appear to be induced by SFN, at least in human hepatocytes, even though its expression in human liver cells does appear to offer considerable protection against AFB-DNA damage. Although induction of detoxification pathways has served as the primary mechanistic focus of chemoprevention studies, protective effects of

  10. Dietary modulation of the biotransformation and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B(1).

    PubMed

    Gross-Steinmeyer, Kerstin; Eaton, David L

    2012-09-28

    Diet and its various components are consistently identified as among the most important 'risk factors' for cancer worldwide, yet great uncertainty remains regarding the relative contribution of nutritive (e.g., vitamins, calories) vs. non-nutritive (e.g., phytochemicals, fiber, contaminants) factors in both cancer induction and cancer prevention. Among the most potent known human dietary carcinogens is the mycotoxin, aflatoxin B(1) (AFB). AFB and related aflatoxins are produced as secondary metabolites by the molds Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus that commonly infect poorly stored foods including peanuts, pistachios, corn, and rice. AFB is a potent hepatocarcinogenic agent in numerous animal species, and has been implicated in the etiology of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Recent research has shown that many diet-derived factors have great potential to influence AFB biotransformation, and some efficiently protect from AFB-induced genotoxicity. One key mode of action for reducing AFB-induced carcinogenesis in experimental animals was shown to be the induction of detoxification enzymes such as certain glutathione-S-transferases that are regulated through the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway. Although initial studies utilized the dithiolthione drug, oltipraz, as a prototypical inducer of antioxidant response, dietary components such as suforaphane (SFN) are also effective inducers of this pathway in rodent models. However, human GSTs in general do not appear to be extensively induced by SFN, and GSTM1 - the only human GST with measurable catalytic activity toward aflatoxin B(1)-8,9-epoxide (AFBO; the genotoxic metabolite of AFB), does not appear to be induced by SFN, at least in human hepatocytes, even though its expression in human liver cells does appear to offer considerable protection against AFB-DNA damage. Although induction of detoxification pathways has served as the primary mechanistic focus of chemoprevention studies, protective effects of

  11. 3. NORTH SIDE OF B BLOCK, FROM B1 (RIGHT) TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. NORTH SIDE OF B BLOCK, FROM B-1 (RIGHT) TO B-7 (LEFT), VIEW SOUTHEAST - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Between 1931 Pierhead Line, Essex, York, & Montgomery Streets, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  12. An Overview of B-1 Cells as Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popi, Ana F.; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda M.; Mariano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The role of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has been extensively studied, mainly in relation to the activation of memory T cells. Considering the B cell subtypes, the role of B-1 cells as APCs is beginning to be explored. Initially, it was described that B-1 cells are activated preferentially by T-independent antigens. However, some reports demonstrated that these cells are also involved in a T-dependent response. The aim of this review is to summarize information about the ability of B-1 cells to play a role as APCs and to briefly discuss the role of the BCR and toll-like receptor signals in this process. Furthermore, some characteristics of B-1 cells, such as natural IgM production and phagocytic ability, could interfere in the participation of these cells in the onset of an adaptive response. PMID:27148259

  13. Resveratrol protects SR-B1 levels in keratinocytes exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Sticozzi, C; Belmonte, G; Cervellati, F; Muresan, X M; Pessina, F; Lim, Y; Forman, H J; Valacchi, G

    2014-04-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) has been strongly linked to several health conditions including heart disease, lung cancer, and other respiratory and circulatory ailments. Deleterious effects of cigarette smoking on skin have also been well documented, but unlike effects on other organs, damage does not depend upon inhalation. The upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (rich in cholesterol fatty acids and ceramide), is very susceptible to damage induced by exposure to environmental stressors that can modify its lipid composition and thereby affect its function of protecting skin from dehydration. Scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1) is involved in the uptake of cholesterol in several tissues including skin. We previously demonstrated that CS exposure induces formation of aldehyde (HNE) adducts that decrease SR-B1 expression. As topical resveratrol, a well-known polyphenolic stilbene, has been demonstrated to show benefits against skin disorders, we investigated its possible role as a protective agent against CS-induced reduction of SR-B1 expression in cutaneous tissue. In this study, we demonstrate that resveratrol at doses ranging from 0.5 to 10 μM is not toxic and is able to increase SR-B1 protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in human keratinocytes. Moreover, when the cells that were pretreated with various doses of resveratrol were exposed to CS, the loss of SR-B1 was prevented in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, in keratinocytes, resveratrol was also able to prevent an increase in HNE-protein adducts induced by CS. In particular resveratrol was able to prevent HNE-SR-B1 adduct formation. Thus, resveratrol seems to be a natural compound that could provide skin with a defense against exogenous stressors by protecting the essential cholesterol receptor, SR-B1.

  14. Hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase 2B1b expression and localization in normal human brain

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Emily D.; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Falany, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    Steroid sulfonation in the human brain has not been well characterized. The major sulfotransferase (SULT) isoforms that conjugate steroids in humans are SULT1E1, SULT2A1, and SULT2B1b. SULT2B1b catalyzes the sulfonation of 3β-hydroxysteroids, including neurosteroids dehydroepiandrosterone and pregnenolone, as well as cholesterol and several hydroxycholesterols. SULT2B1b mRNA and protein expression were detected in adult and fetal human brain sections, whereas neither mRNA, nor protein expression were identified for SULT1E1 or SULT2A1. Using immunohistochemical analysis, SULT2B1b expression was detected in neurons and oligodendrocytes in adult brain and in epithelial tissues in 28-week-old fetal brain. Sulfonation of cholesterol, oxysterols, and neurosteroids in the brain is apparently catalyzed by SULT2B1b since expression of neither SULT2A1 nor SULT1E1 was detected in human brain sections. SULT2B1b mRNA and protein were also detected in human U373-MG glioblastoma cells. Both mRNA and protein expression of liver X receptor (LXR)-β, but not LXR-α, were detected in U373-MG cells, and LXR-β activation resulted in a decrease in SULT2B1b protein expression. Since hydroxycholesterols are important physiological LXR activators, this suggests a role for regulation of sterol metabolism by LXR and SULT2B1b. Therefore, elucidating key enzymes in the metabolism of cholesterol and neurosteroids could help define the properties of steroid conjugation in the human brain. PMID:24683427

  15. The phospholipid flippase ATP8B1 mediates apical localization of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator.

    PubMed

    van der Mark, Vincent A; de Jonge, Hugo R; Chang, Jung-Chin; Ho-Mok, Kam S; Duijst, Suzanne; Vidović, Dragana; Carlon, Marianne S; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Paulusma, Coen C

    2016-09-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the phospholipid flippase ATP8B1. Apart from severe cholestatic liver disease, many PFIC1 patients develop extrahepatic symptoms characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF), such as pulmonary infection, sweat gland dysfunction and failure to thrive. CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel essential for epithelial fluid transport. Previously it was shown that CFTR transcript levels were strongly reduced in livers of PFIC1 patients. Here we have investigated the hypothesis that ATP8B1 is important for proper CFTR expression and function. We analyzed CFTR expression in ATP8B1-depleted intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cell lines and assessed CFTR function by measuring short-circuit currents across transwell-grown ATP8B1-depleted intestinal T84 cells and by a genetically-encoded fluorescent chloride sensor. In addition, we studied CFTR surface expression upon induction of CFTR transcription. We show that CFTR protein levels are strongly reduced in the apical membrane of human ATP8B1-depleted intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cell lines, a phenotype that coincided with reduced CFTR activity. Apical membrane insertion upon induction of ectopically-expressed CFTR was strongly impaired in ATP8B1-depleted cells. We conclude that ATP8B1 is essential for correct apical localization of CFTR in human intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cells, and that impaired CFTR localization underlies some of the extrahepatic phenotypes observed in ATP8B1 deficiency. PMID:27301931

  16. Role of CYP1B1 in PAH-DNA adduct formation and breast cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Russell, Marion L.; Muller, A.P.; Caleffi, M.; Eschiletti, J.; Graudenz, M.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) increases breast cancer risk. PAHs are products of incomplete burning of organic matter and are present in cigarette smoke, ambient air, drinking water, and diet. PAHs require metabolic transformation to bind to DNA, causing DNA adducts, which can lead to mutations and are thought to be an important pre-cancer marker. In breast tissue, PAHs appear to be metabolized to their cancer-causing form primarily by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1. Because the genotoxic impact of PAH depends on their metabolism, we hypothesized that high CYP1B1 enzyme levels result in increased formation of PAH-DNA adducts in breast tissue, leading to increased development of breast cancer. We have investigated molecular mechanisms of the relationship between PAH exposure, CYP1B1 expression and breast cancer risk in a clinic-based case-control study. We collected histologically normal breast tissue from 56 women (43 cases and 13 controls) undergoing breast surgery and analyzed these specimens for CYP1B1 genotype, PAH-DNA adducts and CYP1B1 gene expression. We did not detect any difference in aromatic DNA adduct levels of cases and controls, only between smokers and non-smokers. CYP1B1 transcript levels were slightly lower in controls than cases, but the difference was not statistically significant. We found no correlation between the levels of CYP1B1 expression and DNA adducts. If CYP1B1 has any role in breast cancer etiology it might be through its metabolism of estrogen rather than its metabolism of PAHs. However, due to the lack of statistical power these results should be interpreted with caution.

  17. Total Synthesis of Leupyrrin B1: A Potent Inhibitor of Human Leukocyte Elastase.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Sebastian; Wosniok, Paul R; Herkommer, Daniel; Schulz-Fincke, Anna-Christina; Gütschow, Michael; Menche, Dirk

    2016-08-19

    The total synthesis of leupyrrin B1 was accomplished by an expedient strategy that involves an optimized HATU-mediated amide coupling protocol of elaborate substrates. The generally useful procedure was also successfully applied in an improved total synthesis of leupyrrin A1. Finally, leupyrrins A1 and B1 were evaluated toward a panel of proteases, and human leukocyte elastase was discovered as a molecular target of the leupyrrins. PMID:27486674

  18. Chicken TREM-B1, an Inhibitory Ig-Like Receptor Expressed on Chicken Thrombocytes.

    PubMed

    Turowski, Vanessa; Sperling, Beatrice; Hanczaruk, Matthias A; Göbel, Thomas W; Viertlboeck, Birgit C

    2016-01-01

    Triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) form a multigene family of immunoregulatory Ig-like receptors and play important roles in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. In chickens, three members of the TREM family have been identified on chromosome 26. One of them is TREM-B1 which possesses two V-set Ig-domains, an uncharged transmembrane region and a long cytoplasmic tail with one ITSM and two ITIMs indicating an inhibitory function. We generated specific monoclonal antibodies by immunizing a Balb/c mouse with a TREM-B1-FLAG transfected BWZ.36 cell line and tested the hybridoma supernatants on TREM-B1-FLAG transfected 2D8 cells. We obtained two different antibodies specific for TREM-B1, mab 7E8 (mouse IgG1) and mab 1E9 (mouse IgG2a) which were used for cell surface staining. Single and double staining of different tissues, including whole blood preparations, revealed expression on thrombocytes. Next we investigated the biochemical properties of TREM-B1 by using the specific mab 1E9 for immunoprecipitation of either lysates of surface biotinylated peripheral blood cells or stably transfected 2D8 cells. Staining with streptavidin coupled horse radish peroxidase revealed a glycosylated monomeric protein of about 50 kDa. Furthermore we used the stably transfected 2D8 cell line for analyzing the cytoplasmic tyrosine based signaling motifs. After pervanadate treatment, we detected phosphorylation of the tyrosine residues and subsequent recruitment of the tyrosine specific protein phosphatase SHP-2, indicating an inhibitory potential for TREM-B1. We also showed the inhibitory effect of TREM-B1 in chicken thrombocytes using a CD107 degranulation assay. Crosslinking of TREM-B1 on activated primary thrombocytes resulted in decreased CD107 surface expression of about 50-70%. PMID:26967520

  19. Bloch-Siegert B1+-Mapping for Human Cardiac 31P-MRS at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, William T.; Robson, Matthew D.; Rodgers, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Phosphorus MR spectroscopy (31P-MRS) is a powerful tool for investigating tissue energetics in vivo. Cardiac 31P-MRS is typically performed using surface coils that create an inhomogeneous excitation field across the myocardium. Accurate measurements of B1+ (and hence flip angle) are necessary for quantitative analysis of 31P-MR spectra. We demonstrate a Bloch-Siegert B1+-mapping method for this purpose. Theory and Methods We compare acquisition strategies for Bloch-Siegert B1+-mapping when there are several spectral peaks. We optimize a Bloch-Siegert sensitizing (Fermi) pulse for cardiac 31P-MRS at 7 Tesla (T) and apply it in a three-dimensional (3D) chemical shift imaging sequence. We validate this in phantoms and skeletal muscle (against a dual-TR method) and present the first cardiac 31P B1+-maps at 7T. Results The Bloch-Siegert method correlates strongly (Pearson’s r = 0.90 and 0.84) and has bias <25 Hz compared with a multi-TR method in phantoms and dual-TR method in muscle. Cardiac 3D B1+-maps were measured in five normal volunteers. B1+ maps based on phosphocreatine and alpha-adenosine-triphosphate correlated strongly (r = 0.62), confirming that the method is T1 insensitive. Conclusion The 3D 31P Bloch-Siegert B1+-mapping is consistent with reference methods in phantoms and skeletal muscle. It is the first method appropriate for 31P B1+-mapping in the human heart at 7T. PMID:26509652

  20. Genome Sequence of Leucobacter sp. 4J7B1, a Plant-Osmoprotectant Soil Microorganism

    PubMed Central

    Vílchez, J. I.; García-Fontana, C.; Calvo, C.; González-López, J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first genome sequence for Leucobacter sp. 4J7B1, a newly described desiccation-tolerant strain. The complete genome sequence of Leucobacter sp. 4J7B1 has been sequenced and is estimated to be around 3.5 Mb in size, with an average GC content of 62.18%. We predict 2,953 protein-coding sequences. PMID:25999566

  1. Impaired cortical neurogenesis in plexin-B1 and -B2 double deletion mutant.

    PubMed

    Daviaud, Nicolas; Chen, Karen; Huang, Yong; Friedel, Roland H; Zou, Hongyan

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian cortical expansion is tightly controlled by fine-tuning of proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitors in a region-specific manner. How extrinsic cues interface with cell-intrinsic programs to balance proliferative versus neurogenic decisions remains an unsolved question. We examined the function of Semaphorin receptors Plexin-B1 and -B2 in corticogenesis by generating double mutants, whereby Plexin-B2 was conditionally ablated in the developing brain in a Plexin-B1 null mutant background. Absence of both Plexin-Bs resulted in cortical thinning, particularly in the caudomedial cortex. Plexin-B1/B2 double, but not single, mutants exhibited a reduced neural progenitor pool, attributable to decreased proliferation and an altered division mode favoring cell cycle exit. This resulted in deficient production of neurons throughout the neurogenic period, proportionally affecting all cortical laminae. Consistent with the in vivo data, cultured neural progenitors lacking both Plexin-B1 and -B2 displayed decreased proliferative capacity and increased spontaneous differentiation. Our study therefore defines a novel function of Plexin-B1 and -B2 in transmitting extrinsic signals to maintain proliferative and undifferentiated states of neural progenitors. As single mutants displayed no apparent cortical defects, we conclude that Plexin-B1 and -B2 play redundant or compensatory roles during forebrain development to ensure proper neuronal production and neocortical expansion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 882-899, 2016.

  2. Aflatoxicol and aflatoxins B1 and M1 in the tissues of pigs receiving aflatoxin.

    PubMed

    Trucksess, M W; Stoloff, L; Brumley, W C; Wilson, D M; Hale, O M; Sangster, L T; Miller, D M

    1982-07-01

    Aflatoxicol (AFL) and aflatoxins B1 and M1 were found in tissues (kidney, liver, and muscle) of feeder pigs given an estimated LD50 oral dose of B1 (1.0 mg/kg body weight) provided as a rice culture of Aspergillus flavus and of market-weight pigs fed a naturally contaminated feed, containing aflatoxin B1 at a level of 400 ng/g from corn, for 14 days. The residues in all tissues decreased with time after treatment in both groups, with no detectable residues (approximate detection limits, ng/g, B1 0.03, M1 0.05, AFL 0.01) in pig tissues from the feeding experiment 24 h after withdrawal of aflatoxin-contaminated feed. B1 and M1, when found in the feeding experiment, were at about the same levels in all tissues except the kidney, in which M1 was the dominant aflatoxin. The level of AFL, when detected, was about 10% of the B1 level.

  3. SH2B1beta adaptor is a key enhancer of RET tyrosine kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Donatello, S; Fiorino, A; Degl'Innocenti, D; Alberti, L; Miranda, C; Gorla, L; Bongarzone, I; Rizzetti, M G; Pierotti, M A; Borrello, M G

    2007-10-01

    The RET gene encodes two main isoforms of a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) implicated in various human diseases. Activating germ-line point mutations are responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2-associated medullary thyroid carcinomas, inactivating germ-line mutations for Hirschsprung's disease, while somatic rearrangements (RET/PTCs) are specific to papillary thyroid carcinomas. SH2B1beta, a member of the SH2B adaptors family, and binding partner for several RTKs, has been recently described to interact with proto-RET. Here, we show that both RET isoforms and its oncogenic derivatives bind to SH2B1beta through the SRC homology 2 (SH2) domain and a kinase activity-dependent mechanism. As a result, RET phosphorylates SH2B1beta, which in turn enhances its autophosphorylation, kinase activity, and downstream signaling. RET tyrosine residues 905 and 981 are important determinants for functional binding of the adaptor, as removal of both autophosphorylation sites displaces its recruitment. Binding of SH2B1beta appears to protect RET from dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatases, and might represent a likely mechanism contributing to its upregulation. Thus, overexpression of SH2B1beta, by enhancing phosphorylation/activation of RET transducers, potentiates the cellular differentiation and the neoplastic transformation thereby induced, and counteracts the action of RET inhibitors. Overall, our results identify SH2B1beta as a key enhancer of RET physiologic and pathologic activities.

  4. Boric acid: a potential chemoprotective agent against aflatoxin b1 toxicity in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Geyikoglu, Fatime

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 is the most potent pulmonary and hepatic carcinogen. Since the eradication of Aflatoxin B1 contamination in agricultural products has been difficult, the use of natural or synthetic free radical scavengers could be a potential chemopreventive strategy. Boric acid is the major component of industry and its antioxidant role has recently been reported. The present study assessed, for the first time, the effectiveness of boric acid following exposure to Aflatoxin B1 on human whole blood cultures. The biochemical characterizations of glutathione and some enzymes have been carried out in erythrocytes. Alterations in malondialdehyde level were determined as an index of oxidative stress. The sister-chromatid exchange and micronucleus tests were performed to assess DNA damages in lymphocytes. Aflatoxin B1 treatment significantly reduced the activities of antioxidants by increasing malondialdehyde level (30.53 and 51.43%) of blood, whereas, the boric acid led to an increased resistance of DNA to oxidative damage induced by Aflatoxin B1 in comparison with control values (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the support of boric acid was especially useful in Aflatoxin-toxicated blood. Thus the risk on tissue targeting of Aflatoxin B1 could be reduced ensuring early recovery from its toxicity. PMID:20431944

  5. Structural Insights into Interaction between Mammalian Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B1 and Thioredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Dobrovolska, Olena; Rychkov, Georgy; Shumilina, Elena; Nerinovski, Kirill; Schmidt, Alexander; Shabalin, Konstantin; Yakimov, Alexander; Dikiy, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of the cellular redox balance has vital importance for correcting organism functioning. Methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) are among the key members of the cellular antioxidant defence system. To work properly, methionine sulfoxide reductases need to be reduced by their biological partner, thioredoxin (Trx). This process, according to the available kinetic data, represents the slowest step in the Msrs catalytic cycle. In the present paper, we investigated structural aspects of the intermolecular complex formation between mammalian MsrB1 and Trx. NMR spectroscopy and biocomputing were the two mostly used through the research approaches. The formation of NMR detectable MsrB1/Trx complex was monitored and studied in attempt to understand MsrB1 reduction mechanism. Using NMR data, molecular mechanics, protein docking, and molecular dynamics simulations, it was found that intermediate MsrB1/Trx complex is stabilized by interprotein β-layer. The complex formation accompanied by distortion of disulfide bond within MsrB1 facilitates the reduction of oxidized MsrB1 as it is evidenced by the obtained data. PMID:22505815

  6. An APC/C inhibitor stabilizes cyclin B1 by prematurely terminating ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xing; King, Randall W.

    2012-01-01

    The Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC) is a ubiquitin ligase required for exit from mitosis. We previously showed that Tosyl Arginine Methyl Ester (TAME) inhibits APC-dependent proteolysis by competing with the C-terminal IR-tail of the APC activator Cdc20 for APC binding. Here we show that in the absence of APC substrates, TAME ejects Cdc20 from the APC by promoting Cdc20 auto-ubiquitination in its N-terminal region. Cyclin B1 antagonizes TAME's effect by promoting binding of free Cdc20 to the APC and suppressing Cdc20 auto-ubiquitination. Nevertheless, TAME stabilizes cyclin B1 in Xenopus extract by two mechanisms. First, it reduces the kcat of the APCCdc20/cyclin B1 complex without affecting the Km, slowing the initial ubiquitination of unmodified cyclin B1. Second, as cyclin B1 becomes ubiquitinated, it loses its ability to promote Cdc20 binding to the APC in the presence of TAME. As a result, cyclin B1 ubiquitination terminates before reaching the threshold necessary for proteolysis. PMID:22366722

  7. Cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 over-expression in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    McFadyen, M C E; Cruickshank, M E; Miller, I D; McLeod, H L; Melvin, W T; Haites, N E; Parkin, D; Murray, G I

    2001-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological malignancies world wide. Little improvement has been made in the long-term outcome of this disease, with the 5-year survival of patients only 30%. This poor prognosis is due to the late presentation of the disease and to the unpredictable response of ovarian cancer to chemotherapy. The cytochrome P450 enzymes are a superfamily of haemoproteins, known to be involved in the metabolic activation and/or detoxification of a number of anti-cancer drugs. CYP1B1 is a tumour-related form of cytochrome P450 which is over expressed in a wide variety of primary tumours of different histological type. The presence of CYP1B1 may be of importance in the modulation of these tumours to anti-cancer drugs. We have conducted a comprehensive immunohistochemical investigation, into the presence of cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer. The key findings of this study are the increased expression of CYP1B1 in the majority of ovarian cancers investigated (92%), with a strong correlation demonstrated between CYP1B1 expression in both primary and metastatic ovarian cancer (P= 0.005 Spearman's rank correlation test). In contrast no detectable CYP1B1 was found in normal ovary. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11461084

  8. Evolutionary implication of B-1 lineage cells from innate to adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lv-yun; Shao, Tong; Nie, Li; Zhu, Ling-yun; Xiang, Li-xin; Shao, Jian-zhong

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm that B cells mainly play a central role in adaptive immunity may have to be reevaluated because B-1 lineage cells have been found to exhibit innate-like functions, such as phagocytic and bactericidal activities. Therefore, the evolutionary connection of B-1 lineage cells between innate and adaptive immunities have received much attention. In this review, we summarized various innate-like characteristics of B-1 lineage cells, such as natural antibody production, antigen-presenting function in primary adaptive immunity, and T cell-independent immune responses. These characteristics seem highly conserved between fish B cells and mammalian B-1 cells during vertebrate evolution. We proposed an evolutionary outline of B cells by comparing biological features, including morphology, phenotype, ontogeny, and functional activity between B-1 lineage cells and macrophages or B-2 cells. The B-1 lineage may be a transitional cell type between phagocytic cells (e.g., macrophages) and B-2 cells that functionally connects innate and adaptive immunities. Our discussion would contribute to the understanding on the origination of B cells specialized in adaptive immunity from innate immunity. The results might provide further insight into the evolution of the immune system as a whole.

  9. Toxicity of aflatoxin B1 towards the vitamin D receptor (VDR).

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Paola; Santini, Antonello; Fattore, Luigi; Novellino, Ettore; Ritieni, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    This research describes an unexpected toxicity of the aflatoxin B1 towards the vitamin D receptors. Rickets is a childhood disease, and calcium deficiency is the aetiological cause in Africa, being primarily associated with nutritional problems; in this research the contribution of aflatoxin B1 exposure during the early months of life is an interesting factor to deepen in order to prevent liver damages or the development of rickets. The results show that the expression of vitamin D receptor in osteosarcoma cell line SAOS-2 is significantly down-modulated by exposure to aflatoxin B1. This seems to suggest that Aflatoxin B1, toxic towards the vitamin D receptor, interferes with the actions of the vitamin D on calcium binding gene expression in the kidney and intestine. Experimental data indicate a 58% and 86% decrease if the cells are exposed to 5 ng/mL and 50 ng/mL of aflatoxin B1, respectively. These results seem to indicate that natural occurrence of the aflatoxin B1 and allelic variant of vitamin D receptor on (F allele) increase the risk of developing rickets of African children.

  10. Characterization and expression of a maternal axolotl cyclin B1 during oogenesis and early development.

    PubMed

    Pelczar, Hélène; Caulet, Stéphane; Thibier, Catherine; Aubet, Geneviève; Poulhe, Robert; Vallianou, Ioanna; Yamashita, Masakane; Andéol, Yannick

    2007-06-01

    The M phase promoting factor (MPF) is a dimer composed of a catalytic Cdk1 subunit and a Cyclin B regulatory subunit. We have characterized a cDNA containing the entire coding sequence of an axolotl Cyclin B1 protein that is able to promote MPF activity when added to a fraction from prophase I oocytes that contains monomeric Cdk1. The axolotl cyclin B1 gene is expressed as a maternal mRNA in oocytes and early embryos. Its poly(A) tail length increases in metaphase II oocytes and then decreases regularly during the first embryonic cell cycles. Endogenous Cyclin B1 protein is first expressed during oocyte meiotic maturation. Its level oscillates after fertilization and is coordinated to the phosphorylation level of tyrosine 15 residue of Cdk1 (pTyr15), with both maxima preceding each cell division. As expected, when translated into microinjected oocytes, axolotl Cyclin B1 induces the resumption of meiosis. In electrically activated unfertilized eggs (UFE), Cyclin B1 and pTyr15 cyclic accumulations are observed with kinetics different from those of the early embryonic cycles. The axolotl embryo and UFE provide interesting in vivo comparative models for studying events controlling Cyclin B1 regulation during development. PMID:17428262

  11. Aryl morpholino triazenes inhibit cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel; Perez, Pedro; Jackson, William; Chin, Taylor; Galbreath, Michael; Fronczek, Frank R; Isovitsch, Ralph; Iimoto, Devin S

    2016-07-15

    Many cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1 (CYP1A1 and CYP1B1) inhibitors, such as resveratrol, have planar, hydrophobic, aromatic rings in their structure and exhibit anti-cancer activity. Aryl morpholino triazenes have similar structural features and in addition contain a triazene unit consisting of three consecutive, conjugated nitrogen atoms. Several aryl morpholino triazenes, including 4-[(E)-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)diazenyl]-morpholine (2), were prepared from a reaction involving morpholine and a diazonium ion produced from different aniline derivatives, such as 3,4,5-trimethoxyaniline. The aryl morpholino triazenes were then screened at 100μM for their ability to inhibit CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 using ethoxyresorufin as the substrate. Triazenes that inhibited the enzymes to less than 80% of the uninhibited enzyme activity were assayed to determine their IC50 value. Compound 2 was the only triazene to inhibit both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 to the same degree as resveratrol with IC50 values of 10μM and 18μM, respectively. Compounds 3 and 6 selectively inhibited CYP1B1 over CYP1A1 with IC values of 2μM and 7μM, respectively. Thus, aryl morpholino triazenes are a new class of compounds that can inhibit CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 and potentially prevent cancer. PMID:27265259

  12. Total asymmetric synthesis of (-)-conduramine B-1 and of its enantiomer. N-Benzyl derivatives of conduramine B-1 are beta-glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Łysek, Robert; Schütz, Catherine; Vogel, Pierre

    2005-06-15

    The 'naked sugars' (+)- and (-)-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-en-2-one have been converted into (-)-conduramine B-1 ((-)-3) and its enantiomer (+)-3, respectively. They have been condensed with a variety of aldehydes in the presence of NaBH(OAc)(3). The N-substituted derivatives 4 and ent-4 so-obtained have been tested against two alpha-glucosidases, two amyloglucosidases, two beta-glucosidases and one beta-xylosidase for their inhibitory activities. Although (-)-3 and (+)-3 do not inhibit any of these enzymes at 1mM concentration, N-benzylated derivatives of (-)-conduramine B-1 are selective and competitive inhibitors of beta-glucosidases with K(i) in low micromolecular range.

  13. A full CI treatment of the 1A1, 1B1, and 3B1 states of SiH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1987-01-01

    Full CI calculations are presented for the 1A1, 3B1, and 1B1 states of SiH2 at their respective equilibrium geometries and at geometries with the SiH bonds stretched. These results are compared with those obtained from single-reference and multireference CI calculations. The computed Te values agree well with the full CI results, provided that the effects of higher-than-double excitations are accounted for either by the Davidson correction or by a multireference approach. When the SiH bonds are stretched, the single-reference methods are not sufficiently flexible, and only CASSCF/MRCI achieves chemical accuracy (i.e., agrees with the full CI to 1 kcal/mol). Overall, the accuracy of the various approximate methods is very similar to that found for H2O, NH2, and CH2.

  14. [OATP1B1 in drug-drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine Danshensu and rosuvastatin].

    PubMed

    Wen, Jin-hua; Wei, Xiao-hua; Cheng, Xiao-hua; Zuo, Rong; Peng, Hong-wei; Lü, Yan-ni; Zhou, Jian; Zheng, Xue-lian; Cai, Jun; Xiong, Yu-qing; Cao, Li

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to explore the drug-drug interactions mechanisms mediated by OATP1B1 between traditional Chinese medicine Danshensu and rosuvastatin. First, the changes of rosuvastatin pharmacokinetics were investigated in presence of Danshensu in rats. Then, the primary rat hepatocytes model was established to explore the effects of Danshensu on the uptake of rosuvastatin by hepatocytes. Finally, HEK293T cells with overexpression of OATP1B1*a and OATP1B1*5 were established using a lentiviral delivery system to explore the effects of Danshensu on the uptake of rosuvastatin. Rosuvastatin pharmacokinetic parameters of C(max0, AUCO(0-t), AUC(0-∞) were increased about 123%, 194% and 195%, by Danshensu in rats, while the CL z/F value was decreased by 60%. Uptake of rosuvastatin in the primary rat hepatocytes was decreased by 3.13%, 41.15% and 74.62%, respectively in the presence of 20, 40 and 80 μmol x L(-1) Danshensu. The IC50 parameters was (53.04 ± 2.43) μmol x L(-1). The inhibitory effect of Danshensu on OATP1B1 mediated transport of rosuvastatin was related to the OATP1B1 gene type. In OATP1B1*5-HEK293T mutant cells, transport of rosuvastatin were reduced by (39.11 ± 4.94)% and (63.61 ± 3.94)%, respectively, by Danshensu at 1 and 10 μmol x L(-1). While transport of rosuvastatin was reduced by (8.22 ± 2.40)% and (11.56 ± 3.04)% and in OATP1B1*1a cells, respectively. Danshensu significantly altered the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in rats, which was related to competitive inhibition of transport by OATPJBI. Danshensu exhibited a significant activity in the inhibition of rosuvastatin transport by OATP1B1*5-HEK293T, but not by OATP1B1*1a, suggesting a dependence on OATP1B1 sequence. PMID:27405165

  15. Analysis of CYP1B1 in pediatric and adult glaucoma and other ocular phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Linda M.; Tyler, Rebecca C.; Weh, Eric; Hendee, Kathryn E.; Kariminejad, Ariana; Abdul-Rahman, Omar; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Manning, Melanie A.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; Costakos, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The CYP1B1 gene encodes an enzyme that is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. Mutations in CYP1B1 have been mainly reported in recessive pediatric ocular phenotypes, such as primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) and congenital glaucoma with anterior segment dysgenesis (CG with ASD), with some likely pathogenic variants also identified in families affected with adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Methods We examined CYP1B1 in 158 pediatric patients affected with PCG (eight), CG with ASD (22), CG with other developmental ocular disorders (11), juvenile glaucoma with or without additional ocular anomalies (26), and ASD or other developmental ocular conditions without glaucoma (91); in addition, a large cohort of adult patients with POAG (193) and POAG-negative controls (288) was examined. Results Recessive pathogenic variants in CYP1B1 were identified in two PCG pedigrees, three cases with CG and ASD, and two families with CG and other ocular defects, such as sclerocornea in one patient and microphthalmia in another individual; neither sclerocornea nor microphthalmia has been previously associated with CYP1B1. Most of the identified causative mutations are new occurrences of previously reported pathogenic alleles with two novel variants identified: a c.1325delC, p.(Pro442Glnfs*15) frameshift allele in a family with PCG and a c.157G>A, p.(Gly53Ser) variant identified in a proband with CG, Peters anomaly, and microphthalmia. Analysis of the family history in the CYP1B1-positive families revealed POAG in confirmed or presumed heterozygous relatives in one family with PCG and two families with ASD/CG; POAG was associated with the c.1064_1076del, p.(Arg355Hisfs*69) allele in two of these pedigrees. Screening of an unrelated POAG cohort identified the same c.1064_1076del heterozygous allele in one individual with sporadic POAG but not in age- and ethnicity-matched POAG-negative individuals. Overall, there was no significant enrichment for mutant

  16. The Effects of Vitamin B1 on Ameliorating the Premenstrual Syndrome Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahifard, Sareh; Koshkaki, Afifeh Rahmanian; Moazamiyanfar, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: The premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a series of physical, mental, and behavioral symptoms with various severities, and disturbs social and personal relationships. The syndrome appears during luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and is a common disorder of reproductive age. Different treatments have been introduced for the syndrome due to its unknown complicated causes. Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) may reduce symptoms of the syndrome through affecting the performance of coenzymes in the metabolism of carbohydrates and main branch of amino acid that plays an important role in appearance of physical and mental symptoms of the PMS. Vitamin B1 is the first water-soluble discovered vitamin. As it is effective in neural activity and muscle tonus in different body activities, including hematopoiesis, metabolism of carbohydrates, activities of the central nervous system and neuromuscular system, etc., it can be effective in this dysmenorrhea that is a disorder resulting from uterine muscular contraction. There are no enough studies and research on the effect of vitamin B1 on the symptoms of PMS, therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effect of vitamin B1 on the symptoms of PMS in students residing at dormitories of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Methods: In this double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 80 students with PMS residing at dormitories of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences were divided randomly into two groups, vitamin B1 and placebo. The severity of the symptoms of PMS in two cycles, before the intervention and during the intervention, was recorded by the students. The data were collected using an information collection form, PMS provisional diagnosis form, daily status record form, Beck Depression Inventory. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There was no significant difference among the studied variables in terms of confounding variables. The comparison of

  17. Collisional Removal of O2(b1Σ ^+g, v = 1) by Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogerakis, K. S.; Pejaković, D. A.; Copeland, R. A.; Slanger, T. G.

    2004-12-01

    In the thermosphere, energy transfer between excited O atoms and ground-state molecular oxygen produces O2 in the first two vibrational levels of the b1Σ ^+g state: O(1D) + O2 -> O(3P) + O2(b1Σ ^+g, v = 0, 1). Subsequent radiative decay of O2(b1Σ ^+g, v = 0, 1) to the ground state O2(X3Σ ^-g) results in the Atmospheric Band emissions. Atmospheric observations suggest that above ˜120 km O(3P) plays an important role in removing O2(b1Σ ^+g, v = 1). Therefore, knowledge of the rate coefficient for collisional removal of O2(b1Σ ^+g<, v = 1) by O(3P) is important for detailed understanding of the Atmospheric Band emissions. Measurements are reported of the room-temperature rate coefficient for removal of O2(b1Σ ^+g, v = 1) by O(3P). A commercial F2 laser with pulsed energy output of up to 50 mJ at 157 nm is used to photodissociate a large fraction of molecular oxygen in a O2/N2 mixture. Photodissociation of an O2 molecule produces a ground-state oxygen atom O(3P) and an excited oxygen atom O(1D), and O(1D) rapidly transfers energy to the remaining O2 to produce O2(b1Σ ^+g, v = 0, 1). The O2(b1Σ ^+g, v = 1) population is monitored by observing emission in the O2 (b-X) 1--1 band at 771 nm. To extract the O2(b1Σ ^+g, v = 1) + O(3P) rate coefficient, knowledge of the O(3P) partial pressure or, equivalently, the fraction of dissociated O2, is necessary. Based on the F2 laser fluence, the signal dependence on the fraction of dissociation, and computer modeling, the signals measured in our experiments correspond to about 50% dissociation. Our measurements yield a preliminary value of the rate coefficient for O2(b1Σ ^+g, v = 1) removal by O(3P) of 6 × 10-12 cm3s-1. The results will be compared to the rate coefficients for corresponding processes in the ground and a1Δ g states of O2, and implications of the results for modeling of the upper atmosphere will be discussed. This work is supported by the NSF Aeronomy Program under grant ATM-0209229. The F2 laser was

  18. Expansion of B-1a Cells with Germline Heavy Chain Sequence in Lupus Mice

    PubMed Central

    Holodick, Nichol E.; Zeumer, Leilani; Rothstein, Thomas L.; Morel, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (B6.TC) lupus-prone mice carrying the NZB allele of Cdkn2c, encoding for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P18INK4, accumulate B-1a cells due to a higher rate of proliferative self-renewal. However, it is unclear whether this affects primarily early-appearing B-1a cells of fetal origin or later-appearing B-1a cells that emerge from bone marrow. B-1a cells are the major source of natural autoantibodies, and it has been shown that their protective nature is associated with a germline-like sequence, which is characterized by few N-nucleotide insertions and a repertoire skewed toward rearrangements predominated during fetal life, VH11 and VH12. To determine the nature of B-1a cells expanded in B6.TC mice, we amplified immunoglobulin genes by PCR from single cells in mice. Sequencing showed a significantly higher proportion of B-1a cell antibodies that display fewer N-additions in B6.TC mice than in B6 control mice. Following this lower number of N-insertions within the CDR-H3 region, the B6.TC B-1a cells display shorter CDR-H3 length than B6 B-1a cells. The absence of N-additions is a surrogate for fetal origin, as TdT expression starts after birth in mice. Therefore, our results suggest that the B-1a cell population is not only expanded in autoimmune B6.TC mice but also qualitatively different with the majority of cells from fetal origin. Accordingly, our sequencing results also demonstrated the overuse of VH11 and VH12 in autoimmune B6.TC mice as compared to B6 controls. These results suggest that the development of lupus autoantibodies in these mice is coupled with skewing of the B-1a cell repertoire and possible retention of protective natural antibodies. PMID:27047495

  19. Inhibition by the bioflavonoid ternatin of aflatoxin B1-induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Souza, M F; Tomé, A R; Rao, V S

    1999-02-01

    Aflatoxin B1, a metabolite of Aspergillus flavus is a potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic mycotoxin. Lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage are the principal manifestations of aflatoxin B1-induced toxicity which could be mitigated by antioxidants. Many plant constituents, e.g. flavonoids, lignans and spice principles (capsaicin, curcumin, eugenol, etc.) have been reported to prevent liver damage associated with lipid peroxidation. In this study we investigated ternatin, a tetramethoxyflavone isolated from Egletes viscosa, for possible protection against liver injury induced by aflatoxin B1 in rats. Seventy two hours after a single intraperitoneal dose of aflatoxin B1 (1 mg kg(-1)), the concentration of malondialdehyde, the product of lipid peroxidation in liver homogenates, and serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were significantly elevated (P<0.001). Subcutaneous ternatin (25 mg kg(-1)) pretreatment greatly reduced aflatoxin B1-induced increases in the levels of serum enzymes (ALT from 5071+/-763 to 293+/-66 international units L(-1) and AST from 4241+/-471 to 449+/-108 international units L(-1)) and elevated malondialdehyde levels (from 11.37+/-1.27 to 0.79+/-0.22 nmol (mg wet tissue)(-1)) in a manner similar to oral vitamin E (300 mg kg(-1)), a standard antioxidant. Further, histological changes induced by aflatoxin B1 such as hepatocellular necrosis and bile-duct proliferation were markedly inhibited in animals pretreated with ternatin or vitamin E. These data provide evidence that ternatin inhibits lipid peroxidation and affords protection against liver damage induced by aflatoxin B1. Ternatin might, therefore, be a suitable candidate for the chemoprevention of aflatoxicosis associated liver cancer.

  20. The Role of Heat Shock Protein 90B1 in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Mo, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yongxian; Peng, Xiuhong; Luo, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogenetic disorder in women that is characterized by arrested follicular growth and anovulatory infertility. The altered protein expression levels in the ovarian tissues reflect the molecular defects in folliculogenesis. To identify aberrant protein expression in PCOS, we analyzed protein expression profiles in the ovarian tissues of patients with PCOS. We identified a total of 18 protein spots that were differentially expressed in PCOS compared with healthy ovarian samples. A total of 13 proteins were upregulated and 5 proteins were downregulated. The expression levels of heat shock protein 90B1 (HSP90B1) and calcium signaling activator calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were increased by at least two-fold. The expression levels of HSP90B1 and CALM1 were positively associated with ovarian cell survival and negatively associated with caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Knock-down of HSP90B1 with siRNA attenuated ovarian cell survival and increased apoptosis. In contrast, ovarian cell survival was improved and cell apoptosis was decreased in cells over-expressing HSP90B1. These results demonstrated the pivotal role of HSP90B1 in the proliferation and survival of ovarian cells, suggesting a critical role for HSP90B1 in the pathogenesis of PCOS. We also observed a downregulation of anti-inflammatory activity-related annexin A6 (ANXA6) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) compared with the normal controls, which could affect cell division and folliculogenesis in PCOS. This is the first study to identify novel altered gene expression in the ovarian tissues of patients with PCOS. These findings may have significant implications for future diagnostic and treatment strategies for PCOS using molecular interventions. PMID:27046189

  1. Somatic overgrowth associated with homozygous mutations in both MAN1B1 and SEC23A

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Swati; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Wang, Tracy; Dempsey Nunez, Laura; Rosenblatt, David S.; Gibson, William T.; Gilfix, Brian; Bergeron, John J. M.; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A.

    2016-01-01

    Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous mutations in two unlinked genes, SEC23A c.1200G>C (p.M400I) and MAN1B1 c.1000C>T (p.R334C), associated with congenital birth defects in two patients from a consanguineous family. Patients presented with carbohydrate-deficient transferrin, tall stature, obesity, macrocephaly, and maloccluded teeth. The parents were healthy heterozygous carriers for both mutations and an unaffected sibling with tall stature carried the heterozygous mutation in SEC23A only. Mutations in SEC23A are responsible for craniolenticosultura dysplasia (CLSD). CLSD patients are short, have late-closing fontanels, and have reduced procollagen (pro-COL1A1) secretion because of abnormal pro-COL1A1 retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mutation we identified in MAN1B1 was previously associated with reduced MAN1B1 protein and congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). CDG patients are also short, are obese, and have abnormal glycan remodeling. Molecular analysis of fibroblasts from the family revealed normal levels of SEC23A in all cells and reduced levels of MAN1B1 in cells with heterozygous or homozygous mutations in SEC23A and MAN1B1. Secretion of pro-COL1A1 was increased in fibroblasts from the siblings and patients, and pro-COL1A1 was retained in Golgi of heterozygous and homozygous mutant cells, although intracellular pro-COL1A1 was increased in patient fibroblasts only. We postulate that increased pro-COL1A1 secretion is responsible for tall stature in these patients and an unaffected sibling, and not previously discovered in patients with mutations in either SEC23A or MAN1B1. The patients in this study share biochemical and cellular characteristics consistent with mutations in MAN1B1 and SEC23A, indicating a digenic disease. PMID:27148587

  2. Somatic overgrowth associated with homozygous mutations in both MAN1B1 and SEC23A.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Swati; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Wang, Tracy; Dempsey Nunez, Laura; Rosenblatt, David S; Gibson, William T; Gilfix, Brian; Bergeron, John J M; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A

    2016-05-01

    Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified homozygous mutations in two unlinked genes, SEC23A c.1200G>C (p.M400I) and MAN1B1 c.1000C>T (p.R334C), associated with congenital birth defects in two patients from a consanguineous family. Patients presented with carbohydrate-deficient transferrin, tall stature, obesity, macrocephaly, and maloccluded teeth. The parents were healthy heterozygous carriers for both mutations and an unaffected sibling with tall stature carried the heterozygous mutation in SEC23A only. Mutations in SEC23A are responsible for craniolenticosultura dysplasia (CLSD). CLSD patients are short, have late-closing fontanels, and have reduced procollagen (pro-COL1A1) secretion because of abnormal pro-COL1A1 retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mutation we identified in MAN1B1 was previously associated with reduced MAN1B1 protein and congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). CDG patients are also short, are obese, and have abnormal glycan remodeling. Molecular analysis of fibroblasts from the family revealed normal levels of SEC23A in all cells and reduced levels of MAN1B1 in cells with heterozygous or homozygous mutations in SEC23A and MAN1B1. Secretion of pro-COL1A1 was increased in fibroblasts from the siblings and patients, and pro-COL1A1 was retained in Golgi of heterozygous and homozygous mutant cells, although intracellular pro-COL1A1 was increased in patient fibroblasts only. We postulate that increased pro-COL1A1 secretion is responsible for tall stature in these patients and an unaffected sibling, and not previously discovered in patients with mutations in either SEC23A or MAN1B1. The patients in this study share biochemical and cellular characteristics consistent with mutations in MAN1B1 and SEC23A, indicating a digenic disease. PMID:27148587

  3. Lipid polymorphism induced by surfactant peptide SP-B(1-25).

    PubMed

    Farver, R Suzanne; Mills, Frank D; Antharam, Vijay C; Chebukati, Janetricks N; Fanucci, Gail E; Long, Joanna R

    2010-09-22

    Pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein for lowering surface tension in the alveoli. SP-B(1-25), a peptide comprised of the N-terminal 25 amino-acid residues of SP-B, is known to retain much of the biological activity of SP-B. Circular dichroism has shown that when SP-B(1-25) interacts with negatively charged lipid vesicles, it contains significant helical structure for the lipid compositions and peptide/lipid ratios studied here. The effect of SP-B(1-25) on lipid organization and polymorphisms was investigated via DSC, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. At 1-3 mol% peptide and physiologic temperature, SP-B(1-25) partitions at the interface of negatively charged PC/PG lipid bilayers. In lipid mixtures containing 1-5 mol% peptide, the structure of SP-B(1-25) remains constant, but (2)H and (31)P NMR spectra show the presence of an isotropic lipid phase in exchange with the lamellar phase below the T(m) of the lipids. This behavior is observed for both DPPC/POPG and POPC/POPG lipid mixtures as well as for both the PC and PG components of the mixtures. For 1-3 mol% SP-B(1-25), a return to a single lamellar phase above the lipid mixture T(m) is observed, but for 5 mol% SP-B(1-25) a significant isotropic component is observed at physiologic temperatures for DPPC and exchange broadening is observed in (2)H and (31)P NMR spectra of the other lipid components in the two mixtures. DLS and TEM rule out the formation of micellar structures and suggest that SP-B(1-25) promotes the formation of a fluid isotropic phase. The ability of SP-B(1-25) to fuse lipid lamellae via this mechanism, particularly those enriched in DPPC, suggests a specific role for the highly conserved N-terminus of SP-B in the packing of lipid lamellae into surfactant lamellar bodies or in stabilizing multilayer structures at the air-liquid interface. Importantly, this behavior has not been seen for the other SP-B fragments of

  4. Prenatal exposure to aflatoxin B1: developmental, behavioral, and reproductive alterations in male rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriya, Ch.; Reddy, P. Sreenivasula

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) inhibits androgen biosynthesis as a result of its ability to form a high-affinity complex with the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The results of the present study demonstrate the postnatal effects of in utero exposure to AfB1 in the rat. Pregnant Wistar rats were given 10, 20, or 50 μg AfB1/kg body weight daily from gestation day (GD) 12 to GD 19. At parturition, newborns were observed for clinical signs and survival. All animals were born alive and initially appeared to be active. Male pups from control and AfB1-exposed animals were weaned and maintained up to postnatal day (PD) 100. Litter size, birth weight, sex ratio, survival rate, and crown-rump length of the pups were significantly decreased in AfB1-exposed rats when compared to controls. Elapsed time (days) for testes to descend into the scrotal sac was significantly delayed in experimental pups when compared to control pups. Behavioral observations such as cliff avoidance, negative geotaxis, surface rightening activity, ascending wire mesh, open field behavior, and exploratory and locomotory activities were significantly impaired in experimental pups. Body weights and the indices of testis, cauda epididymis, prostate, seminal vesicles, and liver were significantly reduced on PD 100 in male rats exposed to AfB1 during embryonic development when compared with controls. Significant reduction in the testicular daily sperm production, epididymal sperm count, and number of viable, motile, and hypo-osmotic tail coiled sperm was observed in experimental rats. The levels of serum testosterone and activity levels of testicular hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner with a significant increase in the serum follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in experimental rats. Deterioration in the testicular and cauda epididymal architecture was observed in experimental rats. The results of fertility

  5. Cytochrome P450 interactions in human cancers: new aspects considering CYP1B1.

    PubMed

    Roos, Peter H; Bolt, Hermann M

    2005-08-01

    Molecular epidemiological studies are now a powerful tool to determine differential genetic susceptibilities to cancer-causing agents, and to obtain information on potential mechanisms. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) allelic variants are considered biomarkers of susceptibility to cancer. Such variants have an influence on the bioactivation and thereby on the potency of chemical carcinogens. This is very much straight forward for tobacco smoke-related human cancers. A new aspect is the implication of CYP1B1 in tobacco smoke-related cancers at several organ sites. On this basis, the present review is focused on lung, breast, urinary bladder and head and neck cancer. The CYP profile of the human lung includes CYP1A1, -1B1, -2A6, -2A13, -2B6, -2C18, -2E1, -2F1, -3A5 and -4B1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrosamines, as active components of tobacco smoke, appear as primary chemical factors for lung malignancies. For human mammary cancer, the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been shown to be associated with an increase of breast cancer risk, and there seems to be a link between risks caused by HRT use and modifying polymorphisms of drug/xenobiotic enzymes. Specifically, an association of the CYP1B1*3/*3 genotype with increased breast cancer risks has been postulated. Cigarette smoking is a major cause of human urinary bladder cancer. Arylamines, PAHs and nitrosamines are locally activated within the urothelium. Important CYPs in the bladder epithelium of experimental animals and man are CYP1B1 and -4B1. Alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking are known as the major causes of head and neck cancers. Recently, it appears that a polymorphic variant CYP1B1*3/*3 relates significantly to the individual susceptibility of smokers to head and neck cancer, supporting the view that PAH are metabolically activated through CYP1B1. It appears that CYP1B1 plays a key role for the activation of carcinogens at several organ targets, with a likelihood of complex gene

  6. B-1 B cell IgM antibody initiates T cell elicitation of contact sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Askenase, P W; Tsuji, R F

    2000-01-01

    Although B-1 B cells have received considerable attention, their actual role in the normal functioning of the immune system is unclear. The hypothesized role of B-1 cell IgM in natural protective immunity is just being established. We have uncovered a separate and novel role for B-1 cell IgM in initiating the elicitation of acquired T cell-dependent contact sensitivity (CS), the prototype of in vivo T cell immunity, early after immunization (within 4 days). The recent recognition of a similarly unanticipated role of B cells in a variety of T cell responses, may indicate that B-1 cell IgM has a broader role in immunity than thought previously. We showed that 24 hr CS responses, and rises in local IFN-gamma levels at 24 hrs later after antigen (Ag) challenge the ears, were absent in pan B cell and antibody deficient mice. The mechanism of B cell involvement in CS-initiation is via local C5a generation early (1-2 hrs) after antigen (Ag) challenge of the ears, in 4 day contact sensitized mice. C5a activates local mast cells to release serotonin (5-HT) and TNF alpha to induce endothelial ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, leading to T cell recruitment. We hypothesized that C5a was generated via complement activation due to antibodies forming local AgAb complexes, and that B-1 cell IgM was involved because isotype switching of B-2 cells to produce C-activating IgG isotypes, could not occur as early as day 4. Indeed, B-1 cell deficient CBA/N-xid mice lacked C5a in 2 hr ear extracts, and had impaired CS ear swelling and elaboration of IFN-gamma at 24 hrs. Importantly, adoptive transfer of purified normal peritoneal B-1 cells, or just i.v. injection of Ag-specific IgM monoclonal antibodies in sensitized xid, restored deficient early C5a and late 24 hr ear swelling. These results suggest that early after Ag challenge, specific B-1 cell IgM, produced at distant sites by prior sensitization, forms AgAb complexes that trigger elaboration of C5a, to activate mast cell release of vasoactive TNF

  7. The aflatoxin B1 isolating potential of two lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Adel; Mirnejad, Reza; Yahaghi, Emad; Behnod, Vahid; Mirhosseini, Ali; Amani, Sajad; Sattari, Sara; Darian, Ebrahim Khodaverdi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine lactic acid bacteria's capability to enhance the process of binding and isolating aflatoxin B1 and to utilize such lactic acid bacteria as a food supplement or probiotic products for preventing absorption of aflatoxin B1 in human and animal bodies. Methods In the present research, the bacteria were isolated from five different sources. For surveying the capability of the bacteria in isolating aflatoxin B1, ELISA method was implemented, and for identifying the resultant strains through 16S rRNA sequencing method, universal primers were applied. Results Among the strains which were isolated, two strains of Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus beveris exhibited the capability of absorbing and isolating aflatoxin B1 by respectively absorbing and discharging 17.4% and 34.7% of the aforementioned toxin existing in the experiment solution. Conclusions Strains of Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus beveris were isolated from human feces and local milk samples, respectively. And both strains has the ability to isolate or bind with aflatoxin B1. PMID:23998015

  8. Role of Oxidative Stress in Sclerotial Differentiation and Aflatoxin B1 Biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Vernardis, Spyros I.; Klapa, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    We show here that oxidative stress is involved in both sclerotial differentiation (SD) and aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus. Specifically, we observed that (i) oxidative stress regulates SD, as implied by its inhibition by antioxidant modulators of reactive oxygen species and thiol redox state, and that (ii) aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis and SD are comodulated by oxidative stress. However, aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis is inhibited by lower stress levels compared to SD, as shown by comparison to undifferentiated A. flavus. These same oxidative stress levels also characterize a mutant A. flavus strain, lacking the global regulatory gene veA. This mutant is unable to produce sclerotia and aflatoxin B1. (iii) Further, we show that hydrogen peroxide is the main modulator of A. flavus SD, as shown by its inhibition by both an irreversible inhibitor of catalase activity and a mimetic of superoxide dismutase activity. On the other hand, aflatoxin B1 biosynthesis is controlled by a wider array of oxidative stress factors, such as lipid hydroperoxide, superoxide, and hydroxyl and thiyl radicals. PMID:25002424

  9. Aging Converts Innate B1a Cells into Potent CD8+ T Cell Inducers.

    PubMed

    Lee-Chang, Catalina; Bodogai, Monica; Moritoh, Kanako; Chen, Xin; Wersto, Robert; Sen, Ranjan; Young, Howard A; Croft, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Biragyn, Arya

    2016-04-15

    B cell dysregulation in aging is thought to mostly occur in conventional B2 cells without affecting innate B1 cells. Elderly humans and mice also accumulate 4-1BBL(+)MHC class-I(Hi)CD86(Hi)B cells of unknown origin. In this article, we report that these cells, termed 4BL cells, are activated murine and possibly human B1a cells. The activation is mediated by aging human monocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. They induce expression and activation of 4-1BBL and IFN-γR1 on B1a cells to subsequently upregulate membrane TNF-α and CD86. As a result, activated B1a/4BL cells induce expression of granzyme B in CD8(+)T cells by targeting TNFR2 via membrane TNF-α and providing costimulation with CD86. Thus, for the first time, to our knowledge, these results indicate that aging affects the function of B1a cells. Upon aging, these cells lose their tumor-supporting activity and become inducers of potentially antitumor and autoimmune CD8(+)T cells.

  10. Fetal Lymphoid Progenitors Become Restricted to B-1 Fates Coincident with IL-7Rα Expression

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Ryuji; Shinoda, Kaori; Hayano, Yuki; Nagai, Yoshinori; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Kouro, Taku

    2016-01-01

    B-1 cells represent a sub-fraction of B lymphocytes that participate in T cell-independent antibody production and contribute to innate immunity. While the production of B-1 cells is favored during the fetal waves of lymphopoiesis, it has been unclear when and how that differentiation option is specified. To clarify this, lymphoid and hematopoietic progenitors of fetal liver (FL) and adult bone marrow (ABM) were examined for the B cell differentiation potential. Mouse common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) and more primitive KSL fraction of FL and ABM were transferred to SCID mice and donor-derived B cell subsets were analyzed 4 weeks later. CLPs were also cultured on ST2 stromal cells for 6 days prior to transplantation. While Lin- IL-7Rα+ CLPs from ABM differentiated to B-1, B-2 and marginal zone B (MZB) cells, equivalent cells from d15 FL differentiated mostly to B-1a cells. We found that fetal CLPs had less ability to colonize the bone marrow than adult CLPs. However, the fetal/adult difference was already present when progenitors were cultured in an identical condition before transplantation. More primitive KSL fraction of FL could generate the same broad spectrum of B cells typical of adults, including splenic MZB cells. In conclusion, we argue that FL and ABM-CLPs are intrinsically different regarding B-1/B-2 fates and the difference is acquired just before or coincident with the acquisition of IL-7Rα expression. PMID:27792746

  11. Herschel observations of a potential core-forming clump: Perseus B1-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavoy, S. I.; di Francesco, J.; André, Ph.; Pezzuto, S.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bontemps, S.; Bressert, E.; Chitsazzadeh, S.; Fallscheer, C.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Martin, P.; Motte, F.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Peretto, N.; Reid, M.; Schneider, N.; Testi, L.; White, G. J.; Wilson, C.

    2012-04-01

    We present continuum observations of the Perseus B1-E region from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. These Herschel data reveal a loose grouping of substructures at 160-500 μm not seen in previous submillimetre observations. We measure temperature and column density from these data and select the nine densest and coolest substructures for follow-up spectral line observations with the Green Bank Telescope. We find that the B1-E clump has a mass of ~100 M⊙ and appears to be gravitationally bound. Furthermore, of the nine substructures examined here, one substructure (B1-E2) appears to be itself bound. The substructures are typically less than a Jeans length from their nearest neighbour and thus, may interact on a timescale of ~1 Myr. We propose that B1-E may be forming a first generation of dense cores, which could provide important constraints on the initial conditions of prestellar core formation. Our results suggest that B1-E may be influenced by a strong, localized magnetic field, but further observations are still required.

  12. Cancer Activation and Polymorphisms of Human Cytochrome P450 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Young-Jin; Kim, Donghak

    2016-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s, CYPs) are major oxidative catalysts that metabolize various xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. Many carcinogens induce cancer only after metabolic activation and P450 enzymes play an important role in this phenomenon. P450 1B1 mediates bioactivation of many procarcinogenic chemicals and carcinogenic estrogen. It catalyzes the oxidation reaction of polycyclic aromatic carbons, heterocyclic and aromatic amines, and the 4-hydroxylation reaction of 17β-estradiol. Enhanced expression of P450 1B1 promotes cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. There are at least 25 polymorphic variants of P450 1B1 and some of these have been reported to be associated with eye diseases. In addition, P450 1B1 polymorphisms can greatly affect the metabolic activation of many procarcinogenic compounds. It is necessary to understand the relationship between metabolic activation of such substances and P450 1B1 polymorphisms in order to develop rational strategies for the prevention of its toxic effect on human health. PMID:27123158

  13. Cyp26b1 within the growth plate regulates bone growth in juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    Minegishi, Yoshiki; Sakai, Yasuo; Yahara, Yasuhito; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hosokawa, Ko; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2014-11-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A and plays important roles in embryonic development. CYP26 enzymes degrade RA and have specific expression patterns that produce a RA gradient, which regulates the patterning of various structures in the embryo. However, it has not been addressed whether a RA gradient also exists and functions in organs after birth. We found localized RA activities in the diaphyseal portion of the growth plate cartilage were associated with the specific expression of Cyp26b1 in the epiphyseal portion in juvenile mice. To disturb the distribution of RA, we generated mice lacking Cyp26b1 specifically in chondrocytes (Cyp26b1(Δchon) cKO). These mice showed reduced skeletal growth in the juvenile stage. Additionally, their growth plate cartilage showed decreased proliferation rates of proliferative chondrocytes, which was associated with a reduced height in the zone of proliferative chondrocytes, and closed focally by four weeks of age, while wild-type mouse growth plates never closed. Feeding the Cyp26b1 cKO mice a vitamin A-deficient diet partially reversed these abnormalities of the growth plate cartilage. These results collectively suggest that Cyp26b1 in the growth plate regulates the proliferation rates of chondrocytes and is responsible for the normal function of the growth plate and growing bones in juvenile mice, probably by limiting the RA distribution in the growth plate proliferating zone.

  14. Evidence for the eta(b)(1S) meson in radiative Upsilon(2S) decay.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-16

    We have performed a search for the eta_{b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the Upsilon(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6x10(6) Upsilon(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Egamma=609.3(-4.5)(+4.6)(stat)+/-1.9(syst) MeV, corresponding to an eta(b)(1S) mass of 9394.2(-4.9)(+4.8)(stat)+/-2.0(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for the decay Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S) is determined to be [3.9+/-1.1(stat)-0.9+1.1(syst)]x10(-4). We find the ratio of branching fractions B[Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]/B[Upsilon(3S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]=0.82+/-0.24(stat)(-0.19)(+0.20)(syst).

  15. Evidence for the ηb(1S) Meson in Radiative Υ(2S) Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-10-01

    We have performed a search for the ηb(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the Υ(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6×106 Υ(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Eγ=609.3-4.5+4.6(stat)±1.9(syst)MeV, corresponding to an ηb(1S) mass of 9394.2-4.9+4.8(stat)±2.0(syst)MeV/c2. The branching fraction for the decay Υ(2S)→γηb(1S) is determined to be [3.9±1.1(stat)-0.9+1.1(syst)]×10-4. We find the ratio of branching fractions B[Υ(2S)→γηb(1S)]/B[Υ(3S)→γηb(1S)]=0.82±0.24(stat)-0.19+0.20(syst).

  16. L1-mediated retrotransposition of murine B1 and B2 SINEs recapitulated in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Dewannieux, Marie; Heidmann, Thierry

    2005-06-01

    SINEs are short interspersed nucleotide elements with transpositional activity, present at a high copy number (up to a million) in mammalian genomes. They are 80-400 bp long, non-coding sequences which derive either from the 7SL RNA (e.g. human Alus, murine B1s) or tRNA (e.g. murine B2s) polymerase III-driven genes. We have previously demonstrated that Alus very efficiently divert the enzymatic machinery of the autonomous L1 LINE (long interspersed nucleotide element) retrotransposons to transpose at a high rate. Here we show, using an ex vivo assay for transposition, that both B1 and B2 SINEs can be mobilized by murine LINEs, with the hallmarks of a bona fide retrotransposition process, including target site duplications of varying lengths and integrations into A-rich sequences. Despite different phylogenetic origins, transposition of the tRNA-derived B2 sequences is as efficient as that of the human Alus, whereas that of B1s is 20-100-fold lower despite a similar high copy number of these elements in the mouse genome. We provide evidence, via an appropriate nucleotide substitution within the B1 sequence in a domain essential for its intracellular targeting, that the current B1 SINEs are not optimal for transposition, a feature most probably selected for the host sake in the course of evolution.

  17. Structures of the ozonolysis products and ozonolysis pathway of aflatoxin B1 in acetonitrile solution.

    PubMed

    Diao, Enjie; Shan, Changpo; Hou, Hanxue; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Minghua; Dong, Haizhou

    2012-09-12

    The ozonolysis of aflatoxin B(1) (400 μg/mL) in acetonitrile solution was conducted with an ozone concentration of 6.28 mg/L at the flow rate of 60 mL/min for different times. The results showed that ozone was an effective detoxification agent because of its powerful oxidative role. Thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectra were applied to confirm and identify the ozonolysis products of aflatoxin B(1). A total of 13 products were identified, and 6 of them were main products. The structural identification of these products provided effective information for understanding the ozonolysis pathway of aflatoxin B(1). Two ozonolysis pathways were proposed on the basis of the accurate mass and molecular formulas of these product ions. Nine ozonolysis products came from the first oxidative pathway based on the Criegee mechanism, and the other four products were produced from the second pathway based on the oxidative and electrophilic reactions of ozone. According to the toxicity mechanism of aflatoxin B(1) to animals, the toxicity of aflatoxin B(1) was significantly reduced because of the disappearance of the double bond on the terminal furan ring or the lactone moiety on the benzene ring.

  18. The capsular polysaccharide Vi from Salmonella Typhi is a B1b antigen

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Kingsley, Robert A.; Hitchcock, Jessica R.; Ross, Ewan A.; Lopez-Macias, Constantino; Lakey, Jeremy; Martin, Laura B.; Toellner, Kai-Michael; MacLennan, Calman A.; MacLennan, Ian C; Henderson, Ian R.; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination with purified capsular polysaccharide Vi antigen from Salmonella Typhi can protect against typhoid fever, although the mechanism for its efficacy is not clearly established. Here, we have characterised the B cell response to this vaccine in wild-type and T cell-deficient mice. We show that immunization with Typhim Vi rapidly induces proliferation in B1b peritoneal cells, but not in B1a cells or marginal zone (MZ) B cells. This induction of B1b proliferation is concomitant with the detection of splenic Vi-specific antibody secreting cells and protective antibody and Rag1-deficient B1b cell chimeras generated by adoptive transfer induced specific antibody after Vi immunization. Furthermore, antibody derived from peritoneal B cells is sufficient to confer protection against Salmonella that express Vi antigen. Expression of Vi by Salmonella during infection did not inhibit the development of early antibody responses to non-Vi antigens. Despite this, the protection conferred by immunization of mice with porin proteins from Salmonella, which induce antibody-mediated protection, was reduced after infection with Vi-expressing Salmonella, although protection was not totally abrogated. This work therefore suggests that in mice, B1b cells contribute to the protection induced by Vi antigen and targeting non-Vi antigens as sub-unit vaccines may offer an attractive strategy to augment current Vi-based vaccine strategies. PMID:23162127

  19. The capsular polysaccharide Vi from Salmonella typhi is a B1b antigen.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jennifer L; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Kingsley, Robert A; Hitchcock, Jessica R; Ross, Ewan A; López-Macías, Constantino; Lakey, Jeremy; Martin, Laura B; Toellner, Kai-Michael; MacLennan, Calman A; MacLennan, Ian C; Henderson, Ian R; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F

    2012-12-15

    Vaccination with purified capsular polysaccharide Vi Ag from Salmonella typhi can protect against typhoid fever, although the mechanism for its efficacy is not clearly established. In this study, we have characterized the B cell response to this vaccine in wild-type and T cell-deficient mice. We show that immunization with typhoid Vi polysaccharide vaccine rapidly induces proliferation in B1b peritoneal cells, but not in B1a cells or marginal zone B cells. This induction of B1b proliferation is concomitant with the detection of splenic Vi-specific Ab-secreting cells and protective Ab in Rag1-deficient B1b cell chimeras generated by adoptive transfer-induced specific Ab after Vi immunization. Furthermore, Ab derived from peritoneal B cells is sufficient to confer protection against Salmonella that express Vi Ag. Expression of Vi by Salmonella during infection did not inhibit the development of early Ab responses to non-Vi Ags. Despite this, the protection conferred by immunization of mice with porin proteins from Salmonella, which induce Ab-mediated protection, was reduced postinfection with Vi-expressing Salmonella, although protection was not totally abrogated. This work therefore suggests that, in mice, B1b cells contribute to the protection induced by Vi Ag, and targeting non-Vi Ags as subunit vaccines may offer an attractive strategy to augment current Vi-based vaccine strategies.

  20. Lamin B1 protein is required for dendrite development in primary mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Caterina; Mahajani, Sameehan; Ruffilli, Roberta; Marotta, Roberto; Gasparini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Lamin B1, a key component of the nuclear lamina, plays an important role in brain development and function. A duplication of the human lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene has been linked to adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, and mouse and human loss-of-function mutations in lamin B1 are susceptibility factors for neural tube defects. In the mouse, experimental ablation of endogenous lamin B1 (Lmnb1) severely impairs embryonic corticogenesis. Here we report that in primary mouse cortical neurons, LMNB1 overexpression reduces axonal outgrowth, whereas deficiency of endogenous Lmnb1 results in aberrant dendritic development. In the absence of Lmnb1, both the length and complexity of dendrites are reduced, and their growth is unresponsive to KCl stimulation. This defective dendritic outgrowth stems from impaired ERK signaling. In Lmnb1-null neurons, ERK is correctly phosphorylated, but phospho-ERK fails to translocate to the nucleus, possibly due to delocalization of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) at the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these data highlight a previously unrecognized role of lamin B1 in dendrite development of mouse cortical neurons through regulation of nuclear shuttling of specific signaling molecules and NPC distribution. PMID:26510501