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Sample records for a1c fasting glucose

  1. The heritability of HbA1c and fasting blood glucose in different measurement settings.

    PubMed

    Simonis-Bik, Annemarie M C; Eekhoff, Elisabeth M W; Diamant, Michaela; Boomsma, Dorret I; Heine, Rob J; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Leeuwen, Marieke; de Geus, Eco J C

    2008-12-01

    In an extended twin study we estimated the heritability of fasting HbA1c and blood glucose levels. Blood glucose was assessed in different settings (at home and in the clinic). We tested whether the genetic factors influencing fasting blood glucose levels overlapped with those influencing HbA1c and whether the same genetic factors were expressed across different settings. Fasting blood glucose was measured at home and during two visits to the clinic in 77 healthy families with same-sex twins and siblings, aged 20 to 45 years. HbA1c was measured during the first clinic visit. A 4-variate genetic structural equation model was used that estimated the heritability of each trait and the genetic correlations among traits. Heritability explained 75% of the variance in HbA1c. The heritability of fasting blood glucose was estimated at 66% at home and lower in the clinic (57% and 38%). Fasting blood glucose levels were significantly correlated across settings (0.34 < r < 0.54), mostly due to a common set of genes that explained between 53% and 95% of these correlations. Correlations between HbA1c and fasting blood glucoses were low (0.11 < r < 0.23) and genetic factors influencing HbA1c and fasting glucose were uncorrelated. These results suggest that in healthy adults the genes influencing HbA1c and fasting blood glucose reflect different aspects of the glucose metabolism. As a consequence these two glycemic parameters can not be used interchangeably in diagnostic procedures or in studies attempting to find genes for diabetes. Both contribute unique (genetic) information.

  2. Divergence between HbA1c and fasting glucose through childhood: implications for diagnosis of impaired fasting glucose (Early Bird 52).

    PubMed

    Hosking, Joanne; Metcalf, Brad S; Jeffery, Alison N; Streeter, Adam J; Voss, Linda D; Wilkin, Terence J

    2014-05-01

    An HbA1c threshold of ≥ 6.5% has recently been adopted for the diagnosis of diabetes in adults, and of ≥ 5.7% to identify adults at risk. Little,however, is known of HbA1c's behaviour or diagnostic value in youth. Our aim was to describe the course of HbA1c during childhood, and its association with fasting glucose. HbA1c and glucose were measured every year in a cohort of 326 healthy children (162 boys) from 5 to 15 years. Mixed effects modelling was used to establish the determinants of HbA1c and its development over time. ROC analysis was used to determine the diagnostic value of HbA1c in the 55 individuals who showed impaired fasting glucose(IFG – glucose ≥ 5.6 mmol/L). Glucose rose progressively from 4.3 mmol/L at 5 years to 5.1 mmol/Lat 15 years, and although there were positive associations between HbA1c and glucose, from 10 to 13 years, HbA1c fell while glucose continued to rise. IFG developed in 55 children, but HbA1c exceeded 5.7% in only 16 of them. The maximum area under the ROC curve was 0.71 at the age of 14 (p<0.001), and the sensitivity and specificity were optimal at 50 and 80% respectively,corresponding to HbA1c of 5.4%. Although HbA1c retains a positive association with glucose throughout childhood, it is weak, and their trends diverge from 10 years,suggesting that factors other than glycaemia systematically influence the variance of HbA1c in youth. These findings therefore limit the interpretation of HbA1c for the diagnosis of IFG during childhood.

  3. Low association between fasting and OGTT stimulated glucose levels with HbA1c in overweight children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ehehalt, Stefan; Wiegand, Susanna; Körner, Antje; Schweizer, Roland; Liesenkötter, Klaus-Peter; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Spielau, Ulrike; Denzer, Christian; Ranke, Michael B; Neu, Andreas; Binder, Gerhard; Wabitsch, Martin; Kiess, Wieland; Reinehr, Thomas

    2016-11-22

    Diabetes and prediabetes are defined based on different methods such as fasting glucose, glucose at 2-hour in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). These parameters probably describe different deteriorations in glucose metabolism limiting the exchange between each other in definitions of diabetes. To investigate the relationship between OGTT and HbA1c in overweight and obese children and adolescents living in Germany. Study population: Overweight and obese children and adolescents (n = 4848; 2668 female) aged 7 to 17 years without known diabetes. The study population was stratified into the following subgroups: normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, diabetes according to OGTT and/or HbA1c categories, confirmed diagnosis of diabetes. In the entire study group fasting plasma glucose (FPG) correlated weakly to 2-hour glucose (r = 0.26), FPG correlated weakly to HbA1c (r = 0.18), and 2-hour glucose correlated weakly to HbA1c (r = 0.17, all P < .001). Patients with confirmed diabetes showed a very high correlation between FPG and 2-hour glucose (r = 0.73, n = 50). Moderate correlations could be found for patients with impaired fasting glucose (2-hour glucose vs HbA1c: r = 0.30, n = 436), for patients with diabetes according to OGTT and/or HbA1c (FPG vs 2-hour glucose: r = 0.43; 2-hour glucose vs HbA1c: r = -0.30, n = 115) and for patients with confirmed diabetes (2-hour glucose vs HbA1c: r = -0.47, all P < .001). Because FPG, 2-hour glucose, and HbA1c correlated only weakly we propose that these parameters, particularly in the normal range, might reflect distinct aspects of carbohydrate metabolism. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Elevation of fasting morning glucose relative to hemoglobin A1c in normoglycemic patients treated with niacin and with statins.

    PubMed

    Rajanna, Veena; Campbell, Kristen B; Leimberger, Jeffrey; Mohanty, Bibhu D; Guyton, John R

    2012-01-01

    Niacin increases fasting glucose levels, and statins modestly increase the rate of new-onset diabetes. The clinical importance and mechanisms of these effects are not fully explored. On the basis of anecdotal observations, we hypothesized that elevated morning fasting glucose may be accompanied by relatively normal hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in patients treated with niacin and other lipid-modifying drugs. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis to test this hypothesis. The Duke Lipid Clinic database (1994-2007) was screened for simultaneous determinations of fasting morning glucose and HbA1c, yielding 1483 data pairs among 554 subjects. Subjects with diabetes, by clinical diagnosis, medication, or any HbA1c ≥6.5%, or nondiabetes were analyzed separately. Repeated-measures linear regression featured glucose as dependent variable and included terms for HbA1c, drug(s), and their interaction. Regression lines for glucose on HbA1c had altered slopes in the presence of niacin and/or statin use in normoglycemic subjects. The corresponding interaction terms (drug and HbA1c) were significant (niacin P = .026, statin P = .013). Fibrate use had no effect (interaction P = .49). When modeled together, niacin and statin effects were independent. Regression curves in diabetic patients were not affected by lipid medications. Elevated fasting glucose may be accompanied by relatively normal HbA1c in niacin- and statin-treated patients. HbA1c reflects average daily glucose levels and is likely a better measure of the glycemic effect of lipid medications. Because our data were retrospective, confirmation from randomized trials is needed. Copyright © 2012 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ethnicity modifies the relation between fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c in Indians, Malays and Chinese.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, K; Kao, S L; Thai, A C; Salim, A; Lee, J J M; Heng, D; Tai, E S; Khoo, E Y H

    2012-07-01

    To study whether HbA(1c) , and its relationship with fasting plasma glucose, was significantly different among Chinese, Malays and Indians in Singapore. A sample of 3895 individuals without known diabetes underwent detailed interview and health examination, including anthropometric and biochemical evaluation, between 2004 and 2007. Pearson's correlation, analysis of variance and multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine the influence of ethnicity on HbA(1c) . As fasting plasma glucose increased, HbA(1c) increased more in Malays and Indians compared with Chinese after adjustment for age, gender, waist circumference, serum cholesterol, serum triglyceride and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P-interaction < 0.001). This translates to an HbA(1c) difference of 1.1 mmol/mol (0.1%, Indians vs. Chinese), and 0.9 mmol/mol (0.08%, Malays vs. Chinese) at fasting plasma glucose 5.6 mmol/l (the American Diabetes Association criterion for impaired fasting glycaemia); and 2.1 mmol/mol (0.19%, Indians vs. Chinese) and 2.6 mmol/mol (0.24%, Malays vs. Chinese) at fasting plasma glucose 7.0 mmol/l, the diagnostic criterion for diabetes mellitus. Using HbA(1c) in place of fasting plasma glucose will reclassify different proportions of the population in different ethnic groups. This may have implications in interpretation of HbA(1c) results across ethnic groups and the use of HbA(1c) for diagnosing diabetes mellitus. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  6. Association between HbA1c and carotid atherosclerosis among elderly Koreans with normal fasting glucose

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Won; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Lee, Yong-ho; Song, Bo Mi; Choi, Hansol; Park, Ji Hye; Rhee, Yumie; Kim, Chang Oh

    2017-01-01

    Aim We examined whether glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is associated to carotid atherosclerosis in an elderly Korean population with normal fasting glucose. Methods Using data from the Korean Urban Rural Elderly study, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1,133 participants (335 men and 798 women) with a mean age of 71.8 years. All participants had fasting blood glucose less than 100mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) and HbA1c level below 6.5% (48 mmol/mol). They were also free from a history of cardiovascular disease, known type 2 diabetes mellitus or use of anti-diabetes medications. Carotid atherosclerosis was assessed by intima-media thickness (IMT) using ultrasonography. The association between HbA1c and carotid IMT was investigated using multivariable linear regression analysis. Results HbA1c levels were independently and positively associated with carotid IMT (β = 0.020, p = 0.045) after adjusting for sex, age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, smoking and alcohol intake. However, fasting insulin and glucose levels were not associated with carotid IMT. Conclusion HbA1c levels were positively associated with carotid atherosclerosis, as assessed by carotid IMT, in an elderly population with normoglycemia. Our study suggested that higher HbA1c level is an effective and informative marker of carotid atherosclerosis in an elderly population. PMID:28178313

  7. Fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c in identifying and predicting diabetes: the strong heart study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Fabsitz, Richard R; Devereux, Richard B; Welty, Thomas K

    2011-02-01

    To compare fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA(1c) in identifying and predicting type 2 diabetes in a population with high rates of diabetes. Diabetes was defined as an FPG level ≥ 126 mg/dL or an HbA(1c) level ≥ 6.5%. Data collected from the baseline and second exams (1989-1995) of the Strong Heart Study were used. RESULTS For cases of diabetes identified by FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL, using HbA(1c) ≥ 6.5% at the initial and 4-year follow-up diabetes screenings (or in identifying incident cases in 4 years) among undiagnosed participants left 46% and 59% of cases of diabetes undetected, respectively, whereas for cases identified by HbA(1c) ≥ 6.5%, using FPG ≥ 126 mg/dL left 11% and 59% unidentified, respectively. Age, waist circumference, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio, and baseline FPG and HbA(1c) levels were common significant risk factors for incident diabetes defined by either FPG or HbA(1c); triglyceride levels were significant for diabetes defined by HbA(1c) alone, and blood pressure and sibling history of diabetes were significant for diabetes defined by FPG alone. Using both the baseline FPG and HbA(1c) in diabetes prediction identified more people at risk than using either measure alone. CONCLUSIONS Among undiagnosed participants, using HbA(1c) alone in initial diabetes screening identifies fewer cases of diabetes than FPG, and using either FPG or HbA(1c) alone cannot effectively identify diabetes in a 4-year periodic successive diabetes screening or incident cases of diabetes in 4 years. Using both criteria may identify more people at risk. The proposed models using the commonly available clinical measures can be applied to assessing the risk of incident diabetes using either criterion.

  8. Reduction of Fasting Blood Glucose and Hemoglobin A1c Using Oral Aloe Vera: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dick, William R; Fletcher, Emily A; Shah, Sachin A

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a global epidemic and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Additional medications that are novel, affordable, and efficacious are needed to treat this rampant disease. This meta-analysis was performed to ascertain the effectiveness of oral aloe vera consumption on the reduction of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). PubMed, CINAHL, Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, and Natural Standard databases were searched. Studies of aloe vera's effect on FBG, HbA1c, homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), fasting serum insulin, fructosamine, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in prediabetic and diabetic populations were examined. After data extraction, the parameters of FBG and HbA1c had appropriate data for meta-analyses. Extracted data were verified and then analyzed by StatsDirect Statistical Software. Reductions of FBG and HbA1c were reported as the weighted mean differences from baseline, calculated by a random-effects model with 95% confidence intervals. Subgroup analyses to determine clinical and statistical heterogeneity were also performed. Publication bias was assessed by using the Egger bias statistic. Nine studies were included in the FBG parameter (n = 283); 5 of these studies included HbA1c data (n = 89). Aloe vera decreased FBG by 46.6 mg/dL (p < 0.0001) and HbA1c by 1.05% (p = 0.004). Significant reductions of both endpoints were maintained in all subgroup analyses. Additionally, the data suggest that patients with an FBG ≥200 mg/dL may see a greater benefit. A mean FBG reduction of 109.9 mg/dL was observed in this population (p ≤ 0.0001). The Egger statistic showed publication bias with FBG but not with HbA1c (p = 0.010 and p = 0.602, respectively). These results support the use of oral aloe vera for significantly reducing FBG (46.6 mg/dL) and HbA1c (1.05%). Further clinical studies that are more robust and better

  9. Comparison of the Current Diagnostic Criterion of HbA1c with Fasting and 2-Hour Plasma Glucose Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Karnchanasorn, Rudruidee; Huang, Jean; Feng, Wei; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% in diagnosing diabetes compared to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 126 mg/dL and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) ≥ 200 mg/dL in a previously undiagnosed diabetic cohort, we included 5,764 adult subjects without established diabetes for whom HbA1c, FPG, 2hPG, and BMI measurements were collected. Compared to the FPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 43.3% (106 subjects). Compared to the 2hPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 28.1% (110 subjects). Patients who were diabetic using 2hPG criterion but had HbA1c < 6.5% were more likely to be older (64 ± 15 versus 60 ± 15 years old, P = 0.01, mean ± STD), female (53.2% versus 38.2%, P = 0.008), leaner (29.7 ± 6.1 versus 33.0 ± 6.6 kg/m2, P = 0.000005), and less likely to be current smokers (18.1% versus 29.1%, P = 0.02) as compared to those with HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. The diagnostic agreement in the clinical setting revealed the current HbA1c ≥ 6.5% is less likely to detect diabetes than those defined by FPG and 2hPG. HbA1c ≥ 6.5% detects less than 50% of diabetic patients defined by FPG and less than 30% of diabetic patients defined by 2hPG. When the diagnosis of diabetes is in doubt by HbA1c, FPG and/or 2hPG should be obtained. PMID:27597979

  10. Detection of Abnormal Glucose Tolerance in Africans Is Improved by Combining A1C With Fasting Glucose: The Africans in America Study

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Caroline K.; O'Connor, Michelle Y.; Ricks, Madia; Chung, Stephanie T.; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Lozier, Jay N.; Sacks, David B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Abnormal glucose tolerance is rising in sub-Saharan Africa. Hemoglobin A1c by itself and in combination with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is used to diagnose abnormal glucose tolerance. The diagnostic ability of A1C in Africans with heterozygous variant hemoglobin, such as sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait, has not been rigorously evaluated. In U.S.-based Africans, we determined by hemoglobin status the sensitivities of 1) FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L, 2) A1C ≥ 5.7% (39 mmol/mol), and 3) FPG combined with A1C (FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L and/or A1C ≥5.7% [39 mmol/mol]) for the detection of abnormal glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in 216 African immigrants (68% male, age 37 ± 10 years [mean ± SD], range 20–64 years). Abnormal glucose tolerance was defined as 2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L. RESULTS Variant hemoglobin was identified in 21% (46 of 216). Abnormal glucose tolerance occurred in 33% (72 of 216). When determining abnormal glucose tolerance from the OGTT (2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L), sensitivities of FPG for the total, normal, and variant hemoglobin groups were 32%, 32%, and 33%, respectively. Sensitivities for A1C were 53%, 54%, and 47%. For FPG and A1C combined, sensitivities were 64%, 63%, and 67%. Sensitivities for FPG and A1C and the combination did not vary by hemoglobin status (all P > 0.6). For the entire cohort, sensitivity was higher for A1C than FPG and for both tests combined than for either test alone (all P values ≤ 0.01). CONCLUSIONS No significant difference in sensitivity of A1C by variant hemoglobin status was detected. For the diagnosis of abnormal glucose tolerance in Africans, the sensitivity of A1C combined with FPG is significantly superior to either test alone. PMID:25338926

  11. Detection of abnormal glucose tolerance in Africans is improved by combining A1C with fasting glucose: the Africans in America Study.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Anne E; Thoreson, Caroline K; O'Connor, Michelle Y; Ricks, Madia; Chung, Stephanie T; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Lozier, Jay N; Sacks, David B

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal glucose tolerance is rising in sub-Saharan Africa. Hemoglobin A1c by itself and in combination with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is used to diagnose abnormal glucose tolerance. The diagnostic ability of A1C in Africans with heterozygous variant hemoglobin, such as sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait, has not been rigorously evaluated. In U.S.-based Africans, we determined by hemoglobin status the sensitivities of 1) FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L, 2) A1C ≥ 5.7% (39 mmol/mol), and 3) FPG combined with A1C (FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L and/or A1C ≥5.7% [39 mmol/mol]) for the detection of abnormal glucose tolerance. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in 216 African immigrants (68% male, age 37 ± 10 years [mean ± SD], range 20-64 years). Abnormal glucose tolerance was defined as 2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L. Variant hemoglobin was identified in 21% (46 of 216). Abnormal glucose tolerance occurred in 33% (72 of 216). When determining abnormal glucose tolerance from the OGTT (2-h glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L), sensitivities of FPG for the total, normal, and variant hemoglobin groups were 32%, 32%, and 33%, respectively. Sensitivities for A1C were 53%, 54%, and 47%. For FPG and A1C combined, sensitivities were 64%, 63%, and 67%. Sensitivities for FPG and A1C and the combination did not vary by hemoglobin status (all P > 0.6). For the entire cohort, sensitivity was higher for A1C than FPG and for both tests combined than for either test alone (all P values ≤ 0.01). No significant difference in sensitivity of A1C by variant hemoglobin status was detected. For the diagnosis of abnormal glucose tolerance in Africans, the sensitivity of A1C combined with FPG is significantly superior to either test alone. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  12. Markers of glycemic control in the mouse: comparisons of 6-h- and overnight-fasted blood glucoses to Hb A1c.

    PubMed

    Han, Byoung Geun; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Tchekneva, Elena E; Wang, Ying-Ying; Lee, Chieh Allen; Ebrahim, Benyamin; Harris, Raymond C; Kern, Timothy S; Wasserman, David H; Breyer, Matthew D; Qi, Zhonghua

    2008-10-01

    The present studies examined the relationship between fasting blood glucose and Hb A(1c) in C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, and KK/HlJ mice with and without diabetes mellitus. Daily averaged blood glucose levels based on continuous glucose monitoring and effects of 6-h vs. overnight fasting on blood glucose were determined. Daily averaged blood glucose levels were highly correlated with Hb A(1c), as determined with a hand-held automated device using an immunodetection method. R(2) values were 0.90, 0.95, and 0.99 in KK/HIJ, C57BL/6J, and DBA/2J, respectively. Six-hour fasting blood glucose correlated more closely with the level of daily averaged blood glucose and with Hb A(1c) than did blood glucose following an overnight fast. To validate the immunoassay-determined Hb A(1c), we also measured total glycosylated hemoglobin using boronate HPLC. Hb A(1c) values correlated well with total glycosylated hemoglobin in all three strains but were relatively lower than total glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic DBA/2J mice. These results show that 6-h fasting glucose provides a superior index of glycemic control and correlates more closely with Hb A(1c) than overnight-fasted blood glucose in these strains of mice.

  13. Modelling the Relative Contribution of Fasting and Post-Prandial Plasma Glucose to HbA1c in Healthy and Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollerton, Richard L.; Luzio, Steven D.; Owens, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is regarded as the gold standard of glucose homeostasis assessment in diabetes. There has been much discussion in recent medical literature of experimental results concerning the relative contribution of fasting and post-prandial glucose levels to the value of HbA1c. A mathematical model of haemoglobin glycation is…

  14. Modelling the Relative Contribution of Fasting and Post-Prandial Plasma Glucose to HbA1c in Healthy and Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollerton, Richard L.; Luzio, Steven D.; Owens, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is regarded as the gold standard of glucose homeostasis assessment in diabetes. There has been much discussion in recent medical literature of experimental results concerning the relative contribution of fasting and post-prandial glucose levels to the value of HbA1c. A mathematical model of haemoglobin glycation is…

  15. Fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose, and HbA1c in pregnancy and the postpartum risk of diabetes among Chinese women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huikun; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Leishen; Leng, Junhong; Li, Weiqin; Li, Nan; Li, Min; Qiao, Yijuan; Tian, Huiguang; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Yang, Xilin; Yu, Zhijie; Hu, Gang

    2016-02-01

    Very few studies have assessed the association of fasting and 2h glucose, and HbA1c during pregnancy with postpartum diabetes risk among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We assessed the association of fasting glucose, 2h glucose and HbA1c at 26-30 gestational weeks with postpartum diabetes risk among women with prior GDM. A cohort study in 1263 GDM women at 1-5 years after delivery was performed. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate the association of fasting and 2h plasma glucose, and HbA1c at 26-30 gestational weeks with the risk of diabetes at postpartum. The multivariable-adjusted (age, pre-pregnancy body mass index, weight gain during pregnancy, current body mass index, family history of diabetes, marital status, education, family income, smoking status, passive smoking, leisure-time physical activity, alcohol drinking, and intake of energy, saturated fat, and dietary fiber) hazard ratios of postpartum diabetes were 1.61 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.36-1.91) for each 1 mmol/l increase in fasting glucose during pregnancy, 1.63 (95% CI: 1.45-1.84) for each 1 mmol/l increase in 2h glucose during pregnancy, 2.11 (95% CI: 1.50-2.97) for each 1 unit (%) increase in HbA1c during pregnancy. When fasting glucose, 2h glucose and HbA1c during pregnancy were entered multivariable-adjusted model simultaneously, 2h glucose and HbA1c but not fasting glucose remained to be significant and positive predictors for postpartum diabetes. For women with prior GDM, 2h plasma glucose and HbA1c during pregnancy are independent predictors of postpartum diabetes, but fasting plasma glucose during pregnancy is not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Physical activity and change in fasting glucose and HbA1c: a quantitative meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Boniol, Mathieu; Dragomir, Miruna; Autier, Philippe; Boyle, Peter

    2017-08-24

    A systematic review was conducted of randomized trials which evaluated the impact of physical activity on the change in fasting glucose and HbA1c. A literature search was conducted in PubMed until December 2015. Studies reporting glucose or HbA1c at baseline and at the end of study were included, and the change and its variance were estimated from studies with complete data. Mixed-effect random models were used to estimate the change of fasting glucose (mg/dl) and HbA1c (%) per additional minutes of physical activity per week. A total of 125 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Based on 105 studies, an increase of 100 min in physical activity per week was associated with an average change of -2.75 mg/dl of fasting glucose (95% CI -3.96; -1.55), although there was a high degree of heterogeneity (83.5%). When restricting the analysis on type 2 diabetes and prediabetes subjects (56 studies), the average change in fasting glucose was -4.71 mg/dl (95% CI -7.42; -2.01). For HbA1c, among 76 studies included, an increase of 100 min in physical activity per week was associated with an average change of -0.14% of HbA1c (95% CI -0.18; -0.09) with heterogeneity (73%). A large degree of publication bias was identified (Egger test p < 0.001). When restricting the analysis on type 2 diabetes and prediabetes subjects (60 studies), the average change in HbA1c was -0.16% (95% CI -0.21; -0.11). This analysis demonstrates that moderate increases in physical activity are associated with significant reductions in both fasting glucose and HbA1c.

  17. Six weeks' sebacic acid supplementation improves fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c and glucose tolerance in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Membrez, M; Chou, C J; Raymond, F; Mansourian, R; Moser, M; Monnard, I; Ammon-Zufferey, C; Mace, K; Mingrone, G; Binnert, C

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the impact of chronic ingestion of sebacic acid (SA), a 10-carbon medium-chain dicarboxylic acid, on glycaemic control in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods: Three groups of 15 db/db mice were fed for 6 weeks either a chow diet (Ctrl) or a chow diet supplemented with 1.5 or 15% (SA1.5% and SA15%, respectively) energy from SA. Fasting glycaemia was measured once a week and HbA1c before and after supplementation. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed at the end of the supplementation. Gene expression was determined by transcriptomic analysis on the liver of the Ctrl and SA15% groups. Results: After 42 days of supplementation, fasting glycaemia and HbA1c were ∼70 and 25% lower in the SA15% group compared with the other groups showing a beneficial effect of SA on hyperglycaemia. During OGTT, plasma glucose area under the curve was reduced after SA15% compared with the other groups. This effect was associated with a tendency for an improved insulin response. In the liver, Pck1 and FBP mRNA were statistically decreased in the SA15% compared with Ctrl suggesting a reduced hepatic glucose output induced by SA. Conclusion: Dietary supplementation of SA largely improves glycaemic control in a mouse model of T2D. This beneficial effect may be due to (i) an improved glucose-induced insulin secretion and (ii) a reduced hepatic glucose output. PMID:20977585

  18. The effect of nano-curcumin on HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and lipid profile in diabetic subjects: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Dastani, Mostafa; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Abnous, Khalil; Ghayour Mobarhan, Majid; Kazemi Oskuee, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes mellitus is defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both or insulin resistance. Curcumin inhibits NF-κB signaling pathway. The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of Nano-curcumin on HbA1C, fast blood glucose and lipid profile in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy type-2 diabetic patients (fasting blood glucose (FBG) ≥ 126 mg/dL or 2-hr postprandial blood glucose ≥200 mg/dl) randomly receivedeither Curcumin (as nano-micelle 80 mg/day) or placebo for 3 months in a double blind randomized clinical trial. Fasting blood glucose, HbA1C, and lipids profile were checked before and after the intervention. Data analyses, including parametric and nonparametric tests were done using the SPSS 11.5 software. A p value < 0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. (RCT registration code: IRCT2013081114330N1) Results: Mean age, BMI, FBG, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), LDL, HDL, HbA1c , and sex and had no significant difference at the baseline between the groups. In Nano-curcumin group, a significant decrease was found in HbA1C, FBG, TG, and BMI comparing results of each subject before and after the treatment (p<0.05). By comparing pre- and post-treatment values among the groups, HbA1c, eAG, LDL-C, and BMI variables showed significant differences (p<0.05). Conclusion: These findings suggest an HbA1c lowering effect for Nano-curcumin in type-2 diabetes; also, it is partially decrease in serum LDL-C and BMI. PMID:27761427

  19. The correlation of hemoglobin A1c to blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Sikaris, Ken

    2009-05-01

    The understanding that hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) represents the average blood glucose level of patients over the previous 120 days underlies the current management of diabetes. Even in making such a statement, we speak of "average blood glucose" as though "blood glucose" were itself a simple idea. When we consider all the blood glucose forms-arterial versus venous versus capillary, whole blood versus serum versus fluoride-preserved plasma, fasting versus nonfasting-we can start to see that this is not a simple issue. Nevertheless, it seems as though HbA1c correlates to any single glucose measurement. Having more than one measurement and taking those measurements in the preceding month improves the correlation further. In particular, by having glucose measurements that reflect both the relatively lower overnight glucose levels and measurements that reflect the postprandial peaks improves not only our ability to manage diabetes patients, but also our understanding of how HbA1c levels are determined. Modern continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices may take thousands of glucose results over a week. Several studies have shown that CGM glucose averages account for the vast proportion of the variation of HbA1c. The ability to relate HbA1c to average glucose may become a popular method for reporting HbA1c, eliminating current concerns regarding differences in HbA1c standardization. Hemoglobin A1c expressed as an average glucose may be more understandable to patients and improve not only their understanding, but also their ability to improve their diabetes management. 2009 Diabetes Technology Society.

  20. Are the Same Clinical Risk Factors Relevant for Incident Diabetes Defined by Treatment, Fasting Plasma Glucose, and HbA1c?

    PubMed Central

    Balkau, Beverley; Soulimane, Soraya; Lange, Céline; Gautier, Alain; Tichet, Jean; Vol, Sylviane

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare incidences and risk factors for diabetes using seven definitions, with combinations of pharmacological treatment, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥7.0 mmol/L, and HbA1c ≥6.5%. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants aged 30–65 years from the Data from an Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR) cohort were followed for 9 years. RESULTS More men had incident diabetes as defined by FPG ≥7.0 mmol/L and/or treatment than by HbA1c ≥6.5% and/or treatment: 7.5% (140/1,867) and 5.3% (99/1,874), respectively (P < 0.009); for women incidences were similar: 3.2% (63/1,958) and 3.4% (66/1,954). Known risk factors predicted diabetes for almost all definitions. Among those with incident diabetes by FPG alone versus HbA1c alone, there were more men (78 vs. 35%), case patients were 8 years younger, and fewer were alcohol abstainers (12 vs. 35%) (all P < 0.005). A diabetes risk score discriminated well between those with and without incident diabetes for all definitions. CONCLUSIONS In men, FPG definitions yielded more incident cases of diabetes than HbA1c definitions, in contrast with women. An FPG-derived risk score remained relevant for HbA1c-defined diabetes. PMID:21346181

  1. The association between HbA1c, fasting glucose, 1-hour glucose and 2-hour glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test and cardiovascular disease in individuals with elevated risk for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lind, Marcus; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Nerman, Olle; Eriksson, Johan; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Peltonen, Markku; Pivodic, Aldina; Lindström, Jaana

    2014-01-01

    To determine the association between HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 1-hour (1 hPG) and 2-hour (2 hPG) glucose after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and cardiovascular disease in individuals with elevated risk for diabetes. We studied the relationship between baseline, updated mean and updated (last) value of HbA1c, FPG, 1 hPG and 2 hPG after an oral 75 g glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and acute CVD events in 504 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) at baseline enrolled in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. Follow-up of clinical trial. 504 individuals with IGT were followed with yearly evaluations with OGTT, FPG and HbA1c. Relative risk of CVD. Over a median follow-up of 9.0 years 34 (6.7%) participants had a CVD event, which increased to 52 (10.3%) over a median follow-up of 13.0 years when including events that occurred among participants following a diagnosis of diabetes. Updated mean HbA1c, 1 hPG and 2 hPG, HR per 1 unit SD of 1.57 (95% CI 1.16 to 2.11), p = 0.0032, 1.51 (1.03 to 2.23), p = 0.036 and 1.60 (1.10 to 2.34), p = 0.014, respectively, but not FPG (p = 0.11), were related to CVD. In analyses of the last value prior to the CVD event the same three glycaemic measurements were associated with the CVD events, with HRs per 1 unit SD of 1.45 (1.06 to 1.98), p = 0.020, 1.55 (1.04 to 2.29), p = 0.030 and 2.19 (1.51 to 3.18), p<0.0001, respectively but only 2 hPG remained significant in pairwise comparisons. Including the follow-up period after diabetes onset updated 2 hPG (p = 0.003) but not updated mean HbA1c (p = 0.08) was related to CVD. Current 2 hPG level in people with IGT is associated with increased risk of CVD. This supports its use in screening for prediabetes and monitoring glycaemic levels of people with prediabetes.

  2. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c ) and fasting plasma glucose relationships in sea-level and high-altitude settings.

    PubMed

    Bazo-Alvarez, J C; Quispe, R; Pillay, T D; Bernabé-Ortiz, A; Smeeth, L; Checkley, W; Gilman, R H; Málaga, G; Miranda, J J

    2017-06-01

    Higher haemoglobin levels and differences in glucose metabolism have been reported among high-altitude residents, which may influence the diagnostic performance of HbA1c . This study explores the relationship between HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in populations living at sea level and at an altitude of > 3000 m. Data from 3613 Peruvian adults without a known diagnosis of diabetes from sea-level and high-altitude settings were evaluated. Linear, quadratic and cubic regression models were performed adjusting for potential confounders. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and concordance between HbA1c and FPG was assessed using a Kappa index. At sea level and high altitude, means were 13.5 and 16.7 g/dl (P > 0.05) for haemoglobin level; 41 and 40 mmol/mol (5.9% and 5.8%; P < 0.01) for HbA1c ; and 5.8 and 5.1 mmol/l (105 and 91.3 mg/dl; P < 0.001) for FPG, respectively. The adjusted relationship between HbA1c and FPG was quadratic at sea level and linear at high altitude. Adjusted models showed that, to predict an HbA1c value of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%), the corresponding mean FPG values at sea level and high altitude were 6.6 and 14.8 mmol/l (120 and 266 mg/dl), respectively. An HbA1c cut-off of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) had a sensitivity for high FPG of 87.3% (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 76.5 to 94.4) at sea level and 40.9% (95% CI 20.7 to 63.6) at high altitude. The relationship between HbA1c and FPG is less clear at high altitude than at sea level. Caution is warranted when using HbA1c to diagnose diabetes mellitus in this setting. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  3. The Correlation of Hemoglobin A1c to Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Sikaris, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The understanding that hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) represents the average blood glucose level of patients over the previous 120 days underlies the current management of diabetes. Even in making such a statement, we speak of “average blood glucose” as though “blood glucose” were itself a simple idea. When we consider all the blood glucose forms—arterial versus venous versus capillary, whole blood versus serum versus fluoride-preserved plasma, fasting versus nonfasting—we can start to see that this is not a simple issue. Nevertheless, it seems as though HbA1c correlates to any single glucose measurement. Having more than one measurement and taking those measurements in the preceding month improves the correlation further. In particular, by having glucose measurements that reflect both the relatively lower overnight glucose levels and measurements that reflect the postprandial peaks improves not only our ability to manage diabetes patients, but also our understanding of how HbA1c levels are determined. Modern continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices may take thousands of glucose results over a week. Several studies have shown that CGM glucose averages account for the vast proportion of the variation of HbA1c. The ability to relate HbA1c to average glucose may become a popular method for reporting HbA1c, eliminating current concerns regarding differences in HbA1c standardization. Hemoglobin A1c expressed as an average glucose may be more understandable to patients and improve not only their understanding, but also their ability to improve their diabetes management. PMID:20144279

  4. Risk of progression to diabetes from prediabetes defined by HbA1c or fasting plasma glucose criteria in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul-Hee; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Hee; Bae, Sung-Jin; Choe, Jaewon; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2016-08-01

    To examine the abilities of HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) criteria predicting 5-year progression rate to diabetes in Korean adults with prediabetes. Participants included 17,971 Koreans (aged 20-79years) who underwent routine medical check-ups at a mean interval of 5.2years (3.1-6.7years). Prediabetes was defined as FPG 5.6-6.9mmol/l or HbA1c 5.7-6.4% (39-46mmol/mol). Incident diabetes was defined as FPG⩾7.0mmol/l, HbA1c⩾6.5% (48mmol/mol), or initiation of antidiabetic medications. At baseline, the prevalence of prediabetes was 30.6% (n=5495) by FPG and 20.4% (n=3664) by HbA1c criteria. The 5-year progression rate to diabetes was significantly higher in prediabetes identified by HbA1c than by FPG tests (14.7% vs. 10.4%, P<0.001). Of individuals diagnosed with prediabetes by only one test, those by HbA1c alone had a higher risk of progression to diabetes than those diagnosed by FPG alone (6.0% vs. 3.9%, P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that area under the curve was greater for HbA1c (0.855, 95% CI 0.840-0.870) than for FPG (0.830, 0.813-0.846) (P=0.016). After adjustment for conventional risk factors, the odds ratio (OR) of developing diabetes was higher in participants with prediabetes identified by HbA1c (OR 9.91, 8.24-11.9) than by FPG (OR 7.29, 5.97-8.89) (P=0.026). Although fewer individuals with prediabetes were identified by HbA1c than by FPG criteria, the ability to predict progression to diabetes was stronger for HbA1c than for FPG in Koreans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Mediterranean diet improves HbA1c but not fasting blood glucose compared to alternative dietary strategies: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Carter, P; Achana, F; Troughton, J; Gray, L J; Khunti, K; Davies, M J

    2014-06-01

    Overweight or obese individuals with type 2 diabetes are encouraged to lose weight for optimal glucose management, yet many find this difficult. Determining whether alterations in dietary patterns irrespective of weight loss can aid glucose control has not been fully investigated. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis aiming to determine the effects of a Mediterranean diet compared to other dietary interventions on glycaemic control irrespective of weight loss. Electronic databases were searched for controlled trials that included a Mediterranean diet intervention. The interventions included all major components of the Mediterranean diet and were carried out in free-living individuals at high risk or diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Network meta-analysis compared all interventions with one another at the same time as maintaining randomisation. Analyses were conducted within a Bayesian framework. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria, seven examined fasting blood glucose (n = 972), six examined fasting insulin (n = 1330) and three examined HbA1c (n = 487). None of the interventions were significantly better than the others in lowering glucose parameters. The Mediterranean diet reduced HbA1c significantly compared to usual care but not compared to the Palaeolithic diet. The effect of alterations in dietary practice irrespective of weight loss on glycaemic control cannot be concluded from the present review. The need for further research in this area is apparent because no firm conclusions about relative effectiveness of interventions could be drawn as a result of the paucity of the evidence. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  6. Combined use of fasting plasma glucose and glycated hemoglobin A1c in a stepwise fashion to detect undiagnosed diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Tomoko; Tominaga, Makoto; Nishimura, Rimei; Daimon, Makoto; Oizumi, Toshihide; Yoshiike, Nobuo; Tajima, Naoko

    2007-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common and serious condition related with considerable morbidity. Screening for DM is one strategy for reducing this burden. In Japan National Diabetes Screening Program (JNDSP) guideline, the combined use of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in a stepwise fashion has been recommended to identify the group of people needing life-style counseling or medical care. However, the efficacy of this program has not been fully evaluated, as an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is not mandatory in the guideline. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of the screening test scenario, in which an OGTT would be applied to people needing life-style counseling or medical care on this guideline: FPG 110-125 mg/dl and HbA1c over 5.5%. Subjects were 1,726 inhabitants without a previous history of DM in the Funagata study, which is a population-based survey conducted in Yamagata prefecture to clarify the risk factors, related conditions, and consequences of DM. DM was diagnosed according to the 1999 World Health Organization criteria. The prevalence of undiagnosed DM was 6.6%. The tested screening scenario gave a sensitivity of 55.3%, a specificity of 98.4%, a positive predictive value of 70.8%, and a negative predictive value of 96.9% for undiagnosed DM. In conclusion, the screening test scenario, in which an OGTT would be followed by the combined use of FPG and HbA1c in a stepwise fashion according to the JNDSP guideline, was not effective in identifying people with undiagnosed DM.

  7. Association of prediabetes by fasting glucose and/or haemoglobin A1c levels with subclinical atherosclerosis and impaired renal function: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Xing, Frank Y F; Neeland, Ian J; Gore, M Odette; Ayers, Colby R; Paixao, Andre R M; Turer, Aslan T; Berry, Jarett D; Khera, Amit; de Lemos, James A; McGuire, Darren K

    2014-01-01

    Prediabetes defined by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) predicts incident diabetes, but their individual and joint associations with micro- and macro-vascular risk remain poorly defined. FPG, HbA1c, coronary artery calcium (CAC), carotid wall thickness, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were measured in adults free from prior diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the Dallas Heart Study 2 (DHS-2), a population-based cohort study. Prediabetes was defined by FPG 100-125 mg/dL and/or HbA1c 5.7%-6.4%. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyse associations of HbA1c and/or FPG in the prediabetes range with subclinical atherosclerosis and renal measures. The study comprised 2340 participants, median age = 49 years; 60% women and 50% black. Those with prediabetes were older (52 vs 48 years), more often men (63% vs 53%), black (53% vs 47%) and obese (58% vs 40%; p < 0.001 for each). Prediabetes was captured by FPG alone (43%), HbA1c alone (30%) or both (27%). Those with prediabetes by HbA1c or FPG versus normal HbA1c/FPG had more CAC [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-2.2], higher carotid wall thickness (1.32 vs 1.29 mm, p < 0.001), eGFR < 60 mL/min [OR = 1.6 (95% CI = 1.1-2.4)], UACR > 30 mg/dL [OR = 1.8 (95% CI = 1.2-2.7)] and a higher odds for the composite eGFR + UACR [chronic kidney disease (CKD) ≥ 2] [OR = 1.9 (95% CI = 1.5-2.6)]. After multivariable adjustment, none of these associations remained significant. Prediabetes defined by HbA1c and/or FPG criteria is crudely associated with markers of diabetic macro- and micro-vascular disease, but not after statistical adjustment, suggesting the relationships are attributable to other characteristics of the prediabetes population.

  8. Association of African genetic ancestry with fasting glucose and HbA1c levels in non-diabetic individuals: the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Prediabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Richard W.; Piccolo, Rebecca; López, Lenny; Florez, Jose C.; Porneala, Bianca; Marceau, Lisa; McKinlay, John B.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis To test among diabetes-free urban community-dwelling adults the hypothesis that the proportion of African genetic ancestry is positively associated with glycaemia, after accounting for other continental ancestry proportions, BMI and socioeconomic status (SES). Methods The Boston Area Community Health cohort is a multi-stage 1:1:1 stratified random sample of self-identified African-American, Hispanic and white adults from three Boston inner city areas. We measured 62 ancestry informative markers, fasting glucose (FG), HbA1c, BMI and SES (income, education, occupation and insurance status) and analysed 1,387 eligible individuals (379 African-American, 411 Hispanic, 597 white) without clinical or biochemical evidence of diabetes. We used three-heritage multinomial linear regression models to test the association of FG or HbA1c with genetic ancestry proportion adjusted for: (1) age and sex; (2) age, sex and BMI; and (3) age, sex, BMI and SES. Results Mean age- and sex-adjusted FG levels were 5.73 and 5.54 mmol/l among those with 100% African or European ancestry, respectively. Using per cent European ancestry as the referent, each 1% increase in African ancestry proportion was associated with an age- and sex-adjusted FG increase of 0.0019 mmol/l ( p=0.01). In the BMI- and SES-adjusted model the slope was 0.0019 ( p=0.02). Analysis of HbA1c gave similar results. Conclusions/interpretation A greater proportion of African genetic ancestry is independently associated with higher FG levels in a non-diabetic community-based cohort, even accounting for other ancestry proportions, obesity and SES. The results suggest that differences between African-Americans and whites in type 2 diabetes risk may include genetically mediated differences in glucose homeostasis. PMID:24942103

  9. Association of African genetic ancestry with fasting glucose and HbA1c levels in non-diabetic individuals: the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Prediabetes Study.

    PubMed

    Meigs, James B; Grant, Richard W; Piccolo, Rebecca; López, Lenny; Florez, Jose C; Porneala, Bianca; Marceau, Lisa; McKinlay, John B

    2014-09-01

    To test among diabetes-free urban community-dwelling adults the hypothesis that the proportion of African genetic ancestry is positively associated with glycaemia, after accounting for other continental ancestry proportions, BMI and socioeconomic status (SES). The Boston Area Community Health cohort is a multi-stage 1:1:1 stratified random sample of self-identified African-American, Hispanic and white adults from three Boston inner city areas. We measured 62 ancestry informative markers, fasting glucose (FG), HbA1c, BMI and SES (income, education, occupation and insurance status) and analysed 1,387 eligible individuals (379 African-American, 411 Hispanic, 597 white) without clinical or biochemical evidence of diabetes. We used three-heritage multinomial linear regression models to test the association of FG or HbA1c with genetic ancestry proportion adjusted for: (1) age and sex; (2) age, sex and BMI; and (3) age, sex, BMI and SES. Mean age- and sex-adjusted FG levels were 5.73 and 5.54 mmol/l among those with 100% African or European ancestry, respectively. Using per cent European ancestry as the referent, each 1% increase in African ancestry proportion was associated with an age- and sex-adjusted FG increase of 0.0019 mmol/l (p = 0.01). In the BMI- and SES-adjusted model the slope was 0.0019 (p = 0.02). Analysis of HbA1c gave similar results. A greater proportion of African genetic ancestry is independently associated with higher FG levels in a non-diabetic community-based cohort, even accounting for other ancestry proportions, obesity and SES. The results suggest that differences between African-Americans and whites in type 2 diabetes risk may include genetically mediated differences in glucose homeostasis.

  10. Association of prediabetes, defined by fasting glucose, HbA1c only, or combined criteria, with the risk of cardiovascular disease in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Kyu; Lee, Jung Bok; Kim, Seon Ha; Jo, Min-Woo; Kim, Eun Hee; Hwang, Jenie Yoonoo; Bae, Sung Jin; Jung, Chang Hee; Lee, Woo Je; Park, Joong-Yeol; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Young-Hak; Choe, Jaewon

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the association between cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and prediabetes defined by either fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, or their combination in a Korean population. In all, 76 434 South Koreans who voluntarily underwent a general health examination in the Health Screening & Promotion Center (Asan Medical Center) were analyzed after excluding patients with a previous history of CVD. Cardiovascular events and death due to CVD during a median follow-up period of 3.1 years (interquartile range 1.9-4.3 years) were identified from the Nationwide Health Insurance Claims Database and death certificates using ICD-10 codes. Age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for overall CVD events were significantly greater for subjects with prediabetes defined by FPG only (HR 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-1.31), HbA1c only (HR 1.28; 95% CI 1.16-1.42), and combined criteria (HR 1.20; 95% CI 1.09-1.32) compared with the normoglycemic group. After adjusting for multiple conventional risk factors (e.g. hypertension, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking status, family history of CVD, and BMI), the HRs for overall CVD were significantly increased only for participants with prediabetes defined by HbA1c. Age- and sex-adjusted HRs for major ischemic heart disease events were significantly increased for subjects with prediabetes defined either by HbA1c or combined criteria. Similarly, age- and sex-adjusted HRs for percutaneous coronary intervention were significantly higher for subjects with prediabetes defined by HbA1c only. For diabetes, the multivariate-adjusted HRs for all outcomes were significantly increased by all three criteria. Adding an HbA1c criterion when defining prediabetes in Koreans can help identify individuals with an increased risk of CVD. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose and the prediction of diabetes: Inter99, AusDiab and D.E.S.I.R.

    PubMed

    Soulimane, Soraya; Simon, Dominique; Shaw, Jonathan; Witte, Daniel; Zimmet, Paul; Vol, Sylviane; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Magliano, Dianna; Vistisen, Dorte; Balkau, Beverley

    2012-06-01

    With diabetes defined by HbA1c≥6.5% and/or FPG≥7.0mmol/l and/or diabetes treatment, we investigated HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) thresholds/change-points above which the incidence of diabetes increases. Data are Danish (Inter99), Australian (AusDiab) and French (D.E.S.I.R.), with respectively 4930, 6012 and 3784 non-diabetic participants. Diabetes incidences at 5 years for Inter99 and AusDiab and at 6 years for D.E.S.I.R. were 2.3%, 3.1% and 2.4% respectively and incidences increased with baseline HbA1c and FPG. As HbA1c distributions differed between cohorts, HbA1c was standardized on D.E.S.I.R. data. Change-points where diabetes incidence increased were identified for HbA1c (%) after standardization: 5.1 (4.9-5.6) (Inter99), 5.4 (5.1-5.6) (AusDiab), 5.3 (5.1-5.7) (D.E.S.I.R.); for FPG change-points (mmol/l) were 5.1 (…-6.1) (Inter99), 5.5 (5.2-5.8) (AusDiab), no change-point for D.E.S.I.R. Using current diabetes risk criteria HbA1c≥5.7% and/or FPG≥5.6mmol/l to screen for diabetes provided high sensitivity (over 89%) and positive predictive values: 4.3%, 6.9%, and 5.9% respectively. HbA1c and FPG change-points predicting incident diabetes did not always exist, differed across studies, when available were generally lower than current criteria with wide confidence intervals. Using jointly HbA1c≥5.7% and/or FPG≥5.6mmol/l as a criterion for the risk of incident diabetes is appropriate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Screening for dysglycaemia in patients with coronary artery disease as reflected by fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, and HbA1c: a report from EUROASPIRE IV--a survey from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Gyberg, Viveca; De Bacquer, Dirk; Kotseva, Kornelia; De Backer, Guy; Schnell, Oliver; Sundvall, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Wood, David; Rydén, Lars

    2015-05-14

    Three methods are used to identify dysglycaemia: fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h post-load plasma glucose (2hPG) from the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The aim was to describe the yield and concordance of FPG, HbA1c, and 2hPG alone, or in combination, to identify dysglycaemia in patients with coronary artery disease. In EUROASPIRE IV, a cross-sectional survey of patients aged 18-80 years with coronary artery disease in 24 European countries, 4004 patients with no reported history of diabetes had FPG, 2hPG, and HbA1c measured. All participants were divided into different glycaemic categories according to the ADA and WHO criteria for dysglycaemia. Using all screening tests together, 1158 (29%) had undetected diabetes. Out of them, the proportion identified by FPG was 75%, by 2hPG 40%, by HbA1c 17%, by FPG + HbA1c 81%, and by OGTT (=FPG + 2hPG) 96%. Only 7% were detected by all three methods FPG, 2hPG, and HbA1c. The ADA criteria (FPG + HbA1c) identified 90% of the population as having dysglycaemia compared with 73% with the WHO criteria (OGTT = FPG + 2hPG). Screening according to the ADA criteria for FPG + HbA1c identified 2643 (66%) as having a 'high risk for diabetes', while the WHO criteria for FPG + 2hPG identified 1829 patients (46%). In patients with established coronary artery disease, the OGTT identifies the largest number of patients with previously undiagnosed diabetes and should be the preferred test when assessing the glycaemic state of such patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Does A1c consistently reflect mean plasma glucose?

    PubMed

    Shrom, David; Sarwat, Samiha; Ilag, Liza; Bloomgarden, Zachary T

    2010-06-01

    A1c, a surrogate measure of glycemic control, is known to have a strong linear correlation with mean plasma glucose (MPG) when analyzed in populations of patients. However, clinically significant intersubject variability in this relationship exists, which suggests that A1c measurements may not reflect actual glycemic control in some patients. In the present study we explored the extent to which A1c accurately represents glycemic control, as measured by MPG, for individual patients. Data were pooled from randomized clinical trials in which A1c and self-monitored plasma glucose (SMPG) profiles were collected by patients with Type 2 diabetes treated with insulin analog regimens. MPG levels were calculated from SMPG profiles. Distributions of MPG were analyzed for patients within similar ranges of A1c (<6.5%, 6.5%-<7.5%, 7.5%-<8.5%, 8.5%-<9.5%, and ≥9.5%) and distributions of A1c were analyzed in patients within similar ranges of MPG (<6.1, 6.1-<7.8, 7.8-<9.4, 9.4-<11.1, and ≥11.1 mmol/L). Substantial proportions of patients had clinically significant differences between A1c and MPG. For example, among 260 patients with A1c between 6.5% and 7.5%, 10% had MPG levels <6.4 mmol/L, whereas 10% had MPG >9.5 mmol/L. Among the 224 patients with MPG levels ≥6.1 mmol/L and <7.8 mmol/L, 10% had A1c <6% and 10% had A1c >8.1%. In the absence of SMPG, A1c may inadequately represent glycemic control for many diabetic patients. © 2010 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. The difference between oats and beta-glucan extract intake in the management of HbA1c, fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    He, Li-xia; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Yuan-sheng; Li, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Increasing oats and beta-glucan extract intake has been associated with improved glycemic control, which is associated with the reduction in the development of diabetes. This study aims to assess the different effects between oat (whole and bran) and beta-glucan extract intake on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. PubMed, Embase, Medline, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Web of Science were searched up to February 2014. We included randomized controlled trials with interventions that lasted at least four weeks that compared oats and beta-glucan (extracted from oats or other sources) intake with a control. A total of 1351 articles were screened for eligibility, and relevant data were extracted from 18 studies (n = 1024). Oat product dose ranged from 20 g d(-1) to 136 g d(-1), and beta-glucan extract dose ranged from 3 g d(-1) to 10 g d(-1). Compared with the control, oat intake resulted in a greater decrease in fasting glucose and insulin of subjects (P < 0.05), but beta-glucan extract intake did not. Furthermore, oat intake resulted in a greater decrease in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (P < 0.001, I(2) = 0%) and fasting glucose (P < 0.001, I(2) = 68%) after removing one study using a concentrate and a different design and fasting insulin of type 2 diabetes (T2D) (P < 0.001, I(2) = 0%). The intake of oats and beta-glucan extracted from oats were effective in decreasing fasting glucose (P = 0.007, I(2) = 91%) and fasting insulin of T2D (P < 0.001, I(2) = 0%) and tented to lower HbA1c (P = 0.09, I(2) = 92%). Higher consumption of whole oats and oat bran, but not oat or barley beta-glucan extracts, are associated with lower HbA1c, fasting glucose and fasting insulin of T2D, hyperlipidaemic and overweight subjects, especially people with T2D, which supports the need for clinical trials to evaluate the potential role of oats in approaching to the management of glycemic control and insulin sensitivity of diabetes or metabolic syndrome subjects.

  15. Hemoglobin A1c and Self-Monitored Average Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris P.; Breton, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previously we have introduced the eA1c—a new approach to real-time tracking of average glycemia and estimation of HbA1c from infrequent self-monitoring (SMBG) data, which was developed and tested in type 2 diabetes. We now test eA1c in type 1 diabetes and assess its relationship to the hemoglobin glycation index (HGI)—an established predictor of complications and treatment effect. Methods: Reanalysis of previously published 12-month data from 120 patients with type 1 diabetes, age 39.15 (14.35) years, 51/69 males/females, baseline HbA1c = 7.99% (1.48), duration of diabetes 20.28 (12.92) years, number SMBG/day = 4.69 (1.84). Surrogate fasting BG and 7-point daily profiles were derived from these unstructured SMBG data and the previously reported eA1c method was applied without any changes. Following the literature, we calculated HGI = HbA1c – (0.009 × Fasting BG + 6.8). Results: The correlation of eA1c with reference HbA1c was r = .75, and its deviation from reference was MARD = 7.98%; 95% of all eA1c values fell within ±20% from reference. The HGI was well approximated by a linear combination of the eA1c calibration factors: HGI = 0.007552*θ1 + 0.007645*θ2 – 3.154 (P < .0001); 73% of low versus moderate-high HGIs were correctly classified by the same factors as well. Conclusions: The eA1c procedure developed in type 2 diabetes to track in real-time changes in average glycemia and present the results in HbA1c-equivalent units has shown similar performance in type 1 diabetes. The eA1c calibration factors are highly predictive of the HGI, thereby explaining partially the biological variation causing discrepancies between HbA1c and its linear estimates from SMBG data. PMID:26553023

  16. Effect of dietary polyphenols from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) pomace on adipose tissue mass, fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and plasma monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels in OLETF rats.

    PubMed

    Yui, Kazuki; Uematsu, Hiroki; Muroi, Keisuke; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Baba, Minako; Osada, Kyoichi

    2013-01-01

    Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) pomace contains procyanidin-rich polyphenols, which are large oligomeric compounds of catechin. We studied the effect of high dose (1%) of dietary hop pomace polyphenols (HPs) in Otsuka Long-EvansTokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes. By 70 days, the rats fed HPs tended to have a lower body weight and reduced mesenteric white adipose tissue weight than the rats fed a control diet. Triglyceride levels in both plasma and liver tended to be lower in the HPs-fed group than in the control group. Dietary HPs substantially suppressed the activities of hepatic fatty acid synthetase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and malic enzyme, through the suppression of SREBP1c mRNA expression in OLETF rats. Moreover, in the HPs-fed group, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression and fasting blood glucose levels at 40 days, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels at 70 days were significantly lower than those in the control group. Thus, dietary HPs may exert an ameliorative function on hepatic fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, and inflammatory response accompanying the increase of the adipose tissue mass in OLETF rats.

  17. Red cell distribution width is associated with hemoglobin A1C elevation, but not glucose elevation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xue; Wan, Min; Gu, Yeqing; Song, Yanqi; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Li; Meng, Ge; Wu, Hongmei; Xia, Yang; Shi, HongBin; Su, Qian; Fang, Liyun; Yang, Huijun; Yu, Fei; Sun, Shaomei; Wang, Xing; Zhou, Ming; Jia, Qiyu; Song, Kun; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Ming; Niu, Kaijun

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the association between red cell distribution width (RDW) and elevation of glucose/glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). An analysis was conducted using data from a prospective cohort study of adults. People without prediabetes or diabetes (n=7,795) were followed for a mean of 2.90years (range: 1-7years, 95% confidence interval: 2.86-2.94years). Glucose elevation is defined as fasting glucose levels exceeding 5.6mmol/l, or 2-hour glucose values in the oral glucose tolerance test exceeding 7.8mmol/l. HbA1c elevation is defined as a HbA1c value exceeding a normal limit of 39mmol/mol (5.7%). Adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association between RDW quartiles and elevation of HbA1c/glucose. The multiple-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of HbA1c elevation for increased quartiles of RDW were 1.00 (reference), 1.08 (0.89, 1.30), 1.28 (1.07, 1.54), and 1.54 (1.29, 1.85) (P for trend<0.0001). However, no significant association was observed between RDW and blood glucose (fasting and postprandial). Elevated RDW is independently related to future HbA1c elevation, but not to glucose elevation. This suggests that RDW may associate with HbA1c through a non-glycemic way, which should be taken into consideration when using HbA1c as a diagnostic criterion of prediabetes or diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiometabolic Risk Profiles in Patients With Impaired Fasting Glucose and/or Hemoglobin A1c 5.7% to 6.4%: Evidence for a Gradient According to Diagnostic Criteria: The PREDAPS Study.

    PubMed

    Giráldez-García, Carolina; Sangrós, F Javier; Díaz-Redondo, Alicia; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Serrano, Rosario; Díez, Javier; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; García-Soidán, F Javier; Artola, Sara; Ezkurra, Patxi; Carrillo, Lourdes; Millaruelo, J Manuel; Seguí, Mateu; Martínez-Candela, Juan; Muñoz, Pedro; Goday, Albert; Regidor, Enrique

    2015-11-01

    It has been suggested that the early detection of individuals with prediabetes can help prevent cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the current study was to examine the cardiometabolic risk profile in patients with prediabetes according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and/or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) criteria.Cross-sectional analysis from the 2022 patients in the Cohort study in Primary Health Care on the Evolution of Patients with Prediabetes (PREDAPS Study) was developed. Four glycemic status groups were defined based on American Diabetes Association criteria. Information about cardiovascular risk factors-body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glomerular filtration-and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed. Mean values of clinical and biochemical characteristics and frequencies of metabolic syndrome were estimated adjusting by age, sex, educational level, and family history of diabetes.A linear trend (P < 0.001) was observed in most of the cardiovascular risk factors and in all components of metabolic syndrome. Normoglycemic individuals had the best values, individuals with both criteria of prediabetes had the worst, and individuals with only one-HbA1c or FPG-criterion had an intermediate position. Metabolic syndrome was present in 15.0% (95% confidence interval: 12.6-17.4), 59.5% (54.0-64.9), 62.0% (56.0-68.0), and 76.2% (72.8-79.6) of individuals classified in normoglycemia, isolated HbA1c, isolated FPG, and both criteria groups, respectively.In conclusion, individuals with prediabetes, especially those with both criteria, have worse cardiometabolic risk profile than normoglycemic individuals. These results suggest the need to use both criteria in the clinical practice to identify those individuals with the highest cardiovascular risk, in order to offer them special attention with intensive lifestyle intervention programs.

  19. Cardiometabolic Risk Profiles in Patients With Impaired Fasting Glucose and/or Hemoglobin A1c 5.7% to 6.4%: Evidence for a Gradient According to Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Giráldez-García, Carolina; Sangrós, F. Javier; Díaz-Redondo, Alicia; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Serrano, Rosario; Díez, Javier; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; García-Soidán, F. Javier; Artola, Sara; Ezkurra, Patxi; Carrillo, Lourdes; Millaruelo, J. Manuel; Seguí, Mateu; Martínez-Candela, Juan; Muñoz, Pedro; Goday, Albert; Regidor, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It has been suggested that the early detection of individuals with prediabetes can help prevent cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the current study was to examine the cardiometabolic risk profile in patients with prediabetes according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and/or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) criteria. Cross-sectional analysis from the 2022 patients in the Cohort study in Primary Health Care on the Evolution of Patients with Prediabetes (PREDAPS Study) was developed. Four glycemic status groups were defined based on American Diabetes Association criteria. Information about cardiovascular risk factors–body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glomerular filtration–and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed. Mean values of clinical and biochemical characteristics and frequencies of metabolic syndrome were estimated adjusting by age, sex, educational level, and family history of diabetes. A linear trend (P < 0.001) was observed in most of the cardiovascular risk factors and in all components of metabolic syndrome. Normoglycemic individuals had the best values, individuals with both criteria of prediabetes had the worst, and individuals with only one–HbA1c or FPG–criterion had an intermediate position. Metabolic syndrome was present in 15.0% (95% confidence interval: 12.6–17.4), 59.5% (54.0–64.9), 62.0% (56.0–68.0), and 76.2% (72.8–79.6) of individuals classified in normoglycemia, isolated HbA1c, isolated FPG, and both criteria groups, respectively. In conclusion, individuals with prediabetes, especially those with both criteria, have worse cardiometabolic risk profile than normoglycemic individuals. These results suggest the need to use both criteria in the clinical practice to identify those individuals with the highest cardiovascular risk, in order to offer them special attention with intensive lifestyle intervention programs. PMID:26554799

  20. A1C Is Associated With Intima-Media Thickness in Individuals With Normal Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bobbert, Thomas; Mai, Knut; Fischer-Rosinský, Antje; Pfeiffer, Andreas F.H.; Spranger, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE One-hour glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was recently proposed as a valuable marker to identify individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and increased intima-media thickness (IMT). However, central markers of glycemic control were not considered. The aim of this study was to identify which marker of glycemic control is most informative with respect to the variation of IMT in individuals with NGT. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cardiovascular risk factors, glucose metabolism (OGTT), and IMT were determined in 1,219 nondiabetic individuals (851 women, 368 men; 558 with NGT). RESULTS One-hour glucose and A1C levels were significantly correlated to carotid IMT in individuals with NGT, whereas fasting and 2-h glucose levels were not informative. Only A1C was associated with IMT independent of other confounders, whereas 1-h glucose was not informative. Comparable results were found in the total cohort, including individuals with IFG and IGT. CONCLUSIONS A1C was the most informative glycemic marker with respect to IMT in individuals with NGT. PMID:19808917

  1. A1C is associated with intima-media thickness in individuals with normal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bobbert, Thomas; Mai, Knut; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Spranger, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    One-hour glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was recently proposed as a valuable marker to identify individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and increased intima-media thickness (IMT). However, central markers of glycemic control were not considered. The aim of this study was to identify which marker of glycemic control is most informative with respect to the variation of IMT in individuals with NGT. Cardiovascular risk factors, glucose metabolism (OGTT), and IMT were determined in 1,219 nondiabetic individuals (851 women, 368 men; 558 with NGT). One-hour glucose and A1C levels were significantly correlated to carotid IMT in individuals with NGT, whereas fasting and 2-h glucose levels were not informative. Only A1C was associated with IMT independent of other confounders, whereas 1-h glucose was not informative. Comparable results were found in the total cohort, including individuals with IFG and IGT. A1C was the most informative glycemic marker with respect to IMT in individuals with NGT.

  2. Professional flash continuous glucose monitoring as a supplement to A1C in primary care.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Irl B

    2017-09-25

    Decreasing glycated hemoglobin (A1C) is the primary goal of current diabetes management due to intervention studies in type 1 and type 2 diabetes associating levels <7.0% (53 mmol/mol) with lower complication risk. Strategic self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is also recommended to achieve greater time in range, with fewer extremes of hypo- or hyperglycemia. Unlike A1C, SMBG can distinguish among fasting, prandial, and postprandial hyperglycemia; uncover glycemic variability, including potentially dangerous hypoglycemia; and provide feedback to patients about the effects of behavior and medication on glycemic control. However, it has the drawback of capturing only static glucose readings and users are often dependent on time-pressed clinicians to interpret numerous data points. A novel flash continuous glucose monitoring (FCGM) device used for a single 2-week period with a readily interpretable data report know as the ambulatory glucose profile (AGP) has the potential to overcome limitations of conventional technologies, with less cost and greater convenience. This review summarizes the rationale for using intermittent FCGM as a supplement to A1C in primary care, and provides a stepwise approach to interpreting the AGP visual display for efficient individualized therapy.

  3. Translating the A1C assay into estimated average glucose values.

    PubMed

    Nathan, David M; Kuenen, Judith; Borg, Rikke; Zheng, Hui; Schoenfeld, David; Heine, Robert J

    2008-08-01

    The A1C assay, expressed as the percent of hemoglobin that is glycated, measures chronic glycemia and is widely used to judge the adequacy of diabetes treatment and adjust therapy. Day-to-day management is guided by self-monitoring of capillary glucose concentrations (milligrams per deciliter or millimoles per liter). We sought to define the mathematical relationship between A1C and average glucose (AG) levels and determine whether A1C could be expressed and reported as AG in the same units as used in self-monitoring. A total of 507 subjects, including 268 patients with type 1 diabetes, 159 with type 2 diabetes, and 80 nondiabetic subjects from 10 international centers, was included in the analyses. A1C levels obtained at the end of 3 months and measured in a central laboratory were compared with the AG levels during the previous 3 months. AG was calculated by combining weighted results from at least 2 days of continuous glucose monitoring performed four times, with seven-point daily self-monitoring of capillary (fingerstick) glucose performed at least 3 days per week. Approximately 2,700 glucose values were obtained by each subject during 3 months. Linear regression analysis between the A1C and AG values provided the tightest correlations (AG(mg/dl) = 28.7 x A1C - 46.7, R(2) = 0.84, P < 0.0001), allowing calculation of an estimated average glucose (eAG) for A1C values. The linear regression equations did not differ significantly across subgroups based on age, sex, diabetes type, race/ethnicity, or smoking status. A1C levels can be expressed as eAG for most patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

  4. Increased hemoglobin A1c threshold for prediabetes remarkably improving the agreement between A1c and oral glucose tolerance test criteria in obese population.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Ma, Hao; Na, Lixin; Jiang, Shuo; Lv, Lin; Li, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Na, Guanqiong; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear why the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes, especially prediabetes, between diagnosed by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) criteria, is substantially discordant. We aimed to evaluate the effects of obesity on the agreement between HbA1c and OGTT for diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes and identify the optimal HbA1c cutoff values in different body mass index (BMI) classifications. In a population-based, cross-sectional study in Harbin, China, 4325 individuals aged 20-74 years without a prior diagnosed diabetes were involved in this study. measure The performance and optimal cutoff points of HbA1c were assessed by receiver-operating characteristic curve. The contribution of BMI to HbA1c was analyzed by structural equational model. The agreement between HbA1c criteria and OGTT decreased with BMI gain (κ = 0.359, 0.312, and 0.275 in a normal weight, overweight, and obese population, respectively). The structural equational model results showed that BMI was significantly associated with HbA1c in normal glucose tolerance and prediabetes subjects but not in diabetes subjects. At a specificity of 80% for prediabetes and 97.5% for diabetes, the optimal HbA1c cutoff points for prediabetes and diabetes were 5.6% and 6.4% in normal-weight, 5.7% and 6.5% in overweight, and 6.0% and 6.5% in an obese population. When the new HbA1c cutoff values were used, the agreement in obese subjects increased almost to the level in normal-weight subjects. The poor agreement between HbA1c and OGTT criteria in an obese population can be significantly improved through increasing the HbA1c threshold for prediabetes.

  5. A Comparison of HbA1c and Fasting Blood Sugar Tests in General Population

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfari, Zahra; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Alizadeh, Sakineh Mohammad; Atapour, Jamileh; Zolala, Farzaneh

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Early diagnosis of diabetes is crucially important in reduction of the complications. Although HbA1c is an accurate marker for the prediction of complications, less information is available about its accuracy in diagnosis of diabetes. In this study, the association between HbA1c and FBS was assessed through a cross-sectional population-based study. Methods: A random sample of population in Kerman city was selected. The total number was 604 people. Their HbA1c and fasting blood sugar (FBS) were tested. The association between HbA1c and FBS and also their sensitivity, specificity and predictive values in detection of abnormal values of each other were determined. Results: The association of HbA1c with FBS was relatively strong particularly in diabetic subjects. Generally, FBS was a more accurate predictor for HbA1c compared with HbA1c as a predictor of FBS. Although the optimum cutoff point of HbA1c was >6.15%, its precision was comparable with the conventional cutoff point of >6%. Conclusions: In conclusion, FBS sounds more reliable to separate diabetic from non-diabetic subjects than HbA1c. In case of being interested in using HbA1c in screening, the conventional cutoff points of 6% is an acceptable threshold for discrimination of diabetics from non-diabetics. PMID:21566790

  6. PROFESSIONAL CONTINUOUS FLASH GLUCOSE MONITORING WITH AMBULATORY GLUCOSE PROFILE REPORTING TO SUPPLEMENT A1C: RATIONALE AND PRACTICAL IMPLEMENTATION.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Irl B; Verderese, Carol A

    2017-08-17

    Recent consensus statements strongly advocate downloading and interpretation of continuous glucose data for diabetes management in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Supplementing periodic A1C testing with intermittent continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) using a standardized report form known as the ambulatory glucose profile (AGP) is an evolving standard of care. The rationale for this approach and its implementation with a recently approved novel monitoring technology are explored. Search of the medical literature, professional guidelines, and realworld evidence guided this introduction of an integrative practice framework that uses AGP in conjunction with intermittent continuous "flash" glucose monitoring (CFGM) as a supplement to A1C testing. The combination of intermittent continuous glucose pattern analysis, standardized glucose metrics, and a readily interpretable data report, as discussed in this review, has the potential to practically extend the recognized benefits of CGM to more patients, and clarify the relationship between A1C and average glucose levels in individual cases. Novel CFGM technologies portend greater use of continuous forms of glucose monitoring and wider adoption of AGP report analysis. Additional formal and empirical evidence is needed to more fully characterize best practice.

  7. [HbA1c is not enough in screening for impaired glucose metabolism. Glucose tolerance tests are also needed, as shown in Swedish prospective epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Margareta; Daka, Bledar; Larsson, Charlotte

    2015-09-29

    An HbA1c threshold of ≥ 42 mmol/mol has been proposed to diagnose prediabetes. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the proposed threshold for detection of individuals with prediabetes was examined in a study of 573 randomly selected individuals from Vara and Skövde. In addition, the utility of the FINDRISC questionnaire and of a fasting glucose test in combination with three short questions concerning BMI, heredity for type 2 diabetes and known hypertension was examined. Results from an oral glucose tolerance test were used as reference. The sensitivity of HbA1c and FINDRISC to detect individuals with IGT was 16 and 26 per cent respectively. Questions regarding BMI, heredity and hypertension together with a fasting glucose test yielded a sensitivity of 50%, but a lower specificity and positive predictive value. We conclude that HbA1c inefficiently detected individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and that oral glucose tolerance tests can still preferably be recommended.

  8. The relationship of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin A1C levels among nondiabetic trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Tammy R; O'Neill, Patrick J; Kanneganti, Shalini R; Davis, Karole M; Drachman, David A

    2008-01-01

    : Hyperglycemia (blood glucose >/=110 mg/dL) in trauma patients without a known history of diabetes mellitus (DM) is often attributed to the metabolic stress response of injury. We studied whether this hyperglycemia may actually indicate the presence of occult DM (ODM) as demonstrated by elevated glycosylated hemoglobin A1C (gHbA1C). : After obtaining approval from the Institutional Review Board, a prospective, sequential case series study of nondiabetic adult patients presenting to an urban Level I trauma center from September 2006 to February 2007 was performed. In addition to basic demographics, all hyperglycemic patients had a measured gHbA1C. ODM was diagnosed when gHbA1C was >/=6%. : A total of 1,039 trauma patients were screened with 192 (18%) noted to be hyperglycemic. Of these 192 patients, 22% (n = 42) were found to have an elevated gHbA1C. Using logistic regression, being older (Odds ratio [OR] = 1.04; p < 0.004), having a higher body mass index (BMI) (OR = 1.12; p < 0.003), and being Native American (OR = 5.08; p < 0.017) were each identified as significant risk factors for elevated gHbA1C levels and the diagnosis of ODM. In contrast, the magnitude of observed hyperglycemia, gender, or other races were not shown to be significant risk factors for the presence of ODM. : Almost a quarter of nondiabetic trauma patients presenting with hyperglycemia were found to have elevated gHbA1C levels and ODM. Risk factors for ODM included advancing age and body mass index as well as being Native American. The hyperglycemia seen in trauma patients should not solely be attributed to the hormonal and metabolic response to injury; wider ODM screening for both acute management strategies and long-term health benefits is warranted.

  9. FTO, abdominal adiposity, fasting hyperglycemia associated with elevated HbA1c in Japanese middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Midori; Yoshida, Toru; Bin, Wu; Fukuo, Keisuke; Kazumi, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    FTO is the most important polygene for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Our aims were to investigate whether a variant in FTO affects glucose dysregulation through its effect on fat accumulation or distribution, and when and how FTO influences fat accumulation and distribution and glucose dysregulation from birth until midlife. A total of 454 Japanese female university students (mean age: 20 years) and 132 middle-aged women (mean age: 50 years) who were the biological mothers of the students underwent the following: genotyping for rs1558902 in the FTO gene, assessment of fat accumulation and distribution, obesity-related metabolic traits and serum adipokine measurement. A subsample of 364 students reported their weight history since birth. The A allele in rs1558902 was substantially less common in young and middle-aged Japanese women (18 and 17%, respectively) than in the European population (45%). The strong effect of genotype AA on BMI was evident at age 12, 15, 20 and 50 years whereas there was no effect on birth weight. In young and middle-aged women, the variant was strongly associated with higher body weight and fat mass. The effects on abdominal girth, fasting glucose, homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance and HbA1c were evident in mothers but not in students. In addition, genotype AA was associated with increased white blood cell counts and hsCRP in mothers only. Associations with fasting glucose, insulin resistance, and white blood cell counts remained after correction for BMI, abdominal girth and fat mass. In multiple logistic regression analysis, AA homozygote in FTO was associated with higher odds of overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m(2)) in young (OR 1.73 (95%CI 1.06-30.0)) and middle-aged women (OR 1.73 (95%CI 1.06-30.0)). It was also associated with higher odds of abdominal fat accumulation (abdominal girth ≥90 cm, OR 1.73 (95%CI 1.06-30.0)) and fasting hyperglycemia (≥100 mg/dL) (OR 1.87(95%CI 1.05-40.4)) in middle-aged mothers. Despite the small

  10. GLYCATED ALBUMIN AT 4 WEEKS CORRELATES WITH A1C LEVELS AT 12 WEEKS AND REFLECTS SHORT-TERM GLUCOSE FLUCTUATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Desouza, Cyrus V.; Rosenstock, Julio; Zhou, Rong; Holcomb, Richard G.; Fonseca, Vivian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the performance of glycated albumin (GA) monitoring by comparing it to other measures of glycemic control during intensification of antidiabetic therapy. Methods This 12-week, prospective, multicenter study compared the diagnostic clinical performance of GA to glycated hemoglobin A1C (A1C), fructosamine corrected for albumin (FRA), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and mean blood glucose (MBG) estimated from self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in 30 patients with suboptimally controlled type 1 or 2 diabetes. Results Mean A1C decreased from 9.5% to 8.1%. Mean SMBG correlated closely with CGM (Pearson r = 0.783 for daily estimates and r = 0.746 for weekly estimates, P<.0001). Both GA and FRA levels significantly correlated with changes from baseline in A1C and mean weekly SMBG (P<.001).The lowest observed median GA occurred at 4 weeks, followed by a small increase and then a slight reduction, mirroring changes in overall mean SMBG values. The median A1C fell throughout the treatment period, failing to reflect short-term changes in SMBG. A ≥1% reduction in GA at 4 weeks was significantly associated with a ≥0.5% change in A1C at 12 weeks (odds ratio [OR] = 19.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4, 944, P = .018). Conclusion In patients receiving glucose-lowering therapy, changes in GA at 4 weeks were concordant with changes in A1C at 12 weeks, and both GA and FRA more accurately reflected short-term blood glucose fluctuations than A1C. PMID:26214108

  11. Comparing point-of-care A1C and random plasma glucose for screening diabetes in migrant farm workers.

    PubMed

    Wensil, Ashley M; Smith, Jennifer D; Pound, Melanie W; Herring, Charles

    2013-01-01

    To compare point-of-care (POC) glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) and random plasma glucose (RPG) as a POC screening tool for prediabetes and diabetes in migrant farm workers of eastern North Carolina. Prospective, observational, single-center study. Federally qualified community health center in eastern North Carolina, from August to October 2011. Migrant farm workers 18 years or older who resided in a migrant camp in eastern North Carolina. Diabetes screening using POC A1C and RPG via fingerstick followed by venipuncture A1C and basic metabolic panel in individuals with a positive screening. Positive predictive value (PPV) of POC A1C and RPG, incidence of positive screening, incidence of confirmed diagnosis, concordance rate of the screening tools, and correlation between POC A1C and laboratory A1C. 206 workers participated in the screenings; screening identified 39 individuals with a POC A1C greater than 5.7% and 1 individual with both an RPG of 200 mg/dL or more and a POC A1C greater than 5.7%. Of the 39 individuals found to have a positive screening, 24 presented to Carolina Family Health Centers, Inc., for follow-up venipuncture; however, 1 participant did not have a venipuncture A1C, leaving 23 individuals with complete data. Two participants were diagnosed with diabetes and 17 with prediabetes. POC A1C had a PPV of 82.6%; however, the PPV of RPG could not be calculated due to the number of participants lost to follow-up. POC A1C correlated well with laboratory A1C regardless of time to follow-up. POC A1C should be considered for diabetes screening in high-risk populations. If the screening had been performed with RPG alone, 38 individuals would have gone undetected. Early identification of individuals with elevated blood glucose will likely decrease the risk of long-term complications.

  12. Evaluation of a Methodology for Estimating HbA1c Value by a New Glucose Meter.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Jochen; Flacke, Frank; Dumais, Bonnie; Peters, Casey C; Mallery, Erin B; Taylor, Liz

    2015-05-22

    Accuracy/robustness of HbA1c estimation (eA1c) with an algorithm built into the MyStar Extra blood glucose (BG) meter has been demonstrated by in silico testing. We evaluated the performance and use of eA1c in a clinical setting. Subjects took the BG meter home for 4 months to obtain eA1c in this open-label, single-center study. Laboratory HbA1c values were obtained approximately every 2 weeks and the corresponding eA1c documented. Subjects completed a questionnaire at study end (NCT01885546). There were 133 enrolled subjects (mean [SD] age 60.0 [15.0] years, 69 males, 104 with diabetes, HbA1c 7.0% [1.4]). A total of 1008 pairs of eA1c and laboratory HbA1c values were available. In subjects with diabetes, 97.5% of the eA1c results fell within ± 20% of the laboratory HbA1c, 95.0% within ± 18%, and 90.7% within ± 15%. When results were limited to the reportable HbA1c range of ≥ 6 to ≤ 10%, 99.3% of eA1c values fell within ± 20% of the laboratory HbA1c, 98.5% within ± 18%, and 96.2% within ± 15% Most subjects agreed/strongly agreed that the eA1c section in the user guide and flash cards was easy to follow (72%), they would use the system to track their eA1c (70%), they found the eA1c tool helpful (79%), and the tool may motivate them to manage their diabetes better (83%). Accuracy of the eA1c feature in this clinical setting was similar to the performance in silico. The majority of subjects found this tool helpful and agreed it may motivate to manage their diabetes better. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. Shifting from glucose diagnosis to the new HbA1c diagnosis reduces the capability of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) to screen for glucose abnormalities within a real-life primary healthcare preventive strategy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate differences in the performance of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) as a screening tool for glucose abnormalities after shifting from glucose-based diagnostic criteria to the proposed new hemoglobin (Hb)A1c-based criteria. Methods A cross-sectional primary-care study was conducted as the first part of an active real-life lifestyle intervention to prevent type 2 diabetes within a high-risk Spanish Mediterranean population. Individuals without diabetes aged 45-75 years (n = 3,120) were screened using the FINDRISC. Where feasible, a subsequent 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test and HbA1c test were also carried out (n = 1,712). The performance of the risk score was calculated by applying the area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver operating characteristic, using three sets of criteria (2-hour glucose, fasting glucose, HbA1c) and three diagnostic categories (normal, pre-diabetes, diabetes). Results Defining diabetes by a single HbA1c measurement resulted in a significantly lower diabetes prevalence (3.6%) compared with diabetes defined by 2-hour plasma glucose (9.2%), but was not significantly lower than that obtained using fasting plasma glucose (3.1%). The FINDRISC at a cut-off of 14 had a reasonably high ability to predict diabetes using the diagnostic criteria of 2-hour or fasting glucose (AUC = 0.71) or all glucose abnormalities (AUC = 0.67 and 0.69, respectively). When HbA1c was used as the primary diagnostic criterion, the AUC for diabetes detection dropped to 0.67 (5.6% reduction in comparison with either 2-hour or fasting glucose) and fell to 0.55 for detection of all glucose abnormalities (17.9% and 20.3% reduction, respectively), with a relevant decrease in sensitivity of the risk score. Conclusions A shift from glucose-based diagnosis to HbA1c-based diagnosis substantially reduces the ability of the FINDRISC to screen for glucose abnormalities when applied in this real-life primary-care preventive strategy. PMID

  14. Comparison of A1C to Oral Glucose Tolerance Test for the Diagnosis of Prediabetes in Overweight and Obese Youth.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Aditi; Naraparaju, Gayathri; Friedman, Miriam; Perez-Colon, Sheila; Umpaichitra, Vatcharapan; Chin, Vivian L

    2017-07-01

    IN BRIEF This study reports performance of A1C against the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in predicting prediabetes among overweight and obese African-American and Caribbean children. A retrospective chart review was completed for 230 children. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to find the predictive performances of different tests against the OGTT. A1C alone is a poor discriminator of prediabetes in our study population, with low sensitivity (70%) and specificity (48.8%). BMI z score, A1C, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance are significant predictors of prediabetes and, when taken together, provide better discrimination for prediabetes.

  15. Does glucose variability influence the relationship between mean plasma glucose and HbA1c levels in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients?

    PubMed

    Kuenen, Judith C; Borg, Rikke; Kuik, Dirk J; Zheng, Hui; Schoenfeld, David; Diamant, Michaela; Nathan, David M; Heine, Robert J

    2011-08-01

    The A1C-Derived Average Glucose (ADAG) study demonstrated a linear relationship between HbA(1c) and mean plasma glucose (MPG). As glucose variability (GV) may contribute to glycation, we examined the association of several glucose variability indices and the MPG-HbA(1c) relationship. Analyses included 268 patients with type 1 diabetes and 159 with type 2 diabetes. MPG during 3 months was calculated from 7-point self-monitored plasma glucose and continuous glucose monitoring. We calculated three different measures of GV and used a multiple-step regression model to determine the contribution of the respective GV measures to the MPG-HbA(1c) relationship. GV, as reflected by SD and continuous overlapping net glycemic action, had a significant effect on the MPG-HbA(1c) relationship in type 1 diabetic patients so that high GV led to a higher HbA(1c) level for the same MPG. In type 1 diabetes, the impact of confounding and effect modification of a low versus high SD at an MPG level of 160 mg/dL on the HbA(1c) level is 7.02 vs. 7.43 and 6.96 vs. 7.41. All GV measures showed the same tendency. In only type 1 diabetic patients, GV shows a significant interaction with MPG in the association with HbA(1c). This effect is more pronounced at higher HbA(1c) levels. However, the impact of GV on the HbA(1c) level in type 1 diabetes is modest, particularly when HbA(1c) is close to the treatment target of 7%.

  16. Hemoglobin A1c and mean glucose in patients with type 1 diabetes: analysis of data from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation continuous glucose monitoring randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Darrell M; Xing, Dongyuan; Beck, Roy W; Block, Jennifer; Bode, Bruce; Fox, Larry A; Hirsch, Irl; Kollman, Craig; Laffel, Lori; Ruedy, Katrina J; Steffes, Michael; Tamborlane, William V

    2011-03-01

    To determine the relationship between mean sensor glucose concentrations and hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) values measured in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications laboratory at the University of Minnesota in a cohort of subjects with type 1 diabetes from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation continuous glucose monitoring randomized trial. Near-continuous glucose sensor data (≥ 4 days/week) were collected for 3 months before a central laboratory-measured HbA(1c) was performed for 252 subjects aged 8-74 years, the majority of whom had stable HbA(1c) values (77% within ± 0.4% of the patient mean). The slope (95% CI) for mean sensor glucose concentration (area under the curve) versus a centrally measured HbA(1c) was 24.4 mg/dL (22.0-26.7) for each 1% change in HbA(1c), with an intercept of -16.2 mg/dL (-32.9 to 0.6). Although the slope did not vary with age or sex, there was substantial individual variability, with mean sensor glucose concentrations ranging from 128 to 187 mg/dL for an HbA(1c) of 6.9-7.1%. The root mean square of the errors between the actual mean sensor glucose concentration versus the value calculated using the regression equation was 14.3 mg/dL, whereas the median absolute difference was 10.1 mg/dL. There is substantial individual variability between the measured versus calculated mean glucose concentrations. Consequently, estimated average glucose concentrations calculated from measured HbA(1c) values should be used with caution.

  17. Impact of demographics and disease progression on the relationship between glucose and HbA1c.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Anetta; Møller, Jonas B; Kristensen, Niels R; Klim, Søren; Kjellsson, Maria C; Ingwersen, Steen H; Karlsson, Mats O

    2017-06-15

    Several studies have shown that the relationship between mean plasma glucose (MPG) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) may vary across populations. Especially race has previously been referred to shift the regression line that links MPG to HbA1c at steady-state (Herman & Cohen, 2012). To assess the influence of demographic and disease progression-related covariates on the intercept of the estimated linear MPG-HbA1c relationship in a longitudinal model. Longitudinal patient-level data from 16 late-phase trials in type 2 diabetes with a total of 8927 subjects was used to study covariates for the relationship between MPG and HbA1c. The analysed covariates included age group, BMI, gender, race, diabetes duration, and pre-trial treatment. Differences between trials were taken into account by estimating a trial-to-trial variability component. Participants included 47% females and 20% above 65years. 77% were Caucasian, 9% were Asian, 5% were Black and the remaining 9% were analysed together as other races. Estimates of the change in the intercept of the MPG-HbA1c relationship due to the mentioned covariates were determined using a longitudinal model. The analysis showed that pre-trial treatment with insulin had the most pronounced impact associated with a 0.34% higher HbA1c at a given MPG. However, race, diabetes duration and age group also had an impact on the MPG-HbA1c relationship. Our analysis shows that the relationship between MPG and HbA1c is relatively insensitive to covariates, but shows small variations across populations, which may be relevant to take into account when predicting HbA1c response based on MPG measurements in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. HbA1c in the diagnosis of diabetes and abnormal glucose tolerance in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liyong; Shen, Ximei; Yan, Sunjie; Yuan, Xin; Lu, Juanjuan; Wei, Wenfeng

    2013-07-01

    To assess the suitability of HbA1c as a criterion for the diagnosis of diabetes in patients with Graves' disease. This study enrolled 310 patients with untreated newly diagnosed Graves' disease, 208 patients with euthyroid goiter and 329 age-matched (control) subjects without thyroid disease from Fuzhou, China. The performance of HbA1c against the OGTT for diagnosing diabetes was determined. The Framingham risk score was used to assess general cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The percentage of patients with abnormal glucose metabolism as classified by HbA1c levels was lower than by OGTT criteria in patients with Graves' disease-33.2% vs. 41.3% for pre-diabetes and 4.5% vs. 11.3% for diabetes, respectively. The sensitivity of HbA1c for diagnosing diabetes in patients with Graves' disease was lower than in patients with euthyroid goiter and subjects without thyroid disease (34.9%, 63.2% and 60.6% respectively), while the specificity was similar (99.3%, 98.6%, 97.4%). Approximately 7.4% of patients with Graves' disease diagnosed with diabetes according to OGTT criteria were misdiagnosed as not having the disease by HbA1c, much higher than that for the other two groups. Patients with Graves' disease with diabetes not diagnosed with the disease by HbA1c showed a high risk for CVD. The low sensitivity of the HbA1c criterion underestimated the percentage of diabetes in patients with Graves' disease. Patients with diabetes who were misdiagnosed as not having the disease by HbA1c were at high risk for CVD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA copy number augments performance of A1C and oral glucose tolerance testing in the prediction of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong Beom; Koh, InSong; Nam, Hye-Young; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Lee, Hong Kyu; Han, Bok-Ghee

    2017-01-01

    Here, we tested the performance of the mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA-CN) in predicting future type 2 diabetes (n = 1108). We used the baseline clinical data (age, sex, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure) and the mtDNA-CN, hemoglobin A1c (A1C) levels and results of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) including fasting plasma glucose, 1-hour glucose, and 2-hour glucose levels, to predict future diabetes. We built a prediction model using the baseline data and the diabetes status at biannual follow-up of 8 years. The mean area under curve (AUC) for all follow-ups of the full model including all variables was 0.92 ± 0.04 (mean ± standard deviation), while that of the model excluding the mtDNA-CN was 0.90 ± 0.03. The sensitivity of the f4ull model was much greater than that of the model not including mtDNA-CN: the mean sensitivities of the model with and without mtDNA-CN were 0.60 ± 0.06 and 0.53 ± 0.04, respectively. We found that the mtDNA-CN of peripheral leukocytes is a biomarker that augments the predictive power for future diabetes of A1C and OGTT. We believe that these results could provide invaluable information for developing strategies for the management of diabetes. PMID:28251996

  20. Update on diabetes diagnosis: a historical review of the dilemma of the diagnostic utility of glycohemoglobin A1c and a proposal for a combined glucose-A1c diagnostic method.

    PubMed

    Aldasouqi, Saleh A; Gossain, Ved V

    2012-01-01

    The role of glycohemoglobin A1c (A1c) for the diagnosis of diabetes has been debated for over three decades. Recently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended adding A1c as an additional criterion for diabetes diagnosis. In view of the continued debate about the diagnostic utility of A1c, and in view of the unabated burden of undiagnosed diabetes, the search for alternative diagnostic methods is discussed. A historical literature review is provided, in view of the new ADA diagnostic guidelines, and a proposal is provided for combining A1c and a glucose measurement as a diagnostic alternative/adjunct to the use of a single criterion. This proposal is based on the non-overlapping of the advantages and disadvantages of these individual tests. The cost-effectiveness of this method remains to be tested.

  1. The effects of lowering nighttime and breakfast glucose levels with sensor-augmented pump therapy on hemoglobin A1c levels in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Maahs, David M; Chase, H Peter; Westfall, Emily; Slover, Robert; Huang, Suiying; Shin, John J; Kaufman, Francine R; Pyle, Laura; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2014-05-01

    This study determined the association of continuous glucose monitoring glucose (CGM-glucose) levels at different times of the day with improvement in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. The potential application of these data is to focus effort to improve glucose control in patients with type 1 diabetes. Data were analyzed from 196 patients with type 1 diabetes who were randomized to receive sensor-augmented pump therapy in the 1-year STAR 3 trial. CGM-glucose values and HbA1c levels from baseline and after 1 year were evaluated to determine associations of improvement in CGM-glucose at different times of the day with longitudinal improvement in HbA1c. Improvement in HbA1c levels after 1 year was related to improvement in mean CGM-glucose levels in daytime (6 a.m.-midnight), overnight (midnight-6 a.m.), and each mealtime period (P<0.0001 for each). In multivariable analysis, only improvement in breakfast meal period was associated with improvement in HbA1c after 1 year, explaining 59% of the HbA1c improvement using the partial R(2) test. Moreover, among those patients who only improved CGM-glucose in the overnight period there was an associated improvement in breakfast meal period CGM-glucose of 26 ± 22 mg/dL (P<0.01). Breakfast period glucose improvement had the greatest effect on lowering HbA1c levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. Improving glucose control overnight resulted in subsequent improvement in the breakfast period. Although glucose control should be improved at all times, methods to improve overnight and post-breakfast glucose levels may be of primary importance in improving glucose control in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  2. Single, community-based blood glucose readings may be a viable alternative for community surveillance of HbA1c and poor glycaemic control in people with known diabetes in resource-poor settings

    PubMed Central

    Reidpath, Daniel D.; Jahan, Nowrozy K.; Mohan, Devi; Allotey, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Background The term HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin) is commonly used in relation to diabetes mellitus. The measure gives an indication of the average blood sugar levels over a period of weeks or months prior to testing. For most low- and middle-income countries HbA1c measurement in community surveillance is prohibitively expensive. A question arises about the possibility of using a single blood glucose measure for estimating HbA1c and therefore identifying poor glycaemic control in resource-poor settings. Design Using data from the 2011–2012 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, we examined the relationship between HbA1c and a single fasting measure of blood glucose in a non-clinical population of people with known diabetes (n=333). A linear equation for estimating HbA1c from blood glucose was developed. Appropriate blood glucose cut-off values were set for poor glycaemic control (HbA1c≥69.4 mmol/mol). Results The HbA1c and blood glucose measures were well correlated (r=0.7). Three blood glucose cut-off values were considered for classifying poor glycaemic control: 8.0, 8.9, and 11.4 mmol/L. A blood glucose of 11.4 had a specificity of 1, but poor sensitivity (0.37); 8.9 had high specificity (0.94) and moderate sensitivity (0.7); 8.0 was associated with good specificity (0.81) and sensitivity (0.75). Conclusions Where HbA1c measurement is too expensive for community surveillance, a single blood glucose measure may be a reasonable alternative. Generalising the specific results from these US data to low resource settings may not be appropriate, but the general approach is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27511810

  3. The association between self-monitoring of blood glucose, hemoglobin A1C and testing patterns in community pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    Mansell, Kerry; Evans, Charity; Tran, David; Sevany, Shellina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if pharmacists providing advice on self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) to new meter users, based on the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs), resulted in improvements in A1C. SMBG testing patterns and pharmacist interactions were also observed. Methods: A cluster randomized, pilot study was performed, with pharmacies randomized to an intervention or control group. The intervention group provided SMBG education according to the CDA CPGs at baseline, 2 weeks, 1 month and 3 months; the control group provided usual care. The primary endpoint was the mean change in A1C measured at 6 months. Secondary endpoints included a description of SMBG patterns and lifestyle changes and were determined via a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Thirty-six participants (26 intervention, 10 control) were recruited from 9 pharmacies across Saskatchewan, Canada. Mean A1C decreased by −1.69 and −0.70 in the intervention and control groups, respectively (p = 0.376). A total of 12 of 26 (46.2%) participants in the intervention group indicated they performed SMBG ≥7 times per week; 75% (9/12) of these were controlled by lifestyle or metformin alone. When applicable, most participants in the intervention group indicated they perform SMBG with exercise (62.5%), during illness (62.5%) and with hypoglycemic symptoms (81.3%) compared with 33.3%, 42.9% and 42.9% in the control group, respectively. Most participants in the intervention group (20/26; 76.9%) reported making lifestyle changes as a result of speaking with the pharmacist, with all indicating that they maintained these changes at 6 months. Conclusions: The results of this pilot study indicate that a larger study examining pharmacist interventions related to SMBG is feasible. Future studies are required to determine patient motivations and further evaluate the role of pharmacists in ensuring best practices to positively influence guideline-based blood glucose

  4. Continuous glucose monitoring and HbA1c in the evaluation of glucose metabolism in children at high risk for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Helminen, Olli; Pokka, Tytti; Tossavainen, Päivi; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Veijola, Riitta

    2016-10-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) parameters, self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG), HbA1c and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were studied during preclinical type 1 diabetes mellitus. Ten asymptomatic children with multiple (⩾2) islet autoantibodies (cases) and 10 age and sex-matched autoantibody-negative controls from the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Study were invited to 7-day CGM with Dexcom G4 Platinum Sensor. HbA1c and two daily SMBG values (morning and evening) were analyzed. Five-point OGTTs were performed and carbohydrate intake was assessed by food records. The matched pairs were compared with the paired sample t-test. The cases showed higher mean values and higher variation in glucose levels during CGM compared to the controls. The time spent ⩾7.8mmol/l was 5.8% in the cases compared to 0.4% in the controls (p=0.040). Postprandial CGM values were similar except after the dinner (6.6mmol/l in cases vs. 6.1mmol/l in controls; p=0.023). When analyzing the SMBG values higher mean level, higher evening levels, as well as higher variation were observed in the cases when compared to the controls. HbA1c was significantly higher in the cases [5.7% (39mmol/mol) vs. 5.3% (34mmol/mol); p=0.045]. No differences were observed in glucose or C-peptide levels during OGTT. Daily carbohydrate intake was slightly higher in the cases (254.2g vs. 217.7g; p=0.034). Glucose levels measured by CGM and SMBG are useful indicators of dysglycemia during preclinical type 1 diabetes mellitus. Increased evening glucose values seem to be common in children with preclinical type 1 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. HbA1c values calculated from blood glucose levels using truncated Fourier series and implementation in standard SQL database language.

    PubMed

    Temsch, W; Luger, A; Riedl, M

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a mathematical model to calculate HbA1c values based on self-measured blood glucose and past HbA1c levels, thereby enabling patients to monitor diabetes therapy between scheduled checkups. This method could help physicians to make treatment decisions if implemented in a system where glucose data are transferred to a remote server. The method, however, cannot replace HbA1c measurements; past HbA1c values are needed to gauge the method. The mathematical model of HbA1c formation was developed based on biochemical principles. Unlike an existing HbA1c formula, the new model respects the decreasing contribution of older glucose levels to current HbA1c values. About 12 standard SQL statements embedded in a php program were used to perform Fourier transform. Regression analysis was used to gauge results with previous HbA1c values. The method can be readily implemented in any SQL database. The predicted HbA1c values thus obtained were in accordance with measured values. They also matched the results of the HbA1c formula in the elevated range. By contrast, the formula was too "optimistic" in the range of better glycemic control. Individual analysis of two subjects improved the accuracy of values and reflected the bias introduced by different glucometers and individual measurement habits.

  6. Frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose and attainment of HbA1c target values.

    PubMed

    Elgart, Jorge F; González, Lorena; Prestes, Mariana; Rucci, Enzo; Gagliardino, Juan J

    2016-02-01

    Test strips for self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) represent in Argentina, around 50 % of diabetes treatment cost; the frequency of their use is closely associated with hyperglycemia treatment. However, the favorable impact of SMBG on attainment of HbA1c goal in different treatment conditions remains controversial. We therefore attempted to estimate the relationship between use of SMBG test strips and degree of attainment of metabolic control in an institution of our social security subsector (SSS) in which provision is fully covered and submitted to a regular audit system. Observational retrospective study using information of 657 patients with T2DM (period 2009-2010) from the database of the Diabetes and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors Program (DICARO) of one institution of our SSS. DICARO provides-with an audit system-100 % coverage for all drugs and keeps records of clinical, metabolic and treatment data from every patient. The average monthly test strips/patient used for SMBG increased as a function of treatment intensification: Monotherapy with oral antidiabetic drugs (OAD) < combined OAD therapy < insulin treatment. In every condition, the number was larger in people with target HbA1c levels. Test strips represented the larger percentage of total prescription cost. In our population, the type of hyperglycemia treatment was the main driver of test strip use for SMBG; in every condition tested, targeted HbA1c values were associated with greater strip use. Patient education and prescription audit may optimize its use and treatment outcomes.

  7. Determinants of hemoglobin A1c level in patients with type 2 diabetes after in-hospital diabetes education: A study based on continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Torimoto, Keiichi; Okada, Yosuke; Sugino, Sachiko; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the relationship between blood glucose profile at hospital discharge, evaluated by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level at 12 weeks after discharge in patients with type 2 diabetes who received inpatient diabetes education. This was a retrospective study. The participants were 54 patients with type 2 diabetes who did not change their medication after discharge. The mean blood glucose (MBG), standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean postprandial glucose excursion, maximum blood glucose, minimum blood glucose, percentage of time with blood glucose at ≥180 mg/dL (time at ≥180), percentage of time with blood glucose at ≥140 mg/dL, and percentage of time with blood glucose at <70 mg/dL were measured at admission and discharge using CGM. The primary end-point was the relationship between CGM parameters and HbA1c level at 12 weeks after discharge. The HbA1c level at 12 weeks after discharge correlated with MBG level (r = 0.30, P = 0.029). Multivariate analysis showed that MBG level and disease duration were predictors of 12-week HbA1c level. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out considering goal achievement as a HbA1c level <7.0% 12 weeks after discharge. Disease duration and time at ≥180 were associated with goal achievement. The present results suggested that blood glucose profile at discharge using CGM seems useful to predict HbA1c level after discharge in patients with type 2 diabetes who received inpatient diabetes education. Early treatment to improve MBG level, as well as postprandial hyperglycemia, is important to achieve strict glycemic control. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. A1C

    MedlinePlus

    A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 ... A1C alone or in combination with other diabetes tests to make a diagnosis. They also use the ...

  9. Evaluation of hemoglobin A1c measurement by Capillarys 2 electrophoresis for detection of abnormal glucose tolerance in African immigrants to the United States.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Basilio, Jeffrey; Hanson, Steven; Little, Randie R; Sumner, Anne E; Sacks, David B

    2015-06-15

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used to monitor long-term glycemic control in individuals with diabetes, guide therapy, predict the risk of microvascular complications, and more recently to diagnose diabetes. An automated liquid-flow capillary electrophoresis method was recently developed to measure HbA1c using the Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing instrument. Analytical evaluation was performed at 2 clinical centers. A clinical analysis was conducted in 109 African-born individuals, 24% of whom have variant hemoglobin (HbAS or HbAC). Abnormal glucose tolerance (which includes both diabetes and prediabetes) was defined as 2h glucose of ≥ 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/l) during an oral glucose tolerance test. Interlaboratory CVs were ≤ 2.1%. The method showed satisfactory correlation with 2 other analyzers that measure HbA1c by high-performance liquid chromatography. Neither labile HbA1c, carbamylated hemoglobin, uremia, bilirubin nor common hemoglobin variants (HbC/HbS/HbE) interfered. Forty-five individuals (41%) had abnormal glucose tolerance. The sensitivity of HbA1c for diagnosing abnormal glucose tolerance was 38%, 36% and 42% for total, normal and variant hemoglobin groups, respectively. The analytical performance of HbA1c on the Capillarys 2 is suitable for clinical application. Variant hemoglobin in Africans did not interfere with the detection of abnormal glucose tolerance by HbA1c measured on the Capillarys 2. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Visceral fat area is associated with HbA1c but not dialysate-related glucose load in nondiabetic PD patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Li-Chun; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chao, Chia-Ter; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Factors associated with increased visceral fat area (VFA) have been well documented in the general population but rarely explored in nondiabetic individuals on peritoneal dialysis (PD). As glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is positively correlated with VFA in diabetic patients, we hypothesized that the same correlation would exist in nondiabetic PD patients. We enrolled 105 nondiabetic patients who had undergone chronic PD for more than 3 months. Each subject underwent an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan, and the umbilicus cut was analyzed for VFA. VFA values, corrected for body mass index and subjected to natural logarithm transformations, were examined to determine whether they were correlated with HbA1c and other parameters. PD dialysates prescribed at the time of enrollment were recorded to calculate glucose load. We found that when 105 nondiabetic PD patients were classified according to tertiles of HbA1c, higher HbA1c was associated with larger VFA. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that HbA1c was an independent determinant of VFA, while glucose load and other PD-specific factors were not. In summary, HbA1c, but not PD-related glucose load, was positively correlated with VFA in nondiabetic PD patients, suggesting clinical utility of HbA1c in the PD population.

  11. Evaluation of 1,5-Anhydroglucitol, Hemoglobin A1c, and Glucose Levels in Youth and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sanjeev N.; Schwartz, Natalie; Wood, Jamie R.; Svoren, Britta M.; Laffel, Lori M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective Serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) is a marker of hyperglycemic excursions in adults with diabetes and HbA1c <8%. We compared 1,5-AG levels among youth and young adults with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D) and investigated the utility of 1,5-AG in the assessment of glycemic status in pediatric T1D. Methods We compared 1,5-AG, HbA1c, and plasma glucose levels in 138 patients with T1D (duration ≥1 year) and 136 healthy controls, ages 10–30 years. Within each group, we investigated associations between 1,5-AG and clinical characteristics, HbA1c and random plasma glucose. For patients with T1D, 1,5-AG was further analyzed according to HbA1c strata: <8%, 8–9%, and >9%. Results Compared to controls, patients with T1D had higher HbA1c (8.5±1.6% vs. 5.1±0.4%, p<0.0001), lower 1,5-AG (4.0±2.0 vs. 24.7±6.4 μg/mL, p<0.0001), and higher glucose (11.1±5.2 vs. 5.1±0.9 mmol/L, p<0.0001). Males had higher 1,5-AG than females within patients (4.5±2.3 vs. 3.4±1.6 μg/mL, p=0.003) and controls (26.0±6.6 vs. 23.5±6.0 μg/mL, p=0.02). 1,5-AG was not correlated with glucose in either group. 1,5-AG was significantly correlated to HbA1c in patients, but not controls. For patients with HbA1c <8%, 1,5-AG demonstrated the widest range and was not predicted by HbA1c; 1,5-AG levels were narrowly distributed among patients with HbA1c ≥8%. Conclusions Youth and young adults with T1D demonstrate similar 1,5-AG levels which are distinct from controls. 1,5-AG assessment may provide unique information beyond that provided by HbA1c in the mid-term assessment of glycemic control in young patients with T1D and HbA1c <8%. PMID:22060802

  12. A semi-mechanistic model of the relationship between average glucose and HbA1c in healthy and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Lledó-García, Rocío; Mazer, Norman A; Karlsson, Mats O

    2013-04-01

    HbA1c is the most commonly used biomarker for the adequacy of glycemic management in diabetic patients and a surrogate endpoint for anti-diabetic drug approval. In spite of an empirical description for the relationship between average glucose (AG) and HbA1c concentrations, obtained from the A1c-derived average glucose (ADAG) study by Nathan et al., a model for the non-steady-state relationship is still lacking. Using data from the ADAG study, we here develop such models that utilize literature information on (patho)physiological processes and assay characteristics. The model incorporates the red blood cell (RBC) aging description, and uses prior values of the glycosylation rate constant (KG), mean RBC life-span (LS) and mean RBC precursor LS obtained from the literature. Different hypothesis were tested to explain the observed non-proportional relationship between AG and HbA1c. Both an inverse dependence of LS on AG and a non-specificity of the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program assay used could well describe the data. Both explanations have mechanistic support and could be incorporated, alone or in combination, in models allowing prediction of the time-course of HbA1c changes associated with changes in AG from, for example dietary or therapeutic interventions, and vice versa, to infer changes in AG from observed changes in HbA1c. The selection between the alternative mechanistic models require gathering of new information.

  13. Long-term effect of the Internet-based glucose monitoring system on HbA1c reduction and glucose stability: a 30-month follow-up study for diabetes management with a ubiquitous medical care system.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Chang, Sang-Ah; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Choi, Yoon-Hee; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Moon, Sung-Dae; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Song, Ki-Ho; Son, Hyun-Shik; Kim, Hee-Seung; Lee, Won-Chul; Cha, Bong-Yun; Son, Ho-Young; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the long-term effectiveness of the Internet-based glucose monitoring system (IBGMS) on glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled trial in 80 patients with type 2 diabetes for 30 months. The intervention group was treated with the IBGMS, while the control group made conventional office visits only. HbA1c (A1C) was performed at 3-month intervals. For measuring of the stability of glucose control, the SD value of A1C levels for each subject was used as the A1C fluctuation index (HFI). The mean A1C and HFI were significantly lower in the intervention group (n = 40) than in the control group (n = 40). (A1C [mean +/- SD] 6.9 +/- 0.9 vs. 7.5 +/- 1.0%, P = 0.009; HFI 0.47 +/- 0.23 vs. 0.78 +/- 0.51, P = 0.001; intervention versus control groups, respectively). Patients in the intervention group with a basal A1C >or=7% (n = 27) had markedly lower A1C levels than corresponding patients in the control group during the first 3 months and maintained more stable levels throughout the study (P = 0.022). Control patients with a basal A1C <7% (n = 15) showed the characteristic bimodal distribution of A1C levels, whereas the A1C levels in the intervention group remained stable throughout the study with low HFI. Long-term use of the IBGMS has proven to be superior to conventional diabetes care systems based on office visits for controlling blood glucose and achieving glucose stability.

  14. Continuous glucose monitoring adds information beyond HbA1c in well-controlled diabetes patients with early cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Jesper; Laugesen, Esben; Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Hoeyem, Pernille; Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Poulsen, Per Loegstrup; Tarnow, Lise; Hansen, Troels Krarup

    2017-09-01

    Hyperglycemia as evaluated by HbA1c is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) may add information beyond HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes and CAN. 81 patients with type 2 diabetes (43 men, mean age 58±11year, HbA1c 6.6±0.5%). Patients were tested for CAN using cardiovascular reflex tests (response to standing, deep breathing and Valsalva maneuver) and underwent CGM for three days. CAN was defined as early (one test abnormal), or manifest (two or three tests abnormal). Twenty patients had early CAN and two patients had manifest CAN. Blood pressure, HbA1c, cholesterol levels and smoking habits were comparable in patients with vs. without CAN. Post-breakfast glycemic peak was significantly higher in patients with CAN (peak 207 vs 176mg/dL, P=0.009). Furthermore, the nocturnal glucose drop and dawn glucose was significantly higher in patients with CAN compared with patients without CAN (mean 134 vs. 118mg/dL, P=0.017 and mean 143 vs. 130mg/dL, P=0.045, respectively). Removing the two patients with manifest CAN from the statistical analysis didn't change the results. These findings emphasize the importance of monitoring glucose patterns over 24-h and not only rely on HbA1c as therapeutic target in patients with type 2 diabetes and CAN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of intermittent fasting on glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Varady, Krista A

    2016-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the most recent human trials that have examined the impact of intermittent fasting on glucose homeostasis. Our literature search retrieved one human trial of alternate day fasting, and three trials of Ramadan fasting published in the past 12 months. Current evidence suggests that 8 weeks of alternate day fasting that produces mild weight loss (4% from baseline) has no effect on glucose homeostasis. As for Ramadan fasting, decreases in fasting glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance have been noted after 4 weeks in healthy normal weight individuals with mild weight loss (1-2% from baseline). However, Ramadan fasting may have little impact on glucoregulatory parameters in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome who failed to observe weight loss. Whether intermittent fasting is an effective means of regulating glucose homeostasis remains unclear because of the scarcity of studies in this area. Large-scale, longer-term randomized controlled trials will be required before the use of fasting can be recommended for the prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases.

  16. Correlating Lab Test Results in Clinical Notes with Structured Lab Data: A Case Study in HbA1c and Glucose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sijia; Wang, Liwei; Ihrke, Donna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Tao, Cui; Weng, Chunhua; Liu, Hongfang

    2017-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that information extraction of unstructured clinical notes using natural language processing (NLP) and text mining is essential for secondary use of clinical data for clinical research and practice. Lab test results are currently structured in most of the electronic health record (EHR) systems. However, for referral patients or lab tests that can be done in non-clinical setting, the results can be captured in unstructured clinical notes. In this study, we proposed a rule-based information extraction system to extract the lab test results with temporal information from clinical notes. The lab test results of glucose and HbA1c from 104 randomly sampled diabetes patients selected from 1996 to 2015 are extracted and further correlated with structured lab test information in the Mayo Clinic EHRs. The system has high F1-scores of 0.964, 0.967 and 0.966 in glucose, HbA1c and overall extraction, respectively.

  17. Accuracy of three hemoglobin A1c point-of-care systems for glucose monitoring in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Torregrosa, María-Eugenia; Molina, Juan; Argente, Carlos R; Ena, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Use of hemoglobin A1c point-of-care devices in physician offices provides immediate results and reduces inconveniences for the patients. We compared the analytical performances of 3 point-of-care HbA1c analyzers to high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). We preselected a pool of 40 EDTA-preserved whole blood samples from our laboratory with HbA1c results obtained by HPLC (mean 6.6% [49 mmol/mol] and range: 4.6-9.9% [27-87 mmol/mol]). Aliquots of theses samples were tested by Afinion AS100, DCA Vantage and In2it point-of-care systems. According the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute EP-09 protocol we determined linearity (linear regression and correlation coefficient between point-of-care and reference methods), bias (Bland-Altman analysis) and coefficient of variation (%). We used the acceptability criteria endorsed by the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program. The calculated correlation coefficients (r) were 0.98, 0.98 and 0.83 for Afinion AS100, DCA Vantage and In2it systems, respectively. The 95% confidence interval of the error between point-of-care systems and the reference method was -0.41% and +0.34% (p =.22) for Afinion AS100, -0.62% and +0.05% (p =.57) for DCA Vantage, and -1.15% and +1.26% (p<.001) for the In2it. The coefficients of variation for Afinion AS100, DCA Vantage and In2it systems were 1.80, 3.74 and 7.14%, respectively. Only the Afinion AS100 point-of-care system met all NGSP performance criteria. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effects of Ginger on Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-I and Malondialdehyde in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khandouzi, Nafiseh; Shidfar, Farzad; Rajab, Asadollah; Rahideh, Tayebeh; Hosseini, Payam; Mir Taheri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder, causes many complications such as micro- and macro-vascular diseases. Anti-diabetic, hypolipidemic and anti-oxidative properties of ginger have been noticed in several researches. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of ginger on fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial, a total of 41 type 2 diabetic patients randomly were assigned to ginger or placebo groups (22 in ginger group and 19 in control group), received 2 g/day of ginger powder supplement or lactose as placebo for 12 weeks. The serum concentrations of fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde were analyzed before and after the intervention. Ginger supplementation significantly reduced the levels of fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in ginger group in comparison to baseline, as well as control group, while it increased the level of apolipoprotein A-I (p<0.05). It seems that oral administration of ginger powder supplement can improves fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. So it may have a role in alleviating the risk of some chronic complications of diabetes. PMID:25561919

  19. The effects of ginger on fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin a1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein a-I and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Khandouzi, Nafiseh; Shidfar, Farzad; Rajab, Asadollah; Rahideh, Tayebeh; Hosseini, Payam; Mir Taheri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder, causes many complications such as micro- and macro-vascular diseases. Anti-diabetic, hypolipidemic and anti-oxidative properties of ginger have been noticed in several researches. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of ginger on fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial, a total of 41 type 2 diabetic patients randomly were assigned to ginger or placebo groups (22 in ginger group and 19 in control group), received 2 g/day of ginger powder supplement or lactose as placebo for 12 weeks. The serum concentrations of fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde were analyzed before and after the intervention. Ginger supplementation significantly reduced the levels of fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in ginger group in comparison to baseline, as well as control group, while it increased the level of apolipoprotein A-I (p<0.05). It seems that oral administration of ginger powder supplement can improves fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. So it may have a role in alleviating the risk of some chronic complications of diabetes.

  20. Comparison of admission random glucose, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin in predicting the neurological outcome of acute ischemic stroke: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Chen, Chin-I; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Yih-Ru; Wu, Hsin-Chiao; Chan, Lung; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Hu, Han-Hwa; Chiou, Hung-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia is a known predictor of negative outcomes in stroke. Several glycemic measures, including admission random glucose, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), have been associated with bad neurological outcomes in acute ischemic stroke, particularly in nondiabetic patients. However, the predictive power of these glycemic measures is yet to be investigated. Methods This retrospective study enrolled 484 patients with acute ischemic stroke from January 2009 to March 2013, and complete records of initial stroke severity, neurological outcomes at three months, and glycemic measures were evaluated. We examined the predictive power of admission random glucose, fasting glucose, and HbA1c for neurological outcomes in acute ischemic stroke. Furthermore, subgroup analyses of nondiabetic patients and patients with diabetes were performed separately. Results Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that admission random glucose and fasting glucose were significant predictors of poor neurological outcomes, whereas HbA1c was not (areas under the ROC curve (AUCs): admission random glucose = 0.564, p = 0.026; fasting glucose = 0.598, p = 0.001; HbA1c = 0.510, p = 0.742). Subgroup analyses of nondiabetic patients and those with diabetes revealed that only fasting glucose predicts neurological outcomes in patients with diabetes, and the AUCs of these three glycemic measures did not differ between the two groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis of the study patients indicated that only age, initial stroke severity, and fasting glucose were independent predictors of poor neurological outcomes, whereas admission random glucose and HbA1c were not (adjusted odds ratio: admission random glucose = 1.002, p = 0.228; fasting glucose = 1.005, p = 0.039; HbA1c = 1.160, p = 0.076). Furthermore, subgroup multivariate logistic regression analyses of nondiabetic patients and those with diabetes indicated that none of the three glycemic

  1. Correlating Lab Test Results in Clinical Notes with Structured Lab Data: A Case Study in HbA1c and Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sijia; Wang, Liwei; Ihrke, Donna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Tao, Cui; Weng, Chunhua; Liu, Hongfang

    2017-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that information extraction of unstructured clinical notes using natural language processing (NLP) and text mining is essential for secondary use of clinical data for clinical research and practice. Lab test results are currently structured in most of the electronic health record (EHR) systems. However, for referral patients or lab tests that can be done in non-clinical setting, the results can be captured in unstructured clinical notes. In this study, we proposed a rule-based information extraction system to extract the lab test results with temporal information from clinical notes. The lab test results of glucose and HbA1c from 104 randomly sampled diabetes patients selected from 1996 to 2015 are extracted and further correlated with structured lab test information in the Mayo Clinic EHRs. The system has high F1-scores of 0.964, 0.967 and 0.966 in glucose, HbA1c and overall extraction, respectively. PMID:28815133

  2. The effects of long term fasting in Ramadan on glucose regulation in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Karatoprak, C; Yolbas, S; Cakirca, M; Cinar, A; Zorlu, M; Kiskac, M; Cikrikcioglu, M A; Erkoc, R; Tasan, E

    2013-09-01

    For Ramadan fasting, observing Muslims do not eat or drink between sunrise and sunset during Ramadan, Islam's holy month of the year according to the lunar calendar. In 2011, fasting patients with diabetes fasted for an average of 16.5 hours per day, having 2 meals between sunset and sunrise for a month. We aimed to evaluate the impact of extended fasting on glucose regulation and observe possible complications of extended fasting in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. We conducted a randomized, retrospective, observational study. Patients who presented at the Diabetes Clinic during the 15 days before and after Ramadan in August 2011 Istanbul, whose hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose, weight and height value examinations and follow-up were completed were included in the study. Seventy-six diabetes patients who fasted during Ramadan (fasting group) and 71 patients with diabetes who did not fast (non-fasting group) were included in the study. These two groups with similar demographic characteristics were compared before and after Ramadan. HbA1c, fasting and postprandial plasma glucose, body mass index, weight and adverse events were evaluated. No statistically significant difference was observed among the fasting and the non-fasting groups. There was no difference between the pre and post-Ramadan values of the fasting group. We could not find any negative effects of extended fasting on glucose regulation of patients with diabetes who are using certain medications. No serious adverse event was observed. We failed to demonstrate benefits of increasing the number of meals in patients with diabetes.

  3. Haemoglobin A1c is not a surrogate for glucose and insulin measures for investigating the early life and childhood determinants of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes in healthy children. An analysis from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC).

    PubMed

    Shultis, W A; Leary, S D; Ness, A R; Scott, J; Martin, R M; Whincup, P H; Smith, G Davey

    2006-12-01

    Research into early life and childhood determinants of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes are complicated by requirements for fasting blood samples and glucose tolerance tests. We investigated haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), a marker of glycaemia measured in non-fasting blood, as an alternative. HbA(1c) was measured in 1645 children aged 9-11 years without diabetes from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Thirty-nine children had two HbA(1c) measurements. Data on parental, child and potential confounding factors were collected prospectively from questionnaires, medical records and direct examination. Data from a shortened 30-min oral glucose tolerance test were available for 431 children at age 8 years. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Mean (sd) HbA(1c) was 4.91(0.29)%. HbA(1c) increased with age and was higher in boys compared with girls, non-white compared with white children, and in children with anaemia. Mean difference between repeated HbA(1c) measurements was 0.01%. HbA(1c) was weakly positively associated with fasting glucose (beta = 0.066%/mmol/l, P = 0.05), but was not associated with 30-min glucose, fasting or 30-min insulin, or homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. HbA(1c) was weakly inversely associated with weight sd score (beta =-0.02%/unit, P = 0.004), body mass index sd score (beta = -0.02%/unit, P = 0.002), and total body fat (beta = -0.003%/kg, P = 0.06) and lean mass (beta = -0.011%/kg, P = 0.01), but was not associated with birthweight or breastfeeding. HbA(1c) is not a good marker of fasting or post-load glucose and insulin measures in healthy children, and is not a viable alternative to these measures for investigating the determinants of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes in children.

  4. Impact of corpulence parameters and haemoglobin A1c on metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients: comparison of apolipoprotein B/A-I ratio with fasting and postprandial conventional lipid ratios

    PubMed Central

    Diaf, Mustapha; Khaled, Boumediene M.; Sellam, Fériel

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective The incidence of diabetes co-morbidities could probably be better assessed by studying its associations with major corpulence parameters and glycaemic control indicators. We assessed the utility of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in metabolic control for type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Fasting and postprandial blood samples were collected from 238 type 2 diabetic patients aged 57.4±11.9 years. The sera were analysed for glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), and apolipoproteins (apoA-I and apoB). Ratios of lipids and apolipoproteins were calculated and their associations with BMI, WC, and HbA1c levels were analysed. Results Our investigation showed increases in most fasting and postprandial lipid parameters according to BMI and WC. In men, postprandial HDL-c and TG levels were significantly higher (p<0.05) in overweight and obese patients, respectively, as well as in patients with abdominal obesity. Contrariwise, postprandial TC levels were significantly higher (p<0.01) in overweight and abdominal obese women. However, elevations of apoA-I and apoB levels were according to BMI and WC in both genders. There was a strong influence of BMI, WC, and HbA1c levels on the apoB/apoA-I ratio compared to traditional fasting and postprandial lipid ratios in both men and women. The apoB/apoA-I ratio was more correlated with postprandial TC/HDL and LDL-c/HDL-c ratios in men and with postprandial TG/HDL-c in women. Conclusion The apoB/apoA-I ratio is helpful in assessing metabolic risk caused by overall obesity, abdominal obesity and impaired glycaemia in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:25959906

  5. Subjects with impaired fasting glucose: evolution in a period of 6 years.

    PubMed

    Leiva, E; Mujica, V; Orrego, R; Wehinger, S; Soto, A; Icaza, G; Vásquez, M; Díaz, L; Andrews, M; Arredondo, M

    2014-01-01

    To study the evolution of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), considering glucose and HbA1c levels and risk factors associated, in a period of 6 years. We studied 94 subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) that were diagnosed in 2005 and followed up to 2012. Glucose and HbA1c levels were determined. A descriptive analysis of contingence charts was performed in order to study the evolution in the development of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Twenty-eight of ninety-four subjects became T2DM; 51/94 remained with IFG; and 20/94 presented normal fasting glucose. From the 28 diabetic subjects, 9 had already developed diabetes and were under treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents; 5 were diagnosed with plasma glucose < 126 mg/dL, but with HbA1c over 6.5%. In those who developed diabetes, 15/28 had a family history of T2DM in first relative degree. Also, diabetic subjects had a BMI significantly higher than nodiabetics (t test: P < 0.01). The individuals that in 2005 had the highest BMI are those who currently have diabetes. The IFG constitutes a condition of high risk of developing T2DM in a few years, especially over 110 mg/dL and in obesity patients.

  6. Subjects with Impaired Fasting Glucose: Evolution in a Period of 6 Years

    PubMed Central

    Leiva, E.; Mujica, V.; Orrego, R.; Wehinger, S.; Soto, A.; Icaza, G.; Vásquez, M.; Díaz, L.; Andrews, M.; Arredondo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To study the evolution of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), considering glucose and HbA1c levels and risk factors associated, in a period of 6 years. Methods. We studied 94 subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) that were diagnosed in 2005 and followed up to 2012. Glucose and HbA1c levels were determined. A descriptive analysis of contingence charts was performed in order to study the evolution in the development of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Results. Twenty-eight of ninety-four subjects became T2DM; 51/94 remained with IFG; and 20/94 presented normal fasting glucose. From the 28 diabetic subjects, 9 had already developed diabetes and were under treatment with oral hypoglycemic agents; 5 were diagnosed with plasma glucose < 126 mg/dL, but with HbA1c over 6.5%. In those who developed diabetes, 15/28 had a family history of T2DM in first relative degree. Also, diabetic subjects had a BMI significantly higher than nodiabetics (t test: P < 0.01). The individuals that in 2005 had the highest BMI are those who currently have diabetes. Conclusion. The IFG constitutes a condition of high risk of developing T2DM in a few years, especially over 110 mg/dL and in obesity patients. PMID:25215305

  7. Effect of Different Periods of Fasting on Oral Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, C. H.; O'Regan, J.; O'Sullivan, D. J

    1973-01-01

    The effect of different periods of fasting on oral glucose tolerance was investigated in 33 subjects. It was found that glucose tolerance deteriorated as the fasting period became shorter. This effect was seen almost exclusively in subjects over 40 years of age. Only the fasting blood sugar was affected by the duration of the pretest fast in younger subjects. PMID:4733248

  8. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    HbA1C test; Glycated hemoglobin test; Glycohemoglobin test; Hemoglobin A1C; Diabetes - A1C; Diabetic - A1C ... gov/pubmed/26696680 . Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb, glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, HbA1a, HbA1b, HbA1c - blood. ...

  9. Both the frequency of HbA1c testing and the frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose predict metabolic control: A multicentre analysis of 15 199 adult type 1 diabetes patients from Germany and Austria.

    PubMed

    Schwandt, A; Best, F; Biester, T; Grünerbel, A; Kopp, F; Krakow, D; Laimer, M; Wagner, C; Holl, R W

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between metabolic control and frequency of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ) measurements and of self-monitoring of blood glucose, as well as the interaction of both. Data of 15 199 adult type 1 diabetes patients registered in a standardized electronic health record (DPV) were included. To model the association between metabolic control and frequency of HbA1c testing or of self-monitoring of blood glucose, multiple hierarchic regression models with adjustment for confounders were fitted. Tukey-Kramer test was used to adjust P values for multiple comparisons. Vuong test was used to compare non-nested models. The baseline variables of the study population were median age 19.9 [Q1; Q3: 18.4; 32.2] years and diabetes duration 10.4 [6.8; 15.7] years. Haemoglobin A1c was 60.4 [51.5; 72.5] mmol/mol. Frequency of HbA1c testing was 8.0 [5.0; 9.0] within 2 years, and daily self-monitoring of blood glucose frequency was 5.0 [4.0; 6.0]. After adjustment, a U-shaped association between metabolic control and frequency of HbA1c testing was observed with lowest HbA1c levels in the 3-monthly HbA1c testing group. There was an inverse relationship between self-monitoring of blood glucose and HbA1c with lower HbA1c associated with highest frequency of testing (>6 daily measurements). Quarterly HbA1c testing and frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose were associated with best metabolic control. The adjusted Vuong Z statistic suggests that metabolic control might be better explained by HbA1c testing compared to self-monitoring of blood glucose (P < .0001). This research reveals the importance of quarterly clinical HbA1c monitoring together with frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes management to reach and maintain target HbA1c . Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Impaired CD4+ and T-helper 17 cell memory response to Streptococcus pneumoniae is associated with elevated glucose and percent glycated hemoglobin A1c in Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Perla J.; Mathews, Christine; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Hwang, Shen-An; Brown, Eric L.; De Santiago, Heather K.; Fisher Hoch, Susan P.; Mccormick, Joseph B.; Mirza, Shaper

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes are significantly more susceptible to pneumococcal infections than healthy individuals of the same age. Increased susceptibility is the result of impairments in both innate and adaptive immune systems. Given the central role of T-helper 17 (Th17) and T-regulatory (Treg) cells in pneumococcal infection and their altered phenotype in diabetes, this study was designed to analyze the Th17 and Treg cell responses to a whole heat-killed capsular type 2 strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Patients with diabetes demonstrated a lower frequency of total CD+T-cells, which showed a significant inverse association with elevated fasting blood glucose. Measurement of specific subsets indicated that those with diabetes had, low intracellular levels of interleukin (IL)-17, and lower pathogen-specific memory CD4+ and IL-17+ cell numbers. No significant difference was observed in the frequency of CD4+ and Th17 cells between those with and without diabetes. However, stratification of data by obesity indicated a significant increase in frequency of CD4+ and Th17 cells in obese individuals with diabetes compared with nonobese individual with diabetes. The memory CD+T-cell response was associated inversely with both fasting blood glucose and percent glycated hemoglobin A1c. This study demonstrated that those with type 2 diabetes have a diminished pathogen-specific memory CD4+ and Th17 response, and low percentages of CD+T-cells in response to S. pneumoniae stimulation. PMID:23927943

  11. Association between HbA1c and peripheral neuropathy in a 10-year follow-up study of people with normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peterson, M; Pingel, R; Lagali, N; Dahlin, L B; Rolandsson, O

    2017-09-20

    To explore the association between HbA1c and sural nerve function in a group of people with normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance or Type 2 diabetes. We conducted a 10-year follow-up study in 87 out of an original 119 participants. At study commencement (2004), 64 men and 55 women (mean age 61.1 years) with normal glucose tolerance (n=39), impaired glucose tolerance (n=29), or Type 2 diabetes (n=51) were enrolled. At the 2014 follow-up (men, n=46, women, n=41; mean age 71.1 years), 36, nine and 42 participants in the normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes categories, respectively, were re-tested. Biometric data and blood samples were collected, with an electrophysiological examination performed on both occasions. At follow-up, we measured the amplitude of the sural nerve in 74 of the 87 participants. The mean amplitude had decreased from 10.9 μV (2004) to 7.0 μV (2014; P<0.001). A 1% increase in HbA1c was associated with a ~1% average decrease in the amplitude of the sural nerve, irrespective of group classification. Crude and adjusted estimates ranged from -0.84 (95% CI -1.32, -0.37) to -1.25 (95% CI -2.31, -0.18). Although the mean conduction velocity of those measured at both occasions (n=73) decreased from 47.6 m/s to 45.8 m/s (P=0.009), any association with HbA1c level was weak. Results were robust with regard to potential confounders and missing data. Our data suggest an association between sural nerve amplitude and HbA1c  at all levels of HbA1c . Decreased amplitude was more pronounced than was diminished conduction velocity, supporting the notion that axonal degeneration is an earlier and more prominent effect of hyperglycaemia than demyelination. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Fasting plasma glucose levels and coronary artery calcification in subjects with impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Eun, Young-Mi; Kang, Sung-Goo; Song, Sang-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Prediabetes is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). While the association of impaired glucose tolerance with CVD has been shown in many studies, the relationship between impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and CVD remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores of participants with normal fasting glucose versus those with IFG, according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels, and to assess whether differences in CAC scores were independent of important confounders. Retrospective study. Health Promotion Center of the University Hospital (Gyeonggi-do, South Korea), during the period 2010-2014. Participants were enrolled from the general population who visited for a medical check-up. CAC was assessed in asymptomatic individuals by multidetector computed tomography. Anthropometric parameters and metabolic profiles were also recorded. Subjects were divided into four fasting glucose groups. Participants with a history of CVD or diabetes mellitus were excluded. Correlation between FPG and CAC scores, CAC score categories, and association between CAC score and FPG categories. Of 1112 participants, 346 (34.2%) had a CAC score > 0. FPG values in the IFG patients were positively but weakly correlated with CAC scores (r=0.099, P=.001). The incidence of CAC differed according to FPG level (P < .001) and in Kruskal-Wallis test the mean CAC score differed by FPG group (P < .001). After adjustment for other factors in a multiple logistic regression analysis, those subjects with FPG >=110 mg/dL had a significantly higher risk of CAC than did subjects with normal fasting glucose (110.

  13. A1C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Hemoglobin A1c Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: A1c; HbA1c; Glycohemoglobin; Glycated Hemoglobin; Glycosylated Hemoglobin Formal name: Hemoglobin A1c Related tests: ...

  14. C-Peptide Level in Fasting Plasma and Pooled Urine Predicts HbA1c after Hospitalization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Remi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Kikuchi, Takako; Onishi, Yukiko; Takao, Toshiko; Tahara, Tazu; Yoshida, Yoko; Suzawa, Naoki; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kushiyama, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how measures of insulin secretion and other clinical information affect long-term glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Between October 2012 and June 2014, we monitored 202 diabetes patients who were admitted to the hospital of Asahi Life Foundation for glycemic control, as well as for training and education in diabetes management. We measured glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) six months after discharge to assess disease management. In univariate analysis, fasting plasma C-peptide immunoreactivity (F-CPR) and pooled urine CPR (U-CPR) were significantly associated with HbA1c, in contrast to ΔCPR and C-peptide index (CPI). This association was strongly independent of most other patient variables. In exploratory factor analysis, five underlying factors, namely insulin resistance, aging, sex differences, insulin secretion, and glycemic control, represented patient characteristics. In particular, insulin secretion and resistance strongly influenced F-CPR, while insulin secretion affected U-CPR. In conclusion, the data indicate that among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, F-CPR and U-CPR may predict improved glycemic control six months after hospitalization.

  15. C-Peptide Level in Fasting Plasma and Pooled Urine Predicts HbA1c after Hospitalization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Remi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Kikuchi, Takako; Onishi, Yukiko; Takao, Toshiko; Tahara, Tazu; Yoshida, Yoko; Suzawa, Naoki; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kushiyama, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how measures of insulin secretion and other clinical information affect long-term glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Between October 2012 and June 2014, we monitored 202 diabetes patients who were admitted to the hospital of Asahi Life Foundation for glycemic control, as well as for training and education in diabetes management. We measured glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) six months after discharge to assess disease management. In univariate analysis, fasting plasma C-peptide immunoreactivity (F-CPR) and pooled urine CPR (U-CPR) were significantly associated with HbA1c, in contrast to ΔCPR and C-peptide index (CPI). This association was strongly independent of most other patient variables. In exploratory factor analysis, five underlying factors, namely insulin resistance, aging, sex differences, insulin secretion, and glycemic control, represented patient characteristics. In particular, insulin secretion and resistance strongly influenced F-CPR, while insulin secretion affected U-CPR. In conclusion, the data indicate that among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, F-CPR and U-CPR may predict improved glycemic control six months after hospitalization. PMID:26849676

  16. Misled by the Morning "Fasting" Plasma Glucose.

    PubMed

    King, Allen B

    2015-05-13

    Because of its ease and simplicity of its measurement, the morning fasting plasma glucose (FPG), has been as used a surrogate marker for the entire basal day when titrating once-nightly basal insulin. Common in obese insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes, late and large evening meals elevate the FPG. This has led to dosing of basal insulin well beyond the basal requirements and contributes to hypoglycemia and weight gain seen with this therapy. It is recommended that during basal insulin titration, the evening meal be limited and hypoglycemia be monitored early in the morning, that bewitching time when the "peakless" basal insulin's action is peaking and the predawn phenomenon insulin sensitivity is higher. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  17. Garlic intake lowers fasting blood glucose: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Hou, Li-qiong; Liu, Yun-hui; Zhang, Yi-yi

    2015-01-01

    Garlic is a common spicy flavouring agent also used for certain therapeutic purposes. Garlic's effects on blood glucose have been the subject of many clinical and animal studies, however, studies reporting hypoglycemic effects of garlic in humans are conflicting. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify relevant trials of garlic or garlic extracts on markers of glycemic control [fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c)]. A meta-analysis of the effect of garlic intake on human was done to assess garlic's effectiveness in lowering glucose levels. Two reviewers extracted data from each of the identified studies. Seven eligible randomized controlled trials with 513 subjects were identified. Pooled analyses showed that garlic intake results in a statistically significant lowering in FBG [SMD=-1.67; 95% CI (-2.80, -0.55), p=0.004]. Our pooled analyses did not include PPG control and HbA1c outcomes. Because only 1 study included in the meta-analysis reported PPG variables and only 2 studies reported HbA1c variables. In conclusion, the current meta-analysis showed that the administration of garlic resulted in a significant reduction in FBG concentrations. More trials are needed to investigate the effectiveness of garlic on HbA1c and PPG.

  18. [Effects of barley flake on metabolism of glucose and lipids in the patients with impaired fasting glucose].

    PubMed

    Bi, Mingxin; Niu, Yucun; Li, Xue; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effects of barley flake (BF) on the glucose-lipid metabolism in patients with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). 100 patients with IFG were divided into the oat meal (OM) control group and barley flake experimental group for three months intervention according to randomized controlled trail (RCT). Biochemical indicators, glucose-lipid metabolism related enzymes, the area under curve (AUC) of blood glucose and insulin after oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were assessed before and after intervention. In addition, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated by FBG (mmol/L) x INS (microU/L)/ 22.5. At the end of the three month active intervention, the mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) and insulin (INS) in the patients with BF treatment decreased by 9.26% (P < 0.001) and 13.37% (P = 0.001) separately compared with that in patients with OM treatment; meanwhile, total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in patients with BF treatment also decreased by 7.20% (P < 0.001) and 9.42% (P = 0. 002), respectively. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), HOMA-IR, total glyceride (TG), Apo-B, the AUC of blood glucose and insulin after OGTT were also significantly decreased separately (P < 0.01 or < 0.05 ). However, statistically significant differences failed to be found in HDL-C, Apo-A, ALP and SOD between these two groups. BF had favorable effect on improvement of glucose-lipid metabolism in the patients with impaired fasting glucose.

  19. Fasting enhances the response of arcuate neuropeptide Y-glucose-inhibited neurons to decreased extracellular glucose

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Beth Ann; Fioramonti, Xavier; Jochnowitz, Nina; Fakira, Kurt; Gagen, Karen; Contie, Sylvain; Lorsignol, Anne; Penicaud, Luc; Martin, William J.; Routh, Vanessa H.

    2009-01-01

    Fasting increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, peptide levels, and the excitability of NPY-expressing neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate (ARC) nucleus. A subpopulation of ARC-NPY neurons (∼40%) are glucose-inhibited (GI)-type glucose-sensing neurons. Hence, they depolarize in response to decreased glucose. Because fasting enhances NPY neurotransmission, we propose that during fasting, GI neurons depolarize in response to smaller decreases in glucose. This increased excitation in response to glucose decreases would increase NPY-GI neuronal excitability and enhance NPY neurotransmission. Using an in vitro hypothalamic explant system, we show that fasting enhances NPY release in response to decreased glucose concentration. By measuring relative changes in membrane potential using a membrane potential-sensitive dye, we demonstrate that during fasting, a smaller decrease in glucose depolarizes NPY-GI neurons. Furthermore, incubation in low (0.7 mM) glucose enhanced while leptin (10 nM) blocked depolarization of GI neurons in response to decreased glucose. Fasting, leptin, and glucose-induced changes in NPY-GI neuron glucose sensing were mediated by 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We conclude that during energy sufficiency, leptin reduces the ability of NPY-GI neurons to sense decreased glucose. However, after a fast, decreased leptin and glucose activate AMPK in NPY-GI neurons. As a result, NPY-GI neurons become depolarized in response to smaller glucose fluctuations. Increased excitation of NPY-GI neurons enhances NPY release. NPY, in turn, shifts energy homeostasis toward increased food intake and decreased energy expenditure to restore energy balance. PMID:19211911

  20. Hemoglobin A1c in predicting progression to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Tomoko; Tajima, Naoko; Oizumi, Toshihide; Karasawa, Shigeru; Wada, Kiriko; Kameda, Wataru; Susa, Shinji; Kato, Takeo; Daimon, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The predictive value of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in comparison to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is evaluated for 5-year incident diabetes (DM), as HbA1c may be more practical than FPG in the screening for DM in the future. Of 1189 non-DM subjects aged 35-89 years old from the Funagata Study, 57 subjects (4.8%) had developed DM on the WHO criteria at 5-year follow-up. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval: CI) for a one standard deviation increase in FPG/HbA1c was 3.40 (2.44-4.74)/3.49 (2.42-5.02). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for FPG/HbA1c was 0.786 (95% CI: 0.719-0.853)/0.785 (0.714-0.855). The HbA1c corresponding to FPG 5.56 mmol/l was HbA1c 5.3%. There was no statistical difference in sensitivity between FPG 5.56 mmol/l and HbA1c 5.3% (61.4% vs. 56.1%), while specificity was higher in HbA1c 5.3% than FPG 5.56 mmol/l (87.8% vs. 82.5%, p-value<0.001). The fraction of incident case from those with baseline IGT was similar between the groups, however the fraction of people above the cut-off was significantly lower in HbA1c 5.3% than FPG 5.56 mmol/l (14.3% vs. 19.6%, p-value<0.001). HbA1c is similar to FPG to evaluate DM risk, and HbA1c could be practical and efficient to select subjects for intervention.

  1. Chronic fructose substitution for glucose or sucrose in food or beverages has little effect on fasting blood glucose, insulin, or triglycerides: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rebecca A; Frese, Michael; Romero, Julio; Cunningham, Judy H; Mills, Kerry E

    2017-08-01

    Background: Conflicting evidence exists on the role of long-term fructose consumption on health. No systematic review has addressed the effect of isoenergetic fructose replacement of other sugars and its effect on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose, insulin, and triglycerides.Objective: The objective of this study was to review the evidence for a reduction in fasting glycemic and insulinemic markers after chronic, isoenergetic replacement of glucose or sucrose in foods or beverages by fructose. The target populations were persons without diabetes, those with impaired glucose tolerance, and those with type 2 diabetes.Design: We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and clinicaltrials.gov The date of the last search was 26 April 2016. We included randomized controlled trials of isoenergetic replacement of glucose, sucrose, or both by fructose in adults or children with or without diabetes of ≥2 wk duration that measured fasting blood glucose. The main outcomes analyzed were fasting blood glucose and insulin as well as fasting triglycerides, blood lipoproteins, HbA1c, and body weight.Results: We included 14 comparison arms from 11 trials, including 277 patients. The studies varied in length from 2 to 10 wk (mean: 28 d) and included doses of fructose between 40 and 150 g/d (mean: 68 g/d). Fructose substitution in some subgroups resulted in significantly but only slightly lowered fasting blood glucose (-0.14 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.24, -0.036 mmol/L), HbA1c [-10 g/L (95% CI: -12.90, -7.10 g/L; impaired glucose tolerance) and -6 g/L (95% CI: -8.47, -3.53 g/L; normoglycemia)], triglycerides (-0.08 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.14, -0.02 mmol/L), and body weight (-1.40 kg; 95% CI: -2.07, -0.74 kg). There was no effect on fasting blood insulin or blood lipids.Conclusions: The evidence suggests that the substitution of fructose for glucose or sucrose in food or beverages may be of benefit to

  2. Contributions of gluconeogenesis to glucose production in the fasted state.

    PubMed Central

    Landau, B R; Wahren, J; Chandramouli, V; Schumann, W C; Ekberg, K; Kalhan, S C

    1996-01-01

    Healthy subjects ingested 2H2O and after 14, 22, and 42 h of fasting the enrichments of deuterium in the hydrogens bound to carbons 2, 5, and 6 of blood glucose and in body water were determined. The hydrogens bound to the carbons were isolated in formaldehyde which was converted to hexamethylenetetramine for assay. Enrichment of the deuterium bound to carbon 5 of glucose to that in water or to carbon 2 directly equals the fraction of glucose formed by gluconeogenesis. The contribution of gluconeogenesis to glucose production was 47 +/- 49% after 14 h, 67 +/- 41% after 22 h, and 93 +/- 2% after 42 h of fasting. Glycerol's conversion to glucose is included in estimates using the enrichment at carbon 5, but not carbon 6. Equilibrations with water of the hydrogens bound to carbon 3 of pyruvate that become those bound to carbon 6 of glucose and of the hydrogen at carbon 2 of glucose produced via glycogenolysis are estimated from the enrichments to be approximately 80% complete. Thus, rates of gluconeogenesis can be determined without corrections required in other tracer methodologies. After an overnight fast gluconeogenesis accounts for approximately 50% and after 42 h of fasting for almost all of glucose production in healthy subjects. PMID:8755648

  3. Ketone-glucose interaction in fed, fasted, and fasted-infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, A G; Wolfe, R R; Colpoys, M F; Muhlbacher, F; Wilmore, D W

    1983-05-01

    Ketosis following starvation was suppressed by hindlimb infection in seven fasted sheep. Glucose production determined following the primed constant infusion of [6-3H(N)]glucose was elevated in the fasted-infected animals (9.50 +/- 1.11 mmol X kg-1 X min-1 (mean +/- SE) versus fasted controls (5.56 +/- 2.2). To determine if the ketonemia following sepsis contributed to the increased glucogenesis associated with catabolic disorder, glucose production and arterial substrates were measured before and after infusion of sodium-DL-beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB, 20 mumol X kg-1 X min-1) in fed, fasted, and fasted-infected animals. Following 3 h of beta-OHB infusion in the awake conditioned animals, beta-OHB and acetoacetate blood concentrations more than doubled. With infusion, blood glucose and alanine concentrations decreased in the fed and fasted sheep but not in the fasted-infected group. Glucose production fell significantly from 10.11 +/- 1.33 to 8.44 +/- 1.05 in the fed animals and from 5.05 +/- 0.28 to 4.11 +/- 0.33 in the fasted group. Glucose production was unaffected by beta-OHB infusion in the fasted-infected animals (9.50 +/- 1.83 vs. 9.11 +/- 1.44). The accelerated rate of glucose production in sheep following infection is not a consequence of the hypoketonemic state associated with sepsis.

  4. Glucose turnover in 48-hour-fasted running rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, B.; Mikines, K.J.; Galbo, H.

    1987-03-01

    In fed rats, hyperglycemia develops during exercise. This contrasts with the view based on studies of fasted human and dog that euglycemia is maintained in exercise and glucose production (R/sub a/) controlled by feedback mechanisms. Forty-eight-hour-fasted rats (F) were compared to fed rats (C) and overnight food-restricted (FR) rats. (3-/sup 3/H)- and (U-/sup 14/C)glucose were infused and blood and tissue sampled. During running (21 m/min, 0% grade) R/sub a/ increased most in C and least in F and only in F did R/sub a/ not significantly exceed glucose disappearance. Plasma glucose increased more in C (3.3 mmol/1) than in FR (1.6 mmol/l) and only modestly (0.6 mmol/l) and transiently in F. Resting liver glycogen and exercise glycogenolysis were highest in C and similar in FR and F. Resting muscle glycogen and exercise glycogenolysis were highest in C and lowest in F. During running, lactate production and gluconeogenesis were higher in FR than in F. At least in rats, responses of production and plasma concentration of glucose to exercise depend on size of liver and muscle glycogen stores; glucose production matches increase in clearance better in fasted than in fed states. Probably glucose production is stimulated by feedforward mechanisms and feedback mechanisms are added if plasma glucose decreases.

  5. Sex and age affect agreement between fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin for diagnosis of dysglycemia.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Medina, Mercedes; Uranga, Begoña; Rus, Antonio; Martínez, Rosa; Puertas, Carolina; Blanco, María Dolores; Casís, Ernesto; Corcoy, Rosa

    To assess agreement between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels for diagnosis of dysglycemia (diabetes and risk of diabetes), overall and depending on clinical characteristics. The study enrolled 1020 adult subjects without drug-treated diabetes who underwent a laboratory test at a Spanish health care center. The criteria for dysglycemia of the American Diabetes Association were used. A logistic regression analysis was used to predict de novo diagnosis of dysglycemia based on sex, age, body mass index, anemia, and iron levels. Overall prevalence of dysglycemia was 28.04%, and was identified by FPG only in 13.63% of subjects, by both FPG and HbA1c in 7.65%, and by HbA1c only in 6.76% (de novo diagnoses). Independent predictors of de novo diagnoses based on HbA1c were female sex (odds ratio [OR]: 2.119, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.133-4.020; p<0.020), age (OR for 42-56 years: 2.541, 95% CI: 0.634-17.140; OR for ≥57 years: 5.656, 95% CI: 1.516-36.980; overall p<0.007), and serum ferritin levels (borderline significance). In this study population, agreement between FPG and HbA1c for diagnosis of dysglycemia was poor, with FPG being the test that identified more subjects. De novo diagnoses based on HbA1c were more common in females and increased with age. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Insufficient Sensitivity of Hemoglobin A1C (A1C) Determination in Diagnosis or Screening of Early Diabetic States

    PubMed Central

    Fajans, Stefan S.; Herman, William H.; Oral, Elif A.

    2010-01-01

    An International Expert Committee made recommendations for using the hemoglobin A1C (A1C) assay as the preferred method for diagnosis of diabetes in nonpregnant individuals. A concentration of ≥ 6.5% was considered as diagnostic. It is the aim of this study to compare the sensitivity of A1C with that of plasma glucose concentrations in subjects with early diabetes or IGT. We chose two groups of subjects who had A1C of ≤ 6.4%. The first group of 89 subjects had family histories of diabetes (MODY or T2DM) and had OGTT and A1C determinations. They included 36 subjects with diabetes or IGT and 53 with normal OGTT. The second group of 58 subjects was screened for diabetes in our Diabetes Clinic by FPG or 2HPG or OGTT and A1C and similar comparisons were made. Subjects with diabetes or IGT, including those with fasting hyperglycemia, had A1C ranging from 5.0 – 6.4%, mean 5.8%. The subjects with normal OGTT had A1C of 4.2 – 6.3%, mean 5.4% or 5.5% for the two groups. A1C may be in the normal range in subjects with diabetes or IGT, including those with fasting hyperglycemia. Approximately one third of subjects with early diabetes and IGT have A1C <5.7%, the cut-point that ADA recommends as indicating the onset of risk of developing diabetes in the future. The results of our study are similar to those obtained by a large Dutch epidemiological study. If our aim is to recognize early diabetic states to apply effective prophylactic procedures to prevent or delay progression to more severe diabetes, A1C is not sufficiently sensitive or reliable for diagnosis of diabetes or IGT. A combination of A1C and plasma glucose determinations, where necessary, are recommended for diagnosis or screening of diabetes or IGT. PMID:20723948

  7. Hepatic glucose sensing is impaired, but can be normalized, in people with impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Leigh; Færch, Kristine; Kerege, Anna A; Bacon, Samantha D; Bergman, Bryan C

    2014-07-01

    Abnormal endogenous glucose production (EGP) is a characteristic feature in people with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). We sought to determine whether impaired hepatic glucose sensing contributes to abnormal EGP in IFG and whether it could be experimentally restored. Glucose production (rate of appearance; Ra) and flux (glucose cycling) were assessed during a hyperglycemic-euinsulinemic somatostatin clamp with an infusion of [6,6-(2)H2-]glucose and [2-(2)H]glucose before and after enhanced hepatic glucokinase activity via an infusion of low-dose fructose in people with IFG and normal glucose tolerance (NGT). During euglycemia, neither endogenous glucose production [(6,6-(2)H2)-glucose Ra; P = 0.53] or total glucose output (TGO; [2-(2)H]-glucose Ra; P = .12) was different between groups, but glucose cycling ([2-(2)H]glucose Ra to [6,6-(2)H2-]glucose Ra; a surrogate measure of hepatic glucokinase activity in the postabsorptive state) was lower in IFG than NGT (P = .04). Hyperglycemia suppressed EGP more in NGT than IFG (P < .01 for absolute or relative suppression, NGT vs IFG), whereas TGO decreased similarly in both groups (P = .77). The addition of fructose completely suppressed EGP in IFG (P < .01) and tended to do the same to TGO (P = .01; no such changes in NGT, P = .39-.55). Glucose cycling (which reflects glucose-6-phosphatase activity during glucose infusion) was similar in IFG and NGT (P = .51) during hyperglycemia and was unchanged and comparable between groups with the addition of fructose (P = .24). In summary, glucose sensing is impaired in IFG but can be experimentally restored with low-dose fructose. Glucokinase activation may prove to be a novel strategy for the prevention of diabetes in this high-risk group.

  8. Evaluation of Hemoglobin A1c Criteria to Assess Preoperative Diabetes Risk in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Sima; Zrull, Christina A.; Patil, Preethi V.; Jha, Leena; Kling-Colson, Susan C.; Gandia, Kenia G.; DuBois, Elizabeth C.; Plunkett, Cynthia D.; Bodnar, Tim W.; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) has recently been recommended for diagnosing diabetes mellitus and diabetes risk (prediabetes). Its performance compared with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h post-glucose load (2HPG) is not well delineated. We compared the performance of A1C with that of FPG and 2HPG in preoperative cardiac surgery patients. Methods Data from 92 patients without a history of diabetes were analyzed. Patients were classified with diabetes or prediabetes using established cutoffs for FPG, 2HPG, and A1C. Sensitivity and specificity of the new A1C criteria were evaluated. Results All patients diagnosed with diabetes by A1C also had impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes by other criteria. Using FPG as the reference, sensitivity and specificity of A1C for diagnosing diabetes were 50% and 96%, and using 2HPG as the reference they were 25% and 95%. Sensitivity and specificity for identifying prediabetes with FPG as the reference were 51% and 51%, respectively, and with 2HPG were 53% and 51%, respectively. One-third each of patients with prediabetes was identified using FPG, A1C, or both. When testing A1C and FPG concurrently, the sensitivity of diagnosing dysglycemia increased to 93% stipulating one or both tests are abnormal; specificity increased to 100% if both tests were required to be abnormal. Conclusions In patients before cardiac surgery, A1C criteria identified the largest number of patients with diabetes and prediabetes. For diagnosing prediabetes, A1C and FPG were discordant and characterized different groups of patients, therefore altering the distribution of diabetes risk. Simultaneous measurement of FGP and A1C may be a more sensitive and specific tool for identifying high-risk individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:21854260

  9. Relationships between body weight, fasting blood glucose concentration, sex and age in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis).

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Chang, Q; Zhang, Y; Zou, X; Chen, L; Zhang, L; Lv, L; Liang, B

    2013-12-01

    The tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) is a squirrel-like lower primate or a close relative of primates, commonly used as an animal model in biomedical research. Despite more than three decades of usage in research, the clear relationships between body weight, fasting blood glucose concentration, sex and age among tree shrews remain unclear. Based on an investigation of 992 tree shrews (454 males and 538 females) aged between 4 months and 4 years old, we found that male tree shrews have significantly higher body weight and fasting blood glucose concentration than female tree shrews (p < 0.001). The concentration of fasting blood glucose slightly increased with body weight in males (r = 0.152, p < 0.001). Meanwhile, in females, the body weight, concentration of fasting blood glucose and waist circumference positively increased with age (p < 0.001). Additionally, 17 tree shrews with Lee index [body weight (g)*0.33*1000/body length (cm)] above 290 had significantly higher body weight, waist circumference and glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) than non-obese tree shrews with a Lee index score below 290 (p < 0.001). Interestingly, 6 of 992 tree shrews (three males and three females, 2-4 years old) displayed impaired plasma triglycerides, HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein and oral glucose tolerance test, suggestive of the early symptoms of metabolic syndrome. This study provides the first clear relationships between body weight, fasting blood glucose concentration, sex and age in tree shrews, further improving our understanding of this relationship in metabolic syndrome (MetS). Given the similarity of tree shrews to humans and non-human primates, this finding supports their potential use as an animal model in the research of MetS.

  10. Effects of fasting on plasma glucose and prolonged tracer measurement of hepatic glucose output in NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Glauber, H.; Wallace, P.; Brechtel, G.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the measurement of hepatic glucose output (HGO) with prolonged (3-/sup 3/H)glucose infusion in 14 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Over the course of 10.5 h, plasma glucose concentration fell with fasting by one-third, from 234 +/- 21 to 152 +/- 12 mg/dl, and HGO fell from 2.35 +/- 0.18 to 1.36 +/- 0.07 mg . kg-1 . min-1 (P less than .001). In the basal state, HGO and glucose were significantly correlated (r = 0.68, P = .03), and in individual patients, HGO and glucose were closely correlated as both fell with fasting (mean r = 0.79, P less than .01). Plasma (3-/sup 3/H)glucose radioactivity approached a steady state only 5-6 h after initiation of the primed continuous infusion, and a 20% overestimate of HGO was demonstrated by not allowing sufficient time for tracer labeling of the glucose pool. Assumption of steady-state instead of non-steady-state kinetics in using Steele's equations to calculate glucose turnover resulted in a 9-24% overestimate of HGO. Stimulation of glycogenolysis by glucagon injection demonstrated no incorporation of (3-/sup 3/H)glucose in hepatic glycogen during the prolonged tracer infusion. In a separate study, plasma glucose was maintained at fasting levels (207 +/- 17 mg/dl) for 8 h with the glucose-clamp technique. Total glucose turnover rates remained constant during this prolonged tracer infusion. However, HGO fell to 30% of the basal value simply by maintaining fasting hyperglycemia in the presence of basal insulin levels.

  11. Utility of hemoglobin A(1c) for diagnosing prediabetes and diabetes in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Paulina; Santoro, Nicola; Liu, Haibei; Lartaud, Derek; Shaw, Melissa M; Goldberg, Rachel; Guandalini, Cindy; Savoye, Mary; Rose, Paulina; Caprio, Sonia

    2011-06-01

    Hemoglobin A(1c) (A1C) has emerged as a recommended diagnostic tool for identifying diabetes and subjects at risk for the disease. This recommendation is based on data in adults showing the relationship between A1C with future development of diabetes and microvascular complications. However, studies in the pediatric population are lacking. We studied a multiethnic cohort of 1,156 obese children and adolescents without a diagnosis of diabetes (male, 40%/female, 60%). All subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and A1C measurement. These tests were repeated after a follow-up time of ∼2 years in 218 subjects. At baseline, subjects were stratified according to A1C categories: 77% with normal glucose tolerance (A1C <5.7%), 21% at risk for diabetes (A1C 5.7-6.4%), and 1% with diabetes (A1C >6.5%). In the at risk for diabetes category, 47% were classified with prediabetes or diabetes, and in the diabetes category, 62% were classified with type 2 diabetes by the OGTT. The area under the curve receiver operating characteristic for A1C was 0.81 (95% CI 0.70-0.92). The threshold for identifying type 2 diabetes was 5.8%, with 78% specificity and 68% sensitivity. In the subgroup with repeated measures, a multivariate analysis showed that the strongest predictors of 2-h glucose at follow-up were baseline A1C and 2-h glucose, independently of age, ethnicity, sex, fasting glucose, and follow-up time. The American Diabetes Association suggested that an A1C of 6.5% underestimates the prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes in obese children and adolescents. Given the low sensitivity and specificity, the use of A1C by itself represents a poor diagnostic tool for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes in obese children and adolescents.

  12. Utility of Hemoglobin A1c for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes in Obese Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Nowicka, Paulina; Santoro, Nicola; Liu, Haibei; Lartaud, Derek; Shaw, Melissa M.; Goldberg, Rachel; Guandalini, Cindy; Savoye, Mary; Rose, Paulina; Caprio, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) has emerged as a recommended diagnostic tool for identifying diabetes and subjects at risk for the disease. This recommendation is based on data in adults showing the relationship between A1C with future development of diabetes and microvascular complications. However, studies in the pediatric population are lacking. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied a multiethnic cohort of 1,156 obese children and adolescents without a diagnosis of diabetes (male, 40%/female, 60%). All subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and A1C measurement. These tests were repeated after a follow-up time of ∼2 years in 218 subjects. RESULTS At baseline, subjects were stratified according to A1C categories: 77% with normal glucose tolerance (A1C <5.7%), 21% at risk for diabetes (A1C 5.7–6.4%), and 1% with diabetes (A1C >6.5%). In the at risk for diabetes category, 47% were classified with prediabetes or diabetes, and in the diabetes category, 62% were classified with type 2 diabetes by the OGTT. The area under the curve receiver operating characteristic for A1C was 0.81 (95% CI 0.70–0.92). The threshold for identifying type 2 diabetes was 5.8%, with 78% specificity and 68% sensitivity. In the subgroup with repeated measures, a multivariate analysis showed that the strongest predictors of 2-h glucose at follow-up were baseline A1C and 2-h glucose, independently of age, ethnicity, sex, fasting glucose, and follow-up time. CONCLUSIONS The American Diabetes Association suggested that an A1C of 6.5% underestimates the prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes in obese children and adolescents. Given the low sensitivity and specificity, the use of A1C by itself represents a poor diagnostic tool for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes in obese children and adolescents. PMID:21515842

  13. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Screening with fasting plasma glucose

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mukesh M

    2016-01-01

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) as a screening test for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has had a checkered history. During the last three decades, a few initial anecdotal reports have given way to the recent well-conducted studies. This review: (1) traces the history; (2) weighs the advantages and disadvantages; (3) addresses the significance in early pregnancy; (4) underscores the benefits after delivery; and (5) emphasizes the cost savings of using the FPG in the screening of GDM. It also highlights the utility of fasting capillary glucose and stresses the value of the FPG in circumventing the cumbersome oral glucose tolerance test. An understanding of all the caveats is crucial to be able to use the FPG for investigating glucose intolerance in pregnancy. Thus, all health professionals can use the patient-friendly FPG to simplify the onerous algorithms available for the screening and diagnosis of GDM - thereby helping each and every pregnant woman. PMID:27525055

  14. Effects of iriflophenone 3-C-β-glucoside on fasting blood glucose level and glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Pranakhon, Ratree; Aromdee, Chantana; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the biological activities of agar wood (Aquilaria sinensis Lour., Thymelaeaceae), is anti-hyperglycemic activity. The methanolic extract (ME) was proven to possess the fasting blood glucose activity in rat and glucose uptake transportation by rat adipocytes. Objective: To determine the decreasing fasting blood glucose level of constituents affordable for in vivo test. If the test was positive, the mechanism which is positive to the ME, glucose transportation, will be performed. Materials and Methods: The ME was separated by column chromatography and identified by spectroscopic methods. Mice was used as an animal model (in vivo), and rat adipocytes were used for the glucose transportation activity (in vitro). Result: Iriflophenone 3-C-β-glucoside (IPG) was the main constituent, 3.17%, and tested for the activities. Insulin and the ME were used as positive controls. The ME, IPG and insulin lowered blood glucose levels by 40.3, 46.4 and 41.5%, respectively, and enhanced glucose uptake by 152, 153, and 183%, respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that IPG is active in lowering fasting blood glucose with potency comparable to that of insulin. PMID:25709215

  15. Peripheral Blood Transcriptomic Signatures of Fasting Glucose and Insulin Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian H; Hivert, Marie-France; Peters, Marjolein J; Pilling, Luke C; Hogan, John D; Pham, Lisa M; Harries, Lorna W; Fox, Caroline S; Bandinelli, Stefania; Dehghan, Abbas; Hernandez, Dena G; Hofman, Albert; Hong, Jaeyoung; Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D; Munson, Peter J; Rybin, Denis V; Singleton, Andrew B; Uitterlinden, André G; Ying, Saixia; Melzer, David; Levy, Daniel; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Florez, Jose C; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B; Kolaczyk, Eric D

    2016-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genetic loci associated with glycemic traits. However, characterizing the functional significance of these loci has proven challenging. We sought to gain insights into the regulation of fasting insulin and fasting glucose through the use of gene expression microarray data from peripheral blood samples of participants without diabetes in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) (n = 5,056), the Rotterdam Study (RS) (n = 723), and the InCHIANTI Study (Invecchiare in Chianti) (n = 595). Using a false discovery rate q <0.05, we identified three transcripts associated with fasting glucose and 433 transcripts associated with fasting insulin levels after adjusting for age, sex, technical covariates, and complete blood cell counts. Among the findings, circulating IGF2BP2 transcript levels were positively associated with fasting insulin in both the FHS and RS. Using 1000 Genomes-imputed genotype data, we identified 47,587 cis-expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) and 6,695 trans-eQTL associated with the 433 significant insulin-associated transcripts. Of note, we identified a trans-eQTL (rs592423), where the A allele was associated with higher IGF2BP2 levels and with fasting insulin in an independent genetic meta-analysis comprised of 50,823 individuals. We conclude that integration of genomic and transcriptomic data implicate circulating IGF2BP2 mRNA levels associated with glucose and insulin homeostasis. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  16. Is There a Role for HbA1c in Pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ruth C E; Rowan, Janet; Florkowski, Chris M

    2016-01-01

    Outside pregnancy, HbA1c analysis is used for monitoring, screening for and diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes. During pregnancy, the role for HbA1c analysis is not yet established. Physiological changes lower HbA1c levels, and pregnancy-specific reference ranges may need to be recognised. Other factors that influence HbA1c are also important to consider, particularly since emerging data suggest that, in early pregnancy, HbA1c elevations close to the reference range may both identify women with underlying hyperglycaemia and be associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. In later pregnancy, HbA1c analysis is less useful than an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at detecting gestational diabetes. Postpartum, HbA1c analysis detects fewer women with abnormal glucose tolerance than an OGTT, but the ease of testing may improve follow-up rates and combining HbA1c analysis with fasting plasma glucose or waist circumference may improve detection rates. This article discusses the relevance of HbA1c testing at different stages of pregnancy.

  17. Glucose regulates lipid metabolism in fasting king penguins.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Servane F; Orvoine, Jord; Groscolas, René

    2003-08-01

    This study aims to determine whether glucose intervenes in the regulation of lipid metabolism in long-term fasting birds, using the king penguin as an animal model. Changes in the plasma concentration of various metabolites and hormones, and in lipolytic fluxes as determined by continuous infusion of [2-3H]glycerol and [1-14C]palmitate, were examined in vivo before, during, and after a 2-h glucose infusion under field conditions. All the birds were in the phase II fasting status (large fat stores, protein sparing) but differed by their metabolic and hormonal statuses, being either nonstressed (NSB; n = 5) or stressed (SB; n = 5). In both groups, glucose infusion at 5 mg.kg-1.min-1 induced a twofold increase in glycemia. In NSB, glucose had no effect on lipolysis (maintenance of plasma concentrations and rates of appearance of glycerol and nonesterified fatty acids) and no effect on the plasma concentrations of triacylglycerols (TAG), glucagon, insulin, or corticosterone. However, it limited fatty acid (FA) oxidation, as indicated by a 25% decrease in the plasma level of beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB). In SB, glucose infusion induced an approximately 2.5-fold decrease in lipolytic fluxes and a large decrease in FA oxidation, as reflected by a 64% decrease in the plasma concentration of beta-OHB. There were also a 35% decrease in plasma TAG, a 6.5- and 2.8-fold decrease in plasma glucagon and corticosterone, respectively, and a threefold increase in insulinemia. These data show that in fasting king penguins, glucose regulates lipid metabolism (inhibition of lipolysis and/or of FA oxidation) and affects hormonal status differently in stressed vs. nonstressed individuals. The results also suggest that in birds, as in humans, the availability of glucose, not of FA, is an important determinant of the substrate mix (glucose vs. FA) that is oxidized for energy production.

  18. High dose flaxseed oil supplementation may affect fasting blood serum glucose management in human type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Barre, Douglas E; Mizier-Barre, Kazimiera A; Griscti, Odette; Hafez, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized partially by elevated fasting blood serum glucose and insulin concentrations and the percentage of hemoglobin as HbA1c. It was hypothesized that each of blood glucose and its co-factors insulin and HbA1c and would show a more favorable profile as the result of flaxseed oil supplementation. Patients were recruited at random from a population pool responding to a recruitment advertisement in the local newspaper and 2 area physicians. Completing the trial were 10 flaxseed oil males, 8 flaxseed oil females, 8 safflower (placebo) oil males and 6 safflower oil females. Patients visited on two pre-treatment occasions each three months apart (visits 1 and 2). At visit 2 subjects were randomly assigned in double blind fashion and in equal gender numbers to take flaxseed oil or safflower oil for three further months until visit 3. Oil consumption in both groups was approximately 10 g/d. ALA intake in the intervention group was approximately 5.5 g/d. Power was 0.80 to see a difference of 1 mmol of glucose /L using 12 subjects per group with a p < 0.05. Flaxseed oil had no impact on fasting blood serum glucose, insulin or HbA1c levels. It is concluded that high doses of flaxseed oil have no effect on glycemic control in type 2 diabetics.

  19. Variants in MTNR1B influence fasting glucose levels

    PubMed Central

    Prokopenko, Inga; Langenberg, Claudia; Florez, Jose C; Saxena, Richa; Soranzo, Nicole; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Loos, Ruth J F; Manning, Alisa K; Jackson, Anne U; Aulchenko, Yurii; Potter, Simon C; Erdos, Michael R; Sanna, Serena; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Wheeler, Eleanor; Kaakinen, Marika; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Chen, Wei-Min; Ahmadi, Kourosh; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bergman, Richard N; Bochud, Murielle; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Buchanan, Thomas A; Cao, Antonio; Cervino, Alessandra; Coin, Lachlan; Collins, Francis S; Crisponi, Laura; de Geus, Eco J C; Dehghan, Abbas; Deloukas, Panos; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Paul; Freimer, Nelson; Gateva, Vesela; Herder, Christian; Hofman, Albert; Hughes, Thomas E; Hunt, Sarah; Illig, Thomas; Inouye, Michael; Isomaa, Bo; Johnson, Toby; Kong, Augustine; Krestyaninova, Maria; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lim, Noha; Lindblad, Ulf; Lindgren, Cecilia M; McCann, Owen T; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew D; Naitza, Silvia; Orrù, Marco; Palmer, Colin N A; Pouta, Anneli; Randall, Joshua; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Saramies, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Scott, Laura J; Scuteri, Angelo; Sharp, Stephen; Sijbrands, Eric; Smit, Jan H; Song, Kijoung; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Voight, Benjamin F; Waterworth, Dawn; Wichmann, H-Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Yuan, Xin; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Schlessinger, David; Sandhu, Manjinder; Boomsma, Dorret I; Uda, Manuela; Spector, Tim D; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Altshuler, David; Vollenweider, Peter; Jarvelin, Marjo Riitta; Lakatta, Edward; Waeber, Gerard; Fox, Caroline S; Peltonen, Leena; Groop, Leif C; Mooser, Vincent; Cupples, L Adrienne; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Boehnke, Michael; Barroso, Inês; Van Duijn, Cornelia; Dupuis, Josée; Watanabe, Richard M; Stefansson, Kari; McCarthy, Mark I; Wareham, Nicholas J; Meigs, James B; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2009-01-01

    To identify previously unknown genetic loci associated with fasting glucose concentrations, we examined the leading association signals in ten genome-wide association scans involving a total of 36,610 individuals of European descent. Variants in the gene encoding melatonin receptor 1B (MTNR1B) were consistently associated with fasting glucose across all ten studies. The strongest signal was observed at rs10830963, where each G allele (frequency 0.30 in HapMap CEU) was associated with an increase of 0.07 (95% CI = 0.06-0.08) mmol/l in fasting glucose levels (P = 3.2 = × 10−50) and reduced beta-cell function as measured by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-B, P = 1.1 × 10−15). The same allele was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio = 1.09 (1.05-1.12), per G allele P = 3.3 × 10−7) in a meta-analysis of 13 case-control studies totaling 18,236 cases and 64,453 controls. Our analyses also confirm previous associations of fasting glucose with variants at the G6PC2 (rs560887, P = 1.1 × 10−57) and GCK (rs4607517, P = 1.0 × 10−25) loci. PMID:19060907

  20. Variants in MTNR1B influence fasting glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Prokopenko, Inga; Langenberg, Claudia; Florez, Jose C; Saxena, Richa; Soranzo, Nicole; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Loos, Ruth J F; Manning, Alisa K; Jackson, Anne U; Aulchenko, Yurii; Potter, Simon C; Erdos, Michael R; Sanna, Serena; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Wheeler, Eleanor; Kaakinen, Marika; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Chen, Wei-Min; Ahmadi, Kourosh; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bergman, Richard N; Bochud, Murielle; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Buchanan, Thomas A; Cao, Antonio; Cervino, Alessandra; Coin, Lachlan; Collins, Francis S; Crisponi, Laura; de Geus, Eco J C; Dehghan, Abbas; Deloukas, Panos; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Paul; Freimer, Nelson; Gateva, Vesela; Herder, Christian; Hofman, Albert; Hughes, Thomas E; Hunt, Sarah; Illig, Thomas; Inouye, Michael; Isomaa, Bo; Johnson, Toby; Kong, Augustine; Krestyaninova, Maria; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lim, Noha; Lindblad, Ulf; Lindgren, Cecilia M; McCann, Owen T; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew D; Naitza, Silvia; Orrù, Marco; Palmer, Colin N A; Pouta, Anneli; Randall, Joshua; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Saramies, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Scott, Laura J; Scuteri, Angelo; Sharp, Stephen; Sijbrands, Eric; Smit, Jan H; Song, Kijoung; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Voight, Benjamin F; Waterworth, Dawn; Wichmann, H-Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Yuan, Xin; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Schlessinger, David; Sandhu, Manjinder; Boomsma, Dorret I; Uda, Manuela; Spector, Tim D; Penninx, Brenda Wjh; Altshuler, David; Vollenweider, Peter; Jarvelin, Marjo Riitta; Lakatta, Edward; Waeber, Gerard; Fox, Caroline S; Peltonen, Leena; Groop, Leif C; Mooser, Vincent; Cupples, L Adrienne; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Boehnke, Michael; Barroso, Inês; Van Duijn, Cornelia; Dupuis, Josée; Watanabe, Richard M; Stefansson, Kari; McCarthy, Mark I; Wareham, Nicholas J; Meigs, James B; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2009-01-01

    To identify previously unknown genetic loci associated with fasting glucose concentrations, we examined the leading association signals in ten genome-wide association scans involving a total of 36,610 individuals of European descent. Variants in the gene encoding melatonin receptor 1B (MTNR1B) were consistently associated with fasting glucose across all ten studies. The strongest signal was observed at rs10830963, where each G allele (frequency 0.30 in HapMap CEU) was associated with an increase of 0.07 (95% CI = 0.06-0.08) mmol/l in fasting glucose levels (P = 3.2 x 10(-50)) and reduced beta-cell function as measured by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-B, P = 1.1 x 10(-15)). The same allele was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio = 1.09 (1.05-1.12), per G allele P = 3.3 x 10(-7)) in a meta-analysis of 13 case-control studies totaling 18,236 cases and 64,453 controls. Our analyses also confirm previous associations of fasting glucose with variants at the G6PC2 (rs560887, P = 1.1 x 10(-57)) and GCK (rs4607517, P = 1.0 x 10(-25)) loci.

  1. Fasting Serum Glucose Level in Postmenopausal Bangladeshi Women.

    PubMed

    Tajkia, T; Nessa, A; Mia, M R; Das, R K; Sufrin, S; Zannat, M R; Naznin, R; Khanam, A; Akter, R; Nasreen, S

    2016-07-01

    The study was done to find out the causes that changes the fasting serum glucose level in postmenopausal women. This was descriptive type of cross sectional study carried out over a period of one year from July 2014 to June 2015 in the department of physiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh. Women of reproductive age (25-45 years) and clinically diagnosed 100 menopausal women (45-70 years) were included for this study. Convenience type of sampling technique was used for selecting the study subjects. Measurement of fasting serum glucose was done by GOD-PAP method. Data were expressed as mean±SD and statistical significance of difference among the groups were calculated by unpaired student's 't' test. The mean±SD of serum glucose in menopausal women were significant at 1% level of probability than women of reproductive age. This study revealed that postmenopausal women showed higher levels of fasting serum glucose level. Fasting blood sugar level between the study & control group were 7.69±2.37 and 4.59±0.73 and the difference was statistically significant.

  2. Effect of chromium supplementation on glycated hemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Raynold V; Phung, Olivia J

    2015-02-13

    Chromium (Cr) is a trace element involved in glucose homeostasis. We aim to evaluate and quantify the effects of Cr supplementation on A1C and FPG in patients with T2DM. A systematic literature search of Pubmed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library (from database inception to 11/2014) with no language restrictions sought RCTs or cohort studies evaluating Cr supplementation in T2DM vs control and reporting either change in glycated hemoglobin (A1C) or fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Meta-analysis was conducted on each subtype of Cr supplement separately, and was analyzed by random effects model to yield the weighted mean differences (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was assessed by using the I(2) statistic. A total of 14 RCTs (n=875 participants, mean age range: 30 to 83 years old, 8 to 24 weeks of follow-up) were identified (Cr chloride: n=3 study, Cr picolinate: n=5 study, brewer's yeast: n=4 study and Cr yeast: n=3 study). Compared with placebo, Cr yeast, brewer's yeast and Cr picolinate did not show statistically significant effects on A1C. Furthermore, compared to control, Cr chloride, Cr yeast and Cr picolinate showed no effect on FPG, however, brewer's yeast showed a statistically significant decrease in FPG -19.23 mg/dL (95% CI=-35.30 to -3.16, I(2)=21%, n=137). Cr supplementation with brewer's yeast may provide marginal benefits in lowering FPG in patients with T2DM compared to placebo however it did not have any effect on A1C.

  3. Relationship between Hb and HbA1c in Japanese adults: an analysis of the 2009 Japan Society of Ningen Dock database.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiko; Moriyama, Kengo; Yamakado, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the effect of Hb on HbA1c levels in 265,427 Japanese individuals. The divergence between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels increased with lower Hb, resulting in HbA1c levels that were higher in relation to than the FPG levels. Similarly, the correlation between FPG and HbA1c levels, stratified by Hb, weakened as Hb decreased. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A distinct metabolic signature predicts development of fasting plasma glucose

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High blood glucose and diabetes are amongst the conditions causing the greatest losses in years of healthy life worldwide. Therefore, numerous studies aim to identify reliable risk markers for development of impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes. However, the molecular basis of impaired glucose metabolism is so far insufficiently understood. The development of so called 'omics' approaches in the recent years promises to identify molecular markers and to further understand the molecular basis of impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes. Although univariate statistical approaches are often applied, we demonstrate here that the application of multivariate statistical approaches is highly recommended to fully capture the complexity of data gained using high-throughput methods. Methods We took blood plasma samples from 172 subjects who participated in the prospective Metabolic Syndrome Berlin Potsdam follow-up study (MESY-BEPO Follow-up). We analysed these samples using Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), and measured 286 metabolites. Furthermore, fasting glucose levels were measured using standard methods at baseline, and after an average of six years. We did correlation analysis and built linear regression models as well as Random Forest regression models to identify metabolites that predict the development of fasting glucose in our cohort. Results We found a metabolic pattern consisting of nine metabolites that predicted fasting glucose development with an accuracy of 0.47 in tenfold cross-validation using Random Forest regression. We also showed that adding established risk markers did not improve the model accuracy. However, external validation is eventually desirable. Although not all metabolites belonging to the final pattern are identified yet, the pattern directs attention to amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism and redox homeostasis. Conclusions We demonstrate that metabolites identified using a high

  5. A distinct metabolic signature predicts development of fasting plasma glucose.

    PubMed

    Hische, Manuela; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Schwarz, Franziska; Fischer-Rosinský, Antje; Bobbert, Thomas; Assmann, Anke; Catchpole, Gareth S; Pfeiffer, Andreas Fh; Willmitzer, Lothar; Selbig, Joachim; Spranger, Joachim

    2012-02-02

    High blood glucose and diabetes are amongst the conditions causing the greatest losses in years of healthy life worldwide. Therefore, numerous studies aim to identify reliable risk markers for development of impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes. However, the molecular basis of impaired glucose metabolism is so far insufficiently understood. The development of so called 'omics' approaches in the recent years promises to identify molecular markers and to further understand the molecular basis of impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes. Although univariate statistical approaches are often applied, we demonstrate here that the application of multivariate statistical approaches is highly recommended to fully capture the complexity of data gained using high-throughput methods. We took blood plasma samples from 172 subjects who participated in the prospective Metabolic Syndrome Berlin Potsdam follow-up study (MESY-BEPO Follow-up). We analysed these samples using Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), and measured 286 metabolites. Furthermore, fasting glucose levels were measured using standard methods at baseline, and after an average of six years. We did correlation analysis and built linear regression models as well as Random Forest regression models to identify metabolites that predict the development of fasting glucose in our cohort. We found a metabolic pattern consisting of nine metabolites that predicted fasting glucose development with an accuracy of 0.47 in tenfold cross-validation using Random Forest regression. We also showed that adding established risk markers did not improve the model accuracy. However, external validation is eventually desirable. Although not all metabolites belonging to the final pattern are identified yet, the pattern directs attention to amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism and redox homeostasis. We demonstrate that metabolites identified using a high-throughput method (GC-MS) perform well in

  6. Association of Sickle Cell Trait With Hemoglobin A1c in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Mary E; Wellenius, Gregory A; Sumner, Anne E; Correa, Adolfo; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Liem, Robert I; Wilson, James G; Sacks, David B; Jacobs, David R; Carson, April P; Luo, Xi; Gjelsvik, Annie; Reiner, Alexander P; Naik, Rakhi P; Liu, Simin; Musani, Solomon K; Eaton, Charles B; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2017-02-07

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) reflects past glucose concentrations, but this relationship may differ between those with sickle cell trait (SCT) and those without it. To evaluate the association between SCT and HbA1c for given levels of fasting or 2-hour glucose levels among African Americans. Retrospective cohort study using data collected from 7938 participants in 2 community-based cohorts, the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study and the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). From the CARDIA study, 2637 patients contributed a maximum of 2 visits (2005-2011); from the JHS, 5301 participants contributed a maximum of 3 visits (2000-2013). All visits were scheduled at approximately 5-year intervals. Participants without SCT data, those without any concurrent HbA1c and glucose measurements, and those with hemoglobin variants HbSS, HbCC, or HbAC were excluded. Analysis of the primary outcome was conducted using generalized estimating equations (GEE) to examine the association of SCT with HbA1c levels, controlling for fasting or 2-hour glucose measures. Presence of SCT. Hemoglobin A1c stratified by the presence or absence of SCT was the primary outcome measure. The analytic sample included 4620 participants (mean age, 52.3 [SD, 11.8] years; 2835 women [61.3%]; 367 [7.9%] with SCT) with 9062 concurrent measures of fasting glucose and HbA1c levels. In unadjusted GEE analyses, for a given fasting glucose, HbA1c values were statistically significantly lower in those with (5.72%) vs those without (6.01%) SCT (mean HbA1c difference, -0.29%; 95% CI, -0.35% to -0.23%). Findings were similar in models adjusted for key risk factors and in analyses using 2001 concurrent measures of 2-hour glucose and HbA1c concentration for those with SCT (mean, 5.35%) vs those without SCT (mean, 5.65%) for a mean HbA1c difference of -0.30% (95% CI, -0.39% to -0.21%). The HbA1c difference by SCT was greater at higher fasting (P = .02 for interaction) and 2-hour (P = .03) glucose

  7. The effect of defective early phase insulin secretion on postload glucose intolerance in impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Sargin, Mehmet; Ikiişik, Murat; Sargin, Haluk; Orçun, Asuman; Kaya, Müjgan; Gözü, Hülya; Dabak, Reşat; Bayramiçli, Oya Uygur; Yayla, Ali

    2005-10-01

    Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are two risk groups for type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by both impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance but their relative contribution to the development of hyperglycemia may differ due to heterogeneity of the disease. Combined glucose intolerance (CGI), on the other hand, seems to represent a more advanced stage of prediabetes that bears a distinctly higher risk of progression to diabetes and its comorbidities. This study has the aim to compare isolated IFG and CGI categories with respect to the degree of early phase insulin secretion abnormalities and insulin resistance. Subjects who had IFG (fasting glucose: 110-126 mg/dl) were included in the study. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with insulin response was done and subjects were classified according to the WHO criteria. Six subjects were excluded because they had diabetic glucose tolerance. A total of 66 patients (53.4 +/- 11.1 years, female/male: 48/18) were divided into two groups according to their glucose tolerance in OGGT (Group 1: isolated IFG and group 2: CGI). Early phase insulin secretion was measured by intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and OGTT. Insulin resistance was assessed by the R value of the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). We did not find any statistically significant difference between groups according to age, gender, body mass index (BMI), fasting glucose, fasting insulin, insulin-AUC (0-180 min) and HOMA-R values. In OGGT there was no statistically significant difference between 0', 30', 60' and 90' insulin levels of the groups; only 120' and 180' insulin levels were higher in CGI than in IFG group (p<0.05). In IVGTT, there was no statistically significant difference between glucose levels of the groups. Furthermore, insulin response to intravenous glucose was higher in IFG than in CGI (p<0.05). Our data demonstrate that isolated IFG and CGI are similar with respect to

  8. Hindbrain ghrelin receptor signaling is sufficient to maintain fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael M; Perello, Mario; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Sakata, Ichiro; Gautron, Laurent; Lee, Charlotte E; Lauzon, Danielle; Elmquist, Joel K; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    The neuronal coordination of metabolic homeostasis requires the integration of hormonal signals with multiple interrelated central neuronal circuits to produce appropriate levels of food intake, energy expenditure and fuel availability. Ghrelin, a peripherally produced peptide hormone, circulates at high concentrations during nutrient scarcity. Ghrelin promotes food intake, an action lost in ghrelin receptor null mice and also helps maintain fasting blood glucose levels, ensuring an adequate supply of nutrients to the central nervous system. To better understand mechanisms of ghrelin action, we have examined the roles of ghrelin receptor (GHSR) expression in the mouse hindbrain. Notably, selective hindbrain ghrelin receptor expression was not sufficient to restore ghrelin-stimulated food intake. In contrast, the lowered fasting blood glucose levels observed in ghrelin receptor-deficient mice were returned to wild-type levels by selective re-expression of the ghrelin receptor in the hindbrain. Our results demonstrate the distributed nature of the neurons mediating ghrelin action.

  9. Correlation between macrosomia body indices and maternal fasting blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Song, Y; Zhang, S; Song, W

    2014-05-01

    To explore the significance of neonatal body indices in identifying pathological macrosomia, we implemented a retrospective study of 254 neonates, including: 100 macrosomia of diabetic pregnancies, 77 macrosomia of healthy pregnancies and 77 normal neonates of healthy pregnancies, using their birth weight, body length, head circumference and chest circumference, to calculate neonatal body indices, multiple regression analysis of the correlation between newborn body indices and maternal fasting blood glucose. The Quetelet Index and Kaup Index of diabetic macrosomia is higher than that of non-diabetic macrosomia; HC:CC (ratio between head circumference and chest circumference) is reversed (p < 0.05). The multiple regression equation of neonatal body indices to maternal fasting blood glucose is BG = 6.959 + 0.031 QI -4.482 × HC:CC. Quetelet index and HC:CC have linear relationship with maternal fasting blood glucose (p < 0.05). Compared with birth weight, Quetelet Index and HC:CC could better reflect the effect of maternal metabolism on the fetus and be of great significance in the prediction of fetal macrosomia.

  10. Cinnamon extract improves fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin level in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting; Sheng, Hongguang; Wu, Johnna; Cheng, Yuan; Zhu, Jianming; Chen, Yan

    2012-06-01

    For thousands of years, cinnamon has been used as a traditional treatment in China. However, there are no studies to date that investigate whether cinnamon supplements are able to aid in the treatment of type 2 diabetes in Chinese subjects. We hypothesized cinnamon should be effective in improving blood glucose control in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. To address this hypothesis, we performed a randomized, double-blinded clinical study to analyze the effect of cinnamon extract on glycosylated hemoglobin A(1c) and fasting blood glucose levels in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 66 patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited and randomly divided into 3 groups: placebo and low-dose and high-dose supplementation with cinnamon extract at 120 and 360 mg/d, respectively. Patients in all 3 groups took gliclazide during the entire 3 months of the study. Both hemoglobin A(1c) and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly reduced in patients in the low- and high-dose groups, whereas they were not changed in the placebo group. The blood triglyceride levels were also significantly reduced in the low-dose group. The blood levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver transaminase remained unchanged in the 3 groups. In conclusion, our study indicates that cinnamon supplementation is able to significantly improve blood glucose control in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  11. Use of hemoglobin A1C to detect Haitian-Americans with undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Exebio, Joel C; Zarini, Gustavo G; Vaccaro, Joan A; Exebio, Cristobal; Huffman, Fatma G

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the validity of hemoglobin A1C (A1C) as a diagnostic tool for type 2 diabetes and to determine the most appropriate A1C cutoff point for diagnosis in a sample of Haitian-Americans. Subjects (n = 128) were recruited from Miami-Dade and Broward counties, FL. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was run in order to measure sensitivity and specificity of A1C for detecting diabetes at different cutoff points. The area under the ROC curve was 0.86 using fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L as the gold standard. An A1C cutoff point of 6.26% had sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 74%, whereas an A1C cutoff point of 6.50% (recommended by the American Diabetes Association - ADA) had sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 89%. A1C is a reliable alternative to fasting plasma glucose in detecting diabetes in this sample of Haitian-Americans. A cutoff point of 6.26% was the optimum value to detect type 2 diabetes.

  12. Association of morning fasting blood glucose variability with insulin antibodies and clinical factors in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Chihiro; Tashima-Horie, Kanako; Fukushima, Sayaka; Saito, Satoko; Tanaka, Sayoko; Haruki, Takenori; Ogino, Jun; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Hashimoto, Naotake

    2016-07-30

    The fasting blood glucose concentration in type 1 diabetes may vary without being much affected by diet and exercise. This study aimed to identify association of morning fasting blood glucose concentration variability with insulin antibodies and clinical factors. The subjects in this study were 54 patients with type 1 diabetes who had high variation of fasting blood glucose. The insulin antibody level was measured, and correlations of glycemic variability with antibody levels, binding rates, and other clinical factors were investigated. The standard deviation (SD) of the 30-day morning self-monitored fasting blood glucose concentration (FBG SD) was evaluated as an index of glycemic variability. The mean glucose level was 159.8±42.1 mg/dL and the FBG SD was 47.5±22.0 mg/dL. Glycemic variability (FBG SD) was positively correlated with insulin antibody level, but not with insulin antibody binding rate, and had a negative correlation with C-peptide immunoreactivity/plasma glucose (CPR/PG) and positive correlations with diabetes duration, basal insulin dose and bolus insulin dose. Glycemic variability was not correlated with BMI, HbA1c or age. In multiple regression analysis of glycemic variability, CPR/PG was the only significant related factor. The results showed that glycemic variability was mainly influenced by endogenous insulin secretion capacity and was high in patients with high insulin antibody levels. In some patients with a high insulin antibody titer, the antibody may have an effect on the variability of the fasting glucose concentration in type 1 diabetes.

  13. Effects of intermittent fasting on glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Antoni, Rona; Johnston, Kelly L; Collins, Adam L; Robertson, M Denise

    2017-08-01

    Two intermittent fasting variants, intermittent energy restriction (IER) and time-restricted feeding (TRF), have received considerable interest as strategies for weight-management and/or improving metabolic health. With these strategies, the pattern of energy restriction and/or timing of food intake are altered so that individuals undergo frequently repeated periods of fasting. This review provides a commentary on the rodent and human literature, specifically focusing on the effects of IER and TRF on glucose and lipid metabolism. For IER, there is a growing evidence demonstrating its benefits on glucose and lipid homeostasis in the short-to-medium term; however, more long-term safety studies are required. Whilst the metabolic benefits of TRF appear quite profound in rodents, findings from the few human studies have been mixed. There is some suggestion that the metabolic changes elicited by these approaches can occur in the absence of energy restriction, and in the context of IER, may be distinct from those observed following similar weight-loss achieved via modest continuous energy restriction. Mechanistically, the frequently repeated prolonged fasting intervals may favour preferential reduction of ectopic fat, beneficially modulate aspects of adipose tissue physiology/morphology, and may also impinge on circadian clock regulation. However, mechanistic evidence is largely limited to findings from rodent studies, thus necessitating focused human studies, which also incorporate more dynamic assessments of glucose and lipid metabolism. Ultimately, much remains to be learned about intermittent fasting (in its various forms); however, the findings to date serve to highlight promising avenues for future research.

  14. Interpretation of HbA1c : association with mean cell volume and haemoglobin concentration.

    PubMed

    Simmons, D; Hlaing, T

    2014-11-01

    The utility of HbA1c in diabetes diagnosis is reduced in settings associated with altered haemoglobin glycation. We have studied whether HbA1c varies with mean cell volume and mean cell haemoglobin concentration as measures of haemoglobin metabolism. Randomly selected adults from rural Victoria, Australia, were invited for biomedical assessment. After excluding patients with known diabetes and/or serum creatinine ≥ 0.12 mmol/l, 1315 adults were included. Demography, arthropometric measurements, oral glucose tolerance test, analyses of full blood count and HbA1c were undertaken. After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, BMI, town and socio-economic status, there were no significant differences in haemoglobin, mean cell volume or mean cell haemoglobin concentration by glycaemic status (defined by oral glucose tolerance test). HbA1c was significantly and independently associated with fasting glucose, town, mean cell haemoglobin concentration, ethnicity, age and BMI among men < 50 years (R² = 33.8%); fasting glucose, 2-h glucose, mean cell haemoglobin concentration and town among men ≥ 50 years (R² = 47.9%); fasting glucose, mean cell volume, mean cell haemoglobin concentration, town, 2-h glucose and age among women < 50 years (R² = 46.3%); fasting glucose, mean cell haemoglobin concentration, mean cell volume and 2-h glucose among women ≥ 50 years (R² = 51.6%). A generalized linear model showed a gradient from an adjusted mean HbA1c of 36 (95% CI 34-38) mmol/mol with a mean cell haemoglobin concentration of ≤ 320 g/l to 30 (95% CI 29-31) mmol/mol with a mean cell haemoglobin concentration of > 370 g/l. The gradient across mean cell volume was negative, but only by 1 mmol/mol (0.1%) HbA1c . A mean HbA1c difference of 5 mmol/mol (0.5%) across the mean cell haemoglobin concentration reference range suggests that an accompanying full blood count examination may be required for its use in the diagnosis of diabetes. Further studies are required to confirm this.

  15. Can Fasting Glucose Levels or Post-Breakfast Glucose Fluctuations Predict the Occurrence of Nocturnal Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Receiving Basal-Bolus Insulin Therapy with Long-Acting Insulin?

    PubMed

    Mitsuishi, Sumie; Nishimura, Rimei; Ando, Kiyotaka; Tsujino, Daisuke; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether the occurrence of nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia may be predicted based on fasting glucose levels and post-breakfast glucose fluctuations. The study subjects comprised type 1 diabetic patients who underwent CGM assessments and received basal-bolus insulin therapy with long-acting insulin. The subjects were evaluated for I) fasting glucose levels and II) the range of post-breakfast glucose elevation (from fasting glucose levels to postprandial 1- and 2-hour glucose levels). The patients were divided into those with asymptomatic hypoglycemia during nighttime and those without for comparison. Optimal cut-off values were also determined for relevant parameters that could predict nighttime hypoglycemia by using ROC analysis. 64 patients (mean HbA1c 8.7 ± 1.8%) were available for analysis. Nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia occurred in 23 patients (35.9%). Fasting glucose levels (I) were significantly lower in those with hypoglycemia than those without (118 ± 35 mg/dL vs. 179 ± 65 mg/dL; P < 0.001). The range of post-breakfast glucose elevation (II) was significantly greater in those with hypoglycemia than in those without (postprandial 1-h, P = 0.003; postprandial 2-h, P = 0.005). The cut-off values determined for relevant factors were as follows: (I) fasting glucose level < 135 mg/dL (sensitivity 0.73/specificity 0.83/AUC 0.79, P < 0.001); and (II) 1-h postprandial elevation > 54 mg/dL (0.65/0.61/0.71, P = 0.006), 2-h postprandial elevation > 78 mg/dL (0.65/0.73/0.71, P = 0.005). Nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia was associated with increases in post-breakfast glucose levels in type 1 diabetes. Study findings also suggest that fasting glucose levels and the range of post-breakfast glucose elevation could help predict the occurrence of nocturnal asymptomatic hypoglycemia.

  16. Ethnic disparity in hemoglobin A1c levels among normoglycemic offspring of parents with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chapp-Jumbo, Emmanuel; Edeoga, Chimaroke; Wan, Jim; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the racial/ethnic disparities in hemoglobin A1c levels among nondiabetic persons with similar parental history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We studied a community-based sample of adult offspring of parents with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Measurements included anthropometry, hematology assessments, serial fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance testing, plasma insulin, hemoglobin A1c, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell function, using a homeostasis model assessment. The study included 302 participants (135 white, 167 black). Compared with white participants, black participants had lower fasting plasma glucose levels (91.9 ± 0.51 mg/dL vs 93.6 ± 0.50 mg/dL, P = .015), lower area under the curve of plasma glucose during oral glucose tolerance testing (P = <.001), higher body mass index (31.1 ± 0.61 kg/m² vs 28.5 ± 0.57 kg/m², P = <.001), and similar insulin sensitivity and β-cell function. Hemoglobin A1c was higher in black participants than in white participants (5.68 ± 0.033% vs 5.45 ± 0.028%, P<.001). The absolute black-white difference in hemoglobin A1c level of approximately 0.22% persisted after adjusting for age, hemoglobin, hematocrit, body mass index, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, glucose area under the curve, and other covariates. Among healthy offspring of parents with type 2 diabetes mellitus in this study, African American participants had higher hemoglobin A1c levels than white participants after adjusting for age, adiposity, blood glucose, and known variables. Thus, plasma glucose level is more valid than hemoglobin A1c for diagnosing prediabetes or diabetes in black persons.

  17. Diagnostic value of hemoglobin A1c for type 2 diabetes mellitus in a population at risk.

    PubMed

    Peter, A; Fritsche, A; Stefan, N; Heni, M; Häring, H-U; Schleicher, E

    2011-04-01

    Because the American Diabetes Association has recently included HbA1c as the primary diagnostic test for the detection of diabetes mellitus (HbA1c ≥6.5%) we investigated its use as screening parameter for diabetes in a cohort at increased risk for the disease. During the last 10 years 2 036 Caucasians at risk to develop type 2 diabetes but not having this diagnosis yet, consecutively underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). HbA1c was determined with the HPLC method (Tosoh A1c 2.2), external and internal quality controls were well within the allowed ranges. The oral glucose tolerance test classified 1 523 individuals as normal glucose tolerant (NGT), 387 as impaired glucose tolerant (IGT) or having impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) and 126 as diabetic. The 6.5% cut-off value of HbA1c classified 47% of the diabetic individuals correctly. Of the remaining 53% diabetic individuals (HbA1c <6.5%) 35% had increased fasting glucose levels, while 65% were only diagnosed by their increased 2 h glucose values. A cut-off value of 6.5% HbA1c classifies diabetic subjects with a specificity of 98.7%. However, the sensitivity of 46.8% is low, indicating that more than half of diabetic subjects are missed when using this test. The present data shows that the use of HbA1c as a the primary diagnostic test will reduce diabetes prevalence. Furthermore, it suggests, that HbA1c and OGTT measurements cannot simply be exchanged, but most probably detect and define different categories of diabetes, i. e., categories with different risk of cardiovascular disease. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Chinese herbal medicines for people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Grant, Suzanne J; Bensoussan, Alan; Chang, Dennis; Kiat, Hosen; Klupp, Nerida L; Liu, Jian Ping; Li, Xun

    2009-10-07

    Around 308 million people worldwide are estimated to have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT); 25% to 75% of these will develop diabetes within a decade of initial diagnosis. At diagnosis, half will have tissue-related damage and all have an increased risk for coronary heart disease. The objective of this review was to assess the effects and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for the treatment of people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (IFG). We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, AMED, a range of Chinese language databases, SIGLE and databases of ongoing trials. Randomised clinical trials comparing Chinese herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions in people with IGT or IFG were considered. Two authors independently extracted data. Trials were assessed for risk of bias against key criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants, outcome assessors and intervention providers, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias. This review examined 16 trials lasting four weeks to two years involving 1391 participants receiving 15 different Chinese herbal medicines in eight different comparisons. No trial reported on mortality, morbidity or costs. No serious adverse events like severe hypoglycaemia were observed. Meta-analysis of eight trials showed that those receiving Chinese herbal medicines combined with lifestyle modification were more than twice as likely to have their fasting plasma glucose levels return to normal levels (i.e. fasting plasma glucose <7.8 mmol/L and 2hr blood glucose <11.1 mmol/L) compared to lifestyle modification alone (RR 2.07; 95% confidence intervall (CI) 1.52 to 2.82). Those receiving Chinese herbs were less likely to progress to diabetes over the duration of the trial (RR 0.33; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.58). However, all trials had a considerable risk of bias and none

  19. Chinese herbal medicines for people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting blood glucose

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Suzanne J; Bensoussan, Alan; Chang, Dennis; Kiat, Hosen; Klupp, Nerida L; Liu, Jian Ping; Li, Xun

    2011-01-01

    Background Around 308 million people worldwide are estimated to have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT); 25% to 75% of these will develop diabetes within a decade of initial diagnosis. At diagnosis, half will have tissue-related damage and all have an increased risk for coronary heart disease. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for the treatment of people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Search strategy We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, AMED, a range of Chinese language databases, SIGLE and databases of ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised clinical trials comparing Chinese herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions in people with IGT or IFG were considered. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data. Trials were assessed for risk of bias against key criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants, outcome assessors and intervention providers, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias. Main results This review examined 16 trials lasting four weeks to two years involving 1391 participants receiving 15 different Chinese herbal medicines in eight different comparisons. No trial reported on mortality, morbidity or costs. No serious adverse events like severe hypoglycaemia were observed. Meta-analysis of eight trials showed that those receiving Chinese herbal medicines combined with lifestyle modification were more than twice as likely to have their fasting plasma glucose levels return to normal levels (i.e. fasting plasma glucose <7.8 mmol/L and 2hr blood glucose <11.1 mmol/L) compared to lifestyle modification alone (RR 2.07; 95% confidence intervall (CI) 1.52 to 2.82). Those receiving Chinese herbs were less likely to progress to diabetes over the duration of the

  20. Noninvasive assessment of insulin resistance in the liver using the fasting (13)C-glucose breath test.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ken; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Shindo, Daisuke; Aida, Yuta; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Nagatsuma, Keisuke; Saito, Masaya; Ishii, Hirotaka; Abe, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Fumihiko; Shimada, Takao; Nakada, Koji; Ikewaki, Katsunori; Aizawa, Yoshio; Tajiri, Hisao; Suzuki, Masato

    2013-09-01

    Evaluating hepatic insulin resistance (IR) is the key to making a sensitive an accurate diagnosis of glucose intolerance. However, there is currently no suitable method to perform this procedure. This study was conducted to investigate whether the fasting (13)C-glucose breath test (FGBT) is useful as a convenient and highly sensitive clinical test for evaluating hepatic IR. Healthy nonobese subjects and a disease group consisting of patients with mild glucose intolerance were administered 100 mg (13)C-glucose after an overnight fast. A series of breath samples was collected until 360 minutes after ingestion, and the (13)CO2-to-(12)CO2 ratio was measured using an infrared spectrometer and was plotted as a kinetic curve of (13)C excretion. The area under the curve until 360 minutes (AUC360) of the (13)C excretion kinetic curve of the FGBT reflects the efficiency of energy production in the liver. First, we assessed the correlations between the AUC360 (or the (13)C excretion rate at 120 minutes) and the HOMA-IR and HbA1c levels as standard measurements of IR and diabetes mellitus (DM). There were relatively strong correlation coefficients (r = -0.49 to -0.81, r(2) = 0.24-0.66, P < 0.01; n = 35 males, n = 33 females). Second, we compared the AUC360 of healthy subjects and that of the patients with mild glucose intolerance. The AUC360 of the healthy subjects was consistently higher than that of the patients with mild glucose intolerance. The presence of IR or DM in males and females was diagnosed using cutoff values. The FGBT is a novel glucose metabolism test that can be used conveniently and safely to evaluate the balance of glucose metabolism in the liver. This test has excellent sensitivity for diagnosing alterations in hepatic glucose metabolism, particularly hepatic IR. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of α-Thalassemia on HbA1c Measurement.

    PubMed

    Xu, Anping; Ji, Ling; Chen, Weidong; Xia, Yong; Zhou, Yu

    2016-11-01

    α-Thalassemia is a benign condition that is often present in patients with diabetes mellitus. Here, we evaluated the effects of different genotypes α-thalassemia on HbA1c measurement. A total of 189 samples from nondiabetic patients were analyzed. HbA1c analysis was performed by ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, boronate affinity HPLC, immunoassay, and capillary electrophoresis. Fasting glucose, fructosamin, and HbA2 were also performed. All samples were confirmed by genotyping for thalassemia. In patients with two or three functional α-genes, HbA1c values were not significantly different from those of controls (P > 0.05); however, in individuals with α-thalassemia with one functional α-gene (i.e., HbH disease), HbA1c levels were significantly different from those of controls (P < 0.01). HbA1c values were significantly lower in individuals with HbH disease than in control individuals and patients in the other two α-thalassemia groups. For patients with HbH disease, there were no significant differences in the four HbA1c measurement systems (P > 0.05). In this study, HbA1c values in samples from individuals with two or three functional α-genes basically reflected the normal mean blood glucose level, while those in samples from individuals with one functional α-gene did not. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Hemoglobin A1c levels and aortic arterial stiffness: the Cardiometabolic Risk in Chinese (CRC) study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jun; Zhou, Na; Teng, Fei; Zou, Caiyan; Xue, Ying; Yang, Manqing; Song, Huaidong; Qi, Lu

    2012-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recently published new clinical guidelines in which hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was recommended as a diagnostic test for diabetes. The present study was to investigate the association between HbA1c and cardiovascular risk, and compare the associations with fasting glucose and 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (2 h OGTT). The study samples are from a community-based health examination survey in central China. Carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and HbA1c were measured in 5,098 men and women. After adjustment for age, sex, and BMI, the levels of HbA1c were significantly associated with an increasing trend of cfPWV in a dose-dependent fashion (P for trend <0.0001). The associations remained significant after further adjustment for blood pressure, heart rate, and lipids (P = 0.004), and the difference in cfPWV between the highest and the lowest quintiles of HbA1c was 0.31 m/s. Fasting glucose and 2 h OGTT were not associated with cfPWV in the multivariate analyses. HbA1c showed additive effects with fasting glucose or 2 h OGTT on cfPWV. In addition, age and blood pressure significantly modified the associations between HbA1c and cfPWV (P for interactions <0.0001 for age; and  = 0.019 for blood pressure). The associations were stronger in subjects who were older (≥60 y; P for trend = 0.004) and had higher blood pressure (≥120 [systolic blood pressure]/80 mmHg [diastolic blood pressure]; P for trend = 0.028) than those who were younger and had lower blood pressure (P for trend >0.05). HbA1c was related to high cfPWV, independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Senior age and high blood pressure might amplify the adverse effects of HbA1c on cardiovascular risk.

  3. Insulin Secretory Defect and Insulin Resistance in Isolated Impaired Fasting Glucose and Isolated Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama-Sasabe, Sae; Fukushima, Mitsuo; Xin, Xin; Taniguchi, Ataru; Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Mitsui, Rie; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hideaki; Yabe, Daisuke; Yasuda, Koichiro; Kurose, Takeshi; Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the characteristics of isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), we analyzed the factors responsible for elevation of 2-hour postchallenge plasma glucose (2 h PG) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels. Methods. We investigated the relationship between 2 h PG and FPG levels who underwent 75 g OGTT in 5620 Japanese subjects at initial examination for medical check-up. We compared clinical characteristics between isolated IGT and isolated IFG and analyzed the relationships of 2 h PG and FPG with clinical characteristics, the indices of insulin secretory capacity, and insulin sensitivity. Results. In a comparison between isolated IGT and isolated IFG, insulinogenic index was lower in isolated IGT than that of isolated IFG (0.43 ± 0.34 versus 0.50 ± 0.47, resp.; p < 0.01). ISI composite was lower in isolated IFG than that of isolated IGT (6.87 ± 3.38 versus 7.98 ± 4.03, resp.; p < 0.0001). In isolated IGT group, insulinogenic index showed a significant correlation with 2 h PG (r = −0.245, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with 2 h PG (β = −0.290). In isolated IFG group, ISI composite showed a significant correlation with FPG (r = −0.162, p < 0.0001) and had the strongest correlation with FPG (β = −0.214). Conclusions. We have elucidated that decreased early-phase insulin secretion is the most important factor responsible for elevation of 2 h PG levels in isolated IGT subjects, and decreased insulin sensitivity is the most important factor responsible for elevation of FPG levels in isolated IFG subjects. PMID:26788515

  4. Distribution of fasting plasma glucose and prevalence of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes in the Mexican paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Romero, Fernando; Violante, Rafael; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha

    2009-07-01

    Published data on the distribution of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in children are scarce. We therefore set out to examine the distribution of FPG and determine the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes (T2-DM) in Mexican children aged 6-18 years in a community-based cross-sectional study. A total of 1534 apparently healthy children were randomly enrolled and underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. IFG was defined by an FPG value between >or=100 and <126 mg/dL, IGT by glucose concentration 2-h post-load between >or=140 and <200 mg/dL, and T2-DM by glucose concentration 2-h post-load >or=200 mg/dL. The FPG level at the 75(th) percentile of distribution was 98.0, 100.0 and 99.0 mg/dL for children aged 6-9, 10-14 and 15-18 years, respectively; the 95(th) percentile of FPG was greater than 100 mg/dL for all the age strata. In the population overall, the prevalences of IFG, IGT, and T2-DM were 18.3%, 5.2% and 0.6%, respectively. Among obese children and adolescents, the prevalences of IFG, IGT, IFG + IGT and T2-DM were 19.1%, 5.7%, 2.5% and 1.3%. Our study shows a high prevalence of prediabetes and is the first that reports the distribution of FPG in Mexican children and adolescents.

  5. Fasting plasma glucose and 5-year incidence of diabetes in the JPHC diabetes study - suggestion for the threshold for impaired fasting glucose among Japanese.

    PubMed

    Noda, Mitsuhiko; Kato, Masayuki; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Yumi; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    To determine the optimal fasting plasma glucose (FPG) cut-off value which effectively identifies high risk subjects for type 2 diabetes in Japanese, we conducted a population-based prospective study on diabetes as part of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study and estimated the 5-year incidence of diabetes. The subjects of the analysis of this study were 2,207 Japanese aged 51-70 at baseline from whom a fasting blood sample was collected in both the baseline and the 5-year follow-up surveys and who completed the questionnaires at both times. Diabetes was defined as an FPG value > or = 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) and/or self-reported diabetes. A total of 125 subjects developed diabetes during the 5 years after the baseline survey, and the incidence rate for a baseline FPG value of 95-99, 100-104, 105-109, 110-114, 115- 119, and 120-125 mg/dL was 6.1, 11.5, 30.3, 52.6, 86.4, and 115.2 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. The results of receiver operating characteristic curve analysis suggested that an FPG value of 102 mg/dL (5.67 mmol/L) was optimal for predicting diabetes during the next 5-years. The cut-off value was similar in both genders and in the 51- to 60-year-old group and 61- to 70-year-old group. Use of hemoglobin A(1c) level > or = 6.1% for an additional diagnostic criterion resulted in a small increment in incidence, but the cut-off value for predicting diabetes was almost the same (101 mg/dL). The results of this study suggested that the cut-off FPG value should be lowered in terms of prediction of type 2 diabetes among Japanese populations.

  6. GPR40 partial agonist MK-2305 lower fasting glucose in the Goto Kakizaki rat via suppression of endogenous glucose production

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, Melissa E.; Kosinski, Daniel T.; Mane, Joel; Bunzel, Michelle; Cao, Jin; Souza, Sarah; Thomas-Fowlkes, Brande; Di Salvo, Jerry; Weinglass, Adam B.; Li, Xiaoyan; Myers, Robert W.; Knagge, Kevin; Carrington, Paul E.; Hagmann, William K.

    2017-01-01

    GPR40 (FFA1) is a fatty acid receptor whose activation results in potent glucose lowering and insulinotropic effects in vivo. Several reports illustrate that GPR40 agonists exert glucose lowering in diabetic humans. To assess the mechanisms by which GPR40 partial agonists improve glucose homeostasis, we evaluated the effects of MK-2305, a potent and selective partial GPR40 agonist, in diabetic Goto Kakizaki rats. MK-2305 decreased fasting glucose after acute and chronic treatment. MK-2305-mediated changes in glucose were coupled with increases in plasma insulin during hyperglycemia and glucose challenges but not during fasting, when glucose was normalized. To determine the mechanism(s) mediating these changes in glucose metabolism, we measured the absolute contribution of precursors to glucose production in the presence or absence of MK-2305. MK-2305 treatment resulted in decreased endogenous glucose production (EGP) driven primarily through changes in gluconeogenesis from substrates entering at the TCA cycle. The decrease in EGP was not likely due to a direct effect on the liver, as isolated perfused liver studies showed no effect of MK-2305 ex vivo and GPR40 is not expressed in the liver. Taken together, our results suggest MK-2305 treatment increases glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), resulting in changes to hepatic substrate handling that improve glucose homeostasis in the diabetic state. Importantly, these data extend our understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which GPR40 partial agonists reduce hyperglycemia. PMID:28542610

  7. Serum Fibroblast Growth Factor 19 Levels Are Decreased in Chinese Subjects With Impaired Fasting Glucose and Inversely Associated With Fasting Plasma Glucose Levels

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qichen; Li, Huating; Song, Qianqian; Yang, Wenjing; Hou, Xuhong; Ma, Xiaojing; Lu, Junxi; Xu, Aimin; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), a hormone secreted from the small intestine, has recently been shown to stimulate glycogen synthesis and inhibit gluconeogenesis through insulin-independent pathways. This study investigated the change of FGF19 in prediabetes and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and explored the association of serum FGF19 levels with parameters of glucose metabolism in Chinese subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fasting serum FGF19 levels were determined by ELISA in 81 normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 91 impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 93 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 104 newly diagnosed T2DM subjects, and their association with parameters of glucose metabolism was studied. An ordinal logistic regression analysis was performed in subjects with NGT, IFG, and T2DM. Serum FGF19 levels at 2 h after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test in the different glucose tolerance categories were studied in a subgroup. RESULTS Fasting serum FGF19 levels in subjects with IFG (210 pg/mL [142–327]) (median [interquartile range]) and T2DM (196 pg/mL [137–280]) were significantly lower than those in NGT subjects (289 pg/mL [224–393]) (both P < 0.001). However, no significant difference in fasting FGF19 levels was observed between IGT (246 pg/mL [138–379]) and NGT subjects. Fasting serum FGF19 levels were negatively associated with fasting plasma glucose and independently associated with the deterioration of glucometabolic status from NGT to IFG and T2DM. CONCLUSIONS Fasting serum FGF19 levels were decreased in Chinese subjects with IFG and inversely associated with fasting glucose levels. PMID:23628619

  8. Fasting glucose measurement as a potential first step screening for glucose metabolism abnormalities in women with anovulatory polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Veltman-Verhulst, Susanne M; Goverde, Angelique J; van Haeften, Timon W; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2013-08-01

    Is routine screening by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) needed for all women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Screening for glucose metabolism abnormalities of PCOS patients by an OGTT could potentially be limited to patients who present with a fasting glucose concentration between 6.1 and 7.0 mmol/l only. Women with PCOS are at increased risk of developing diabetes. This study proposes a stepwise screening strategy for (pre)diabetes for PCOS patients based on risk stratification by fasting plasma glucose. A cross-sectional study of 226 women diagnosed with anovulatory PCOS. A consecutive series of 226 patients, diagnosed with PCOS at the University Medical Centre Utrecht, the Netherlands, were screened for glucose metabolism abnormalities by OGTT (75 g glucose load). The majority of the 226 women (mean age: 29.6 ± 4.3 years; BMI: 27.3 ± 6.7 kg/m(2); 81% Caucasian) presented with a normal OGTT (169 women (75%)). Of the 57 (25%) women presenting with mild to moderate glucose abnormalities, 53 (93%) could be identified by fasting glucose concentrations only. Diabetes was diagnosed in a total of eight women (3.5%). In six women, the diagnosis was based on fasting glucose >7.0 mmol/l. The other two cases of diabetes initially presented with fasting glucose between 6.1 and 7.0 mmol/l and were diagnosed by OGTT assessment. No women diagnosed with diabetes presented with fasting glucose levels below 6.1 mmol/l. We therefore conclude that all diabetes patients could potentially be found by initial fasting glucose assessment followed by OGTT only in patients with fasting glucose between 6.1 and 7.0 mmol/l. Before general implementation can be advised, this screening algorithm should be validated in a prospective study of a similar or greater number of PCOS women. Our study comprised of a mostly Caucasian (81%) population, therefore generalization to other ethnic populations should be done with caution. No external finance was involved in this study. B

  9. Hemorheological alterations in adults with prediabetes identified by hemoglobin A1c levels.

    PubMed

    Marini, M A; Fiorentino, T V; Andreozzi, F; Mannino, G C; Succurro, E; Sciacqua, A; Perticone, F; Sesti, G

    2017-07-01

    A link between increased blood viscosity and type 2 diabetes has been previously reported. Herein, we investigated the association of blood viscosity with prediabetes, identified by glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) according to the new American Diabetes Association criteria, and subclinical atherosclerosis. The study cohort includes 1136 non-diabetic adults submitted to anthropometrical evaluation, an oral glucose tolerance test and ultrasound measurement of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Whole blood viscosity was estimated using a validated formula based on hematocrit and total plasma proteins. After adjusting for age, and gender, individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7-6.4% [39-47 mmol/mol]) exhibited significantly higher values of hematocrit, and predicted blood viscosity as compared with controls. Increased levels of IMT were observed in subjects with HbA1c-defined prediabetes in comparison to controls. Predicted blood viscosity was positively correlated with age, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, fibrinogen, white blood cell, HbA1c, fasting and 2-h post-load glucose levels, fasting insulin, IMT and inversely correlated with HDL and Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity. Of the three glycemic parameters, i.e. HbA1c, fasting and 2-h post-load glucose, only HbA1c showed a significant correlation with predicted blood viscosity (β = 0.054, P = 0.04) in a multivariate regression analysis model including multiple atherosclerosis risk factors. The study shows that individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes have increased predicted blood viscosity and IMT. The HbA1c criterion may be helpful to capture individuals with an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease who may benefit from an intensive lifestyle intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical

  10. Impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance in children and adolescents with overweight/obesity.

    PubMed

    Di Bonito, P; Pacifico, L; Chiesa, C; Valerio, G; Miraglia Del Giudice, E; Maffeis, C; Morandi, A; Invitti, C; Licenziati, M R; Loche, S; Tornese, G; Franco, F; Manco, M; Baroni, M G

    2017-04-01

    To investigate in a large sample of overweight/obese (OW/OB) children and adolescents the prevalence of prediabetic phenotypes such as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and to assess their association with cardiometabolic risk (CMR) factors including hepatic steatosis (HS). Population data were obtained from the CARdiometabolic risk factors in children and adolescents in ITALY study. Between 2003 and 2013, 3088 youths (972 children and 2116 adolescents) received oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and were included in the study. In 798 individuals, abdominal ultrasound for identification of HS was available. The prevalence of IFG (3.2 vs. 3.3%) and IGT (4.6 vs. 5.0%) was similar between children and adolescents. Children with isolated IGT had a 2-11 fold increased risk of high LDL-C, non-HDL-C, Tg/HDL-C ratio, and low insulin sensitivity, when compared to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). No significant association of IFG with any CMR factor was found in children. Among adolescents, IGT subjects, and to a lesser extent those with IFG, showed a worse CMR profile compared to NGT subgroup. In the overall sample, IGT phenotype showed a twofold increased risk of HS compared to NGT subgroup. Our study shows an unexpected similar prevalence of IFG and IGT between children and adolescents with overweight/obesity. The IGT phenotype was associated with a worse CMR profile in both children and adolescents. Phenotyping prediabetes conditions by OGTT should be done as part of prediction and prevention of cardiometabolic diseases in OW/OB youth since early childhood.

  11. Glucose excursions and glycaemic control during Ramadan fasting in diabetic patients: insights from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM).

    PubMed

    Lessan, N; Hannoun, Z; Hasan, H; Barakat, M T

    2015-02-01

    Ramadan fasting represents a major shift in meal timing and content for practicing Muslims. This study used continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) to assess changes in markers of glycaemic excursions during Ramadan fasting to investigate the short-term safety of this practice in different groups of patients with diabetes. A total of 63 subjects (56 with diabetes, seven healthy volunteers; 39 male, 24 female) had CGM performed during, before and after Ramadan fasting. Mean CGM curves were constructed for each group for these periods that were then used to calculate indicators of glucose control and excursions. Post hoc data analyses included comparisons of different medication categories (metformin/no medication, gliptin, sulphonylurea and insulin). Medication changes during Ramadan followed American Diabetes Association guidelines. Among patients with diabetes, there was a significant difference in mean CGM curve during Ramadan, with a slow fall during fasting hours followed by a rapid rise in glucose level after the sunset meal (iftar). The magnitude of this excursion was greatest in the insulin-treated group, followed by the sulphonylurea-treated group. Markers of control deteriorated in a small number (n=3) of patients. Overall, whether fasting or non-fasting, subjects showed no statistically significant changes in mean interstitial glucose (IG), mean amplitude of glycaemic excursion (MAGE), high and low blood glucose indices (HBGI/LBGI), and number of glucose excursions and rate of hypoglycaemia. The main change in glycaemic control with Ramadan fasting in patients with diabetes is in the pattern of excursions. Ramadan fasting caused neither overall deterioration nor improvement in the majority of patients with good baseline glucose control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Postprandial and Fasting Hepatic Glucose Fluxes in Long-Standing Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kacerovsky, Michaela; Jones, John; Schmid, Albrecht I.; Barosa, Cristina; Lettner, Angelika; Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Szendroedi, Julia; Chmelik, Marek; Nowotny, Peter; Chandramouli, Visvanathan; Wolzt, Michael; Roden, Michael

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Intravenous insulin infusion partly improves liver glucose fluxes in type 1 diabetes (T1D). This study tests the hypothesis that continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) normalizes hepatic glycogen metabolism. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS T1D with poor glycemic control (T1Dp; HbA1c: 8.5 ± 0.4%), T1D with improved glycemic control on CSII (T1Di; 7.0 ± 0.3%), and healthy humans (control subjects [CON]; 5.2 ± 0.4%) were studied. Net hepatic glycogen synthesis and glycogenolysis were measured with in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Endogenous glucose production (EGP) and gluconeogenesis (GNG) were assessed with [6,6-2H2]glucose, glycogen phosphorylase (GP) flux, and gluconeogenic fluxes with 2H2O/paracetamol. RESULTS When compared with CON, net glycogen synthesis was 70% lower in T1Dp (P = 0.038) but not different in T1Di. During fasting, T1Dp had 25 and 42% higher EGP than T1Di (P = 0.004) and CON (P < 0.001; T1Di vs. CON: P = NS). GNG was 74 and 67% higher in T1Dp than in T1Di (P = 0.002) and CON (P = 0.001). In T1Dp, GP flux (7.0 ± 1.6 μmol ⋅ kg−1 ⋅ min−1) was twofold higher than net glycogenolysis, but comparable in T1Di and CON (3.7 ± 0.8 and 4.9 ± 1.0 μmol ⋅ kg−1 ⋅ min−1). Thus T1Dp exhibited glycogen cycling (3.5 ± 2.0 μmol ⋅ kg−1 ⋅ min−1), which accounted for 47% of GP flux. CONCLUSIONS Poorly controlled T1D not only exhibits augmented fasting gluconeogenesis but also increased glycogen cycling. Intensified subcutaneous insulin treatment restores these abnormalities, indicating that hepatic glucose metabolism is not irreversibly altered even in long-standing T1D. PMID:21562079

  13. Lower fasting blood glucose in neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Aline Stangherlin; Jansen, Ann Kristine; Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro; Matos, Camila Maria; Souza, Marcio Leandro Ribeiro; de Souza, Juliana Ferreira; Diniz, Maria de Fátima Haueisen Sander; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Diniz, Leonardo Mauricio; de Rezende, Nilton Alves; Riccardi, Vincent Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies indicate a lower occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) level is the main criterion used to diagnose DM and glucose intolerance. Therefore, this study compared FBG level between adults with NF1 and non-NF1 controls. We selected clinical records of 57 out of 701 individuals attending the Neurofibromatosis Outpatient Reference Center of the Clinics Hospital of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil. The selected patients with NF1 were matched to non-NF1 controls selected from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health according to sex, age (range, 35–74 years) and BMI at a ratio of 1:3. In both groups, individuals with DM were excluded. Median FBG level in the NF1 group (86 mg/dl (range, 56–127 mg/dl)) was lower than that in the non-NF1 control group (102 mg/dl (range, 85–146 mg/dl)) (P<0.001). Prevalence of FBG level ≥100 mg/dl in the NF1 group (16%) was lower than that in the non-NF1 control group (63%) (P<0.05). The chance of a high FBG level was 89% lower in the NF1 group (odds ratio, 0.112; 95% CI, 0.067–0.188) (P<0.05). In conclusion, adults with NF1 showed a lower FBG level and a lower prevalence of high FBG level compared with non-NF1 controls. PMID:26631381

  14. Occurrence of impaired fasting glucose in GH-deficient adults receiving GH replacement compared with untreated subjects.

    PubMed

    Woodmansee, Whitney W; Hartman, Mark L; Lamberts, Steven W J; Zagar, Anthony J; Clemmons, David R

    2010-01-01

    The effects of GH replacement on glucose metabolism in GH-deficient (GHD) adults in clinical practice are not well defined. Therefore, we assessed GH treatment effects on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and haemoglobin A1c (A1c) concentrations in GHD adults in a clinical setting. Post-hoc analysis of the observational Hypopituitary Control and Complications Study conducted at 157 US centres (1997-2002). GH-deficient adults who were GH-naïve at study entry and had at least two FPG measurements. Effect of GH treatment on the frequency and time course of abnormal FPG (> or =5.6 mmol/l) development, FPG normalization, progression of increased FPG and abnormal follow-up A1c (>6%) values in GHD patients treated with GH (n = 403) or untreated (n = 169) at their physician's discretion. In subjects without pre-existing diabetes mellitus, development of an abnormal FPG tended to occur in a greater percentage of GH-treated than untreated subjects (35.3% versus 24.5, P = 0.06). Additionally, GH treatment was associated with a mild, transient increase in FPG and shorter time to development of an abnormal FPG in these subjects (P < 0.01). Most ( approximately 80%) abnormal FPG values were below 7 mmol/l and normalized in 69% of GH-treated subjects without diabetes. Treatment with GH had no effect on the rate of FPG normalization, progression of increased FPG or abnormal follow-up A1c values. Initiation of GH replacement in GHD adults was associated with a mild increase in FPG that often normalized spontaneously. Nevertheless, clinicians should monitor FPG in patients receiving GH treatment.

  15. Prognosis of Ischemic Stroke With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus According to Hemoglobin A1c Criteria in Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jing; Pan, Yuesong; Zhao, Xingquan; Zheng, Huaguang; Jia, Qian; Li, Hao; Guan, Ling; Liu, Liping; Wang, Chunxue; Meng, Xia; He, Yan; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-08-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was recommended to diagnose diabetes mellitus, but whether newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus (NDDM) according to the new criteria was associated with stroke prognosis was unclear. We aimed to investigate the prognosis of ischemic stroke with NDDM according to the new criteria. Ischemic stroke without a diabetes mellitus history in the survey on Abnormal Glucose Regulation in Patients With Acute Stroke Across China were included in the analysis. NDDM was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥7.0 mmol/L, 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test ≥11.1 mmol/L, or HbA1c ≥6.5%, and NDDM was divided into group 1, diagnosed by glucose criteria (fasting plasma glucose ≥7.0 mmol/L or 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test ≥11.1 mmol/L with/without HbA1c ≥6.5%), or group 2, diagnosed by single high HbA1c (fasting plasma glucose <7.0 mmol/L, 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test <11.1 mmol/L, and HbA1c ≥6.5%). The association between NDDM and 1-year prognosis (mortality, stroke recurrence, and poor functional outcome [modified Rankin scale score 3-6]) was estimated. Among 1251 ischemic stroke patients, 539 were NDDM and 141 of NDDM with single high HbA1c. NDDM was an independent risk factor for 1-year mortality (hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.001-1.26), stroke recurrence (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.28), and poor functional outcome (odds ratio, 2.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.95-3.43) compared with non-diabetes mellitus. Nevertheless, NDDM with single high HbA1c was not significantly associated with 1-year prognosis for all end points (P>0.05 for all). NDDM by new criteria was associated with poor prognosis at 1 year after ischemic stroke; however, NDDM with single high HbA1c did not predict a poor prognosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. The usage of fasting glucose and glycated hemoglobin for the identification of unknown type 2 diabetes in high risk patients with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Valderhaug, Tone G; Sharma, Archana; Kravdal, Gunnhild; Rønningen, Reidun; Nermoen, Ingrid

    2017-11-01

    In spite of increased vigilance of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (DM2), the prevalence of unknown DM2 in subjects with morbid obesity is not known. To assess the prevalence of undiagnosed DM2 and compare the performance of glycated A1c (HbA1c) and fasting glucose (FG) for the diagnosis of DM2 and prediabetes (preDM) in patients with morbid obesity. We measured fasting glucose and HbA1c in 537 consecutive patients with morbid obesity without previously known DM2. A total of 49 (9%) patients with morbid obesity had unknown DM2 out of which 16 (33%) fulfilled both the criteria for HbA1c and FG. Out of 284 (53%) subjects with preDM, 133 (47%) fulfilled both the criteria for HbA1c and FG. Measurements of agreement for FG and HbA1c were moderate for DM2 (κ = 0.461, p < .001) and fair for preDM (κ = 0.317, p < .001). Areas under the curve for FG and HbA1c in predicting unknown DM2 were 0.970 (95% CI 0.942, 0.998) and 0.894 (95% CI 0.837, 0.951) respectively. The optimal thresholds to identify unknown DM2 were FG ≥6.6 mmol/L and HbA1c ≥ 6.1% (43 mmol/mol). The prevalence of DM2 remains high and both FG and HbA1c identify patients with unknown DM2. FG was slightly superior to HbA1c in predicting and separating patients with unknown DM2 from patients without DM2. We suggest that an FG ≥6.6 mmol/L or an HbA1c ≥6.1% (43 mmol/mol) may be used as primary cut points for the identification of unknown DM2 among patients with morbid obesity.

  17. Effects of Hemoglobin Variants on Hemoglobin A1c Values Measured Using a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Method

    PubMed Central

    De-La-Iglesia, Silvia; Ropero, Paloma; Nogueira-Salgueiro, Patricia; Santana-Benitez, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is routinely used to monitor long-term glycemic control and for diagnosing diabetes mellitus. However, hemoglobin (Hb) gene variants/modifications can affect the accuracy of some methods. The potential effect of Hb variants on HbA1c measurements was investigated using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method compared with an immunoturbimetric assay. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels were measured in 42 371 blood samples. Samples producing abnormal chromatograms were further analyzed to characterize any Hb variants. Fructosamine levels were determined in place of HbA1c levels when unstable Hb variants were identified. Abnormal HPLC chromatograms were obtained for 160 of 42 371 samples. In 26 samples HbS was identified and HbA1c results correlated with FPG. In the remaining 134 samples HbD, Hb Louisville, Hb Las Palmas, Hb N-Baltimore, or Hb Porto Alegre were identified and HbA1c did not correlate with FPG. These samples were retested using an immunoturbidimetric assay and the majority of results were accurate; only 3 (with the unstable Hb Louisville trait) gave aberrant HbA1c results. Hb variants can affect determination of HbA1c levels with some methods. Laboratories should be aware of Hb variants occurring locally and choose an appropriate HbA1c testing method. PMID:25355712

  18. A Novel Glycated Hemoglobin A1c-Lowering Traditional Chinese Medicinal Formula, Identified by Translational Medicine Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tsai-Chung; Li, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Hui-Chi; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Ho, Tin-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder that has a significant impact on the health care system. The reduction of glycated hemoglobin A1c is highly associated with the improvements of glycemic control and diabetic complications. In this study, we identified a traditional Chinese medicinal formula with a HbA1c-lowering potential from clinical evidences. By surveying 9,973 diabetic patients enrolled in Taiwan Diabetic Care Management Program, we found that Chu-Yeh-Shih-Kao-Tang (CYSKT) significantly reduced HbA1c values in diabetic patients. CYSKT reduced the levels of HbA1c and fasting blood glucose, and stimulated the blood glucose clearance in type 2 diabetic mice. CYSKT affected the expressions of genes associated with insulin signaling pathway, increased the amount of phosphorylated insulin receptor in cells and tissues, and stimulated the translocation of glucose transporter 4. Moreover, CYSKT affected the expressions of genes related to diabetic complications, improved the levels of renal function indexes, and increased the survival rate of diabetic mice. In conclusion, this was a translational medicine study that applied a “bedside-to-bench” approach to identify a novel HbA1c-lowering formula. Our findings suggested that oral administration of CYSKT affected insulin signaling pathway, decreased HbA1c and blood glucose levels, and consequently reduced mortality rate in type 2 diabetic mice. PMID:25133699

  19. Generational change in fasting glucose and insulin among children at ages 5-16y: Modelled on the EarlyBird study (2015) and UK growth standards (1990) (EarlyBird 69).

    PubMed

    Mostazir, Mohammod; Jeffery, Alison; Voss, Linda; Wilkin, Terence

    2017-01-01

    Pre-diabetes is a state of beta-cell stress caused by excess demand for insulin. Body mass is an important determinant of insulin demand, and BMI has risen substantially over recent time. We sought to model changes in the parameters of glucose control against rising BMI over the past 25years. Using random coefficient mixed models, we established the correlations between HbA1C, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, HOMA2-IR and BMI in contemporary (2015) children (N=307) at ages 5-16y from the EarlyBird study, and modelled their corresponding values 25years ago according to the distribution of BMI in the UK Growth Standards (1990). There was little change in HbA1C or fasting glucose over the 25y period at any age or in either gender. On the other hand, the estimates for fasting insulin and HOMA2-IR were substantially higher in both genders in 2015 compared with 1990. Insofar as it is determined by body mass, there has been a substantial rise in beta cell demand among children over the past 25years. The change could be detected by fasting insulin and HOMA2-IR, but not by fasting glucose or HbA1C. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Abnormal glucose tolerance and increased risk for cardiovascular disease in Japanese-Americans with normal fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Liao, D; Shofer, J B; Boyko, E J; McNeely, M J; Leonetti, D L; Kahn, S E; Fujimoto, W Y

    2001-01-01

    To compare the American Diabetes Association (ADA) fasting glucose and the World Health Organization (WHO) oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) criteria for diagnosing diabetes and detecting people at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Study subjects were 596 Japanese-Americans. Fasting insulin, lipids, and C-peptide levels; systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BPs); BMI (kg/m2); and total and intra-abdominal body fat distribution by computed tomography (CT) were measured. Study subjects were categorized by ADA criteria as having normal fasting glucose (NFG), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and diabetic fasting glucose and by WHO criteria for a 75-g OGTT as having normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and diabetic glucose tolerance (DGT). Of 503 patients with NFG, 176 had IGT and 20 had DGT These patients had worse CVD risk factors than those with NGT . The mean values for NGT, IGT, and DGT, respectively, and analysis of covariance P values, adjusted for age and sex, are as follows; intra-abdominal fat area by CT 69.7, 95.0, and 101.1 cm2 (P < 0.0001); total CT fat area 437.7, 523.3, and 489.8 cm2 (P < 0.0001); fasting triglycerides 1.40, 1.77, and 1.74 mmol/l (P = 0.002); fasting HDL cholesterol 1.56, 1.50, and 1.49 mmol/l (P = 0.02); C-peptide 0.80, 0.90, 0.95 nmol/l (P = 0.002); systolic BP 124.9, 132.4, and 136.9 mmHg (P = 0.0035); diastolic BP 74.8, 77.7, and 78.2 mmHg (P = 0.01). NFG patients who had IGT or DGT had more intra-abdominal fat and total adiposity; higher insulin, C-peptide, and triglyceride levels; lower HDL cholesterol levels; and higher BPs than those with NGT. Classification by fasting glucose misses many Japanese-Americans with abnormal glucose tolerance and less favorable cardiovascular risk profiles.

  1. Glucose oxidation and nonoxidative glucose disposal during prolonged fasts of the northern elephant seal pup (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E; Tift, Michael S; Champagne, Cory D

    2012-09-01

    Elephant seal weanlings demonstrate rates of endogenous glucose production (EGP) during protracted fasts that are higher than predicted on the basis of mass and time fasting. To determine the nonoxidative and oxidative fate of endogenously synthesized glucose, substrate oxidation, metabolic rate, glycolysis, and EGP were measured in fasting weanlings. Eight weanlings were sampled at 14 days of fasting, and a separate group of nine weanlings was sampled at 49 days of fasting. Metabolic rate was determined via flow-through respirometry, and substrate-specific oxidation was determined from the respiratory quotient and urinary nitrogen measurements. The rate of glucose disposal (Glu((R)(d))) was determined through a primed, constant infusion of [3-(3)H]glucose, and glycolysis was determined from the rate of appearance of (3)H in the body water pool. Glu((R)(d)) was 1.41 ± 0.27 and 0.95 ± 0.21 mmol/min in the early and late fasting groups, respectively. Nearly all EGP went through glycolysis, but the percentage of Glu((R)(d)) oxidized to meet the daily metabolic demand was only 24.1 ± 4.4% and 16.7 ± 5.9% between the early and late fasting groups. Glucose oxidation was consistently less than 10% of the metabolic rate in both groups. This suggests that high rates of EGP do not support substrate provisions for glucose-demanding tissues. It is hypothesized that rates of EGP may be ancillary to the upregulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle to meet high rates of lipid oxidation while mitigating ketosis.

  2. Hyperuricemia Is a Risk Factor for the Onset of Impaired Fasting Glucose in Men with a High Plasma Glucose Level: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Teruki; Kumagi, Teru; Furukawa, Shinya; Hirooka, Masashi; Kawasaki, Keitarou; Koizumi, Mitsuhito; Todo, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Shin; Abe, Masanori; Kitai, Kohichiro; Matsuura, Bunzo; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Background It is not clear whether elevated uric acid is a risk factor for the onset of impaired fasting glucose after stratifying by baseline fasting plasma glucose levels. We conducted a community-based retrospective longitudinal cohort study to clarify the relationship between uric acid levels and the onset of impaired fasting glucose, according to baseline fasting plasma glucose levels. Methods We enrolled 6,403 persons (3,194 men and 3,209 women), each of whom was 18–80 years old and had >2 annual check-ups during 2003–2010. After excluding persons who had fasting plasma glucose levels ≥6.11 mM and/or were currently taking anti-diabetic agents, the remaining 5,924 subjects were classified into quartiles according to baseline fasting plasma glucose levels. The onset of impaired fasting glucose was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥6.11 mM during the observation period. Results In the quartile groups, 0.9%, 2.1%, 3.4%, and 20.2% of the men developed impaired fasting glucose, respectively, and 0.1%, 0.3%, 0.5%, and 5.6% of the women developed impaired fasting glucose, respectively (P trend <0.001). After adjusting for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, triacylglycerols, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, creatinine, fatty liver, family history of diabetes, alcohol consumption, and current smoking, uric acid levels were positively associated with onset of impaired fasting glucose in men with highest-quartile fasting plasma glucose levels (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.003; 95% confidence interval, 1.0001–1.005, P = 0.041). Conclusions Among men with high fasting plasma glucose, hyperuricemia may be independently associated with an elevated risk of developing impaired fasting glucose. PMID:25237894

  3. Associations between central nervous system serotonin, fasting glucose, and hostility in African American females.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Stephen H; Georgiades, Anastasia; Brummett, Beverly H; Barefoot, John C; Siegler, Ilene C; Matson, Wayne R; Kuhn, Cynthia M; Grichnik, Katherine; Stafford-Smith, Mark; Williams, Redford B; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Surwit, Richard S

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has shown an association between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women. Central nervous system serotonin activity is implicated both in metabolic processes and in hostility related traits. The purpose of this study is to determine whether central nervous system serotonin influences the association between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women. The study consisted of 119 healthy volunteers (36 African American women, 27 White women, 21 White males, and 35 African American males, mean age 34 ± 8.5 years). Serotonin related compounds were measured in cerebrospinal fluid. Hostility was measured by the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale. Hostility was associated with fasting glucose and central nervous system serotonin related compounds in African American women only. Controlling for the serotonin related compounds significantly reduced the association of hostility to glucose. The positive correlation between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women can partly be explained by central nervous system serotonin function.

  4. Associations between Central Nervous System Serotonin, Fasting Glucose and Hostility in African American Females

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Stephen H.; Georgiades, Anastasia; Brummett, Beverly H.; Barefoot, John C.; Siegler, Ilene C.; Matson, Wayne R.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Grichnik, Katherine; Stafford-Smith, Mark; Williams, Redford B.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Surwit, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown an association between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women. Central nervous system serotonin activity is implicated both in metabolic processes and in hostility related traits. Purpose To determine whether central nervous system serotonin influences the association between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women. Methods The study consisted of 119 healthy volunteers (36 African American women, 27 white women, 21 white males, and 35 African American males, mean age 34±8.5 years). Serotonin metabolites were measured in cerebrospinal fluid. Hostility was measured by the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale. Results Hostility was associated with fasting glucose and central nervous system serotonin metabolites in African American women only. Controlling for the serotonin metabolites significantly reduced the association of hostility to glucose. Conclusions The positive correlation between hostility and fasting glucose in African American women can partly be explained by central nervous system serotonin function. PMID:24806470

  5. ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guang; Naito, Mariko; Wakai, Kenji; Morita, Emi; Kawai, Sayo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Sadao; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takezaki, Toshiro; Tanaka, Keitaro; Morita, Makiko; Uemura, Hirokazu; Ozaki, Etsuko; Hosono, Satoyo; Mikami, Haruo; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Associations between alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes risk are inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. This study investigated the associations of ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms with fasting blood glucose levels, and the impact of the associations of alcohol consumption with fasting blood glucose levels in Japanese individuals. This cross-sectional study included 907 men and 912 women, aged 35–69 years. The subjects were selected from among the Japan Multi-institutional Collaborative Cohort study across six areas of Japan. The ADH1B and ALDH2 polymorphisms were genotyped by Invader Assays. The ALDH2 Glu504Lys genotypes were associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose in men (P = 0.04). Mean fasting glucose level was positively associated with alcohol consumption in men with the ALDH2 504 Lys allele (Ptrend = 0.02), but not in men with the ALDH2 504Glu/Glu genotype (Ptrend = 0.45), resulting in no statistically significant interaction (P = 0.38). Alcohol consumption was associated with elevated fasting blood glucose levels compared with non-consumers in men (Ptrend = 0.002). The ADH1B Arg48His polymorphism was not associated with FBG levels overall or after stratification for alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that the ALDH2 polymorphism is associated with different levels of fasting blood glucose through alcohol consumption in Japanese men. The interaction of ALDH2 polymorphisms in the association between alcohol consumption and fasting blood glucose warrants further investigation. PMID:27303105

  6. Impact of repeated measures and sample selection on genome-wide association studies of fasting glucose

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Alonso, Alvaro; Li, Man; Kao, Wen; Köttgen, Anna; Yan, Yuer; Couper, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Pankow, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Although GWAS have been performed in longitudinal studies, most used only a single trait measure. GWAS of fasting glucose have generally included only normoglycemic individuals. We examined the impact of both repeated measures and sample selection on GWAS in ARIC, a study which obtained four longitudinal measures of fasting glucose and included both individuals with and without prevalent diabetes. The sample included Caucasians and the Affymetrix 6.0 chip was used for genotyping. Sample sizes for GWAS analyses ranged from 8372 (first study visit) to 5782 (average fasting glucose). Candidate SNP analyses with SNPs identified through fasting glucose or diabetes GWAS were conducted in 9133 individuals, including 761 with prevalent diabetes. For a constant sample size, smaller p-values were obtained for the average measure of fasting glucose compared to values at any single visit, and two additional significant GWAS signals were detected. For four candidate SNPs (rs780094, rs10830963, rs7903146, and rs4607517), the strength of association between genotype and glucose was significantly (p-interaction < .05) different in those with and without prevalent diabetes and for all five fasting glucose candidate SNPs (rs780094, rs10830963, rs560887, rs4607517, rs13266634) the association with measured fasting glucose was more significant in the smaller sample without prevalent diabetes than in the larger combined sample of those with and without diabetes. This analysis demonstrates the potential utility of averaging trait values in GWAS studies and explores the advantage of using only individuals without prevalent diabetes in GWAS of fasting glucose. PMID:20839289

  7. Effects of Sleep Disorders on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Ahmet; Ünalacak, Murat; Bilge, Uğur; Yildiz, Pinar; Güler, Seda; Selçuk, Engin Burak; Bilgin, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have reported the presence of sleep disorders in approximately 50–70% of diabetic patients, and these may contribute to poor glycemic control, diabetic neuropathy, and overnight hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of sleep disorders in diabetic patients, and to investigate possible relationships between scores of these sleep disorders and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and diabetic parameters (fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c], and lipid levels). Methods: We used the Berlin questionnaire (BQ) for OSAS, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to determine the frequency of sleep disorders and their possible relationships with fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, and lipid levels. Results: The study included 585 type 2 diabetic patients admitted to family medicine clinics between October and December 2014. Sleep, sleep quality, and sleep scores were used as the dependent variables in the analysis. The ESS scores showed that 54.40% of patients experienced excessive daytime sleepiness, and according to the PSQI, 64.30% experienced poor-quality sleep. The BQ results indicated that 50.20% of patients were at high-risk of OSAS. HbA1c levels correlated significantly with the ESS and PSQI results (r = 0.23, P < 0.001 and r = 0.14, P = 0.001, respectively), and were significantly higher in those with high-risk of OSAS as defined by the BQ (P < 0.001). These results showed that HbA1c levels were related to sleep disorders. Conclusions: Sleep disorders are common in diabetic patients and negatively affect the control of diabetes. Conversely, poor diabetes control is an important factor disturbing sleep quality. Addressing sleep disturbances in patients who have difficulty controlling their blood glucose has dual benefits: Preventing diabetic complications caused by sleep disturbance and improving diabetes control. PMID:26668142

  8. Association of Genomic Instability with HbA1c levels and Medication in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grindel, Annemarie; Brath, Helmut; Nersesyan, Armen; Knasmueller, Siegfried; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) is associated with increased cancer risk. Instability of the genetic material plays a key role in the aetiology of human cancer. This study aimed to analyse genomic instability with the micronucleus cytome assay in exfoliated buccal cells depending on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and medication in 146 female DM2 patients. The occurrence of micronuclei was significantly increased in DM2 patients compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, it was doubled in DM2 patients with HbA1c > 7.5% compared to subjects with HbA1c ≤ 7.5%. Positive correlations were found between micronuclei frequencies and HbA1c as well as fasting plasma glucose. Patients under insulin treatment showed a two-fold increase in micronuclei frequencies compared to subjects under first-line medication (no drugs or monotherapy with non-insulin medication). However, after separation of HbA1c (cut-off 7.5%) only patients with severe DM2 characterised by high HbA1c and insulin treatment showed higher micronuclei frequencies but not patients with insulin treatment and low HbA1c. We demonstrated that the severity of DM2 accompanied by elevated micronuclei frequencies predict a possible enhanced cancer risk among female DM2 patients. Therapy, therefore, should focus on a strict HbA1c control and personalised medical treatments. PMID:28150817

  9. Significance of HbA1c Test in Diagnosis and Prognosis of Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Shariq I.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Ekhzaimy, Aishah; Masood, Afshan; Sakharkar, Meena K.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a global endemic with rapidly increasing prevalence in both developing and developed countries. The American Diabetes Association has recommended glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as a possible substitute to fasting blood glucose for diagnosis of diabetes. HbA1c is an important indicator of long-term glycemic control with the ability to reflect the cumulative glycemic history of the preceding two to three months. HbA1c not only provides a reliable measure of chronic hyperglycemia but also correlates well with the risk of long-term diabetes complications. Elevated HbA1c has also been regarded as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke in subjects with or without diabetes. The valuable information provided by a single HbA1c test has rendered it as a reliable biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of diabetes. This review highlights the role of HbA1c in diagnosis and prognosis of diabetes patients. PMID:27398023

  10. Independent association of HbA(1c) and incident cardiovascular disease in people without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert J; Appleton, Sarah L; Hill, Catherine L; Wilson, David H; Taylor, Anne W; Chittleborough, Catherine R; Gill, Tiffany K; Ruffin, Richard E

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies have reported no association between elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) among women without diabetes. This study describes associations between HbA(1c) and new onset CVD in a representative adult population cohort. Assessment of participants in The North West Adelaide Health Study (NWAHS), a population study of randomly selected adults (age > or =18 years, n = 4,060), included measurement of height, weight, blood pressure, fasting lipids, glucose, and HbA(1c). A self-completed questionnaire assessed doctor-diagnosed diabetes, CVD and stroke, smoking status, and demographics. The cohort was followed for an average 3.5 years. Of the 2,913 adults free of diabetes at baseline and follow-up, 94 (3.5%) reported new onset coronary heart disease (CHD) and/or stroke. Compared with those with an HbA(1c) < or =5.0%, risk of new onset CVD was increased in those with HbA(1c) 5.4-5.6% (odds ratio (OR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4, 4.6), and > or =5.7% (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1, 3.4), after adjustment for other risk factors. The association was stronger in women than men (P = 0.03), and attenuated to only a small degree by addition of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, BMI, waist circumference, or smoking to the model. Elevated HbA(1c) is related to new onset CVD over a relatively short follow-up period in both men and women without diabetes and who do not develop diabetes, after adjustment for other major risk factors. Unlike previous studies, this relationship was not substantially attenuated by other traditional risk factors.

  11. High-normal fasting glucose levels are associated with increased prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance in obese children.

    PubMed

    Grandone, A; Amato, A; Luongo, C; Santoro, N; Perrone, L; del Giudice, E Miraglia

    2008-12-01

    The natural history of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and Type 2 diabetes among obese children is not clear. Although the cut-off for impaired fasting glucose (IFG) has recently been changed from 110 (6.1 mmol/l) to 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/l), it does not seem a reliable way to find all subjects with impaired glucose homeostasis. The aim of our study was to determine whether high-normal fasting glucose level could predict the occurrence of IGT and metabolic syndrome. Three hundred and twenty-three Italian obese children and adolescents were included in the study (176 females, mean age 11+/-2.9 yr; mean body mass index z-score: 3+/-0.6). Waist circumference, serum glucose, insulin, triglyceride, cholesterol HDL, blood pressure were evaluated and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. The prevalence of IFG and IGT were respectively 1.5% (5 subjects) and 5% (18 patients); no diabetic patients were found. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 20% of patients. Fasting glycemia values <100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/l) have been divided in quintiles. Metabolic syndrome prevalence increased across quintiles, although not in a statistically significantly manner, but it could depend on the selected diagnostic criteria as no univocal definition exists for metabolic syndrome in youths. Interestingly high-normal fasting plasma glucose levels constitute an independent risk factor for IGT among obese children and adolescents; therefore, this very easy-to-use parameter may help to identify obese patients at increased risk of diabetes or at least could suggest in which subjects to perform an OGTT.

  12. One-Hour Postload Hyperglycemia Confers Higher Risk of Hepatic Steatosis to HbA1c-Defined Prediabetic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Andreozzi, Francesco; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Pedace, Elisabetta; Perticone, Maria; Sciacqua, Angela; Perticone, Francesco; Sesti, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    Individuals with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c)-defined prediabetes (HbA1c value of 5.7-6.4%) and 1-hour plasma glucose ≥155 mg/dL during an oral glucose tolerance test have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. To evaluate the degree to which HbA1c-defined prediabetes and 1-hour postload glucose ≥155 mg/dL individually and jointly associate with hepatic steatosis and related biomarkers. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on 1108 White individuals. Ambulatory care. Anthropometric and metabolic characteristics including hepatic steatosis assessed by ultrasonography. Compared with the normal group (HbA1c <5.7%), HbA1c-defined prediabetic and diabetic individuals exhibit higher values of fasting, 1-hour, and 2-hour postload glucose; fasting and 2-hour postload insulin; triglycerides; uric acid; homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance; liver insulin resistance index; liver enzymes; and inflammatory biomarkers; and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and IGF-1. Prediabetic and diabetic subjects have increased risk of hepatic steatosis (1.5- and 2.46-fold, respectively). Stratifying participants according to HbA1c and 1-hour postload glucose, we found that individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes and 1-hour postload glucose ≥155 mg/dL have significantly higher risk of hepatic steatosis as compared with individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes but 1-hour postload glucose <155 mg/dL. Individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes and 1-hour postload glucose ≥155 mg/dL exhibit higher values of liver enzymes; fasting, 1-hour, and 2-hour postload glucose; insulin; triglycerides; uric acid; and inflammatory biomarkers; and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein and IGF-1. These data suggest that a value of 1-hour postload glucose ≥155 mg/dL may be helpful to identify a subset of individuals within HbA1c-defined glycemic categories at higher risk of hepatic steatosis.

  13. A1C Test and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis The A1C Test & Diabetes The A1C Test & Diabetes What is the A1C test? The A1C test ... A1C test be used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Yes. In 2009, an international expert ...

  14. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c Print A A A What's in this ... de sangre: hemoglobina A1c What It Is A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test is used to monitor long- ...

  15. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c A A A What's in this article? ... de sangre: hemoglobina A1c What It Is A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test is used to monitor long- ...

  16. Effect of HCV on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance in first 5 years of infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naeema; Rashid, Amir; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Bashir, Qudsia

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effects of hepatitis C virus infection in the first 5 years on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance. The case-control study was conducted at the Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from December 2011 to November 2012, and comprised subjects recruited from a government hospital in Rawalpindi. The subjects included known cases of hepatitis C virus infection for at least 5 years, and normal healthy controls. Fasting blood samples of all the subjects were collected and analysed for serum fasting insulin and serum fasting glucose levels. Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance was calculated SPSS 11 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 30 subjects, 20(66.6%) were cases, while 10(33.3%) were controls. Serum fasting glucose mean level in cases was 89.55±9.53 compared to 84.40±9.80 in the controls (p=0.188). The mean serum fasting insulin in controls was 7.52±3.23 and 6.79±3.30 in cases (p=0.567). Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance level in controls was 1.60±0.76 and In the cases it was 1.49±0.74 (p=0.695). Peripheral insulin resistance and development of type 2 diabetes as a complication of hepatitis C virus infection was not likely at least within the first five years of infection.

  17. Elevated Fasting Plasma Glucose before Liver Transplantation is Associated with Lower Post-Transplant Survival

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Emi; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Taura, Naota; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu; Miuma, Satoshi; Shibata, Hidetaka; Honda, Takuya; Hidaka, Masaaki; Soyama, Akihiko; Takeshima, Fuminao; Eguchi, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of liver cirrhosis is higher among individuals with diabetes mellitus, and a cirrhotic patient with diabetes may have a poorer prognosis after liver transplantation compared to a patient without diabetes. Thus, we evaluated whether fasting plasma glucose prior to receiving a liver transplant was a prognostic factor for post-transplant survival. Material/Methods Ninety-one patients received a living donor liver transplant between November 2005 and December 2012. Patients were considered diabetic if they were prescribed diabetes medications or had impaired glucose tolerance as measured by an oral glucose tolerance test. Each patient was monitored through December 31, 2013, to evaluate prognosis. Results Fasting plasma glucose of at least 100 mg/dL significantly decreased survival following transplant (52% in the high FPG group compared to 78% in the control group, p=0.04), while postprandial hyperglycemia had no effect on survival. Additionally, overall mortality and the incidence of vascular disease were significantly higher among patients with uncontrolled plasma glucose. Impaired fasting plasma glucose was significantly and inversely associated with overall survival in the univariate and multivariate analyses, while creatinine (at least 1 mg/dL) was inversely associated with survival in the univariate analysis. Conclusions Elevated fasting plasma glucose prior to liver transplantation was inversely associated with post-transplant survival. This effect may be due to underlying microangiopathy as a result of uncontrolled diabetes before transplantation. Our data demonstrated the importance of controlled blood glucose prior to liver transplantation. PMID:27909287

  18. Lowered fasting chenodeoxycholic acid correlated with the decrease of fibroblast growth factor 19 in Chinese subjects with impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Huating; Zhou, Hu; Fang, Li; Xu, Jingjing; Yan, Han; Chen, Shuqin; Song, Qianqian; Zhang, Yinan; Xu, Aimin; Fang, Qichen; Ye, Yang; Jia, Weiping

    2017-07-20

    The gut-derived hormone Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) could regulate glucose metabolism and is induced by bile acids (BAs) through activating Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). FGF19 was found to decrease in subjects with isolated-impaired fasting glucose (I-IFG) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the reason for the change of FGF19 in subjects with different glucometabolic status remained unclear. Here we measured six BAs including chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, their glycine conjugates and FGF19 levels during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated-impaired glucose tolerance, I-IFG, combined glucose intolerance (CGI) and T2DM subjects. After OGTT, serum FGF19 peaked at 120 min in all subjects. Glycine conjugated BAs peaked at 30 min, while free BAs did not elevated significantly. Consistent with the decrease trend in FGF19 levels, fasting serum CDCA levels in subjects with I-IFG, CGI and T2DM were significantly lower than NGT subjects (P < 0.05). Fasting serum CDCA was independently associated with FGF19. CDCA strongly upregulated FGF19 mRNA levels in LS174T cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that the decrease of FGF19 in subjects with I-IFG was at least partially due to their decrease of CDCA acting via FXR.

  19. New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Josée; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga; Saxena, Richa; Soranzo, Nicole; Jackson, Anne U; Wheeler, Eleanor; Glazer, Nicole L; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Gloyn, Anna L; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mägi, Reedik; Morris, Andrew P; Randall, Joshua; Johnson, Toby; Elliott, Paul; Rybin, Denis; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Henneman, Peter; Grallert, Harald; Dehghan, Abbas; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Franklin, Christopher S; Navarro, Pau; Song, Kijoung; Goel, Anuj; Perry, John R B; Egan, Josephine M; Lajunen, Taina; Grarup, Niels; Sparsø, Thomas; Doney, Alex; Voight, Benjamin F; Stringham, Heather M; Li, Man; Kanoni, Stavroula; Shrader, Peter; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Kumari, Meena; Qi, Lu; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gieger, Christian; Zabena, Carina; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Ingelsson, Erik; An, Ping; O'Connell, Jeffrey; Luan, Jian'an; Elliott, Amanda; McCarroll, Steven A; Payne, Felicity; Roccasecca, Rosa Maria; Pattou, François; Sethupathy, Praveen; Ardlie, Kristin; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Balkau, Beverley; Barter, Philip; Beilby, John P; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J; Bergmann, Sven; Bochud, Murielle; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Böttcher, Yvonne; Brunner, Eric; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan J M; Cooper, Matthew N; Cornelis, Marilyn; Crawford, Gabe; Crisponi, Laura; Day, Ian N M; de Geus, Eco J C; Delplanque, Jerome; Dina, Christian; Erdos, Michael R; Fedson, Annette C; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Forouhi, Nita G; Fox, Caroline S; Frants, Rune; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Galan, Pilar; Goodarzi, Mark O; Graessler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J; Grundy, Scott; Gwilliam, Rhian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hadjadj, Samy; Hallmans, Göran; Hammond, Naomi; Han, Xijing; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon C; Hercberg, Serge; Herder, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hillman, David R; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joe; Isomaa, Bo; Johnson, Paul R V; Jørgensen, Torben; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesaniemi, Y Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Knight, Beatrice; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Lathrop, G Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A; Le Bacquer, Olivier; Lecoeur, Cécile; Li, Yun; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mahley, Robert; Mangino, Massimo; Manning, Alisa K; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; McAteer, Jarred B; McCulloch, Laura J; McPherson, Ruth; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Meyre, David; Mitchell, Braxton D; Morken, Mario A; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Naitza, Silvia; Narisu, Narisu; Neville, Matthew J; Oostra, Ben A; Orrù, Marco; Pakyz, Ruth; Palmer, Colin N A; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Pattaro, Cristian; Pearson, Daniel; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Pichler, Irene; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Potter, Simon C; Pouta, Anneli; Province, Michael A; Psaty, Bruce M; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, Nigel W; Rice, Kenneth; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Sandbaek, Annelli; Sandhu, Manjinder; Sanna, Serena; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Scheet, Paul; Scott, Laura J; Seedorf, Udo; Sharp, Stephen J; Shields, Beverley; Sigurethsson, Gunnar; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Silveira, Angela; Simpson, Laila; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Nicholas L; Sovio, Ulla; Swift, Amy; Syddall, Holly; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uitterlinden, André G; van Dijk, Ko Willems; van Hoek, Mandy; Varma, Dhiraj; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Waeber, Gérard; Wagner, Peter J; Walley, Andrew; Walters, G Bragi; Ward, Kim L; Watkins, Hugh; Weedon, Michael N; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witteman, Jaqueline C M; Yarnell, John W G; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zelenika, Diana; Zethelius, Björn; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zillikens, M Carola; Borecki, Ingrid B; Loos, Ruth J F; Meneton, Pierre; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Nathan, David M; Williams, Gordon H; Hattersley, Andrew T; Silander, Kaisa; Salomaa, Veikko; Smith, George Davey; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter; Spranger, Joachim; Karpe, Fredrik; Shuldiner, Alan R; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George V; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Morris, Andrew D; Lind, Lars; Palmer, Lyle J; Hu, Frank B; Franks, Paul W; Ebrahim, Shah; Marmot, Michael; Kao, W H Linda; Pankow, James S; Sampson, Michael J; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Pramstaller, Peter Paul; Wichmann, H Erich; Illig, Thomas; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F; Stumvoll, Michael; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F; Bergman, Richard N; Buchanan, Thomas A; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Altshuler, David; Rotter, Jerome I; Siscovick, David S; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Boomsma, Dorret I; Deloukas, Panos; Spector, Timothy D; Frayling, Timothy M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kong, Augustine; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Cao, Antonio; Scuteri, Angelo; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Waterworth, Dawn M; Vollenweider, Peter; Peltonen, Leena; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Wareham, Nicholas J; Sladek, Robert; Froguel, Philippe; Watanabe, Richard M; Meigs, James B; Groop, Leif; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I; Florez, Jose C; Barroso, Inês

    2010-02-01

    Levels of circulating glucose are tightly regulated. To identify new loci influencing glycemic traits, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide association studies informative for fasting glucose, fasting insulin and indices of beta-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in up to 46,186 nondiabetic participants. Follow-up of 25 loci in up to 76,558 additional subjects identified 16 loci associated with fasting glucose and HOMA-B and two loci associated with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR. These include nine loci newly associated with fasting glucose (in or near ADCY5, MADD, ADRA2A, CRY2, FADS1, GLIS3, SLC2A2, PROX1 and C2CD4B) and one influencing fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (near IGF1). We also demonstrated association of ADCY5, PROX1, GCK, GCKR and DGKB-TMEM195 with type 2 diabetes. Within these loci, likely biological candidate genes influence signal transduction, cell proliferation, development, glucose-sensing and circadian regulation. Our results demonstrate that genetic studies of glycemic traits can identify type 2 diabetes risk loci, as well as loci containing gene variants that are associated with a modest elevation in glucose levels but are not associated with overt diabetes.

  20. Impaired fasting glucose and cardiovascular outcomes in postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Alka M; Herrington, David; Vittinghoff, Eric; Lin, Feng; Bittner, Vera; Cauley, Jane A; Hulley, Stephen; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2005-05-17

    Type 2 diabetes increases risk for cardiovascular disease. Persons with impaired fasting glucose levels may also have increased risk. To evaluate the association between glucose status and cardiovascular outcomes and the effect of lowering the fasting glucose level criterion for impaired fasting glucose from a lower limit of 6.1 mmol/L (110 mg/dL) to 5.6 mmol/L (100 mg/dL). Prospective cohort study. 20 U.S. clinical centers. 2763 postmenopausal women with established coronary heart disease (CHD) who were followed for 6.8 years. Any CHD event (nonfatal myocardial infarction or CHD death), stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), congestive heart failure (CHF) hospitalization, and any cardiovascular event. During follow-up, 583 women had a CHD event, 329 women had a stroke or TIA, and 348 women were hospitalized for CHF. Women with diabetes were at an approximately 75% increased risk for each outcome compared with normoglycemic women. The 218 women with impaired fasting glucose according to the 1997 definition (fasting glucose level, 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/L [110 to 125 mg/dL]) had increased risk for any CHD event (hazard ratio, 1.37 [95% CI, 1.08 to 1.74]), while the 698 women with impaired fasting glucose according to the 2003 definition (fasting glucose level, 5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L [100 to 125 mg/dL]) were not at increased risk (hazard ratio, 1.09 [CI, 0.90 to 1.34]). Most of the women (n = 480) with fasting glucose levels between 5.6 mmol/L (100 mg/dL) and 6.0 mmol/L (109 mg/dL) had no increased risk for CHD (hazard ratio, 0.90 [CI, 0.73 to 1.12]). Women with impaired fasting glucose according to either definition were not at increased risk for stroke or TIA or CHF. These findings may not be generalizable to men or women without existing heart disease. Among postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease, the 2003 definition for impaired fasting glucose was not associated with increased risk for new CHD, stroke or TIA, or CHF.

  1. Frequency of diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in high-risk groups identified by a FINDRISC survey in Puebla City, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    García-Alcalá, Hector; Genestier-Tamborero, Christelle Nathalie; Hirales-Tamez, Omara; Salinas-Palma, Jorge; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Background As a first step in the prevention of diabetes, the International Diabetes Federation recommends identification of persons at risk using the Finnish type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment (FINDRISC) survey. The frequency of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in high-risk groups identified by FINDRISC is unknown in our country. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in higher-risk groups using a FINDRISC survey in an urban population. Methods We used a television program to invite interested adults to fill out a survey at a television station. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed in all persons with a FINDRISC score ≥ 15 points (high-risk and very high-risk groups). Patients were classified as normal (fasting glucose < 100 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose < 140 mg/dL), or having impaired fasting glucose (fasting glucose 100–125 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose < 140 mg/dL), glucose intolerance (fasting glucose < 126 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose 140–199 mg/dL), and diabetes mellitus (fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL or 2-hour glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL). We describe the frequency of each diagnostic category in this selected population according to gender and age. Results A total of 186 patients had a score ≥ 15. The frequencies of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, and normal glucose levels were 28.6%, 25.9%, 29.2%, and 16.2%, respectively. We found a higher frequency of diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose in men than in women (33% versus 27% and 40% versus 21%, respectively) and more glucose intolerance in women than in men (34% versus 16%, P < 0.05). Patients with diabetes mellitus (52.55 ± 9.2 years) were older than those with impaired fasting glucose (46.19 ± 8.89 years), glucose intolerance (46.15 ± 10.9 years), and normal levels (41.9 ± 10.45 years, P < 0.05). We found a higher frequency of diabetes

  2. Frequency of diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in high-risk groups identified by a FINDRISC survey in Puebla City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Alcalá, Hector; Genestier-Tamborero, Christelle Nathalie; Hirales-Tamez, Omara; Salinas-Palma, Jorge; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2012-01-01

    As a first step in the prevention of diabetes, the International Diabetes Federation recommends identification of persons at risk using the Finnish type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment (FINDRISC) survey. The frequency of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in high-risk groups identified by FINDRISC is unknown in our country. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in higher-risk groups using a FINDRISC survey in an urban population. We used a television program to invite interested adults to fill out a survey at a television station. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed in all persons with a FINDRISC score ≥ 15 points (high-risk and very high-risk groups). Patients were classified as normal (fasting glucose < 100 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose < 140 mg/dL), or having impaired fasting glucose (fasting glucose 100-125 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose < 140 mg/dL), glucose intolerance (fasting glucose < 126 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose 140-199 mg/dL), and diabetes mellitus (fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL or 2-hour glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL). We describe the frequency of each diagnostic category in this selected population according to gender and age. A total of 186 patients had a score ≥ 15. The frequencies of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, and normal glucose levels were 28.6%, 25.9%, 29.2%, and 16.2%, respectively. We found a higher frequency of diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose in men than in women (33% versus 27% and 40% versus 21%, respectively) and more glucose intolerance in women than in men (34% versus 16%, P < 0.05). Patients with diabetes mellitus (52.55 ± 9.2 years) were older than those with impaired fasting glucose (46.19 ± 8.89 years), glucose intolerance (46.15 ± 10.9 years), and normal levels (41.9 ± 10.45 years, P < 0.05). We found a higher frequency of diabetes mellitus in those aged over 50 years

  3. PERFORMANCE OF A1C VERSUS OGTT FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF PREDIABETES IN A COMMUNITY-BASED SCREENING

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Jenny E.; Shah, Vallabh O.; Schrader, Ronald; Wong, Craig S.; Burge, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Reliable identification of individuals at risk for developing diabetes is critical to instituting preventative strategies. Studies suggest that the accuracy of using A1c as a sole diagnostic criterion for diabetes may be variable across different ethnic groups. We postulate that there will be lack of concordance between A1c and the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) for diagnosing prediabetes across Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White (NHW) populations. Research Design and Methods 218 asymptomatic adults at risk for Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) were assessed with A1c and OGTT for the diagnosis of prediabetes. Glucose homeostasis status was assigned as no diabetes (A1c < 5.7%), prediabetes (A1c 5.7% – 6.4%), and T2D (A1c > 6.4%). Inclusion criteria were age > 18 years and at least one of the following: a family history of diabetes, a history of gestational diabetes, Hispanic ethnicity, non-Caucasian race, or obesity. Subjects received a fasting 75-gram OGTT and A1c on the same day. Bowker’s Test of Symmetry was employed to determine agreement between the tests. Results Data from 99 Hispanic patients and 79 NHW patients were analyzed. There was no concordance between A1c and OGTT for Hispanic (p=0.002) or NHW individuals (p=0.003) with prediabetes. Conclusions A1c is discordant with OGTT among Hispanic and NHW subjects for the diagnosis of prediabetes. Sole use of A1c to designate glycemic status will result in a greater prevalence of prediabetes among Hispanic and NHW New Mexicans. PMID:27482613

  4. Fasting regulates EGR1 and protects from glucose- and dexamethasone-dependent sensitization to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vinciguerra, Manlio; Rappa, Francesca; Wei, Min; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Cappello, Francesco; Mirzaei, Hamed; Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter D.

    2017-01-01

    Fasting reduces glucose levels and protects mice against chemotoxicity, yet drugs that promote hyperglycemia are widely used in cancer treatment. Here, we show that dexamethasone (Dexa) and rapamycin (Rapa), commonly administered to cancer patients, elevate glucose and sensitize cardiomyocytes and mice to the cancer drug doxorubicin (DXR). Such toxicity can be reversed by reducing circulating glucose levels by fasting or insulin. Furthermore, glucose injections alone reversed the fasting-dependent protection against DXR in mice, indicating that elevated glucose mediates, at least in part, the sensitizing effects of rapamycin and dexamethasone. In yeast, glucose activates protein kinase A (PKA) to accelerate aging by inhibiting transcription factors Msn2/4. Here, we show that fasting or glucose restriction (GR) regulate PKA and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to protect against DXR in part by activating the mammalian Msn2/4 ortholog early growth response protein 1 (EGR1). Increased expression of the EGR1-regulated cardioprotective peptides atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in heart tissue may also contribute to DXR resistance. Our findings suggest the existence of a glucose–PKA pathway that inactivates conserved zinc finger stress-resistance transcription factors to sensitize cells to toxins conserved from yeast to mammals. Our findings also describe a toxic role for drugs widely used in cancer treatment that promote hyperglycemia and identify dietary interventions that reverse these effects. PMID:28358805

  5. Reduction of blood glucose level by orexins in fasting normal and streptozotocin-diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Yoshitaka; Honda, Ritsu; Wada, Tsutomu; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu; Kimura, Ikuko

    2002-07-19

    Orexin-A and orexin-B are neuropeptides implicated in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. In the present study, we examined the effects of orexins on blood glucose levels in response to fasting in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. After the injection of orexin-A and orexin-B (0.01-1 nmol/kg, i.v.), the blood glucose levels in both normal mice and diabetic mice in the fasting state decreased. In contrast, neither orexin-A nor orexin-B affected the glucose levels in the animals allowed free access to food. Intracerebroventricular administration of orexin-A and orexin-B was associated with glucose-lowering effects in fasting diabetic mice. The serum insulin level did not significantly change following the administration of orexin-A or orexin-B, in either the normal or the diabetic mice in the fasting state. These results demonstrate that orexins lower the blood glucose levels exclusively in the fasting state. The orexins may stimulate some neural and hormonal network and thereby promote blood glucose utilization.

  6. Glucose reverses fasting-induced activation in the arcuate nucleus of mice.

    PubMed

    Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2008-01-08

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is an important target for metabolic and hormonal signals controlling food intake. As demonstrated by c-Fos studies, arcuate neurons are activated in food-deprived mice, whereas refeeding reverses the fasting-induced activation. To evaluate whether an increase in blood glucose has an inhibitory effect on these neurons, we analyzed the c-Fos response to an intraperitoneal glucose injection in fasted mice. This treatment increased blood glucose levels twofold and reduced 2-h food intake. Similar to refeeding, it also reversed the fasting-induced activation in the arcuate nucleus. Therefore, an increase in blood glucose might be an important feeding-related signal acting via the arcuate nucleus to oppose orexigenic stimuli.

  7. Investigation of mean platelet volume in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and in subjects with impaired fasting glucose: a cost-effective tool in primary health care?

    PubMed Central

    Ozder, Aclan; Eker, Hasan Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare mean platelet volume (MPV) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and in non-diabetic controls. A total of 201 adults with T2DM and 201 subjects with IFG from the Family Medicine out-patient clinic as well as 201 healthy controls were included in the study. We measured blood fasting glucose, complete blood count and LDL-cholesterol and compared the results between the groups enrolled. In the patients with diabetes and subjects with IFG, MPV was significantly higher (10.66 ± 0.94 fL and 10.49 ± 0.96 fL, respectively ) as compared to the non-diabetic group (10.04 ± 1.01 fL) (p = 0.000). Among the diabetic subjects, a positive statistical Pearson correlation was seen between MPV and HbA1c levels (r = 0.357; p = 0.000) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels (r = 0.306; p = 0.000). The mean MPV in patients having HbA1C < 7.5% was 10.17 ± 0.83 fL and significantly lower than that of patients with HbA1c ≥ 7.5% (10.80 ± 0.92 fL) (p = 0.001). MPV could be used as a simple and cost-effective tool to monitor the progression and control of T2DM and thereby in preventing vascular events in primary health care. PMID:25232423

  8. Fasting glucose GWAS candidate region analysis across ethnic groups in the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    PubMed

    Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Guo, Xiuqing; Bowden, Donald W; Bertoni, Alain G; Sale, Michele M; Yao, Jie; Bluemke, David A; Goodarzi, Mark O; Chen, Y Ida; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Raffel, Leslie J; Papanicolaou, George J; Meigs, James B; Pankow, James S

    2012-05-01

    Genetic variants associated with fasting glucose in European ancestry populations are increasingly well understood. However, the nature of the associations between these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and fasting glucose in other racial and ethnic groups is unclear. We sought to examine regions previously identified to be associated with fasting glucose in Caucasian genome-wide association studies (GWAS) across multiple ethnicities in the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Nondiabetic MESA participants with fasting glucose measured at the baseline exam and with GWAS genotyping were included; 2,349 Caucasians, 664 individuals of Chinese descent, 1,366 African Americans, and 1,171 Hispanics. Genotype data were generated from the Affymetrix 6.0 array and imputation in IMPUTE. Fasting glucose was regressed on SNP dosage data in each ethnic group adjusting for age, gender, MESA study center, and ethnic-specific principal components. SNPs from the three gene regions with the strongest associations to fasting glucose in previous Caucasian GWAS (MTNR1B / GCK / G6PC2) were examined in depth. There was limited power to replicate associations in other ethnic groups due to smaller allele frequencies and limited sample size; SNP associations may also have differed across ethnic groups due to differing linkage disequilibrium patterns with causal variants. rs10830963 in MTNR1B and rs4607517 in GCK demonstrated consistent magnitude and direction of association with fasting glucose across ethnic groups, although the associations were often not nominally significant. In conclusion, certain SNPs in MTNR1B and GCK demonstrate consistent effects across four racial and ethnic groups, narrowing the putative region for these causal variants. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Biomarkers in Fasting Serum to Estimate Glucose Tolerance, Insulin Sensitivity, and Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Goldfine, Allison B.; Gerwien, Robert W.; Kolberg, Janice A.; O’Shea, Sheila; Hamren, Sarah; Hein, Glenn P.; Xu, Xiaomei M.; Patti, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Biomarkers for estimating reduced glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, or impaired insulin secretion would be clinically useful, since these physiologic measures are important in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study in which 94 individuals, of whom 84 had 1 or more risk factors and 10 had no known risk factors for diabetes, underwent oral glucose tolerance testing. We measured 34 protein biomarkers associated with diabetes risk in 250-μL fasting serum samples. We applied multiple regression selection techniques to identify the most informative biomarkers and develop multivariate models to estimate glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. The ability of the glucose tolerance model to discriminate between diabetic individuals and those with impaired or normal glucose tolerance was evaluated by area under the ROC curve (AUC) analysis. RESULTS Of the at-risk participants, 25 (30%) were found to have impaired glucose tolerance, and 11 (13%) diabetes. Using molecular counting technology, we assessed multiple biomarkers with high accuracy in small volume samples. Multivariate biomarker models derived from fasting samples correlated strongly with 2-h postload glucose tolerance (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.0001), composite insulin sensitivity index (R2 = 0.91, P < 0.0001), and insulin secretion (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.0001). Additionally, the glucose tolerance model provided strong discrimination between diabetes vs impaired or normal glucose tolerance (AUC 0.89) and between diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance vs normal tolerance (AUC 0.78). CONCLUSIONS Biomarkers in fasting blood samples may be useful in estimating glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. PMID:21149503

  11. Glycemic and insulinemic responses to different preexercise snacks in participants with impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Heidi K; Kim, Yeonsoo; Hertzler, Steven R; Watt, Celia A; Mattern, Craig O

    2011-02-01

    To compare serum glucose and insulin responses to 3 preexercise snacks before, during, and after exercise in individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and healthy (H) men. In addition, in an IFG population, the authors sought to determine whether a natural fruit snack (i.e., raisins) yields more desirable glucose and insulin concentrations than an energy bar or a glucose solution. The IFG (n = 11, age = 54.5 ± 1.3 yr, fasting blood glucose [BG] = 6.3 ± 0.1 mmol/L) and H groups (n = 9, age = 48.0 ± 3.1 yr, fasting BG = 4.9 ± 0.1 mmol/L) cycled at 50% of VO2peak for 45 min on 4 occasions after consuming water or 50 g of carbohydrate from raisins (R), an energy bar (EB), or a glucose beverage (GLU). Metabolic markers were measured before, during, and after exercise. In all nutritional conditions, glucose concentrations of the IFG group were consistently higher than in the H group. Differences between IFG and H groups in insulin concentrations were sporadic and isolated. In the IFG group, preexercise glucose concentration was lower in the R condition than in GLU. Ten and 20 min into exercise, glucose concentrations in the R and EB conditions were lower than in GLU. Insulin concentrations were lower in the R condition than in EB and GLU immediately before exercise and at Minute 10 but at 20 min R remained lower than only GLU. Glucose concentrations were higher in the IFG group regardless of preexercise snack. Compared with the glucose solution, raisins lowered both the postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses, whereas the energy bar reduced glycemia but not insulinemia.

  12. Single Fasting Plasma Glucose Versus 75-g Oral Glucose-Tolerance Test in Prediction of Adverse Perinatal Outcomes: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Songying; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Lifang; He, Jianrong; Li, Weidong; Chen, Niannian; Wen, Xingxuan; Xiao, Wanqing; Yuan, Mingyang; Qiu, Lan; Cheng, Kar Keung; Xia, Huimin; Mol, Ben Willem J; Qiu, Xiu

    2017-02-01

    There remains uncertainty regarding whether a single fasting glucose measurement is sufficient to predict risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. We included 12,594 pregnant women who underwent a 75-g oral glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) at 22-28weeks' gestation in the Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study, China. Outcomes were large for gestational age (LGA) baby, cesarean section, and spontaneous preterm birth. We calculated the area under the receiver operator characteristic curves (AUCs) to assess the capacity of OGTT glucose values to predict adverse outcomes, and compared the AUCs of different components of OGTT. 1325 women had a LGA baby (10.5%). Glucose measurements were linearly associated with LGA, with strongest associations for fasting glucose (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.30-1.45). Weaker associations were observed for cesarean section and spontaneous preterm birth. Fasting glucose have a comparable discriminative power for prediction of LGA to the combination of fasting, 1h, and 2h glucose values during OGTT (AUCs, 0.611 vs. 0.614, P=0.166). The LGA risk was consistently increased in women with abnormal fasting glucose (≥5.1mmol/l), irrespective of 1h or 2h glucose levels. A single fasting glucose measurement performs comparably to 75-g OGTT in predicting risk of having a LGA baby. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of ageing, fasting and high-fat diet on central and peripheral glucose tolerance and glucose-sensing neural networks in the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    van den Top, Marco; Zhao, Fei-Yue; Pattaranit, Ratchada; Michael, Natalie J; Munder, Astrid; Pryor, Jack T; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2017-08-23

    Obesity and aging are risk factors for diabetes. Here we investigated effects of aging, obesity and fasting on central and peripheral glucose tolerance and on glucose-sensing neuronal function in the arcuate nucleus of rats, with a view to providing insight into central mechanisms regulating glucose homeostasis and how they change or are subject to dysfunction with aging and obesity. We show that following a glucose load, central glucose tolerance at the level of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma is significantly reduced in rats maintained on high fat diet (HFD). With aging, up to 2 years, central glucose tolerance was impaired in an age-dependent manner whilst peripheral glucose tolerance remained unaffected. Aging-induced peripheral glucose intolerance was improved by a 24 hour fast, whilst central glucose tolerance was not corrected. Pre-wean, immature animals have elevated basal plasma glucose levels and a delayed increase in central glucose levels following peripheral glucose injection compared to mature animals. Electrophysiological recording techniques revealed an energy-status-dependent role for glucose excited, inhibited and adapting neurons along with glucose-induced changes in synaptic transmission. We conclude that aging affects central whilst HFD profoundly affects central and peripheral glucose tolerance, and glucose-sensing neurons adapt function in an energy-status-dependent manner. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Fasting adaptation in idiopathic ketotic hypoglycemia: a mismatch between glucose production and demand.

    PubMed

    Huidekoper, Hidde H; Duran, Marinus; Turkenburg, Marjolein; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Sauerwein, Hans P; Wijburg, Frits A

    2008-08-01

    In order to study the pathophysiology of hypoglycemia in idiopathic ketotic hypoglycemia (KH), glucose kinetics during fasting in patients with KH were determined. A fasting test was performed in 12 children with previously documented KH. Besides determination of glucoregulatory hormones, plasma ketones, FFA and alanine, the rates of endogenous glucose production (EGP), glucose uptake, gluconeogenesis (GNG) and glycogenolysis (GGL) were quantified using the [6,6-(2)H(2)] glucose isotope dilution method and the deuterated water method. The five youngest subjects (age 2.5-3.9 years) became hypoglycemic (glucose <3.0 mmol/l) during the test. Mean differences in glucose kinetics between overnight fasting and the end of the test in the hypoglycemic vs. the normoglycemic subjects were: EGP: -31.9% vs. -17.9% (p = 0.007), GGL: -66.2% vs. -50.8% (p = 0.465) and GNG 6.8% vs. 19.5% (p = 0.465). Plasma alanine levels were significantly lower (p = 0.028) at the end of the test in the hypoglycemic subjects. Plasma ketones and FFA levels were in the normal range for fasting duration in all subjects. We conclude that hypoglycemia in KH is caused by the inability to sustain an adequate EGP during fasting in view of the higher glucose requirement in young children. The decrease in GGL is not accompanied by a significant increase in GNG, possibly because of a limitation in the supply of alanine. Our results support the hypothesis that KH represents the lower tail of the Gaussian distribution of fasting tolerance in children.

  15. Undiagnosed impaired fasting glucose and diabetes mellitus amongst inpatients receiving antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David; Young, Corina; Mohamed, Radia; Paton, Carol; Walwyn, Rebecca

    2005-03-01

    The associations between psychosis, antipsychotic drugs and diabetes mellitus have not been precisely defined but it has been repeatedly suggested that atypical antipsychotics are more likely to give rise to diabetes than are conventional drugs. This belief is largely based on healthcare database analyses which, in part, rely on the assumption that all cases of diabetes are identified in practice. We examined records of 606 hospitalized patients receiving antipsychotic treatment and found an apparent prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose of 6.4%. From this sample of patients, we investigated 166 patients (fasting blood samples) who were not known to have any disorder of glucose homeostasis and identified 10 cases of impaired fasting glucose and nine cases of diabetes mellitus (11.4% of those tested). Nine of these cases had documented evidence of previous testing for diabetes. Apparent prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose was 16.9% in those tested in practice or the study. Diagnosis was significantly associated with age [odds ratio (OR) 1.02] and treatment duration with current drug (OR 1.01). Adjusted ORs of diagnosis were not significantly different for any atypical antipsychotic compared with conventional drugs. It is concluded that there was a clinically significant prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in those individuals receiving antipsychotics. Importantly, database analyses may underestimate the true prevalence of diabetes in similar populations and erroneously ascribe increased risk to certain drug treatments.

  16. A Prospective Analysis of Elevated Fasting Glucose Levels and Cognitive Function in Older People

    PubMed Central

    Euser, Sjoerd M.; Sattar, Naveed; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Bollen, Eduard L.E.M.; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Hofman, Albert; Perry, Ivan J.; Breteler, Monique M.B.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between fasting glucose levels, insulin resistance, and cognitive impairment in old age. Diabetes is associated with cognitive impairment in older people. However, the link between elevated fasting glucose levels and insulin resistance in nondiabetic individuals, and the risk of cognitive impairment is unclear. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed data from, in total, 8,447 participants in two independent prospective studies: the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER), 5,019 participants, aged 69–84 years, and the Rotterdam Study, 3,428 participants, aged 61–97 years. Fasting glucose levels were assessed at baseline in both studies; fasting insulin levels were assessed in the Rotterdam Study only. Cognitive function was assessed in both studies at baseline and during follow-up. RESULTS Subjects with diabetes had impaired cognitive function at baseline. In contrast, in people without a history of diabetes, there was no clear association between baseline fasting glucose levels and executive function and memory, nor was there a consistent relationship between elevated baseline fasting glucose levels and the rate of cognitive decline in either cohort. Insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment index) was also unrelated to cognitive function and decline. CONCLUSIONS Elevated fasting glucose levels and insulin resistance are not associated with worse cognitive function in older people without a history of diabetes. These data suggest either that there is a threshold for effects of dysglycemia on cognitive function or that factors other than hyperglycemia contribute to cognitive impairment in individuals with frank diabetes. PMID:20393152

  17. Unfavorable inflammatory profile in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes identified by hemoglobin A1c levels according to the American Diabetes Association criteria.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, T V; Hribal, M L; Perticone, M; Andreozzi, F; Sciacqua, A; Perticone, F; Sesti, G

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the inflammatory profile of individuals with prediabetes defined by HbA1c levels, according to the new American Diabetes Association criteria, and to determine the ability of HbA1c to identify individuals with subclinical inflammation independently of the contribution of other metabolic parameters such as fasting, 1- or 2-h post-load glucose (PG) levels. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen, white blood cells (WBC) count and complement C3 (C3) were assessed, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in 711 adults. Subjects were stratified into three groups according to their HbA1c levels. Poor agreement existed between HbA1c and 2-h PG criteria for identification of individuals with prediabetes (κ coefficient = 0.300). As compared with subjects having HbA1c <5.7 % (39 mmol/mol), individuals with prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7-6.4 %, [39-46 mmol/mol]) exhibited a significant increase of the concentration of five inflammatory markers (hsCRP, ESR, fibrinogen, WBC count, C3) as well as of a cluster of inflammatory markers, as measured by an inflammatory score after adjusting for sex, age, smoking, fasting, 1- and 2-h PG levels. In multiple regression models including sex, age, body mass index, smoking habit, fasting, 1- and 2-h PG levels, and HOMA index, HbA1c levels were significant independent contributors to each of the five inflammatory markers examined. These data suggest that HbA1c is a reliable marker of glucose homeostasis, and may identify individuals at increased risk of diabetes with unfavorable inflammatory profile independently from fasting and 2-h PG levels.

  18. Different levels of thyroid hormones between impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance: free T3 affects the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance in opposite ways.

    PubMed

    Jing, Su; Xiaoying, Ding; Ying, Xu; Rui, Liu; Mingyu, Gu; Yuting, Chen; Yanhua, Yin; Yufan, Wang; Haiyan, Sun; Yongde, Peng

    2014-06-01

    There is an association between thyroid disorders and diabetes mellitus. To investigate thyroid hormone levels in different glucose metabolic statuses, analyse relationships between thyroid hormone levels and different categories of prediabetes and metabolic parameters within a large euthyroid nondiabetic population. A total of 3328 subjects without diabetes or thyroid dysfunction were included in this cross-sectional study. Subjects were divided in to four groups [normal glucose tolerance (NGR), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and combined glucose intolerance (CGI)] according to the results of oral glucose tolerance test. Participants were then divided into four groups according to the quartile of free T3 (FT3) in their blood. Subjects with IFG had higher levels of FT3 and ratio of FT3 to FT4 (FT3/FT4), but lower level of free T4 (FT4) than subjects with IGT. FT3/FT4 was negatively associated with postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) [standardized β (β) = -0·087; P < 0·001]. The prevalence of IFG and CGI was increased with the level of FT3, while the prevalence of IGT was decreased with the level of FT3 (P for trend: <0·001, 0·003 and <0·001, respectively). FT3 was negatively associated with the risk of IGT (OR = 0·409, 95% CI 0·179-0·935), whereas FT4 was positively associated with the risk of IGT (OR = 1·296, 95% CI 1·004-1·673). Free thyroid hormone levels were different between subjects with IFG and IGT. FT3 affects the prevalence of IFG and IGT in opposite ways. The difference in thyroid hormone levels may play an important role in the different pathological mechanisms of IFG and IGT. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Detecting Prediabetes and Diabetes: Agreement between Fasting Plasma Glucose and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Thai Adults.

    PubMed

    Aekplakorn, Wichai; Tantayotai, Valla; Numsangkul, Sakawduan; Sripho, Wilarwan; Tatsato, Nutchanat; Burapasiriwat, Tuanjai; Pipatsart, Rachada; Sansom, Premsuree; Luckanajantachote, Pranee; Chawarokorn, Pongpat; Thanonghan, Anek; Lakhamkaew, Watchira; Mungkung, Aungsumalin; Boonkean, Rungnapa; Chantapoon, Chanidsa; Kungsri, Mayuree; Luanseng, Kasetsak; Chaiyajit, Kornsinun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate an agreement in identifying dysglycemia between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and the 2 hr postprandial glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a population with high risk of diabetes. A total of 6,884 individuals aged 35-65 years recruited for a community-based diabetes prevention program were tested for prediabetes including impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and diabetes. The agreement was assessed by Kappa statistics. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with missed prediabetes and diabetes by FPG. A total of 2671 (38.8%) individuals with prediabetes were identified. The prevalence of prediabetes identified by FPG and OGTT was 32.2% and 22.3%, respectively. The proportions of diabetes classified by OGTT were two times higher than those identified by FPG (11.0% versus 5.4%, resp.). The Kappa statistics for agreement of both tests was 0.55. Overall, FPG missed 46.3% of all prediabetes and 54.7% of all diabetes cases. Prediabetes was more likely to be missed by FPG among female, people aged <45 yrs, and those without family history of diabetes. The detection of prediabetes and diabetes using FPG only may miss half of the cases. Benefit of adding OGTT to FPG in some specific groups should be confirmed.

  20. Detecting Prediabetes and Diabetes: Agreement between Fasting Plasma Glucose and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Thai Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tantayotai, Valla; Numsangkul, Sakawduan; Sripho, Wilarwan; Tatsato, Nutchanat; Burapasiriwat, Tuanjai; Pipatsart, Rachada; Sansom, Premsuree; Luckanajantachote, Pranee; Chawarokorn, Pongpat; Thanonghan, Anek; Lakhamkaew, Watchira; Mungkung, Aungsumalin; Boonkean, Rungnapa; Chantapoon, Chanidsa; Kungsri, Mayuree; Luanseng, Kasetsak; Chaiyajit, Kornsinun

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate an agreement in identifying dysglycemia between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and the 2 hr postprandial glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a population with high risk of diabetes. Methods. A total of 6,884 individuals aged 35–65 years recruited for a community-based diabetes prevention program were tested for prediabetes including impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and diabetes. The agreement was assessed by Kappa statistics. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with missed prediabetes and diabetes by FPG. Results. A total of 2671 (38.8%) individuals with prediabetes were identified. The prevalence of prediabetes identified by FPG and OGTT was 32.2% and 22.3%, respectively. The proportions of diabetes classified by OGTT were two times higher than those identified by FPG (11.0% versus 5.4%, resp.). The Kappa statistics for agreement of both tests was 0.55. Overall, FPG missed 46.3% of all prediabetes and 54.7% of all diabetes cases. Prediabetes was more likely to be missed by FPG among female, people aged <45 yrs, and those without family history of diabetes. Conclusion. The detection of prediabetes and diabetes using FPG only may miss half of the cases. Benefit of adding OGTT to FPG in some specific groups should be confirmed. PMID:26347060

  1. Extracellular hyperosmotic stress stimulates glucose uptake in incubated fast-twitch rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Farlinger, Chris M; Lui, Adrian J; Harrison, Rose C; LeBlanc, Paul J; Peters, Sandra J; Roy, Brian D

    2013-06-01

    The influence of hyperosmotic stress on glucose uptake, handling, and signaling processes remains unclear in mammalian skeletal muscle. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate alterations in glucose uptake and handling during extracellular hyperosmotic stress in isolated fast-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle. Using an established in vitro isolated whole-muscle model, extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were dissected from male rats (4-6 weeks of age) and incubated (30-60 min) in an organ bath, containing Sigma Medium-199 with 8 mmol·L(-1) D-glucose, and mannitol was added to the targeted osmolalities (ISO, iso-osmotic, 290 mmol·kg(-1); HYPER, hyperosmotic, 400 mmol·kg(-1)). Results demonstrate that relative water content decreased in HYPER. HYPER resulted in significant alterations in muscle metabolite concentrations (lower glycogen, elevated lactate, and glucose-6-phosphate), suggesting a decrease in energy charge. Glucose uptake was also found to be higher in HYPER, and AS160 (implicated in insulin- and contraction-mediated glucose uptake) was found to be significantly more phosphorylated in HYPER than in ISO after 30 min. In conclusion, glucose uptake and handling is altered with hyperosmotic extracellular stress in the fast-twitch EDL. The increases in glucose uptake might be facilitated through alterations in AS160 signaling after 30 to 60 min of osmotic stress.

  2. Fasting but not casual blood glucose is associated with pancreatic cancer mortality in Japanese: EPOCH-JAPAN.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Masato; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Yamada, Michiko; Ukawa, Shigekazu; Hirata, Takumi; Tanaka, Sachiko; Miura, Katsuyuki; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Okamura, Tomonori

    2017-06-01

    The dose-response relationship between fasting blood glucose levels and risk of pancreatic cancer has been investigated, but the association between casual blood glucose levels and pancreatic cancer death has not been examined. We examined the association between casual and fasting blood glucose levels and death due to pancreatic cancer in Japanese. We performed a pooled analysis of the individual Japanese including 46,387 participants aged 40-79 years from ten cohorts. Participants were classified into five groups: low normal, middle normal, high normal, prediabetes (casual blood glucose 140-199 mg/dl, or fasting blood glucose 110-125 mg/dl), and diabetes (casual blood glucose ≥200 mg/dl, fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg/dl, or anti-diabetic drug use). Low normal, middle normal, and high normal were defined according to tertiles of casual or fasting normal blood glucose levels. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for pancreatic cancer mortality were estimated stratifying casual and fasting blood glucose by cohort-stratified Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, with low normal (casual blood glucose <94 mg/dl, or fasting blood glucose <90 mg/dl) as a reference. Fasting blood glucose showed a dose-response relationship with pancreatic cancer mortality (p for trend = 0.005). After adjusting for covariates, HRs (95% CIs) were 2.83 (1.18-6.76) for prediabetes and 3.96 (1.56-10.08) for diabetes. However, there were no significant associations with casual blood glucose. These tendencies were observed after the exclusion of participants who were censored for the first 5 years of follow-up. Fasting blood glucose is a better predictor of pancreatic cancer death than casual blood glucose.

  3. Relationship between gestational fasting plasma glucose and neonatal birth weight, prenatal blood pressure and dystocia in pregnant Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Cai, Jing; Liu, Shujuan; Huang, Mingwei; Chen, Yao; Lai, Xiaolan; Chen, Yuyu; Zhao, Zhongwen; Wu, Fangzhen; Wu, Dongmei; Miu, Haiyan; Lai, Shenghan; Chen, Gang

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the optimal cut-off point of fasting plasma glucose for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus for pregnant Chinese women. This study investigates the relationship between gestational fasting plasma glucose and several variables: neonatal birth weight, prenatal blood pressure and dystocia rate of pregnant women. In this study, we hoped to provide a useful tool to screen gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant Chinese women. For 1058 pregnant women enrolled in our hospital at pregnancy weeks 22-30, fasting plasma glucose, neonatal birth weight and prenatal blood pressure, as well as dystocia conditions, were examined. We analysed the correlations between the following: gestational fasting plasma glucose and neonatal birth weight; prenatal blood pressure and gestational fasting plasma glucose as well as dystocia rate and gestational fasting plasma glucose group. A modest correlation was observed between gestational fasting plasma glucose and neonatal birth weight (r = 0.093, p = 0.003). The macrosomia rate was smallest when the gestational fasting plasma glucose was in the range 3.51-5.5 mmol/L. Prenatal blood pressure increased linearly with increasing gestational fasting plasma glucose (p = 0.000). There was a significant difference between the dystocia rates in different fasting plasma glucose groups (chi-squared = 13.015, p = 0.043). The results showed that the dystocia rate significantly increased when gestational fasting plasma glucose was >4.9 mmol/L; p = 0.03, OR = 2.156 (95% CI, 1.077-4.318). We suggest that the optimal range of gestational fasting plasma glucose for pregnant Chinese women is in the range 3.5-4.9 mmol/L. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Plasma epinephrine predicts fasting glucose in centrally obese African-American women.

    PubMed

    Surwit, Richard S; Williams, Redford B; Lane, James D; Feinglos, Mark N; Kuhn, Cynthia M; Georgiades, Anastasia

    2010-09-01

    The high prevalence of diabetes in African-American (AA) women has been widely assumed to be related to the greater prevalence of obesity in this group. Catecholamine release acting on central adipose tissue has been proposed to be a contributing factor. The aim of this article was to examine the interaction of plasma catecholamines and central adiposity on fasting and nonfasting glucose levels in two separate samples. In both studies, the women were healthy, nondiabetic of similar age. In addition, both studies assessed plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NOREPI) levels collected at three time points. In study 1, catecholamines were measured during a standardized laboratory mental stress task and in study 2, they were measured during the initial phase (10 min) of an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). Results from both studies revealed significant effects of EPI on fasting glucose in the obese women. In study 1, mean EPI levels were significantly related to fasting glucose in AA women with high trunk fat (beta = 0.60, P < 0.001). Because high BMI was associated with high trunk fat in women, we used BMI >30 as a proxy for high trunk fat (>32%) in study 2. In study 2, EPI response to the glucose bolus was a strong predictor of fasting glucose in AA women with BMI >30 (beta = 0.75, P < 0.003). We conclude that the effect of central adiposity on fasting glucose may be moderated by plasma EPI. This suggests that adrenal medullary activity could play a role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Factors associated with reaching or not reaching target HbA1c after initiation of basal or premixed insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J; Schmitt, H; Jiang, H H; Ivanyi, T

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate factors associated with reaching or not reaching target glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels by analysing the respective contributions of fasting hyperglycaemia (FHG), also referred to as basal hyperglycaemia, vs postprandial hyperglycaemia (PHG) before and after initiation of a basal or premixed insulin regimen in patients with type 2 diabetes. This post-hoc analysis of insulin-naïve patients in the DURABLE study randomised to receive either insulin glargine or insulin lispro mix 25 evaluated the percentages of patients achieving a target HbA1c of <7.0% (<53mmol/mol) per baseline HbA1c quartiles, and the effect of each insulin regimen on the relative contributions of PHG and FHG to overall hyperglycaemia. Patients had comparable demographic characteristics and similar HbA1c and FHG values at baseline in each HbA1c quartile regardless of whether they reached the target HbA1c. The higher the HbA1c quartile, the greater was the decrease in HbA1c, but also the smaller the percentage of patients achieving the target HbA1c. HbA1c and FHG decreased more in patients reaching the target, resulting in significantly lower values at endpoint in all baseline HbA1c quartiles with either insulin treatment. Patients not achieving the target HbA1c had slightly higher insulin doses, but lower total hypoglycaemia rates. Smaller decreases in FHG were associated with not reaching the target HbA1c, suggesting a need to increase basal or premixed insulin doses to achieve targeted fasting plasma glucose and improve patient response before introducing more intensive prandial insulin regimens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictive ability of fasting plasma glucose for a diabetic 2-h postload glucose value in oral glucose tolerance test: spectrum effect.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Jale; Aksoy, Duygu Yazgan; Harmanci, Ayla; Karaagaoglu, Ergun; Gurlek, Alper

    2007-01-01

    The performance of diagnostic tests may vary according to patient characteristics. The aim of this study is to find out the factors, if any, that may affect the performance of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) to predict a diabetic 2-h postload glucose level (> or =200 mg/dl) in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). One hundred ninety-six patients with known risk factors for diabetes mellitus to whom OGTT was applied were included. Factors that may have an effect on the performance of FPG in prediction of a diabetic value in OGTT were determined by using logistic regression and likelihood ratios (LRs). The cutoff of FPG predicting a 2-h postload glucose of > or =200 mg/dl was calculated by receiver operating characteristic curve as 110 mg/dl (sensitivity, 76.7%; specificity, 75.9%). Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and body mass index (BMI) influenced sensitivity, whereas age, family history, and presence of hyperlipidemia affected specificity of FPG. Significant factors for positive LR were age and hyperlipidemia, whereas sex, smoking, hyperlipidemia, physical inactivity, WHR, and BMI influenced negative LR. Fasting plasma glucose performance as a diagnostic test can be affected by many factors that are clearly stated as risk factors for diabetes mellitus. These data emphasize how the interpretation of a diagnostic test varies as the patient characteristics vary; the criteria that we confidently rely on may not be that reliable, changing between just two different patients.

  7. Fasting plasma glucose test at the first prenatal visit as a screen for gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sacks, David A; Chen, Wansu; Wolde-Tsadik, Girma; Buchanan, Thomas A

    2003-06-01

    To determine whether the fasting plasma glucose test administered at the first prenatal visit could serve as an efficient screen for gestational diabetes. A total of 5557 women not known to have diabetes were offered a fasting plasma glucose test at their first prenatal visit. Results less than 100 mg/dL were blinded. A glucose tolerance test was requested immediately of those whose screening test result was 100-125 mg/dL and of all women not identified as having diabetes by their 23rd gestational week. A total of 4507 women (81%) complied with the protocol. Of the 302 women found to have gestational diabetes, 46 (15%) were detected before 24 weeks. A false-positive rate of 57% was found at a threshold fasting glucose concentration giving a sensitivity of 80% for the detection of gestational diabetes. The fasting plasma glucose screening test at the first prenatal visit has good patient compliance. However, its poor specificity (high false-positive rate) makes it an inefficient screening test for gestational diabetes.

  8. Reduced insulin secretion and glucose intolerance are involved in the fasting susceptibility of common vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Mariella B; Queiroz, Joicy F; Dias Gomes, Carolinne I; Collares-Buzato, Carla B; Barbosa, Helena C; Boschero, Antonio C; Gonçalves, Carlos A; Pinheiro, Eliana C

    2013-03-01

    Susceptibility during fasting has been reported for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), to the point of untimely deaths after only 2-3 nights of fasting. To investigate the underlying physiology of this critical metabolic condition, we analyzed serum insulin levels, pancreatic islets morphometry and immunocytochemistry (ICC), static insulin secretion in pancreas fragments, and insulin signaling mechanism in male vampire bats. A glucose tolerance test (ipGTT) was also performed. Serum insulin was found to be lower in fed vampires compared to other mammals, and was significantly reduced after 24h fasting. Morphometrical analyses revealed small irregular pancreatic islets with reduced percentage of β-cell mass compared to other bats. Static insulin secretion analysis showed that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was impaired, as insulin levels did not reach significance under high glucose concentrations, whereas the response to the amino acid leucin was preserved. Results from ipGTT showed a failure on glucose clearance, indicating glucose intolerance due to diminished pancreatic insulin secretion and/or decreased β-cell response to glucose. In conclusion, data presented here indicate lower insulinemia and impaired insulin secretion in D. rotundus, which is consistent with the limited ability to store body energy reserves, previously reported in these animals. Whether these metabolic and hormonal features are associated with their blood diet remains to be determined. The peculiar food sharing through blood regurgitation, reported to this species, might be an adaptive mechanism overcoming this metabolic susceptibility.

  9. The performance of risk scores and hemoglobin A1c to find undiagnosed diabetes with isolated postload hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Hung-Yuan; Lin, Mao-Shin; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Hua, Cyue-Huei; Liu, Yu-Lai; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Sung, Fung-Chang; Chen, Ming-Fong; Lee, Jin-Chuan; Chiao, Ching-Hsiang; Wei, Jung-Nan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop strategies to screen diabetic subjects with isolated postload hyperglycemia (IPH) in Chinese population. We included 1175 adult subjects who did not report diabetes were included. Diabetes was diagnosed by oral glucose tolerance tests. IPH was defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG)<7 mmol/l and 2-hour post-load plasma glucose (2hPG) greater than 11.1 mmol/l. Using FPG criteria, only 59.8% of diabetic subjects were not identified, showing a poor agreement between FPG and 2hPG criteria (kappa 0.294). Age, FPG, total cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, body mass index, HbA1c and medication for hypertension were associated factors for IPH. Four scores were constructed using all these factors, age and blood test results, age and HbA1c, and data from non-invasive examinations, respectively. The area under the ROC curve were 0.9296(95%CI 0.8948-0.9643), 0.9111(95%CI 0.8713-0.9508), 0.8902(95%CI 0.8341-0.9646), 0.8924(95%CI 0.7835-0.8753), and 0.8654(95%CI 0.7963-0.9345) for score 1, 2, 3, 4, and HbA1c, respectively. The sensitivity of all four risk scores to detect IPH was better than that of impaired fasting glucose (IFG). The sensitivity and specificity of HbA1c at cutoff 6.2% for detecting IPH was also better than that of IFG. In conclusion, the risk scores and HbA1c are useful to identify subjects with undiagnosed IPH, with better performance than IFG.

  10. Prospective Association between Fasting NEFA and Type 2 Diabetes: Impact of Post-load Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Il'yasova, D.; Wang, F.; D'Agostino, R.B.; Hanley, A.; Wagenknecht, L.E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Elevated fasting non-esterified free fatty acids (fasting NEFA) are thought to promote type 2 diabetes. Three prospective studies support this concept, showing increased diabetes risk associated with fasting NEFA. However, these prospective associations may be confounded by strong cross-sectional correlations between fasting NEFA and metabolic predictors of diabetes. To examine this assumption, we used cohort data from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS). Methods Within the IRAS cohort (n=902, 145 incident cases), we examined nine metabolic variables for their confounding effect on the fasting NEFA-diabetes association: 2-hour glucose (2hG), fasting plasma glucose, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, weight, insulin sensitivity (SI), fasting insulin, and acute insulin response. We compared odds ratios for fasting NEFA (log-transformed and adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, and clinic) before and after inclusion of each metabolic variable into a logistic regression model. Results Three variables (2hG, BMI, and SI) cross-sectionally correlated with fasting NEFA (r≥0.1, p<0.05). Unadjusted for metabolic predictors, fasting NEFA levels were positively associated with diabetes risk: OR=1.37 (0.87–2.15) per unit on a log-scale. All metabolic variables except AIR showed confounding. Inclusion of 2hG reversed the positive association [OR=0.50 (0.30–0.82)], whereas other predictors reduced the association to the null. The final model included the parameters correlated with baseline fasting NEFA (2hG, BMI, SI) and the demographic variables resulting in OR =0.47 (0.27–0.81). Conclusions Our results indicate that 2hG strongly confounds the prospective association between fasting NEFA and diabetes; carefully adjusted fasting NEFA levels are inversely associated with diabetes risk. PMID:20143044

  11. HbA1c and Glycated Albumin Levels Are High in Gastrectomized Subjects with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Inada, Shinya; Koga, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    We report that glycated albumin (GA) is higher relative to HbA1c in non-diabetic, gastrectomized subjects without anemia, and thus is a sign of oxyhyperglycemia. It is known that gastrectomized subjects are prone to iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), and that the HbA1c levels of subjects with IDA are falsely high. In the present study, the HbA1c and GA levels of gastrectomized subjects with IDA were compared with gastrectomized subjects without anemia. Seven non-diabetic gastrectomized subjects with IDA were enrolled in the present study. Twenty-eight non-diabetic gastrectomized subjects without anemia matched with the subjects with IDA in terms of age, gender, and body mass index were used as the controls. Although there were no significant differences in fasting plasma glucose and OGTT 2-hour plasma glucose (2-h PG) between the two groups, the HbA1c and GA levels in gastrectomized subjects with IDA were significantly higher than the controls. For all of the gastrectomized subjects (n=35), ferritin exhibited a significant negative correlation with HbA1c and GA, and a significant positive correlation with 2-h PG. In addition, the HbA1c and GA levels exhibited a significant negative correlation with the mean corpuscular hemoglobin and hemoglobin. The HbA1c and GA levels in gastrectomized subjects with IDA were significantly higher than those in controls. The high GA levels are attributed to a tendency in which patients with total gastrectomy, who are prone to IDA, are susceptible to postprandial hyperglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia, which in turn leads to large fluctuations in plasma glucose.

  12. Corticosterone, but not Glucose, Treatment Enables Fasted Adrenalectomized Rats to Survive Moderate Hemorrhage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Chew, Gordon; Ha, Taryn; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1990-01-01

    Fed adrenalectomized rats survive the stress of hemorrhage and hypovolemia, whereas fasted adrenalectomized rats become hypotensive and hypoglycemic after the first 90 min and die within 4 hours (h). We have studied the effects of glucose and corticosterone (B) infusions after hemorrhage as well as treatment with B at the time of adrenalectomy on the capacity of chronically prepared, conscious, fasted, adrenalectomized rats to survive hemorrhage. We have also measured the magnitudes of vasoactive hormone responses to hemorrhage. Maintenance of plasma glucose concentrations did not sustain life; however, treatment of rats at the time of adrenalectomy with B allowed 100 percent survival, and acute treatment of adrenalectomized rats at the time of hemorrhage allowed about 50 percent survival during the 5-h posthemorrhage observation period. Rats in the acute B infusion group that died exhibited significantly increased plasma B and significantly decreased plasma glucose concentrations by 2 h compared to the rats that lived. Plasma vasopressin, renin, and norepinephrine responses to hemorrhage were markedly augmented in the adrenalectomized rats not treated with B, and plasma vasopressin concentrations were significantly elevated at 1 and 2 h in all of the rats that subsequently died compared to values in those that lived. We conclude that: 1) death after hemorrhage in fasted adrenalectomized rats is not a result of lack of glucose; 2) chronic and, to an extent, acute treatment of fasted adrenalectomized rats with B enables survival; 3) fasted adrenalectomized rats exhibit strong evidence of hepatic insufficiency which is not apparent in either fed adrenalectomized rats or B-treated fasted adrenalectomized rats; 4) death after hemorrhage in fasted adrenalectomized rats may result from hepatic failure as a consequence of marked splanchnic vasoconstriction mediated bv the actions of extraordinarily high levels of vasoactive hormones after hemorrhage; and 5) B appears to

  13. Corticosterone, but not Glucose, Treatment Enables Fasted Adrenalectomized Rats to Survive Moderate Hemorrhage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Chew, Gordon; Ha, Taryn; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1990-01-01

    Fed adrenalectomized rats survive the stress of hemorrhage and hypovolemia, whereas fasted adrenalectomized rats become hypotensive and hypoglycemic after the first 90 min and die within 4 hours (h). We have studied the effects of glucose and corticosterone (B) infusions after hemorrhage as well as treatment with B at the time of adrenalectomy on the capacity of chronically prepared, conscious, fasted, adrenalectomized rats to survive hemorrhage. We have also measured the magnitudes of vasoactive hormone responses to hemorrhage. Maintenance of plasma glucose concentrations did not sustain life; however, treatment of rats at the time of adrenalectomy with B allowed 100 percent survival, and acute treatment of adrenalectomized rats at the time of hemorrhage allowed about 50 percent survival during the 5-h posthemorrhage observation period. Rats in the acute B infusion group that died exhibited significantly increased plasma B and significantly decreased plasma glucose concentrations by 2 h compared to the rats that lived. Plasma vasopressin, renin, and norepinephrine responses to hemorrhage were markedly augmented in the adrenalectomized rats not treated with B, and plasma vasopressin concentrations were significantly elevated at 1 and 2 h in all of the rats that subsequently died compared to values in those that lived. We conclude that: 1) death after hemorrhage in fasted adrenalectomized rats is not a result of lack of glucose; 2) chronic and, to an extent, acute treatment of fasted adrenalectomized rats with B enables survival; 3) fasted adrenalectomized rats exhibit strong evidence of hepatic insufficiency which is not apparent in either fed adrenalectomized rats or B-treated fasted adrenalectomized rats; 4) death after hemorrhage in fasted adrenalectomized rats may result from hepatic failure as a consequence of marked splanchnic vasoconstriction mediated bv the actions of extraordinarily high levels of vasoactive hormones after hemorrhage; and 5) B appears to

  14. Association between Inflammation and Biological Variation in Hemoglobin A1c in U.S. Nondiabetic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuqian; Hempe, James M.; McCarter, Robert J.; Li, Shengxu

    2015-01-01

    Context: Inflammation is associated with higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Whether the relationship is independent of blood glucose concentration remains unclear. Objective: The hemoglobin glycation index (HGI) was used to test the hypothesis that interindividual variation in HbA1c is associated with inflammation. Participants: This study used nondiabetic adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2008). Main Outcome Measures: A subsample of participants was used to estimate the linear regression relationship between HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Predicted HbA1c were calculated for 7323 nondiabetic participants by inserting FPG into the equation, HbA1c = 0.017× FPG (mg/dL) + 3.7. HGI was calculated as the difference between the observed and predicted HbA1c and the population was divided into low, moderate, and high HGI subgroups. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL), monocytes, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were used as biomarkers of inflammation. Results: Mean HbA1c, CRP, monocyte, and PMNL levels, but not FPG, progressively increased in the low, moderate, and high HGI subgroups. There were disproportionately more Blacks than whites in the high HGI subgroup. CRP (ß, 0.009; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.0001–0.017), PMNL (ß, 0.036; 95% CI, 0.010–0.062), and monocyte count (ß, 0.072; 95% CI, 0.041–0.104) were each independent predictors of HGI after adjustment for age, sex, race, triglycerides, hemoglobin level, mean corpuscular volume, red cell distribution width, and obesity status. Conclusions: HGI reflects the effects of inflammation on HbA1c in a nondiabetic population of U.S. adults and may be a marker of risk associated with inflammation independent of FPG, race, and obesity. PMID:25867810

  15. Comparable Dietary Patterns Describe Dietary Behavior across Ethnic Groups in the Netherlands, but Different Elements in the Diet Are Associated with Glycated Hemoglobin and Fasting Glucose Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Louise H; van Dam, Rob M; Snijder, Marieke B; Peters, Ron J G; Dekker, Jacqueline M; de Vries, Jeanne H M; de Boer, Evelien J; Schulze, Matthias B; Stronks, Karien; Nicolaou, Mary

    2015-08-01

    Ethnic minority populations in Western societies suffer from a disproportionate burden of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Insight into the role of dietary patterns in T2D may assist public health nutrition efforts in addressing these health disparities. We explored the association between dietary patterns and biomarkers of T2D in 5 ethnic groups living in Amsterdam, Netherlands. A total of 3776 men and women aged 18-70 y of Dutch, South Asian Surinamese, African-Surinamese, Turkish, and Moroccan origin from the HELIUS (HEalthy LIfe in an Urban Setting) study were included. Diet was assessed by using a food-frequency questionnaire, and dietary patterns were derived separately per ethnic group. First, food group-based dietary patterns were derived by using principal components analysis and the association with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and plasma fasting glucose was assessed by using multivariable linear regression. Second, biomarker-driven dietary patterns based on HbA1c and fasting glucose concentrations were derived by applying reduced rank regression. Two comparable food group-based dietary patterns were identified in each ethnic group: a "meat and snack" pattern and a "vegetable" pattern. The meat-and-snack pattern derived within the Dutch origin population was significantly associated with HbA1c (β = 0.09; 95% CI: 0.00, 0.19) and fasting glucose (β = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.09, 0.26) concentrations. A biomarker-derived pattern characterized by red and processed meat was observed among Dutch-origin participants; however, among ethnic minority groups, this pattern was characterized by other foods including ethnicity-specific foods (e.g., roti, couscous). Although similar food group dietary patterns were derived within 5 ethnic groups, the association of the meat-and-snack pattern with fasting glucose concentrations differed by ethnicity. Taken together with the finding of ethnic differences in biomarker-driven dietary patterns, our results imply that addressing T2D risk in

  16. Serum Uric Acid Levels were Dynamically Coupled with Hemoglobin A1c in the Development of Type 2 Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fengjiang; Chang, Baocheng; Yang, Xilin; Wang, Yaogang; Chen, Liming; Li, Wei-Dong

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to decipher the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in both type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and normal subjects. A total of 2,250 unrelated T2DM patients and 4,420 Han Chinese subjects from a physical examination population were recruited for this study. In T2DM patients SUA levels were negatively correlated with HbA1c (rs = ‑0.109, P = 0.000) and 2 h plasma glucose levels (rs = ‑0.178, P = 0.000). In the physical examination population, SUA levels were inversely correlated with HbA1c (rs = ‑0.175, P = 0.000) and FPG (rs = ‑0.131, P = 0.009) in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c (rs = 0.040, P = 0.012) and FPG (rs = 0.084, P = 0.000) in normal-glucose subjects. Multivariate analyses showed that HbA1c was significantly negatively associated with HUA both in T2DM patients (OR = 0.872, 95% CI: 0.790~0.963) and in the physical examination T2DM patients (OR = 0.722, 95% CI: 0.539~0.968). Genetic association studies in T2DM patients showed that alleles of two glucose-uric acid transporter genes, ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were significantly associated with SUA levels (P < 0.05). SUA level is inversely correlated with HbA1c in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c in normal-glucose subjects. The reverse transporting of uric acid and glucose in renal tubules might be accounted for these associations.

  17. Smoking Cessation and the Risk of Diabetes Mellitus and Impaired Fasting Glucose: Three-Year Outcomes after a Quit Attempt

    PubMed Central

    Stein, James H.; Asthana, Asha; Smith, Stevens S.; Piper, Megan E.; Loh, Wei-Yin; Fiore, Michael C.; Baker, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    Weight gain after smoking cessation may increase diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) risk. This study evaluated associations between smoking cessation and continued smoking with incident diabetes and IFG three years after a quit attempt. The 1504 smokers (58% female) were mean (standard deviation) 44.7 (11.1) years old and smoked 21.4 (8.9) cigarettes/day. Of 914 participants with year 3 data, the 238 abstainers had greater weight gain, increase in waist circumference, and increase in fasting glucose levels than the 676 continuing smokers (p≤0.008). In univariate analyses, Year 3 abstinence was associated with incident diabetes (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.44–4.67, p = .002; 4.3% absolute excess) and IFG (OR = 2.43, 95% CI 1.74–3.41, p<0.0001; 15.6% absolute excess). In multivariate analyses, incident diabetes was associated independently with older age (p = 0.0002), higher baseline body weight (p = 0.021), weight gain (p = 0.023), baseline smoking rate (p = 0.008), baseline IFG (p<0.0001), and baseline hemoglobin A1C (all p<0.0001). Smoking more at baseline predicted incident diabetes among eventual abstainers (p<0.0001); weighing more at baseline predicted incident diabetes among continuing smokers (p = 0.0004). Quitting smoking is associated with increased diabetes and IFG risk. Independent risk factors include older age, baseline body weight, baseline glycemic status, and heavier pre-quit smoking. These findings may help target smokers for interventions to prevent dysglycemia. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00332644 PMID:24893290

  18. Vitamin D3 supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    PubMed Central

    Nazarian, Shaban; Peter, John V St; Boston, Raymond C; Jones, Sidney A; Mariash, Cary N

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D has in vitro and in vivo effects on β-cells and insulin sensitivity. Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) has been associated with onset and progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2). However, studies involving supplementation of vitamin D in subjects with previously established diabetes have demonstrated inconsistent effects on insulin sensitivity. The aim of this open-label study was to assess the effects of high dose vitamin D3 supplementation on insulin sensitivity in subjects with VDD and impaired fasting glucose. We studied 8 subjects with VDD and pre-diabetes with the modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance (mFSIGT) test before and after vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D3 was administered as 10,000 IU daily for 4 weeks. The mFSIGT was analyzed with MinMod Millennnium to obtain estimates of Acute Insulin Response to Glucose (AIRg), Insulin Sensitivity (SI), and Disposition Index (DI). We found that AIRg decreased (p = 0.011) and insulin sensitivity, expressed as SI, increased (p = 0.012) after a intervention with vitamin D. If these findings are repeated in a randomized, double-blind, sudy the results indicate that orally administered high dose vitamin D3 supplementation improves insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose and suggests that high dose vitamin D3 supplementation might provide an inexpensive public health measure in preventing, or at least delaying, the progression from impaired fasting glucose to diabetes. PMID:22005267

  19. High frequency of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the Western brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Santana, Marli S; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Costa, Mônica R F; Sampaio, Vanderson S; Brito, Marcelo A M; Lacerda, Marcus V G; Alecrim, Maria G C

    2014-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human genetic abnormalities, and it has a significant prevalence in the male population (X chromosome linked). The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of impaired fasting glucose and diabetes among G6PD-deficient persons in Manaus, Brazil, an area in the Western Brazilian Amazon to which malaria is endemic. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient males had more impaired fasting glucose and diabetes. This feature could be used as a screening tool for G6PD-deficient persons who are unable to use primaquine for the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax malaria.

  20. Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c): Clinical Applications of a Mathematical Concept

    PubMed Central

    Leow, Melvin Khee Shing

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reflects the cumulative glucose exposure of erythrocytes over a preceding time frame proportional to erythrocyte survival. HbA1c is thus an areal function of the glucose-time curve, an educationally useful concept to aid teaching and clinical judgment. Methods: An ordinary differential equation is formulated as a parsimonious model of HbA1c. The integrated form yields HbA1c as an area-under-the-curve (AUC) of a glucose-time profile. The rate constant of the HbA1c model is then derived using the validated regression equation in the ADAG study that links mean blood glucose and HbA1c with a very high degree of goodness-of-fit. Results: This model has didactic utility to enable patients, biomedical students and clinicians to appreciate how HbA1c may be conceptually inferred from discrete blood glucose values using continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) or self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) glucometer readings as shown in the examples. It can be appreciated how hypoglycemia can occur with rapid HbA1c decline despite poor glycemic control. Conclusions: Being independent of laboratory assay pitfalls, computed ‘virtual’ HbA1c serves as an invaluable internal consistency cross-check against laboratory-measured HbA1c discordant with SMBG readings suggestive of inaccurate/fraudulent glucometer records or hematologic disorders including thalassemia and hemoglobinopathy. This model could be implemented within portable glucometers, CGMS devices and even smartphone apps for deriving tentative ‘virtual’ HbA1c from serial glucose readings as an adjunct to measured HbA1c. Such predicted ‘virtual’ HbA1c readily accessible via glucometers may serve as feedback to modify behavior and empower diabetic patients to achieve better glycemic control. PMID:27708483

  1. Cinnamon intake lowers fasting blood glucose: an updated meta-analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVE – To determine if meta-analysis of recent clinical studies of cinnamon intake by people with Type II diabetes and/or prediabetes resulted in significant changes in fasting blood glucose. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS -- Published clinical studies were identified using a literature search (P...

  2. Fasting Blood Glucose and Insulin Level in Opium Addict versus Non-Addict Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gozashti, Mohammad Hossein; Yazdi, Farzaneh; Salajegheh, Pouria; Dehesh, Mohammad Moein; Divsalar, Kouros

    2015-01-01

    Background Many of lay person believe that opium lowers blood glucose. However some studies show the opposite results. In this study, we tried to evaluate the effect of opium on blood glucose and insulin resistance. Methods This comparative study including 53 addicts in case groups who used opium just in the form of smoking and 55 non-addicts in a control group, took part in the study, after proving not to be opium users. After taking blood samples, their fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting blood insulin and lipid profiles were evaluated. Furthermore, insulin resistance index was analyzed via the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) formula with the cut-off points of 7.2 and 7.1. Findings Age and gender were not significantly different between the groups. There was no significant difference regarding the prevalence of insulin resistance between the two groups, according to the cut-off points of 7.1 and 7.2 (P = 0.196 and P = 0.248, respectively). Mean insulin resistance index was not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.325). In the case group, fasting blood insulin was considerably lower (P = 0.025) and fasting blood sugar (FBS) was significantly higher (P = 0.016) than the control group. Conclusion According to the level of insulin and FBS in addicts, it does not seem that opium has a significant effect on reducing the blood glucose and insulin resistance. PMID:26322211

  3. Impaired Fasting Glucose in Nondiabetic Range: Is It a Marker of Cardiovascular Risk Factor Clustering?

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Giovanna; Kramer, Verónica; Orellana, Lorena; Bustamante, María José; Casasbellas, Cinthia; Adasme, Marcela; Salazar, Alejandra; Navarrete, Carlos; Acevedo, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Background. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) through the nondiabetic range (100–125 mg/dL) is not considered in the cardiovascular (CV) risk profile. Aim. To compare the clustering of CV risk factors (RFs) in nondiabetic subjects with normal fasting glucose (NFG) and IFG. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study in 3739 nondiabetic subjects. Demographics, medical history, and CV risk factors were collected and lipid profile, fasting glucose levels (FBG), C-reactive protein (hsCRP), blood pressure (BP), anthropometric measurements, and aerobic capacity were determined. Results. 559 (15%) subjects had IFG: they had a higher mean age, BMI, waist circumference, non-HDL cholesterol, BP, and hsCRP (p < 0.0001) and lower HDL (p < 0.001) and aerobic capacity (p < 0.001). They also had a higher prevalence of hypertension (34% versus 25%; p < 0.001), dyslipidemia (79% versus 74%; p < 0.001), and obesity (29% versus 16%; p < 0.001) and a higher Framingham risk score (8% versus 6%; p < 0.001). The probability of presenting 3 or more CV RFs adjusted by age and gender was significantly higher in the top quintile of fasting glucose (≥98 mg/dL; OR = 2.02; 1.62–2.51). Conclusions. IFG in the nondiabetic range is associated with increased cardiovascular RF clustering. PMID:26504260

  4. A prospective study of impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes in China

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand; Cui, Liufu; Sun, Lixia; Lu, Bing; Chen, Shuohua; Liu, Xing; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xiurong; Xie, Xiaobing; Hu, Frank B.; Wu, Shouling; Gao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The worldwide prevalence and incidence of diabetes and obesity are increasing in pandemic proportions. This is particularly relevant for China, where an extremely large population is growing, aging, and urbanizing. We thus conducted a prospective study to examine the prevalence and incidence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes, the rate at which fasting blood glucose rises, and the major modifiable risk factors associated with these outcomes in a large Chinese population from the Kailuan prospective study. A prospective cohort included 100,279 Chinese participants, aged 18 years or more, who had available information on fasting blood glucose concentrations at the start of the study (2006). Examination surveys were conducted every 2 years in 2008 and 2010. For the analyses of incident diabetes, we included 76,869 participants who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at the baseline and participants in the 2008 and/or 2010 follow-up. Diabetes was defined by a fasting blood glucose concentration ≥7 mmol/L, self-reported history, or active treatment with insulin or any oral hypoglycemic agent. IFG was defined by a fasting blood glucose concentration between 5.6 and 6.9 mmol/L. During the 4-year study, the prevalence of diabetes and IFG rose from 6.6% to 7.7%, and 17.3% to 22.6%, respectively. There were 17,811 incident cases of IFG and 4867 incident cases of diabetes. The age-standardized incident rate of IFG and diabetes were 62.6/1000 person-years (51.2/1000 person-years in women and 73.8/1000 person-years in men) and 10.0/1000 person-years (7.8/1000 person-years in women and 12.1/1000 person-years in men), respectively. We observed steady increases in fasting blood glucose with body anthropometrics and in every defined category of body mass index, including in those traditionally considered to be well within the “normal” range. In this large longitudinal study of Chinese adults, we observed a high prevalence and

  5. A prospective study of impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes in China: The Kailuan study.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Anand; Cui, Liufu; Sun, Lixia; Lu, Bing; Chen, Shuohua; Liu, Xing; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Xiurong; Xie, Xiaobing; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Shouling; Gao, Xiang

    2016-11-01

    The worldwide prevalence and incidence of diabetes and obesity are increasing in pandemic proportions. This is particularly relevant for China, where an extremely large population is growing, aging, and urbanizing. We thus conducted a prospective study to examine the prevalence and incidence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes, the rate at which fasting blood glucose rises, and the major modifiable risk factors associated with these outcomes in a large Chinese population from the Kailuan prospective study.A prospective cohort included 100,279 Chinese participants, aged 18 years or more, who had available information on fasting blood glucose concentrations at the start of the study (2006). Examination surveys were conducted every 2 years in 2008 and 2010. For the analyses of incident diabetes, we included 76,869 participants who were free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer at the baseline and participants in the 2008 and/or 2010 follow-up. Diabetes was defined by a fasting blood glucose concentration ≥7 mmol/L, self-reported history, or active treatment with insulin or any oral hypoglycemic agent. IFG was defined by a fasting blood glucose concentration between 5.6 and 6.9 mmol/L.During the 4-year study, the prevalence of diabetes and IFG rose from 6.6% to 7.7%, and 17.3% to 22.6%, respectively. There were 17,811 incident cases of IFG and 4867 incident cases of diabetes. The age-standardized incident rate of IFG and diabetes were 62.6/1000 person-years (51.2/1000 person-years in women and 73.8/1000 person-years in men) and 10.0/1000 person-years (7.8/1000 person-years in women and 12.1/1000 person-years in men), respectively. We observed steady increases in fasting blood glucose with body anthropometrics and in every defined category of body mass index, including in those traditionally considered to be well within the "normal" range.In this large longitudinal study of Chinese adults, we observed a high prevalence and incidence of IFG

  6. Effect of chromium-enriched yeast on fasting plasma glucose, glycated haemoglobin and serum lipid levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with insulin.

    PubMed

    Racek, Jaroslav; Sindberg, C D; Moesgaard, S; Mainz, Josef; Fabry, Jaroslav; Müller, Luděk; Rácová, Katarína

    2013-10-01

    Chromium is required for a normal insulin function, and low levels have been linked with insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to follow the effect of chromium supplementation on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and serum lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) on insulin therapy. Eleven randomly selected patients with DM2 on insulin therapy were supplemented with a daily dose of 100 μg chromium yeast for the first supplementation period of 2 weeks. In the second supplementation period, the chromium dose was doubled and continued for the next 6 weeks. The third phase was a 6-week washout period. After each period, the levels of FPG and HbA1c were compared with the corresponding values at the end of the previous period. Serum triglycerides, total HDL and LDL cholesterol values after supplementation were compared with the baseline values. FPG decreased significantly after the first period of chromium supplementation (p < 0.001), and a tendency to a further reduction was observed after the second supplementation period. Similarly, HbA1c decreased significantly in both periods (p < 0.02 and p < 0.002, respectively). Eight weeks after withdrawal of chromium supplementation, both FPG and HbA1c levels returned to their pre-intervention values. The serum lipid concentrations were not significantly influenced by chromium supplementation. Chromium supplementation could be beneficial in patients with DM2 treated with insulin, most likely due to lowered insulin resistance leading to improved glucose tolerance. This finding needs to be confirmed in a larger study.

  7. Fasting Glucose Changes in Adolescents with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Compared To Obese Controls: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Asma; Lteif, Aida N.; Kumar, Seema; Simmons, Patricia S.; Chang, Alice Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare changes in fasting glucose among adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) to obese adolescents without PCOS. Methods Retrospective cohort study of 310 adolescents with PCOS and 250 obese adolescents, (ages 13–18 years) seen at Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN, from 1996–2012. Included for analysis were 98 adolescents with PCOS and 150 obese adolescents who had 2 or more fasting glucose measurements separated by at least 6 months. Adolescents with impaired fasting glucose or diabetes were excluded. Multivariate models were used to assess predictors of change in fasting glucose. Results At diagnosis, adolescents with PCOS had lower body mass index (BMI) (kg/m2) and older age than obese adolescents (P<.001). Adolescents with PCOS had shorter follow up (years) (P=.02). Baseline fasting glucose (mg/dl) was not different between groups. Mean change in fasting glucose (mg/dl/year) was 2.4± 9.4 mg/dl/year for PCOS and 2.2±6.2 mg/dl/year for obese adolescents (P=.83). Significant predictors for change in fasting glucose were BMI and fasting glucose at diagnosis (P<.01). Within the PCOS cohort, BMI was a significant predictor for development of IFG (P=.003). Prevalence of hypertension (HTN) increased in the PCOS cohort from baseline to follow up (P=.02). PCOS and BMI were significantly associated with development of HTN in the entire cohort. Conclusions Adolescent girls with PCOS do not show a significant change in fasting glucose or an increased risk for the development of IFG compared to obese adolescents. BMI, not PCOS status, was the strongest predictor for changes in fasting glucose and development of IFG over time. PMID:26238569

  8. Coffee consumption and incidence of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and type 2 diabetes: the Hoorn Study.

    PubMed

    van Dam, R M; Dekker, J M; Nijpels, G; Stehouwer, C D A; Bouter, L M; Heine, R J

    2004-12-01

    Coffee contains several substances that may affect glucose metabolism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between habitual coffee consumption and the incidence of IFG, IGT and type 2 diabetes. We used cross-sectional and prospective data from the population-based Hoorn Study, which included Dutch men and women aged 50-74 years. An OGTT was performed at baseline and after a mean follow-up period of 6.4 years. Associations were adjusted for potential confounders including BMI, cigarette smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption and dietary factors. At baseline, a 5 cup per day higher coffee consumption was significantly associated with lower fasting insulin concentrations (-5.6%, 95% CI -9.3 to -1.6%) and 2-h glucose concentrations (-8.8%, 95% CI -11.8 to -5.6%), but was not associated with lower fasting glucose concentrations (-0.8%, 95% CI -2.1 to 0.6%). In the prospective analyses, the odds ratio (OR) for IGT was 0.59 (95% CI 0.36-0.97) for 3-4 cups per day, 0.46 (95% CI 0.26-0.81) for 5-6 cups per day, and 0.37 (95% CI 0.16-0.84) for 7 or more cups per day, as compared with the corresponding values for the consumption of 2 or fewer cups of coffee per day (p=0.001 for trend). Higher coffee consumption also tended to be associated with a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes (OR 0.69, CI 0.31-1.51 for >/=7 vs /=7 vs fasting glucose metabolism.

  9. Factors predictive of macrosomia in pregnancies with a positive oral glucose challenge test: importance of fasting plasma glucose.

    PubMed

    Legardeur, H; Girard, G; Journy, N; Ressencourt, V; Durand-Zaleski, I; Mandelbrot, L

    2014-02-01

    The study aimed to determine the factors associated with fetal macrosomia following a positive oral glucose challenge test (OGCT). In this retrospective single-centre study of 1268 pregnancies with positive 50-g OGCTs (plasma glucose≥130mg/dL, or 7.2mmol/L), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was defined as fasting plasma glucose (FPG)≥95mg/dL (5.3mmol/L) and/or postprandial glucose (PPG)≥120mg/dL (6.7mmol/L). In GDM pregnancies, the odds ratios adjusted for confounders (age, BMI, ethnicity, parity and weight gain) were 2.02 for macrosomia (Z score≥1.28) and 2.62 for severe macrosomia (Z score≥1.88). For each 10-mg/dL increase in FPG, the mean birth-weight increase was 60g. Macrosomia risk did not differ between GDM patients with normal FPG (<95mg/dL, or 5.3mmol/L) and non-diabetics, but increased significantly in cases of FPG≥95mg/dL and regardless of the level of PPG. In our study population, birth-weight and macrosomia risk were strongly correlated with FPG, suggesting that it is a simple and efficient marker for the risk of macrosomia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of genetic variants previously associated with fasting glucose and insulin in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Florez, Jose C; Jablonski, Kathleen A; McAteer, Jarred B; Franks, Paul W; Mason, Clinton C; Mather, Kieren; Horton, Edward; Goldberg, Ronald; Dabelea, Dana; Kahn, Steven E; Arakaki, Richard F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Knowler, William C

    2012-01-01

    Common genetic variants have been recently associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels in white populations. Whether these associations replicate in pre-diabetes is not known. We extended these findings to the Diabetes Prevention Program, a clinical trial in which participants at high risk for diabetes were randomized to placebo, lifestyle modification or metformin for diabetes prevention. We genotyped previously reported polymorphisms (or their proxies) in/near G6PC2, MTNR1B, GCK, DGKB, GCKR, ADCY5, MADD, CRY2, ADRA2A, FADS1, PROX1, SLC2A2, GLIS3, C2CD4B, IGF1, and IRS1 in 3,548 Diabetes Prevention Program participants. We analyzed variants for association with baseline glycemic traits, incident diabetes and their interaction with response to metformin or lifestyle intervention. We replicated associations with fasting glucose at MTNR1B (P<0.001), G6PC2 (P = 0.002) and GCKR (P = 0.001). We noted impaired β-cell function in carriers of glucose-raising alleles at MTNR1B (P<0.001), and an increase in the insulinogenic index for the glucose-raising allele at G6PC2 (P<0.001). The association of MTNR1B with fasting glucose and impaired β-cell function persisted at 1 year despite adjustment for the baseline trait, indicating a sustained deleterious effect at this locus. We also replicated the association of MADD with fasting proinsulin levels (P<0.001). We detected no significant impact of these variants on diabetes incidence or interaction with preventive interventions. The association of several polymorphisms with quantitative glycemic traits is replicated in a cohort of high-risk persons. These variants do not have a detectable impact on diabetes incidence or response to metformin or lifestyle modification in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

  11. Association between Advanced Glycation End Products and Impaired Fasting Glucose: Results from the SALIA Study

    PubMed Central

    Teichert, Tom; Hellwig, Anne; Peßler, Annette; Hellwig, Michael; Vossoughi, Mohammad; Sugiri, Dorothea; Vierkötter, Andrea; Schulte, Thomas; Freund, Juliane; Roden, Michael; Hoffmann, Barbara; Schikowski, Tamara; Luckhaus, Christian; Krämer, Ursula; Henle, Thomas; Herder, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes and related complications, whereas their role in the early deterioration of glycaemia is unknown. While previous studies used antibody-based methods to quantify AGEs, data from tandem mass spectrometry coupled liquid chromatography (LC-MS/MS)-based measurements are limited to patients with known diabetes. Here, we used the LC-MS/MS method to test the hypothesis that plasma AGE levels are higher in individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) than in those with normal fasting glucose (NFG). Secondary aims were to assess correlations of plasma AGEs with quantitative markers of glucose metabolism and biomarkers of subclinical inflammation. This study included on 60 women with NFG or IFG (n = 30 each, mean age 74 years) from the German SALIA cohort. Plasma levels of free metabolites (3-deoxyfructose, 3-deoxypentosone, 3-deoxypentulose), two hydroimidazolones, oxidised adducts (carboxymethyllysine, carboxyethyllysine, methionine sulfoxide) and Nε-fructosyllysine were measured using LC-MS/MS. Plasma concentrations of all tested AGEs did not differ between the NFG and IFG groups (all p>0.05). Associations between plasma levels of AGEs and fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR as a measure of insulin resistance were weak (r between -0.2 and 0.2, all p>0.05). The association between 3-deoxyglucosone-derived hydroimidazolone with several proinflammatory biomarkers disappeared upon adjustment for multiple testing. In conclusion, plasma AGEs assessed by LC-MS/MS were neither increased in IFG nor associated with parameters of glucose metabolism and subclinical inflammation in our study. Thus, these data argue against strong effects of AGEs in the early stages of deterioration of glucose metabolism. PMID:26018950

  12. Fasting and glucose effects on pituitary leptin expression. Is leptin a local signal for nutrient status?

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher; Akhter, Noor; Johnson, Brandy W.; Iruthayanathan, Mary; Syed, Farhan; Kudo, Akihiko; Zhou, Yi-Hong; Childs, Gwen V.

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, a potent anorexigenic hormone is found in the anterior pituitary. The aim of this study was to determine if and how pituitary leptin-bearing cells were regulated by nutritional status. Male rats showed 64% reductions in pituitary leptin mRNA, but not serum leptin, 24 h after fasting, accompanied by significant 30-50% reductions in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH), and 70-80% reductions in target cells for gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) or growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH). There was a 2—fold increase in corticotropes. Subsets (22%) of pituitary cells co-expressed leptin and GH and <5% co-expressed leptin and LH, prolactin, TSH, or ACTH. Fasting resulted in significant 55-75% losses in cells with leptin proteins or mRNA and GH or LH. To determine if restoration of serum glucose could rescue leptin, LH and GH, additional fasted rats were given 10% glucose water for 24 h. Restoring serum glucose in fasted rats resulted in pituitary cell populations with normal levels of leptin, GH, and LH cells. Similarly, LH and GH cells were restored, in vitro, after populations from fasted rats were treated for as little as 1 h in 10-100 pg/ml leptin. These correlative changes in pituitary leptin, LH and GH, coupled with leptin’s rapid restoration of GH and LH, in vitro, suggest that pituitary leptin may signal nutritional changes. Collectively, the findings suggest that pituitary leptin expression could be coupled to glucose sensors like glucokinase, to facilitate rapid responses by the neuroendocrine system to nutritional cues. PMID:17595338

  13. Higher fasting plasma glucose is associated with striatal and hippocampal shape differences: the 2sweet project.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqi; Shaw, Marnie; Humphries, Jacob; Sachdev, Perminder; Anstey, Kaarin J; Cherbuin, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated associations between higher normal fasting plasma glucose levels (NFG) (<6.1 mmol/L), type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hippocampal atrophy and other cerebral abnormalities. Little is known about the association between plasma glucose and the striatum despite sensorimotor deficits being implicated in T2D. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between plasma glucose levels and striatal and hippocampal morphology using vertex-based shape analysis. A population-based, cross-sectional study. Canberra and Queanbeyan, Australia. 287 cognitively healthy individuals (mean age 63 years, 132 female, 273 Caucasian) with (n=261) or without T2D (n=26), selected from 2551 participants taking part in the Personality & Total Health (PATH) Through Life study by availability of glucose data, MRI scan, and absence of gross brain abnormalities and cognitive impairment. Fasting plasma glucose was measured at first assessment, and MRI images were collected 8 years later. Shape differences indicating outward and inward deformation at the hippocampus and the striatum were examined with FMRIB Software Library-Integrated Registration and Segmentation Toolbox (FSL-FIRST) after controlling for sociodemographic and health variables. Higher plasma glucose was associated with shape differences indicating inward deformation, particularly at the caudate and putamen, among participants with NFG after controlling for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, smoking and depressive symptoms. Those with T2D showed shape differences indicating inward deformation at the right hippocampus and bilateral striatum, but outward deformation at the left hippocampus, compared with participants with NFG. These findings further emphasize the importance of early monitoring and management of plasma glucose levels, even within the normal range, as a risk factor for cerebral atrophy.

  14. A Mendelian Randomization Study of Metabolite Profiles, Fasting Glucose and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Bert van Klinken, Jan; Semiz, Sabina; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Verhoeven, Aswin; Hankemeier, Thomas; Harms, Amy C; Sijbrands, Eric; Sheehan, Nuala A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Demirkan, Ayşe

    2017-08-28

    Mendelian randomization (MR) provides us the opportunity to investigate the causal paths of metabolites in type 2 diabetes and glucose homeostasis. We developed and tested an MR approach based on genetic risk scoring for plasma metabolite levels, utilizing a pathway-based sensitivity analysis to control for non-specific effects. We focused on 124 circulating metabolites which correlate with fasting glucose in the Erasmus Rucphen Family study (n = 2,564) and tested the possible causal effect of each metabolite with glucose and type 2 diabetes and vice versa. We detected fourteen paths with potential causal effects by MR, following pathway based sensitivity analysis. Our results suggest that elevated plasma triglycerides might be partially responsible for increased glucose level and type 2 diabetes risk, which is consistent with previous reports. Additionally, elevated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) components i.e. S-HDL-triglycerides might have a causal role of elevating glucose levels. In contrast, large (L) and extra-large (XL) HDL lipid components i.e. XL-HDL-cholesterol, XL-HDL-free cholesterol, XL-HDL-phospholipids, L-HDL-cholesterol and L-HDL-free cholesterol as well as HDL-cholesterol seem to be protective against increasing fasting glucose, but not against type 2 diabetes. Finally, we demonstrate that genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes associates with increased levels of alanine, and decreased levels of phosphatidylcholine alkyl-acyl C42:5 and phosphatidylcholine alkyl-acyl C44:4. Our MR results provide novel insight into promising causal paths to and from glucose and type 2 diabetes and underline the value of additional information from high resolution metabolomics over classical biochemistry. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  15. Supplementation of cheonggukjang and red ginseng cheonggukjang can improve plasma lipid profile and fasting blood glucose concentration in subjects with impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Kyung; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Jeong, Yong-Jin; Jeon, Seon-Min; Choi, Ji-Young; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the plasma lipid profile and blood glucose-lowering effects of cheonggukjang (CH) and red ginseng CH (RGCH) in 45 subjects (men:women = 27:18; mean age, 44.9 ± 3.1 years) with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Subjects were randomly divided into three groups: control (starch, 2 g/day), CH (20 g/day), and RGCH (20 g/day). Each volunteer received his or her daily doses for 8 weeks. The supplementation with CH and RGCH significantly decreased the plasma total cholesterol about 30.0 mg/mL and 37.7 mg/mL, respectively, compared to the initial value. The plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration was also significantly reduced by 29.66% and 23.42% in the CH and RGCH groups, respectively, compared to the initial value. The concentration of plasma non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (107.9 mg/mL) was significantly lowered in the RGCH group compared to the initial value (139.1 mg/mL). The level of erythrocyte thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was significantly lowered in the CH (6.5 nmol/mL) and RGCH (6.6 nmol/mL) groups compared to the initial value (7.9 nmol/mL and 8.0 nmol/mL, respectively). The ratio of apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein A-1 concentrations (2.5) was significantly reduced in the CH group compared to the initial value (3.0). The concentration of fasting blood glucose (FBG) was significantly lower in the CH- and RGCH-supplemented groups compared to the initial value. These results suggest that CH and RGCH can lower the FBG concentration and improve the plasma lipid profile in subjects with IFG.

  16. Glucose transporters and in vivo glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscle: fasting, insulin stimulation and immunoisolation studies of GLUT1 and GLUT4.

    PubMed Central

    Kraegen, E W; Sowden, J A; Halstead, M B; Clark, P W; Rodnick, K J; Chisholm, D J; James, D E

    1993-01-01

    Our aim was to study glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4 in relation to in vivo glucose uptake in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. The levels of both transporters were of a similar order of magnitude in whole muscle tissue (GLUT1/GLUT4 ratio varied from 0.1 to 0.6), suggesting that both may have an important physiological role in regulating muscle glucose metabolism. GLUT4 correlated very strongly (r2 = 0.97) with maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (Rg' max., estimated using the glucose clamp plus 2-deoxy[3H]glucose bolus technique) in six skeletal muscles and heart. A distinct difference in regulation of the two transporters was evident in heart: in 5 h-fasted rats, basal glucose uptake and GLUT1 levels in heart were very high and both were reduced, by 90 and 60% respectively, by 48 h fasting. However, in heart (and in red skeletal muscle), neither GLUT4 levels nor Rg' max. were reduced by 48 h fasting. GLUT1 was shown to be specifically expressed in cardiac myocytes, because intracellular vesicles enriched in GLUT4 contained significant levels of GLUT1. In conclusion, the high association of muscle GLUT4 content with insulin responsiveness in different muscles, and the preservation of both with fasting, supports a predominant role of GLUT4 in insulin-mediated glucose uptake. GLUT1 may play an important role in mediating cardiac muscle glucose uptake in the basal metabolic state. Marked changes in GLUT1 expression with alterations in the metabolic state, such as prolonged fasting, may play an important role in cardiac glucose metabolism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8216230

  17. Usefulness of hemoglobin A1c as a criterion of dysglycemia in the definition of metabolic syndrome in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Chul-Hee; Kim, Eun-Hee; Bae, Sung-Jin; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2012-03-01

    To explore the utility of the HbA1c criterion in the definition of metabolic syndrome (MS) in Koreans, we cross-sectionally analyzed clinical and laboratory data on 11,293 non-diabetic Korean adults (aged 20-89 years, 34% women) collected during regular health checkups. Dysglycemia was defined as either fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 5.6 mmol/l or HbA1c ≥ 5.7%. The prevalence of MS as judged by the HbA1c criterion alone (17.8%) was significantly less than that determined by FPG level alone (24.5%). Use of a combination of both criteria slightly increased the prevalence of MS (26.0%). Among the 2953 subjects categorized as having MS using the combined criteria, 929 (31%) were diagnosed by the FPG criterion alone, 177 (6%) by the HbA1c criterion alone, and 1847 (63%) using both criteria. The group diagnosed using FPG values alone had significantly higher BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma insulin levels, and insulin resistance index compared with those in the group diagnosed using HbA1c levels alone. In men, the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was significantly higher and the HDL-cholesterol level was lower in the HbA1c-alone group. Therefore, employment of the HbA1c criterion may be useful to define MS in subjects at increased risk for atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Internalized racism, body fat distribution, and abnormal fasting glucose among African-Caribbean women in Dominica, West Indies.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Cleve; Tull, Eugene S.; Chambers, Earle C.; Taylor, Jerome

    2002-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship of internalized racism to glucose intolerance in a population of Afro-Caribbean women aged 18 to 55. Also of interest was whether this relationship would be differentially influenced by the type of body fat distribution or confounded by the level of hostility. A total of 244 women were selected from a systematic sample of households on the island of Dominica, West Indies. Demographic data together with information on internalized racism were collected by questionnaire. Anthropometric information and fasting blood glucose were also measured. Women with high levels of internalized racism exhibited an increased risk of elevated fasting glucose compared to those with low levels of internalized racism (odds ratio (OR) = 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-5.5). There was no difference in mean body mass index (BMI) by level of internalized racism. However those with high internalized racism had a significantly larger waist circumference after adjusting for age, education, hostility, and elevated fasting glucose status. In multivariate analyses controlling for age, education, hostility, and either weight or BMI, internalized racism remained independently associated with elevated fasting glucose. However, once waist circumference was included in the model, the relationship of internalized racism to elevated fasting glucose was not statistically significant. This study demonstrates a significant relationship between internalized racism and abnormal levels of fasting glucose which may be mediated through abdominal fat. The exact nature of the relationship of internalized racism to glucose intolerance may be an important area of future study. PMID:11918383

  19. Variations in the G6PC2/ABCB11 genomic region are associated with fasting glucose levels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Min; Erdos, Michael R.; Jackson, Anne U.; Saxena, Richa; Sanna, Serena; Silver, Kristi D.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Hansen, Torben; Orrù, Marco; Grazia Piras, Maria; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Willer, Cristen J.; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Shen, Haiqing; Kuusisto, Johanna; Ebrahim, Shah; Sestu, Natascia; Duren, William L.; Spada, Maria Cristina; Stringham, Heather M.; Scott, Laura J.; Olla, Nazario; Swift, Amy J.; Najjar, Samer; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Andersen, Gitte; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Jørgensen, Torben; Saramies, Jouko; Valle, Timo T.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Lakatta, Edward; Bergman, Richard N.; Uda, Manuela; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pedersen, Oluf; Cao, Antonio; Groop, Leif; Mohlke, Karen L.; Laakso, Markku; Schlessinger, David; Collins, Francis S.; Altshuler, David; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Boehnke, Michael; Scuteri, Angelo; Watanabe, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Identifying the genetic variants that regulate fasting glucose concentrations may further our understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetes. We therefore investigated the association of fasting glucose levels with SNPs in 2 genome-wide scans including a total of 5,088 nondiabetic individuals from Finland and Sardinia. We found a significant association between the SNP rs563694 and fasting glucose concentrations (P = 3.5 × 10–7). This association was further investigated in an additional 18,436 nondiabetic individuals of mixed European descent from 7 different studies. The combined P value for association in these follow-up samples was 6.9 × 10–26, and combining results from all studies resulted in an overall P value for association of 6.4 × 10–33. Across these studies, fasting glucose concentrations increased 0.01–0.16 mM with each copy of the major allele, accounting for approximately 1% of the total variation in fasting glucose. The rs563694 SNP is located between the genes glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit 2 (G6PC2) and ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B (MDR/TAP), member 11 (ABCB11). Our results in combination with data reported in the literature suggest that G6PC2, a glucose-6-phosphatase almost exclusively expressed in pancreatic islet cells, may underlie variation in fasting glucose, though it is possible that ABCB11, which is expressed primarily in liver, may also contribute to such variation. PMID:18521185

  20. Internalized racism, body fat distribution, and abnormal fasting glucose among African-Caribbean women in Dominica, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Butler, Cleve; Tull, Eugene S; Chambers, Earle C; Taylor, Jerome

    2002-03-01

    The current study examined the relationship of internalized racism to glucose intolerance in a population of Afro-Caribbean women aged 18 to 55. Also of interest was whether this relationship would be differentially influenced by the type of body fat distribution or confounded by the level of hostility. A total of 244 women were selected from a systematic sample of households on the island of Dominica, West Indies. Demographic data together with information on internalized racism were collected by questionnaire. Anthropometric information and fasting blood glucose were also measured. Women with high levels of internalized racism exhibited an increased risk of elevated fasting glucose compared to those with low levels of internalized racism (odds ratio (OR) = 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-5.5). There was no difference in mean body mass index (BMI) by level of internalized racism. However those with high internalized racism had a significantly larger waist circumference after adjusting for age, education, hostility, and elevated fasting glucose status. In multivariate analyses controlling for age, education, hostility, and either weight or BMI, internalized racism remained independently associated with elevated fasting glucose. However, once waist circumference was included in the model, the relationship of internalized racism to elevated fasting glucose was not statistically significant. This study demonstrates a significant relationship between internalized racism and abnormal levels of fasting glucose which may be mediated through abdominal fat. The exact nature of the relationship of internalized racism to glucose intolerance may be an important area of future study.

  1. Meta-analysis investigating associations between healthy diet and fasting glucose and insulin levels and modification by loci associated with glucose homeostasis in data from 15 cohorts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Whether loci that influence fasting glucose (FG) and fasting insulin (FI) levels, as identified by genome-wide association studies, modify associations of diet with FG or FI is unknown. We utilized data from 15 US and European cohort studies comprising 51,289 persons without diabetes to test whether...

  2. Adaptation of glucose metabolism to fasting in young children with infectious diseases: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Zijlmans, Wilco C W R; van Kempen, Anne A M W; Serlie, Mireille J; Kager, Piet A; Sauerwein, Hans P

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a frequently encountered complication in young children with infectious diseases and may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Mortality rate in young children under 5 years of age is increased four- to six-fold when severe infectious disease is complicated by hypoglycemia. Young age, prolonged fasting and severity of disease are considered important risk factors. This perspective describes the combined results of recently conducted studies on the effect of these risk factors on glucose metabolism in children with different infectious diseases. The results of these studies have nutritional implications for the approach in clinical practice towards young children with infectious diseases and specific recommendations are made. A unique finding is the existence of infectious disease-related differences in the adaptation of glucose metabolism during fasting in young children.

  3. Effect of Rosiglitazone and Ramipril on β-Cell Function in People With Impaired Glucose Tolerance or Impaired Fasting Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Anthony J.; Zinman, Bernard; Sheridan, Patrick; Yusuf, Salim; Gerstein, Hertzel C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine the degree to which ramipril and/or rosiglitazone changed β-cell function over time among individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who participated in the Diabetes Reduction Assessment With Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication (DREAM) Trial, which evaluated whether ramipril and/or rosiglitazone could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The present analysis included subjects (n = 982) from DREAM trial centers in Canada who had oral glucose tolerance tests at baseline, after 2 years, and at the end of the study. β-Cell function was assessed using the fasting proinsulin–to–C-peptide ratio (PI/C) and the insulinogenic index (defined as 30–0 min insulin/30–0 min glucose) divided by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (insulinogenic index [IGI]/insulin resistance [IR]). RESULTS Subjects receiving rosiglitazone had a significant increase in IGI/IR between baseline and end of study compared with the placebo group (25.59 vs. 1.94, P < 0.0001) and a significant decrease in PI/C (−0.010 vs. −0.006, P < 0.0001). In contrast, there were no significant changes in IGI/IR or PI/C in subjects receiving ramipril compared with placebo (11.71 vs. 18.15, P = 0.89, and −0.007 vs. −0.008, P = 0.64, respectively). The impact of rosiglitazone on IGI/IR and PI/C was similar within subgroups of isolated IGT and IFG + IGT (all P < 0.001). Effects were more modest in those with isolated IFG (IGI/IR: 8.95 vs. 2.13, P = 0.03; PI/C: −0.003 vs. −0.001, P = 0.07). CONCLUSIONS Treatment with rosiglitazone, but not ramipril, resulted in significant improvements in measures of β-cell function over time in pre-diabetic subjects. Although the long-term sustainability of these improvements cannot be determined from the present study, these findings demonstrate that the diabetes preventive effect of rosiglitazone was

  4. Intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training program improves insulin resistance and fasting plasma glucose in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Marquis-Gravel, Guillaume; Hayami, Douglas; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Guilbeault, Valérie; Latour, Élise; Gayda, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the effects of a long-term intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and Mediterranean diet (MedD) counseling on glycemic control parameters, insulin resistance and β-cell function in obese subjects. The glycemic control parameters (fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin), insulin resistance, and β-cell function of 72 obese subjects (54 women; mean age = 53 ± 9 years) were assessed at baseline and upon completion of a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention program conducted at the cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation center of the Montreal Heart Institute, from 2009 to 2012. The program included 2-3 weekly supervised exercise training sessions (HIIT and resistance exercise), combined to MedD counseling. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (mmol/L) (before: 5.5 ± 0.9; after: 5.2 ± 0.6; P < 0.0001), fasting insulin (pmol/L) (before: 98 ± 57; after: 82 ± 43; P = 0.003), and insulin resistance, as assessed by the HOMA-IR score (before: 3.6 ± 2.5; after: 2.8 ± 1.6; P = 0.0008) significantly improved, but not HbA1c (%) (before: 5.72 ± 0.55; after: 5.69 ± 0.39; P = 0.448), nor β-cell function (HOMA-β, %) (before: 149 ± 78; after: 144 ± 75; P = 0.58). Following a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention combining HIIT and MedD counseling, obese subjects experienced significant improvements of FPG and insulin resistance. This is the first study to expose the effects of a long-term program combining HIIT and MedD on glycemic control parameters among obese subjects.

  5. Intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training program improves insulin resistance and fasting plasma glucose in obese patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Marquis-Gravel, Guillaume; Hayami, Douglas; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Guilbeault, Valérie; Latour, Élise; Gayda, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To analyze the effects of a long-term intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and Mediterranean diet (MedD) counseling on glycemic control parameters, insulin resistance and β-cell function in obese subjects. Methods The glycemic control parameters (fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin), insulin resistance, and β-cell function of 72 obese subjects (54 women; mean age = 53 ± 9 years) were assessed at baseline and upon completion of a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention program conducted at the cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation center of the Montreal Heart Institute, from 2009 to 2012. The program included 2–3 weekly supervised exercise training sessions (HIIT and resistance exercise), combined to MedD counseling. Results Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (mmol/L) (before: 5.5 ± 0.9; after: 5.2 ± 0.6; P < 0.0001), fasting insulin (pmol/L) (before: 98 ± 57; after: 82 ± 43; P = 0.003), and insulin resistance, as assessed by the HOMA-IR score (before: 3.6 ± 2.5; after: 2.8 ± 1.6; P = 0.0008) significantly improved, but not HbA1c (%) (before: 5.72 ± 0.55; after: 5.69 ± 0.39; P = 0.448), nor β-cell function (HOMA-β, %) (before: 149 ± 78; after: 144 ± 75; P = 0.58). Conclusion Following a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention combining HIIT and MedD counseling, obese subjects experienced significant improvements of FPG and insulin resistance. This is the first study to expose the effects of a long-term program combining HIIT and MedD on glycemic control parameters among obese subjects. PMID:26844086

  6. Nutrient Patterns Associated with Fasting Glucose and Glycated Haemoglobin Levels in a Black South African Population

    PubMed Central

    Chikowore, Tinashe; Pisa, Pedro T.; van Zyl, Tertia; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Wentzel-Viljoen, Edelweiss; Conradie, Karin R.

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) burden is increasing globally. However, evidence regarding nutrient patterns associated with the biomarkers of T2D is limited. This study set out to determine the nutrient patterns associated with fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin the biomarkers of T2D. Factor analysis was used to derive nutrient patterns of 2010 participants stratified by urban/rural status and gender. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to 25 nutrients, computed from the quantified food frequency questionnaires (QFFQ). Three nutrient patterns per stratum, which accounted for 73% of the variation of the selected nutrients, were identified. Multivariate linear regression models adjusted for age, BMI, smoking, physical activity, education attained, alcohol intake, seasonality and total energy intake were computed. Starch, dietary fibre and B vitamins driven nutrient pattern was significantly associated with fasting glucose (β = −0.236 (−0.458; −0.014); p = 0.037) and glycated haemoglobin levels (β = −0.175 (−0.303; −0.047); p = 0.007) in rural women. Thiamine, zinc and plant protein driven nutrient pattern was associated with significant reductions in glycated haemoglobin and fasting glucose ((β = −0.288 (−0.543; −0.033); p = 0.027) and (β = −0.382 (−0.752; −0.012); p = 0.043), respectively) in rural men. Our results indicate that plant driven nutrient patterns are associated with low fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin levels. PMID:28106816

  7. Loss of beta cell function as fasting glucose increases in the non-diabetic range.

    PubMed

    Godsland, I F; Jeffs, J A R; Johnston, D G

    2004-07-01

    Our aim was to define the level of glycaemia at which pancreatic insulin secretion, particularly first-phase insulin release, begins to decline. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured during an IVGTT in 553 men with non-diabetic fasting plasma glucose concentrations. In 466 of the men C-peptide was also estimated. IVGTT insulin secretion in first and late phases was assessed by: (i) the circulating insulin response; (ii) population parameter deconvolution analysis of plasma C-peptide concentrations; and (iii) a combined model utilising both insulin and C-peptide concentrations. Measurements of insulin sensitivity and elimination were also derived by modelling analysis. As fasting plasma glucose (FPG) increased, IVGTT first-phase insulin secretion declined by 73%, 71% and 68% for the three methods respectively. The FPG values at which this decline began, determined by change point regression, were 4.97, 5.16 and 5.42 mmol/l respectively. The sensitivity of late-phase insulin secretion to glucose declined at FPG concentrations above 6.0 mmol/l. Insulin elimination, but not insulin sensitivity, varied with FPG. The range of FPG over which progressive loss of the first-phase response begins may be as low as 5.0 to 5.4 mmol/l, with late-phase insulin responses declining at FPG concentrations above 6.0 mmol/l.

  8. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose uptake by lung slices from fed and fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, C F; Massaro, D

    1978-03-01

    We studied the uptake and phosphorylation of 2-deoxy-D-[1-14C]glucose (2-[14C]DG) by lung slices from fed and fasted rats to obtain information on the effect of starvation on surgar transport by the lung. We found that 2-[14C]DG is taken up and phosphorylated by the lung, but that, as in other tissues it is not metabolized beyond the phosphorylation step. The accumulation of 2-[14C]DG as free 2-DG does not require energy, fails to show saturation in the range studied (5-100 mM), and is not inhibited by exogenous glucose. The phosphorylation of 2-DG by the lung is energy dependent, saturable, and competitively inhibited by exogenous glucose. Fasting does not interfere with the intracellular accumulation of unphosphorylated 2-DG but causes about a 40% decrease in the accumulation of phosphorylated 2-DG. We conclude that membrane transport does not limit uptake of 2-DG; fasting decreases the phosphorylation of 2-DG.

  9. [Associated factors of impaired fasting glucose in some Korean rural adults].

    PubMed

    Yun, Hye Eun; Han, Mi-ah; Kim, Ki Soon; Park, Jong; Kang, Myeng Guen; Ryu, So Yeon

    2010-07-01

    This study was performed to investigate the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and its related characteristics among healthy adults in some Korean rural areas. We conducted a cross-sectional study using the data from 1352 adults who were over the age 40 and under the age 70 and who were free of diabetes mellitus (DM), cardiovascular diseases and other diseases and who participated in a survey conducted as part of the Korean Rural Genomic Cohort Study. IFG was defined as a serum fasting glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dL. The prevalence of IFG was 20.4% in men, 15.5% in women and 12.7% overall. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the independent risk factors for IFG were male gender, having a family history of DM, the quartiles of gamma glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein and the waist circumference. The homeostatis model assessment for insulin resistance was very strongly associated with IFG. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and MS components was higher in the subjects with IFG then in those with normal fasting glucose (NFG). The result of study could supply evidence to find the high risk population and to determine a strategy for treating IFG. Further research is needed to explain the causal relationship and mechanisms of IFG.

  10. Leukocyte telomere length is inversely associated with post-load but not with fasting plasma glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Khalangot, Mykola; Krasnienkov, Dmytro; Vaiserman, Alexander; Avilov, Ivan; Kovtun, Volodymir; Okhrimenko, Nadia; Koliada, Alexander; Kravchenko, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by shorter leukocyte telomere length, but the relationship between leukocyte telomere length and type 2 diabetes mellitus development is rather questioned. Fasting and post-load glycaemia associated with different types of insulin resistance and their relation with leukocyte telomere length remains unknown. We compared leukocyte telomere length and fasting or post-load glucose levels in persons who do not receive glucose lowering treatment. For 82 randomly selected rural residents of Ukraine, aged 45+, not previously diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus, the WHO oral glucose tolerance test and anthropometric measurements were performed. Leukocyte telomere length was measured by standardized method of quantitative monochrome multiplex polymerase chain reaction in real time. Spearman's or Pearson's rank correlation was used for correlation analysis between fasting plasma glucose or 2-h post-load plasma glucose levels and leukocyte telomere length. Logistical regression models were used to evaluate risks of finding short or long telomeres associated with fasting plasma glucose or 2-h post-load plasma glucose levels. No association of fasting plasma glucose and leukocyte telomere length was revealed, whereas 2-h post-load plasma glucose levels demonstrated a negative correlation ( P < 0.01) with leukocyte telomere length. Waist circumference and systolic blood pressure were negatively related ( P = 0.03) with leukocyte telomere length in men. Oral glucose tolerance test result-based glycemic categories did not show differences between mean leukocyte telomere length in categories of normal fasting plasma glucose and 2-h post-load plasma glucose (NGT, n = 33); diabetes mellitus (DM), n = 18 and impaired fasting glucose/tolerance (IFG/IGT, n = 31) levels. A correlation relationship between leukocyte telomere length and 2-h post-load plasma glucose level in NGT; IFG/IGT and DM groups ( P = 0.027; 0

  11. Implications of iron deficiency/anemia on the classification of diabetes using HbA1c

    PubMed Central

    Attard, S M; Herring, A H; Wang, H; Howard, A-G; Thompson, A L; Adair, L S; Mayer-Davis, E J; Gordon-Larsen, P

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Nonglycemic factors like iron deficiency (ID) or anemia may interfere with classification of diabetes and prediabetes using hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). However, few population-based studies of diabetes in areas with endemic ID/anemia have been conducted. We aimed to determine how mutually exclusive categories of ID alone, anemia alone and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) were each associated with prediabetes and diabetes prevalence using fasting blood glucose (FBG) versus HbA1c in a population-based study of adults with endemic ID/anemia. Subjects/Methods: We used data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey, a longitudinal, population-based study across 228 communities within nine provinces of China. This analysis included 7308 adults seen in the 2009 survey aged 18–75 years. We used descriptive and covariate-adjusted models to examine relative risk of prediabetes and diabetes using FBG alone, HbA1c alone, HbA1c and FBG, or neither (normoglycemia) by anemia alone, ID alone, IDA or normal iron/hemoglobin. Results: Approximately 65% of individuals with diabetes in our sample were concordantly classified with diabetes using both FBG and HbA1c, while 35% had a discordant diabetes classification: they were classified using either FBG or HbA1c, but not both. Fewer participants with ID alone versus normal iron/hemoglobin were classified with diabetes using HbA1c only. From covariate-adjusted, multinomial regression analyses, the adjusted prevalence of prediabetes using HbA1c only was 22% for men with anemia alone, but 13% for men with normal iron/hemoglobin. In contrast, the predicted prevalence of prediabetes using HbA1c only was 8% for women with ID alone, compared with 13% for women with normal iron/hemoglobin. Conclusions: These findings suggest potential misclassification of diabetes using HbA1c in areas of endemic ID/anemia. Estimating diabetes prevalence using HbA1c may result in under-diagnosis in women with ID and over-diagnosis in men with

  12. Effects of alcohol abstinence on glucose metabolism in Japanese men with elevated fasting glucose: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Funayama, Takashi; Tamura, Yoshifumi; Takeno, Kageumi; Kawaguchi, Minako; Kakehi, Saori; Watanabe, Takahiro; Furukawa, Yasuhiko; Kaga, Hideyoshi; Yamamoto, Risako; Kanazawa, Akio; Fujitani, Yoshio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Watada, Hirotaka

    2017-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that moderate alcohol consumption provides protection against the development of type 2 diabetes. However, several other reports suggested that moderate alcohol intake may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes in non-obese Japanese. The aim of present study was to investigate the effect of 1-week alcohol abstinence on hepatic insulin sensitivity and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in non-obese Japanese men. We recruited 8 non-obese Japanese men with mildly elevated FPG and drinking habits alcohol (mean frequency; 5.6 ± 2.5 times/week, mean alcohol consumption; 32.1 ± 20.0 g/day). Before and after the 1-week alcohol abstinence, we used the 2-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp to measure endogenous glucose production (EGP) and insulin sensitivity (IS) in muscle and liver. One-week alcohol abstinence significantly reduced both FPG by 7% (from 105.5 ± 11.7 to 98.2 ± 7.8 mg/dl, P < 0.01) and fasting EGP by 6% (from 84.1 ± 4.2 to 77.6 ± 1.6 mg/m2 per min, P < 0.01), respectively. Two–step clamp study showed that alcohol abstinence significantly improved hepatic-IS, but not muscle-IS. In conclusion, one week alcohol abstinence improved hepatic IS and FPG in non-obese Japanese men with mildly elevated FPG and drinking habits alcohol. PMID:28067302

  13. Interference of hemoglobinA1c (HbA1c) detection using ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method by clinically silent hemoglobin variant in University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC)--a case report.

    PubMed

    Thevarajah, M; Nadzimah, M N; Chew, Y Y

    2009-03-01

    Glycated hemoglobin, measured as HbA1c is used as an index of mean glycemia in diabetic patients over the preceding 2-3 months. Various assay methods are used to measure HbA1c and many factors may interfere with its measurement according to assay method used, causing falsely high or low results. To report a case of diabetic patient with clinically silent hemoglobin variant, causing undetectable HbA1c concentration using ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Our patient is a 65-year-old female with type 2 diabetes mellitus on diet control, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Her fasting blood glucose concentrations ranged from 6.2 to 7.8 mmol/L. Her HbA1c concentrations measured with immunoturbidimetry method (Cobas Integra, Roche Diagnostics) ranged from 6.11 to 7.23%, but were undetectable when measured with ion-exchange HPLC [Arkray HA8160, Diabetes Mode (also known as Menarini HA8160)]. Hemoglobin analysis identified the presence of a hemoglobin variant--Hemoglobin D Punjab. Clinical laboratories should be aware of limitations of the HbA1c assay method used, such as potential interference with hemoglobin variant as depicted by our case. Alternative methods for monitoring glycemic control in these patients should be considered.

  14. Epidemiological evidence of altered cardiac autonomic function in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance but not isolated impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Lin, Thy-Sheng; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Jin; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2007-10-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is present in diabetes mellitus (DM), but no study is available on alteration in cardiac autonomic function (CAF) across different glycemic statuses including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and DM. Our objective was to examine whether CAF is altered in subjects with IGT and isolated IFG. The study was a stratified systematic cluster sampling design within the general community. A total of 1440 subjects were classified as NGT (n = 983), isolated IFG (n = 163), IGT (n = 188), and DM (n = 106). CAF was determined by 1) standard deviation of normal-to-normal (SDNN) or RR interval, power spectrum in low and high frequency (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz; HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz), and LF/HF ratio in supine position for 5 min; 2) ratio between 30th and 15th RR interval after standing from supine position (30/15 ratio); and 3) average heart rate change during breathing of six deep breaths for 1 min (HR(DB)). Univariate analysis showed significant differences in SDNN, 30/15 ratio, HR(DB), HF power, and LF/HF ratio among subjects with NGT, isolated IFG, IGT, and DM. In multivariate analysis, none of the indices of CAF was related to isolated IFG in the reference group of NGT. IGT and DM were negatively associated with 30/15 ratio and HF power but positively associated with LF/HF ratio. In addition, DM was also related to a lower SDNN. DM and IGT subjects had an impaired CAF independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. The risk of altered CAF is not apparent in subjects with isolated IFG.

  15. Altered Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Handling in Subjects with Impaired Glucose Tolerance as Compared to Impaired Fasting Glucose.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Gijs H; Moors, Chantalle C M; Jocken, Johan W E; van der Zijl, Nynke J; Jans, Anneke; Konings, Ellen; Diamant, Michaela; Blaak, Ellen E

    2016-03-14

    Altered skeletal muscle fatty acid (FA) metabolism contributes to insulin resistance. Here, we compared skeletal muscle FA handling between subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; n = 12 (7 males)) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 14 (7 males)) by measuring arterio-venous concentration differences across forearm muscle. [²H₂]-palmitate was infused intravenously, labeling circulating endogenous triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acids (FFA), whereas [U-(13)C]-palmitate was incorporated in a high-fat mixed-meal, labeling chylomicron-TAG. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken to determine muscle TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), FFA, and phospholipid content, their fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and degree of saturation, and gene expression. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Net skeletal muscle glucose uptake was lower (p = 0.018) and peripheral insulin sensitivity tended to be reduced (p = 0.064) in IGT as compared to IFG subjects. Furthermore, IGT showed higher skeletal muscle extraction of VLDL-TAG (p = 0.043), higher muscle TAG content (p = 0.025), higher saturation of FFA (p = 0.004), lower saturation of TAG (p = 0.017) and a tendency towards a lower TAG FSR (p = 0.073) and a lower saturation of DAG (p = 0.059) versus IFG individuals. Muscle oxidative gene expression was lower in IGT subjects. In conclusion, increased liver-derived TAG extraction and reduced lipid turnover of saturated FA, rather than DAG content, in skeletal muscle accompany the more pronounced insulin resistance in IGT versus IFG subjects.

  16. Altered Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Handling in Subjects with Impaired Glucose Tolerance as Compared to Impaired Fasting Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Gijs H.; Moors, Chantalle C. M.; Jocken, Johan W. E.; van der Zijl, Nynke J.; Jans, Anneke; Konings, Ellen; Diamant, Michaela; Blaak, Ellen E.

    2016-01-01

    Altered skeletal muscle fatty acid (FA) metabolism contributes to insulin resistance. Here, we compared skeletal muscle FA handling between subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; n = 12 (7 males)) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 14 (7 males)) by measuring arterio-venous concentration differences across forearm muscle. [2H2]-palmitate was infused intravenously, labeling circulating endogenous triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acids (FFA), whereas [U-13C]-palmitate was incorporated in a high-fat mixed-meal, labeling chylomicron-TAG. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken to determine muscle TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), FFA, and phospholipid content, their fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and degree of saturation, and gene expression. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Net skeletal muscle glucose uptake was lower (p = 0.018) and peripheral insulin sensitivity tended to be reduced (p = 0.064) in IGT as compared to IFG subjects. Furthermore, IGT showed higher skeletal muscle extraction of VLDL-TAG (p = 0.043), higher muscle TAG content (p = 0.025), higher saturation of FFA (p = 0.004), lower saturation of TAG (p = 0.017) and a tendency towards a lower TAG FSR (p = 0.073) and a lower saturation of DAG (p = 0.059) versus IFG individuals. Muscle oxidative gene expression was lower in IGT subjects. In conclusion, increased liver-derived TAG extraction and reduced lipid turnover of saturated FA, rather than DAG content, in skeletal muscle accompany the more pronounced insulin resistance in IGT versus IFG subjects. PMID:26985905

  17. Sex difference in the effect of the fasting serum glucose level on the risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Song Vogue; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Nam, Chung Mo; Suh, Il

    2017-09-04

    Diabetic women have a greater relative risk of coronary heart disease than diabetic men. However, the sex difference in the effect of fasting serum glucose levels below the diabetic range on the risk of coronary heart disease is unclear. We investigated whether the association between nondiabetic blood glucose levels and the incident risk of coronary heart disease is different between men and women. The fasting serum glucose levels and other cardiovascular risk factors at baseline were measured in 159,702 subjects (100,144 men and 59,558 women). Primary outcomes were hospital admission and death due to coronary heart disease during the 11-year follow-up. The risk for coronary heart disease in women significantly increased with impaired fasting glucose levels (≥110mg/dL) compared to normal glucose levels (<100mg/dL), whereas the risk for coronary heart disease in men was significantly increased at a diabetic glucose range (≥126mg/dL). Women had a higher hazard ratio of coronary heart disease associated with the fasting serum glucose level than men (p for interaction with sex=0.021). The stronger effect of the fasting serum glucose levels on the risk of coronary heart disease in women than in men was significant from a prediabetic range (≥110mg/dL). Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Age and sex variations of HbA(1C) in a French population without known diabetes aged 6 to 79 years].

    PubMed

    Gusto, Gaëlle; Vol, Sylviane; Born, Catherine; Balkau, Beverley; Lamy, Jocelyne; Bourderioux, Christiane; Lantieri, Olivier; Tichet, Jean

    2011-01-01

    HbA(1C) is being used for screening and diagnosing diabetes. We determined mean values of HbA(1C) according to age and sex in a large population without known diabetes, in a wide age range 6-79  years. 5,138 men and women without known diabetes aged 6-79  years participated in a routine health examination provided by their medical insurance. HbA(1C) was assessed on an HPLC analyzer aligned with a DCCT method. HbA(1C) was approximately normally distributed in both men and women. Mean (SD) HbA(1C) were, for men vs women, in percentages 5.3 (0.4) vs 5.2 (0.3), in mmol/mol 34 (5) vs 34 (4) and in estimated blood glucose in mmol/L 5.83 (0.67) vs 5.75 (0.53). HbA(1C) increased with age by 0.08% every 10  years and this was attenuated to a 0.04% increase after adjustment on fasting plasma glucose. Between 15 and 49  years, women had lower values than men (p < 0.0001), but no sex differences were observed before and after this age range. In our population, 0.6% had HbA(1C) greater or equal to 6.5% and 88% (96% of men and 73% of women) of them had fasting plasma glucose greater or equal to 6,1 mmol/L. Threshold of 6.0% selected 2.8% of our population.

  19. Effect of low glycemic load diet on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in poorly-controlled diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Ziaee, Amir; Afaghi, Ahmad; Sarreshtehdari, Majied

    2011-12-29

    Different carbohydrate diets have been administrated to diabetic patients to evaluate the glycemic response, while Poor-controlled diabetes is increasing world wide. To investigate the role of an alternative carbohydrate diet on glycemic control, we explored the effect of a low glycemic load (Low GL)-high fat diet on glycemic response and also glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of poor-controlled diabetes patients. Hundred poorly-controlled diabetes patients, HbA1c > 8, age 52.8 ± 4.5 y, were administrated a low GL diet , GL = 67 (Energy 1800 kcal; total fat 36%; fat derived from olive oil and nuts 15%; carbohydrate 42%; protein 22%) for 10 weeks. Patients did their routine life style program during intervention. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c before and after intervention with significant reduction were: 169 ± 17, 141 ± 12; 8.85% (73 mmol/mol) ± 0.22%, and 7.81% (62 mmol/mol) ± 0.27%; respectively (P < 0.001). Mean fasting blood glucose reduced by 28.1 ± 12.5 and HbA1c by 1.1% (11 mmol/mol) ± 0.3% (P=0.001). There was positive moderate correlation between HbA1c concentration before intervention and FBS reduction after intervention (P < 0.001, at 0.01 level, R =0.52), and strong positive correlation between FBS before intervention and FBS reduction (P < 0.001, at 0.01 level, R = 0.70). This study demonstrated that our alternative low glycemic load diet can be effective in glycemic control.

  20. Nonalcoholic fatty liver is a risk factor for postprandial hyperglycemia, but not for impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Tomoko; Moriyoshi, Yuriko; Nagahara, Hikaru; Shiratori, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and nonalcoholic fatty liver. The second was to make a rule regarding to whom 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) should be applied to identify subjects with IGT and diabetes mellitus (DM) in the annual check-up at the human dry dock. A total of 716 subjects who visited the Department of General Medicine of the International Medical Center of Japan from May 2001 through January 2008 for an annual check-up at the human dry dock were analyzed. We evaluated risk factors related to nonalcoholic fatty liver using multivariate logistic regression analysis and compared the difference of body mass index (BMI) and glucose level at 75-g OGTT at two different time points in subjects whose fatty change had improved or worsened. Nonalcoholic fatty liver was strongly related to 2-h- and 1-h-post-challenge glucose level (P<0.0001 and P=0.018, respectively), but not fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (P=0.706). The risk factors for IGT were nonalcoholic fatty liver (P<0.05), low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (P=0.026) and age (P=0.013). A clearly positive relationship was observed between the difference of BMI and 2-h-post-challenge glucose level among the subjects whose fatty change had improved or worsened (R=0.6, P=0.018). Nonalcoholic fatty liver was clearly related to the 2-h- or 1-h-post-challenge glucose level, but not to FPG, in 75-g OGTT, and this IGT was corrected by body weight reduction in accordance with diminished nonalcoholic fatty liver. Thus, 75-g OGTT should be applied to subjects with nonalcoholic fatty liver to evaluate IGT.

  1. Divergent mechanisms for the insulin resistant and hyperresponsive glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted and refed rats. Alterations in both glucose transporter number and intrinsic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, B B; Simpson, I A; Cushman, S W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fasting and refeeding on the glucose transport response to insulin in isolated rat adipose cells have been examined using 3-O-methylglucose transport in intact cells and cytochalasin B binding and Western blotting in subcellular membrane fractions. After a 72-h fast, basal glucose transport activity decreases slightly and insulin-stimulated activity decreases greater than 85%. Following 48 h of fasting, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity is diminished from 3.9 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 fmol/cell per min (mean +/- SEM). Similarly, the concentrations of glucose transporters are reduced with fasting in both the plasma membranes from insulin-stimulated cells from 38 +/- 5 to 18 +/- 3 pmol/mg of membrane protein and the low density microsomes from basal cells from 68 +/- 8 to 34 +/- 9 pmol/mg of membrane protein. Ad lib. refeeding for 6 d after a 48-h fast results in up to twofold greater maximally insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity compared with the control level (7.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.5 +/- 0.2 fmol/cell per min), before returning to baseline at 10 d. However, the corresponding concentration of glucose transporters in the plasma membranes is restored only to the control level (45 +/- 5 vs. 50 +/- 5 pmol/mg of membrane protein). Although the concentration of glucose transporters in the low density microsomes of basal cells remains decreased, the total number is restored to the control level due to an increase in low density microsomal protein. Thus, the insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted rats can be explained by a decreased translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane due to a depleted intracellular pool. In contrast, the insulin hyperresponsive glucose transport observed with refeeding appears to result from (a) a restored translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane from a repleted intracellular pool and (b) enhanced plasma membrane glucose transporter intrinsic activity

  2. Glucose metabolism and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Dario; Ceriello, Antonio; Esposito, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Islet dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance are both present in type 2 diabetes and are both necessary for the development of hyperglycemia. In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, large, prospective clinical studies have shown a strong relation between time-averaged mean values of glycemia, measured as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular diabetic complications. These studies are the basis for the American Diabetes Association's current recommended treatment goal that HbA1c should be <7%. The measurement of the HbA1c concentration is considered the gold standard for assessing long-term glycemia; however, it does not reveal any information on the extent or frequency of blood glucose excursions, but provides an overall mean value only. Postprandial hyperglycemia occurs frequently in patients with diabetes receiving active treatment and can occur even when metabolic control is apparently good. Interventional studies indicate that reducing postmeal glucose excursions is as important as controlling fasting plasma glucose in persons with diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. Evidence exists for a causal relation between postmeal glucose increases and microvascular and macrovascular outcomes; therefore, it is not surprising that treatment with different compounds that have specific effects on postprandial glucose regulation is accompanied by a significant improvement of many pathways supposed to be involved in diabetic complications, including oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and nuclear factor-kappaB activation. The goal of therapy should be to achieve glycemic status as near to normal as safely possible in all 3 components of glycemic control: HbA1c, fasting glucose, and postmeal glucose peak.

  3. Epigenetic regulation of the glucose transporter gene Slc2a1 by β-hydroxybutyrate underlies preferential glucose supply to the brain of fasted mice.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Funakoshi, Masabumi; Nishito, Yasumasa; Aigaki, Toshiro; Hara, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    We carried out liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of metabolites in mice. Those metabolome data showed that hepatic glucose content is reduced, but that brain glucose content is unaffected, during fasting, consistent with the priority given to brain glucose consumption during fasting. The molecular mechanisms for this preferential glucose supply to the brain are not fully understood. We also showed that the fasting-induced production of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) enhances expression of the glucose transporter gene Slc2a1 (Glut1) via histone modification. Upon β-OHB treatment, Slc2a1 expression was up-regulated, with a concomitant increase in H3K9 acetylation at the critical cis-regulatory region of the Slc2a1 gene in brain microvascular endothelial cells and NB2a neuronal cells, shown by quantitative PCR analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of the Hdac2 gene increased Slc2a1 expression, suggesting that it is one of the responsible histone deacetylases (HDACs). These results confirm that β-OHB is a HDAC inhibitor and show that β-OHB plays an important role in fasting-induced epigenetic activation of a glucose transporter gene in the brain.

  4. Association Between the Presence of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Hemoglobin A1c in Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae W.; Ku, Cheol R.; Noh, Jung H.; Ko, Kyung S.; Rhee, Byoung D.; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have investigated the clinical effect of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) on the use of the Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a screening parameter for diabetes or prediabetes. We investigated the association between IDA and HbA1c levels in Korean adults. Among the 11,472 adults (≥19 years of age) who participated in the 2011–2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (a cross-sectional and nationally representative survey conducted by the Korean Center for Disease Control for Health Statistics), 807 patients with diabetes currently taking anti-diabetes medications were excluded from this study. We compared the weighted HbA1c levels and weighted proportion (%) of HbA1c levels of ≥5.7%, ≥6.1%, and ≥6.5% according to the range of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels and the presence of IDA. Among 10,665 participants (weighted n = 35,229,108), the prevalence of anemia and IDA was 7.3% and 4.3%, respectively. The HbA1c levels were higher in participants with IDA (5.70% ± 0.02%) than in normal participants (5.59% ± 0.01%; P < 0.001), whereas there was no significant difference in FPG levels. In participants with an FPG level of <100 mg/dL and 100 to 125 mg/dL, the weighted HbA1c level was higher in those with IDA (5.59% ± 0.02% and 6.00% ± 0.05%) than in normal participants (5.44% ± 0.01% and 5.82% ± 0.01%) after adjusting for confounders such as age, sex, FPG level, heavy alcohol drinking, waist circumference, and smoking status as well as after exclusion of an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (P < 0.001, <0.01). The weighted proportions (%) of an HbA1c level of ≥5.7% and ≥6.1% were also higher in participants with IDA than in normal participants (P < 0.001, <0.05). However, the weighted HbA1c levels in individuals with an FPG level ≥126 mg/dL and a weighted proportion (%) of an HbA1c level of ≥6.5% showed no significant differences according to

  5. Effect of somatostatin on nonesterified fatty acid levels modifies glucose homeostasis during fasting

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrick, G.K.; Frizzell, R.T.; Cherrington, A.D. )

    1987-10-01

    In the 7-days fasted conscious dog, unlike the postabsorptive conscious dog, somatostatin infusion results in decreased levels of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and increased glucose utilization (R{sub d}) even when insulin and glucagon levels are held constant. The aim of this study was to determine whether NEFA replacement in such animals would prevent the increase in R{sub d}. In each of three protocols there was an 80-min tracer equilibration period, a 40-min basal period, and a 3-h test period. During the test period in the first protocol saline was infused, in the second protocol somatostatin was infused along with intraportal replacement amounts of insulin and glucagon (hormone replacement), while in the third protocol somatostatin plus the pancreatic hormones were infused with concurrent heparin plus Intralipid infusion. Glucose turnover was assessed using (3-{sup 3}H)glucose. The peripheral levels of insulin, glucagon, and glucose were similar and constant in all three protocols; however, during somatostatin infusion, exogenous glucose infusion was necessary to maintain euglycemia. The NEFA level was constant during saline infusion and decreased in the hormone replacement protocol. In the hormone replacement plus NEFA protocol, the NEFA level did not change during the first 90-min period and then increased during the second 90-min period. After a prolonged fast in the dog, (1) somatostatin directly or indirectly inhibits adipose tissue NEFA release and causes a decrease in the plasma NEFA level, and (2) this decrease in the NEFA level causes an increase in R{sub d}.

  6. The “Lipid Accumulation Product” Is Associated with 2-Hour Postload Glucose Outcomes in Overweight/Obese Subjects with Nondiabetic Fasting Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Malavazos, Alexis Elias; Cereda, Emanuele; Ermetici, Federica; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Briganti, Silvia; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Morricone, Lelio

    2015-01-01

    “Lipid accumulation product” (LAP) is a continuous variable based on waist circumference and triglyceride concentration previously associated with insulin resistance. We investigated the accuracy of LAP in identifying oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) abnormalities and compared it to the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in a population of overweight/obese outpatients presenting with nondiabetic fasting glucose. We studied 381 (male: 23%) adult (age: 18–70 years) overweight/obese Caucasians (body mass index: 36.9 ± 5.4 Kg/m2) having fasting plasma glucose < 7.0 mmol/L. OGTT was used to diagnose unknown glucose tolerance abnormalities: impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2-DM). According to OGTT 92, subjects had an IGT and 33 were diagnosed T2-DM. Logistic regression analysis detected a significant association for both LAP and HOMA-IR with single (IGT and T2-DM) and composite (IGT + T2-DM) abnormal glucose tolerance conditions. However, while the association with diabetes was similar between LAP and HOMA-IR, the relationship with IGT and composite outcomes by models including LAP was significantly superior to those including HOMA-IR (P = 0.006 and P = 0.007, resp.). LAP seems to be an accurate index, performing better than HOMA-IR, for identifying 2-hour postload OGTT outcomes in overweight/obese patients with nondiabetic fasting glucose. PMID:25792981

  7. Fish protein intake induces fast-muscle hypertrophy and reduces liver lipids and serum glucose levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Fuminori; Mizushige, Takafumi; Uozumi, Keisuke; Hayamizu, Kohsuke; Han, Li; Tsuji, Tomoko; Kishida, Taro

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, fish protein was proven to reduce serum lipids and body fat accumulation by skeletal muscle hypertrophy and enhancing basal energy expenditure in rats. In the present study, we examined the precise effects of fish protein intake on different skeletal muscle fiber types and metabolic gene expression of the muscle. Fish protein increased fast-twitch muscle weight, reduced liver triglycerides and serum glucose levels, compared with the casein diet after 6 or 8 weeks of feeding. Furthermore, fish protein upregulated the gene expressions of a fast-twitch muscle-type marker and a glucose transporter in the muscle. These results suggest that fish protein induces fast-muscle hypertrophy, and the enhancement of basal energy expenditure by muscle hypertrophy and the increase in muscle glucose uptake reduced liver lipids and serum glucose levels. The present results also imply that fish protein intake causes a slow-to-fast shift in muscle fiber type.

  8. G6PC2 Modulates Fasting Blood Glucose In Male Mice in Response to Stress.

    PubMed

    Boortz, Kayla A; Syring, Kristen E; Dai, Chunhua; Pound, Lynley D; Oeser, James K; Jacobson, David A; Wang, Jen-Chywan; McGuinness, Owen P; Powers, Alvin C; O'Brien, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    The glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic 2 (G6PC2) gene is expressed specifically in pancreatic islet beta cells. Genome-wide association studies have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the G6PC2 gene are associated with variations in fasting blood glucose (FBG) but not fasting plasma insulin. Molecular analyses examining the functional effects of these single nucleotide polymorphisms demonstrate that elevated G6PC2 expression is associated with elevated FBG. Studies in mice complement these genome-wide association data and show that deletion of the G6pc2 gene lowers FBG without affecting fasting plasma insulin. This suggests that, together with glucokinase, G6PC2 forms a substrate cycle that determines the glucose sensitivity of insulin secretion. Because genome-wide association studies and mouse studies demonstrate that elevated G6PC2 expression raises FBG and because chronically elevated FBG is detrimental to human health, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes, it is unclear why G6PC2 evolved. We show here that the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone strongly induces human G6PC2 promoter activity and endogenous G6PC2 expression in isolated human islets. Acute treatment with dexamethasone selectively induces endogenous G6pc2 expression in 129SvEv but not C57BL/6J mouse pancreas and isolated islets. The difference is due to a single nucleotide polymorphism in the C57BL/6J G6pc2 promoter that abolishes glucocorticoid receptor binding. In 6-hour fasted, nonstressed 129SvEv mice, deletion of G6pc2 lowers FBG. In response to the stress of repeated physical restraint, which is associated with elevated plasma glucocorticoid levels, G6pc2 gene expression is induced and the difference in FBG between wild-type and knockout mice is enhanced. These data suggest that G6PC2 may have evolved to modulate FBG in response to stress.

  9. Evaluation of the Interference of Hemoglobin Variant J-Bangkok on Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Measurement by Five Different Methods.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dong-Mei; Xu, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Wei-Jia; Zhang, Xiu-Ming; Suo, Ming-Huan; Zhang, De-Cai

    2017-09-20

    Objective The interference of the hemoglobin variant (Hb J-Bangkok) was evaluated on 4 different glycated hemoglobin assays and compared with a reference immuno assay. Methods An overall test of coincidence of 2 least-squares linear regression lines was performed to determine whether the presence of Hb J-Bangkok caused a statistically significant difference in HbA1c results compared with a reference immuno assay. Statistical analysis was performed on the difference of the estimated average glucose calculated from HbA1c values and fasting plasma glucose in the Hb J-Bangkok variant group using the different detection systems. Deming regression analysis was used to determinate whether Hb J-Bangkok had a significant interference on HbA1c results using an HbA1c±10% relative bias at 6% and 9% HbA1c as evaluation limits. Results Turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay method, and enzymatic methods were not affected by Hb J-Bangkok. However, Hb J-Bangkok showed statistically significant interference to the two ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography methods. Conclusion When performing HbA1c tests, clinical laboratory personnel should identify the Hb variant and select the appropriate methods or use alternative indicators. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. A prospective study of low fasting glucose with cardiovascular disease events and all-cause mortality: The Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Mongraw-Chaffin, Morgana; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Sears, Dorothy D; Garcia, Lorena; Phillips, Lawrence S; Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Zaslavsky, Oleg; Anderson, Cheryl A M

    2017-05-01

    While there is increasing recognition of the risks associated with hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes, few studies have investigated incident cause-specific cardiovascular outcomes with regard to low fasting glucose in the general population. We hypothesized that low fasting glucose would be associated with cardiovascular disease risk and all-cause mortality in postmenopausal women. To test our hypothesis, we used both continuous incidence rates and Cox proportional hazards models in 17,287 participants from the Women's Health Initiative with fasting glucose measured at baseline. Participants were separated into groups based on fasting glucose level: low (<80mg/dL), normal/reference (80-99mg/dL), impaired (100-125mg/dL), and diabetic (≥126mg/dL). Participants were free of cardiovascular disease at enrollment, had mean age of 62years, and were 52% Caucasian, 24% African American, 8% Asian, and 12% Hispanic. Median follow-up was 15years. Graphs of continuous incidence rates compared to fasting glucose distribution exhibited evidence of a weak J-shaped association with heart failure and mortality that was predominantly due to participants with treated diabetes. Impaired and diabetic fasting glucose were positively associated with all outcomes. Associations for low fasting glucose differed, with coronary heart disease (HR=0.64 (0.42, 0.98)) significantly inverse; stroke (0.73 (0.48, 1.13)), combined cardiovascular disease (0.91 (0.73, 1.14)), and all-cause mortality (0.97 (0.79, 1.20)) null or inverse and not significant; and heart failure (1.27 (0.80, 2.02)) positive and not significant. Fasting glucose at the upper range, but not the lower range, was significantly associated with incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Josée; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga; Saxena, Richa; Soranzo, Nicole; Jackson, Anne U; Wheeler, Eleanor; Glazer, Nicole L; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Gloyn, Anna L; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mägi, Reedik; Morris, Andrew P; Randall, Joshua; Johnson, Toby; Elliott, Paul; Rybin, Denis; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Henneman, Peter; Grallert, Harald; Dehghan, Abbas; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Franklin, Christopher S; Navarro, Pau; Song, Kijoung; Goel, Anuj; Perry, John R B; Egan, Josephine M; Lajunen, Taina; Grarup, Niels; Sparsø, Thomas; Doney, Alex; Voight, Benjamin F; Stringham, Heather M; Li, Man; Kanoni, Stavroula; Shrader, Peter; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Kumari, Meena; Qi, Lu; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gieger, Christian; Zabena, Carina; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Ingelsson, Erik; An, Ping; O’Connell, Jeffrey; Luan, Jian'an; Elliott, Amanda; McCarroll, Steven A; Payne, Felicity; Roccasecca, Rosa Maria; Pattou, François; Sethupathy, Praveen; Ardlie, Kristin; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Balkau, Beverley; Barter, Philip; Beilby, John P; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J; Bergmann, Sven; Bochud, Murielle; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Böttcher, Yvonne; Brunner, Eric; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan J M; Cooper, Matthew N; Cornelis, Marilyn; Crawford, Gabe; Crisponi, Laura; Day, Ian N M; de Geus, Eco; Delplanque, Jerome; Dina, Christian; Erdos, Michael R; Fedson, Annette C; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Forouhi, Nita G; Fox, Caroline S; Frants, Rune; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Galan, Pilar; Goodarzi, Mark O; Graessler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J; Grundy, Scott; Gwilliam, Rhian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hadjadj, Samy; Hallmans, Göran; Hammond, Naomi; Han, Xijing; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon C; Hercberg, Serge; Herder, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hillman, David R; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joe; Isomaa, Bo; Johnson, Paul R V; Jørgensen, Torben; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesaniemi, Y Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Knight, Beatrice; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Lathrop, G Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A; Le Bacquer, Olivier; Lecoeur, Cécile; Li, Yun; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mahley, Robert; Mangino, Massimo; Manning, Alisa K; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; McAteer, Jarred B; McCulloch, Laura J; McPherson, Ruth; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Meyre, David; Mitchell, Braxton D; Morken, Mario A; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Naitza, Silvia; Narisu, Narisu; Neville, Matthew J; Oostra, Ben A; Orrù, Marco; Pakyz, Ruth; Palmer, Colin N A; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Pattaro, Cristian; Pearson, Daniel; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Pichler, Irene; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Potter, Simon C; Pouta, Anneli; Province, Michael A; Psaty, Bruce M; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, Nigel W; Rice, Kenneth; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Sandbaek, Annelli; Sandhu, Manjinder; Sanna, Serena; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Scheet, Paul; Scott, Laura J; Seedorf, Udo; Sharp, Stephen J; Shields, Beverley; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Sijbrands, Erik J G; Silveira, Angela; Simpson, Laila; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Nicholas L; Sovio, Ulla; Swift, Amy; Syddall, Holly; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uitterlinden, André G; van Dijk, Ko Willems; van Hoek, Mandy; Varma, Dhiraj; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Waeber, Gérard; Wagner, Peter J; Walley, Andrew; Walters, G Bragi; Ward, Kim L; Watkins, Hugh; Weedon, Michael N; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witteman, Jaqueline C M; Yarnell, John W G; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zelenika, Diana; Zethelius, Björn; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zillikens, M Carola; Borecki, Ingrid B; Loos, Ruth J F; Meneton, Pierre; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Nathan, David M; Williams, Gordon H; Hattersley, Andrew T; Silander, Kaisa; Salomaa, Veikko; Smith, George Davey; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter; Spranger, Joachim; Karpe, Fredrik; Shuldiner, Alan R; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George V; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Morris, Andrew D; Lind, Lars; Palmer, Lyle J; Hu, Frank B.; Franks, Paul W; Ebrahim, Shah; Marmot, Michael; Kao, W H Linda; Pankow, James S; Sampson, Michael J; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Pramstaller, Peter Paul; Wichmann, H Erich; Illig, Thomas; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F; Stumvoll, Michael; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F; Hamsten, Anders; Bergman, Richard N; Buchanan, Thomas A; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Altshuler, David; Rotter, Jerome I; Siscovick, David S; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Boomsma, Dorret; Deloukas, Panos; Spector, Timothy D; Frayling, Timothy M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kong, Augustine; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Cao, Antonio; Scuteri, Angelo; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Waterworth, Dawn M; Vollenweider, Peter; Peltonen, Leena; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Wareham, Nicholas J; Sladek, Robert; Froguel, Philippe; Watanabe, Richard M; Meigs, James B; Groop, Leif; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I; Florez, Jose C; Barroso, Inês

    2010-01-01

    Circulating glucose levels are tightly regulated. To identify novel glycemic loci, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide associations studies informative for fasting glucose (FG), fasting insulin (FI) and indices of β-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in up to 46,186 non-diabetic participants. Follow-up of 25 loci in up to 76,558 additional subjects identified 16 loci associated with FG/HOMA-B and two associated with FI/HOMA-IR. These include nine new FG loci (in or near ADCY5, MADD, ADRA2A, CRY2, FADS1, GLIS3, SLC2A2, PROX1 and FAM148B) and one influencing FI/HOMA-IR (near IGF1). We also demonstrated association of ADCY5, PROX1, GCK, GCKR and DGKB/TMEM195 with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Within these loci, likely biological candidate genes influence signal transduction, cell proliferation, development, glucose-sensing and circadian regulation. Our results demonstrate that genetic studies of glycemic traits can identify T2D risk loci, as well as loci that elevate FG modestly, but do not cause overt diabetes. PMID:20081858

  12. Dysglycaemia and Other Predictors for Progression or Regression from Impaired Fasting Glucose to Diabetes or Normoglycaemia.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, L; Holloway, Kara L; Kotowicz, Mark A; Pasco, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a growing health problem worldwide. This study aimed to describe dysglycaemia and determine the impact of body composition and clinical and lifestyle factors on the risk of progression or regression from impaired fasting glucose (IFG) to diabetes or normoglycaemia in Australian women. This study included 1167 women, aged 20-94 years, enrolled in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors for progression to diabetes or regression to normoglycaemia (from IFG), over 10 years of follow-up. At baseline the proportion of women with IFG was 33.8% and 6.5% had diabetes. Those with fasting dysglycaemia had higher obesity-related factors, lower serum HDL cholesterol, and lower physical activity. Over a decade, the incidence of progression from IFG to diabetes was 18.1 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI, 10.7-28.2). Fasting plasma glucose and serum triglycerides were important factors in both progression to diabetes and regression to normoglycaemia. Our results show a transitional process; those with IFG had risk factors intermediate to normoglycaemics and those with diabetes. This investigation may help target interventions to those with IFG at high risk of progression to diabetes and thereby prevent cases of diabetes.

  13. Hemoglobin A1C above threshold levels are associated with decreased β-cell function in overweight Latino youth

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Corral, Claudia M.; Vargas, Lisa G.; Goran, Michael I.; Weigensberg, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine, in an overweight pediatric population, if an A1C-determined high risk, pre-diabetic state (A1C ≥6.0–6.4%) is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity and β-cell dysfunction, known factors in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Study design We divided 206 healthy overweight Latino adolescents (124 male/82 female; age 13.1±2.0 yrs), into 2 groups: Lower Risk (LR, n=179) had A1C <6.0%; and High Risk (HR, n=27) had A1C 6.0–6.4%. Measures included A1C; OGTT fasting & 2-hr glucose and insulin; insulin sensitivity (SI), acute insulin response (AIR), and disposition index (DI, an index of β-cell function) by frequently sampled FSIVGTT with minimal modeling. Body fat was determined by DEXA. Results Compared with the LR group, the HR group had 21% lower SI (1.21±0.06 vs. 1.54±0.13, p<0.05), 30% lower AIR (928±102 vs. 1342±56, p<0.01), and 31% lower DI (1390±146 vs. 2023±83, p=0.001) after adjusting for age and total percent body fat. Conclusion These data provide clear evidence of greater impairment of β-cell function in those overweight Latino children with A1C 6.0–6.4%, and would thereby support the adoption of the International Expert Committee A1C-determined definition of high risk state for overweight children at risk for type 2 diabetes. PMID:22137671

  14. Leptin and Fasting Regulate Rat Gastric Glucose-Regulated Protein 58

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Susana B.; Caminos, Jorge E.; González, Carmen R.; Vázquez, María J.; Garcés, María F.; Cepeda, Libia A.; García-Rendueles, María E. R.; Iglesias-Gamarra, Antonio; Gómez-Díaz, Consuelo; Lopez, Miguel; Castaño, Justo P.; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    The stomach secretes a wide range of peptides with essential metabolic functions, and thereby plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Disulfide isomerase glucose-regulated protein 58 (GRp58) is a molecular chaperone member of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling pathway, which is a marker for human gastric cancer. Since GRp58 seems to be regulated by a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pattern shift, we used the 2DE gel methodology and peptide mass fingerprinting-protein identification by means of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. We show that gastric mucosa GRp58 is dephosphorylated by fasting, and this effect is blunted when fasted rats are treated with leptin. Furthermore, we assessed the gene expression of GRp58 under different physiological settings known to be associated with energy homeostasis (fasting, leptin treatment and leptin deficiency). We found that intraperitoneal administration of leptin increases whereas leptin deficiency decreases GRp58 mRNA levels. However, GRp58 expression remains unchanged after fasting, indicating that leptin actions on GRp58 are no direct sensitivity to fasting. Dissection of the molecular pathways mediating the interactions between ER stress-related factors and nutrient availability, as well as their target genes, may open a new avenue for the study of obesity and other metabolic disorders. PMID:22121381

  15. [Evaluation of hearing loss parameters in workers and its relationship with fasting blood glucose levels].

    PubMed

    Vicente-Herrero, M Teofila; Lladosa Marco, Silvia; Ramírez-Iñiguez de La Torre, M Victoria; Terradillos-García, M Jesús; López-González, Ángel Arturo

    2014-05-01

    Hearing loss due to noise is considered within the prevention plans of the most common occupational diseases. In addition to evaluation of working conditions, other personal factors increasing the risk of hypoacusis, such as diabetes, should be taken into account. To explore hearing loss in the workplace and its relationship to impaired fasting baseline blood glucose levels. An observational, cross-sectional study enrolling 1636 workers from service companies was conducted. Full audiometric evaluation was performed at different frequencies: high frequency (HF), early loss index (ELI), speech average loss (SAL), and monaural and binaural loss. Results were categorized by baseline blood glucose levels: G1 (<100mg/dl), G2 (100-125mg/dl), and G3 (>125mg/dl). Based on both HF and ELI, 11% of workers had clear indication of deafness. Women with G3 levels showed significant differences in the results of HF and ELI indexes as compared to the G1 group (P=.038 and .046, respectively). A positive association was found between hearing loss and G3 blood glucose levels in HF (OR: .338; p=.002), ELI (OR: .407; p=.007), and the monaural test in the left ear (OR: 4.77×10-5; p=.006). Despite the methodological limitations of this study, there is evidence for an increased risk of high frequency hearing loss in workers with high baseline blood glucose levels. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Lipoprotein lipase in human milk: compartmentalization and effect of fasting, insulin, and glucose.

    PubMed

    Neville, M C; Waxman, L J; Jensen, D; Eckel, R H

    1991-02-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the effect of maternal metabolic state on the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in human milk. Although the total LPL activity in milk was not significantly affected by up to three cycles of freezing and thawing, the amount of LPL associated with the cream fraction of the milk increased from an average of less than 10% to about 70% after this treatment. The enzyme was relatively stable when the milk was stored on ice, losing activity at a rate of about 1% per hour. At 37 degrees C degradation was more rapid, about 7% per hour. When LPL activity was measured in samples taken at hourly intervals by breast pump, using oxytocin to achieve a complete letdown at each pumping, activity was found to double from the first to the third pumping. Thereafter the activity was stable under fasting conditions. Hyperglycemic and euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp protocols were used to evaluate the effects of glucose and insulin. Both high plasma glucose and high plasma insulin in the presence of normal glucose significantly increased LPL activity within 4 hours. We conclude that, like adipose, tissue LPL, mammary LPL is regulated by plasma insulin.

  17. Fast and Quantitative T1ρ-weighted Dynamic Glucose Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schuenke, Patrick; Paech, Daniel; Koehler, Christina; Windschuh, Johannes; Bachert, Peter; Ladd, Mark E.; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Radbruch, Alexander; Zaiss, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    Common medical imaging techniques usually employ contrast agents that are chemically labeled, e.g. with radioisotopes in the case of PET, iodine in the case of CT or paramagnetic metals in the case of MRI to visualize the heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment. Recently, it was shown that natural unlabeled D-glucose can be used as a nontoxic biodegradable contrast agent in Chemical Exchange sensitive Spin-Lock (CESL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect the glucose uptake and potentially the metabolism of tumors. As an important step to fulfill the clinical needs for practicability, reproducibility and imaging speed we present here a robust and quantitative T1ρ-weighted technique for dynamic glucose enhanced MRI (DGE-MRI) with a temporal resolution of less than 7 seconds. Applied to a brain tumor patient, the new technique provided a distinct DGE contrast between tumor and healthy brain tissue and showed the detailed dynamics of the glucose enhancement after intravenous injection. Development of this fast and quantitative DGE-MRI technique allows for a more detailed analysis of DGE correlations in the future and potentially enables non-invasive diagnosis, staging and monitoring of tumor response to therapy. PMID:28169369

  18. [Prognostic value of first fasting glucose measurement compared with admission glucose level in patients with acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vivas, David; García-Rubira, Juan C; González-Ferrer, Juan J; Núñez-Gil, Iván; del Prado, Náyade; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos

    2008-05-01

    The admission plasma glucose (APG) level is a recognized prognostic factor in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, little is known about the prognostic value of the first fasting plasma glucose (FPG) measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of the first FPG measurement relative to that of the APG level in patients with ACS. The study involved 547 consecutive patients who were admitted to our center with a diagnosis of ACS in 2006. Patients were divided into three groups according to their first FPG or APG level (i.e., <126 mg/dL, 126-200 mg/dL, or >200 mg/dL). The primary endpoint was the combined outcome of death or reinfarction during hospitalization. The primary endpoint was observed in 46 patients, 25 of whom died. Patients in this group were older, were more often diabetics or smokers, more often had had a prior myocardial infarction, were in a higher admission Killip class, showed more than one vessel disease on catheterization, had a lower left ventricular ejection fraction, and had higher admission creatinine, APG, and first FPG levels. Multivariate analysis, adjusted for previously identified factors, revealed that the first FPG level was an independent risk factor for death or reinfarction (126-200 mg/dL, odds ratio [OR]=5.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-25.45; >200 mg/dL, OR=6.66; 95% CI, 2.05-21.63), but that the APG level was not (126-200 mg/dL, OR=0.84; 95% CI, 0.63-1.05; >200 mg/dL, OR=1.14; 95% CI, 0.29-4.51). The first FPG level was found to be a better predictor of an adverse outcome (i.e., death or reinfarction) during hospitalization in ACS patients than the APG level.

  19. High glucose selectivity in pressurized water hydrolysis of cellulose using ultra-fast reactors.

    PubMed

    Cantero, Danilo A; Dolores Bermejo, M; José Cocero, M

    2013-05-01

    A new reactor was developed for the selective hydrolysis of cellulose. In this study, the glucose selectivity obtained from cellulose was improved by using ultra-fast reactions in which a selective medium was combined with an effective residence time control. A selective production of glucose, fructose and cellobiose (50%) or total mono-oligo saccharides (>96%) was obtained from the cellulose in a reaction time of 0.03 s. Total cellulose conversion was achieved with a 5-hydroxymethylfural concentration lower than 5 ppm in a novel micro-reactor. Reducing the residence time from minutes to milliseconds opens the possibility of moving from the conventional m(3) to cm(3) reactor volumes.

  20. Impact of diabetes duration on achieved reductions in glycated haemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose and body weight with liraglutide treatment for up to 28 weeks: a meta‐analysis of seven phase III trials

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, T.; Barkholt Christensen, S.; Nauck, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    This meta‐analysis of seven randomized, placebo‐controlled studies (total 3222 patients) evaluated whether type 2 diabetes (T2D) duration affects the changes in blood glucose control and body weight that can be achieved with liraglutide and placebo. With liraglutide 1.2 mg, shorter diabetes duration was associated with a significantly greater, but clinically non‐relevant, difference in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction (p < 0.05), i.e. a 0.18% (1.96 mmol/mol) reduction in HbA1c per 10 years shorter diabetes duration. With liraglutide 1.8 mg, shorter diabetes duration was associated with a small but statistically significant trend for greater fasting plasma glucose (FPG) reduction (p < 0.05), i.e. a 0.38 mmol/l reduction in FPG per 10 years shorter diabetes duration. Neither the liraglutide 1.8 mg nor placebo results showed a significant association between HbA1c and diabetes duration and neither the liraglutide 1.2 mg nor placebo results showed a significant association between FPG and diabetes duration. Likewise, neither liraglutide nor placebo showed a significant association between change in weight and diabetes duration. These results suggest diabetes duration has a clinically negligible effect on achievable blood glucose control and weight outcomes with liraglutide and placebo in patients with T2D. PMID:26679282

  1. Impact of the Bienestar School-Based Diabetes Mellitus Prevention Program on Fasting Capillary Glucose Levels

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Roberto P.; Yin, Zenong; Hernandez, Arthur; Hale, Daniel E.; Garcia, Oralia A.; Mobley, Connie

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a school-based diabetes mellitus prevention program on low-income fourth-grade Mexican American children. Design A randomized controlled trial with 13 intervention and 14 control schools. Setting Elementary schools in inner-city neighborhoods in San Antonio, Tex. Participants Eighty percent of participants were Mexican American and 94% were from economically disadvantaged households. Baseline and follow-up measures were collected from 1419 (713 intervention and 706 control) and 1221 (619 intervention and 602 control) fourth-grade children, respectively. Intervention The Bienestar Health Program consists of a health class and physical education curriculum, a family program, a school cafeteria program, and an after-school health club. The objectives are to decrease dietary saturated fat intake, increase dietary fiber intake, and increase physical activity. Main Outcome Measures The primary end point was fasting capillary glucose level, and the secondary end points were percentage of body fat, physical fitness level, dietary fiber intake, and dietary saturated fat intake. Fasting capillary glucose level, bioelectric impedance, modified Harvard step test, three 24-hour dietary recalls, weight, and height were collected at baseline and 8 months later. Results Children in the intervention arm attended an average of 32 Bienestar sessions. Mean fasting capillary glucose levels decreased in intervention schools and increased in control schools after adjusting for covariates (−2.24 mg/dL [0.12 mmol/L]; 95% confidence interval, −6.53 to 2.05 [−0.36 to 0.11 mmol/L]; P = .03). Fitness scores (P = .04) and dietary fiber intake (P = .009) significantly increased in intervention children and decreased in control children. Percentage of body fat (P = .56) and dietary saturated fat intake (P = .52) did not differ significantly between intervention and control children. Conclusion This intervention showed some positive results, but additional

  2. The Body Mass Index, Blood Pressure, and Fasting Blood Glucose in Patients With Methamphetamine Dependence.

    PubMed

    Lv, Dezhao; Zhang, Meijuan; Jin, Xuru; Zhao, Jiyun; Han, Bin; Su, Hang; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Xiangyang; Ren, Wenwei; He, Jincai

    2016-03-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a prevalently abused psychostimulant in the world. Previously published studies and case reports indicated potential associations between MA and body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular factors (eg, blood pressure and fasting blood glucose). However, these associations have not been studied clearly. This study aimed to investigate BMI and cardiovascular factors in the MA-dependent patients.A total of 1019 MA-dependent patients were recruited between February 2, 2008 and March 11, 2013. A case report was used to gather information on sociocharacteristics and drug-dependent history. Meanwhile, a number of 1019 age- and sex-matched controls' information were collected from the physical examination center. We measured BMI, blood pressure, and fasting blood glucose among the participants.MA-dependent patients had significantly lower BMI (20.4 ± 0.1 vs 23.9 ± 0.1 kg/m, P < 0.001), lower fasting blood glucose (5.0 ± 0.01 vs 5.2 ± 0.01 mmol/L, P < 0.001) and higher systolic blood pressure (122.1 ± 0.4 vs 114.8 ± 0.4 mmHg, P < 0.001) compared with the control group after adjustment of possible confounders. Additional, we only found the duration of MA use was independently associated with BMI (B = -0.08, P = 0.04).This study demonstrated that MA dependence was associated with BMI and cardiovascular factors. In addition, we found a negative association between duration of MA use and BMI.

  3. Simple Fabrication of a Highly Sensitive and Fast Glucose Biosensor using Enzyme Immobilized in Mesocellular Carbon Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dohoon; Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Jungbae; Kim, Jaeyun; Na, Hyon Bin; Kim, Bokie; Shin, Chae-Ho; Kwak, Ja Hun; Dohnalkova, Alice; Grate, Jay W.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Hak Sung

    2005-12-05

    We fabricated a highly sensitive and fast glucose biosensor by simply immobilizing glucose oxidase in mesocellular carbon foam. Due to its unique structure, the MSU-F-C enabled high enzyme loading without serious mass transfer limitation, resulting in high catalytic efficiency. As a result, the glucose biosensor fabricated with MSU-F-C/GOx showed a high sensitivity and fast response. Given these results and the inherent electrical conductivity, we anticipate that MSU-F-C will make a useful matrix for enzyme immobilization in various biocatalytic and electrobiocatalytic applications.

  4. Fasting plasma glucose as a screening test for gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Mukesh M; Dhatt, Gurdeep S

    2007-02-01

    Although debated, most preeminent expert panels recommend routine screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Among the many tests that have been used and evaluated for the screening of GDM, the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) remains very appealing. It is easy to administer, well tolerated, inexpensive, reproducible and patient friendly. However attractive, the FPG has given varied results in different populations and its use as a screening test for GDM remains uncertain. This review will objectively assess the available studies to find the real value of FPG as a screening test for GDM.

  5. Derivation and validation of an HbA1c optimal cutoff for diagnosing prediabetes in a South African mixed ancestry population.

    PubMed

    Zemlin, Annalise E; Matsha, Tandi E; Kengne, Andre P; Erasmus, Rajiv T

    2015-08-25

    Prediabetes compromises impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance and is a high risk for future diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Traditional diagnostic methods involve a fasting sample or oral glucose tolerance test, which is cumbersome, time-consuming and inconvenient. An HbA1c-based approach has been incorporated into new guidelines, but cut-offs may vary and have not been defined for all population groups. We derived and validated HbA1c cut-offs to diagnose prediabetes in mixed ancestry South Africans. Participants were 667 (derivation sample), 234 (validation sample 1) and 674 (validation sample 2) diabetes-free individuals. They underwent standard 2-hour OGTT with HbA1c test. Receiver-operator characteristic curves were used to determine optimal HbA1c cut-off to predict prediabetes. A total of 27.7% participants in the derivation sample had prediabetes versus 17.5% (validation sample 1) and 15.4% (validation sample 2). The optimal cut-off was 5.75% in all three cohorts with sensitivity and specificity of 64.8% and 60.4% in combined derivation and validation sample 1, and 59.6% and 69.8% in validation sample 2. The discriminatory capacity of HbA1c for predicting prediabetes in this population is modest at the derived cut-off. The use of HbA1c alone in this setting may result in an inaccurate diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Incretin action maintains insulin secretion, but not hepatic insulin action, in people with impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Leigh; Man, Chiara Dalla; Hunerdosse, Devon M; Cobelli, Claudio; Bergman, Bryan C

    2010-10-01

    To determine whether altered GLP-1 activity contributes to the abnormal endogenous glucose production (EGP) and insulin secretion characteristic of people with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). People with IFG (n=10) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n=13) underwent assessment of EGP (via [6,6-(2)H(2)]-glucose infusion). Parameters of whole body insulin action and secretion were estimated by IVGTT and OGTT. Measures of EGP and insulin secretion were made before and after sitagliptin administration. EGP was not different at baseline (glucose R(a); 1.47+/-0.08 vs. 1.46+/-0.05mg/kg/min, IFG vs. NGT, p=0.93). However, when differences in circulating insulin were accounted for (EGPXSSPI; 20.2+/-2.1 vs. 14.4+/-1.0AU, vs. NGT, p=0.03) the hepatic insulin resistance index was significantly higher in IFG. Baseline insulin action (S(i); 2.3+/-0.1x10(-4)/microU/ml vs. 3.5+/-0.4x10(-4)/microU/ml, p=0.01, IFG vs. NGT) and secretion (DI; 587+/-81x10(-4)/min vs. 1171+/-226x10(-4)/min, p=0.04, IFG vs. NGT) were impaired in IFG when evaluated by the IVGTT, but not by OGTT (insulin sensitivity 4.52+/-1.08x10(-4)dl/kg/min vs. 6.73+/-1.16x10(-4)dl/kg/min, IFG vs. NGT, p=0.16; indices of basal (Phi(b)), static (Phi(s)), dynamic (Phi(d)), and total (Phi(t)) insulin secretion, p>0.07). Sitagliptin did not change EGP or insulin secretion in either group. Incretin action maintained insulin secretion, but not hepatic insulin action, in people with IFG.

  7. Diagnostic efficiency of hemoglobin A1c for newly diagnosed diabetes and prediabetes in community-based Chinese adults aged 40 years or older.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kai; Sun, Yu; Li, Wen-juan; Zhang, Xiu-ping; Li, Cheng-qiao; Yang, Wei-fang; Ma, Ze-qiang; Ma, Ai-xia; Zheng, Hui-zhen; Song, Jun; Lin, Peng; Hou, Xin-guo; Chen, Li

    2014-12-01

    Europeans and Americans are gradually accepting the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) threshold of 6.5% for diagnosing diabetes proposed by the American Diabetes Association, but the cutoff of HbA1c for the Chinese population is unclear. We evaluated the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c for diagnosing newly diagnosed diabetes and prediabetes in community-based Chinese adults 40 years of age or older. In this study 8,239 subjects (5,496 women) 40-90 years of age underwent HbA1c and oral glucose tolerance test measurement after an overnight fast. Diabetes and prediabetes were defined by the World Health Organization criteria. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c, and the optimal cutoff was defined as the point on the receiver operating characteristic curve with the largest Youden index. Spearman correlation was used for correlation analysis. The prevalence of newly diagnosed diabetes and prediabetes was 10.7% (880/8,239) and 19.0% (1,564/8,239), respectively. Fasting plasma glucose and postprandial plasma glucose were positively correlated with HbA1c level (r=0.725 and r=0.673, both P<0.001, respectively). For diagnosing diabetes, the AUC was 0.857 (95% confidence interval, 0.841-0.873), and the optimal cutoff for HbA1c was 6.3%, with the largest Youden index being 0.581. For diagnosing prediabetes, the AUC was 0.681 (95% confidence interval, 0.666-0.697), and the optimal cutoff for HbA1c was 5.9%, with the largest Youden index being 0.280. An HbA1c threshold of 6.3% was highly valuable for diagnosing newly diagnosed diabetes, and a value of 5.9% was weakly valuable for diagnosing prediabetes in community-based Chinese adults 40 years of age or older.

  8. Fasting, non-fasting glucose and HDL dysfunction in risk of pre-diabetes, diabetes, and coronary disease in non-diabetic adults.

    PubMed

    Onat, Altan; Can, Günay; Çiçek, Gökhan; Ayhan, Erkan; Doğan, Yüksel; Kaya, Hasan

    2013-08-01

    We determined in non-diabetic persons the risk of fasting and non-fasting glucose levels for pre-diabetes, diabetes, and coronary heart disease (CHD), including the roles of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and HDL cholesterol, and delineated risk profiles of the pre-diabetic states. Over 7¼ years, 2,619 middle-aged Turkish adults free of diabetes and CHD were studied prospectively. Using different serum glucose categories including impaired fasting glucose (IFG, 6.1-6.97 mmol/L) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), outcomes were analyzed by Cox regression. IFG was identified at baseline in 112 and IGT in 33 participants. Metabolic syndrome components distinguished individuals with IFG from those with normoglycemia. Participants with IGT tended to differ from adults in normal postprandial glucose categories in regard to high levels of triglycerides, apoA-I, and CRP. Diabetes risk, adjusted for sex, age, waist circumference, CRP, and HDL cholesterol, commenced at a fasting 5.6-6.1 mmol/L threshold, was fourfold at levels 6.1-6.97 mmol/L. Optimal glucose values regarding CHD risk were 5.0-6.1 mmol/L. Fasting and postprandial glucose values were not related to CHD risk in men; IGT alone predicted risk in women (HR 3.74 [1.16;12.0]), independent of age, systolic blood pressure, non-HDL cholesterol, waist circumference, smoking status, and CRP. HDL cholesterol was unrelated to the development of IFG, IGT, and diabetes, while CRP elevation independently predicted the development of diabetes. IGT independently predicts CHD risk, especially in women. HDL dysfunction associated with low-grade inflammation is a co-determinant of pre-diabetic states and their progression to diabetes.

  9. Fasting Glucose and the Risk of Depressive Symptoms: Instrumental-Variable Regression in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

    PubMed

    Wesołowska, Karolina; Elovainio, Marko; Hintsa, Taina; Jokela, Markus; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Pitkänen, Niina; Lipsanen, Jari; Tukiainen, Janne; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Juonala, Markus; Raitakari, Olli; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2017-08-04

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been associated with depressive symptoms, but the causal direction of this association and the underlying mechanisms, such as increased glucose levels, remain unclear. We used instrumental-variable regression with a genetic instrument (Mendelian randomization) to examine a causal role of increased glucose concentrations in the development of depressive symptoms. Data were from the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (n = 1217). Depressive symptoms were assessed in 2012 using a modified Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-I). Fasting glucose was measured concurrently with depressive symptoms. A genetic risk score for fasting glucose (with 35 single nucleotide polymorphisms) was used as an instrumental variable for glucose. Glucose was not associated with depressive symptoms in the standard linear regression (B = -0.04, 95% CI [-0.12, 0.04], p = .34), but the instrumental-variable regression showed an inverse association between glucose and depressive symptoms (B = -0.43, 95% CI [-0.79, -0.07], p = .020). The difference between the estimates of standard linear regression and instrumental-variable regression was significant (p = .026) CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the association between T2D and depressive symptoms is unlikely to be caused by increased glucose concentrations. It seems possible that T2D might be linked to depressive symptoms due to low glucose levels.

  10. Effects of pre-germinated brown rice on blood glucose and lipid levels in free-living patients with impaired fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Fang; Kise, Mitsuo; Wang, Ming-Fu; Ito, Yukihiko; Yang, Mei-Due; Aoto, Hiromichi; Yoshihara, Rie; Yokoyama, Jyunichi; Kunii, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Shigeru

    2008-04-01

    White rice (WR) is made by polishing brown rice (BR) and has lost various nutrients; however, most people prefer it to BR, maybe because of the hardness of BR. Pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) improves the problem of BR. It is made by soaking BR kernels in water to germinate and becomes softer than BR. In this study we compared the effects of WR and PGBR on blood glucose and lipid concentrations in the impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes patients. Six men and 5 women with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to 6 wk on WR or PGBR diet separated by a 2 wk washout interval in a crossover design. Each subject was instructed to consume 3 packs of cooked WR or PGBR (180 g/pack) daily in each intervention phase. Blood samples were collected 4 times (in study weeks 0, 6, 8 and 14) for biochemical examination. Blood concentrations of fasting blood glucose, fructosamine, serum total cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were favorably improved on the PGBR diet (p<0.01), but not on the WR diet. The present results suggest that diets including PGBR may be useful to control blood glucose level.

  11. Dietary Fatty Acids Differentially Associate with Fasting Versus 2-Hour Glucose Homeostasis: Implications for The Management of Subtypes of Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Nicola; Perreault, Leigh; Kerege, Anna; Strauss, Allison; Bergman, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Over-nutrition has fuelled the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, but the role of individual macronutrients to the diabetogenic process is not well delineated. We aimed to examine the impact of dietary fatty acid intake on fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose concentrations, as well as tissue-specific insulin action governing each. Normoglycemic controls (n = 15), athletes (n = 14), and obese (n = 23), as well as people with prediabetes (n = 10) and type 2 diabetes (n = 11), were queried about their habitual diet using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. All subjects were screened by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and studied using the hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp with infusion of 6,62H2-glucose. Multiple regression was performed to examine relationships between dietary fat intake and 1) fasting plasma glucose, 2) % suppression of endogenous glucose production, 3) 2-hour post-OGTT plasma glucose, and 4) skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (glucose rate of disappearance (Rd) and non-oxidative glucose disposal (NOGD)). The %kcal from saturated fat (SFA) was positively associated with fasting (β = 0.303, P = 0.018) and 2-hour plasma glucose (β = 0.415, P<0.001), and negatively related to % suppression of hepatic glucose production (β = -0.245, P = 0.049), clamp Rd (β = -0.256, P = 0.001) and NOGD (β = -0.257, P = 0.001). The %kcal from trans fat was also negatively related to clamp Rd (β = -0.209, P = 0.008) and NOGD (β = -0.210, P = 0.008). In contrast, the %kcal from polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) was negatively associated with 2-hour glucose levels (β = -0.383, P = 0.001), and positively related to Rd (β = 0.253, P = 0.007) and NOGD (β = 0.246, P = 0.008). Dietary advice to prevent diabetes should consider the underlying pathophysiology of the prediabetic state. PMID:26999667

  12. Nanometal-decorated exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet based glucose biosensors with high sensitivity and fast response.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jue; Do, Inhwan; Drzal, Lawrence T; Worden, Robert M; Lee, Ilsoon

    2008-09-23

    We report the novel fabrication of a highly sensitive, selective, fast responding, and affordable amperometric glucose biosensor using exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnPs) decorated with Pt and Pd nanoparticles. Nafion was used to solubilize metal-decorated graphite nanoplatelets, and a simple cast method with high content organic solvent (85 wt %) was used to prepare the biosensors. The addition of precious metal nanoparticles such as platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) to xGnP increased the electroactive area of the electrode and substantially decreased the overpotential in the detection of hydrogen peroxide. The Pt-xGnP glucose biosensor had a sensitivity of 61.5+/-0.6 microA/(mM x cm(2)) and gave a linear response up to 20 mM. The response time and detection limit (S/N=3) were determined to be 2 s and 1 microM, respectively. Therefore, this novel glucose biosensor based on the Pt nanoparticle coated xGnP is among the best reported to date in both sensing performance and production cost. In addition, the effects of metal nanoparticle loading and the particle size on the biosensor performance were systematically investigated.

  13. Serum high-molecular weight adiponectin decreases abruptly after an oral glucose load in subjects with normal glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose, but not those with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Noriyuki; Hara, Kenji; Yatsuka, Chikako; Nakano, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Suetsugu, Mariko; Nakamachi, Takafumi; Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko; Haruki, Kohsuke; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2009-10-01

    Adiponectin exists in the blood as 3 forms, which are a trimer, a hexamer, and a high-molecular weight (HMW) form. We investigated whether circulating HMW adiponectin levels were altered by oral glucose or fat ingestion. Forty male subjects underwent a 75-g oral glucose loading test (OGTT), and 11 healthy subjects (5 women and 6 men) received a fat loading test. Serum levels of HMW and total adiponectin were measured during the OGTT and the fat loading test. The fat loading test was performed for at least 8 hours. Among the 40 male subjects, 11 had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 9 had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 11 had impaired glucose tolerance, and 9 had diabetes mellitus (DM). In all 40 subjects, the serum total adiponectin level did not change significantly, whereas serum HMW adiponectin decreased significantly after a glucose load and reached 92.2% of the basal level at 120 minutes after the OGTT (P < .01). The HMW to total adiponectin ratio decreased significantly from 0.47 +/- 0.15 at baseline to 0.43 +/- 0.13 at 120 minutes after a glucose load (P < .05). Serum HMW adiponectin measured at 120 minutes after the OGTT decreased significantly to 86.0% and 85.6% of the basal level in subjects with NGT or IFG, respectively (both P < .01). In subjects with impaired glucose tolerance or DM, however, serum HMW adiponectin did not change. The area under the curve for insulin at 30 minutes after a glucose load during the OGTT was significantly larger in subjects with NGT or IFG than in those with DM (P < .05). In addition, the insulinogenic index (DeltaI(0-30)/DeltaG(0-30)) was significantly higher in subjects with NGT or IFG than in those with DM (P < .001). Percentage changes in serum HMW adiponectin of the baseline at 120 minutes correlated negatively with those in serum insulin (r = -0.468, P = .0023), but not plasma glucose, of the baseline at 30 minutes in 40 subjects. On the other hand, serum triglycerides increased significantly after an oral fat load in

  14. Association of leisure time physical activity and abdominal obesity with fasting serum insulin and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Borodulin, K; Tuomilehto, J; Peltonen, M; Lakka, T A; Sundvall, J; Jousilahti, P

    2006-09-01

    We investigated the joint associations of leisure time physical activity and abdominal obesity with fasting insulin and 2-h glucose levels and with the risk of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and Type 2 diabetes (Type 2 DM). A cross-sectional population-based random sample of 1812 Finnish adults 45-74 years of age without a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Relative energy expenditure during the previous 12 months (METh/week), assessed by a questionnaire, was used as a measure of leisure time physical activity. Waist-hip ratio (WHR) was used as a measure of abdominal obesity. IGT and Type 2 DM were assessed by a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test and were defined according to the World Health Organization guidelines. While 2-h glucose and fasting insulin levels increased with increasing WHR (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively), both of them decreased with increasing physical activity (P = 0.015 and P < 0.001, respectively). The highest 2-h glucose and fasting insulin levels were found among individuals who had most abdominal obesity and were least physically active. Physically inactive individuals had a higher prevalence of IGT and Type 2 DM in all WHR tertiles than physically active persons. Higher levels of leisure time physical activity are associated with lower 2-h glucose and fasting insulin levels and a reduced risk of having IGT and Type 2 DM, independent of the level of abdominal obesity.

  15. Lack of agreement between the revised criteria of impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance in children with excess body weight.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Rita; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Morán-Villota, Segundo; Barradas-González, Rosalinda; Herrera-Márquez, Rocio; Cruz López, Miguel; Kumate, Jesus; Wacher, Niels H

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the agreement between impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) in children with excess body weight using the original and the revised definitions of IFG. Obese and overweight children aged 4-17 years were included (n = 533). Anthropometric parameters and biochemical tests (fasting and 2-h glucose tests after an oral glucose load [1.75 g/kg]) were performed. Case subjects with a fasting plasma glucose >/=126 mg/dl were excluded. The diagnostic parameters of the original and the revised definitions of IFG for detecting IGT were estimated. The analysis of agreement between these categories was made using the kappa test. The prevalence of IFG increased from 6.2 to 13.3% using the new criteria. The prevalence of IFG became closer to the prevalence of IGT (14.8%). The revised criteria increased the sensitivity from 26.6 to 36.7%. However, the new IFG definition was not useful for identifying IGT cases. Of the 71 case subjects with IFG, only 29 (40.8%) had IGT. In addition, 50 case subjects with IGT (9.4%) and 13 with diabetes (2.4%) had a fasting glycemia <100 mg/dl. A poor agreement was found between the 2003 IFG definition and abnormal 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose (kappa = 0.359). The proportion of false-positive cases increased (36.3-59.1%) under the new definition. The new definition modestly increases the sensitivity of IFG for detecting IGT in children with excess body weight. Despite this, more than one-half of these cases are not detected. In addition, the false-positive rate was increased by 61%.

  16. Fasting plasma glucose and serum lipids in patients with primary aldosteronism: a controlled cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Matrozova, Joanna; Steichen, Olivier; Amar, Laurence; Zacharieva, Sabina; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François

    2009-04-01

    An association between primary aldosteronism and metabolism disorders has been reported. The aim of this retrospective study was to test for this association by comparison between large cohorts of patients with primary aldosteronism and with essential hypertension. We retrieved the records of 460 cases with primary aldosteronism (103 lateralized, 150 not lateralized, and 207 undetermined) and of 1363 controls with essential hypertension individually matched for age and sex. We compared clinical history; blood pressure levels; body mass index; levels of fasting plasma glucose and serum triglycerides; total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose among subtypes of primary aldosteronism, as well as between cases with primary aldosteronism and their matched controls. Fasting plasma glucose and serum lipid levels did not differ among the 3 subtypes of primary aldosteronism. The prevalence of impaired fasting glucose was lower in patients with primary aldosteronism than their matched controls, but the prevalence of hyperglycemia (impaired fasting glucose or diabetes mellitus) and blood levels of glucose and lipids did not differ between cases and controls. There was no significant difference between preoperative and postoperative levels of either fasting plasma glucose or serum lipids in patients who underwent adrenalectomy and had follow-up data available. The analysis of this large group of patients with primary aldosteronism and essential hypertension does not confirm a higher prevalence of carbohydrate or lipid metabolism disorders in the former. It is unlikely that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome differs significantly between patients with primary aldosteronism and those with essential hypertension.

  17. Relationship between maternal fasting glucose levels at 4-12 gestational weeks and offspring growth and development in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ling; Liu, Enqing; Guo, Jia; Pan, Lei; Li, Baojuan; Leng, Junhong; Zhang, Cuiping; Zhang, Yu; Li, Nan; Hu, Gang

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the association of maternal fasting glucose levels at 4-12 gestational weeks with anthropometry in the offspring from birth to 12 months in Tianjin, China. A total of 57,454 pregnant women underwent a fasting glucose test during the first trimester, and their children had body weight/length measured from birth to 12 months of age. Maternal fasting glucose concentrations at 4-12 gestational weeks were positively associated with Z scores for birth weight, birth length, birth weight for length, and birth body mass index (BMI). Infants born to mothers with fasting glucose concentrations ≥126mg/dL (7.0mmol/l) had had the highest mean Z scores for birth weight, birth length, birth weight for length and birth BMI for gestational age, and the lowest mean Z scores for weight and length for age at months 3, 6, 9, and 12, the smallest changes in Z scores for weight for age, weight for length, and BMI for age from birth to month 3, and largest changes in Z scores for weight for age, and BMI for age after 6 months. Higher maternal fasting glucose during pregnancy was associated with larger birth weight and birth length, less weight gain and length gain in the first 3 months of life, and more weight gain in months 6-12 of life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of Postbreakfast Triglyceride and Visit-to-Visit Annual Variation of Fasting Plasma Glucose with Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Kaori; Takenouchi, Akiko; Tsuboi, Ayaka; Fukuo, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured at baseline and after a median follow-up of 6.0 years in 161 patients with type 2 diabetes. Intrapersonal means and SD of HbA1c, systolic BP, fasting, and postmeal plasma glucose (FPG and PMPG, resp.) and serum triglycerides (FTG and PMTG, resp.) were calculated in each patient during the first 12 months after enrollment. Associations of these variables with nephropathy progression (15 patients with progression of albuminuric stages and 5 with ACR doubling within the microalbuminuric range) were determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis providing odds ratio with 95% confidential interval. Patients with nephropathy progression, compared with those without nephropathy progression, had higher HbA1c (p < 0.01). They also had higher means and SD of FPG (both p < 0.05), FTG (both p < 0.05), and PMTG (p = 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that SD-FPG (1.036, 1.001–1.073, p = 0.04) and PMTG (1.013, 1.008–1.040, p = 0.001) were significant predictors of progression of nephropathy even after adjustment for mean FPG and SD-FTG, age, sex, BMI, waist circumference, diabetes duration and therapy, means and SDs of HbA1c, PPG, FTG and systolic BP, baseline ACR, smoking status, and uses of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medications. Consistency of glycemic control and management of postmeal TG may be important to prevent nephropathy progression in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:27975066

  19. Association of Postbreakfast Triglyceride and Visit-to-Visit Annual Variation of Fasting Plasma Glucose with Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Kaori; Takenouchi, Akiko; Tsuboi, Ayaka; Fukuo, Keisuke; Kazumi, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured at baseline and after a median follow-up of 6.0 years in 161 patients with type 2 diabetes. Intrapersonal means and SD of HbA1c, systolic BP, fasting, and postmeal plasma glucose (FPG and PMPG, resp.) and serum triglycerides (FTG and PMTG, resp.) were calculated in each patient during the first 12 months after enrollment. Associations of these variables with nephropathy progression (15 patients with progression of albuminuric stages and 5 with ACR doubling within the microalbuminuric range) were determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis providing odds ratio with 95% confidential interval. Patients with nephropathy progression, compared with those without nephropathy progression, had higher HbA1c (p < 0.01). They also had higher means and SD of FPG (both p < 0.05), FTG (both p < 0.05), and PMTG (p = 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that SD-FPG (1.036, 1.001-1.073, p = 0.04) and PMTG (1.013, 1.008-1.040, p = 0.001) were significant predictors of progression of nephropathy even after adjustment for mean FPG and SD-FTG, age, sex, BMI, waist circumference, diabetes duration and therapy, means and SDs of HbA1c, PPG, FTG and systolic BP, baseline ACR, smoking status, and uses of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medications. Consistency of glycemic control and management of postmeal TG may be important to prevent nephropathy progression in type 2 diabetic patients.

  20. Visceral, subcutaneous abdominal adiposity and liver fat content distribution in normal glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Borel, A L; Nazare, J A; Smith, J; Aschner, P; Barter, P; Van Gaal, L; Eng Tan, C; Wittchen, H U; Matsuzawa, Y; Kadowaki, T; Ross, R; Brulle-Wohlhueter, C; Alméras, N; Haffner, S M; Balkau, B; Després, J P

    2015-03-01

    To examine the specific distribution of liver fat content, visceral and subcutaneous adiposity in normal glucose tolerance (NGT/NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (iIFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (iIGT) and combined conditions (IFG+IGT), as well as with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (nT2D). Multicenter, international observational study: cross-sectional analysis. Two thousand five hundred and fifteen patients (50.0% women, 54.5% non-Caucasian) without previously known diabetes were recruited from 29 countries. Abdominal fat distribution was measured by computed tomography (CT). Liver fat was estimated using the CT-liver mean attenuation. Compared with NGT/NGT patients, increased visceral adiposity was found in iIFG, iIGT, IFG+IGT and nT2D; estimated liver fat progressively increased across these conditions. A one-s.d. increase in visceral adiposity was associated with an increased risk of having iIFG (men: odds ratio (OR) 1.41 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-1.74), women: OR 1.62 (1.29-2.04)), iIGT (men: OR 1.59 (1.15-2.01), women: OR 1.30 (0.96-1.76)), IFG+IGT (men: OR 1.64 (1.27-2.13), women: OR 1.83 (1.36-2.48)) and nT2D (men: OR 1.80 (1.35-2.42), women: OR 1.73 (1.25-2.41)). A one-s.d. increase in estimated liver fat was associated with iIGT (men: OR 1.46 (1.12-1.90), women: OR 1.81 (1.41-2.35)), IFG+IGT (men: OR 1.42 (1.14-1.77), women: OR 1.74 (1.35-2.26)) and nT2D (men: OR 1.77 (1.40-2.27), women: OR 2.38 (1.81-3.18)). Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue showed an inverse relationship with nT2D in women (OR 0.63 (0.45-0.88)). Liver fat was associated with iIGT but not with iIFG, whereas visceral adiposity was associated with both. Liver fat and visceral adiposity were associated with nT2D, whereas subcutaneous adiposity showed an inverse relationship with nT2D in women.

  1. Catechol-O-methyltransferase association with hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Kathryn T.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Chen, Ling; Harden, Maegan; Tolkin, Benjamin R.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Bray, George A.; Ridker, Paul M.; Florez, Jose C.; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Catecholamines have metabolic effects on blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and blood glucose. Genetic variation in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that degrades catecholamines, is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). Here we examined COMT effects on glycemic function and type 2 diabetes. Methods We tested whether COMT polymorphisms were associated with baseline HbA1c in the Women’s Genome Health Study (WGHS), and Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC), and with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in WGHS, DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis consortium (DIAGRAM), and the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Given evidence that COMT modifies some drug responses, we examined association with type 2 diabetes and randomized metformin and aspirin treatment. Results COMT rs4680 high-activity G-allele was associated with lower HbA1c in WGHS (β = −0.032% [0.012], p = 0.008) and borderline significant in MAGIC (β = −0.006% [0.003], p = 0.07). Combined COMT per val allele effects on type 2 diabetes were significant (OR = 0.98 [0.96–0.998], p = 0.03) in fixed-effects analyses across WGHS, DIAGRAM, and DPP. Similar results were obtained for 2 other COMT SNPs rs4818 and rs4633. In the DPP, the rs4680 val allele was borderline associated with lower diabetes incidence among participants randomized to metformin (HR = 0.81 [0.65–1.00], p = 0.05). Conclusions COMT rs4680 high-activity G-allele was associated with lower HbA1c and modest protection from type 2 diabetes. The directionality of COMT associations was concordant with those previously observed for cardiometabolic risk factors and CVD. PMID:27282867

  2. Inaccuracy of haemoglobin A1c among HIV-infected men: effects of CD4 cell count, antiretroviral therapies and haematological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Laurence; Palella, Frank J.; Abraham, Alison G.; Li, Xiuhong; Vigouroux, Corinne; Pialoux, Gilles; Kingsley, Lawrence; Lake, Jordan E.; Brown, Todd T.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Crain, Barbara; Dobs, Adrian; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Gallant, Joel; Johnson-Hill, Lisette; Plankey, Michael; Sacktor, Ned; Selnes, Ola; Shepard, James; Thio, Chloe; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Phair, John P.; Badri, Sheila; O'Gorman, Maurice; Ostrow, David; Palella, Frank; Ragin, Ann; Detels, Roger; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Aronow, Aaron; Bolan, Robert; Breen, Elizabeth; Butch, Anthony; Jamieson, Beth; Miller, Eric N.; Oishi, John; Vinters, Harry; Wiley, Dorothy; Witt, Mallory; Yang, Otto; Young, Stephen; Zhang, Zuo Feng; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Becker, James T.; Cranston, Ross D.; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Mellors, John W.; Silvestre, Anthony J.; Stall, Ronald D.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Munoz, Alvaro; Abraham, Alison; Althoff, Keri; Cox, Christopher; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Golub, Elizabeth; Schollenberger, Janet; Seaberg, Eric C.; Su, Sol; Huebner, Robin E.; Dominguez, Geraldina

    2014-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence that among HIV-infected patients haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values may not accurately reflect glycaemia. We assessed HbA1c discordance (observed HbA1c − expected HbA1c) and associated factors among HIV-infected participants in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). Methods Fasting glucose (FG) and HbA1c were measured at each semi-annual MACS visit since 1999. All HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men for whom at least one FG and HbA1c pair measurement was available were evaluated. Univariate median regression determined the association between HbA1c and FG by HIV serostatus. The relationship between HbA1c and FG in HIV-uninfected men was used to determine the expected HbA1c. Generalized estimating equations determined factors associated with the Hb1Ac discordance among HIV-infected men. Clinically significant discordance was defined as observed HbA1c − expected HbA1c ≤−0.5%. Results Over 13 years, 1500 HIV-uninfected and 1357 HIV-infected men were included, with a median of 11 visits for each participant. At an FG of 125 mg/dL, the median HbA1c among HIV-infected men was 0.21% lower than among HIV-uninfected men and the magnitude of this effect increased with FG >126 mg/dL. Sixty-three percent of HIV-infected men had at least one visit with clinically significant HbA1c discordance, which was independently associated with: low CD4 cell count (<500 cells/mm3); a regimen containing a protease inhibitor, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor or zidovudine; high mean corpuscular volume; and abnormal corpuscular haemoglobin. Conclusion HbA1c underestimates glycaemia in HIV-infected patients and its use in patients with risk factors for HbA1c discordance may lead to under-diagnosis and to under-treatment of established diabetes mellitus. PMID:25096078

  3. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose, and microvascular dysfunction: a principal component analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Panazzolo, Diogo G; Sicuro, Fernando L; Clapauch, Ruth; Maranhão, Priscila A; Bouskela, Eliete; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz G

    2012-11-13

    We aimed to evaluate the multivariate association between functional microvascular variables and clinical-laboratorial-anthropometrical measurements. Data from 189 female subjects (34.0 ± 15.5 years, 30.5 ± 7.1 kg/m2), who were non-smokers, non-regular drug users, without a history of diabetes and/or hypertension, were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). PCA is a classical multivariate exploratory tool because it highlights common variation between variables allowing inferences about possible biological meaning of associations between them, without pre-establishing cause-effect relationships. In total, 15 variables were used for PCA: body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), fasting plasma glucose, levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), triglycerides (TG), insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and functional microvascular variables measured by nailfold videocapillaroscopy. Nailfold videocapillaroscopy was used for direct visualization of nutritive capillaries, assessing functional capillary density, red blood cell velocity (RBCV) at rest and peak after 1 min of arterial occlusion (RBCV(max)), and the time taken to reach RBCV(max) (TRBCV(max)). A total of 35% of subjects had metabolic syndrome, 77% were overweight/obese, and 9.5% had impaired fasting glucose. PCA was able to recognize that functional microvascular variables and clinical-laboratorial-anthropometrical measurements had a similar variation. The first five principal components explained most of the intrinsic variation of the data. For example, principal component 1 was associated with BMI, waist circumference, systolic BP, diastolic BP, insulin, TG, CRP, and TRBCV(max) varying in the same way. Principal component 1 also showed a strong association among HDL-c, RBCV, and RBCV(max), but in the opposite way. Principal component 3 was associated only with microvascular

  4. The Prevalence and Associated Factors of Periodontitis According to Fasting Plasma Glucose in the Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the relationship between diabetes and periodontitis is well established, the association between periodontitis and prediabetes has been investigated less extensively. Furthermore, there has been little research on the prevalence of periodontitis among individuals with prediabetes and diabetes as well as in the overall population using nationally representative data. Among 12,406 adults (≥19 years’ old) who participated in the 2012–2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a total of 9977 subjects completed oral and laboratory examinations and were included in this analysis. Periodontitis was defined as a community periodontal index score of ≥3 according to the World Health Organization criteria. The fasting plasma glucose level was categorized into the following 5 groups: normal fasting glucose (NFG) 1 (<90 mg/dL), NFG 2 (90–99 mg/dL), impaired fasting glucose (IFG) 1 (100–110 mg/dL), IFG 2 (111–125 mg/dL), and diabetes (≥126 mg/dL). Overall, the weighted prevalence of periodontitis among the Korean adult population was 24.8% (23.3–26.4%) (weight n = 8,455,952/34,086,014). The unadjusted weighted prevalences of periodontitis were 16.7%, 22.8%, 29.6%, 40.7%, and 46.7% in the NFG 1, NFG 2, IFG 1, IFG 2, and diabetes groups, respectively (P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex, smoking history, heavy alcohol drinking, college graduation, household income, waist circumference, serum triglyceride level, serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and the presence of hypertension, the adjusted weighted prevalence of periodontitis increased to 29.7% in the IFG 2 group (P = 0.045) and 32.5% in the diabetes group (P < 0.001), compared with the NFG 1 group (24%). The odds ratios for periodontitis with the above-mentioned variables as covariates were 1.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14–1.77, P = 0.002) in the diabetes group and 1.33 (95% CI 1.01–1.75, P = 0.044) in the IFG

  5. Effect of colesevelam and niacin on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and glycemic control in subjects with dyslipidemia and impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Michael H; Rooney, Michael; Pollock, Elisabeth; Drucker, Joan; Choy, Young

    2013-01-01

    Niacin monotherapy in patients with dyslipidemia and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) may result in hyperglycemia. Colesevelam has the unique dual approvals to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and to improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of combined colesevelam and niacin treatment on LDL-C-lowering and glycemic control in subjects with IFG and dyslipidemia. Men or women ≥ 18 years of age, with dyslipidemia (non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥ 100 mg/dL and ≤ 220 mg/dL; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol < 60 mg/dL) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 90 mg/dL and ≤ 145 mg/dL were randomly assigned 1:1 to colesevelam (3750 mg/d) with niacin titration (n = 70) or placebo with niacin titration (n = 70) over 12 weeks. Niacin was titrated from 500 mg/d up to a maximum of 2000 mg/d as tolerated, and all subjects took enteric-coated aspirin daily. Lipid and glycemic efficacy parameters were assessed as well as safety evaluations of adverse events, vital signs, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, hematology, and urinalysis. Adjunct colesevelam had significantly greater LDL-C-lowering effect than niacin alone (placebo); -20.67% vs -12.86%, respectively (P = .0088). Niacin-mediated increases in FPG were significantly less with adjunct colesevelam (1.8 mg/dL vs 6.7 mg/dL; P = .0046), and fewer colesevelam subjects had increases of ≥ 10 mg/dL in FPG (8 vs 17, respectively). Adjunct colesevelam resulted in significantly smaller increases in hemoglobin A1c than placebo (0.06% vs 0.18%, respectively; P = .005). Consistent with hemoglobin A1c and FPG changes, fructosamine levels significantly decreased with colesevelam treatment (-5.0 μmol/L) but increased with placebo (3.0 μmol/L; P =.0255). Colesevelam as an adjunct to niacin therapy further lowers LDL-C while obviating the adverse effects of niacin on glucose metabolism in patients with dyslipidemia and IFG

  6. Methods, units and quality requirements for the analysis of haemoglobin A1c in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Ilkka; Penttilä, Karri; Holm, Päivi; Laitinen, Harri; Ranta, Päivi; Törrönen, Jukka; Rauramaa, Rainer

    2016-06-26

    The formation of glycohemoglobin, especially the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) fraction, occurs when glucose becomes coupled with the amino acid valine in the β-chain of Hb; this reaction is dependent on the plasma concentration of glucose. Since the early 1970s it has been known that diabetics display higher values OF HbA1C because they have elevated blood glucose concentrations. Thus HbA1c has acquired a very important role in the treatment and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. After the introduction of the first quantitative measurement OF HbA1C, numerous methods for glycohemoglobin have been introduced with different assay principles: From a simple mini-column technique to the very accurate automated high-pressure chromatography and lastly to many automated immunochemical or enzymatic assays. In early days, the results of the quality control reports for HbA1c varied extensively between laboratories, therefore in United States and Canada working groups (WG) of the Diabetes Controls and Complications Trial (DCCT) were set up to standardize the HbA1c assays against the DCCT/National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program reference method based on liquid chromatography. In the 1990s, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) appointed a new WG to plan a reference preparation and method for the HBA1c measurement. When the reference procedures were established, in 2004 IFCC recommended that all manufacturers for equipment used in HbA1c assays should calibrate their methods to their proposals. This led to an improvement in the coefficient of variation (CV%) associated with the assay. In this review, we describe the glycation of Hb, methods, standardization of the HbA1c assays, analytical problems, problems with the units in which HbA1c values are expressed, reference values, quality control aspects, target requirements for HbA1c, and the relationship of the plasma glucose values to HbA1c concentrations. We also note that the acceptance

  7. Methods, units and quality requirements for the analysis of haemoglobin A1c in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Penttilä, Ilkka; Penttilä, Karri; Holm, Päivi; Laitinen, Harri; Ranta, Päivi; Törrönen, Jukka; Rauramaa, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The formation of glycohemoglobin, especially the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) fraction, occurs when glucose becomes coupled with the amino acid valine in the β-chain of Hb; this reaction is dependent on the plasma concentration of glucose. Since the early 1970s it has been known that diabetics display higher values OF HbA1C because they have elevated blood glucose concentrations. Thus HbA1c has acquired a very important role in the treatment and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. After the introduction of the first quantitative measurement OF HbA1C, numerous methods for glycohemoglobin have been introduced with different assay principles: From a simple mini-column technique to the very accurate automated high-pressure chromatography and lastly to many automated immunochemical or enzymatic assays. In early days, the results of the quality control reports for HbA1c varied extensively between laboratories, therefore in United States and Canada working groups (WG) of the Diabetes Controls and Complications Trial (DCCT) were set up to standardize the HbA1c assays against the DCCT/National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program reference method based on liquid chromatography. In the 1990s, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) appointed a new WG to plan a reference preparation and method for the HBA1c measurement. When the reference procedures were established, in 2004 IFCC recommended that all manufacturers for equipment used in HbA1c assays should calibrate their methods to their proposals. This led to an improvement in the coefficient of variation (CV%) associated with the assay. In this review, we describe the glycation of Hb, methods, standardization of the HbA1c assays, analytical problems, problems with the units in which HbA1c values are expressed, reference values, quality control aspects, target requirements for HbA1c, and the relationship of the plasma glucose values to HbA1c concentrations. We also note that the acceptance

  8. Genetic Variant in HK1 Is Associated With a Proanemic State and A1C but Not Other Glycemic Control–Related Traits

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefond, Amélie; Vaxillaire, Martine; Labrune, Yann; Lecoeur, Cécile; Chèvre, Jean-Claude; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Cauchi, Stéphane; Balkau, Beverley; Marre, Michel; Tichet, Jean; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Hadjadj, Samy; Gallois, Yves; Czernichow, Sébastien; Hercberg, Serge; Kaakinen, Marika; Wiesner, Susanne; Charpentier, Guillaume; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Elliott, Paul; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Horber, Fritz; Dina, Christian; Pedersen, Oluf; Sladek, Robert; Meyre, David; Froguel, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A1C is widely considered the gold standard for monitoring effective blood glucose levels. Recently, a genome-wide association study reported an association between A1C and rs7072268 within HK1 (encoding hexokinase 1), which catalyzes the first step of glycolysis. HK1 deficiency in erythrocytes (red blood cells [RBCs]) causes severe nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia in both humans and mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The contribution of rs7072268 to A1C and the RBC-related traits was assessed in 6,953 nondiabetic European participants. We additionally analyzed the association with hematologic traits in 5,229 nondiabetic European individuals (in whom A1C was not measured) and 1,924 diabetic patients. Glucose control–related markers other than A1C were analyzed in 18,694 nondiabetic European individuals. A type 2 diabetes case-control study included 7,447 French diabetic patients. RESULTS Our study confirms a strong association between the rs7072268–T allele and increased A1C (β = 0.029%; P = 2.22 × 10−7). Surprisingly, despite adequate study power, rs7072268 showed no association with any other markers of glucose control (fasting- and 2-h post-OGTT–related parameters, n = 18,694). In contrast, rs7072268–T allele decreases hemoglobin levels (n = 13,416; β = −0.054 g/dl; P = 3.74 × 10−6) and hematocrit (n = 11,492; β = −0.13%; P = 2.26 × 10−4), suggesting a proanemic effect. The T allele also increases risk for anemia (836 cases; odds ratio 1.13; P = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS HK1 variation, although strongly associated with A1C, does not seem to be involved in blood glucose control. Since HK1 rs7072268 is associated with reduced hemoglobin levels and favors anemia, we propose that HK1 may influence A1C levels through its anemic effect or its effect on glucose metabolism in RBCs. These findings may have implications for type 2 diabetes diagnosis and clinical management because anemia is a frequent complication of the diabetes state. PMID

  9. The 13C-Glucose Breath Test for Insulin Resistance Assessment in Adolescents: Comparison with Fasting and Post-Glucose Stimulus Surrogate Markers of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Hernández, Jorge; Martínez-Basila, Azucena; Salas-Fernández, Alejandra; Navarro-Betancourt, José R.; Piña-Aguero, Mónica I.; Bernabe-García, Mariela

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of the 13C-glucose breath test (13C-GBT) for insulin resistance (IR) detection in adolescents through comparison with fasting and post-glucose stimulus surrogates. Methods: One hundred thirty-three adolescents aged between 10 and 16 years received an oral glucose load of 1.75 g per kg of body weight dissolved in 150 mL of water followed by an oral dose of 1.5 mg/kg of U-13C-Glucose, without a specific maximum dose. Blood samples were drawn at baseline and 120 minutes, while breath samples were obtained at baseline and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 minutes. The 13C-GBT was compared to homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) IR (≥p95 adjusted by gender and age), fasting plasma insulin (≥p90 adjusted by gender and Tanner stage), results of 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), insulin levels (≥65 μU/mL) in order to determine the optimal cut-off point for IR diagnosis. Results: 13C-GBT data, expressed as adjusted cumulative percentage of oxidized dose (A% OD), correlated inversely with fasting and post-load IR surrogates. Sexual development alters A% OD results, therefore individuals were stratified into pubescent and post-pubescent. The optimal cut-off point for the 13C-GBT in pubescent individuals was 16.3% (sensitivity=82.8% & specificity=60.6%) and 13.0% in post-pubescents (sensitivity=87.5% & specificity=63.6%), when compared to fasting plasma insulin. Similar results were observed against HOMA and 2-h OGTT insulin. Conclusion: The 13C-GBT is a practical and non-invasive method to screen for IR in adolescents with reasonable sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27354200

  10. Impaired fasting blood glucose is associated to cognitive impairment and cerebral atrophy in middle-aged non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Djelti, Fathia; Dhenain, Marc; Terrien, Jérémy; Picq, Jean-Luc; Hardy, Isabelle; Champeval, Delphine; Perret, Martine; Schenker, Esther; Epelbaum, Jacques; Aujard, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive impairment is a major health and social issue because of increasing aged population. Cognitive decline is not homogeneous in humans and the determinants leading to differences between subjects are not fully understood. In middle-aged healthy humans, fasting blood glucose levels in the upper normal range are associated with memory impairment and cerebral atrophy. Due to a close evolutional similarity to Man, non-human primates may be useful to investigate the relationships between glucose homeostasis, cognitive deficits and structural brain alterations. In the grey mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus, spatial memory deficits have been associated with age and cerebral atrophy but the origin of these alterations have not been clearly identified. Herein, we showed that, on 28 female grey mouse lemurs (age range 2.4-6.1 years-old), age correlated with impaired fasting blood glucose (rs=0.37) but not with impaired glucose tolerance or insulin resistance. In middle-aged animals (4.1-6.1 years-old), fasting blood glucose was inversely and closely linked with spatial memory performance (rs=0.56) and hippocampus (rs=−0.62) or septum (rs=−0.55) volumes. These findings corroborate observations in humans and further support the grey mouse lemur as a natural model to unravel mechanisms which link impaired glucose homeostasis, brain atrophy and cognitive processes. PMID:28039490

  11. Latinas with Elevated Fasting Plasma Glucose: An Analysis Using NHANES 2009–2010 Data

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Shiela M.; Vega, Marlena; Clayton-Jeter, Helene D.; Deren, Sherry; Rosedale, Mary; Rindskopf, David M.

    2017-01-01

    For Latinas with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels in the pre-diabetes and diabetes ranges, early detection can support steps to optimize their health. Data collected in 2009–2010 indicate that 36.7% of Latinas in the U.S. had elevated FPG levels. Latinas with elevated FPG who were unaware of their diabetes status were significantly less likely than non-Hispanic White and non-Hispanic Black women to have seen a health care provider in the past year (75.8%, 92.9%, and 90.2%, respectively; p = .018). With almost 1 million Latinas in the U.S. with elevated FPG unaware of their diabetes risk, and less likely than other at-risk women to see health care providers, there is an urgent need to establish alternate sites of opportunity for their diabetes screening. PMID:24865436

  12. Noninvasive and fast measurement of blood glucose in vivo by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jintao, Xue; Liming, Ye; Yufei, Liu; Chunyan, Li; Han, Chen

    2017-05-01

    This research was to develop a method for noninvasive and fast blood glucose assay in vivo. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, a more promising technique compared to other methods, was investigated in rats with diabetes and normal rats. Calibration models are generated by two different multivariate strategies: partial least squares (PLS) as linear regression method and artificial neural networks (ANN) as non-linear regression method. The PLS model was optimized individually by considering spectral range, spectral pretreatment methods and number of model factors, while the ANN model was studied individually by selecting spectral pretreatment methods, parameters of network topology, number of hidden neurons, and times of epoch. The results of the validation showed the two models were robust, accurate and repeatable. Compared to the ANN model, the performance of the PLS model was much better, with lower root mean square error of validation (RMSEP) of 0.419 and higher correlation coefficients (R) of 96.22%.

  13. Prevalence of insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome with alternative definitions of impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Ford, Earl S; Abbasi, Fahim; Reaven, Gerald M

    2005-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect of the new definition of impaired fasting glucose (IFG = fasting glucose concentration 100-125 mg/dL among people without diabetes) on the ability to identify insulin resistance, as well as the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in apparently healthy individuals. From the Stanford General Clinical Research Center data-base, we used data from 230 men and 260 women aged 19-79 years who had had an insulin suppression test to measure insulin resistance. From the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994), we used data from 8814 participants aged > or =20 years to estimate the impact of adopting the new IFG criteria on the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Among the 490 participants, the prevalence of IFG increased from 5.5% under the old definition of IFG to 20.4% under the new definition. Using the old definition of IFG, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) of IFG of identifying an individual as being insulin resistant were 10%, 97%, and 63%, respectively. Using the new definition, these parameters were 33%, 88%, and 61%, respectively. If the new IFG criteria were adopted, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome would increase from 21.8% to 26.3%. The new definition of IFG expands the population with insulin resistance by almost four-fold and could expand the population with the metabolic syndrome by about 20%. The clinical and public health implications of the new IFG definition remain to be elucidated.

  14. Trabecular Bone Score in Men and Women with Impaired Fasting Glucose and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Kara L; De Abreu, Lelia L F; Hans, Didier; Kotowicz, Mark A; Sajjad, Muhammad A; Hyde, Natalie K; Pasco, Julie A

    2017-09-30

    Diabetes is associated with increased skeletal fragility, despite higher bone mineral density (BMD). Alternative measures are necessary to more accurately determine fracture risk in individuals with diabetes. Therefore, we aimed to describe the relationship between trabecular bone score (TBS) and normoglycaemia, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes and determine whether TBS-adjusted FRAX (Aus) score differed between these groups. This study included 555 men (68.7 ± 12.2 years) and 514 women (62.0 ± 12.0 years), enrolled in the observational Geelong Osteoporosis Study. IFG was considered as fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 5.5 mmol/L and diabetes as FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, with the use of antihyperglycaemic medication and/or self-report. Using multivariable regression, the relationship between groups and TBS was determined. Men and women (all ages) with diabetes had lower mean TBS compared to those with normoglycaemia, in models adjusted for age, height and weight/waist circumference (all p < 0.05). Men with IFG had lower mean TBS in the age-adjusted models only (all p < 0.05). The addition of TBS to the FRAX score improved the discrimination between glycaemia groups, particularly for younger women (< 65 years). There was no difference in TBS detected between normoglycaemia and IFG; however, those with diabetes had lower TBS. Thus, the increased fracture risk in men and women with diabetes may be a result of BMD-independent bone deterioration. TBS adjustment of FRAX scores may be useful for younger women (< 65 years) with diabetes. This suggests that halting or reversing progression from IFG to diabetes could be important to prevent skeletal fragility in diabetes.

  15. Impaired fasting glucose prevalence in two nationwide cohorts of obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hagman, E; Reinehr, T; Kowalski, J; Ekbom, A; Marcus, C; Holl, R W

    2014-01-01

    Impaired fasting glucose (IFG), a pre-stage to type 2 diabetes in adults, is also present in obese children. A large variation of the occurrence has been recorded, but the true prevalence is unknown due to lack of larger representative cohort studies. This study was implemented to investigate the prevalence of IFG in two nationwide cohorts of obese children and to find factors that affect the risk of IFG. A cross-sectional study based on data collected from two nationwide registers of obese children in Germany and Sweden, respectively. Subjects included were 2-18 years old. 32,907 subjects with fasting glucose were eligible in Germany and 2726 in Sweden. Two cutoff limits for IFG were used: 5.6-6.9 mmol l(-1) according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and 6.1-6.9 mmol l(-1)according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Variables collected were gender, age and degree of obesity. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios. The total prevalence of IFG among obese children in the German cohort according to the ADA was 5.7% and according to the WHO it was 1.1%. In Sweden, the corresponding prevalence was 17.1% and 3.9%, respectively. IFG risk was correlated with increasing age, male sex and degree of obesity. IFG is highly prevalent among obese children. Age and degree of obesity are positively correlated with the risk of having IFG. There are large regional differences. After adjustments, obese children in Sweden, due to unknown reasons, have a 3.4- to 3.7-fold higher risk of having IFG than obese children in Germany.

  16. Antidepressant medication use and trajectories of fasting plasma glucose, glycated haemoglobin, β-cell function and insulin sensitivity: a 9-year longitudinal study of the D.E.S.I.R. cohort.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Marine Azevedo; Dugravot, Aline; Balkau, Beverley; Roussel, Ronan; Fumeron, Frédéric; Elbaz, Alexis; Canonico, Marianne; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Nabi, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    Use of antidepressants is seen to be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, even though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We examined whether antidepressant use was associated with change in fasting plasma glucose, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), β-cell function (HOMA2-%B) and insulin sensitivity (HOMA2-%S) over time. Participants in the French D.E.S.I.R. cohort study included over 4700 men (48.1%) and women, free of diabetes, aged 30-65 years at baseline in 1994-96 (D.E.S.I.R. 0), who were followed for 9 years at 3-yearly intervals (D.E.S.I.R. 3, 1997-99; 6, 2000-02; 9, 2003-05). Antidepressant use, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, HOMA2-%B and HOMA2-%S were assessed concurrently at four medical examinations. Linear mixed models were used to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of time-dependent antidepressant use with changes in these four biological parameters. Mean fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c increased whereas HOMA2-%B and HOMA2-%S decreased over the follow-up. In a fully adjusted model, there were no differences in: mean fasting plasma glucose (β = 0.01 mmol/l, P = 0.702); HbA1c (β = 0.01 %, P = 0.738); HOMA2-%B (β = 0.00, P = 0.812); or HOMA2-%S (β =-0.01, P = 0.791) at baseline (1994-96) between antidepressant users and non-users. The interaction term with time also suggested no differences in the annual change in: fasting plasma glucose (β = 0.00 mmol/l, P = 0.322); HbA1c (β = 0.00 %, P = 0.496); HOMA2-%B (β = 0.00, P = 0.609); or HOMA2-%S (β = 0.00, P = 0.332) between antidepressant users and non-users. Similar associations were observed in analyses of type and cumulative use of antidepressants over follow-up. Our longitudinal data show that use of antidepressants is not associated with altered glucose metabolism, suggesting that the association between antidepressant use and diabetes reported by previous studies may not be causal. Detection bias or

  17. Improved meta-analytic methods show no effect of chromium supplements on fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Christopher H

    2014-01-01

    The trace mineral chromium has been extensively researched over the years in its role in glucose metabolism. Dietary supplement companies have attempted to make claims that chromium may be able to treat or prevent diabetes. Previous meta-analyses/systematic reviews have indicated that chromium supplementation results in a significant lowering of fasting glucose in diabetics but not in nondiabetics. A meta-analysis was conducted using an alternative measure of effect size, d(ppc2) in order to account for changes in the control group as well as the chromium group. The literature search included MEDLINE, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and previously published article reviews, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Included studies were randomized, placebo-controlled trials in the English language with subjects that were nonpregnant adults, both with and without diabetes. Sixteen studies with 809 participants (440 diabetics and 369 nondiabetics) were included in the analysis. Screening for publication bias indicated symmetry of the data. Tests of heterogeneity indicated the use of a fixed-effect model (I² = 0 %). The analysis indicated that there was no significant effect of chromium supplementation in diabetics or nondiabetics, with a weighted average effect size of 0.02 (SE = 0.07), p = 0.787, CI 95 % = -0.12 to 0.16. Chromium supplementation appears to provide no benefits to populations where chromium deficiency is unlikely.

  18. Proposed Application of Fast Fourier Transform in Near Infra Red Based Non Invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenie, R. P.; Iskandar, J.; Kurniawan, A.; Rustami, E.; Syafutra, H.; Nurdin, N. M.; Handoyo, T.; Prabowo, J.; Febryarto, R.; Rahayu, M. S. K.; Damayanthi, E.; Rimbawan; Sukandar, D.; Suryana, Y.; Irzaman; Alatas, H.

    2017-03-01

    Worldwide emergence of glycaemic status related health disorders, such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome, is growing in alarming rate. The objective was to propose new methods for non invasive blood glucose level measurement system, based on implementation of Fast Fourier Transform methods. This was an initial-lab-scale-research. Data on non invasive blood glucose measurement are referred from Scopus, Medline, and Google Scholar, from 2011 until 2016, and was used as design references, combined with in house verification. System was developed in modular fashion, based on aforementioned compiled references. Several preliminary tests to understand relationship between LED and photo-diode responses have been done. Several references were used as non invasive blood glucose measurement tools design basis. Solution is developed in modular fashion. we have proven different sensor responses to water and glucose. Human test for non invasive blood glucose level measurement system is needed.

  19. Day-to-day variability of fasting plasma glucose in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Ollerton, R L; Playle, R; Ahmed, K; Dunstan, F D; Luzio, S D; Owens, D R

    1999-03-01

    To determine the day-to-day intraindividual variability of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in newly diagnosed Caucasian type 2 diabetic subjects. A total of 193 newly diagnosed, previously untreated, Caucasian type 2 diabetic subjects (135 men, 58 women) had FPG measured on two consecutive days (FPG1, FPG2). Ethical approval and subjects' full informed consent were obtained. Subjects fasted for 12 h before each study day and rested for at least 30 min before blood was taken. Plasma glucose was analyzed by a glucose oxidase method with intra- and interassay coefficients of variation (CVs) < 2%. Variability of FPG was assessed by comparison of percentage differences (PDs): PD = 100 (FPG2 - FPG1)/FPG1, with averaged FPG (FPGaver = [FPG1 + FPG2]/2). Biological and analytical variability were determined by use of SD2total = SD2biological + SD2analytical, where SD2analytical approximately equal to 2 x (CVglucose measurement)2. Given normally distributed data with zero mean, 95% of daily percentage differences will be expected to fall within a range of +/- 2 SDtotal. Subjects were age 54 +/- 10 years (mean +/- SD) and had BMI of 29.3 +/- 5.3 kg/m2. FPG values for both days were 12.2 +/- 3.4 mmol/l (FPG1) and 12.1 +/- 3.3 mmol/l (FPG2), with a mean paired difference (95% CI) of 0.1 (0.0 to 0.3) mmol/l. The variance of these differences increased with increasing FPGaver. The PDs did not exhibit this effect and were normally distributed (mean -0.6% [-1.7 to 0.4]; SD 7.4% [6.8 to 8.3]), giving a 95% variability (2 SD) of 14.8%. Biological variability (2 SDbiological) was 13.7%. No significant difference in PD was found between men and women (mean difference 1.3% [-1.0 to 3.6]; SDmale 7.4%, SDfemale 7.3%; P = 0.62). A total of 95% of the FPG values for this group of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic subjects varied within approximately +/- 15% on a daily basis, with approximately 14% caused by biological variability. As these results are expressed in percentage terms, subjects in

  20. Antihypertensive drug class and impaired fasting glucose: a risk association study among Chinese patients with uncomplicated hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin CS; Jiang, Johnny Y; Fung, H; Griffiths, Sian; Mercer, Stewart

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of studies addressing the factors associated with impaired fasting glucose in Chinese patients with uncomplicated hypertension. We included 1,218 patients newly prescribed a single antihypertensive drug in the public primary healthcare setting in Hong Kong, where their fasting glucose levels were measured 6–7 weeks after the first-ever antihypertensive prescription. Methods The odds ratios of having above borderline (≥ 6.1 mmol/l) and adverse (≥ 7.0 mmol/l) glucose levels, respectively, were studied according to patient age, gender, socioeconomic status, clinic types and antihypertensive drug classes by multivariable regression analyses. Results The fasting glucose levels were statistically similar (p = 0.786) among patients prescribed thiazide diuretics (5.48 mmol/l, 95%, 5.38, 5.59), calcium channel blockers (5.46 mmol/l, 95% C.I. 5.37, 5.54), β-blockers (5.42 mmol/l, 95% C.I. 5.34, 5.51) and drugs acting on the renin angiotensin system (RAS) [5.41 mmol/l, 95% C.I. 5.20, 5.61]. Multivariate analyses reported no significant associations between antihypertensive drug class and impaired fasting glucose. Elderly patients and male gender were significantly more likely to present with above borderline and adverse readings respectively. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of impaired fasting glucose in these groups, and use of thiazides should not in itself deter its use as a first-line antihypertensive agent among ethnic Chinese patients. PMID:18783618

  1. Association of coffee consumption and CYP1A2 polymorphism with risk of impaired fasting glucose in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Palatini, Paolo; Benetti, Elisabetta; Mos, Lucio; Garavelli, Guido; Mazzer, Adriano; Cozzio, Susanna; Fania, Claudio; Casiglia, Edoardo

    2015-03-01

    Whether and how coffee use influences glucose metabolism is still a matter for debate. We investigated whether baseline coffee consumption is longitudinally associated with risk of impaired fasting glucose in a cohort of 18-to-45 year old subjects screened for stage 1 hypertension and whether CYP1A2 polymorphism modulates this association. A total of 1,180 nondiabetic patients attending 17 hospital centers were included. Seventy-four percent of our subjects drank coffee. Among the coffee drinkers, 87% drank 1-3 cups/day (moderate drinkers), and 13% drank over 3 cups/day (heavy drinkers). Genotyping of CYP1A2 SNP was performed by real time PCR in 639 subjects. At the end of a median follow-up of 6.1 years, impaired fasting glucose was found in 24.0% of the subjects. In a multivariable Cox regression coffee use was a predictor of impaired fasting glucose at study end, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.3 (95% CI 0.97-1.8) in moderate coffee drinkers and of 2.3 (1.5-3.5) in heavy drinkers compared to abstainers. Among the subjects stratified by CYP1A2 genotype, heavy coffee drinkers carriers of the slow *1F allele (59%) had a higher adjusted risk of impaired fasting glucose (HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-5.9) compared to abstainers whereas this association was of borderline statistical significance among the homozygous for the A allele (HR 1.7, 95% CI 0.8-3.8). These data show that coffee consumption increases the risk of impaired fasting glucose in hypertension particularly among carriers of the slow CYP1A2 *1F allele.

  2. Prevalence and risk factors of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose among university applicants in Eastern China: findings from a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hao, C; Zhang, C; Chen, W; Shi, Z

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose among urban university applicants in Eastern China. The study uses data from the annual health examination among all students finishing high school who applied for university entrance in Changzhou City in 2012. In total, 6716 students aged 17-19 years had fasting blood glucose, alanine transaminase, height, weight and blood pressure measured. Impaired fasting glucose and diabetes were defined as fasting blood glucose ≥ 5.6 mmol/l (but < 7 mmol/l) and ≥ 7 mmol/l, respectively. The overall prevalence of impaired fasting glucose and diabetes was 2.40% and 0.13%, respectively (3.67% and 0.09% in boys; 1.09% and 0.18% in girls). In total, 20.9% of boys and 10.6% of girls were overweight/obese. High socio-economic status was associated with an increased risk of diabetes/impaired fasting glucose, but the association was significant only among boys (adjusted odds ratio 1.94, 95% CI 1.26-2.98). Alanine transaminase levels were significantly and positively related to diabetes/impaired fasting glucose risk. Overweight/obesity was significantly associated with increased risk of impaired fasting glucose/diabetes in girls, but not in boys. Moreover, the number of the above-mentioned risk factors (i.e. overweight/obesity, elevated alanine transaminase, pre-hypertension) was significantly and positively related to diabetes/impaired fasting glucose among both boys and girls. Impaired fasting glucose was prevalent among urban university applicants, in particular boys and those of high socio-economic status in eastern China. Elevated levels of liver function enzyme appear to be the strongest risk factor for diabetes/impaired fasting glucose. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  3. Fast, Highly-Sensitive, and Wide-Dynamic-Range Interdigitated Capacitor Glucose Biosensor Using Solvatochromic Dye-Containing Sensing Membrane.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Rajibur Rahaman; Khalilian, Alireza; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-02-20

    In this paper, we proposed an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based glucose biosensor to measure different concentrations of glucose from 1 μM to 1 M. We studied four different types of solvatochromic dyes: Auramine O, Nile red, Rhodamine B, and Reichardt's dye (R-dye). These dyes were individually incorporated into a polymer [polyvinyl chloride (PVC)] and N,N-Dimethylacetamide (DMAC) solution to make the respective dielectric/sensing materials. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time an IDC glucose biosensing system utilizing a solvatochromic-dye-containing sensing membrane. These four dielectric or sensing materials were individually placed into the interdigitated electrode (IDE) by spin coating to make four IDC glucose biosensing elements. The proposed IDC glucose biosensor has a high sensing ability over a wide dynamic range and its sensitivity was about 23.32 mV/decade. It also has fast response and recovery times of approximately 7 s and 5 s, respectively, excellent reproducibility with a standard deviation of approximately 0.023, highly stable sensing performance, and real-time monitoring capabilities. The proposed IDC glucose biosensor was compared with an IDC, potentiometric, FET, and fiber-optic glucose sensor with respect to response time, dynamic range width, sensitivity, and linearity. We observed that the designed IDC glucose biosensor offered excellent performance.

  4. Fast, Highly-Sensitive, and Wide-Dynamic-Range Interdigitated Capacitor Glucose Biosensor Using Solvatochromic Dye-Containing Sensing Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Rajibur Rahaman; Khalilian, Alireza; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based glucose biosensor to measure different concentrations of glucose from 1 μM to 1 M. We studied four different types of solvatochromic dyes: Auramine O, Nile red, Rhodamine B, and Reichardt’s dye (R-dye). These dyes were individually incorporated into a polymer [polyvinyl chloride (PVC)] and N,N-Dimethylacetamide (DMAC) solution to make the respective dielectric/sensing materials. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time an IDC glucose biosensing system utilizing a solvatochromic-dye-containing sensing membrane. These four dielectric or sensing materials were individually placed into the interdigitated electrode (IDE) by spin coating to make four IDC glucose biosensing elements. The proposed IDC glucose biosensor has a high sensing ability over a wide dynamic range and its sensitivity was about 23.32 mV/decade. It also has fast response and recovery times of approximately 7 s and 5 s, respectively, excellent reproducibility with a standard deviation of approximately 0.023, highly stable sensing performance, and real-time monitoring capabilities. The proposed IDC glucose biosensor was compared with an IDC, potentiometric, FET, and fiber-optic glucose sensor with respect to response time, dynamic range width, sensitivity, and linearity. We observed that the designed IDC glucose biosensor offered excellent performance. PMID:26907291

  5. Glucose Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Glucose Tests Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... the meaning of other test results. Fasting Blood Glucose Glucose Level Indication From 70 to 99 mg/ ...

  6. Obese mice on a high-fat alternate-day fasting regimen lose weight and improve glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Joslin, P M N; Bell, R K; Swoap, S J

    2017-10-01

    Alternate-day fasting (ADF) causes body weight (BW) loss in humans and rodents. However, it is not clear that ADF while maintaining a high-fat (HF) diet results in weight loss and the accompanying improvement in control of circulating glucose. We tested the hypotheses that a high-fat ADF protocol in obese mice would result in (i) BW loss, (ii) improved glucose control, (iii) fluctuating phenotypes on 'fasted' days when compared to 'fed' days and (iv) induction of torpor on 'fasted days'. We evaluated the physiological effects of ADF in diet-induced obese mice for BW, heart rate (HR), body temperature (Tb ), glucose tolerance, insulin responsiveness, blood parameters (leptin, insulin, free fatty acids) and hepatic gene expression. Diet-induced obese male C57BL/6J mice lost one-third of their pre-diet BW while on an ADF diet for 10 weeks consisting of HF food. The ADF protocol improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, although mice on a fast day were less glucose tolerant than the same mice on a fed day. ADF mice on a fast day had low circulating insulin, but had an enhanced response to an insulin-assisted glucose tolerance test, suggesting the impaired glucose tolerance may be a result of insufficient insulin production. On fed days, ADF mice were the warmest, had a high HR and displayed hepatic gene expression and circulating leptin that closely mimicked that of mice fed an ad lib HF diet. ADF mice never entered torpor as assessed by HR and Tb . However, on fast days, they were the coolest, had the slowest HR, and displayed hepatic gene expression and circulating leptin that closely mimicked that of Chow-Fed mice. Collectively, the ADF regimen with a HF diet in obese mice results in weight loss, improved blood glucose control, and daily fluctuations in selected physiological and biochemical parameters in the mouse. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Does Iron Deficiency Anaemia and its Severity Influence HbA1C Level in Non Diabetics? An Analysis of 150 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Shivashekar; Arunachalam, Sundaram; Raja, Veena; Ramraj, Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Anaemia has a high prevalence having great impact worldwide and potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of various chronic diseases. Approximately 1/3rd of patients with anaemia have iron deficiency. American Diabetes Association (ADA) has affirmed Glycated Haemoglobin (HbA1C) ≥ 6.5% as a diagnostic criterion for Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Variation of HbA1C in Iron Deficiency Anaemia (IDA) has clashing results. Aim To decide the impact of IDA on HbA1C levels among non diabetics. To assess and analyse the variation of HbA1C according to the degree of anaemia (mild, moderate and severe). Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu from February 2016 to October 2016 and approved by our Institutional Ethical Committee. Totally 150 non diabetics (75 with IDA and 75 without IDA) were included in this study. Medical history was recorded and HbA1C, Haemoglobin (Hb), Haematocrit (Hct), red cell indices, serum iron, ferritin and Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG) were tested. Results The IDA patients in this study had a mean HbA1C (6.84±0.07%) which was higher than the non anaemic group (5.12±0.04%) and this difference was statistically significant (p< 0.05). HbA1C level was increased when severity of anaemia worsened. Also, noteworthy statistical significance was observed between no anaemia, mild, moderate and severe anaemia (p< 0.05). Conclusion In this study, we observed a positive correlation between IDA and elevated HbA1C level in non-diabetic population.

  8. Effects of exposure to electromagnetic field radiation (EMFR) generated by activated mobile phones on fasting blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Al Rubeaan, Khalid

    2013-04-01

    Extensive use of mobile phones has been accompanied by a common public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. No study has been published so far to establish any association between the fastest growing innovation of mobile phone and fasting blood glucose. The aim was to determine the effects of exposure to electromagnetic field radiation generated by mobile phones on fasting blood glucose in Wistar Albino rats. 40 Male Albino rats (Wistar Strain) were divided into 5 equally numerous groups. Group A served as the control one, group B received mobile phone radiation for less than 15 min/day, group C: 15-30 min/day, group D: 31-45 min/day, and group E: 46-60 min/day for a total period of 3 months. Fasting blood glucose was determined by using Spectrophotometer and serum insulin by Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The Homeostatic Model (HOMA-B) was applied for the assessment of β-cell function and (HOMA-IR) for resistance to insulin. Wister Albino rats exposed to mobile phone radiation for longer than 15 min a day for a total period of 3 months had significantly higher fasting blood glucose (p < 0.015) and serum insulin (p < 0.01) compared to the control group. HOMA-IR for insulin resistance was significantly increased (p < 0.003) in the groups that were exposed for 15-30 and 46-60 min/day compared to the control rats. The results of the present study show an association between long-term exposure to activated mobile phones and increase in fasting blood glucose and serum insulin in Albino rats.

  9. Prostate size correlates with fasting blood glucose in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with normal testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok Joong; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Gi-Young; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Isaac Yi; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the correlations between BMI, fasting glucose, insulin, testosterone level, insulin resistance, and prostate size in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with normal testosterone levels. Data from 212 non-diabetic BPH patients with normal testosterone levels, who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) due to medical treatment failure, were evaluated retrospectively. Patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels of ≥ 3 ng/mL underwent multicore transrectal prostate biopsy before TURP to rule out prostate cancer. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or serum testosterone levels of < 3.50 ng/mL were excluded from analysis. Correlations between clinical and laboratory parameters were determined. Prostate size correlated positively with age (r = 0.227, P < 0.001), PSA (r = 0.510, P < 0.001), and fasting glucose level (r = 0.186, P = 0.007), but not with BMI, testosterone, insulin level, or insulin resistance (each P > 0.05). Testosterone level inversely correlated with BMI (r = -0.327, P < 0.001), insulin level (r = -0.207, P = 0.003), and insulin resistance (r = -0.221, P = 0.001), but not with age, prostate size, PSA, or fasting glucose level (each P > 0.05). Upon multiple adjusted linear regression analysis, prostate size correlated with elevated PSA (P < 0.001) and increased fasting glucose levels (P = 0.023). In non-DM BPH patients with normal testosterone levels, fasting glucose level is an independent risk factor for prostate hyperplasia.

  10. Fasting Triglycerides and Glucose Index as a Diagnostic Test for Insulin Resistance in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Romero, Fernando; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; Jiménez-Flores, J Rafael; Simental-Mendia, Luis E; Méndez-Cruz, René; Murguía-Romero, Miguel; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha

    2016-07-01

    Although the Glucose and Triglyceride levels (TyG) index is useful for identification of insulin resistance (IR) in different ethnic groups, it has not been evaluated in young adults. We undertook this study to evaluate the TyG index as a diagnostic test for IR in young adults. A total of 5,538 healthy young adults, 3,795 (68.5%) non-pregnant women and 1,743 (31.5%) men, with an average age of 19.2 ± 1.4 years, were enrolled in a population-based cross-sectional study. To estimate diagnostic characteristics of the TyG index, a randomized subsample of the target population (n = 75) was under euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp test. Using the cutoff values obtained in the clamp study, the diagnostic concordance between TyG index and HOMA-IR was evaluated in the overall population. The TyG index was calculated as the Ln[fasting triglycerides (mg/dL) × fasting glucose (mg/dL)]/2. Normal weight, overweight, and obesity were identified in 3,632 (65.6%), 1,355 (24.5%), and 551 (9.9%) participants. A total of 346 (9.1%) men and 278 (15.9%) women exhibited IR. The best cutoff value of TyG index for diagnosis of IR was 4.55 (sensitivity 0.687, negative predictive value (NPV) 0.844, and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) 0.47) for women and 4.68 (sensitivity 0.673, NPV 0.900, and NLR 0.45) for men. In normal-weight individuals the diagnostic concordance between TyG index and HOMA-IR was 0.934 and 0.915, in the overweight subjects was 0.908 and 0.895 and, in the obese participants 0.916 and 0.950, for men and women, respectively. TyG index may be useful for screening IR in young adults. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of HbA1c criterion on the definition of glycemic component of the metabolic syndrome: the China health and nutrition survey 2009.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xingxing; Du, Tingting; Huo, Rui; Yu, Xuefeng; Xu, Lixian

    2013-11-05

    In 2009, a unified definition of metabolic syndrome (MetS) was proposed, of which, the glycemic component is defined on the basis of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level. Recently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommended the use of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as an alternative to FPG to define prediabetes. Hence, we aim to compare the performance of HbA1c and FPG in the definition of glycemic component of the MetS among Chinese adults. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 7641 Chinese participants aged ≥18 years using data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey 2009. MetS was defined according to the consensus criteria in 2009. We compared the use of HbA1c versus FPG in the definition of the glycemic component of MetS. Increased HbA1c value was defined following the criterion of HbA1c cut-off point of ≥5.7% recommended by the ADA. Overall, 1136 (14.9%) had MetS according to FPG ≥ 5.6 mmol/l, and 1640 (21.5%) had MetS according to HbA1c ≥ 5.7%. Compared with individuals with FPG-based diagnosis of MetS, individuals with HbA1c-based diagnosis of MetS were older, had higher levels of LDL-C, magnesium, and transferrin, and lower levels of uric acid. Of those found to have MetS according to either FPG or HbA1c (n = 2008), overlap between HbA1c- and FPG-based diagnosis of MetS was limited (n = 768, 38.2%). The overlap index regarding MetS diagnosed by FPG or HbA1c persisted low in each evaluated subgroup (≤ 50.0%). We note limited overlap and poor agreement between FPG- and HbA1c-based diagnosis of MetS. Screening MetS through introduction of HbA1c in addition to FPG could contribute to identification of more people with MetS.

  12. Effect of Fasting Blood Glucose Level on Heart Rate Variability of Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lutfi, Mohamed Faisal; Elhakeem, Ramaze Farouke

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies reported increased risk of cardiac events in subjects with fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels lower than the diagnostic threshold of diabetes mellitus. However, whether increased cardiac events in those with upper normal FBG is secondary to the shift of their cardiac sympathovagal balance towards sympathetic predominance is unknown. Aims To assess the association between FBG levels and cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM) in euglycaemic healthy subjects based on heart rate variability (HRV) derived indices. Subjects and Methods The study enrolled 42 healthy young adults. Following sociodemographic and clinical assessment, blood samples were collected to measure FBG levels. Five minutes ECG recordings were performed to all participants to obtain frequency domain HRV measurements, namely the natural logarithm (Ln) of total power (LnTP), very low frequency (LnVLF), low frequency (LnLF) and high frequency (LnHF), low frequency/ high frequency ratio (LnLF/HF), normalized low frequency (LF Norm) and high frequency (HF Norm). Results FBG levels correlated positively with LnHF (r = 0.33, P = 0.031) and HF Norm (r = 0.35, P = 0.025) and negatively with LF Norm (r = -0.35, P = 0.025) and LnLF/HF (r = -0.33, P = 0.035). LnHF and HF Norm were significantly decreased in subjects with the lower (4.00 (1.34) ms2/Hz and 33.12 (11.94) n.u) compared to those with the upper FBG quartile (5.64 (1.63) ms2/Hz and 49.43 (17.73) n.u, P = 0.013 and 0.032 respectively). LF Norm and LnLF/HF were significantly increased in subjects with the lower (66.88 (11.94) n.u and 0.73 (0.53)) compared to those with the higher FBG quartile (50.58 (17.83) n.u and 0.03 (0.79), P = 0.032 and 0.038 respectively). Conclusion The present study is the first to demonstrate that rise of blood glucose concentration, within physiological range, is associated with higher parasympathetic, but lower sympathetic CAM. Further researches are needed to set out the glycemic threshold beyond which

  13. Consumption of meat is associated with higher fasting glucose and insulin concentrations regardless of glucose and insulin genetic risk scores: a meta-analysis of 50,345 Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Fretts, Amanda M; Follis, Jack L; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Ngwa, Julius S; Wojczynski, Mary K; Kalafati, Ioanna Panagiota; Varga, Tibor V; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Houston, Denise K; Lahti, Jari; Ericson, Ulrika; van den Hooven, Edith H; Mikkilä, Vera; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Rice, Kenneth; Renström, Frida; North, Kari E; McKeown, Nicola M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kanoni, Stavroula; Smith, Caren E; Garcia, Melissa E; Tiainen, Anna-Maija; Sonestedt, Emily; Manichaikul, Ani; van Rooij, Frank J A; Dimitriou, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Pankow, James S; Djoussé, Luc; Province, Michael A; Hu, Frank B; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Keller, Margaux F; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Rotter, Jerome I; Hofman, Albert; Graff, Misa; Kähönen, Mika; Mukamal, Kenneth; Johansson, Ingegerd; Ordovas, Jose M; Liu, Yongmei; Männistö, Satu; Uitterlinden, André G; Deloukas, Panos; Seppälä, Ilkka; Psaty, Bruce M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Borecki, Ingrid B; Franks, Paul W; Arnett, Donna K; Nalls, Mike A; Eriksson, Johan G; Orho-Melander, Marju; Franco, Oscar H; Lehtimäki, Terho; Dedoussis, George V; Meigs, James B; Siscovick, David S

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that meat intake is associated with diabetes-related phenotypes. However, whether the associations of meat intake and glucose and insulin homeostasis are modified by genes related to glucose and insulin is unknown. We investigated the associations of meat intake and the interaction of meat with genotype on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in Caucasians free of diabetes mellitus. Fourteen studies that are part of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium participated in the analysis. Data were provided for up to 50,345 participants. Using linear regression within studies and a fixed-effects meta-analysis across studies, we examined 1) the associations of processed meat and unprocessed red meat intake with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations; and 2) the interactions of processed meat and unprocessed red meat with genetic risk score related to fasting glucose or insulin resistance on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Processed meat was associated with higher fasting glucose, and unprocessed red meat was associated with both higher fasting glucose and fasting insulin concentrations after adjustment for potential confounders [not including body mass index (BMI)]. For every additional 50-g serving of processed meat per day, fasting glucose was 0.021 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.011, 0.030 mmol/L) higher. Every additional 100-g serving of unprocessed red meat per day was associated with a 0.037-mmol/L (95% CI: 0.023, 0.051-mmol/L) higher fasting glucose concentration and a 0.049-ln-pmol/L (95% CI: 0.035, 0.063-ln-pmol/L) higher fasting insulin concentration. After additional adjustment for BMI, observed associations were attenuated and no longer statistically significant. The association of processed meat and fasting insulin did not reach statistical significance after correction for multiple comparisons. Observed associations were not modified by genetic loci known to influence fasting glucose or

  14. Consumption of meat is associated with higher fasting glucose and insulin concentrations regardless of glucose and insulin genetic risk scores: a meta-analysis of 50,345 Caucasians12

    PubMed Central

    Fretts, Amanda M; Follis, Jack L; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Ngwa, Julius S; Wojczynski, Mary K; Kalafati, Ioanna Panagiota; Varga, Tibor V; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Houston, Denise K; Lahti, Jari; Ericson, Ulrika; van den Hooven, Edith H; Mikkilä, Vera; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Rice, Kenneth; Renström, Frida; North, Kari E; McKeown, Nicola M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kanoni, Stavroula; Smith, Caren E; Garcia, Melissa E; Tiainen, Anna-Maija; Sonestedt, Emily; Manichaikul, Ani; van Rooij, Frank JA; Dimitriou, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Pankow, James S; Djoussé, Luc; Province, Michael A; Hu, Frank B; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Keller, Margaux F; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Rotter, Jerome I; Hofman, Albert; Graff, Misa; Kähönen, Mika; Mukamal, Kenneth; Johansson, Ingegerd; Ordovas, Jose M; Liu, Yongmei; Männistö, Satu; Uitterlinden, André G; Deloukas, Panos; Seppälä, Ilkka; Psaty, Bruce M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Borecki, Ingrid B; Franks, Paul W; Arnett, Donna K; Nalls, Mike A; Eriksson, Johan G; Orho-Melander, Marju; Franco, Oscar H; Lehtimäki, Terho; Dedoussis, George V; Meigs, James B; Siscovick, David S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies suggest that meat intake is associated with diabetes-related phenotypes. However, whether the associations of meat intake and glucose and insulin homeostasis are modified by genes related to glucose and insulin is unknown. Objective: We investigated the associations of meat intake and the interaction of meat with genotype on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in Caucasians free of diabetes mellitus. Design: Fourteen studies that are part of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium participated in the analysis. Data were provided for up to 50,345 participants. Using linear regression within studies and a fixed-effects meta-analysis across studies, we examined 1) the associations of processed meat and unprocessed red meat intake with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations; and 2) the interactions of processed meat and unprocessed red meat with genetic risk score related to fasting glucose or insulin resistance on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Results: Processed meat was associated with higher fasting glucose, and unprocessed red meat was associated with both higher fasting glucose and fasting insulin concentrations after adjustment for potential confounders [not including body mass index (BMI)]. For every additional 50-g serving of processed meat per day, fasting glucose was 0.021 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.011, 0.030 mmol/L) higher. Every additional 100-g serving of unprocessed red meat per day was associated with a 0.037-mmol/L (95% CI: 0.023, 0.051-mmol/L) higher fasting glucose concentration and a 0.049–ln-pmol/L (95% CI: 0.035, 0.063–ln-pmol/L) higher fasting insulin concentration. After additional adjustment for BMI, observed associations were attenuated and no longer statistically significant. The association of processed meat and fasting insulin did not reach statistical significance after correction for multiple comparisons. Observed associations were not modified by genetic

  15. Change of HbA1c reporting to the new SI units.

    PubMed

    Jones, Graham R D; Barker, George; Goodall, Ian; Schneider, Hans-Gerhard; Shephard, Mark D S; Twigg, Stephen M

    2011-07-04

    An international consensus statement recommends that dual reporting of haemoglobin A (HbA(1c)) levels--in the current units (percentage) and Système International (SI) units (mmol/mol)--be used as an interim measure for a 2-year transition period before progressing towards the use of SI units only. This recommendation is supported by the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists, the Australian Diabetes Educators Association, the Australian Diabetes Society and the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. The SI units are a true measure of HbA(1c) and remove potential confusion between HbA(1c) values and blood glucose values.

  16. Effect of Iron Deficiency Anemia on Hemoglobin A1c Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nitin; Mishra, T.K.; Singh, Tejinder

    2012-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia in India. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used in diabetic patients as an index of glycemic control reflecting glucose levels of the previous 3 months. Like blood sugar levels, HbA1c levels are also affected by the presence of variant hemoglobins, hemolytic anemias, nutritional anemias, uremia, pregnancy, and acute blood loss. However, reports on the effects of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels are inconsistent. We conducted a study to analyze the effects of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels and to assess whether treatment of iron deficiency anemia affects HbA1c levels. Methods Fifty patients confirmed to have iron deficiency anemia were enrolled in this study. HbA1c and absolute HbA1c levels were measured both at baseline and at 2 months after treatment, and these values were compared with those in the control population. Results The mean baseline HbA1c level in anemic patients (4.6%) was significantly lower than that in the control group (5.5%, p<0.05). A significant increase was observed in the patients' absolute HbA1c levels at 2 months after treatment (0.29 g/dL vs. 0.73 g/dL, p<0.01). There was a significant difference between the baseline values of patients and controls (0.29 g/dL vs. 0.74 g/dL, p<0.01). Conclusions In contrast to the observations of previous studies, ours showed that HbA1c levels and absolute HbA1c levels increased with treatment of iron deficiency anemia. This could be attributable to nutritional deficiency and/or certain unknown variables. Further studies are warranted. PMID:22259774

  17. Genetic variation of fasting glucose and changes in glycemia in response to 2-year weight-loss diet intervention: the POUNDS Lost trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiange; Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yan; Rood, Jennifer; Bray, George A.; Sacks, Frank M.; Qi, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Weight loss intervention through diet modification has been widely used to improve obesity-related hyperglycemia; however, little is known about whether genetic variation modifies the intervention effect. We examined the interaction between weight-loss diets and genetic variation of fasting glucose on changes in glycemic traits in a dietary intervention trial. Research Design and Methods The Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST) trial is a randomized, controlled 2-year weight-loss trial. We assessed overall genetic variation of fasting glucose by calculating a genetic risk score (GRS) based on 14 fasting glucose-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms, and examined the progression in fasting glucose and insulin levels, and insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in 733 adults from this trial. Results The GRS was associated with 6-month changes in fasting glucose (P<0.001), fasting insulin (P=0.042), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, P=0.009) and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S, P=0.043). We observed significant interaction between the GRS and dietary fat on 6-month changes in fasting glucose, HOMA-IR and HOMA-S after multivariable adjustment (P-interaction=0.007, 0.045, and 0.028, respectively). After further adjustment for weight loss, the interaction remained significant on change in fasting glucose (P=0.015). In the high-fat diet group, participants in the highest GRS tertile showed increased fasting glucose, whereas participants in the lowest tertile showed decreased fasting glucose (P-trend<0.001); in contrast, the genetic association was not significant in the low-fat diet group (P-trend=0.087). Conclusions Our data suggest that participants with a higher genetic risk may benefit more by eating a low-fat diet to improve glucose metabolism. PMID:27113490

  18. Development of filter paper hemoglobin A1c assay applicable to newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Allison J; Allen, David B; Wiebe, Donald; Eickhoff, Jens; MacDonald, Michael; Baker, Mei

    2016-06-01

    Gestational diabetes influences risk for future metabolic disease including type 2 diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement assesses hemoglobin A glycosylation, and could theoretically be used as a test to estimate gestational glucose exposure. HbA1c assay on dried blood spots (DBS) is needed before potential application to statewide newborn screening (NBS) population studies. The study aimed to establish a reliable method to measure HbA1c on NBS DBS specimens. De-identified blood was used to generate trials to evaluate stability of HbA1c in DBS, optimal elution time, and stability of eluted blood. Analysis of DBS stability HbA1c measurements from 3 to 6days after collection overestimated HbA1c values by a bias factor between 0.83 and 0.87. Sixty minutes of elution time produced maximal reproducibility and minimal bias of results. Within assay standard deviation: 0.058; average bias: -0.02%. Stability of eluted blood did not vary significantly between days 0-2 after DBS elution. Measurement of HbA1c levels on DBS from human blood is feasible. Results suggest new method using DBS to measure HbA1c level with the following characteristics: optimal time for sample analysis 3-6days after collection, elution time of 60min and eluted blood analysis within 2days of elution. Measurement of neonatal HbA1c could provide insight regarding the infant's in utero exposure to glucose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Comparison of hs-CRP Levels in New Diabetes Groups Diagnosed Based on FPG, 2-hPG, or HbA1c Criteria.

    PubMed

    Tutuncu, Yildiz; Satman, Ilhan; Celik, Selda; Dinccag, Nevin; Karsidag, Kubilay; Telci, Aysegul; Genc, Sema; Issever, Halim; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Omer, Beyhan

    2016-01-01

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) have been used to diagnose new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) in order to simplify the diagnostic tests compared with the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; 2-hPG). We aimed to identify optimal cut-off points of high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in new-onset DM people based on FPG, 2-hPG, or HbA1c methods. Data derived from recent population-based survey in Turkey (TURDEP-II). The study included 26,499 adult people (63% women, response rate 85%). The mean serum concentration of hs-CRP in women was higher than in men (p < 0.001). The people with new-onset DM based on HbA1c had higher mean hs-CRP level than FPG based and 2-hPG based DM cases. In HbA1c, 2-hPG, and FPG based new-onset DM people, cut-off levels of hs-CRP in women were 2.9, 2.1, and 2.5 mg/L [27.5, 19.7, and 23.5 nmol/L] and corresponding values in men were 2.0, 1.8, and 1.8 mg/L (19.0, 16.9, and 16.9 nmol/L), respectively (sensitivity 60-65% and specificity 54-64%). Our results revealed that hs-CRP may not further strengthen the diagnosis of new-onset DM. Nevertheless, the highest hs-CRP level observed in new-onset DM people diagnosed with HbA1c criterion supports the general assumption that this method might recognize people in more advanced diabetic stage compared with other diagnostic methods.

  20. Trends in prevalence of diabetes mellitus and mean fasting glucose in Portugal (1987-2009): a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M; Carreira, H; Lunet, N; Azevedo, A

    2014-03-01

    To assess time trends of the prevalence of diabetes and mean blood glucose in Portuguese adults. Systematic review. The search strategy included Pubmed search and screening of bibliographic references of the review articles. Sex-specific linear regression models, with survey year and participants' age as independent variables, were used to predict prevalence estimates of self-reported diabetes and mean fasting glucose. Twenty-seven eligible studies were identified. Time trends of objectively defined diabetes could not be quantified due to the heterogeneity of the diagnostic criteria. Between 1987 and 2009, the prevalence of self-reported diabetes remained approximately constant in young adults, while it increased in middle-aged and older adults, more than two-fold among women and three-fold among men. In the same period, mean fasting glucose increased 7 mg/dL among women and 8 mg/dL among men. The prevalence of self-reported diabetes and mean fasting glucose increased in the last two decades, demanding for effective strategies to reverse this tendency and to manage the increasing number of people with diabetes in the Portuguese population. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effects of Moderate Whole Grain Consumption on Fasting Glucose and Lipids, Gastrointestinal Symptoms, and Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Danielle N.; Kable, Mary E.; Marco, Maria L.; De Leon, Angela; Rust, Bret; Baker, Julita E.; Horn, William; Burnett, Dustin; Keim, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if providing wheat, corn, and rice as whole (WG) or refined grains (RG) under free-living conditions will change parameters of health over a six-week intervention in healthy, habitual non-WG consumers. Measurements of body composition, fecal microbiota, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides were made at baseline and post intervention. Subjects were given adequate servings of either WG or RG products based on their caloric need and asked to keep records of grain consumption, bowel movements, and GI symptoms weekly. After six weeks, subjects repeated baseline testing. Significant decreases in total, LDL, and non-HDL cholesterol were seen after the WG treatments but were not observed in the RG treatment. During Week 6, bowel movement frequency increased with increased WG consumption. No significant differences in microbiota were seen between baseline and post intervention, although, abundance of order Erysipelotrichales increased in RG subjects who ate more than 50% of the RG market basket products. Increasing consumption of WGs can alter parameters of health, but more research is needed to better elucidate the relationship between the amount consumed and the health-related outcome. PMID:28230784

  2. Increasing Neuroplasticity to Bolster Chronic Pain Treatment: A Role for Intermittent Fasting and Glucose Administration?

    PubMed

    Sibille, Kimberly T; Bartsch, Felix; Reddy, Divya; Fillingim, Roger B; Keil, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Neuroplastic changes in brain structure and function are not only a consequence of chronic pain but are involved in the maintenance of pain symptoms. Thus, promotion of adaptive, treatment-responsive neuroplasticity represents a promising clinical target. Emerging evidence about the human brain's response to an array of behavioral and environmental interventions may assist in identifying targets to facilitate increased neurobiological receptivity, promoting healthy neuroplastic changes. Specifically, strategies to maximize neuroplastic responsiveness to chronic pain treatment could enhance treatment gains by optimization of learning and positive central nervous system adaptation. Periods of heightened plasticity have been traditionally identified with the early years of development. More recent research, however, has identified a wide spectrum of methods that can be used to "reopen" and enhance plasticity and learning in adults. In addition to transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation, behavioral and pharmacological interventions have been investigated. Intermittent fasting and glucose administration are two propitious strategies, that are noninvasive, inexpensive to administer, implementable in numerous settings, and might be applicable across differing chronic pain treatments. Key findings and neurophysiological mechanisms are summarized, and evidence for the potential clinical contributions of these two strategies toward ameliorating chronic pain is presented. Neuroplastic changes are a defining feature of chronic pain and a complicating factor in treatment. Noninvasive strategies to optimize the brain's response to treatment interventions might improve learning and memory, increase the positive adaptability of the central nervous system, and enhance treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Associations between Dietary Patterns and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Chinese Men: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meilin; Zhu, Yufeng; Li, Ping; Chang, Hong; Wang, Xuan; Liu, Weiqiao; Zhang, Yuwen; Huang, Guowei

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the association between Asian dietary pattern and prediabetes, in particular, the Chinese diet. We conducted a cross-sectional study to identify dietary patterns associated with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) which considered a state of prediabetes in Chinese men. The study included 1495 Chinese men aged 20 to 75 years. Information about diet was obtained using an 81-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), and 21 predefined food groups were considered in a factor analysis. Three dietary patterns were generated by factor analysis: (1) a vegetables-fruits pattern; (2) an animal offal-dessert pattern; and (3) a white rice-red meat pattern. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of IFG for the highest tertile of the animal offal-dessert pattern in comparison with the lowest tertile was 3.15 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.87–5.30). The vegetables-fruits dietary pattern was negatively associated with the risk of IFG, but a significant association was observed only in the third tertile. There was no significant association between IFG and the white rice-red meat pattern. Our findings indicated that the vegetables-fruits dietary pattern was inversely associated with IFG, whereas the animal offal-dessert pattern was associated with an increased risk of IFG in Chinese men. Further prospective studies are needed to elucidate the diet-prediabetes relationships. PMID:26402695

  4. [Genetic determination of fast plasma glucose concentration and correlation with anthropometric indices].

    PubMed

    Jian, Wei-xia; Su, Qing; Luo, Min

    2009-04-01

    To study the genetic determination of fast plasma glucose (FPG) and correlation with its potential correlated traits, anthropometric measures and blood pressure. Two hundred and eighteen Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) pedigrees composed of 1383 Chinese Han individuals residing in the East and South-East China were analyzed. Univariate variance decomposition analyses were used to estimate the narrow-sense heritability (h(2)) of FPG, anthropometric indices and blood pressure, and bivariate quantitative genetic analyses were used to estimate the genetic and environmental correlations between FPG and anthropometric measures or blood pressure. We found that FPG, blood pressure and all anthropometric indices except for waist to hip ratio were under significant genetic determination, and the h(2) was from 0.28 to 0.43. We did not find significant genetic and environmental correlation between FPG and anthropometric indices and blood pressure. The present study demonstrated that T2DM, obesity and hypertension were controlled by some genetic factors, and FPG shares little common genetic and environmental factors with obesity-related anthropometric indices and blood pressure in our Chinese sample population.

  5. Associations between Dietary Patterns and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Chinese Men: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meilin; Zhu, Yufeng; Li, Ping; Chang, Hong; Wang, Xuan; Liu, Weiqiao; Zhang, Yuwen; Huang, Guowei

    2015-09-21

    Few studies have examined the association between Asian dietary pattern and prediabetes, in particular, the Chinese diet. We conducted a cross-sectional study to identify dietary patterns associated with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) which considered a state of prediabetes in Chinese men. The study included 1495 Chinese men aged 20 to 75 years. Information about diet was obtained using an 81-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), and 21 predefined food groups were considered in a factor analysis. Three dietary patterns were generated by factor analysis: (1) a vegetables-fruits pattern; (2) an animal offal-dessert pattern; and (3) a white rice-red meat pattern. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of IFG for the highest tertile of the animal offal-dessert pattern in comparison with the lowest tertile was 3.15 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.87-5.30). The vegetables-fruits dietary pattern was negatively associated with the risk of IFG, but a significant association was observed only in the third tertile. There was no significant association between IFG and the white rice-red meat pattern. Our findings indicated that the vegetables-fruits dietary pattern was inversely associated with IFG, whereas the animal offal-dessert pattern was associated with an increased risk of IFG in Chinese men. Further prospective studies are needed to elucidate the diet-prediabetes relationships.

  6. Increasing Neuroplasticity to Bolster Chronic Pain Treatment: A Role for Intermittent Fasting and Glucose Administration?

    PubMed Central

    Sibille, KT; Bartsch, F; Reddy, D; Fillingim, RB; Keil, A

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplastic changes in brain structure and function are not only a consequence of chronic pain but are involved in the maintenance of pain symptoms. Thus, promoting adaptive, treatment responsive neuroplasticity represents a promising clinical target. Emerging evidence about the human brain’s response to an array of behavioral and environmental interventions may assist in identifying targets to facilitate increased neurobiological receptivity, promoting healthy neuroplastic changes. Specifically, strategies to maximize neuroplastic responsiveness to chronic pain treatment could enhance treatment gains by optimizing learning and positive central nervous system (CNS) adaptation. Periods of heightened plasticity have been traditionally identified with the early years of development. More recent research however has identified a wide spectrum of methods that can be used to “re-open” and enhance plasticity and learning in adults. In addition to transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation, behavioral and pharmacological interventions have been investigated. Intermittent fasting and glucose administration are two propitious strategies, which are non-invasive, inexpensive to administer, implementable in numerous settings, and may be applicable across differing chronic pain treatments. Key findings and neurophysiological mechanisms are summarized, providing evidence for the potential clinical contributions of these two strategies toward ameliorating chronic pain. PMID:26848123

  7. The Effects of Moderate Whole Grain Consumption on Fasting Glucose and Lipids, Gastrointestinal Symptoms, and Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Danielle N; Kable, Mary E; Marco, Maria L; De Leon, Angela; Rust, Bret; Baker, Julita E; Horn, William; Burnett, Dustin; Keim, Nancy L

    2017-02-21

    This study was designed to determine if providing wheat, corn, and rice as whole (WG) or refined grains (RG) under free-living conditions will change parameters of health over a six-week intervention in healthy, habitual non-WG consumers. Measurements of body composition, fecal microbiota, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides were made at baseline and post intervention. Subjects were given adequate servings of either WG or RG products based on their caloric need and asked to keep records of grain consumption, bowel movements, and GI symptoms weekly. After six weeks, subjects repeated baseline testing. Significant decreases in total, LDL, and non-HDL cholesterol were seen after the WG treatments but were not observed in the RG treatment. During Week 6, bowel movement frequency increased with increased WG consumption. No significant differences in microbiota were seen between baseline and post intervention, although, abundance of order Erysipelotrichales increased in RG subjects who ate more than 50% of the RG market basket products. Increasing consumption of WGs can alter parameters of health, but more research is needed to better elucidate the relationship between the amount consumed and the health-related outcome.

  8. Air pollution and fasting blood glucose: A longitudinal study in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linping; Zhou, Yong; Li, Shanshan; Williams, Gail; Kan, Haidong; Marks, Guy B; Morawska, Lidia; Abramson, Michael J; Chen, Shuohua; Yao, Taicheng; Qin, Tianbang; Wu, Shouling; Guo, Yuming

    2016-01-15

    Limited studies have examined the associations between air pollutants [particles with diameters of 10 μm or less (PM10), sulphur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2)] and fasting blood glucose (FBG). We collected data for 27,685 participants who were followed during 2006 and 2008. Generalized Estimating Equation models were used to examine the effects of air pollutants on FBG while controlling for potential confounders. We found that increased exposure to NO2, SO2 and PM10 was significantly associated with increased FBG levels in single pollutant models (p<0.001). For exposure to 4 days' average of concentrations, a 100 μg/m(3) increase in SO2, NO2, and PM10 was associated with 0.17 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.15-0.19), 0.53 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.42-0.65), and 0.11 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.07-0.15) increase in FBG, respectively. In the multi-pollutant models, the effects of SO2 were enhanced, while the effects of NO2 and PM10 were alleviated. The effects of air pollutants on FBG were stronger in female, elderly, and overweight people than in male, young and underweight people. In conclusion, the findings suggest that air pollution increases the levels of FBG. Vulnerable people should pay more attention on highly polluted days to prevent air pollution-related health issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucoregulatory function among African Americans and European Americans with normal or pre-diabetic hemoglobin A1c levels.

    PubMed

    Ebenibo, Sotonte; Edeoga, Chimaroke; Wan, Jim; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2014-06-01

    A hemoglobin (Hb) A1c range of 5.7%-6.4% has been recommended for the diagnosis of prediabetes. To determine the significance of such "prediabetic" HbA1c levels, we compared glucoregulatory function in persons with HbA1c levels of 5.7%-6.4% and those with HbA1c<5.7%. We studied 280 nondiabetic adults (142 black, 138 white; mean (±SD) age 44.2±10.6 years). Each subject underwent clinical assessment, blood sampling for HbA1c measurement, and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test at baseline. Additional assessments during subsequent outpatient visits included insulin sensitivity, using homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-IR and the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; insulin secretion, using HOMA-B and frequently samples intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) and disposition index (DI); and measurement of fat mass, using DXA. Compared to subjects with HbA1c<5.7%, persons with HbA1c levels of 5.7%-6.4% were older, and had higher body mass index (BMI) and insulin secretion but similar insulin sensitivity. When the two groups were matched in age and BMI, persons with HbA1c 5.7%-6.4% were indistinguishable from those with HbA1c <5.7% with regard to all measures of glycemia and glucoregulatory function. Unlike glucose-defined prediabetes status, an HbA1c range of 5.7%-6.4% does not reliably identify individuals with impaired insulin action or secretion, the classical defects underlying the pathophysiology of prediabetes. Thus, HbA1c cannot validly replace blood glucose measurement in the diagnosis of prediabetes. If utilized as a screening test due to convenience, aberrant HbA1c values should be corroborated with blood glucose measurement before therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Indicators of glycemic control --hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), glycated albumin (GA), and 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG)].

    PubMed

    Sato, Asako

    2014-01-01

    The clinical goal of diabetes management is a good quality of life that is not different from that of a healthy subjects. To fulfill the goal, prevention of complications is needed under good glycemic control. Although blood glucose measurement is essential for glycemic control, there are diurnal variations in blood glucose levels. An indicator of long-term glycemic control is necessary. HbA1c is the gold standard measurement for the assessment of glycemic control, and worldwide large scale clinical studies of diabetes complications have greatly valued HbA1c as an indicator of glycemic control. In addition, recently, HbA1c was recommended for use in the diagnosis of diabetes in Japan and in the United States. Although HbA1c is used widely and internationally, international standardization of the HbA1c value has not been achieved. In Japan, from April 2014, it has been decided to adopt the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP) value, which is used by many countries globally, as the first step toward internationalization. Recently, cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients has been increasing in Japan. Relationships between postprandial hyperglycemia and cardiovascular disease have been noted. Therefore, the correction of postprandial hyperglycemia is one of the important goals of glycemic control to prevent cardiovascular disease. HbA1c or glycated albumin (GA) results from the glycation of hemoglobin or serum albumin and represents 2-month or 2-week glycemia, respectively. In addition, the glycation speed of GA is ten times faster than HbA1c, so GA is likely to reflect the variation in blood glucose and postprandial hyperglycemia in combination with HbA1c and its value. 1,5-anhydroglucitol (AG) is a marker of glycemia-induced glycosuria, since reabsorption of filtered 1,5-AG in the proximal tubule is competitively inhibited by glucose. It is an indicator to identify rapid changes in hyperglycemia. Understanding the characteristics of the

  11. Impaired glucose tolerance and predisposition to the fasted state in liver glycogen synthase knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Jose M; Meyer, Catalina M; Peper, Caron L; Zhai, Lanmin; Bock, Cheryl B; Previs, Stephen F; McGuinness, Owen P; DePaoli-Roach, Anna; Roach, Peter J

    2010-04-23

    Conversion to glycogen is a major fate of ingested glucose in the body. A rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen is glycogen synthase encoded by two genes, GYS1, expressed in muscle and other tissues, and GYS2, primarily expressed in liver (liver glycogen synthase). Defects in GYS2 cause the inherited monogenic disease glycogen storage disease 0. We have generated mice with a liver-specific disruption of the Gys2 gene (liver glycogen synthase knock-out (LGSKO) mice), using Lox-P/Cre technology. Conditional mice carrying floxed Gys2 were crossed with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the albumin promoter. The resulting LGSKO mice are viable, develop liver glycogen synthase deficiency, and have a 95% reduction in fed liver glycogen content. They have mild hypoglycemia but dispose glucose less well in a glucose tolerance test. Fed, LGSKO mice also have a reduced capacity for exhaustive exercise compared with mice carrying floxed alleles, but the difference disappears after an overnight fast. Upon fasting, LGSKO mice reach within 4 h decreased blood glucose levels attained by control floxed mice only after 24 h of food deprivation. The LGSKO mice maintain this low blood glucose for at least 24 h. Basal gluconeogenesis is increased in LGSKO mice, and insulin suppression of endogenous glucose production is impaired as assessed by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. This observation correlates with an increase in the liver gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression and activity. This mouse model mimics the pathophysiology of glycogen storage disease 0 patients and highlights the importance of liver glycogen stores in whole body glucose homeostasis.

  12. Association between Alcohol Intake and Hemoglobin A1c in the Korean Adults: The 2011-2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Although alcohol consumption is commonly encountered in clinical practice, few studies have investigated the clinical significance of alcohol intake on the use of the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level. Objectives This study was performed to investigate the association between alcohol intake and HbA1c level in the general population. Methods Among the 24,594 participants who participated in the 2011–2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 12,923 participants were analyzed in this study. We excluded diabetic patients currently taking antidiabetes medication. We compared the HbA1c level and proportions of patients with an HbA1c level of ≥5.7%, ≥6.1%, and ≥6.5% according to the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) concentration range and the amount of alcohol intake. The average amounts of daily alcohol intake were categorized into three groups: 0 g/day, <30 g/day, ≥30 g/day. Results The mean HbA1c level was 5.65%, and the mean FPG concentration was 95.3 mg/dl. The percentages of patients with an HbA1c level of ≥5.7%, ≥6.1%, and ≥6.5% were 42.6%, 13.4%, and 4.5%, respectively. The average amount of alcohol intake was 12.3 g/day. The percentages of subjects with alcohol intake 0, <30, and ≥ 30 g/day were 16.5%, 69.7%, and 13.8%, respectively. There was a significant positive relationship between alcohol intake and FPG concentration (P < 0.001), the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (P < 0.001), and the prevalence of diabetes (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant relationship between the alcohol intake and HbA1c level. Overall, the adjusted HbA1c levels decreased across alcohol intake (5.70% ± 0.01%, 5.66% ± 0.01%, and 5.55% ± 0.01%) after adjustment for confounding factors such as age, sex, FPG concentration, college graduation, smoking history, presence of hypertension, waist circumference, serum total cholesterol concentration, serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, serum triglyceride

  13. Dose-response study of sajabalssuk ethanol extract from Artemisia princeps Pampanini on blood glucose in subjects with impaired fasting glucose or mild type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Young; Shin, Su-Kyung; Jeon, Seon-Min; Baek, Nam-In; Chung, Hae-Gon; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Lee, Kyung Tae; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Previously we reported that an ethanol extract from Artemisia princeps Pampanini lowered blood glucose in db/db mice. Here we report a preliminary study in which the blood glucose-lowering effects of two different doses of sajabalssuk ethanol extract (SBE), containing eupatilin and jaseocidin, were examined in hyperglycemic subjects with fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels of 100-150 mg/dL. Subjects were randomized into four groups: negative control (2,000 mg of lactose /day), positive control (1,140 mg of pinitol/day), low-dose SBE (2,000 mg of SBE/day), and high-dose SBE (4,000 mg of SBE/day). After 8 weeks of supplementation, FBG and glycosylated hemoglobin levels were significantly lowered in low-and high-dose SBE groups compared to the baseline values; high-dose SBE also resulted in significantly lower plasma free fatty acid levels and systolic blood pressure. This study demonstrated that supplementation of 2 g or 4 g of SBE daily can significantly reduce blood glucose in hyperglycemic subjects, although high-dose SBE seemed to be more effective than low-dose SBE for lowering plasma free fatty acid level and systolic blood pressure.

  14. Using Serum Advanced Glycation End Products-Peptides to Improve the Efficacy of World Health Organization Fasting Plasma Glucose Criterion in Screening for Diabetes in High-Risk Chinese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zilin; He, Jiajia; Qiu, Shanhu; Lei, Chenghao; Zhou, Yi; Xie, Zuolin; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Yanping; Jin, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of using fasting plasma glucose (FPG) alone as a preferred screening test for diabetes has been questioned. This study was aimed to evaluate whether the use of serum advanced glycation end products-peptides (sAGEP) would help to improve the efficacy of FPG in diabetes screening among high-risk Chinese subjects with FPG <7.0 mmol/L. FPG, 2-h plasma glucose (2h-PG), serum glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and sAGEP were measured in 857 Chinese subjects with risk factors for diabetes. The areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves generated by logistic regression models were assessed and compared to find the best model for diabetes screening in subjects with FPG <7.0 mmol/L. The optimal critical line was determined by maximizing the sum of sensitivity and specificity. Among the enrolled subjects, 730 of them had FPG <7.0 mmol/L, and only 41.7% new diabetes cases were identified using the 1999 World Health Organization FPG criterion (FPG ≥7.0 mmol/L). The area under ROC curves generated by the model on FPG-sAGEP was the largest compared with that on FPG-HbA1c, sAGEP, HbA1c or FPG in subjects with FPG <7.0 mmol/L. By maximizing the sum of sensitivity and specificity, the optimal critical line was determined as 0.69×FPG + 0.14×sAGEP = 7.03, giving a critical sensitivity of 91.2% in detecting 2h-PG ≥11.1 mmol/L, which was significantly higher than that of FPG-HbA1c or HbA1c. The model on FPG-sAGEP improves the efficacy of using FPG alone in detecting diabetes among high-risk Chinese subjects with FPG <7.0 mmol/L, and is worth being promoted for future diabetes screening.

  15. Diabetes mellitus, hemoglobin A1C, and the incidence of total joint arthroplasty infection.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Richard; Williams, Kelly M; Marcantonio, Andrew J; Specht, Lawrence M; Tilzey, John F; Healy, William L

    2012-05-01

    Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of infection after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) than patients without diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are a marker for blood glucose control in diabetic patients. A total of 3468 patients underwent 4241 primary or revision total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty at one institution. Hemoglobin A1c levels were examined to evaluate if there was a correlation between the control of HbA1c and infection after TJA. There were a total of 46 infections (28 deep and 18 superficial [9 cellulitis and 9 operative abscesses]). Twelve (3.43%) occurred in diabetic patients (n = 350; 8.3%) and 34 (0.87%) in nondiabetic patients (n = 3891; 91.7%) (P < .001). There were 9 deep (2.6%) infections in diabetic patients and 19 (0.49%) in nondiabetic patients. In noninfected, diabetic patients, HbA1c level ranged from 4.7% to 15.1% (mean, 6.92%). In infected diabetic patients, HbA1c level ranged from 5.1% to 11.7% (mean, 7.2%) (P < .445). The average HbA1c level in patients with diabetes was 6.93%. Diabetic patients have a significantly higher risk for infection after TJA. Hemoglobin A1c levels are not reliable for predicting the risk of infection after TJA.

  16. Factor Analysis of Changes in Hemoglobin A1c After 12 Months of Sitagliptin Therapy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yuasa, Shouhei; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Takai, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Masashi; Umezawa, Shinichi; Kubota, Akira; Maeda, Hajime; Kanamori, Akira; Miyakawa, Masaaki; Tanaka, Yasushi; Terauchi, Yasuo; Matsuba, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, is an effective oral antidiabetic agent as both monotherapy and when combined with insulin. Data from three observational studies performed in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving sitagliptin therapy in the routine clinical setting were integrated to conduct factor analysis of the changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), body weight, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over 12 months. Methods Among patients with type 2 diabetes attending medical institutions affiliated with Kanagawa Physicians Association, those using sitagliptin were followed for 1 year. In the ASSET-K and ASSIST-K studies, patients were managed by diabetologists, while they were managed by non-diabetologists in the ATTEST-K study. Patients were not administered insulin in ASSET-K, whereas insulin was administered in ASSIST-K. HbA1c (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program), blood glucose (fasting/postprandial), body weight, and renal function (serum creatinine and eGFR) were the efficacy endpoints. Factor analysis was performed by analysis of variance using the magnitude of the change in HbA1c, body weight, and eGFR after 12 months of sitagliptin therapy as response variables, and the study, sex, and age as explanatory variables. Results Of 1,327 patients registered in ASSET-K (diabetologists/without insulin), 1,167 patients in ASSIST-K (diabetologists/with insulin), and 530 patients in ATTEST-K (non-diabetologists), statistical analysis was carried out on 1,074, 854, and 411 patients, respectively. There were significant inter-study differences in patient characteristics (complications, duration of diabetes, and baseline HbA1c), the sitagliptin dose, and the use of other antidiabetic agents. HbA1c decreased significantly in all three studies. According to factor analysis, the magnitude of the change in HbA1c over 12 months showed significant inter-study differences and was also significantly influenced by the age

  17. Does Ramadan fasting alter body weight and blood lipids and fasting blood glucose in a healthy population? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kul, Seval; Savaş, Esen; Öztürk, Zeynel Abidin; Karadağ, Gülendam

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis of self-controlled cohort studies comparing body weights, blood levels of lipids and fasting blood glucose levels before and after Ramadan taking into account gender differences. Several databases were searched up to June 2012 for studies showing an effect of Ramadan fasting in healthy subjects, yielding 30 articles. The primary finding of this meta-analysis was that after Ramadan fasting, low-density lipoprotein (SMD = -1.67, 95 % CI = -2.48 to -0.86) and fasting blood glucose levels (SMD = -1.10, 95 % CI = -1.62 to -0.58) were decreased in both sex groups and also in the entire group compared to levels prior to Ramadan. In addition, in the female subgroup, body weight (SMD = -0.04, 95 % CI = -0.20, 0.12), total cholesterol (SMD = 0.05, 95 % CI = -0.51 to 0.60), and triglyceride levels (SMD = 0.03, 95 % CI = -0.31, 0.36) remained unchanged, while HDL levels (SMD = 0.86, 95 % CI = 0.11 to 1.61, p = 0.03) were increased. In males, Ramadan fasting resulted in weight loss (SMD = -0.24, 95 % CI = -0.36, -0.12, p = 0.001). Also, a substantial reduction in total cholesterol (SMD = -0.44, 95 % CI = -0.77 to -0.11) and LDL levels (SMD = -2.22, 95 % CI = -3.47 to -0.96) and a small decrease in triglyceride levels (SMD = -0.35, 95 % CI = -0.67 to -0.02) were observed in males. In conclusion, by looking at this data, it is evident that Ramadan fasting can effectively change body weight and some biochemical parameters in healthy subjects especially in males compared to pre-Ramadan period.

  18. Nutraceutical Effects on Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Patients with Impaired Fasting Glucose: A Pilot, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Clinical Trial on a Combined Product.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Arrigo Francesco Giuseppe; Fogacci, Federica; Morbini, Martino; Colletti, Alessandro; Bove, Marilisa; Veronesi, Maddalena; Giovannini, Marina; Borghi, Claudio

    2017-05-23

    A number of natural compounds have individually demonstrated to improve glucose and lipid levels in humans. To  evaluate the short-term glucose and lipid-lowering activity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose. To assess the effects of a combination of nutraceuticals based on Lagerstroemia speciosa, Berberis aristata, Curcuma longa, Alpha-lipoic acid, Chrome picolinate and Folic acid, we performed a double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial in 40 adults affected by impaired fasting glucose (FPG = 100-125 mg/dL) in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. After a period of 2 weeks of dietary habits correction only, patients continued the diet and began a period of 8 weeks of treatment with nutraceutical or placebo. Data related to lipid pattern, insulin resistance, liver function and hsCRP were obtained at the baseline and at the end of the study. No side effects were detected in both groups of subjects. After the nutraceutical treatment, and compared to the placebo-treated group, the enrolled patients experienced a significant improvement in TG (-34.7%), HDL-C (+13.7), FPI (-13.4%), and HOMA-Index (-25%) versus the baseline values. No significant changes were observed in the other investigated parameters in both groups (Body Mass Index, LDL-C, hsCRP). The tested combination of nutraceuticals showed clinical efficacy in the improvement of TG, HDL-C, FPI and HOMA-Index, with an optimal tolerability profile. Further confirmation is needed to verify these observations on the middle and long term with a larger number of subjects.

  19. Effects of pioglitazone on bone in postmenopausal women with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bone, Henry G; Lindsay, Robert; McClung, Michael R; Perez, Alfonso T; Raanan, Marsha G; Spanheimer, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Meta-analyses of clinical studies have suggested an increased incidence of peripheral fractures in postm