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Sample records for a1c hba1c levels

  1. Analysis of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level on maxillofacial fascial space infection in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jong-Won; Kim, Moon-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was performed to evaluate the impact of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level on characteristics and prognosis of maxillofacial fascial infection in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed the medical records of 72 patients (35 patients with HbA1c lower than 7.0% and 37 patients with HbA1c higher than 7.0%) diagnosed with maxillofacial fascial space infection and hospitalized for treatment at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Dankook University Hospital (Cheonan, Korea) from January 2005 to February 2014. We compared demographics, parameters of glucoregulation (HbA1c), laboratory parameters of inflammation (white blood cell [WBC], C-reactive protein [CRP] count), type and number of involved spaces, type and number of antibiotics, period of hospitalization, number of surgical operations, need for tracheostomy, complications, computed tomography (CT), and microorganisms between the two groups. Results Compared with the well-controlled diabetes mellitus (DM) group (HbA1c <7.0%), patients in the poorly-controlled (HbA1c ≥7.0%) DM group had the following characteristics: longer hospitalization periods, higher values of laboratory parameters of inflammation (WBC, CRP count) at the time of admission, higher number of antibiotics prescribed, more frequent complications, frequent deep neck space involvement, and distinctive main causative microorganisms. As the HbA1c level increases, hospitalization periods and incidence of complications increase gradually. Conclusion This retrospective study suggests that regulation of DM significantly impacts maxillofacial fascial infection. Poorly controlled DM with high HbA1c level negatively influences the prognosis of infection. PMID:26568927

  2. The impact of the HbA1c level of type 2 diabetics on the structure of haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shaoying; Ruan, Ping; Yong, Junguang; Shen, Hongtao; Liao, Zhihong; Dong, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the impact of HbA1c levels on the structure of haemoglobin (Hb) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Seventy-four diabetic patients were classified into the following two groups based on their level of HbA1c: group A, patients with good glycaemic control (HbA1c < 7.0%, n = 36); group B, patients with persistent hyperglycaemia (HbA1c ≥ 9.0%, n = 38). Thirty-four healthy people served as controls (group H). Hb structure was examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and diabetic erythrocytes were modelled to estimate the impact of glucose on these cells and Hb. Increasing glucose concentrations altered both erythrocyte parameters and the Hb secondary structure. Group B differed significantly from group H (p < 0.05): in the former, the ordered Hb secondary structure had a strong tendency to transform into a disordered secondary structure, decreasing structural stability. We presumed here that high HbA1c levels might be a factor contributing to Hb structural modifications in diabetic patients. FTIR spectral analysis can provide a novel way to investigate the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27624402

  3. Evaluation of the relationship between corneal biomechanic and HbA1C levels in type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Yazgan, Serpil; Celik, Ugur; Kaldırım, Havva; Ayar, Orhan; Elbay, Ahmet; Aykut, Veysel; Celik, Burcu; Taş, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the corneal biomechanical properties due to the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels using the ocular response analyzer (ORA) in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods ORA values were obtained from 156 eyes of subjects with type 2 DM and 74 eyes of healthy control subjects with similar age and sex. Subjects were divided into three groups: Group 1, healthy control subjects; Group 2, diabetes patients with HbA1C <7%; and Group 3, diabetes patients with HbA1C ≥7%. Corneal biomechanical parameters: corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), Goldmann-correlated pressure (IOPg), and corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOPcc) measurements were obtained using ORA. Ultrasound pachymetry was used for measurement of central corneal thickness (CCT). Results CH and CRF were significantly different in each of the three groups (P-values for CH respectively; Groups 1 and 2=0.008, Groups 1 and 3, and Groups 2 and 3, <0.001, and for CRF respectively; =0.002, <0.001, <0.001). CCT was significantly different between Groups 1 and 3 and Groups 2 and 3 (P<0.001) but was insignificant between Groups 1 and 2 (P=0.965). IOPcc was not different between Groups 1 and 2 (P=0.524), and Groups 2 and 3 (P=0.115), but was significantly different between Groups 1 and 3 (P=0.003). IOPg was statistically different between each of the three groups (respectively; Groups 1 and 2, P=0.015, Groups 1 and 3, and Groups 2 and 3, P<0.001). Conclusion Both diabetes groups were affected in terms of corneal biomechanical properties when compared to healthy subjects, there was also a positive correlation between HbA1C level and intraocular pressure. PMID:25170249

  4. Meta-analysis of telemonitoring to improve HbA1c levels: promise for stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Bryan A; Taylor, Blake; Appelboom, Geoff; Prasad, Kiran; Bruce, Sam; Yang, Annie; Bruce, Eliza; Christophe, Brandon; Connolly, E Sander

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring glycemic control is useful not only in the primary prevention of stroke in diabetics, but also in the rehabilitation from and secondary prevention of stroke. In an often functionally and neurocognitively impaired population, however, poor compliance with treatment regimens is a major problem. Wireless, telemonitoring glucometers - often integrated into the patient's healthcare system - offer a solution to the compliance issue. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of telemonitoring technologies in improving long-term glycemic control. A search on www.clinicaltrials.gov, using keywords such as "telemonitoring" and "self-care device" was performed, and five trials were identified that compared hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of a group receiving standard care (controls) to a group receiving a telemonitoring intervention. Four of the five studies showed a greater reduction in HbA1c in the intervention group compared to controls at 6 months, although only one was statistically significant. There was considerable heterogeneity between studies (I(2)=69.5%, p=0.02), and the random effects model estimated the aggregate effect size for mean difference in reduction of HbA1c levels to be 0.08% (95% confidence interval -0.12% to 0.28%), which was not statistically significant (p=0.42). The varying results may be due to specific factors in the trials that contributed to their large heterogeneity, and further trials are needed to support the role of telemonitoring in improving diabetes management in this population. Nonetheless, in the future telemonitoring may substantially help patients at risk of ischemic stroke and those who require close glucose monitoring. PMID:25791996

  5. Quantitative classification of HbA1C and blood glucose level for diabetes diagnosis using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Saraoğlu, Hamdi Melih; Temurtas, Feyzullah; Altıkat, Sayit

    2013-12-01

    In this study, artificial neural network structures were used for the quantitative classification of Haemoglobin A1C and blood glucose level for diabetes diagnosis as a non-invasive measurement technique. The neural network structures make inferences from the relationship between the palm perspiration and blood data values. For this purpose, feed forward multilayer, Elman, and radial basis neural network structures were used. The quartz crystal microbalance type and humidity sensors were used for the detection of palm perspiration rates. Total 297 volunteer's data is used in this study. Three quarters of the data was used to train the neural networks. The remaining data were used as test data. The best results for the quantitative classification were obtained from the feed forward NN structure for the detection of the glucose and HbA1C level quantities. And, the performances of all neural networks for the HbA1C value were better than the performances of these neural networks for the glucose level. PMID:23975344

  6. Heterogeneous behavior of lipids according to HbA1c levels undermines the plausibility of metabolic syndrome in type 1 diabetes: data from a nationwide multicenter survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) may cluster in type 1 diabetes, analogously to the metabolic syndrome described in type 2 diabetes. The threshold of HbA1c above which lipid variables start changing behavior is unclear. This study aims to 1) assess the behavior of dyslipidemia according to HbA1c values; 2) detect a threshold of HbA1c beyond which lipids start to change and 3) compare the clustering of lipids and other non-lipid CVRF among strata of HbA1c individuals with type 1 diabetes. Methods Effects of HbA1c quintiles (1st: ≤7.4%; 2nd: 7.5-8.5%; 3rd: 8.6-9.6%; 4th: 9.7-11.3%; and 5th: >11.5%) and covariates (gender, BMI, blood pressure, insulin daily dose, lipids, statin use, diabetes duration) on dyslipidemia were studied in 1275 individuals from the Brazilian multi-centre type 1 diabetes study and 171 normal controls. Results Body size and blood pressure were not correlated to lipids and glycemic control. OR (99% CI) for high-LDL were 2.07 (1.21-3.54) and 2.51 (1.46-4.31), in the 4th and 5th HbA1c quintiles, respectively. Hypertriglyceridemia increased in the 5th quintile of HbA1c, OR 2.76 (1.20-6.37). OR of low-HDL-cholesterol were 0.48 (0.24-0.98) and 0.41 (0.19-0.85) in the 3rd and 4th HbA1c quintiles, respectively. HDL-cholesterol correlated positively (0.437) with HbA1c in the 3rd quintile. HDL-cholesterol and insulin dose correlated inversely in all levels of glycemic control. Conclusions Correlation of serum lipids with HbA1c is heterogeneous across the spectrum of glycemic control in type 1 diabetes individuals. LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides worsened alongside HbA1c with distinct thresholds. Association of lower HDL-cholesterol with higher daily insulin dose is consistent and it points out to a role of exogenous hyperinsulinemia in the pathophysiology of the CVRF clustering. These data suggest diverse pathophysiological processes depending on HbA1c, refuting a unified explanation for cardiovascular risk in type 1 diabetes. PMID

  7. Pediatric Diabetes Consortium Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) New Onset (NeOn) Study: Factors Associated with HbA1c Levels One Year after Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Maria J.; Connor, Crystal G.; Ruedy, Katrina J.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Wood, Jamie R.; Buckingham, Bruce; Klingensmith, Georgeanna; Silverstein, Janet; Tamborlane, William V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify determinants of HbA1c levels one year after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Research Design and Methods Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyzed in 857 participants (mean age 9.1 years, 51% female, 66% non-Hispanic White) not participating in an intervention study who had an HbA1c value at 12 months. Results Mean ± SD HbA1c at one year was 62 ± 16 mmol/mol (7.8% ± 1.5). In univariate and multivariate analyses, clinical center, non-Hispanic White race, private health insurance, living with both parents, higher frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), and lower insulin requirements were associated with lower HbA1c concentrations at one year (p<0.01). No association was found with gender, age, Tanner stage, BMI, DKA at onset, number of positive autoantibodies or HbA1c at onset, or number of visits to diabetes physician during the first year. Conclusions White race, higher socioeconomic status, two-parent household, more frequent SMBG and low insulin requirements are associated with lower HbA1c concentration one year after the onset of T1D in children. PMID:23889707

  8. Elevated HbA1c Levels Are Associated with the Blunted Autonomic Response Assessed by Heart Rate Variability during Blood Volume Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kamakura, Miho; Maruyama, Ryoko

    2016-01-01

    A high glycemic status increases the risk for autonomic dysfunction and cardiovascular failure. The aim of this study was to investigate time-dependent changes in the autonomic response and cardiovascular dynamics and the association between the level of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and autonomic response during blood volume reduction. The study population consisted of 26 preoperative participants who were scheduled for autologous blood donation (200-400 mL of whole blood) for intraoperative or postoperative use. These participants without circulatory, respiratory, or brain disease and diabetes mellitus were grouped according to their HbA1c levels: < 6.5% (n = 18) and ≥ 6.5% (n = 8). We measured blood pressure (BP) and analyzed heart rate variability (HRV) to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation throughout blood donation. During blood volume reduction, which was about 10% of the circulating blood volume, the BP and heart rate varied within normal ranges in both groups. The high-frequency (HF) component, an index of parasympathetic nerve activity, and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) to HF components (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nerve activity, significantly decreased and increased with the progression of blood volume reduction, respectively, in the HbA1c < 6.5% group. In contrast, in the HbA1c ≥ 6.5% group, the HF component did not significantly change, and the increase in the LF/HF ratio was delayed. Time-dependent changes in HRV were related to blood volume reduction only in the HbA1c < 6.5% group. Thus, elevated HbA1c levels are associated with the decrease in the autonomic response induced by blood volume reduction. PMID:27615262

  9. Pediatric diabetes consortium type 1 diabetes new onset (NeOn) study: Factors associated with HbA1c levels one year after diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To identify determinants of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels 1 yr after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyze...

  10. HbA1c Levels Are Associated with Chronic Kidney Disease in a Non-Diabetic Adult Population: A Nationwide Survey (KNHANES 2011–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok Hui; Jung, Da Jung; Choi, Eun Woo; Cho, Kyu Hyang; Park, Jong Won; Do, Jun Young

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies have reported an association between glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in non-diabetes patients. Each component of MetS is in fact related to chronic kidney disease (CKD) incidence and progression. Therefore, HbA1c in non-diabetic mellitus (DM) may be intrinsically associated with the prevalence of CKD. The hypothesis of the present study was that high HbA1c in non-DM patients is associated with CKD. Patients and Methods The total number of participants in this study was 24,594. The participants were divided into three groups according to their HbA1c levels: a Low group (<5.7% or <39 mmol/mol), a Middle group (5.7–6.0% or 39–42 mmol/mol), and a High group (>6.0% or >42 mmol/mol). The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. Results The number of participants allocated to the Low, Middle, and High groups was 8,651, 4,634, and 1,387, respectively. Linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between variables. Standardized β ± standard error was 0.25 ± 0.22 for waist circumference, 0.44 ± 0.20 for fasting glucose, –0.14 ± 0.30 for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, 0.15 ± 2.31 for triglyceride levels, 0.21 ± 0.00 for systolic blood pressure, 0.10 ± 0.00 for diastolic blood pressure, and –0.22 ± 0.42 for eGFR (P < 0.001 for all variables). eGFR in non-diabetes participants was inversely associated with the HbA1c level, where eGFR decreased as HbA1c levels increased. Standardized βs were –0.04 ± 0.42 in multivariable analysis (P < 0.001). The proportion of participants with only MetS, only CKD, or both MetS and CKD was higher in the High group than in the Low and Middle groups. Conclusion High HbA1c in non-DM patients may be associated with CKD. Renal function in patients with high HbA1c levels may need to be monitored. PMID:26716684

  11. A Comparison of hs-CRP Levels in New Diabetes Groups Diagnosed Based on FPG, 2-hPG, or HbA1c Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncu, Yildiz; Satman, Ilhan; Celik, Selda; Dinccag, Nevin; Karsidag, Kubilay; Telci, Aysegul; Genc, Sema; Issever, Halim; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Omer, Beyhan

    2016-01-01

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) have been used to diagnose new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) in order to simplify the diagnostic tests compared with the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; 2-hPG). We aimed to identify optimal cut-off points of high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in new-onset DM people based on FPG, 2-hPG, or HbA1c methods. Data derived from recent population-based survey in Turkey (TURDEP-II). The study included 26,499 adult people (63% women, response rate 85%). The mean serum concentration of hs-CRP in women was higher than in men (p < 0.001). The people with new-onset DM based on HbA1c had higher mean hs-CRP level than FPG based and 2-hPG based DM cases. In HbA1c, 2-hPG, and FPG based new-onset DM people, cut-off levels of hs-CRP in women were 2.9, 2.1, and 2.5 mg/L [27.5, 19.7, and 23.5 nmol/L] and corresponding values in men were 2.0, 1.8, and 1.8 mg/L (19.0, 16.9, and 16.9 nmol/L), respectively (sensitivity 60–65% and specificity 54–64%). Our results revealed that hs-CRP may not further strengthen the diagnosis of new-onset DM. Nevertheless, the highest hs-CRP level observed in new-onset DM people diagnosed with HbA1c criterion supports the general assumption that this method might recognize people in more advanced diabetic stage compared with other diagnostic methods. PMID:26824043

  12. A discrepancy between plasma glycated albumin and HbA1c levels in a patient with steroid-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Katsumi; Kato, Takehiro; Mizuno, Masami; Takeda, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man was admitted for the treatment of steroid-induced diabetes mellitus (DM). He also had interstitial pneumonia and, to treat it, 20 mg prednisolone had been started in April 2014. Although glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level was 7.8% (62 mmol/mol), his glycated albumin (GA) level was normal (13.9%) and the ratio of GA to HbA1c (GA:HbA1c) was lower than that of normal participants and patients with type 2 DM. Plasma GA and GA:HbA1c levels became persistently lower. In September 2015, HbA1c levels measured by HPLC and immunoprecipitation methods were almost the same (6.8% (51 mmol/mol) and 6.7% (50 mmol/mol), respectively), but GA (10.2%) and GA:HbA1c (1.6) were much lower. We report the case of a patient with DM where steroid administration may have caused a decrease in plasma GA and GA:HbA1c levels via increased albumin turnover. PMID:26961565

  13. Diabetes and Elevated HbA1c levels are Associated with Brain Hypometabolism but not Amyloid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosebud O.; Knopman, David S.; Cha, Ruth H.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Boeve, Bradley F.; Kantarci, Kejal; Geda, Yonas E.; Jack, Clifford R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Lowe, Val J.

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional insulin signaling may affect brain metabolism or amyloid deposition. We investigated the associations of type 2 diabetes with amyloid accumulation measured using 11C-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) and brain hypometabolism measured using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods We studied a sample of non-demented participants from the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. All subjects underwent MRI, amyloid PET and FDG PET. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) signature and region of interest (ROI) measures for PiB retention ratio and FDG ratio were measured. Diabetes was assessed from the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records-linkage system. Results Among 749 participants (median age 79.0 years; 56.5% male, 81.0% cognitively normal; 20.6% diabetics), FDG hypometabolism (FDG ratio < 1.31) in the AD signature meta-ROI was more common in diabetics (48.1%) than in non-diabetics (28.9%; p <0.001). The median FDG ratio was lower in diabetics vs. non-diabetics in the AD signature meta-ROI (1.32 vs. 1.40, p < 0.001), and in the angular (1.40 vs. 1.48, p < 0.001) and posterior cingulate gyri ROIs (1.63 vs. 1.72, p < 0.001). The odds ratio (OR [95% confidence interval]) for abnormal AD signature FDG hypometabolism was elevated (OR, 2.28 [1.56, 3.33]) in diabetics vs. non-diabetics after adjustment for age, sex, and education, and after additional adjustment for Apolipoprotein ε4 allele, glycemic level, and cognitive status (OR, 1.69 [1.10, 2.60]). However, AD signature PiB retention ratio was similar in diabetics vs. non-diabetics (OR, 1.03 [0.71, 1.51]; p = 0.87). In post-hoc analyses in non-diabetics, a 1% increase in HBA1c was associated with greater AD signature hypometabolism in cognitively normal subjects (OR, 1.93 [1.03, 3.62; p = 0.04]) and in the total cohort (OR 1.59 [0.92, 2.75; p = 0.10). Conclusion Diabetes and poor glycemic control in non-diabetics may enhance glucose hypometabolism in AD signature regions

  14. Energy balance and macronutrient distribution in relation to C-reactive protein and HbA1c levels among patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bawadi, Hiba; Katkhouda, Rami; Al-Haifi, Ahmad; Tayyem, Reema; Elkhoury, Cosette Fakih; Jamal, Zeina

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently growing evidence indicates that obesity and diabetes are states of inflammation associated with elevated circulation of inflammatory mediators. Excess adiposity and oxidative stress, induced by feeding, may also lead to a state of low-grade inflammation. Objective This study aimed at investigating energy balance and distribution in relation to low-grade inflammation among patients with type 2 diabetes. Design A cross-sectional study included 198 male and female patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients’ weight, height, waist circumference, total body fat and truncal fat percent, energy, and macronutrient intake were measured. Venous blood specimens were collected, and levels of HbA1c and serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were determined. Results After adjusting for covariates (body mass index, total body fat, and truncal fat), energy balance was positively correlated with hs-CRP and HbA1c. A positive energy balance was also associated with increased waist circumference and truncal fat percent (p<0.05). Total energy intake, percent energy from fat (p=0.04), and percent energy from proteins (p=0.03), but not percent energy from carbohydrates (p=0.12), were also correlated with higher hs-CRP levels among poorly glycemic-controlled patients. Conclusion Positive energy balance is associated with elevations in hs-CRP. Increased energy intake and increased percentages of energy from fat and protein are associated with elevated hs-CRP among patients with poor glycemic control. PMID:27238554

  15. The Clinical Significance of HbA1c in Operable Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Manuel Jonas; Milger, Katrin; Haase, Sarah; Sommer, Natascha; Tello, Khodr; Seeger, Werner; Mayer, Eckhard; Wiedenroth, Christoph Benjamin; Grimminger, Friedrich; George, Wolfgang; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Guth, Stefan; Gall, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Background Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has been proposed as an independent predictor of long-term prognosis in pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the clinical relevance of HbA1c in patients with operable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical significance of HbA1c as a biomarker in CTEPH. Methods Prospectively, 102 patients underwent pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) in our national referral center between March 2013 and March 2014, of which after exclusion 45 patients were analyzed. HbA1c- levels, hemodynamic and exercise parameters were analyzed prior and one-year post-PEA. Results 45 patients (BMI: 27.3 ± 6.0 kg/m2; age: 62.7 ± 12.3 years) with a mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) of 43.6 ± 9.4 mmHg, a pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) of 712.1 ± 520.4 dyn*s/cm5, a cardiac index (CI) of 2.4 ± 0.5 l/min/m2 and a mean HbA1c-level of 39.8 ± 5.6 mmol/mol were included. One-year post-PEA pulmonary hemodynamic and functional status significantly improved in our cohort. Baseline HbA1c-levels were significantly associated with CI, right atrial pressure, peak oxygen uptake and the change of 6-minute walking distance using linear regression analysis. However, using logistic regression analysis baseline HbA1c-levels were not significantly associated with residual post-PEA PH. Conclusions This is the first prospective study to describe an association of HbA1c-levels with pulmonary hemodynamics and exercise capacity in operable CTEPH patients. Our preliminary results indicate that in these patients impaired glucose metabolism as assessed by HbA1c is of clinical significance. However, HbA1c failed as a predictor of the hemodynamic outcome one-year post-PEA. PMID:27031508

  16. Extreme Levels of HbA1c Increase Incident ESRD Risk in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Competing Risk Analysis in National Cohort of Taiwan Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chiu-Shong; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether HbA1c is a predictor of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in type 2 diabetes patients remains unclear. This study evaluated relationship between HbA1c and ESRD in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients aged ≥ 30 years who were free of ESRD (n = 51 681) were included from National Diabetes Care Management Program from 2002–2003. Extended Cox proportional hazard model with competing risk of death served to evaluate association between HbA1c level and ESRD. Results A total of 2613 (5.06%) people developed ESRD during a follow-up period of 8.1 years. Overall incidence rate of ESRD was 6.26 per 1000 person-years. Patients with high levels of HbA1c had a high incidence rate of ESRD, from 4.29 for HbA1c of  6.0%–6.9% to 10.33 for HbA1c ≥ 10.0% per 1000 person-years. Patients with HbA1c < 6.0% particularly had a slightly higher ESRD incidence (4.34 per 1000 person-years) than those with HbA1c  of 6.0%–6.9%. A J-shaped relationship between HbA1c level and ESRD risk was observed. After adjustment, patients with HbA1c < 6.0% and ≥ 10.0% exhibited an increased risk of ESRD (HR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.62–2.44; HR: 4.42, 95% CI: 3.80–5.14, respectively) compared with those with HbA1c of 6.0%–6.9%. Conclusions Diabetes care has focused on preventing hyperglycemia, but not hypoglycemia. Our study revealed that HbA1c level ≥ 7.0% was linked with increased ESRD risk in type 2 diabetes patients, and that HbA1c < 6.0% also had the potential to increase ESRD risk. Our study provides epidemiological evidence that appropriate glycemic control is essential for diabetes care to meet HbA1c targets and improve outcomes without increasing the risk to this population. Clinicians need to pay attention to HbA1c results on diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26098901

  17. Challenges in HbA1c Analysis and Reporting in Patients with Variant Hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Sultana, T A; Sheme, Z A; Sultana, G S; Sultana, B; Mishu, F A; Khan, N Z; Sarkar, B C; Muttalib, M A; Khan, S A; Choudhury, S; Mahtab, H

    2016-04-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA(1)c) is a well-established indicator of mean glycemia. The presence of genetic variants of hemoglobin can profoundly affect the accuracy of HbA(1)c measurements. Variants of hemoglobin especially Hemoglobin E (HbE) is prevalent in South East Asia including Bangladesh. The objective of our study is to compare the HbA(1)c values measured on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Turbidimetric Inhibition Immunoassay (TINIA) in diabetic patients with variant hemoglobins including HbE. A total of 7595 diabetic patients receiving treatment at BIRDEM General Hospital were analyzed for HbA(1)c results within a period of two months from December 2013 to January 2014. Seventy two cases out of 7595 (0.95%) had either undetectable or below normal HbA(1)c levels (males-33 and females-39; ratio = 0.82:1) by HPLC method. In 34(0.45%) cases, HbA(1)c value was undetectable by HPLC method but was in the reportable range by TINIA method. In the other 38 (0.55%) cases, HbA(1)c levels were below the reportable range (<4%) by HPLC method but were in the normal or higher range by TINIA method. TINIA method did not agree with HPLC method on Bland Altman plot in the 38 cases with below normal HbA(1)c levels, [Mean bias -5.2(-9.3 to 1.0), 95% CI] but agreed very well [mean bias -0.21 (-0.84 to 0.42), y=1.1037+0.776X; r(2)=0.30, p<0.01] in controls. In control group mean MCV was 83.80±7.48 and in study group was 73.65±10.44. Alkaline electrophoresis confirmed the variant hemoglobin to be HbE. The fasting blood sugar levels of all the 72 cases correlated strongly with TINIA method (r(2) =0.75, p<0.0001) but not with HPLC (r = 0.24, p=0.13). In our regions where populations have a high prevalence of Hb variant, proper knowledge of hemoglobin variants which affect the measurements HbA(1)c level is essential. MCV of 80fl or below may serve as a rough guide to select samples that require analysis by TINIA method. Moreover, HPLC may be a convenient and inexpensive

  18. Haemoglobin J-Baltimore can be detected by HbA1c electropherogram but with underestimated HbA1c value

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Valéry; Lahary, Agnčs; Chagraoui, Abdeslam; Thuillez, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is considered the gold standard for assessing diabetes compensation and treatment. In addition, fortuitous detection of haemoglobin variants during HbA1c measurement is not rare. Recently, two publications reported different conclusions on accuracy of HbA1c value using capillary electrophoresis method in presence of haemoglobin J-Baltimore (HbJ).
Here we describe the fortuitous detection of unknown HbJ using capillary electrophoresis for measurement of HbA1c. A patient followed for gestational diabetes in our laboratory presented unknown haemoglobin on Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing analyser which was identified as HbJ. HbJ is not associated with haematological abnormalities. High Performance Liquid Chromatography methods are known to possibly underestimate HbA1c value in the presence of this variant. This variant and its glycated form are clearly distinguished on electropherogram but HbJ was responsible for underestimating the true area of HbA1c.
Capillary electrophoresis is a good method for detecting HbJ but does not seem suitable for evaluation of HbA1C value in patients in presence of HbJ variant. PMID:27346969

  19. C-Peptide Level in Fasting Plasma and Pooled Urine Predicts HbA1c after Hospitalization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Remi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Kikuchi, Takako; Onishi, Yukiko; Takao, Toshiko; Tahara, Tazu; Yoshida, Yoko; Suzawa, Naoki; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kushiyama, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how measures of insulin secretion and other clinical information affect long-term glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Between October 2012 and June 2014, we monitored 202 diabetes patients who were admitted to the hospital of Asahi Life Foundation for glycemic control, as well as for training and education in diabetes management. We measured glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) six months after discharge to assess disease management. In univariate analysis, fasting plasma C-peptide immunoreactivity (F-CPR) and pooled urine CPR (U-CPR) were significantly associated with HbA1c, in contrast to ΔCPR and C-peptide index (CPI). This association was strongly independent of most other patient variables. In exploratory factor analysis, five underlying factors, namely insulin resistance, aging, sex differences, insulin secretion, and glycemic control, represented patient characteristics. In particular, insulin secretion and resistance strongly influenced F-CPR, while insulin secretion affected U-CPR. In conclusion, the data indicate that among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, F-CPR and U-CPR may predict improved glycemic control six months after hospitalization. PMID:26849676

  20. Intake of Vitamin and Mineral Supplements and Longitudinal Association with HbA1c Levels in the General Non-Diabetic Population—Results from the MONICA/KORA S3/F3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Sigrid; Zierer, Astrid; Heier, Margit; Fischer, Beate; Huth, Cornelia; Baumert, Jens; Meisinger, Christa; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Lower levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) are associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular complications in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. The aim of the study was to longitudinally investigate the association between the use of 11 vitamins and minerals (vitamins E, C, D, B1, folic acid, carotenoids, calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, and selenium) and change in HbA1c levels over 10 years in non-diabetic individuals drawn from the general population. Methods Baseline data were available from 4447 subjects included in the population-based “Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Diseases” (MONICA) Augsburg S3 survey (1994/95). Follow-up data were derived from 2774 participants in the follow-up survey named “Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg” (KORA) F3 (2004/05). Vitamin/mineral intake from supplements and medications was assessed in a personal interview, where participants were asked to bring product packages of preparations that had been ingested during the last 7 days prior to the examination. Associations between regular vitamin/mineral intake amounts and HbA1c levels measured at baseline and follow-up were investigated using generalized estimating equation models. For carotenoids, analyses were stratified by smoking status. Results None of the investigated nutrients except for carotenoids was significantly associated with changes in HbA1c levels after 10 years. Regular intake of carotenoids from supplements and medications in amounts > 6.8mg/d (upper tertile) was associated with an absolute –0.26% (95% CI: –0.43 to –0.08) lower increase in HbA1c levels compared with no intake of carotenoids. An inverse association was observed in those who never smoked but not in (former) smokers. Conclusion Larger prospective and intervention studies in non-diabetic/non-smoking individuals are needed to confirm the results and to assess whether the observed associations between carotenoid intake and change in

  1. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c in children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, Frank; Eickhoff, Malin; Forslund, Anders H; Isaksson, Johan; Gustafsson, Jan

    2015-04-30

    Reports of hypocortisolism and overweight in pediatric ADHD motivate an investigation of blood glucose regulation in this group. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c were investigated in 10 children (10-15 years) with ADHD and 22 comparisons. Fasting blood glucose was similar in both groups. HbA1c values were higher in the ADHD-group. BMI-SDS was also higher in the ADHD-group but did not predict HbA1c. The results suggest an association between ADHD and an altered blood glucose homeostasis. PMID:25747679

  2. Impact of age, BMI and HbA1c levels on the genome-wide DNA methylation and mRNA expression patterns in human adipose tissue and identification of epigenetic biomarkers in blood.

    PubMed

    Rönn, Tina; Volkov, Petr; Gillberg, Linn; Kokosar, Milana; Perfilyev, Alexander; Jacobsen, Anna Louisa; Jørgensen, Sine W; Brøns, Charlotte; Jansson, Per-Anders; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Groop, Leif; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Vaag, Allan; Nilsson, Emma; Ling, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    Increased age, BMI and HbA1c levels are risk factors for several non-communicable diseases. However, the impact of these factors on the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue remains unknown. We analyzed the DNA methylation of ∼480 000 sites in human adipose tissue from 96 males and 94 females and related methylation to age, BMI and HbA1c. We also compared epigenetic signatures in adipose tissue and blood. Age was significantly associated with both altered DNA methylation and expression of 1050 genes (e.g. FHL2, NOX4 and PLG). Interestingly, many reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging in blood, including ELOVL2, FHL2, KLF14 and GLRA1, also showed significant correlations between adipose tissue DNA methylation and age in our study. The most significant association between age and adipose tissue DNA methylation was found upstream of ELOVL2. We identified 2825 genes (e.g. FTO, ITIH5, CCL18, MTCH2, IRS1 and SPP1) where both DNA methylation and expression correlated with BMI. Methylation at previously reported HIF3A sites correlated significantly with BMI in females only. HbA1c (range 28-46 mmol/mol) correlated significantly with the methylation of 711 sites, annotated to, for example, RAB37, TICAM1 and HLA-DPB1. Pathway analyses demonstrated that methylation levels associated with age and BMI are overrepresented among genes involved in cancer, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Our results highlight the impact of age, BMI and HbA1c on epigenetic variation of candidate genes for obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer in human adipose tissue. Importantly, we demonstrate that epigenetic biomarkers in blood can mirror age-related epigenetic signatures in target tissues for metabolic diseases such as adipose tissue. PMID:25861810

  3. Significance of HbA1c Test in Diagnosis and Prognosis of Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Shariq I.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Ekhzaimy, Aishah; Masood, Afshan; Sakharkar, Meena K.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a global endemic with rapidly increasing prevalence in both developing and developed countries. The American Diabetes Association has recommended glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as a possible substitute to fasting blood glucose for diagnosis of diabetes. HbA1c is an important indicator of long-term glycemic control with the ability to reflect the cumulative glycemic history of the preceding two to three months. HbA1c not only provides a reliable measure of chronic hyperglycemia but also correlates well with the risk of long-term diabetes complications. Elevated HbA1c has also been regarded as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke in subjects with or without diabetes. The valuable information provided by a single HbA1c test has rendered it as a reliable biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of diabetes. This review highlights the role of HbA1c in diagnosis and prognosis of diabetes patients. PMID:27398023

  4. Significance of HbA1c Test in Diagnosis and Prognosis of Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Sherwani, Shariq I; Khan, Haseeb A; Ekhzaimy, Aishah; Masood, Afshan; Sakharkar, Meena K

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a global endemic with rapidly increasing prevalence in both developing and developed countries. The American Diabetes Association has recommended glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as a possible substitute to fasting blood glucose for diagnosis of diabetes. HbA1c is an important indicator of long-term glycemic control with the ability to reflect the cumulative glycemic history of the preceding two to three months. HbA1c not only provides a reliable measure of chronic hyperglycemia but also correlates well with the risk of long-term diabetes complications. Elevated HbA1c has also been regarded as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke in subjects with or without diabetes. The valuable information provided by a single HbA1c test has rendered it as a reliable biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of diabetes. This review highlights the role of HbA1c in diagnosis and prognosis of diabetes patients. PMID:27398023

  5. HbA1c Test as a Tool in the Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Renz, Paula Breitenbach; Cavagnolli, Gabriela; Weinert, Letícia Schwerz; Silveiro, Sandra Pinho; Camargo, Joíza Lins

    2015-01-01

    Aims Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a prevalent and potentially serious condition which may put both mothers and neonates at risk. The current recommendation for diagnosis is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). This study aimed to determine the usefulness of HbA1c test as a diagnostic tool for GDM as compared to the traditional criteria based on the OGTT. Methods This was a diagnostic test accuracy study. We performed OGTT and HbA1c test in women attending prenatal visits at a tertiary hospital. GDM was defined according to WHO1999 or ADA/WHO 2013 criteria. ROC curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of HbA1c. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios for different HbA1c cut-off points were calculated. Results Of the 262 women in the third trimester of gestation enrolled in the study, 86 (33%) were diagnosed with GDM. Only five of these women presented HbA1c ≥48 mmol/mol (6.5%). This cut-off point presented 100% specificity but very low sensitivity (7%). Based on ROC curve, and considering OGTT as the reference criterion, HbA1c ≥40 mmol/mol (5.8%) showed adequate specificity in diagnosing GDM (94.9%) but low sensitivity (26.4%). Unlike, HbA1c values of 31 mmol/mol (5.0%) presented adequate sensitivity (89.7%) but low specificity (32.6%) to detect GDM. For women with HbA1c ≥40 mmol/mol (5.8%), the positive and negative likelihood ratios were 5.14 (95%CI 2.49–10.63) and 0.78 (0.68–0.88), respectively. The post-test probability of GDM was about 40%, representing a 4.0-fold increase in the mean pre-test probability. This cut-off point could eliminate the need for the unpleasant and laborious OGTT tests in almost one third of cases, as 38% of patients with GDM may be diagnosable by HbA1c test alone. Conclusions Our results show that combined HbA1c and OGTT measurements may be useful in diagnosing GDM. PMID:26292213

  6. Beyond HbA1c: Environmental Risk Factors for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nwanyanwu, Kristen Harris; Newman-Casey, Paula-Anne; Gardner, Thomas W; Lim, Jennifer I

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy affects 4.2 million people in the United States and is the leading cause of blindness in working-aged people. As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, cost-effective interventions to decrease blindness from diabetic retinopathy will be paramount. While HbA1c and duration of disease are known risk factors, they account for only 11% of the risk of developing microvascular complications from the disease. The assessment of environmental risk factors for diabetic eye disease allows for the determination of modifiable population-level challenges that may be addressed to facilitate the end of blindness from diabetes. PMID:26973797

  7. The correlation between the Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in non-diabetics and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinling; Zhao, Youmin; Chai, Jianwen; Hao, Dongqin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the relativity between the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in non-diabetics and cardiovascular risk factors and definite the significance of predicting the cardiovascular risk factors through cross-sectional research method. There were 2007 cases volunteers (including 650 cases of male, 1357 cases of female) from city community with complete information involved in the research of diabetes. The value of HbA1c 6.5% was set as the diagnose boundary of the diabetes. Differences were considered to be statistically significant at P<0.05. Hypertension, dyslipidemi, being overweight or obesity, age (male was over 45 years old and female was over 55 years old.), HbA1c 6.0% and fasting blood glucose (FBG) 6.1mmol/L were regarded as cardiovascular risk factors. Then we analyzed the number of risk factors for individuals in different HbA1c groups. Meanwhile, patients were grouped into zero, one, two, three, four or more groups with reference to the number of risk factors they had in order to compare the values of risk factors in different groups through Logistic regression. The results showed that (1) For those people who had no less than three risk factors, the frequency of risk factors was on the rise with the increase of HbA1c levels. (2) The value of HbA1c in different groups of risk factors rose with the increasing number of risk factors. There was a significant difference (P<0.001) between groups. (3) The Regression analysis showed that there was a stronger correlation between HbA1c levels and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), fasting blood glucose (FBG) rather than age. So Non-diabetics whose HbA1c levels ranged from 6.0% to 6.5% were at high risk of cardiovascular risk factors. HbA1c levels, which can be a prediction index for cardiovascular risk factors dependent from other cardiovascular risk factors for non-diabetics, and it were highly relevant with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting blood glucose (FBG). PMID:27005508

  8. What is the Role of HbA1c in Diabetic Hemodialysis Patients?

    PubMed

    Coelho, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The definition of a good glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis is far from settled. In the general population, hemoglobin A1c is highly correlated with the average glycemia of the last 8-12 weeks. However, in hemodialysis patients, the correlation of hbA1c with glycemia is weaker as it also reflects changes in hemoglobin characteristics and red blood cells half-life. As expected, studies show that the association between HbA1c and outcomes in these patients differ from the general population. Therefore, the value of HbA1c in the treatment of hemodialysis patients has been questioned. Guidelines are generally cautious in their recommendations about possible targets of HbA1c in this population. Indeed, the risk of not treating hyperglycemia should be weighed against the particularly high risk of precipitating hypoglycemia in dialysis patients. In this review, a critical analysis of the current role of HbA1c in the care of hemodialysis patients is presented. PMID:26138753

  9. Low HbA1c and Increased Mortality Risk-is Frailty a Confounding Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasingly becoming an older person disease due to the increased survival and aging of the population. Previous studies which showed benefits of tight glycemic control and a linear relationship between HbA1c and mortality have largely included younger patients newly diagnosed with diabetes and with less comorbidities. Recent studies, which included older population with diabetes, have shown a U-shaped relationship of increased mortality associated with low HbA1c. The mechanism of such relationship is unclear. There was no direct causal link between low HbA1c and mortality. It appears that malnutrition, inflammation and functional decline are characteristics shared by the populations that showed increased mortality and low HbA1c. In these studies functional status, disability or frailty was not routinely measured. Therefore, although adjustment for comorbidities was made there may be a residual confounding by unmeasured factors such as frailty. Thus, frailty or decline in functional reserve may be the main confounding factor explaining the relationship between increased mortality risk and low HbA1c. PMID:26236548

  10. The Role of Metformin Response in Lipid Metabolism in Patients with Recent-Onset Type 2 Diabetes: HbA1c Level as a Criterion for Designating Patients as Responders or Nonresponders to Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Kashi, Zahra; Mahrooz, Abdolkarim; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat; Alizadeh, Ahad

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated whether response to metformin, the most frequently drug for diabetes treatment, influences the therapeutic effects of antilipidemic medication in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods A total of 150 patients with T2DM were classified into two groups following 3 months of metformin therapy (1000 mg twice daily): responders (patients showing ≥1% reduction in HbA1c from baseline) and nonresponders (patients showing <1% reduction in HbA1c from baseline). The patients received atorvastatin 20 mg, gemfibrozil 300 mg, or atorvastatin 20 mg and gemfibrozil 300 mg daily. Principal Findings HbA1c and fasting glucose levels were significantly different between baseline and 3 months among responders receiving atorvastatin; however, these differences were not statistically significant in nonresponders. Atherogenic ratios of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C/HDL-C; p = 0.002), total cholesterol to HDL-C (TC/HDL-C; p<0.001) and AIP (the atherogenic index of plasma; p = 0.004) decreased significantly in responders receiving atorvastatin than in nonresponders. Moreover, responders receiving atorvastatin showed a significant increase in HDL-C levels but nonresponders receiving atorvastatin did not (p = 0.007). The multivariate model identified a significant association between metformin response (as the independent variable) and TG, TC, HDL-C and LDL-C (dependent variables; Wilk's λ = 0.927, p = 0.036). Conclusions Metformin response affects therapeutic outcomes of atorvastatin on atherogenic lipid markers in patients newly diagnosed with T2DM. Metformin has a greater impact on BMI in responders of metformin compared to nonresponders. Adoption of better therapeutic strategies for reducing atherogenic lipid markers may be necessary for metformin nonresponders. PMID:26978661

  11. Best use of the recommended IFCC reference method, material and values in HbA1C analyses.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, I M; Halonen, T; Punnonen, K; Tiikkainen, U

    2005-01-01

    The results of Finnish HbA(1C) surveys (Labquality Ltd.) during the past 10 years have undergone continuous improvement with smaller overall coefficients of variation for the HbA(1C) mean values of all methods (from 7.5 to 5.4% for normal and from 8.9 to 4.7% for diabetic samples). Most of the HbA(1C) methods are certified for traceability to the Diabetes Control and Complication Trial (DCCT) designated comparison method, which originally was a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method (Bio-Rex 70, Bio-Rad) but is no longer in routine use. It was therefore important that the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) had prepared both reference preparations and method for the determination of HbA(1C). However, the very demanding reference method is not realistic for use in clinical laboratories. According to the present study, the mean HbA(1C) values of the Labquality Ltd. showed significant correlations to the HbA(1C) values of The European Reference Laboratory for Glycohemoglobin (r = 0.999) and to the values using the IFCC method (r = 0.999). The reference values of the IFCC method (mainly those of the manufacturer) range from 2.85 to 3.81%, being significantly lower than the present DCCT values (4.0-6.1%). Since it may take some time before consumers are ready to accept the new IFCC reference values for general use, we propose that the IFCC reference materials and method should be used for calibration of the present methods to the well-known DCCT levels. PMID:16179278

  12. Relationship of HbA1c variability, absolute changes in HbA1c, and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes: a Danish population-based prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Skriver, Mette V; Sandbæk, Annelli; Kristensen, Jette K; Støvring, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed the relationship of mortality with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) variability and with absolute change in HbA1c. Design A population-based prospective observational study with a median follow-up time of 6 years. Methods Based on a validated algorithm, 11 205 Danish individuals with type 2 diabetes during 2001–2006 were identified from public data files, with at least three HbA1c measurements: one index measure, one closing measure 22–26 months later, and one measurement in-between. Medium index HbA1c was 7.3%, median age was 63.9 years, and 48% were women. HbA1c variability was defined as the mean absolute residual around the line connecting index value with closing value. Cox proportional hazard models with restricted cubic splines were used, with all-cause mortality as the outcome. Results Variability between 0 and 0.5 HbA1c percentage point was not associated with mortality, but for index HbA1c ≤8% (64 mmol/mol), a variability above 0.5 was associated with increased mortality (HR of 1 HbA1c percentage point variability was 1.3 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.5) for index HbA1c 6.6–7.4%). For index HbA1c≤8%, mortality increased when HbA1c declined, but was stable when HbA1c rose. For index HbA1c>8%, change in HbA1c was associated with mortality, with the lowest mortality for greatest decline (HR=0.9 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.98) for a 2-percentage point decrease). Conclusions For individuals with an index HbA1c below 8%, both high HbA1c variability and a decline in HbA1c were associated with increased mortality. For individuals with index HbA1c above 8%, change in HbA1c was associated with mortality, whereas variability was not. PMID:25664182

  13. Modelling the Relative Contribution of Fasting and Post-Prandial Plasma Glucose to HbA1c in Healthy and Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollerton, Richard L.; Luzio, Steven D.; Owens, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is regarded as the gold standard of glucose homeostasis assessment in diabetes. There has been much discussion in recent medical literature of experimental results concerning the relative contribution of fasting and post-prandial glucose levels to the value of HbA1c. A mathematical model of haemoglobin glycation is…

  14. Relationship between HbA1c and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Chinese Population: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Ran, Xingwu; Yang, Wenying; Li, Qiang; Peng, Yongde; Li, Yanbing; Gao, Xin; Luan, Xiaojun; Wang, Weiqing; Xie, Yun; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Objective Since there is a paucity of reference data in the literature to indicate the relationship between HbA1c, and 24 h mean blood glucose (MBG) from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in Chinese populations, we described the above relationship in adult Chinese subjects with different glucose tolerance status. Methods Seven-hundred-and-forty-two individuals without history of diabetes were included to the study at 11 hospitals in urban areas across China from 2007–2009 and data of 673 subjects were included into the final analysis. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) classified the participants as nondiabetic subjects, including those with normal glucose regulation (NGR; n = 121) and impaired glucose regulation (IGR; n = 209), or newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 343). All participants completed testing for HbA1c levels and wore a CGM system for three consecutive days. The 24 h MBG levels were calculated. Spearman correlations and linear regression analyses were applied to quantify the relationship between glucose markers. Results The levels of HbA1c and 24 h MBG significantly increased with presence of glucose intolerance (NGRA1c was strongly correlated with 24 h MBG (r = 0.735). The correlation was also found to be significant for the subgroup of participants with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (r = 0.694, P<0.001). Linear regression analysis of the total study population yielded the following equation: 24 h MBG mmol/L = 1.198×HbA1c–0.582 (24 h MBG mg/dL = 21.564×HbA1c–10.476) (R2 = 0.670, P<0.001). The model fit was not improved by application of exponential or quadratic modeling. When HbA1c was 6.5%, the calculated 24 h MBG was 7.2 (6.4–8.1) mmol/L (130 (115–146) mg/dL); and when HbA1c was 7.0%, the 24 h MBG was 7.8 (6.9–8.7) mmol/L (140 (124–157) mg/dL). Conclusions Our study provided the reference data of the

  15. Efficacy of metabolic surgery on HbA1c decrease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with BMI <35 kg/m2--a review.

    PubMed

    Ngiam, Kee Yuan; Lee, Wei-Jei; Lee, Yi-Chih; Cheng, Anton

    2014-01-01

    High glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is strongly correlated with developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) complications; this study reviews the efficacy of various types of metabolic surgeries in reducing HbA1c levels in type 2 diabetics with BMI <35 kg/m(2). An electronic search of MEDLINE databases using terms 'metabolic surgery', type 2 diabetes mellitus, BMI <35 kg/m(2), and related keywords for studies published between 1987 and 2013. Data from 53 articles with 2,258 patients were selected for this review. The weighted mean change in HbA1c was -2.8 % (95 % CI -2.8 to -2.7, p < 0.01) and weighted mean BMI change was -5.5 kg/m(2) (95 % CI -5.6 to -5.4, p < 0.01). There was a strong correlation between weighted percentage mean change in HbA1c and BMI. Adjustable gastric banding and duodenal jejunal bypass were inferior to other surgeries in reducing BMI and HbA1c in BMI <35 kg/m(2). Metabolic surgery significantly decreases HbA1c in T2DM patients with BMI <35 kg/m(2) and that the magnitude of HbA1c change may be a useful surrogate of DM control. PMID:24242843

  16. Are There Clinical Implications of Racial Differences in HbA1c? Yes, to Not Consider Can Do Great Harm!

    PubMed

    Herman, William H

    2016-08-01

    Studies that have compared HbA1c levels by race have consistently demonstrated higher HbA1c levels in African Americans than in whites. These racial differences in HbA1c have not been explained by measured differences in glycemia, sociodemographic factors, clinical factors, access to care, or quality of care. Recently, a number of nonglycemic factors and several genetic polymorphisms that operate through nonglycemic mechanisms have been associated with HbA1c Their distributions across racial groups and their impact on hemoglobin glycation need to be systematically explored. Thus, on the basis of evidence for racial differences in HbA1c, current clinical guidelines from the American Diabetes Association state: "It is important to take…race/ethnicity…into consideration when using the A1C to diagnose diabetes." However, it is not clear from the guidelines how this recommendation might be actualized. So, the critical question is not whether racial differences in HbA1c exist between African Americans and whites; the important question is whether the observed differences in HbA1c level are clinically meaningful. Therefore, given the current controversy, we provide a Point-Counterpoint debate on this issue. In the point narrative below, Dr. Herman provides his argument that the failure to acknowledge that HbA1c might be a biased measure of average glycemia and an unwillingness to rigorously investigate this hypothesis will slow scientific progress and has the potential to do great harm. In the counterpoint narrative that follows Dr. Herman's contribution, Dr. Selvin argues that there is no compelling evidence for racial differences in the validity of HbA1c as a measure of hyperglycemia and that race is a poor surrogate for differences in underlying causes of disease risk.-William T. CefaluEditor in Chief, Diabetes Care. PMID:27457636

  17. Are There Clinical Implications of Racial Differences in HbA1c? A Difference, to Be a Difference, Must Make a Difference.

    PubMed

    Selvin, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Studies that have compared HbA1c levels by race have consistently demonstrated higher HbA1c levels in African Americans than in whites. These racial differences in HbA1c have not been explained by measured differences in glycemia, sociodemographic factors, clinical factors, access to care, or quality of care. Recently, a number of nonglycemic factors and several genetic polymorphisms that operate through nonglycemic mechanisms have been associated with HbA1c Their distributions across racial groups and their impact on hemoglobin glycation need to be systematically explored. Thus, on the basis of evidence for racial differences in HbA1c, current clinical guidelines from the American Diabetes Association state: "It is important to take…race/ethnicity…into consideration when using the A1C to diagnose diabetes." However, it is not clear from the guidelines how this recommendation might be actualized. So, the critical question is not whether racial differences in HbA1c exist between African Americans and whites; the important question is whether the observed differences in HbA1c level are clinically meaningful. Therefore, given the current controversy, we provide a Point-Counterpoint debate on this issue. In the preceding point narrative, Dr. Herman provides his argument that the failure to acknowledge that HbA1c might be a biased measure of average glycemia and an unwillingness to rigorously investigate this hypothesis will slow scientific progress and has the potential to do great harm. In the counterpoint narrative below, Dr. Selvin argues that there is no compelling evidence for racial differences in the validity of HbA1c as a measure of hyperglycemia and that race is a poor surrogate for differences in underlying causes of disease risk.-William T. CefaluEditor in Chief, Diabetes Care. PMID:27457637

  18. Significance of HbA1c and its measurement in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus: US experience.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Deborah Taira; Demaris, Kendra M; Goo, Roy; Mnatzaganian, Christina Louise; Wong Smith, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 American Diabetes Association guidelines denote four means of diagnosing diabetes. The first of these is a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) >6.5%. This literature review summarizes studies (n=47) in the USA examining the significance, strengths, and limitations of using HbA1c as a diagnostic tool for diabetes, relative to other available means. Due to the relatively recent adoption of HbA1c as a diabetes mellitus diagnostic tool, a hybrid systematic, truncated review of the literature was implemented. Based on these studies, we conclude that HbA1c screening for diabetes has been found to be convenient and effective in diagnosing diabetes. HbA1c screening is particularly helpful in community-based and acute care settings where tests requiring fasting are not practical. Using HbA1c to diagnose diabetes also has some limitations. For instance, HbA1c testing may underestimate the prevalence of diabetes, particularly among whites. Because this bias differs by racial group, prevalence and resulting estimates of health disparities based on HbA1c screening differ from those based on other methods of diagnosis. In addition, existing evidence suggests that HbA1c screening may not be valid in certain subgroups, such as children, women with gestational diabetes, patients with human immunodeficiency virus, and those with prediabetes. Further guidelines are needed to clarify the appropriate use of HbA1c screening in these populations. PMID:25349480

  19. Toothbrushing, Blood Glucose and HbA1c: Findings from a Random Survey in Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Su, Lingyu; Liu, Wenzhao; Xie, Bingwu; Dou, Lei; Sun, Jun; Wan, Wenjuan; Fu, Xiaoming; Li, Guangyue; Huang, Jiao; Xu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Both diabetes and periodontal disease are prevalent in China. Poor oral hygiene practice is the major cause of periodontal disease. An association between oral hygiene practice and blood glucose level was reported in individuals with diabetes, but not in the general population. We examined the association in a population-based random survey recruiting 2,105 adults without previously diagnosed diabetes in Chongqing city, China. Plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were measured, and a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test was conducted for each respondent. Self-reported toothbrushing frequency was used as a proxy for oral hygiene practice. In a linear model controlling for potential confounders (demographic characteristics, socio-economic status, lifestyle risk factors, BMI, dental visit frequency, etc.), urban residents who barely brushed their teeth had an increase of 0.50 (95% CI: 0.10-0.90) mmol/L in fasting plasma glucose, and an increase of 0.26% (0.04-0.47%) in HbA1c, relative to those brushing ≥twice daily; for rural residents, the effects were 0.26 (0.05-0.48) mmol/L in fasting plasma glucose and 0.20% (0.09-0.31%) in HbA1c. Individuals with better oral practice tended to have lower level of blood glucose and HbA1c. Establishing good oral health behavioral habits may be conducive to diabetes prevention and control in the general population. PMID:27385509

  20. Toothbrushing, Blood Glucose and HbA1c: Findings from a Random Survey in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lingyu; Liu, Wenzhao; Xie, Bingwu; Dou, Lei; Sun, Jun; Wan, Wenjuan; Fu, Xiaoming; Li, Guangyue; Huang, Jiao; Xu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Both diabetes and periodontal disease are prevalent in China. Poor oral hygiene practice is the major cause of periodontal disease. An association between oral hygiene practice and blood glucose level was reported in individuals with diabetes, but not in the general population. We examined the association in a population-based random survey recruiting 2,105 adults without previously diagnosed diabetes in Chongqing city, China. Plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were measured, and a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test was conducted for each respondent. Self-reported toothbrushing frequency was used as a proxy for oral hygiene practice. In a linear model controlling for potential confounders (demographic characteristics, socio-economic status, lifestyle risk factors, BMI, dental visit frequency, etc.), urban residents who barely brushed their teeth had an increase of 0.50 (95% CI: 0.10–0.90) mmol/L in fasting plasma glucose, and an increase of 0.26% (0.04–0.47%) in HbA1c, relative to those brushing ≥twice daily; for rural residents, the effects were 0.26 (0.05–0.48) mmol/L in fasting plasma glucose and 0.20% (0.09–0.31%) in HbA1c. Individuals with better oral practice tended to have lower level of blood glucose and HbA1c. Establishing good oral health behavioral habits may be conducive to diabetes prevention and control in the general population. PMID:27385509

  1. Report on HbA1c Proficiency Testing in Asia in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Umemoto, Masao; Hoshino, Tadao; Miyashita, Tetsuo; Tani, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, the Japan Diabetes Society decided to introduce the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP) values into clinical practice. Accordingly, NGSP Certification of Japanese manufacturers of HbA1c-related diagnostic reagents and instruments was initiated in February, 2012, through an NGSP network laboratory, the Asian Secondary Reference Laboratory (ASRL) #1. Traceability to the NGSP reference system can be endorsed by manufacturer certification, as well as by the College of American Pathologists (CAP) survey. Nevertheless, only a few manufacturers participate in the CAP survey in Japan. Thus, proficiency testing (PT) was proposed and executed by ASRL #1. Single-donor whole-blood samples were used for the PT. The participated measurement systems were NGSP certified. Twenty-two laboratories obtained certification through ASRL #1; 2 through the Secondary Reference Laboratory (SRL) #8; and 9 through the SRL #9. The combination plots of the bias data in this PT and in the NGSP certification performed in March and May in 2012 were consistent with each other: mean NGSP values at each level agreed well with the target value. In conclusion, PT using whole blood is useful in endorsing NGSP certification. PMID:25932445

  2. The freeware AIDA interactive educational diabetes simulator--http://www.2aida.org--(2). Simulating glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in AIDA v4.3.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, E D

    2001-01-01

    In 1996 an interactive educational diabetes simulator called AIDA was released without charge on the Internet as a non-commercial contribution to continuing diabetes education. Over the past 4+ years over 74,000 people have visited the AIDA Web pages at http://www.2aida.org and over 20,000 copies of the program have been downloaded from there free-of-charge. This article builds on the experience gained from the AIDA development, and the World Wide Web distribution of the software, and highlights some of the problems which users have reported with the program. An updated release of the software (AIDA v4.3) is described and the method applied for modelling glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels within this new version of AIDA is documented. An overview is provided of the trialling and beta-testing of this latest release of the program, and the general concept of a 'virtual diabetic patient' that provides an electronic representation of a patient with diabetes--and which can be used for self-learning/teaching/demonstration purposes--is highlighted. PMID:11386034

  3. Xanthochromia of the skull bone associated with HbA1c.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, T; Klintschar, M; Lichtinghagen, R; Plagemann, I; Smith, A; Budde, E; Hagemeier, L

    2016-03-01

    The color of the surface of 105 skull bones (part of the parietal bone) was determined using a portable spectral colorimeter (spectro color(®)). By this means it was possible to characterize the color objectively according to the L*a*b* color system defined by the "International Commission de l'Eclairage" (CIE). Biochemical markers of carbohydrate metabolism, HbA1c from venous blood, and glucose/lactate concentrations from vitreous humor, were also determined, for assessment of the ante-mortem plasma glucose concentration using Traub's sum formula. As biochemical markers for lipid metabolism disorder, cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) were all determined from venous blood. There is a significant correlation of bone yellowing with HbA1c (p<0.001) and age (p<0.001). The literature asserts a significant correlation between diabetic condition and yellowing of the skull bone. Despite efforts to find the substance responsible for the yellowing of the bone in chronic metabolism disorder, no significant correlation was found between bone color and lipoproteins/bone extracted lipid acids. PMID:26799427

  4. The Relation between Serum Uric Acid and HbA1c Is Dependent upon Hyperinsulinemia in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuliang; Bu, Hemei; Zhao, Sha; Li, Xiaona; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to explore the dependent condition of the relationship between uric acid and blood glucose in type 2 diabetes. Research Design and Methods. We measured the HbA1c, serum uric acid, creatinine, lipids profiles, and so forth of 605 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients, and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) were performed on each patient. The population was divided into high and low insulin groups. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between uric acid and HbA1c. Results. Serum uric acid and HbA1c levels were low in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients. However, we found no significant relationship between uric acid and HbA1c by regression analysis after adjusting total insulin. The concentration of uric acid was inversely correlated with HbA1c in the high insulin group, regardless of patient sex. However, no associations were found in low insulin group. Conclusions. The negative correlation between uric acid and HbA1c is conditional in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients and is related to hyperinsulinemia. Therefore, uric acid is likely only useful as a biomarker of blood glucose in patients exhibiting hyperinsulinemia. PMID:27403443

  5. Quality of HbA1c Measurement in the Practice: The German Perspective.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Freckmann, Guido

    2015-05-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement has come to be a cornerstone in modern diabetes therapy. However, the methodological aspects of this type of measurement have been given little attention lately due to its position as an established method of choice. Nevertheless, quite a number of issues face practical application, such as clinically relevant differences between different measurement methods--both lab-based and point-of-care (POCT) systems will show better or worse diabetes management results after switching methods; and there are a number of possible reasons that need to be known and observed in practice. The aim of this review is to draw attention to these problems from a German point of view and provide suggestions for appropriate measures to improve the situation. PMID:25691655

  6. Quality of HbA1c Measurement in the Practice

    PubMed Central

    Freckmann, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement has come to be a cornerstone in modern diabetes therapy. However, the methodological aspects of this type of measurement have been given little attention lately due to its position as an established method of choice. Nevertheless, quite a number of issues face practical application, such as clinically relevant differences between different measurement methods—both lab-based and point-of-care (POCT) systems will show better or worse diabetes management results after switching methods; and there are a number of possible reasons that need to be known and observed in practice. The aim of this review is to draw attention to these problems from a German point of view and provide suggestions for appropriate measures to improve the situation. PMID:25691655

  7. The Impact of HbA1c Testing on Total Annual Healthcare Expenditures Among Newly Diagnosed Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bhounsule, Prajakta; Peterson, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2010, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes also imposes a huge financial burden on the US economy. In 2009, the American Diabetes Association International Expert Committee recommended the use of the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) test as a uniform diagnostic measure to identify patients with diabetes. Although HbA1c is a convenient diagnostic test, it is also more expensive than older tests and could, therefore, have an impact on patients’ healthcare expenditures. Objectives To determine if HbA1c testing has an impact on total annual healthcare expenditures among newly diagnosed patients with diabetes and to analyze the factors that are associated with the total healthcare expenditures among diabetic patients before and after HbA1c was implemented as a standard diagnostic factor. Methods This was an observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study. The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Household Component 2009 and 2011 databases were used to form the study cohort of patients with diabetes. The total mean healthcare expenditures among patients with diabetes formed the dependent variable. A proxy variable representing a diagnosis of diabetes with and without the use of HbA1c testing in 2009 and in 2011, respectively, formed the main independent variable along with demographic factors, comorbidities, and healthcare services utilization in both years. A generalized linear regression was conducted to determine the association of HbA1c testing with total diabetes-related healthcare expenditures. Results The mean total healthcare expenditure decreased in 2011 compared with 2009. The HbA1c test did not show an association with the total healthcare expenditures versus earlier diabetes-related diagnostic factors. The total expenditures were associated with private insurance, the incidence of a previous heart attack, prescription drug refills, inpatient hospital stays, home care, hospital discharges, and visits to

  8. The Association between HbA1c and Cardiovascular Disease Markers in a Remote Indigenous Australian Community with and without Diagnosed Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Luke W.; Hoy, Wendy E.; Sharma, Suresh K.; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study investigates the burden of cardiovascular risk markers in people with and without diabetes in a remote Indigenous Australian community, based on their HbA1c concentration. Methods. This study included health screening exams of 1187 remote Indigenous residents over 15 years old who represented 70% of the age-eligible community. The participants were stratified by HbA1c into 5 groups using cut-off points recommended by international organisations. The associations of traditional cardiovascular risk markers with HbA1c groups were assessed using logistic and linear regressions and ANOVA models. Results. Of the 1187 participants, 158 (13%) had a previous diabetes diagnosis, up to 568 (48%) were at high risk (5.7–6.4% (39–46 mmol/mol) HbA1c), and 67 (6%) potential new cases of diabetes (≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol)) were identified. Individuals with higher HbA1c levels were more likely to have albuminuria (OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.26–7.82) and dyslipidaemia (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.29–4.34) and visited the clinic more often (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.26–4.99). Almost all traditional CVD risk factors showed a positive association with HbA1c. Conclusions. Screening in this remote Indigenous Australian community highlights the high proportion of individuals who are at high risk of diabetes as indicated by HbA1c and who also had an accentuated cardiovascular risk profile. PMID:26989697

  9. Comparison of the Current Diagnostic Criterion of HbA1c with Fasting and 2-Hour Plasma Glucose Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Karnchanasorn, Rudruidee; Huang, Jean; Feng, Wei; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% in diagnosing diabetes compared to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 126 mg/dL and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) ≥ 200 mg/dL in a previously undiagnosed diabetic cohort, we included 5,764 adult subjects without established diabetes for whom HbA1c, FPG, 2hPG, and BMI measurements were collected. Compared to the FPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 43.3% (106 subjects). Compared to the 2hPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 28.1% (110 subjects). Patients who were diabetic using 2hPG criterion but had HbA1c < 6.5% were more likely to be older (64 ± 15 versus 60 ± 15 years old, P = 0.01, mean ± STD), female (53.2% versus 38.2%, P = 0.008), leaner (29.7 ± 6.1 versus 33.0 ± 6.6 kg/m2, P = 0.000005), and less likely to be current smokers (18.1% versus 29.1%, P = 0.02) as compared to those with HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. The diagnostic agreement in the clinical setting revealed the current HbA1c ≥ 6.5% is less likely to detect diabetes than those defined by FPG and 2hPG. HbA1c ≥ 6.5% detects less than 50% of diabetic patients defined by FPG and less than 30% of diabetic patients defined by 2hPG. When the diagnosis of diabetes is in doubt by HbA1c, FPG and/or 2hPG should be obtained. PMID:27597979

  10. Comparison of the Current Diagnostic Criterion of HbA1c with Fasting and 2-Hour Plasma Glucose Concentration.

    PubMed

    Karnchanasorn, Rudruidee; Huang, Jean; Ou, Horng-Yih; Feng, Wei; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chiu, Ken C; Samoa, Raynald

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% in diagnosing diabetes compared to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 126 mg/dL and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) ≥ 200 mg/dL in a previously undiagnosed diabetic cohort, we included 5,764 adult subjects without established diabetes for whom HbA1c, FPG, 2hPG, and BMI measurements were collected. Compared to the FPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 43.3% (106 subjects). Compared to the 2hPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 28.1% (110 subjects). Patients who were diabetic using 2hPG criterion but had HbA1c < 6.5% were more likely to be older (64 ± 15 versus 60 ± 15 years old, P = 0.01, mean ± STD), female (53.2% versus 38.2%, P = 0.008), leaner (29.7 ± 6.1 versus 33.0 ± 6.6 kg/m(2), P = 0.000005), and less likely to be current smokers (18.1% versus 29.1%, P = 0.02) as compared to those with HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. The diagnostic agreement in the clinical setting revealed the current HbA1c ≥ 6.5% is less likely to detect diabetes than those defined by FPG and 2hPG. HbA1c ≥ 6.5% detects less than 50% of diabetic patients defined by FPG and less than 30% of diabetic patients defined by 2hPG. When the diagnosis of diabetes is in doubt by HbA1c, FPG and/or 2hPG should be obtained. PMID:27597979

  11. Interaction between Mean Arterial Pressure and HbA1c in Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease Hospitalisation: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dahai; Zhao, Zhanzheng; Simmons, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore the relationship between mean arterial pressure (MAP), HbA1c, and cardiovascular (CV) hospitalisation risk in type 2 diabetes. Design. Population-based case-control study. Settings. Primary and secondary care level in Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom. Participants. 588 patients with type 2 diabetes from 18 English general practices recording a CV hospitalisation in 2009–2011 were included. Risk-set sampling was used to select 2920 gender, age, and practice matched control type 2 diabetes patients. Main Outcome Measure. Conditional logistic regression was used to explore further dose-response relationships between MAP, HbA1c, and CV hospitalisation risk. Results. The relationship between MAP and CV hospitalisation was nonlinear (P < 0.001 for linearity test). The MAP associated with the lowest CV hospitalisation risk was 97 (95% CI: 93–101) mmHg. An interaction between MAP and HbA1c for increased risk of cardiovascular hospitalisation was observed among those with HbA1c < 7% (53 mmol/mol) and MAP < 97 mmHg. Conclusions. In type 2 diabetes, MAP is a good predictor of CV hospitalisation risk. CV hospitalisation is lowest with a MAP between 93 and 101 mmHg. CV hospitalisation was particularly high among those with both a low MAP and a lower HbA1c. PMID:27382575

  12. Diabetes case finding in the emergency department, using HbA1c: an opportunity to improve diabetes detection, prevention, and care

    PubMed Central

    Hng, Tien-Ming; Hor, Amanda; Ravi, Sumathy; Feng, Xiaoqi; Lin, Jaime; Astell-Burt, Thomas; Chipps, David; McLean, Mark; Maberly, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Objective We assessed the efficacy of routine glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) testing to detect undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes in an urban Australian public hospital emergency department (ED) located in an area of high diabetes prevalence. Methods Over 6 weeks, all patients undergoing blood sampling in the ED had their random blood glucose measured. If ≥5.5 mmol/L (99 mg/dL), HbA1c was measured on the same sample. HbA1c levels ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol) and 5.7–6.4% (39–46 mmol/mol) were diagnostic of diabetes and prediabetes, respectively. Hospital records were reviewed to identify patients with previously diagnosed diabetes. Results Among 4580 presentations, 2652 had blood sampled of which 1267 samples had HbA1c measured. Of these, 487 (38.4%) had diabetes (either HbA1c≥6.5% or a prior diagnosis), and a further 347 (27.4%) had prediabetes. Among those with diabetes, 32.2% were previously undiagnosed. Conclusions Routine HbA1c testing in the ED identifies a large number of people with undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes, and provides an opportunity to improve their care. PMID:27284456

  13. Association of pre-pregnancy BMI and postpartum weight retention with postpartum HbA1c among women with Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, T.; Brown, F. M.; Curran, A.; James-Todd, T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine the association of pre-pregnancy BMI and postpartum weight retention with postpartum HbA1c levels in women with Type 1 diabetes. Methods We longitudinally evaluated 136 women with Type 1 diabetes who received prenatal and postpartum care through the Joslin Diabetes Center’s Diabetes and Pregnancy Program between 2004 and 2009. Weight, BMI and HbA1c concentration were assessed before the index pregnancy and repeatedly monitored after delivery until 12 months postpartum. We used a linear mixed model to assess the association of postpartum HbA1c with pre-pregnancy BMI and postpartum weight retention. Results The mean HbA1c concentration increased from 49 mmol/mol (6.6%) at 6 weeks postpartum to 58 mmol/mol (7.5%) by 10 months postpartum, a level similar to the mean pre-pregnancy HbA1c concentration. Postpartum weight retention showed a linearly decreasing trend of 0.06 kg/week (P<0.0001), with −0.1 kg average postpartum weight retention by 1 year postpartum. Compared with women with a pre-pregnancy BMI≥25 kg/m2, women with a lower pre-pregnancy BMI maintained a 3.4 mmol/mol (0.31%) lower HbA1c concentration, after adjusting for several sociodemographic, reproductive and diabetes-related factors (P=0.03). There was a suggestion of a time-varying positive association between HbA1c and postpartum weight retention, with the most significant difference of 3.7 mmol/mol (0.34%; P=0.05) at 30 weeks postpartum among women with postpartum weight retention ≥5 kg vs those with postpartum weight retention <5 kg. Conclusions Pre-pregnancy BMI and postpartum weight retention were positively associated with HbA1c during the first postpartum year in women with Type 1 diabetes. Interventions to modify the behaviours associated with these body weight factors before pregnancy and after delivery may help women with Type 1 diabetes maintain good glycaemic control after pregnancy. PMID:25346003

  14. Effect of drug therapy on HEDIS measurements of HbA1c control in diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Bazalo, Gary; Weiss, Richard; Clark, Nathaniel; Alemayehu, Berhanu; Forma, Felicia; Ingram, Garrett

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to corroborate an earlier study that explored the relationship between a health plan's Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) score for glycolated hemoglobin (HbA1c) control in diabetes patients and its utilization of insulin and oral diabetes products. Prescription volumes were tracked for four categories of diabetes drug therapy: analog insulin, human insulin, single-source brand oral products, and multisource generic oral products, for calendar years 2005 and 2006. The prescription shares of each of the four drug categories for each health plan were matched to the health plan's HEDIS measurements of HbA1c control for each year. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was performed between the health plan's HbA1c -based HEDIS score and its prescription share of each drug category. A favorable and statistically significant (p < 0.01) relationship was found between plan HbA1c HEDIS score and plan prescription share of analog insulin in both 2005 and 2006. The correlation between HEDIS scores and human insulin was not statistically significant. Unfavorable relationships were found between HEDIS scores and both the single-source brand (statistically significant) and the multisource generic oral category prescription shares (not significant). These results corroborate the relationships found in our earlier study, although a cause and effect relationship cannot be confirmed. PMID:19264026

  15. HbA1c measured in stored erythrocytes and mortality rate among middle-aged and older women

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Stampfer, M. J.; Cook, N. R.; Rexrode, K. M.; Ridker, P. M.; Buring, J. E.; Manson, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Diabetes is known to increase mortality rate, but the degree to which mild hyperglycaemia may be associated with the risk of death is uncertain. We examined the association between HbA1c measured in stored erythrocytes and mortality rate in women with and without diabetes. Methods We conducted a cohort study of 27,210 women ≥45 years old with no history of cardiovascular disease or cancer who participated in the Women’s Health Study, a randomised trial of vitamin E and aspirin. Results Over a median of 10 years of follow-up, 706 women died. Proportional hazards models adjusted for age, smoking, hypertension, blood lipids, exercise, postmenopausal hormone use, multivitamin use and C-reactive protein were used to estimate the relative risk of mortality. Among women without a diagnosis of diabetes and HbA1c <5.60%, those in the top quintile (HbA1c 5.19–5.59%) had a relative risk of mortality of 1.28 (95% CI 0.98–1.69, p value for linear trend=0.14) compared with those with HbA1c 2.27–4.79%. Women with HbA1c 5.60–5.99% and no diagnosis of diabetes had a 54% increased risk of mortality (95% CI 1–136%) compared with those with HbA1c 2.27–4.79%. HbA1c was significantly associated with mortality across the range 4.50–7.00% (p value for linear trend=0.02); a test of deviation from linearity was not statistically significant (p=0.67). Diabetic women had more than twice the mortality risk of non-diabetic women. Conclusions/interpretation This study provides further evidence that chronic mild hyperglycaemia, even in the absence of diagnosed diabetes, is associated with increased risk of mortality. PMID:18043905

  16. Adherence to oral glucose lowering therapies and associations with one year HbA1c: a retrospective cohort analysis in a large primary care database

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Beverley; Weedon, Michael N.; Donnelly, Louise; Holman, Rury R.; Pearson, Ewan R.; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The impact of taking oral glucose-lowering medicines intermittently, rather than as recommended, is unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using community-acquired United Kingdom clinical data (CPRD and GoDARTS databases) to examine the prevalence of non-adherence to treatment for type 2 diabetes, and investigate its potential impact on HbA1c reduction stratified by type of glucose-lowering medication. Research design and methods Data for patients treated between 2004 and 2014 were extracted for those newly-prescribed metformin, sulfonylurea, thiazolidinedione or dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors who continued to obtain prescriptions over one year, were extracted. Cohorts were defined by prescribed medication type, and good adherence as a medication possession ratio ≥0.8. Linear regression was used to determine potential associations between adherence and one-year baseline-adjusted HbA1c reduction. Results In CPRD and GoDARTS, 13% and 15% of patients respectively were non-adherent. Proportions of non-adherent patients varied by the oral glucose-lowering treatment prescribed (range 8.6% (thiazolidinedione) to 18.8% (metformin)). Non-adherent, compared with adherent, patients had a smaller HbA1c reduction (0.4%[4.4mmmol/mol] and 0.46%[5.0mmol/mol] for CPRD and GoDARTs respectively). Difference in HbA1c response for adherent compared with non-adherent patients varied by drug (range: 0.38%[4.1mmol/mol] to 0.75%[8.2mmol/mol] lower in adherent group). Decreasing levels of adherence were consistently associated with a smaller reduction in HbA1c. Conclusions Reduced medication adherence for commonly used glucose lowering therapies among patients persisting with treatment is associated with smaller HbA1c reductions, compared with those taking treatment as recommended. Differences observed in HbA1c responses to glucose lowering-treatments may be explained in part by their intermittent use. PMID:26681714

  17. Implementation of the HbA1c IFCC unit --from the laboratory to the consumer: The New Zealand experience.

    PubMed

    Florkowski, Christopher; Crooke, Michael; Reed, Maxine

    2014-05-15

    In 2007, an international consensus statement recommended that HbA1c results should be reported world-wide in IFCC units (mmol/mol) and also the more familiar derived percentage units using a master equation. In New Zealand, the HbA1c IFCC units have been successfully implemented and used exclusively since 3rd October 2011 (following a 2 year period of reporting both units) for both patient monitoring and the diagnosis of diabetes, with a diagnostic cut-off of ≥50 mmol/mol. The consultation process in New Zealand dates back to 2003, well before the international recommendations were made. It reflects the close cooperation between the clinical and laboratory communities in New Zealand, particularly through the agency of the New Zealand Society for the Study of Diabetes (NZSSD), a key organisation in New Zealand open to all those involved in the care of people with diabetes and the national advisory body on scientific and clinical diabetes care and standards. There was a phased process of consultation designed to increase familiarity and comfort with the new units and the final step was coupled with the adoption of HbA1c as a diagnostic test with some evidence-based pragmatism around using the rounded cut-off. Genuine clinical engagement is vital in such a process. PMID:24148360

  18. The Change in HbA1c Associated with Initial Adherence and Subsequent Change in Adherence among Diabetes Patients Newly Initiating Metformin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, A. Gabriela; Kimes, Teresa M.; Tunceli, Kaan; Kurtyka, Karen; Mavros, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Whether changes in adherence are associated with changes in HbA1c is assumed but not known. Methods. We conducted a observational study of 2,844 type 2 diabetes patients who initiated metformin as their first antihyperglycemic drug. Using HbA1c measures before, 6–12 months after, and up to 3 years after metformin initiation, we analyzed HbA1c change as a function of initial adherence and change in adherence. Results. Compared with no adherence, initial adherence of 50–79% was associated with an adjusted reduction in HbA1c of 0.45% while adherence ≥80% was associated with HbA1c reduction of 0.73%. Change from some initial adherence (1–79%) to total nonadherence was associated with 0.25% increase in HbA1c. Change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.15%. Those associations were accentuated among patients not in glycemic control: change from some to no adherence was associated with an HbA1c increase of 0.63% and change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.40%. Conclusions. Initial adherence to newly prescribed metformin therapy produces substantial HbA1c reduction. Among those with modest adherence but suboptimal glycemic control, the difference between moving to full adherence versus nonadherence results in lower HbA1c of one percentage point.

  19. The Change in HbA1c Associated with Initial Adherence and Subsequent Change in Adherence among Diabetes Patients Newly Initiating Metformin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Gregory A; Rosales, A Gabriela; Kimes, Teresa M; Tunceli, Kaan; Kurtyka, Karen; Mavros, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Whether changes in adherence are associated with changes in HbA1c is assumed but not known. Methods. We conducted a observational study of 2,844 type 2 diabetes patients who initiated metformin as their first antihyperglycemic drug. Using HbA1c measures before, 6-12 months after, and up to 3 years after metformin initiation, we analyzed HbA1c change as a function of initial adherence and change in adherence. Results. Compared with no adherence, initial adherence of 50-79% was associated with an adjusted reduction in HbA1c of 0.45% while adherence ≥80% was associated with HbA1c reduction of 0.73%. Change from some initial adherence (1-79%) to total nonadherence was associated with 0.25% increase in HbA1c. Change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.15%. Those associations were accentuated among patients not in glycemic control: change from some to no adherence was associated with an HbA1c increase of 0.63% and change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.40%. Conclusions. Initial adherence to newly prescribed metformin therapy produces substantial HbA1c reduction. Among those with modest adherence but suboptimal glycemic control, the difference between moving to full adherence versus nonadherence results in lower HbA1c of one percentage point. PMID:27579326

  20. HbA(1c) diagnostic categories and beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recommended HbA1c diagnostic categories remain controversial and their utility in doubt in pediatrics. We hypothesized that alterations in the pathophysiologic mechanisms of type 2 diabetes may be evident in the American Diabetes Association recommended at-risk/prediabetes category (HbA(1c) 5.7 ...

  1. Study on Diastolic Dysfunction in Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and its Correlation with Glycosylated Haemoglobin (HbA1C)

    PubMed Central

    Aneja, Girish Kumar; Shukla, Shubhra; Razi, Syed Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) represents the first stage of diabetic cardiomyopathy preceding changes in systolic function, reinforcing the importance of early examination of ventricular function in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the incidence of asymptomatic LVDD in newly diagnosed normotensive cases of type 2 diabetes subjects, and its relation to glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C), age at the time of diagnosis, body mass index (BMI) and serum total cholesterol. Aim and Objective To study the incidence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) and its correlation with HbA1C in normotensive, newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was done in western U.P. on 100 patients of newly diagnosed (within 1 month) type 2 DM between patients 30 and 60 years of age, visiting the Medicine and Endocrinology outpatient Department of LLRM Medical College, Meerut. Patients with established type 2 diabetes and already taking antidiabetic treatment, cardiac diseases like valvular heart disease, ischemic and hypertensive heart disease, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, renal failure, chronic pulmonary disease, severe anaemia and haemoglobinopathies were excluded from the study. These patients were informed about the study and informed consent was obtained before proceeding with the investigations. Patients selected were evaluated with relevant investigations like fasting and post prandial blood sugar, HbA1C level, lipid profile and 2D echocardiography to assess LVDD. These selected patients were divided in 2 groups; one with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) and second group of subjects without LVDD. Various parameters like HbA1C, age, body mass index and serum cholesterol were evaluated between these 2 groups. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t-test, Chi-square and Fisher Exact-test. Results Out of

  2. The Prediction of Clinical Outcome Using HbA1c in Acute Ischemic Stroke of the Deep Branch of Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung Bong; Kim, Tae Uk; Hyun, Jung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the association between glycemic control status and clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke limited to the deep branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Methods We evaluated 65 subjects with first-ever ischemic stroke of the deep branches of the MCA, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance angiography. All subjects had blood hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measured at admission. They were classified into two groups according to the level of HbA1c (low <7.0% or high ≥7.0%). Neurological impairment and functional status were evaluated using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI), Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE-K), and the Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) at admission and discharge. Body mass index, serum glucose, homocysteine and cholesterol levels were also measured at admission. Results The two groups did not show any difference in the NIHSS, FIM, K-MBI, MMSE-K, and LOTCA scores at any time point. Body mass index and levels of blood homocysteine and cholesterol were not different between the two groups. The serum blood glucose level at admission was negatively correlated with all outcome measures. Conclusion We found that HbA1c cannot be used for predication of clinical outcome in patients with ischemic stroke of the deep branch of the middle cerebral artery. PMID:26798617

  3. Effect of Long-Term Dietary Arginyl-Fructose (AF) on Hyperglycemia and HbA1c in Diabetic db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang-Hyoung; Ha, Kyoung-Soo; Jo, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Chong M.; Kim, Young-Cheul; Chung, Kwang-Hoe; Kwon, Young-In

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that Amadori compounds exert anti-diabetic effects by lowering sucrose-induced hyperglycemia in normal Sprague-Dawley rats. In the present study we extended our recent findings to evaluate whether α-glucosidase inhibitor arginyl-fructose (AF) lowers blood glucose level in diabetic db/db mice, a genetic model for type 2 diabetes. The db/db mice were randomly assigned to high-carbohydrate diets (66.1% corn starch) with and without AF (4% in the diet) for 6 weeks. Changes in body weight, blood glucose level, and food intake were measured daily for 42 days. Dietary supplementation of AF resulted in a significant decrease of blood glucose level (p < 0.001) and body weight (p < 0.001). The level of HbA1c, a better indicator of plasma glucose concentration over prolonged periods of time, was also significantly decreased for 6-week period (p < 0.001). Dietary treatment of acarbose® (0.04% in diet), a positive control, also significantly alleviated the level of blood glucose, HbA1c, and body weight. These results indicate that AF Maillard reaction product improves postprandial hyperglycemia by suppressing glucose absorption as well as decreasing HbA1c level. PMID:24823880

  4. Comparability of HbA1c and lipids measured with dried blood spot versus venous samples: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Levels of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and blood lipids are important determinants of risk in patients with diabetes. Standard analysis methods based upon venous blood samples can be logistically challenging in resource-poor settings where much of the diabetes epidemic is occurring. Dried blood spots (DBS) provide a simple alternative method for sample collection but the comparability of data from analyses based on DBS is not well established. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to define the association of findings for HbA1c and blood lipids for analyses based upon standard methods compared to DBS. The Cochrane, Embase and Medline databases were searched for relevant reports and summary regression lines were estimated. Results 705 abstracts were found by the initial electronic search with 6 further reports identified by manual review of the full papers. 16 studies provided data for one or more outcomes of interest. There was a close agreement between the results for HbA1c assays based on venous and DBS samples (DBS = 0.9858venous + 0.3809), except for assays based upon affinity chromatography. Significant adjustment was required for assays of total cholesterol (DBS = 0.6807venous + 1.151) but results for triglycerides (DBS = 0.9557venous + 0.1427) were directly comparable. Conclusions For HbA1c and selected blood lipids, assays based on DBS samples are clearly associated with assays based on standard venous samples. There are, however, significant uncertainties about the nature of these associations and there is a need for standardisation of the sample collection, transportation, storage and analysis methods before the technique can be considered mainstream. This should be a research priority because better elucidation of metabolic risks in resource poor settings, where venous sampling is infeasible, will be key to addressing the global epidemic of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25045323

  5. The relationship between HbA1c & atrial fibrillation after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Surer, Suleyman; Seren, Mustafa; Saydam, Onur; Bulut, Ali; Kiziltepe, Ugursay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes mellitus is recognized as a risk factor for mortality and morbidity after coronary bypass grafting. We aimed to determine the association between preoperative hemoglobin HbA1c and AF after isolated off-pump coronary bypass grafting (OPCAB). Methods: The seventy-two diabetic patients undergoing isolated off-pump coronary bypass grafting were retrospectively analyzed for AF. They were divided into; Low (4.8–5.4%), Medium (5.5–8%) and High (8.1–11.5%) groups. The three groups were compared with respect to demographic, echocardiographic, intraoperative and postoperative clinical characteristics correlation. Results: Three patients died during postoperative period. AF occurred in 12 patients (16.6%) after surgery. The incidence of postoperative AF was 15.3% in the lower, 4.4% middle and 57.1% upper group. There was statistically significant correlation between preoperative HbA1C and preoperative stroke, preoperative MI history, Left atrial (LA) size, preoperative levosimendan, preoperative clopidogrel, postoperative AF, postoperative dopamine and dobutamine use, IABP, duration of extubation time, 24-hour chest tube drainage, duration of ICU and hospital mortality. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed significant correlation between postoperative AF and variables like preoperative HbA1c levels, LVEF<30%, history of preoperative MI, preoperative use of levosimendan, preoperative use of clopidogrel, postoperative dopamine, dobutamine adrenaline use, left atrium size, 24-hour chest tube drainage and length of stay in the intensive care unit. Conclusion: Preoperative HbA1c levels could predict the occurrence of postoperative AF in diabetic patients and may entail to administer protective strategies. PMID:27022346

  6. Identification of the Presence of Variant Hemoglobin Using a Measurement of the Labile HbA1c (#C) Fraction.

    PubMed

    Koga, Masafumi; Inada, Shinya; Miyazaki, Ayako

    2016-07-01

    Labile HbA1c migrates in the #C fraction together with modified hemoglobin (such as carbamylated hemoglobin, acetaldehyde hemoglobin, and acetylated hemoglobin) when HbA1c is measured by Arkray's high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It is assumed that most of the labile glycation products of variant hemoglobin do not migrate in #C fraction; in addition, a part of the stable glycation products of variant hemoglobin migrates in #C fraction. We hypothesized that subjects with variant hemoglobin are likely to show abnormally low or high values of #C fraction. In this study, we investigated this hypothesis. Twenty-one non-diabetic subjects with nine types of variant hemoglobin, and 103 non-diabetic subjects without variant hemoglobin were used. HbA1c and #C fraction were measured by Arkray's HPLC (HA-8180) using standard mode. The values of #C fraction in the control group were 1.75 ± 0.15% (range: 1.5-2.1%). The variant hemoglobin group reported #C fraction values of ≤1.3% in twelve subjects, ≥2.3% in five subjects, and within the reference range (1.4-2.2%) in three subjects. When the cutoff values of #C fraction were set at ≤1.3% and ≥2.3%, sensitivity and specificity were 86% and 100%, respectively. Most non-diabetic subjects with variant hemoglobin showed abnormal values of #C fraction. Measurement of #C fraction is a useful screening test for variant hemoglobin in non-diabetic subjects. PMID:27466298

  7. Group Medical Visits (GMVs) in primary care: an RCT of group-based versus individual appointments to reduce HbA1c in older people

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Karim M; Windt, Adriaan; Davis, Jennifer C; Dawes, Martin; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Madden, Ken; Marra, Carlo A; Housden, Laura; Hoppmann, Christiane; Adams, David J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects more than 1.1 million Canadians aged ≥65 years. Group Medical Visits are an emerging health service delivery method. Recent systematic reviews show that they can significantly reduce glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, but Group Visits have not been evaluated within primary care. We intend to determine the clinical effectiveness, quality of life and economic implications of Group Medical Visits within a primary care setting for older people with T2DM. Methods and analysis A 2-year proof-of-concept, single-blinded (measurement team) randomised control trial to test the efficacy of Group Medical Visits in an urban Canadian primary care setting. Participants ≥65 years old with T2DM (N=128) will be equally randomised to either eight groups of eight patients each (Group Medical Visits; Intervention) or to Individual visits (Standard Care; Controls). Those administering cointerventions are not blinded to group assignment. Our sample size is based on estimates of variance (±1.4% for HbA1c) and effect size (0.9/1.4=0.6) from the literature and from our own preliminary data. Forty participants per group will provide a β likelihood of 0.80, assuming an α of 0.05. A conservative estimation of an effect size of 0.7/1.4 changes the N in the power calculation to 59 per group. Hence, we aim to enrol 64 participants in each study arm. We will use intention-to-treat analysis and compare mean HbA1c (% glycosylated HbA1c) (primary outcome) of Intervention/Control participants at 12 months, 24 months and 1 year postintervention on selected clinical, patient-rated and economic measures. Trial registration number NCT02002143. PMID:26169803

  8. Visceral fat area is associated with HbA1c but not dialysate-related glucose load in nondiabetic PD patients

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Li-chun; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chao, Chia-Ter; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with increased visceral fat area (VFA) have been well documented in the general population but rarely explored in nondiabetic individuals on peritoneal dialysis (PD). As glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is positively correlated with VFA in diabetic patients, we hypothesized that the same correlation would exist in nondiabetic PD patients. We enrolled 105 nondiabetic patients who had undergone chronic PD for more than 3 months. Each subject underwent an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan, and the umbilicus cut was analyzed for VFA. VFA values, corrected for body mass index and subjected to natural logarithm transformations, were examined to determine whether they were correlated with HbA1c and other parameters. PD dialysates prescribed at the time of enrollment were recorded to calculate glucose load. We found that when 105 nondiabetic PD patients were classified according to tertiles of HbA1c, higher HbA1c was associated with larger VFA. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that HbA1c was an independent determinant of VFA, while glucose load and other PD-specific factors were not. In summary, HbA1c, but not PD-related glucose load, was positively correlated with VFA in nondiabetic PD patients, suggesting clinical utility of HbA1c in the PD population. PMID:26239161

  9. Visceral fat area is associated with HbA1c but not dialysate-related glucose load in nondiabetic PD patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Li-Chun; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chao, Chia-Ter; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Factors associated with increased visceral fat area (VFA) have been well documented in the general population but rarely explored in nondiabetic individuals on peritoneal dialysis (PD). As glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is positively correlated with VFA in diabetic patients, we hypothesized that the same correlation would exist in nondiabetic PD patients. We enrolled 105 nondiabetic patients who had undergone chronic PD for more than 3 months. Each subject underwent an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan, and the umbilicus cut was analyzed for VFA. VFA values, corrected for body mass index and subjected to natural logarithm transformations, were examined to determine whether they were correlated with HbA1c and other parameters. PD dialysates prescribed at the time of enrollment were recorded to calculate glucose load. We found that when 105 nondiabetic PD patients were classified according to tertiles of HbA1c, higher HbA1c was associated with larger VFA. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that HbA1c was an independent determinant of VFA, while glucose load and other PD-specific factors were not. In summary, HbA1c, but not PD-related glucose load, was positively correlated with VFA in nondiabetic PD patients, suggesting clinical utility of HbA1c in the PD population.

  10. Visceral fat area is associated with HbA1c but not dialysate-related glucose load in nondiabetic PD patients.

    PubMed

    Ho, Li-chun; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chao, Chia-Ter; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with increased visceral fat area (VFA) have been well documented in the general population but rarely explored in nondiabetic individuals on peritoneal dialysis (PD). As glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is positively correlated with VFA in diabetic patients, we hypothesized that the same correlation would exist in nondiabetic PD patients. We enrolled 105 nondiabetic patients who had undergone chronic PD for more than 3 months. Each subject underwent an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan, and the umbilicus cut was analyzed for VFA. VFA values, corrected for body mass index and subjected to natural logarithm transformations, were examined to determine whether they were correlated with HbA1c and other parameters. PD dialysates prescribed at the time of enrollment were recorded to calculate glucose load. We found that when 105 nondiabetic PD patients were classified according to tertiles of HbA1c, higher HbA1c was associated with larger VFA. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that HbA1c was an independent determinant of VFA, while glucose load and other PD-specific factors were not. In summary, HbA1c, but not PD-related glucose load, was positively correlated with VFA in nondiabetic PD patients, suggesting clinical utility of HbA1c in the PD population. PMID:26239161

  11. Effectiveness of PRECEDE model for health education on changes and level of control of HbA1c, blood pressure, lipids, and body mass index in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Individual health education is considered to be essential in the overall care of patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2), although there is some uncertainty regarding its metabolic control benefits. There have been very few randomized studies on the effects of individual education on normal care in DM2 patients with a control group, and none of these have assessed the long-term results. Therefore, this study aims to use this design to assess the effectiveness of the PRECEDE (Predisposing, Reinforcing, Enabling, Causes in Educational Diagnosis, and Evaluation) education model in the metabolic control and the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods An open community effectiveness study was carried out in 8 urban community health centers in the North-East Madrid Urban Area (Spain). Six hundred patients with DM2 were randomized in two groups: PRECEDE or conventional model for health promotion education. The main outcome measures were glycated hemoglobin A1c, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipids and control criteria during the 2-year follow-up period. Results Glycated hemoglobin A1c and systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels decreased significantly in the PRECEDE group (multivariate analysis of covariance, with baseline glycated hemoglobin A1c, SBP, and variables showing statistically significant differences between groups at baseline visits). The decrease levels in diastolic blood pressure (DBP), triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were nonsignificant. PRECEDE increased compliance in all control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. BMI did not change during the study in either of the two models analyzed. Conclusions PRECEDE health education model is a useful method in the overall treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes, which contributes to decrease glycated hemoglobin A1c and SBP levels and increase the compliance in all the control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. Trial registration number Clinical

  12. Examining the relationship between HbA1c and diabetes risk models in a European population indicates a lower threshold to identify 'high risk' is required.

    PubMed

    Gray, Benjamin J; Bracken, Richard M; Turner, Daniel; Morgan, Kerry; Thomas, Michael; Williams, Sally P; Williams, Meurig; Rice, Sam; Stephens, Jeffrey W

    2016-05-01

    This study examined whether changes in HbA1c values are reflected in the risk scores and categories of four validated risk-assessment tools (QDiabetes, Leicester Risk Assessment, Finnish Diabetes Risk Score and Cambridge Risk Score). Retrospective analysis was performed on 651 individuals with no prior diagnosis of cardiovascular disease or diabetes who participated in a UK workplace-based risk-assessment initiative. There were significant positive correlations (p < 0.01) revealed between HbA1c values and predicted risk scores: QDiabetes (r = 0.362), Leicester Risk Assessment (r = 0.315), Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (r = 0.202) and Cambridge Risk Score (r = 0.335). HbA1c values increased within risk prediction categories, and at 'high-risk' categories, median HbA1c values were at least 39 mmol mol(-1) (5.7%) irrespective of gender or risk-assessment model. Overall, an association is present between increases in HbA1c scores and predicted risk of type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the 'high-risk' median HbA1c values in each of the risk assessments are more akin to the lower American recommendations rather than those suggested by the UK expert group. PMID:26956443

  13. Health Coaching Reduces HbA1c in Type 2 Diabetic Patients From a Lower-Socioeconomic Status Community: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Noah; Perez, Daniel F; Kaplan, David M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adoptions of health behaviors are crucial for maintaining good health after type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) diagnoses. However, adherence to glucoregulating behaviors like regular exercise and balanced diet can be challenging, especially for people living in lower-socioeconomic status (SES) communities. Providing cost-effective interventions that improve self-management is important for improving quality of life and the sustainability of health care systems. Objective To evaluate a health coach intervention with and without the use of mobile phones to support health behavior change in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods In this noninferiority, pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT), patients from two primary care health centers in Toronto, Canada, with type 2 diabetes and a glycated hemoglobin/hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of ≥7.3% (56.3 mmol/mol) were randomized to receive 6 months of health coaching with or without mobile phone monitoring support. We hypothesized that both approaches would result in significant HbA1c reductions, although health coaching with mobile phone monitoring would result in significantly larger effects. Participants were evaluated at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The primary outcome was the change in HbA1c from baseline to 6 months (difference between and within groups). Other outcomes included weight, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), satisfaction with life, depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), positive and negative affect (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule [PANAS]), and quality of life (Short Form Health Survey-12 [SF-12]). Results A total of 138 patients were randomized and 7 were excluded for a substudy; of the remaining 131, 67 were allocated to the intervention group and 64 to the control group. Primary outcome data were available for 97 participants (74.0%). While both groups reduced their HbA1c levels, there were no significant between-group differences in

  14. Therapies for type 2 diabetes: lowering HbA1c and associated cardiovascular risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To summarize data supporting the effects of antidiabetes agents on glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Studies reporting on the effects of antidiabetes agents on glycemic control, body weight, lipid levels, and blood pressure parameters are reviewed and summarized for the purpose of selecting optimal therapeutic regimens for patients with type 2 diabetes. Results National guidelines recommend the aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes, including weight loss and achieving lipid and blood pressure treatment goals. All antidiabetes pharmacotherapies lower glucose; however, effects on cardiovascular risk factors vary greatly among agents. While thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, and insulin are associated with weight gain, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are considered weight neutral and metformin can be weight neutral or associated with a small weight loss. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylinomimetics (e.g. pramlintide) result in weight loss. Additionally, metformin, thiazolidinediones, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated beneficial effects on lipid and blood pressure parameters. Conclusion Management of the cardiovascular risk factors experienced by patients with type 2 diabetes requires a multidisciplinary approach with implementation of treatment strategies to achieve not only glycemic goals but to improve and/or correct the underlying cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:20804556

  15. HbA1c as a Predictor of Diabetes and as an Outcome in the Diabetes Prevention Program: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a standard measure of chronic glycemia for managing diabetes, has been proposed to diagnose diabetes and identify people at risk. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a 3.2-year randomized clinical trial of preventing type 2 diabetes with a 10-year follow-up study, the DPP Outcomes Study (DPPOS). We evaluated baseline HbA1c as a predictor of diabetes and determined the effects of treatments on diabetes defined by an HbA1c ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomized 3,234 nondiabetic adults at high risk of diabetes to placebo, metformin, or intensive lifestyle intervention and followed them for the development of diabetes as diagnosed by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h postload glucose (2hPG) concentrations (1997 American Diabetes Association [ADA] criteria). HbA1c was measured but not used for study eligibility or outcomes. We now evaluate treatment effects in the 2,765 participants who did not have diabetes at baseline according to FPG, 2hPG, or HbA1c (2010 ADA criteria). RESULTS Baseline HbA1c predicted incident diabetes in all treatment groups. Diabetes incidence defined by HbA1c ≥6.5% was reduced by 44% by metformin and 49% by lifestyle during the DPP and by 38% by metformin and 29% by lifestyle throughout follow-up. Unlike the primary DPP and DPPOS findings based on glucose criteria, metformin and lifestyle were similarly effective in preventing diabetes defined by HbA1c. CONCLUSIONS HbA1c predicted incident diabetes. In contrast to the superiority of the lifestyle intervention on glucose-defined diabetes, metformin and lifestyle interventions had similar effects in preventing HbA1c-defined diabetes. The long-term implications for other health outcomes remain to be determined. PMID:25336746

  16. Single, community-based blood glucose readings may be a viable alternative for community surveillance of HbA1c and poor glycaemic control in people with known diabetes in resource-poor settings

    PubMed Central

    Reidpath, Daniel D.; Jahan, Nowrozy K.; Mohan, Devi; Allotey, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Background The term HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin) is commonly used in relation to diabetes mellitus. The measure gives an indication of the average blood sugar levels over a period of weeks or months prior to testing. For most low- and middle-income countries HbA1c measurement in community surveillance is prohibitively expensive. A question arises about the possibility of using a single blood glucose measure for estimating HbA1c and therefore identifying poor glycaemic control in resource-poor settings. Design Using data from the 2011–2012 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, we examined the relationship between HbA1c and a single fasting measure of blood glucose in a non-clinical population of people with known diabetes (n=333). A linear equation for estimating HbA1c from blood glucose was developed. Appropriate blood glucose cut-off values were set for poor glycaemic control (HbA1c≥69.4 mmol/mol). Results The HbA1c and blood glucose measures were well correlated (r=0.7). Three blood glucose cut-off values were considered for classifying poor glycaemic control: 8.0, 8.9, and 11.4 mmol/L. A blood glucose of 11.4 had a specificity of 1, but poor sensitivity (0.37); 8.9 had high specificity (0.94) and moderate sensitivity (0.7); 8.0 was associated with good specificity (0.81) and sensitivity (0.75). Conclusions Where HbA1c measurement is too expensive for community surveillance, a single blood glucose measure may be a reasonable alternative. Generalising the specific results from these US data to low resource settings may not be appropriate, but the general approach is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27511810

  17. Single-Use Disposable Electrochemical Label-Free Immunosensor for Detection of Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV).

    PubMed

    Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Magagnin, Luca; Vena, Pasquale; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2016-01-01

    A single-use disposable in vitro electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of HbA1c in undiluted human serum using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was developed. A three-electrode configuration electrochemical biosensor consisted of 10-nm-thin gold film working and counter electrodes and a thick-film printed Ag/AgCl reference electrode was fabricated on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Micro-fabrication techniques including sputtering vapor deposition and thick-film printing were used to fabricate the biosensor. This was a roll-to-roll cost-effective manufacturing process making the single-use disposable in vitro HbA1c biosensor a reality. Self-assembled monolayers of 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were employed to covalently immobilize anti-HbA1c on the surface of gold electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the excellent coverage of MPA-SAM and the upward orientation of carboxylic groups. The hindering effect of HbA1c on the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide electron transfer reaction was exploited as the HbA1c detection mechanism. The biosensor showed a linear range of 7.5-20 µg/mL of HbA1c in 0.1 M PBS. Using undiluted human serum as the test medium, the biosensor presented an excellent linear behavior (R² = 0.999) in the range of 0.1-0.25 mg/mL of HbA1c. The potential application of this biosensor for in vitro measurement of HbA1c for diabetic management was demonstrated. PMID:27376299

  18. Single-Use Disposable Electrochemical Label-Free Immunosensor for Detection of Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV)

    PubMed Central

    Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Magagnin, Luca; Vena, Pasquale; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2016-01-01

    A single-use disposable in vitro electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of HbA1c in undiluted human serum using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was developed. A three-electrode configuration electrochemical biosensor consisted of 10-nm-thin gold film working and counter electrodes and a thick-film printed Ag/AgCl reference electrode was fabricated on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Micro-fabrication techniques including sputtering vapor deposition and thick-film printing were used to fabricate the biosensor. This was a roll-to-roll cost-effective manufacturing process making the single-use disposable in vitro HbA1c biosensor a reality. Self-assembled monolayers of 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were employed to covalently immobilize anti-HbA1c on the surface of gold electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the excellent coverage of MPA-SAM and the upward orientation of carboxylic groups. The hindering effect of HbA1c on the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide electron transfer reaction was exploited as the HbA1c detection mechanism. The biosensor showed a linear range of 7.5–20 µg/mL of HbA1c in 0.1 M PBS. Using undiluted human serum as the test medium, the biosensor presented an excellent linear behavior (R2 = 0.999) in the range of 0.1–0.25 mg/mL of HbA1c. The potential application of this biosensor for in vitro measurement of HbA1c for diabetic management was demonstrated. PMID:27376299

  19. HbA1c Alone Is a Poor Indicator of Cardiometabolic Risk in Middle-Aged Subjects with Pre-Diabetes but Is Suitable for Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Seán R.; Perry, Ivan J.; Phillips, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement is recommended as an alternative to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for the diagnosis of pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. However, evidence suggests discordance between HbA1c and FPG. In this study we examine a range of metabolic risk features, pro-inflammatory cytokines, acute-phase response proteins, coagulation factors and white blood cell counts to determine which assay more accurately identifies individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving a random sample of 2,047 men and women aged 46-73 years. Binary and multinomial logistic regression were employed to examine risk feature associations with pre-diabetes [either HbA1c levels 5.7-6.4% (39-46 mmol/mol) or impaired FPG levels 5.6-6.9 mmol/l] and type 2 diabetes [either HbA1c levels >6.5% (>48 mmol/mol) or FPG levels >7.0 mmol/l]. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to evaluate the ability of HbA1c to discriminate pre-diabetes and diabetes defined by FPG. Results Stronger associations with diabetes-related phenotypes were observed in pre-diabetic subjects diagnosed by FPG compared to those detected by HbA1c. Individuals with type 2 diabetes exhibited cardiometabolic profiles that were broadly similar according to diagnosis by either assay. Pre-diabetic participants classified by both assays displayed a more pro-inflammatory, pro-atherogenic, hypertensive and insulin resistant profile. Odds ratios of having three or more metabolic syndrome features were also noticeably increased (OR: 4.0, 95% CI: 2.8-5.8) when compared to subjects diagnosed by either HbA1c (OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.2-1.8) or FPG (OR: 3.0, 95% CI: 1.7-5.1) separately. Conclusions In middle-aged Caucasian-Europeans, HbA1c alone is a poor indicator of cardiometabolic risk but is suitable for diagnosing diabetes. Combined use of HbA1c and FPG may be of additional benefit for detecting individuals at highest odds of

  20. Use of an oral stable isotope label to confirm variation in red blood cell mean age that influences HbA1c interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsell, Christopher J.; Rogge, Mary Colleen; Haggerty, Shannon; Wagner, David A.; Palascak, Mary B.; Mehta, Shilpa; Hibbert, Jacqueline M.; Joiner, Clinton H.; Franco, Robert S.; Cohen, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    HbA1c is commonly used to monitor glycemic control. However, there is growing evidence that the relationship between HbA1c and mean blood glucose (MBG) is influenced by variation in red blood cell (RBC) lifespan in hematologically normal individuals. Correction of HbA1c for mean RBC age (MRBC) requires a noninvasive, accurate, and affordable method to measure RBC survival. In this study, we evaluated whether a stable isotope approach would satisfy these requirements. RBC lifespan and MRBC were determined in a group of nine hematologically normal diabetic and nondiabetic subjects using oral 15N-glycine to label heme in an age cohort of RBC. The MRBC was 58.7 ± 9.1 (2SD) days and RBC lifespan was 106 ± 21 (2SD) days. This degree of variation (±15 - 20%) is consistent with previous studies using other techniques. In a subset of seven subjects, MRBC determined with the biotin label technique were available from approximately five years prior, and strongly correlated with the stable isotope values (R2 = 0.79). This study suggests that the MRBC is stable over time but varies substantially among individuals, and supports the importance of its variation in HbA1c interpretation. The characteristics of the stable isotope method support its suitability for studies to directly evaluate the impact of variation in MRBC on the interpretation of HbA1c. PMID:25293624

  1. Prevalence of comorbidity in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes and its association with elevated HbA1c: A cross-sectional study in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Bralić Lang, Valerija; Bergman Marković, Biserka

    2016-01-01

    Objective To the authors’ knowledge, there are few valid data that describe the prevalence of comorbidity in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients seen in family practice. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of comorbidities and their association with elevated (≥ 7.0%) haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) using a large sample of T2DM patients from primary care practices. Design A cross-sectional study in which multivariate logistic regression was applied to explore the association of comorbidities with elevated HbA1c. Setting Primary care practices in Croatia. Subjects Altogether, 10 264 patients with diabetes in 449 practices. Main outcome measures Comorbidities and elevated HbA1c. Results In total 7979 (77.7%) participants had comorbidity. The mean number of comorbidities was 1.6 (SD 1.28). Diseases of the circulatory system were the most common (7157, 69.7%), followed by endocrine and metabolic diseases (3093, 30.1%), and diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (1437, 14.0%). After adjustment for age and sex, the number of comorbidities was significantly associated with HbA1c. The higher the number of comorbidities, the lower the HbA1c. The prevalence of physicians’ inertia was statistically significantly and negatively associated with the number of comorbidities (Mann–Whitney U test, Z = –12.34; p < 0.001; r = –0.12). Conclusion There is a high prevalence of comorbidity among T2DM patients in primary care. A negative association of number of comorbidities and HbA1c is probably moderated by physicians’ inertia in treatment of T2DM strictly according to guidelines. Key pointsThere is a high prevalence of comorbidity among T2DM patients in primary care.Patients with breast cancer, obese patients, and those with dyslipidaemia and ischaemic heart disease were more likely to have increased HbA1c.The higher the number of comorbidities, the lower the HbA1c. PMID:26853192

  2. HbA1c Variability as an Independent Risk Factor for Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes: A German/Austrian Multicenter Analysis on 35,891 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Julia M.; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Rami-Merhar, Birgit; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Schütt, Morten; Siegel, Erhard; Holl, Reinhard W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze the effect of HbA1c variability on the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes patients. Patients and Methods 35,891 patients with childhood, adolescent or adult onset of type 1 diabetes from a large multicentre survey, the German/Austrian prospective documentation system (DPV), were analysed. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine whether intra-individual HbA1c variability expressed as variation coefficient is an independent risk factor for the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. Results Kaplan-Meier curves stratified by median HbA1c and variation coefficient revealed that retinopathy-free survival probability is lower when both median HbA1c and HbA1c variability are above the 50th percentile. Cox regression models confirmed this finding: After adjustment for age at diabetes onset, gender and median HbA1c, HbA1c variability was independently associated with the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. Time-covariate interactions used to model non-proportionality indicated an effect decreasing with duration of diabetes for both median HbA1c and HbA1c variability. Predictive accuracy increased significantly when adding HbA1c variability to the Cox regression model. Conclusions In patients with type 1 diabetes, HbA1c variability adds to the risk of diabetic retinopathy independently of average metabolic control. PMID:24609115

  3. HbA1c overtesting and overtreatment among US adults with controlled type 2 diabetes, 2001-13: observational population based study

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, Holly K; Ross, Joseph S; Montori, Victor M; Shah, Nilay D

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the extent and effect of excessive testing for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among adults with controlled type 2 diabetes? Methods A retrospective analysis of data from a national administrative claims database included commercially insured individuals in the USA, 2001-13. Study patients were aged 18 years or older, had type 2 diabetes with stable glycemic control (two consecutive tests showing HbA1c<7.0% within 24 months), did not use insulin, had no history of severe hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, and were not pregnant. HbA1c testing frequency was measured within 24 months after the second (index) HbA1c test, and classified as guideline recommended (≤2 times/year), frequent (3-4 times/year), and excessive (≥5 times/year). Changes in treatment regimen were ascertained within three months of the index test. Study answer and limitations Of 31 545 patients in the study cohort (mean age 58 years; mean index HbA1c 6.2%), HbA1c testing frequency was excessive in 6% and frequent in 55%. Despite good glycemic control at baseline, treatment was further intensified by addition of glucose lowering drugs or insulin in 8.4% of patients (comprising 13%, 9%, and 7% of those tested excessively, frequently, and per guidelines, respectively; P<0.001). Compared with guideline recommended testing, excessive testing was associated with treatment intensification (odds ratio 1.35 (95% confidence interval 1.22 to 1.50)). Excessive testing rates remained unchanged in 2001-08, but fell significantly after 2009. The odds of excessive testing was 46% lower in 2011 than in 2001-02. The study population is not representative of all US patients with type 2 diabetes because it was restricted to commercially insured adults with stable and controlled diabetes not receiving insulin treatment. The study design did not capture the underuse of HbA1c testing. What this study adds In this US cohort of adults with stable and controlled type 2 diabetes, more than 60% received

  4. Universal HbA1c Measurement in Early Pregnancy to Detect Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Ethnic Disparities in Antenatal Diabetes Screening: A Population-Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In response to the type 2 diabetes epidemic, measuring HbA1c with the first-antenatal blood screen was recently recommended in NZ. This would enable prompt treatment of women with unrecognised type 2 diabetes, who may otherwise go undetected until the gestational diabetes (GDM) screen. We compare inter-ethnic antenatal screening practices to examine whether the HbA1c test would be accessed by ethnicities most at risk of diabetes, and we determined the prevalence of unrecognised type 2 diabetes and prediabetes in our pregnant population. This is an observational study of pregnancies in Christchurch NZ during 2008–2010. Utilising electronic databases, we matched maternal characteristics to first-antenatal bloods, HbA1c, and GDM screens (glucose challenge tests and oral glucose tolerance tests). Overall uptake of the first-antenatal bloods versus GDM screening was 83.1% and 53.8% respectively in 11,580 pregnancies. GDM screening was lowest in Māori 39.3%, incidence proportion ratio (IPR) 0.77 (0.71, 0.84) compared with Europeans. By including HbA1c with the first-antenatal bloods, the number screened for diabetes increases by 28.5% in Europeans, 40.0% in Māori, 28.1% in Pacific People, and 26.7% in ‘Others’ (majority of Asian descent). The combined prevalence of unrecognised type 2 diabetes and prediabetes by NZ criteria, HbA1c ≥5.9% (41mmol/mol), was 2.1% in Europeans, Māori 4.7% IPR 2.59 (1.71, 3.93), Pacific People 9.5% IPR 4.76 (3.10, 7.30), and ‘Others’ 6.2% IPR 2.99 (2.19, 4.07). Applying these prevalence data to 2013 NZ national births data, routine antenatal HbA1c testing could have identified type 2 diabetes in 0.44% and prediabetes in 3.96% of women. Routine HbA1c measurement in early pregnancy is an ideal screening opportunity, particularly benefitting vulnerable groups, reducing ethnic disparities in antenatal diabetes screening. This approach is likely to have world-wide relevance and applicability. Further research is underway to establish

  5. Design Features of the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT): A Multicenter Randomized Single-Masked Clinical Trial Testing the Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Glycosylated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Levels in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that periodontitis is associated with prevalent and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), raising the question of whether periodontitis treatment may improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM. Meta-analyses of mostly small clinical trials suggest that periodontitis treatment results in a modest reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin (Hb) A1c. Purpose The purpose of the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) was to determine if periodontal treatment reduces HbA1c in patients with T2DM and periodontitis. Methods DPTT was a phase-III, single-masked, multi-center, randomized trial with a planned enrollment of 600 participants. Participants were randomly assigned to receive periodontal treatment immediately (Treatment Group) or after 6 months (Control Group). HbA1c values and clinical periodontal measures were determined at baseline and 3 and 6 months following randomization. Medication usage and dosing were assessed at each visit. Periodontal treatment consisted of scaling and root planing for a minimum of two 90-minute sessions, plus the use of an antibacterial mouth rinse for at least 32 days afterwards. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c from baseline to 6 months and the trial was powered to detect a between-group difference of 0.6%. Secondary outcomes included changes in periodontal clinical measures, fasting plasma glucose, the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2) and the need for rescue diabetes or periodontal therapy. Conclusion Dental and medical researchers collaborated to recruit, treat and monitor participants with two chronic diseases to determine if treatment of one condition affects the status of the other. PMID:24080100

  6. HbA1c and Risks of All-Cause and Cause-Specific Death in Subjects without Known Diabetes: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guo-Chao; Ye, Ming-Xin; Cheng, Jia-Hao; Zhao, Yong; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Whether HbA1c levels are associated with mortality in subjects without known diabetes remains controversial. Moreover, the shape of the dose–response relationship on this topic is unclear. Therefore, a dose–response meta-analysis was conducted. PubMed and EMBASE were searched. Summary hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Twelve studies were included. The summary HR per 1% increase in HbA1c level was 1.03 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01–1.04] for all-cause mortality, 1.05 [95% CI = 1.02–1.07) for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, and 1.02 (95% CI = 0.99–1.07) for cancer mortality. After excluding subjects with undiagnosed diabetes, the aforementioned associations remained significant for CVD mortality only. After further excluding subjects with prediabetes, all aforementioned associations presented non-significance. Evidence of a non-linear association between HbA1c and mortality from all causes, CVD and cancer was found (all Pnon-linearity < 0.05). The dose–response curves were relatively flat for HbA1c less than around 5.7%, and rose steeply thereafter. In conclusion, higher HbA1c level is associated with increased mortality from all causes and CVD among subjects without known diabetes. However, this association is driven by those with undiagnosed diabetes or prediabetes. The results regarding cancer mortality should be treated with caution due to limited studies. PMID:27045572

  7. Integrative health coaching: a behavior skills approach that improves HbA1c and pharmacy claims-derived medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Wolever, Ruth Q; Dreusicke, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Medication adherence requires underlying behavior skills and a supporting mindset that may not be addressed with education or reminders. Founded in the study of internal motivation and health psychology, integrative health coaching (IHC) helps patients gain insight into their behaviors and make long-term, sustainable lifestyle changes. The purpose of the study is to determine whether IHC improves oral medication adherence, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and psychosocial measures, and to assess whether adherence changes are sustained after the intervention. Methods Using a prospective observational design, participants (n=56) received 14 coaching calls by telephone over 6 months. Medication possession ratio (MPR) was calculated for time intervals before, during, and after the intervention. HbA1c and patient-reported psychosocial outcomes were obtained to test interactions with MPR. Results Medication adherence (MPR) increased from 0.74±0.197 to 0.85±0.155 during coaching, and was sustained at 0.82±0.175 during a 6-month period after the study. Better adherence correlated with a greater decrease in HbA1c. HbA1c decreased from 8.0±1.92% to 7.7±1.70% over the 6-month intervention. All psychosocial measures showed significant improvement. In addition to discussing medication adherence strategies with their coach, patients discussed nutrition and exercise (86.9% of calls), stress management (39.8%), and social support and relationships (15.4%). Conclusions IHC targets internal motivation and supports behavior change by facilitating patients’ insight into their own behaviors, and it uses this insight to foster self-efficacy. This approach may yield sustainable results for medication adherence and warrants further exploration for health-related behavior change. PMID:27239318

  8. [HbA1c is not enough in screening for impaired glucose metabolism. Glucose tolerance tests are also needed, as shown in Swedish prospective epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Margareta; Daka, Bledar; Larsson, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    An HbA1c threshold of ≥ 42 mmol/mol has been proposed to diagnose prediabetes. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the proposed threshold for detection of individuals with prediabetes was examined in a study of 573 randomly selected individuals from Vara and Skövde. In addition, the utility of the FINDRISC questionnaire and of a fasting glucose test in combination with three short questions concerning BMI, heredity for type 2 diabetes and known hypertension was examined. Results from an oral glucose tolerance test were used as reference. The sensitivity of HbA1c and FINDRISC to detect individuals with IGT was 16 and 26 per cent respectively. Questions regarding BMI, heredity and hypertension together with a fasting glucose test yielded a sensitivity of 50%, but a lower specificity and positive predictive value. We conclude that HbA1c inefficiently detected individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and that oral glucose tolerance tests can still preferably be recommended. PMID:26418933

  9. Dietary Pattern Trajectories during 15 Years of Follow-up and HbA1c, Insulin Resistance, and Diabetes Prevalence among Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Batis, Carolina; Mendez, Michelle A.; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Popkin, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Background Most research on dietary patterns and health outcomes does not include longitudinal exposure data. We used an innovative technique to capture dietary pattern trajectories and their association with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and prevalence of newly diagnosed diabetes. Methods We included 4,096 adults with three to six waves of diet data (1991–2006) and biomarkers measured in 2009 from the China Health and Nutrition Survey. Diet was assessed with three 24-hour recalls and a household food inventory. We used a dietary pattern previously identified with reduced rank regression that positively predicted diabetes in 2006 (high in wheat products and soy milk and low in rice, legumes, poultry, eggs, and fish). We estimated a score for this dietary pattern for each subject at each wave. Using latent class trajectory analysis, we grouped subjects with similar dietary pattern score trajectories over time into five classes. Results Three trajectory classes were stable over time, and in two classes the diet became unhealthier over time (upward trend in dietary pattern score). Among two classes with similar scores in 2006, the one with the lower (healthier) initial score had an HbA1c 1.64% lower (−1.64 [95% confidence interval= −3.17, −0.11]) and nonsignificantly a HOMA-IR 6.47% lower (−6.47 [−17.37, 4.42]) and lower odds of diabetes (0.86 [0.44, 1.67]). Conclusions Our findings suggest that dietary pattern trajectories with healthier scores longitudinally had a lower HbA1c compared to those with unhealthier scores, even when the trajectories had similar scores in the end point. PMID:24729424

  10. Longitudinal relationship between diabetes-specific emotional distress and follow-up HbA1c in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, R B; Graue, M; Wentzel-Larsen, T; Peyrot, M; Thordarson, H B; Rokne, B

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine whether diabetes-specific emotional distress was related to follow-up glycaemic control in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods Adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus completed the Diabetes Distress Scale and reported sociodemographic information when attending a clinical consultation at a university endocrinology unit. Blood samples to determine baseline HbA1c were taken during consultations. All respondents’ HbA1c measurements registered from January 2009 to December 2011 were collected from medical records. The relationship between baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress and HbA1c was examined with linear mixed-effects models in 175 patients with complete data. Results After controlling for confounders, baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress and glycaemic control were significantly associated (fixed-effect coefficient 0.40, P < 0.001) and the regimen-related distress subscale had the strongest association with glycaemic control (fixed-effect coefficient 0.47, P < 0.001). The two-item measure of diabetes-specific distress had a weaker but still significant association with glycaemic control (fixed-effect coefficient 0.31, P < 0.001). None of these relationships was significant after adjusting for the baseline HbA1c. Conclusions People with elevated baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress are at risk of prolonged suboptimum glycaemic control; therefore, elevated diabetes-specific emotional distress, especially regimen-related distress, might be an important marker for prolonged suboptimum glycaemic control, and might indicate a need for special attention regarding patient self-management. What’s new? In adults with Type 1 diabetes, elevated baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress is associated with worse glycaemic control over a 1–3-year period and regimen-related distress had the strongest association with subsequent glycaemic control. Baseline diabetes-specific emotional distress is associated with the

  11. An indirect comparison of HbA1c treatment effect with albiglutide and exenatide 2.0 mg QW using the Bucher method

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alan A; Parks, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    No head-to-head comparisons exist between once-weekly (QW) glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists; accordingly, this indirect comparison was conducted to evaluate the comparative efficacy of QW albiglutide vs QW exenatide. Following a systematic literature search, it was determined that HARMONY 7 and DURATION 6, Phase III trials for albiglutide and exenatide, respectively, were similar in study design and baseline characteristics and included a common comparator arm, making them suitable for an indirect comparison using the Bucher method. The primary endpoint of change from baseline in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with albiglutide 50 mg QW and exenatide 2.0 mg QW was compared and tested for noninferiority. The indirect comparison showed a treatment difference of 0.0% (95% confidence interval: −0.189% to 0.189%) in mean change in HbA1c from baseline, and albiglutide 50 mg was noninferior to exenatide 2.0 mg QW at the noninferiority margin of 0.3%. In the absence of a head-to-head trial, these results can be used in pharmacoeconomic analysis and to inform health technology assessment and clinical decision making. PMID:27274297

  12. The Association between HbA1c, Fasting Glucose, 1-Hour Glucose and 2-Hour Glucose during an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test and Cardiovascular Disease in Individuals with Elevated Risk for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Marcus; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Nerman, Olle; Eriksson, Johan; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Peltonen, Markku; Pivodic, Aldina; Lindström, Jaana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 1-hour (1 hPG) and 2-hour (2 hPG) glucose after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and cardiovascular disease in individuals with elevated risk for diabetes. Design We studied the relationship between baseline, updated mean and updated (last) value of HbA1c, FPG, 1 hPG and 2 hPG after an oral 75 g glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and acute CVD events in 504 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) at baseline enrolled in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study. Setting Follow-up of clinical trial. Participants 504 individuals with IGT were followed with yearly evaluations with OGTT, FPG and HbA1c. Main Outcome Measure Relative risk of CVD. Results Over a median follow-up of 9.0 years 34 (6.7%) participants had a CVD event, which increased to 52 (10.3%) over a median follow-up of 13.0 years when including events that occurred among participants following a diagnosis of diabetes. Updated mean HbA1c, 1 hPG and 2 hPG, HR per 1 unit SD of 1.57 (95% CI 1.16 to 2.11), p = 0.0032, 1.51 (1.03 to 2.23), p = 0.036 and 1.60 (1.10 to 2.34), p = 0.014, respectively, but not FPG (p = 0.11), were related to CVD. In analyses of the last value prior to the CVD event the same three glycaemic measurements were associated with the CVD events, with HRs per 1 unit SD of 1.45 (1.06 to 1.98), p = 0.020, 1.55 (1.04 to 2.29), p = 0.030 and 2.19 (1.51 to 3.18), p<0.0001, respectively but only 2 hPG remained significant in pairwise comparisons. Including the follow-up period after diabetes onset updated 2 hPG (p = 0.003) but not updated mean HbA1c (p = 0.08) was related to CVD. Conclusions and Relevance Current 2 hPG level in people with IGT is associated with increased risk of CVD. This supports its use in screening for prediabetes and monitoring glycaemic levels of people with prediabetes. PMID:25285769

  13. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Muhammed Hasanato, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12–16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12–17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5–6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26580639

  14. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Hasanato, Rana Muhammed

    2015-11-01

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12-16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12-17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5-6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26580639

  15. The Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) Published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on the Effect of Periodontal Therapy on Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Has Fundamental Problems

    PubMed Central

    Borgnakke, Wenche S.; Chapple, Iain L.C.; Genco, Robert J.; Armitage, Gary; Bartold, P. Mark; D’Aiuto, Francesco; Eke, Paul I.; Giannobile, William V.; Kocher, Thomas; Kornman, Kenneth S.; Lang, Niklaus P.; Madianos, Phoebus N.; Murakami, Shinya; Nishimura, Fusanori; Offenbacher, Steven; Preshaw, Philip M.; Rahman, Amin ur; Sanz, Mariano; Slots, Jørgen; Tonetti, Maurizio S.; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Subject Participants had type 2 diabetes, were on stable medication regimens, had HbA1c levels between 7% and <9%, retained at least 16 natural teeth, and had untreated chronic periodontitis. A total of 514 participants were enrolled between November 2009 and March 2012 from diabetes and dental clinics and communities affiliated with five participating academic medical centers. They were randomized with half (n = 257) allocated to a treatment group and the other half (n = 257) to a control group. Key Exposure/Study Factor The exposure was non-surgical periodontal treatment comprising scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instruction, and oral rinsing with chlorhexidine provided to the treatment group at baseline. Supportive periodontal therapy was also provided at 3 and 6 months. The control group received no treatment for the 6-month duration of the study. Main Outcome Measure The primary outcome measure was “the difference in change in HbA1c level from baseline between the two groups at 6 months.” Secondary outcomes included changes in periodontal probing depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing (BOP), gingival index, fasting glucose level, and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2) score. Main Results The authors report that enrollment into their Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) was terminated early due to futility. At 6 months, mean HbA1c levels in the periodontal therapy group increased 0.17 (±1.0)%, compared with 0.11 (±1.0)% in the control group, with no significant difference between groups based on a linear regression model adjusting for clinical site (mean difference, −0.05% [95% CI: −0.23% to 0.12%]; p = 0.55). Periodontal measures improved in the treatment group compared with the control group at 6 months, with adjusted between-group differences of 0.28 mm (95% CI: 0.18–0.37) for PPD; 0.25 mm (95% CI: 0.14–0.36) for clinical attachment loss; 13.1% (95% CI: 8.1%–18.1%) for BOP; and 0.27 (95% CI: 0.17

  16. Exenatide once weekly improved glycaemic control, cardiometabolic risk factors and a composite index of an HbA1c < 7%, without weight gain or hypoglycaemia, over 52 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Bergenstal, R M; Li, Y; Porter, T K Booker; Weaver, C; Han, J

    2013-01-01

    Aims Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is often associated with cardiovascular (CV) risk factors such as obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate potential effects of exenatide once weekly (ExQW), a GLP-1 receptor agonist, on glycaemic control and CV risk factors. Methods This analysis included 675 Intent-to-Treat patients with T2DM [baseline (mean ± SD) HbA1c, 8.1 ± 1.2%; fasting blood glucose (FBG), 166 ± 48 mg/dl; weight, 94.3 ± 19.4 kg; systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP), 129 ± 15/78 ± 9 mm Hg; total cholesterol, 178.5 ± 41.9 mg/dl; low-density lipoprotein (LDL), 100.1 ± 35.0 mg/dl; high-density lipoprotein (HDL), 44.5 ± 11.6 mg/dl; triglycerides, 155.6 ± 3.3 mg/dl; alanine aminotransferase (ALT), 32.1 ± 19.5 U/l] treated with diet and exercise alone or in combination with metformin, sulfonylurea, and/or thiazolidinedione who received 52 weeks of ExQW in four clinical trials. Results At 52 weeks, ExQW significantly improved HbA1c [mean (SE) change from baseline, −1.3 (0.05)%], FBG [−36.3 (2.02) mg/dl], body weight [−2.6 (0.19) kg], SBP/DBP [−3.6 (0.56) mm Hg/−1.2 (0.34) mm Hg], total cholesterol, −4.4 (1.33) mg/dl; LDL, −2.6 (1.08) mg/dl; HDL, 1.1 (0.31) mg/dl; triglycerides, −7 (1.6)%], and ALT [−4.3 (0.71) IU/l] concentrations, with greater improvements in patients with elevated analyte levels at baseline. Improvements were observed across a range of background antihyperglycaemia therapies. Of patients completing 52 weeks, 19% achieved the composite American Diabetes Association goal (HbA1c < 7.0%, BP < 130/80 mm Hg, LDL < 100 mg/dl), compared to 1% at baseline. Nearly half (48%) achieved HbA1c < 7.0% without weight gain or major/minor hypoglycaemia. Nausea was the most frequent adverse event and was predominantly mild. Hypoglycaemia was infrequent, and more common with a sulfonylurea. Conclusions With 52 weeks of ExQW, patients experienced sustained improvements in glycaemic

  17. One center in Brussels has consistently had the lowest HbA1c values in the 4 studies (1994-2009) by the Hvidoere International Study Group on Childhood Diabetes: What are the "recipes"?

    PubMed Central

    Dorchy, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The principal aims of therapeutic management of the child, adolescent and adult with type 1 diabetes are to allow good quality of life and to avoid long-term complications (retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, cardiovascular disease, etc.) by maintaining blood glucose concentrations close to normal level. Glycated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) provide a good criterion of overall glycemic control. The Hvidoere Study Group (HSG) on Childhood Diabetes, founded in 1994, is an international group representing about twenty highly experienced pediatric centers from Europe, North America, Japan and Australia. Four international comparisons of metabolic control (1995, 1998, 2005, 2009) have been performed. The one center that has consistently had the lowest HbA1c values (approximate 7.3% or 56.3 mmol/mol) is my center in Brussels. This is more often obtained with a twice-daily free-mixed regimen with additional supplemental fast insulins ad hoc. The so-called “Dorchy’s recipes” are summarized. The conclusion is that the number of daily insulin injections, 2 or ≥ 4, or the use of pumps, by itself does not necessarily give better results. Intensified therapy should not depend upon the number of insulin doses per day, by syringe, pen or pump but rather should be redefined as to intent-to-treat ascertainment (i.e., goals). When there are no mutually agreed upon goals for BG and/or HbA1c, when there is insufficient education and psychosocial support by the medical team or at home, there is likely to be poor outcomes, as shown by the HSG. One of our recipes is not to systematically replace rapid-acting human insulins by fast-acting analogues. Because the multicenter studies of the HSG, performed in developed countries without financial restriction, show that treatment of childhood diabetes is inadequate in general and that levels of HbA1c are very different, diabetes treatment teams should individually explore the reasons for failure, without any prejudice or bias. Any

  18. One center in Brussels has consistently had the lowest HbA1c values in the 4 studies (1994-2009) by the Hvidoere International Study Group on Childhood Diabetes: What are the "recipes"?

    PubMed

    Dorchy, Harry

    2015-02-15

    The principal aims of therapeutic management of the child, adolescent and adult with type 1 diabetes are to allow good quality of life and to avoid long-term complications (retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, cardiovascular disease, etc.) by maintaining blood glucose concentrations close to normal level. Glycated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) provide a good criterion of overall glycemic control. The Hvidoere Study Group (HSG) on Childhood Diabetes, founded in 1994, is an international group representing about twenty highly experienced pediatric centers from Europe, North America, Japan and Australia. Four international comparisons of metabolic control (1995, 1998, 2005, 2009) have been performed. The one center that has consistently had the lowest HbA1c values (approximate 7.3% or 56.3 mmol/mol) is my center in Brussels. This is more often obtained with a twice-daily free-mixed regimen with additional supplemental fast insulins ad hoc. The so-called "Dorchy's recipes" are summarized. The conclusion is that the number of daily insulin injections, 2 or ≥ 4, or the use of pumps, by itself does not necessarily give better results. Intensified therapy should not depend upon the number of insulin doses per day, by syringe, pen or pump but rather should be redefined as to intent-to-treat ascertainment (i.e., goals). When there are no mutually agreed upon goals for BG and/or HbA1c, when there is insufficient education and psychosocial support by the medical team or at home, there is likely to be poor outcomes, as shown by the HSG. One of our recipes is not to systematically replace rapid-acting human insulins by fast-acting analogues. Because the multicenter studies of the HSG, performed in developed countries without financial restriction, show that treatment of childhood diabetes is inadequate in general and that levels of HbA1c are very different, diabetes treatment teams should individually explore the reasons for failure, without any prejudice or bias. Any dogmatism

  19. Does the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus with the DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin reduce HbA1c to a greater extent in Japanese patients than in Caucasian patients?

    PubMed Central

    Foley, James E; Bhosekar, Vaishali; Kawamori, Ryuzo

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous work suggests that Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may respond more favorably to a DPP-4 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) inhibitor than Caucasians. We aimed to compare the efficacy of the DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin (50 mg twice daily [bid]) between Japanese and Caucasian populations. Methods This analysis pooled data from 19 studies of drug-naïve patients with T2DM who were treated for 12 weeks with vildagliptin 50 mg bid as monotherapy. The pool comprised Japanese patients (n=338) who had been treated in Japan and Caucasian patients (n=1,275) who were treated elsewhere. Change from baseline (Δ) in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at 12 weeks (in millimoles per mole) versus baseline HbA1c (both in percentage National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program units [NGSP%] and millimoles per mole) for each population was reported. Universal HbA1c in millimoles per mole was calculated from either the Japanese Diabetes Society or the NGSP% HbA1c standards. Results At baseline, mean values for Japanese and Caucasian patients, respectively, were as follows: age, 59 years and 56 years; % male, 69% and 57%. The average HbA1c was reduced from 7.90% to 6.96% (Japanese Diabetes Society) and from 8.57% to 7.50% (United States National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program), while HbA1c was reduced from 63 mmol/mol to 53 mmol/mol and from 70 mmol/mol to 58 mmol/mol in Japanese and Caucasians, respectively. ΔHbA1c increased with increasing baseline in both populations. The slopes were the same (0.41, r2=0.36; and 0.41, r2=0.15), and the intercepts were 15.4 mmol/mol and 17.2 mmol/mol, respectively. In Japanese patients, mean ΔHbA1c was greater by 1.7 mmol/mol (0.2% NGSP HbA1c) at any given baseline HbA1c than in Caucasians (P=0.01). Conclusion The present pooled analysis suggests that Japanese patients respond better to vildagliptin treatment compared with Caucasians. However, when glycemic control was corrected by using the same glycemic

  20. Burden of Diabetes and First Evidence for the Utility of HbA1c for Diagnosis and Detection of Diabetes in Urban Black South Africans: The Durban Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Hird, Thomas R.; Pirie, Fraser J.; Esterhuizen, Tonya M.; O’Leary, Brian; McCarthy, Mark I.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Motala, Ayesha A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is recommended as an additional tool to glucose-based measures (fasting plasma glucose [FPG] and 2-hour plasma glucose [2PG] during oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]) for the diagnosis of diabetes; however, its use in sub-Saharan African populations is not established. We assessed prevalence estimates and the diagnosis and detection of diabetes based on OGTT, FPG, and HbA1c in an urban black South African population. Research Design and Methods We conducted a population-based cross-sectional survey using multistage cluster sampling of adults aged ≥18 years in Durban (eThekwini municipality), KwaZulu-Natal. All participants had a 75-g OGTT and HbA1c measurements. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the overall diagnostic accuracy of HbA1c, using OGTT as the reference, and to determine optimal HbA1c cut-offs. Results Among 1190 participants (851 women, 92.6% response rate), the age-standardised prevalence of diabetes was 12.9% based on OGTT, 11.9% based on FPG, and 13.1% based on HbA1c. In participants without a previous history of diabetes (n = 1077), using OGTT as the reference, an HbA1c ≥48 mmol/mol (6.5%) detected diabetes with 70.3% sensitivity (95%CI 52.7–87.8) and 98.7% specificity (95%CI 97.9–99.4) (AUC 0.94 [95%CI 0.89–1.00]). Additional analyses suggested the optimal HbA1c cut-off for detection of diabetes in this population was 42 mmol/mol (6.0%) (sensitivity 89.2% [95%CI 78.6–99.8], specificity 92.0% [95%CI: 90.3–93.7]). Conclusions In an urban black South African population, we found a high prevalence of diabetes and provide the first evidence for the utility of HbA1c for the diagnosis and detection of diabetes in black Africans in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27560687

  1. Prevalence of hemoglobin variants in a diabetic population at high risk of hemoglobinopathies and optimization of HbA1c monitoring by incorporating HPLC in the laboratory workup

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Kahena; Ahmed, Habib B.; Kalai, Eya; Blibeche, Salma; Couque, Nathalie; Khiari, Karima; Bahlous, Afef; Abdelmoula, Jaouida

    2014-01-01

    Background In Tunisia, diabetes mellitus and hemoglobinopathies are major public health problems. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is recommended for long-term monitoring of diabetes mellitus, but the presence of hemoglobin variants may interfere with HbA1c measurement. The aim was to determine the prevalence of hemoglobin variants in Tunisian diabetics and optimize the monitoring of diabetics using HbA1c. Methods The study enrolled 9,792 Tunisian diabetic patients. HbA1c was measured by cation-exchange high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). All the chromatograms were analyzed for the presence of Hb variants. Results We identified 228 cases (2.33%) of Hb variants with D-10 HPLC (Bio-Rad): 191 with HbA/S trait, 27 with HbA/C trait, and 10 hemoglobin variants with the mention ‘Variant-Window’ on the chromatograms and subsequently identified as HbA/S on Variant I HPLC (Bio-Rad). Thus, the prevalence of HbS was 2.05%. We did not find any homozygous variant. All HbA1c results were reported to the treating physician. Conclusions To evaluate glycated hemoglobin in populations with a high prevalence of hemoglobinopathies, we should use the HPLC method, which is easy, economical, and reliable. Based on an algorithm, hemoglobin variants visualized on HPLC should be reported to the physician to improve the management of patients. PMID:25361891

  2. Ethnic differences in cross-sectional associations between impaired glucose regulation, identified by oral glucose tolerance test or HbA1c values, and cardiovascular disease in a cohort of European and South Asian origin

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, S. V.; Tillin, T.; Mayet, J.; Shibata, D. K.; Wright, A.; Heasman, J.; Beauchamp, N.; Forouhi, N. G.; Hughes, A. D.; Chaturvedi, N.

    2015-01-01

    Aims We contrasted impaired glucose regulation (prediabetes) prevalence, defined according to oral glucose tolerance test or HbA1c values, and studied cross-sectional associations between prediabetes and subclinical/clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a cohort of European and South-Asian origin. Methods For 682 European and 520 South-Asian men and women, aged 58–85 years, glycaemic status was determined by oral glucose tolerance test or HbA1c thresholds. Questionnaires, record review, coronary artery calcification scores and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging established clinical plus subclinical coronary heart and cerebrovascular disease. Results Prediabetes was more prevalent in South Asian participants when defined by HbA1c rather than by oral glucose tolerance test criteria. Accounting for age, sex, smoking, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides and waist–hip ratio, prediabetes was associated with coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease in European participants, most obviously when defined by HbA1c rather than by oral glucose tolerance test [odds ratios for HbA1c-defined prediabetes 1.60 (95% CI 1.07, 2.39) for coronary heart disease and 1.57 (95% CI 1.00, 2.51) for cerebrovascular disease]. By contrast, non-significant associations were present between oral glucose tolerance test-defined prediabetes only and coronary heart disease [odds ratio 1.41 (95% CI 0.84, 2.36)] and HbA1c-defined prediabetes only and cerebrovascular disease [odds ratio 1.39 (95% CI 0.69, 2.78)] in South Asian participants. Prediabetes defined by HbA1c or oral glucose tolerance test criteria was associated with cardiovascular disease (defined as coronary heart and/or cerebrovascular disease) in Europeans [odds ratio 1.95 (95% CI 1.31, 2.91) for HbA1c prediabetes criteria] but not in South Asian participants [odds ratio 1.00 (95% CI 0.62, 2.66); ethnicity interaction P=0.04]. Conclusions Prediabetes appeared to be less associated with cardiovascular disease in the

  3. The difference between oats and beta-glucan extract intake in the management of HbA1c, fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Xia; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Yuan-Sheng; Li, Yong

    2016-03-16

    Increasing oats and beta-glucan extract intake has been associated with improved glycemic control, which is associated with the reduction in the development of diabetes. This study aims to assess the different effects between oat (whole and bran) and beta-glucan extract intake on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. PubMed, Embase, Medline, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Web of Science were searched up to February 2014. We included randomized controlled trials with interventions that lasted at least four weeks that compared oats and beta-glucan (extracted from oats or other sources) intake with a control. A total of 1351 articles were screened for eligibility, and relevant data were extracted from 18 studies (n = 1024). Oat product dose ranged from 20 g d(-1) to 136 g d(-1), and beta-glucan extract dose ranged from 3 g d(-1) to 10 g d(-1). Compared with the control, oat intake resulted in a greater decrease in fasting glucose and insulin of subjects (P < 0.05), but beta-glucan extract intake did not. Furthermore, oat intake resulted in a greater decrease in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (P < 0.001, I(2) = 0%) and fasting glucose (P < 0.001, I(2) = 68%) after removing one study using a concentrate and a different design and fasting insulin of type 2 diabetes (T2D) (P < 0.001, I(2) = 0%). The intake of oats and beta-glucan extracted from oats were effective in decreasing fasting glucose (P = 0.007, I(2) = 91%) and fasting insulin of T2D (P < 0.001, I(2) = 0%) and tented to lower HbA1c (P = 0.09, I(2) = 92%). Higher consumption of whole oats and oat bran, but not oat or barley beta-glucan extracts, are associated with lower HbA1c, fasting glucose and fasting insulin of T2D, hyperlipidaemic and overweight subjects, especially people with T2D, which supports the need for clinical trials to evaluate the potential role of oats in approaching to the management of glycemic control and insulin sensitivity of diabetes or metabolic syndrome subjects. PMID:26840185

  4. Importance of standardization of hemoglobin A1c in the analysis of factors that predict hemoglobin A1c levels in non-diabetic residents of three distinct areas of Japan.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Noda, M; Tsugane, S; Kimura, S; Akanuma, Y; Kuzuya, T; Ohashi, Y; Kadowaki, T

    2001-08-01

    We performed a statistical analysis to elucidate effects of standardized measurement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) on analysis of factors that affect HbA1c values. Subjects were participants in the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study on Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, and a total of 1789 men and 3150 women in three distinct areas who did not have overt diabetes (HbA1c> or =6.1% or prior diagnosis) were analyzed. A different method of HbA1c assay was used in each area: high-performance liquid chromatography in one area and a different immunochemical method in each of the other two areas. Then, calibration of HbA1c was performed using two HbA1c standards (5.5 and 10.5%) provided by the Japan Diabetes Society. Analysis of co-variance was performed separately in men and women. When raw HbA1c data were used as the outcome, 'area', which represents differences in assay systems, lifestyles, etc. had a significant effect on HbA1c levels. When calibrated HbA1c data were used, however, 'area' was no longer a significant factor. In the latter analysis, age and BMI were the principal contributors to HbA1c, and parental history of diabetes had a weak effect in women. Thus, standardization of HbA1c reduced the difference between assay systems, and uncovered two common factors to determine HbA1c levels. PMID:11403857

  5. Fructosamine and Hemoglobin A1c Correlations in HIV-Infected Adults in Routine Clinical Care: Impact of Anemia and Albumin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Luisa; Rodriguez, Carla; Drozd, Dan; Nance, Robin M.; Delaney, J. A. Chris; Burkholder, Greer; Mugavero, Michael J.; Willig, James H.; Warriner, Amy H.; Crane, Paul K.; Atkinson, Ben E.; Harrington, Robert D.; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Saag, Michael S.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Crane, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    Fructosamine is an alternative method to hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) for determining average glycemia. However, its use has not been extensively evaluated in persons living with HIV (PLWH). We examined the relationship between HbA1c and fructosamine values, specifically focusing on anemia (which can affect HbA1c) and albumin as a marker of liver disease. We included 345 PLWH from two sites. We examined Spearman rank correlations between fructosamine and HbA1c and performed linear test for trends to compare fructosamine and HbA1c correlations by hemoglobin and albumin quartiles. We examined discrepant individuals with values elevated only on one test. We found a correlation of 0.70 between fructosamine and HbA1c levels. Trend tests for correlations between fructosamine and HbA1c were significant for both albumin (p = 0.05) and hemoglobin (p = 0.01) with the lowest correlations in the lowest hemoglobin quartile. We identified participants with unremarkable HbA1c values but elevated fructosamine values. These discrepant individuals had lower mean hemoglobin levels than those elevated by both tests. We demonstrated a large correlation between HbA1c and fructosamine across a range of hemoglobin and albumin levels. There were discrepant cases particularly among those with lower hemoglobin levels. Future studies are needed to clarify the use of fructosamine for diabetes management in PWLH. PMID:26273478

  6. Point-of-Care HbA1c Testing with the A1cNow Test Kit in General Practice Dental Clinics: A Pilot Study Involving Its Accuracy and Practical Issues in Its Use

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Shiela M.; Rosedale, Mary; Pesce, Michael A.; Juterbock, Caroline; Kaur, Navjot; DePaola, Joe; Goetz, Deborah; Wolff, Mark S.; Malaspina, Dolores; Danoff, Ann

    2014-01-01

    With millions of at-risk people undiagnosed with pre-diabetes and diabetes, there is a need to identify alternate screening sites for out-of-range glucose values. We examined practical issues and accuracy (relative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography testing in a laboratory) in the use of the A1cNow point of care device for this screening in general practice dental clinics at a large University-based Dental College. Health care professionals obtained evaluable readings for only 70% of the subjects, even after two attempts, and its use according to manufacturer's instructions was often challenging in the busy environment of the dental clinic. At thresholds for pre-diabetes and diabetes established by the American Diabetes Association, sensitivities of the A1cNow kit relative to the HPLC method were 91.9% and 100%, respectively. However, specificities for pre-diabetes and diabetes were 66.7% and 82.4%, respectively, indicating many false positive results. A better strategy for diabetes screening may involve a laboratory-based analysis approach that is patient- and provider-friendly, with minimal burden to the dental team. PMID:25593546

  7. PERCEIVED WEIGHT DISCRIMINATION AMPLIFIES THE LINK BETWEEN CENTRAL ADIPOSITY AND NONDIABETIC GLYCEMIC CONTROL (HBA1C)

    PubMed Central

    Tsenkova, Vera K.; Carr, Deborah; Schoeller, Dale A.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    Background While the preclinical development of type 2 diabetes is partly explained by obesity and central adiposity, psychosocial research has shown that chronic stressors such as discrimination have health consequences as well. Purpose We investigated the extent to which the well-established effects of obesity and central adiposity on nondiabetic glycemic control (indexed by HbA1c) were moderated by a targeted psychosocial stressor linked to weight: perceived weight discrimination. Methods Data came from the nondiabetic subsample (n=938) of the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS II) survey. Results Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, and waist circumference were linked to significantly higher HbA1c (p < .001). Multivariate-adjusted models showed that weight discrimination exacerbated the effects of waist-to-hip ratio on HbA1c ( p < .05), such that people who had higher WHR and reported weight discrimination had the highest HbA1c levels. Conclusions Understanding how biological and psychosocial factors interact at nondiabetic levels to increase vulnerability could have important implications for public health and education strategies. Effective strategies may include targeting sources of discrimination, rather than solely targeting health behaviors and practices of overweight and obese persons. PMID:21136227

  8. Hba1c, Blood Pressure, and Lipid Control in People with Diabetes: Japan Epidemiology Collaboration on Occupational Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huanhuan; Hori, Ai; Nishiura, Chihiro; Sasaki, Naoko; Okazaki, Hiroko; Nakagawa, Tohru; Honda, Toru; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Tomita, Kentaro; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Nagahama, Satsue; Uehara, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Makoto; Murakami, Taizo; Shimizu, Chii; Shimizu, Makiko; Eguchi, Masafumi; Kochi, Takeshi; Imai, Teppei; Okino, Akiko; Kuwahara, Keisuke; Kashino, Ikuko; Akter, Shamima; Kurotani, Kayo; Nanri, Akiko; Kabe, Isamu; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kunugita, Naoki; Dohi, Seitaro

    2016-01-01

    Aims The control of blood glucose levels, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels reduces the risk of diabetes complications; however, data are scarce on control status of these factors among workers with diabetes. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of participants with diabetes who meet glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), BP, and LDL-C recommendations, and to investigate correlates of poor glycemic control in a large working population in Japan. Methods The Japan Epidemiology Collaboration on Occupational Health (J-ECOH) Study is an ongoing cohort investigation, consisting mainly of employees in large manufacturing companies. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 3,070 employees with diabetes (2,854 men and 216 women) aged 20–69 years who attended periodic health examinations. BP was measured and recorded using different company protocols. Risk factor targets were defined using both American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines (HbA1c < 7.0%, BP < 140/90 mmHg, and LDL-C < 100 mg/dL) and Japan Diabetes Society (JDS) guidelines (HbA1c < 7.0%, BP < 130/80 mmHg, and LDL-C < 120 mg/dL). Logistic regression models were used to explore correlates of poor glycemic control (defined as HbA1c ≥ 8.0%). Results The percentages of participants who met ADA (and JDS) targets were 44.9% (44.9%) for HbA1c, 76.6% (36.3%) for BP, 27.1% (56.2%) for LDL-C, and 11.2% (10.8%) for simultaneous control of all three risk factors. Younger age, obesity, smoking, and uncontrolled dyslipidemia were associated with poor glycemic control. The adjusted odds ratio of poor glycemic control was 0.58 (95% confidence interval, 0.46–0.73) for participants with treated but uncontrolled hypertension, and 0.47 (0.33–0.66) for participants with treated and controlled hypertension, as compared with participants without hypertension. There was no significant difference in HbA1c levels between participants with treated but uncontrolled hypertension and

  9. Is hemoglobin A1c level effective in predicting the prognosis of Fournier gangrene?

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Haluk; Bayrak, Omer; Erturhan, Sakip; Borazan, Ersin; Koc, Mustafa Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of immune failure and/or diabetes mellitus (DM) association on the mortality and morbidity of the Fournier's Gangrene (FG), and interrelatedly, the usability of HbA1c level in the prediction of prognosis. Materials and Methods: The data of 38 patients with the diagnosis of FG were investigated retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups as patients with DM (Group 1, n = 18) and non-diabetics (Group 2, n = 20). The patients in group 1 were also divided into two subgroups as patients with HbA1c value ≥7 (Group 1a) and HbA1c value <7 (Group 1b). Results: The mean age of all 38 male patients was 66.3 ± 6.4 years. The initial symptoms were scrotal rash and swelling (n = 20, 52.6%), high fever (>38°C) (n = 22, 57.8%), purulent discharge from genital or perineal areas (n = 13, 34.2%), skin bruises (n = 11, 28.9%) and general state disorder in five patients that were admitted from day care center (13.1%). DM, as the most often comorbid disease, was detected in 18 patients (47.3%). Six patients (15.7%) were deceased during the follow-up period. Conclusion: In the present study, the researchers determined that diabetic patients with HbA1c level of 7 or higher had worse prognosis, and increased mortality. PMID:27453658

  10. Common Variants at 10 Genomic Loci Influence Hemoglobin A1C Levels via Glycemic and Nonglycemic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Soranzo, Nicole; Sanna, Serena; Wheeler, Eleanor; Gieger, Christian; Radke, Dörte; Dupuis, Josée; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga; Stolerman, Elliot; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Heeney, Matthew M.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ricketts, Sally L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), used to monitor and diagnose diabetes, is influenced by average glycemia over a 2- to 3-month period. Genetic factors affecting expression, turnover, and abnormal glycation of hemoglobin could also be associated with increased levels of HbA1c. We aimed to identify such genetic factors and investigate the extent to which they influence diabetes classification based on HbA1c levels. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied associations with HbA1c in up to 46,368 nondiabetic adults of European descent from 23 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and 8 cohorts with de novo genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We combined studies using inverse-variance meta-analysis and tested mediation by glycemia using conditional analyses. We estimated the global effect of HbA1c loci using a multilocus risk score, and used net reclassification to estimate genetic effects on diabetes screening. RESULTS Ten loci reached genome-wide significant association with HbA1c, including six new loci near FN3K (lead SNP/P value, rs1046896/P = 1.6 × 10−26), HFE (rs1800562/P = 2.6 × 10−20), TMPRSS6 (rs855791/P = 2.7 × 10−14), ANK1 (rs4737009/P = 6.1 × 10−12), SPTA1 (rs2779116/P = 2.8 × 10−9) and ATP11A/TUBGCP3 (rs7998202/P = 5.2 × 10−9), and four known HbA1c loci: HK1 (rs16926246/P = 3.1 × 10−54), MTNR1B (rs1387153/P = 4.0 × 10−11), GCK (rs1799884/P = 1.5 × 10−20) and G6PC2/ABCB11 (rs552976/P = 8.2 × 10−18). We show that associations with HbA1c are partly a function of hyperglycemia associated with 3 of the 10 loci (GCK, G6PC2 and MTNR1B). The seven nonglycemic loci accounted for a 0.19 (% HbA1c) difference between the extreme 10% tails of the risk score, and would reclassify ∼2% of a general white population screened for diabetes with HbA1c. CONCLUSIONS GWAS identified 10 genetic loci reproducibly associated with HbA1c. Six are novel and seven map to loci where rarer variants cause hereditary anemias and iron

  11. The Associations Between Smoking Habits and Serum Triglyceride or Hemoglobin A1c Levels Differ According to Visceral Fat Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Koda, Michiko; Kitamura, Itsuko; Okura, Tomohiro; Otsuka, Rei; Ando, Fujiko; Shimokata, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether smokers and former smokers have worse lipid profiles or glucose levels than non-smokers remains unclear. Methods The subjects were 1152 Japanese males aged 42 to 81 years. The subjects were divided according to their smoking habits (nonsmokers, former smokers, and current smokers) and their visceral fat area (VFA) (<100 cm2 and ≥100 cm2). Results The serum triglyceride (TG) levels of 835 males were assessed. In the VFA ≥100 cm2 group, a significantly greater proportion of current smokers (47.3%) exhibited TG levels of ≥150 mg/dL compared with former smokers (36.4%) and non-smokers (18.8%). The difference in TG level distribution between former smokers and non-smokers was also significant. However, among the subjects with VFA of <100 cm2, the TG levels of the three smoking habit groups did not differ. The serum hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of 877 males were also assessed. In the VFA <100 cm2 group, significantly higher proportions of current smokers (17.9%) and former smokers (14.9%) demonstrated HbA1c levels of ≥5.6% compared with non-smokers (6.3%). In contrast, in the VFA ≥100 cm2 group, significantly fewer former smokers displayed HbA1c levels of ≥5.6% compared with non-smokers and current smokers. Furthermore, the interaction between smoking habits and VFA was associated with the subjects’ TG and HbA1c concentrations, and the associations of TG and HbA1c concentrations and smoking habits varied according to VFA. Conclusions Both smoking habits and VFA exhibited associations with TG and HbA1c concentrations. The associations between smoking habits and these parameters differed according to VFA. PMID:26616395

  12. Impact of Hemoglobin A1c Levels on Residual Platelet Reactivity and Outcomes After Insertion of Coronary Drug-Eluting Stents (from the ADAPT-DES Study).

    PubMed

    Schoos, Mikkel M; Dangas, George D; Mehran, Roxana; Kirtane, Ajay J; Yu, Jennifer; Litherland, Claire; Clemmensen, Peter; Stuckey, Thomas D; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Weisz, Giora; Rinaldi, Michael J; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Metzger, D Christopher; Henry, Timothy D; Cox, David A; Duffy, Peter L; Brodie, Bruce R; Mazzaferri, Ernest L; Maehara, Akiko; Stone, Gregg W

    2016-01-15

    An increasing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level portends an adverse cardiovascular prognosis; however, the association between glycemic control, platelet reactivity, and outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents (DES) is unknown. We sought to investigate whether HbA1c levels are associated with high platelet reactivity (HPR) in patients loaded with clopidogrel and aspirin, thereby constituting an argument for intensified antiplatelet therapy in patients with poor glycemic control. In the prospective, multicenter Assessment of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy With Drug Eluting Stents registry, HbA1c levels were measured as clinically indicated in 1,145 of 8,582 patients, stratified by HbA1c <6.5% (n = 551, 48.12%), 6.5% to 8.5% (n = 423, 36.9%), and >8.5% (n = 171, 14.9%). HPR on clopidogrel and aspirin was defined after PCI as P2Y12 reaction units (PRU) >208 and aspirin reaction units >550, respectively. HPR on clopidogrel was frequent (48.3%), whereas HPR on aspirin was not (3.9%). Patients with HbA1c >8.5% were younger, more likely non-Caucasian, had a greater body mass index, and more insulin-treated diabetes and acute coronary syndromes. Proportions of PRU >208 (42.5%, 50.2%, and 62.3%, p <0.001) and rates of definite or probable stent thrombosis (ST; 0.9%, 2.7%, and 4.2%, p = 0.02) increased progressively with HbA1c groups. Clinically relevant bleeding was greatest in the intermediate HbA1c group (8.2% vs 13.1% vs 9.5%, p = 0.04). In adjusted models that included PRU, high HbA1c levels (>8.5) remained associated with ST (hazard ratio 3.92, 95% CI 1.29 to 12.66, p = 0.02) and cardiac death (hazard ratio 4.24, 95% CI 1.41 to 12.70) but not bleeding at 2-year follow-up. There was no association between aspirin reaction units >550 and HbA1c levels. In conclusion, in this large-scale study, HbA1c and HPR were positively associated, but the clinical effect on adverse outcome was driven by poor glycemic control, which predicted ST and

  13. High hemoglobin A1c levels within the non-diabetic range are associated with the risk of all cancers.

    PubMed

    Goto, Atsushi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Sawada, Norie; Kato, Masayuki; Hidaka, Akihisa; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Shimazu, Taichi; Yamaji, Taiki; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Kadowaki, Takashi; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have reported associations between diabetes and cancer risk. However, specific association of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels with cancer risk remains inconclusive. We followed 29,629 individuals (11,336 men; 18,293 women) aged 46-80 years who participated in the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study who had HbA1c measurements available and were cancer-free at baseline. Cancer incidence was assessed by systemic surveys. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for cancer risk with adjustment for age sex, geographic area, body mass index, smoking status, physical activity, alcohol, coffee, vegetable and total energy consumption, and history of cardiovascular disease. After a median follow-up of 8.5 years, 1,955 individuals had developed cancer. Higher HbA1c levels within both the non-diabetic and diabetic ranges in individuals without known diabetes were associated with overall cancer risk. Compared with individuals without known diabetes and HbA1c levels of 5.0-5.4%, the HRs for all cancers were 1.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.52); 1.01 (0.90-1.14); 1.28 (1.09-1.49); and 1.43 (1.14-1.80) for individuals without known diabetes and HbA1c levels <5.0%, 5.5-5.9%, 6.0-6.4%, and ≥6.5%, respectively, and 1.23 (1.02-1.47) for individuals with known diabetes. The lowest HbA1c group had the highest risk of liver cancer, and HbA1c levels were linearly associated with the risk of all cancers after excluding liver cancer (P for linear trend, 0.004). In conclusion, our findings corroborate the notion that glycemic control in individuals with high HbA1c levels may be important not only to prevent diabetes but also to prevent cancer. PMID:26547128

  14. Anesthesia Preoperative Clinic Referral for Elevated Hba1c Reduces Complication Rate in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Peter J.; Nolan, Jenea; Olsen, Amy C.; Breakwell, Susan; Topp, Richard; Pagel, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is risk factor for complications after orthopedic surgery. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that anesthesia preoperative clinic (APC) referral for elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduces complication rate after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Patients and Methods: Patients (n = 203) with and without DM were chosen from 1,237 patients undergoing TJA during 2006 - 12. Patients evaluated in the APC had surgery in 2006 - 8 regardless of HbA1c (uncontrolled). Those evaluated between in subsequent two-year intervals were referred to primary care for HbA1c ≥ 10% and ≥ 8%, respectively, to improve DM control before surgery. Complications and mortality were quantified postoperatively and at three, six, and twelve months. Length of stay (LOS) and patients requiring a prolonged LOS (> 5 days) were recorded. Results: Patients (197 men, 6 women) underwent 71, 131, and 1 total hip, knee, and shoulder replacements, respectively. Patients undergoing TJA with uncontrolled HbA1c and those with HbA1c < 10%, but not those with HbA1c < 8%, had a higher incidence of coronary disease and hypercholesterolemia than patients without DM. An increase in complication rate was observed in DM patients with uncontrolled HbA1c versus patients without DM (P < 0.001); the complication rate progressively decreased with tighter HbA1c control. More DM patients with preoperative HbA1c that was uncontrolled or ≥ 10% required prolonged LOS versus those without DM (P < 0.001 and P = 0.0404, respectively). Conclusions: APC referral for elevated HbA1c reduces complication rate and the incidence of prolonged hospitalization during the first year after surgery in diabetics undergoing TJA. PMID:26161323

  15. Serum Uric Acid Levels were Dynamically Coupled with Hemoglobin A1c in the Development of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fengjiang; Chang, Baocheng; Yang, Xilin; Wang, Yaogang; Chen, Liming; Li, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to decipher the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in both type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and normal subjects. A total of 2,250 unrelated T2DM patients and 4,420 Han Chinese subjects from a physical examination population were recruited for this study. In T2DM patients SUA levels were negatively correlated with HbA1c (rs = -0.109, P = 0.000) and 2 h plasma glucose levels (rs = -0.178, P = 0.000). In the physical examination population, SUA levels were inversely correlated with HbA1c (rs = -0.175, P = 0.000) and FPG (rs = -0.131, P = 0.009) in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c (rs = 0.040, P = 0.012) and FPG (rs = 0.084, P = 0.000) in normal-glucose subjects. Multivariate analyses showed that HbA1c was significantly negatively associated with HUA both in T2DM patients (OR = 0.872, 95% CI: 0.790~0.963) and in the physical examination T2DM patients (OR = 0.722, 95% CI: 0.539~0.968). Genetic association studies in T2DM patients showed that alleles of two glucose-uric acid transporter genes, ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were significantly associated with SUA levels (P < 0.05). SUA level is inversely correlated with HbA1c in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c in normal-glucose subjects. The reverse transporting of uric acid and glucose in renal tubules might be accounted for these associations. PMID:27328642

  16. Serum Uric Acid Levels were Dynamically Coupled with Hemoglobin A1c in the Development of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fengjiang; Chang, Baocheng; Yang, Xilin; Wang, Yaogang; Chen, Liming; Li, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to decipher the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in both type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and normal subjects. A total of 2,250 unrelated T2DM patients and 4,420 Han Chinese subjects from a physical examination population were recruited for this study. In T2DM patients SUA levels were negatively correlated with HbA1c (rs = −0.109, P = 0.000) and 2 h plasma glucose levels (rs = −0.178, P = 0.000). In the physical examination population, SUA levels were inversely correlated with HbA1c (rs = −0.175, P = 0.000) and FPG (rs = −0.131, P = 0.009) in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c (rs = 0.040, P = 0.012) and FPG (rs = 0.084, P = 0.000) in normal-glucose subjects. Multivariate analyses showed that HbA1c was significantly negatively associated with HUA both in T2DM patients (OR = 0.872, 95% CI: 0.790~0.963) and in the physical examination T2DM patients (OR = 0.722, 95% CI: 0.539~0.968). Genetic association studies in T2DM patients showed that alleles of two glucose-uric acid transporter genes, ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were significantly associated with SUA levels (P < 0.05). SUA level is inversely correlated with HbA1c in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c in normal-glucose subjects. The reverse transporting of uric acid and glucose in renal tubules might be accounted for these associations. PMID:27328642

  17. Optimal Hemoglobin A1c Levels for Screening of Diabetes and Prediabetes in the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Shimodaira, Masanori; Okaniwa, Shinji; Hanyu, Norinao; Nakayama, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) to identify individuals with diabetes and prediabetes in the Japanese population. A total of 1372 individuals without known diabetes were selected for this study. A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. The ability of HbA1c to detect diabetes and prediabetes was investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The kappa (κ) coefficient was used to test the agreement between HbA1c categorization and OGTT-based diagnosis. ROC analysis demonstrated that HbA1c was a good test to identify diabetes and prediabetes, with areas under the curve of 0.918 and 0.714, respectively. Optimal HbA1c cutoffs for diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes were 6.0% (sensitivity 83.7%, specificity 87.6%) and 5.7% (sensitivity 60.6%, specificity 72.1%), respectively, although the cutoff for prediabetes showed low accuracy (67.6%) and a high false-negative rate (39.4%). Agreement between HbA1c categorization and OGTT-based diagnosis was low in diabetes (κ = 0.399) and prediabetes (κ = 0.324). In Japanese subjects, the HbA1c cutoff of 6.0% had appropriate sensitivity and specificity for diabetes screening, whereas the cutoff of 5.7% had modest sensitivity and specificity in identifying prediabetes. Thus, HbA1c may be inadequate as a screening tool for prediabetes. PMID:26114121

  18. Nigerian propolis improves blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c, very low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein levels in rat models of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Oladayo, Mustafa Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: According to our previous studies, propolis of Nigerian origin showed some evidence of hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities in addition to its ability to ameliorate oxidative-stress-induced organ dysfunction. This study was carried out to determine whether an ethanolic extract of Nigerian propolis (EENP) improves glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) concentrations in rats that have alloxan diabetes. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced with alloxan (110 mg/kg). Animals were divided into 5 groups (n = 5); Group 1 was non-diabetic receiving normal saline and Group 2 was diabetic but also received only normal saline. Groups 3, 4, and 5 were diabetic receiving 200 mg/kg propolis, 300 mg/kg propolis, and 150 mg/kg metformin, respectively, for 42 days. Results: Hyperglycemia, elevated serum level of VLDL, elevated plasma level of HbA1c, and decreased levels of HDL were observed in the diabetic untreated animals. Nigerian propolis decreased blood glucose level and serum level of VLDL but elevated HDL level. These changes were significant (P < 0.05). The levels of plasma HbA1c were also reduced in the propolis-treated groups, and the reduction was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Nigerian propolis contains compounds exhibiting hypoglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and HbA1c reducing activities. PMID:27366348

  19. GLUCOSE CONTROL IN RWANDAN YOUTH WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES FOLLOWING ESTABLISHMENT OF SYSTEMATIC, HBA1C BASED, CARE AND EDUCATION

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Sara L.; Edidin, Deborah; Arena, Vincent C.; Becker, Dorothy J.; Bunker, Clareann H.; Gishoma, Crispin; Gishoma, Francois; LaPorte, Ronald E.; Kaberuka, Vedaste; Ogle, Graham; Sibomana, Laurien; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS To assess change in glycemic control concurrent with increased clinic visits, HbA1c testing, and education. Rates of complications were also examined. METHODS A 1–2 year follow-up of 214 members of the Rwanda Life for a Child program (aged < 26 years) with a first HbA1c between June 2009 and November 2010 was conducted. Data were analyzed for the entire cohort and by age (< 18 years, ≥ 18 years). Trajectory analysis was performed to identify trends in HbA1c. RESULTS Mean overall HbA1c decreased significantly from baseline (11.2±2.7%; 99±30 mmol/mol) to one- (10.2±2.6%; 88±28 mmol/mol) and two- (9.8±26%; 84±25 mmol/mol) year follow up visits. The prevalence of microalbuminuria did not significantly change (21.0%, 18.8%, and 19.6%), nor did nephropathy (4.7%, 7.8%, and 5.4%). However, rates of hypertension (31.8%, 44.9%, and 40.3%) were higher than expected. Five HbA1c groups were identified by trajectory analysis, and those with the worst control monitored their glucose significantly fewer times per week. CONCLUSIONS The establishment of regular care, HbA1c testing, and increased education is associated with significant improvements in glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in sub-Saharan Africa, but the high prevalence of hypertension is of concern. PMID:25458328

  20. Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes as Determined by Glycated Haemoglobin A1c and Glucose Levels in a Developing Southern Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G. Neil; Xu, Yan Jun; Lao, Xiang Qian; Xu, Xiao Jun; Song, Xiu Ling; Xu, Hao Feng; Cai, Qiu Mao; Xia, Liang; Nie, Shao Ping; Deng, Hui Hong; Yu, Ignatius Tak Sun

    2012-01-01

    Background The American Diabetes Association and World Health Organization have recently adopted the HbA1c measurement as one method of diagnostic criteria for diabetes. The change in diagnostic criteria has important implications for diabetes treatment and prevention. We therefore investigate diabetes using HbA1c and glucose criteria together, and assess the prevalent trend in a developing southern Chinese population with 85 million residents. Methods A stratified multistage random sampling method was applied and a representative sample of 3590 residents 18 years of age or above was obtained in 2010. Each participant received a full medical check-up, including measurement of fasting plasma glucose, 2-hour post-load plasma glucose, and HbA1c. Information on history of diagnosis and treatment of diabetes was collected. The prevalence of diabetes obtained from the present survey was compared with the data from the survey in 2002. Results The prevalence of diabetes based on both glucose and HbA1c measurements was 21.7% (95% CI: 17.4%–26.1%) in 2010, which suggests that more than 1 in 5 adult residents were suffering from diabetes in this developing population. Only 12.9% (95% CI: 8.3%–17.6%) of diabetic residents were aware of their condition. The prevalence of pre-diabetes was 66.3% (95% CI: 62.7%–69.8%). The prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes which met all the three diagnostic thresholds (fast plasma glucose, 2 hour post-load plasma glucose, and HbA1c) was 3.1% and 5.2%, respectively. Diabetes and pre-diabetes as determined by HbA1c measurement had higher vascular risk than those determined by glucose levels. The prevalence of diabetes increased from 2.9% (95% CI: 2.0%–3.7%) in 2002 to 13.8% (95% CI: 10.2%–17.3%) in 2010 based on the same glucose criteria. Conclusions Our results show that the diabetes epidemic is accelerating in China. The awareness of diabetes is extremely low. The glucose test and HbA1c measurement should be used together to

  1. The Correlation of Hemoglobin A1c to Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Sikaris, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The understanding that hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) represents the average blood glucose level of patients over the previous 120 days underlies the current management of diabetes. Even in making such a statement, we speak of “average blood glucose” as though “blood glucose” were itself a simple idea. When we consider all the blood glucose forms—arterial versus venous versus capillary, whole blood versus serum versus fluoride-preserved plasma, fasting versus nonfasting—we can start to see that this is not a simple issue. Nevertheless, it seems as though HbA1c correlates to any single glucose measurement. Having more than one measurement and taking those measurements in the preceding month improves the correlation further. In particular, by having glucose measurements that reflect both the relatively lower overnight glucose levels and measurements that reflect the postprandial peaks improves not only our ability to manage diabetes patients, but also our understanding of how HbA1c levels are determined. Modern continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices may take thousands of glucose results over a week. Several studies have shown that CGM glucose averages account for the vast proportion of the variation of HbA1c. The ability to relate HbA1c to average glucose may become a popular method for reporting HbA1c, eliminating current concerns regarding differences in HbA1c standardization. Hemoglobin A1c expressed as an average glucose may be more understandable to patients and improve not only their understanding, but also their ability to improve their diabetes management. PMID:20144279

  2. Effects of Aerobic and Resistance Training on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Church, Timothy S.; Blair, Steven N.; Cocreham, Shannon; Johannsen, Neil; Johnson, William; Kramer, Kimberly; Mikus, Catherine R.; Myers, Valerie; Nauta, Melissa; Rodarte, Ruben Q.; Sparks, Lauren; Thompson, Angela; Earnest, Conrad P.

    2011-01-01

    Context Exercise guidelines for individuals with diabetes include both aerobic and resistance training although few studies have directly examined this exercise combination. Objective To examine the benefits of aerobic training alone, resistance training alone, and a combination of both on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Design, Setting, and Participants A randomized controlled trial in which 262 sedentary men and women in Louisiana with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c levels of 6.5% or higher were enrolled in the 9-month exercise program between April 2007 and August 2009. Intervention Forty-one participants were assigned to the nonexercise control group, 73 to resistance training 3 days a week, 72 to aerobic exercise in which they expended 12 kcal/kg per week; and 76 to combined aerobic and resistance training in which they expended 10 kcal/kg per week and engaged in resistance training twice a week. Main Outcome Change in HbA1c level. Secondary outcomes included measures of anthropometry and fitness. Results The study included 63.0% women and 47.3% nonwhite participants who were a mean (SD) age of 55.8 years (8.7 years) with a baseline HbA1c level of 7.7% (1.0%). Compared with the control group, the absolute mean change in HbA1c in the combination training exercise group was −0.34% (95% confidence interval “CI”, −0.64% to −0.03%; P=.03). The mean changes in HbA1c were not statistically significant in either the resistance training (−0.16%; 95% CI, −0.46% to 0.15%; P=.32) or the aerobic (−0.24%; 95% CI, −0.55% to 0.07%; P=.14) groups compared with the control group. Only the combination exercise group improved maximum oxygen consumption (mean, 1.0 mL/kg per min; 95% CI, 0.5-1.5, P<.05) compared with the control group. All exercise groups reduced waist circumference from −1.9 to −2.8 cm compared with the control group. The resistance training group lost a mean of −1.4 kg fat mass (95% CI, −2.0 to −0.7 kg; P<.05

  3. A lateral flow immunosensor for direct, sensitive, and highly selective detection of hemoglobin A1c in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Ang, Shu Hwang; Thevarajah, T Malathi; Woi, Pei Meng; Alias, Yatimah binti; Khor, Sook Mei

    2016-03-15

    An immunosensor that operates based on the principles of lateral flow was developed for direct detection of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in whole blood. We utilized colloidal gold-functionalized antibodies to transduce the specific signal generated when sandwich immuno-complexes were formed on the strip in the presence of HbA1c. The number and intensity of the test lines on the strips indicate normal, under control, and elevated levels of HbA1c. In addition, a linear relationship between HbA1c levels and immunosensor signal intensity was confirmed, with a dynamic range of 4-14% (20-130 mmol mol(-1)) HbA1c. Using this linear relationship, we determined the HbA1c levels in blood as a function of the signal intensity on the strips. Measurements were validated using the Bio-Rad Variant II HPLC and DCA Vantage tests. Moreover, the immunosensor was verified to be highly selective for detection of HbA1c against HbA0, glycated species of HbA0, and HbA2. The limit of detection was found to be 42.5 μg mL(-1) (1.35 mmol mol(-1)) HbA1c, which is reasonably sensitive compared to the values reported for microarray immunoassays. The shelf life of the immunosensor was estimated to be 1.4 months when stored at ambient temperature, indicating that the immunoassay is stable. Thus, the lateral flow immunosensor developed here was shown to be capable of performing selective, accurate, rapid, and stable detection of HbA1c in human blood samples. PMID:26927875

  4. The role of hemoglobin A1c in the assessment of diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Courtney Nagel; McDonnell, Marie E

    2016-05-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a widely used tool for diagnosing, screening, and managing patients with diabetes; however, proper application and interpretation of the HbA1c test is crucial to master for accurate assessment of patients. It also has become the standard test in population-based studies for evaluating the relationship between glycemic control and cardiovascular risk. Results from large clinical trials support the modern perspective that the HbA1c target should be personalized according to the risks and benefits of glycemic control. This likely is most important in patients with diabetes and elevated cardiovascular risk in whom achieving low HbA1c levels early in the natural history may be the most beneficial. PMID:27176682

  5. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    HbA1C test; Glycated hemoglobin test; Glycosylated hemoglobin test; Hemoglobin glycosylated test; Glycohemoglobin test ... have recently eaten does not affect the A1C test, so you do not need to fast to ...

  6. All-Cause Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Association with Achieved Hemoglobin A1c, Systolic Blood Pressure, and Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Hou-Hsien; Tseng, Fen-Yu; Wang, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Ling; Chen, Yi-Chun; See, Ting-Ting; Chen, Hua-Fen

    2014-01-01

    Background To identify the ranges of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels which are associated with the lowest all-cause mortality. Methods A retrospective cohort of 12,643 type 2 diabetic patients (aged ≥18 years) were generated from 2002 to 2010, in Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei city, Taiwan. Patients were identified to include any outpatient diabetes diagnosis (ICD-9: 250), and drug prescriptions that included any oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin prescribed during the 6 months following their first outpatient visit for diabetes. HbA1c, SBP, and LDL-C levels were assessed by the mean value of all available data, from index date to death or censor date. Deaths were ascertained by matching patient records with the Taiwan National Register of Deaths. Results Our results showed general U-shaped associations, where the lowest hazard ratios occurred at HbA1c 7.0–8.0%, SBP 130–140 mmHg, and LDL-C 100–130 mg/dL. The risk of mortality gradually increases if the patient's mean HbA1c, SBP, or LDL-C during the follow-up period was higher or lower than these ranges. In comparison to the whole population, the adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) for patients with HbA1c 7.0–8.0%, SBP 130–140 mmHg, and LDL-C 100–130 mg/dL were 0.69 (0.62–0.77), 0.80 (0.72–0.90), and 0.68 (0.61–0.75), respectively. Conclusions In our type 2 diabetic cohort, the patients with HbA1c 7.0–8.0%, SBP 130–140 mmHg, or LDL-C 100–130 mg/dL had the lowest all-cause mortality. Additional research is needed to confirm these associations and to further investigate their detailed mechanisms. PMID:25347712

  7. Diabetes mellitus, hemoglobin A1C, and the incidence of total joint arthroplasty infection.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Richard; Williams, Kelly M; Marcantonio, Andrew J; Specht, Lawrence M; Tilzey, John F; Healy, William L

    2012-05-01

    Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of infection after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) than patients without diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are a marker for blood glucose control in diabetic patients. A total of 3468 patients underwent 4241 primary or revision total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty at one institution. Hemoglobin A1c levels were examined to evaluate if there was a correlation between the control of HbA1c and infection after TJA. There were a total of 46 infections (28 deep and 18 superficial [9 cellulitis and 9 operative abscesses]). Twelve (3.43%) occurred in diabetic patients (n = 350; 8.3%) and 34 (0.87%) in nondiabetic patients (n = 3891; 91.7%) (P < .001). There were 9 deep (2.6%) infections in diabetic patients and 19 (0.49%) in nondiabetic patients. In noninfected, diabetic patients, HbA1c level ranged from 4.7% to 15.1% (mean, 6.92%). In infected diabetic patients, HbA1c level ranged from 5.1% to 11.7% (mean, 7.2%) (P < .445). The average HbA1c level in patients with diabetes was 6.93%. Diabetic patients have a significantly higher risk for infection after TJA. Hemoglobin A1c levels are not reliable for predicting the risk of infection after TJA. PMID:22054905

  8. The Effect of Periodontal Treatment on Hemoglobin A1c Levels of Diabetic Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Han, Xu; Guo, Xiaojing; Luo, Xiaolong; Wang, Dalin

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that periodontal treatment may affect glycemic control in diabetic patients. And several systematic reviews have been conducted to assess the effect of periodontal treatment on diabetes outcomes. Researches of this aspect are widely concerned, and several new controlled trials have been published. The aim of this study was to update the account for recent findings. Methods A literature search (until the end of January 2014) was carried out using various databases with language restriction to English. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was selected if it investigated periodontal therapy for diabetic subjects compared with a control group received no periodontal treatment for at least 3 months of the follow-up period. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and secondary outcomes were periodontal parameters included probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Results Ten trials of 1135 patients were included in the analysis. After the follow-up of 3 months, treatment substantially lowered HbA1c compared with no treatment after periodontal therapy (–0.36%, 95%CI, −0.52% to −0.19%, P<0.0001). Clinically substantial and statistically significant reduction of PPD and CAL were found between subjects with and without treatment after periodontal therapy (PPD −0.42 mm, 95%CI: −0.60 to −0.23, P<0.00001; CAL −0.34 mm, 95%CI: −0.52 to −0.16, P = 0.0002). And there is no significant change of the level of HbA1c at the 6-month comparing with no treatment (–0.30%, 95%CI, −0.69% to 0.09%, P = 0.13). Conclusions Periodontal treatment leads to the modest reduction in HbA1c along with the improvement of periodontal status in diabetic patients for 3 months, and this result is consistent with previous systematic reviews. And the effect of periodontal treatment on HbA1c cannot be observed at 6-month after treatment. PMID:25255331

  9. Predicting of Trend of Hemoglobin A1c in Type 2 Diabetes: A Longitudinal Linear Mixed Model

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Elahe; Hosseini, Seyed Mohsen; Bahrampour, Abbass; Faghihimani, Elham; Amini, Masood

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are some evidences that control the blood sugar decreasing the risk of diabetes complications, and even fatal. There are so many studies, but they are mostly cross-sectional and ignore the trend and hence it is necessary to implement a longitudinal study. The aim of this prospective study is to find the trend of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) over time and the associative factors on it. Methods: Participants of this longitudinal study were 3440 eligible diabetes patients referred to Isfahan Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center during 2000-2012 who are measured 2-40 times. A linear mixed model was applied to determine the association between HbA1c and variables, including lipids, systolic, diastolic blood pressure and complications such as nephropathy, and retinopathy. Furthermore, the effect of mentioned variables on trend of HbA1c was determined. Results: The fitted model showed total cholesterol, retinopathy, and the method of therapy including oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) plus insulin and insulin therapy decreased the trend of HbA1c and high-density lipoprotein, weight, hyperlipidemia and the method of therapy including diet, and OADs increased the trend of HbA1c. Conclusions: The present study shows that regular visits of diabetic patients as well as controlling blood pressure, lipid profile, and weight loss can improve the trend of HbA1c levels during the time. PMID:25400886

  10. Interference of the Hope Hemoglobin With Hemoglobin A1c Results.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Chanda, Dalia; Gain, Mithun; Krishnan, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is now considered to be the marker of choice in diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus, based on the results of certain landmark clinical trials. Herein, we report the case of a 52-year-old ethnic Southeast Asian Indian man with impaired glucose tolerance whose glycated hemoglobin (ie, HbA1c) levels, as measured via Bio-Rad D10 high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Roche Tina-quant immunoassay were 47.8% and 44.0%, respectively. No variant hemoglobin (Hb) peak was observed via the D10 chromatogram. We assayed the patient specimen on the Sebia MINICAP capillary electrophoresis platform; the HbA1c level was 6.8%, with a large variant Hb peak of 42.0%. This finding suggested the possible presence of the heterozygous Hb Hope, which can result in spuriously elevated HbA1c results on HPLC and turbidimetric immunoassays. Although the capillary electrophoresis system was able to identify the variant, the A1c results should not be considered accurate due to overlapping of the variant and adult Hb peaks on the electrophoretogram reading. Hb Hope is usually clinically silent but can present such analytical challenges. Through this case study, we critically discuss the limitations of various HbA1c assay methods, highlighting the fact that laboratory professionals need to be aware of occurrences of Hb Hope, to help ensure patient safety. PMID:26199262

  11. Impact of Admission Glycosylated Hemoglobin A1c on Angiographic Characteristics and Short Term Clinical Outcomes of Nondiabetic Patients with Acute ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    El-sherbiny, Islam; Nabil, Baher; Saber, Tamer; Abdelgawad, Fathy Elsayed

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the predictive value of admission HbA1c level in nondiabetic patients presented by acute STEMI, on outcome of PCI and short term outcome of adverse cardiac events. Methods. 60 nondiabetic patients were admitted to Cardiology Department, Zagazig University Hospital, with acute STMI: 27 patients with HbA1c levels of 4.5% to 6.4% (group 1), 17 patients with HbA1c levels of 6.5% to 8.5% (group 2), and 16 patients with HbA1c levels higher than 8.5% (group 3). Either invasive intervention was done at admission by (pPCI) or coronary angiography was done within month (3–28 days) from taking thrombolytic. Participants were followed up for 6 months. Results. There was significant difference among different groups of HbA1c as regards the number of diseased vessels, severity of CAD lesions (p value < 0.01), and TIMI flow grades (p value < 0.05). There was significant difference among different groups as regards the adverse cardiac events on short term follow-up period (p value < 0.05). Conclusion. The present study showed that admission higher HbA1c level in patients presented by acute STEMI is associated with more severe CAD, lower rate of complete revascularization, and higher incidence of adverse cardiac events. PMID:26697259

  12. Impact of Admission Glycosylated Hemoglobin A1c on Angiographic Characteristics and Short Term Clinical Outcomes of Nondiabetic Patients with Acute ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbiny, Islam; Nabil, Baher; Saber, Tamer; Abdelgawad, Fathy Elsayed

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the predictive value of admission HbA1c level in nondiabetic patients presented by acute STEMI, on outcome of PCI and short term outcome of adverse cardiac events. Methods. 60 nondiabetic patients were admitted to Cardiology Department, Zagazig University Hospital, with acute STMI: 27 patients with HbA1c levels of 4.5% to 6.4% (group 1), 17 patients with HbA1c levels of 6.5% to 8.5% (group 2), and 16 patients with HbA1c levels higher than 8.5% (group 3). Either invasive intervention was done at admission by (pPCI) or coronary angiography was done within month (3-28 days) from taking thrombolytic. Participants were followed up for 6 months. Results. There was significant difference among different groups of HbA1c as regards the number of diseased vessels, severity of CAD lesions (p value < 0.01), and TIMI flow grades (p value < 0.05). There was significant difference among different groups as regards the adverse cardiac events on short term follow-up period (p value < 0.05). Conclusion. The present study showed that admission higher HbA1c level in patients presented by acute STEMI is associated with more severe CAD, lower rate of complete revascularization, and higher incidence of adverse cardiac events. PMID:26697259

  13. A Novel Glycated Hemoglobin A1c-Lowering Traditional Chinese Medicinal Formula, Identified by Translational Medicine Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tsai-Chung; Li, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Hui-Chi; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Ho, Tin-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder that has a significant impact on the health care system. The reduction of glycated hemoglobin A1c is highly associated with the improvements of glycemic control and diabetic complications. In this study, we identified a traditional Chinese medicinal formula with a HbA1c-lowering potential from clinical evidences. By surveying 9,973 diabetic patients enrolled in Taiwan Diabetic Care Management Program, we found that Chu-Yeh-Shih-Kao-Tang (CYSKT) significantly reduced HbA1c values in diabetic patients. CYSKT reduced the levels of HbA1c and fasting blood glucose, and stimulated the blood glucose clearance in type 2 diabetic mice. CYSKT affected the expressions of genes associated with insulin signaling pathway, increased the amount of phosphorylated insulin receptor in cells and tissues, and stimulated the translocation of glucose transporter 4. Moreover, CYSKT affected the expressions of genes related to diabetic complications, improved the levels of renal function indexes, and increased the survival rate of diabetic mice. In conclusion, this was a translational medicine study that applied a “bedside-to-bench” approach to identify a novel HbA1c-lowering formula. Our findings suggested that oral administration of CYSKT affected insulin signaling pathway, decreased HbA1c and blood glucose levels, and consequently reduced mortality rate in type 2 diabetic mice. PMID:25133699

  14. Adding of Sitagliptin on Insulin Therapy Effectively and Safely Reduces a Hemoglobin A1c Level and Glucose Fluctuation in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tajiri, Yuji; Kawano, Seiko; Hirao, Saori; Oshige, Tamami; Iwata, Shinpei; Ono, Yasuhiro; Inada, Chizuko; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Hideki; Tojikubo, Masayuki; Yamada, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Aims. Efficacy and safety of DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin, add-on therapy to insulin were investigated in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Subjects and Methods. Two hundred and sixteen patients (126 men, 65 ± 12 years old, BMI 24.9 ± 4.5, means ± S.D.) who had been treated by insulin alone or insulin combined with other oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) were recruited, and sitagliptin was added for 3 months. Results. HbA1c was significantly decreased after 3 months of add-on therapy as a whole (8.56 ± 1.50% to 7.88 ± 1.25%, P < 0.0001). Body weight did not change and insulin dosage was significantly (P < 0.0001) decreased for 3 months. Furthermore, day-to-day glucose variability was significantly reduced (18.3 ± 9.1 to 16.1 ± 8.1%, P < 0.05). In stepwise multiple regression analysis on ΔHbA1c as an outcome variable, the higher baseline HbA1c value and a preserved CPR were selected as significant predictive variables. Fifteen patients complained of mild hypoglycemia without any assistance during 3 months of sitagliptin add-on, while no severe hypoglycemic episode was reported. Conclusions. Add-on of sitagliptin to ongoing insulin therapy effectively reduced either HbA1c level or glucose fluctuation and could be a practical and well-tolerated alternative to treat Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes who had been inadequately controlled by insulin with or without other OHAs.

  15. Factor Analysis of Changes in Hemoglobin A1c After 12 Months of Sitagliptin Therapy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yuasa, Shouhei; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Takai, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Masashi; Umezawa, Shinichi; Kubota, Akira; Maeda, Hajime; Kanamori, Akira; Miyakawa, Masaaki; Tanaka, Yasushi; Terauchi, Yasuo; Matsuba, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    , duration of diabetes, and baseline HbA1c. Conclusions Comparison of three observational studies identified differences in patient characteristics, treatment of diabetes (use/non-use of insulin), and the level of specialist care (diabetologist/non-diabetologist). Despite such differences, consistent reduction of HbA1c by sitagliptin was demonstrated in all three studies. The patients showing most improvement in HbA1c with sitagliptin therapy were older patients with a short duration of diabetes and high baseline HbA1c level. PMID:27222674

  16. The Influence of Haemoglobin A1c Levels on Platelet Aggregation and Platelet Turnover in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Treated with Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Neergaard-Petersen, Søs; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Gregersen, Søren; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperglycaemia may attenuate the antiplatelet effect of aspirin and thereby increase the risk of cardiovascular events. We investigated the influence of increased haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels on platelet aggregation and turnover in a large cohort of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) with type 2 diabetes, prediabetes or no diabetes. Methods In this observational study, we included 865 stable CAD patients on 75 mg aspirin as mono-therapy of whom 242 patients had type 2 diabetes and were receiving antidiabetic drugs. Among 623 patients without diabetes, we classified 303 patients with prediabetes (HbA1c ≥5.7–6.4% [39–47 mmol/mol]) naive to antidiabetic drugs. Platelet aggregation was evaluated by the Multiplate Analyzer using arachidonic acid and collagen and by the VerifyNow Aspirin. Platelet turnover was evaluated by immature platelets using flow cytometry and platelet activation by soluble P-selectin. Results CAD patients with type 2 diabetes had higher platelet aggregation (all p-values <0.01), platelet turnover (immature platelet count, p<0.01) and platelet activation (p<0.001) than patients without diabetes. CAD patients with prediabetes had increased platelet aggregation (p = 0.02) and platelet count (p = 0.02) compared with patients without diabetes. Increased levels of HbA1c correlated positively with increased platelet aggregation using arachidonic acid (r = 0.19, p<0.0001), collagen (r = 0.10, p<0.01) and VerifyNow (r = 0.15, p<0.0001), and with platelet count (r = 0.08, p = 0.01), immature platelet count (r = 0.11, p<0.001) and soluble P-selectin (r = 0.15, p<0.0001). These associations were mainly evident in non-diabetic and prediabetic CAD patients. Conclusions CAD patients with prediabetes and diabetes may have attenuated antiplatelet effect of aspirin compared with CAD patients without diabetes. This may be related to increased platelet count in patients with prediabetes. Increased levels of HbA1c correlated positively

  17. What Do We Need beyond Hemoglobin A1c to Get the Complete Picture of Glycemia in People with Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Hinzmann, Rolf; Schlaeger, Christof; Tran, Cam Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is currently the most commonly used marker for the determination of the glycemic status in people with diabetes and it is frequently used to guide therapy and especially medical treatment of people with diabetes. The measurement of HbA1c has reached a high level of analytical quality and, therefore, this biomarker is currently also suggested to be used for the diagnosis of diabetes. Nevertheless, it is crucial for people with diabetes and their treating physicians to be aware of possible interferences during its measurement as well as physiological or pathological factors that contribute to the HbA1c concentration without being related to glycemia, which are discussed in this review. We performed a comprehensive review of the literature based on PubMed searches on HbA1c in the treatment and diagnosis of diabetes including its most relevant limitations, glycemic variability and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Although the high analytical quality of the HbA1c test is widely acknowledged, the clinical relevance of this marker regarding risk reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is still under debate. In this respect, we argue that glycemic variability as a further risk factor should deserve more attention in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:23055818

  18. Association between blood glucose level derived using the oral glucose tolerance test and glycated hemoglobin level

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Young Geon; Park, Jin Soo; Ahn, Young Hwan; Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is widely used as a marker of glycemic control. Translation of the HbA1c level to an average blood glucose level is useful because the latter figure is easily understood by patients. We studied the association between blood glucose levels revealed by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and HbA1c levels in a Korean population. Methods: A total of 1,000 subjects aged 30 to 64 years from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Etiology Research Center cohort were included. Fasting glucose levels, post-load glucose levels at 30, 60, and 120 minutes into the OGTT, and HbA1c levels were measured. Results: Linear regression of HbA1c with mean blood glucose levels derived using the OGTT revealed a significant correlation between these measures (predicted mean glucose [mg/dL] = 49.4 × HbA1c [%] − 149.6; R2 = 0.54, p < 0.001). Our linear regression equation was quite different from that of the Alc-Derived Average Glucose (ADAG) study and Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) cohort. Conclusions: Discrepancies between our results and those of the ADAG study and DCCT cohort may be attributable to differences in the test methods used and the extent of insulin secretion. More studies are needed to evaluate the association between HbA1c and self monitoring blood glucose levels. PMID:26898598

  19. Association between Self-Reported Smoking and Hemoglobin A1c in a Korean Population without Diabetes: The 2011–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae Won; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Noh, Jung Hyun; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background Several Western studies have revealed that among non-diabetics, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are higher in smokers than non-smokers. While studies conducted in Western populations consistently support this association, a recent meta-analysis reported that studies carried out in non-Western populations, including studies of Chinese, Egyptian, and Japanese-Americans, did not detect any significant differences in HbA1c levels between smokers and non-smokers. Objectives We assessed the association between smoking habits and HbA1c levels in the general Korean adult population using data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) performed in 2011–2012. Methods A total of 10,241 participants (weighted n=33,946,561 including 16,769,320 men and 17,177,241 women) without diabetes were divided into four categories according to their smoking habits: never smokers (unweighted n/ weighted n= 6,349/19,105,564), ex-smokers (unweighted n/ weighted n= 1,912/6,207,144), current light smokers (<15 cigarettes per day, unweighted n/ weighted n=1,205/5,130,073), and current heavy smokers (≥15 cigarettes per day, unweighted n/ weighted n=775/3,503,781). Results In age- and gender-adjusted comparisons, the HbA1c levels of each group were 5.52 ± 0.01% in non-smokers, 5.49 ± 0.01% in ex-smokers, 5.53 ± 0.01% in light smokers, and 5.61 ± 0.02% in heavy smokers. HbA1c levels were significantly higher in light smokers than in ex-smokers (p = 0.033), and in heavy smokers compared with light smokers (p < 0.001). The significant differences remained after adjusting for age, gender, fasting plasma glucose, heavy alcohol drinking, hematocrit, college graduation, and waist circumference. Linear regression analyses for HbA1c using the above-mentioned variables as covariates revealed that a significant association between current smoking and HbA1c (coefficient 0.021, 95% CI 0.003–0.039, p = 0.019). Conclusions Current smoking was

  20. Hemoglobin A1c improvements and better diabetes-specific quality of life among participants completing diabetes self-management programs: A nested cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous primary care innovations emphasize patient-centered processes of care. Within the context of these innovations, greater understanding is needed of the relationship between improvements in clinical endpoints and patient-centered outcomes. To address this gap, we evaluated the association between glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and diabetes-specific quality of life among patients completing diabetes self-management programs. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study nested within a randomized comparative effectiveness trial of diabetes self-management interventions in 75 diabetic patients. Multiple linear regression models were developed to examine the relationship between change in HbA1c from baseline to one-year follow-up and Diabetes-39 (a diabetes-specific quality of life measure) at one year. Results HbA1c levels improved for the overall cohort from baseline to one-year follow-up (t (74) = 3.09, p = .0029). One-year follow up HbA1c was correlated with worse overall quality of life (r = 0.33, p = 0.004). Improvements in HbA1c from baseline to one-year follow-up were associated with greater D-39 diabetes control (β = 0.23, p = .04) and D-39 sexual functioning (β = 0.25, p = .03) quality of life subscales. Conclusions Improvements in HbA1c among participants completing a diabetes self-management program were associated with better diabetes-specific quality of life. Innovations in primary care that engage patients in self-management and improve clinical biomarkers, such as HbA1c, may also be associated with better quality of life, a key outcome from the patient perspective. PMID:22583609

  1. Diagnostic Efficiency of Hemoglobin A1c for Newly Diagnosed Diabetes and Prediabetes in Community-Based Chinese Adults Aged 40 Years or Older

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kai; Sun, Yu; Li, Wen-juan; Zhang, Xiu-ping; Li, Cheng-qiao; Yang, Wei-fang; Ma, Ze-qiang; Ma, Ai-xia; Zheng, Hui-zhen; Song, Jun; Lin, Peng; Hou, Xin-guo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Europeans and Americans are gradually accepting the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) threshold of 6.5% for diagnosing diabetes proposed by the American Diabetes Association, but the cutoff of HbA1c for the Chinese population is unclear. We evaluated the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c for diagnosing newly diagnosed diabetes and prediabetes in community-based Chinese adults 40 years of age or older. Subjects and Methods: In this study 8,239 subjects (5,496 women) 40–90 years of age underwent HbA1c and oral glucose tolerance test measurement after an overnight fast. Diabetes and prediabetes were defined by the World Health Organization criteria. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c, and the optimal cutoff was defined as the point on the receiver operating characteristic curve with the largest Youden index. Spearman correlation was used for correlation analysis. Results: The prevalence of newly diagnosed diabetes and prediabetes was 10.7% (880/8,239) and 19.0% (1,564/8,239), respectively. Fasting plasma glucose and postprandial plasma glucose were positively correlated with HbA1c level (r=0.725 and r=0.673, both P<0.001, respectively). For diagnosing diabetes, the AUC was 0.857 (95% confidence interval, 0.841–0.873), and the optimal cutoff for HbA1c was 6.3%, with the largest Youden index being 0.581. For diagnosing prediabetes, the AUC was 0.681 (95% confidence interval, 0.666–0.697), and the optimal cutoff for HbA1c was 5.9%, with the largest Youden index being 0.280. Conclusions: An HbA1c threshold of 6.3% was highly valuable for diagnosing newly diagnosed diabetes, and a value of 5.9% was weakly valuable for diagnosing prediabetes in community-based Chinese adults 40 years of age or older. PMID:25014878

  2. Increased Intraocular Pressure and Hyperglycemic Level in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hymowitz, Maggie B.; Chang, Donny; Feinberg, Edward B.; Roy, Sayon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether hyperglycemic levels as determined from high hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels influence intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR). Methods A retrospective chart review was performed on subjects with a diagnosis of NPDR and a corresponding HbA1c level measured within 90 days before or after an IOP measurement over a two-year period. Exclusion criteria included a diagnosis of glaucoma or treatment with IOP lowering medications or oral or topical steroids. Results Using 14.5mmHg as a baseline mean value for IOP, 42 subjects had an IOP < 14.5mmHg and mean HbA1c of 8.1±1.1, while 72 subjects had an IOP ≥ 14.5mmHg and a mean HbA1c of 9.0±2.1. Although there was an overlap in the confidence intervals, a significant difference (P = 0.01) in the mean HbA1c level was observed in regression analysis between the two groups. Importantly, diabetic subjects with elevated HbA1c levels rarely (<1%) exhibited reduced IOP levels. Conclusions Diabetic subjects with elevated HbA1c levels exhibited significantly higher IOPs compared to those with lower HbA1c levels. Findings from this study indicate an association between hyperglycemia and elevated IOP and that poor glycemic control may contribute to increased IOP levels in long-term diabetic patients. PMID:27002725

  3. Methods, units and quality requirements for the analysis of haemoglobin A1c in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Ilkka; Penttilä, Karri; Holm, Päivi; Laitinen, Harri; Ranta, Päivi; Törrönen, Jukka; Rauramaa, Rainer

    2016-06-26

    The formation of glycohemoglobin, especially the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) fraction, occurs when glucose becomes coupled with the amino acid valine in the β-chain of Hb; this reaction is dependent on the plasma concentration of glucose. Since the early 1970s it has been known that diabetics display higher values OF HbA1C because they have elevated blood glucose concentrations. Thus HbA1c has acquired a very important role in the treatment and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. After the introduction of the first quantitative measurement OF HbA1C, numerous methods for glycohemoglobin have been introduced with different assay principles: From a simple mini-column technique to the very accurate automated high-pressure chromatography and lastly to many automated immunochemical or enzymatic assays. In early days, the results of the quality control reports for HbA1c varied extensively between laboratories, therefore in United States and Canada working groups (WG) of the Diabetes Controls and Complications Trial (DCCT) were set up to standardize the HbA1c assays against the DCCT/National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program reference method based on liquid chromatography. In the 1990s, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) appointed a new WG to plan a reference preparation and method for the HBA1c measurement. When the reference procedures were established, in 2004 IFCC recommended that all manufacturers for equipment used in HbA1c assays should calibrate their methods to their proposals. This led to an improvement in the coefficient of variation (CV%) associated with the assay. In this review, we describe the glycation of Hb, methods, standardization of the HbA1c assays, analytical problems, problems with the units in which HbA1c values are expressed, reference values, quality control aspects, target requirements for HbA1c, and the relationship of the plasma glucose values to HbA1c concentrations. We also note that the acceptance

  4. Methods, units and quality requirements for the analysis of haemoglobin A1c in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Penttilä, Ilkka; Penttilä, Karri; Holm, Päivi; Laitinen, Harri; Ranta, Päivi; Törrönen, Jukka; Rauramaa, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The formation of glycohemoglobin, especially the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) fraction, occurs when glucose becomes coupled with the amino acid valine in the β-chain of Hb; this reaction is dependent on the plasma concentration of glucose. Since the early 1970s it has been known that diabetics display higher values OF HbA1C because they have elevated blood glucose concentrations. Thus HbA1c has acquired a very important role in the treatment and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. After the introduction of the first quantitative measurement OF HbA1C, numerous methods for glycohemoglobin have been introduced with different assay principles: From a simple mini-column technique to the very accurate automated high-pressure chromatography and lastly to many automated immunochemical or enzymatic assays. In early days, the results of the quality control reports for HbA1c varied extensively between laboratories, therefore in United States and Canada working groups (WG) of the Diabetes Controls and Complications Trial (DCCT) were set up to standardize the HbA1c assays against the DCCT/National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program reference method based on liquid chromatography. In the 1990s, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) appointed a new WG to plan a reference preparation and method for the HBA1c measurement. When the reference procedures were established, in 2004 IFCC recommended that all manufacturers for equipment used in HbA1c assays should calibrate their methods to their proposals. This led to an improvement in the coefficient of variation (CV%) associated with the assay. In this review, we describe the glycation of Hb, methods, standardization of the HbA1c assays, analytical problems, problems with the units in which HbA1c values are expressed, reference values, quality control aspects, target requirements for HbA1c, and the relationship of the plasma glucose values to HbA1c concentrations. We also note that the acceptance

  5. The Glucose Measurement Industry and Hemoglobin A1c: An Opportunity for Creative Destruction.

    PubMed

    Cembrowski, George

    2016-01-01

    The MyStar Extra self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) system provides moving estimates of the patient's hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). There is a treasure trove of highly accurate glucose data available from highly accurate SMBG, CGM and FGM along with highly accurate HPLC HbA1c. If Nathan's criteria are used to select subjects whose glucoses can be correlated to the HbA1c, then algorithms can be developed for robustly transforming glucose into HbA1c. These algorithms can then be implemented in any SMBG or with the CGM and FGM software. This calculated HbA1c would even be accurate with Nathan's excluded population thus reducing the use of fructosamine and glycated protein. Finally, the developer of these new algorithms is advised to use a specific approach for testing her algorithm. PMID:26481643

  6. An amperometric hemoglobin A1c biosensor based on immobilization of fructosyl amino acid oxidase onto zinc oxide nanoparticles-polypyrrole film.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sheetal; Pundir, Chandra Shekhar

    2012-11-15

    Measurement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin) level in blood provides the long-term glucose level in diabetic patients without the influence of short-term fluctuations. The existing methods for HbA1c determination, including biosensors, suffer from insufficient sensitivity, detection limit, response time, and storage stability. These problems were overcome in the current biosensor. A method is described for construction of an amperometric HbA1c biosensor by immobilizing a fructosyl amino acid oxidase (FAO) onto zinc oxide nanoparticles/polypyrrole (ZnONPs/PPy) hybrid film deposited onto gold (Au) electrode and using it as working electrode, Ag/AgCl as reference electrode, and platinum (Pt) as auxiliary electrode. The whole blood samples were hemolyzed and digested by protease before measuring their HbA1c level by the biosensor. The enzyme electrode detected fructosyl valine (FV) as low as 50μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 within 2s at +0.27V versus Ag/AgCl, pH7.0, and 35°C with a linear working range of 0.1 to 3.0mM for FV and sensitivity of 38.42μAmM(-1). The electrode showed only a 30% loss of its initial response over a period of 160days when stored at 4°C. The biosensor measured HbA1c in whole blood of apparently healthy individuals and diabetic patients and found it to be in the ranges of 4.0% to 5.6% and 5.7% to 12.0%, respectively. PMID:22906687

  7. Association between Elevated Hemoglobin A1c Levels and the Outcomes of Patients with Small-Artery Occlusion: A Hospital-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Jiang, Lihong; Wang, Hui; Yu, Changshen; Wang, Wanjun; Liu, Shoufeng; Gao, Chunlin; Tong, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jinhuan; Jin, Yi; Wu, Jialing

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal glucose metabolism is an independent risk factor for poor outcome following acute ischemic stroke. However, the relationship between initial hemoglobin A1c level and functional outcome (defined by modified Rankin Scale scores) following small-artery occlusion, a subtype of ischemic stroke, is unknown. The aim of the present study was to evaluate this association among patients diagnosed with small-artery occlusion. Materials and Methods Data on 793 patients diagnosed with small-artery occlusion from October 25, 2012 to June 30, 2015 were collected from the stroke registry of the Department of Neurorehabilitation of HuanHu Hospital. Hemoglobin A1c values at admission were classified into three groups according to tertiles (<5.9,5.9to<6.7, and≥6.7). We used receiver operating characteristics curves to investigate the predictive value of hemoglobin A1c and examined the relationship between hemoglobin A1c levels at admission and modified Rankin Scale scores using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results The area under the curve was 0.570 (95%CI, 0.509–0.631; P = 0.023). Patients in the highest HbA1c stratification (≥6.7) had a significantly higher risk of an unfavorable outcome than patients in the lowest stratification (<5.9; adjusted odds ratio, 2.099; 95%CI, 1.160–3.798; P = 0.014). However, a significant association was not seen in the middle stratification (5.9 to <6.7; P = 0.115). Conclusions Elevated hemoglobin A1c level on admission was adversely associated with functional outcomes 3 months after stroke onset among patients presenting with small-artery occlusion. PMID:27486868

  8. Combination of 5-aminolevulinic acid and ferrous ion reduces plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takeshi; Koda, Aya; Nozawa, Naoko; Ota, Urara; Kondo, Hikaru; Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Kamiya, Atsuko; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a natural amino acid produced only in the mitochondria, is a precursor of heme. Cytochromes that contain heme play an important role in aerobic energy metabolism. Thus, ALA may help reduce T2DM-associated hyperglycemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of ALA combined with sodium ferrous citrate (SFC) on hyperglycemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. We found that the gavage administration of ALA combined with SFC (ALA/SFC) for 6 weeks reduced plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels in rats without affecting plasma insulin levels. The glucose-lowering effect depended on the amount of ALA/SFC administered per day. Furthermore, the glucose tolerance was also significantly improved by ALA/SFC administration. Although food intake was slightly reduced in the rats administered ALA/SFC, there was no effect on their body weight. Importantly, ALA/SFC administration induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in white adipose tissue and liver, and the induced expression levels of HO-1 correlated with the glucose-lowering effects of ALA/SFC. Taken together, these results suggest that ALA combined with ferrous ion is effective in reducing hyperglycemia of T2DM without affecting plasma insulin levels. HO-1 induction may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the glucose-lowering effect of ALA/SFC. PMID:27239432

  9. Relationship between periodontal status and levels of glycated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Morita, I; Inagaki, K; Nakamura, F; Noguchi, T; Matsubara, T; Yoshii, S; Nakagaki, H; Mizuno, K; Sheiham, A; Sabbah, W

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether there is a bi-directional relationship between periodontal status and diabetes. Study 1 included 5,856 people without periodontal pockets of ≥ 4 mm at baseline. Relative risk was estimated for the 5-year incidence of periodontal pockets of ≥ 4 mm (CPI scores 3 and 4, with the CPI probe), in individuals with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of ≥ 6.5% at baseline. Study 2 included 6,125 people with HbA1c < 6.5% at baseline. The relative risk was assessed for elevation of HbA1c levels in 5 years, with baseline periodontal status, assessed by CPI. Relative risk of developing a periodontal pocket was 1.17 (p = 0.038) times greater in those with HbA1c of ≥ 6.5% at baseline, adjusted for body mass index (BMI), smoking status, sex, and age. Relative risks for having HbA1c ≥ 6.5% at 5-year follow-up in groups with periodontal pockets of 4 to 5 mm and ≥ 6 mm at baseline were 2.47 (p = 0.122) and 3.45 (p = 0.037), respectively, adjusted for BMI, alcohol consumption, smoking status, sex, and age. The risk of developing periodontal disease was associated with levels of HbA1c, and the risk of elevations of HbA1c was associated with developing periodontal pockets of more than 4 mm. PMID:22157098

  10. The Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Persons with Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Engebretson, Steven P.; Hyman, Leslie G.; Michalowicz, Bryan S.; Schoenfeld, Elinor R.; Gelato, Marie C.; Hou, Wei; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Reddy, Michael S.; Lewis, Cora E.; Oates, Thomas W.; Tripathy, Devjit; Katancik, James A.; Orlander, Philip R.; Paquette, David W.; Hanson, Naomi Q.; Tsai, Michael Y.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Chronic periodontitis, a destructive inflammatory disorder of the supporting structures of the teeth, is prevalent in patients with diabetes. Limited evidence suggests that periodontal therapy may improve glycemic control. Objective To determine if non-surgical periodontal treatment reduces hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in persons with type 2 diabetes (DM) and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. Design, Setting and Participants The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) is a 6-month, single-masked, randomized, multi-center clinical trial. Participants had DM, were taking stable doses of medications, had HbA1c ≥7% and <9%, and untreated periodontitis. Five hundred fourteen participants were enrolled between November 2009 and March 2012 from diabetes and dental clinics and communities affiliated with five academic medical centers. Intervention The treatment group (n=257) received scaling and root planing plus chlorhexidine oral rinse at baseline, and supportive periodontal therapy at three and six months. The control group (n=257) received no treatment for six months. Main Outcome Measure Difference in HbA1c change from baseline between groups at six months. Secondary outcomes included changes in probing pocket depths, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, gingival index, fasting glucose, and the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2). Results Enrollment was stopped early due to futility. At 6 months, the periodontal therapy group increased HbA1c 0.17% (1.0) (mean (SD)) compared to 0.11% (1.0) in the control group, with no significant difference between groups based on a linear regression model adjusting for clinical site (mean difference = -0.05%; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): -0.23%, 0.12%; p=0.55). Probing depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing and gingival index measures improved in the treatment group compared to the control group at six months with adjusted between-group differences of 0.33mm (95% CI: 0.26, 0.39), 0

  11. [Evaluation of D10 hemoglobin testing system for hemoglobin A1C assay].

    PubMed

    Marzullo, C; Minery, M

    2008-01-01

    Bio-Rad D10 hemoglobin testing system with rack loader for hemoglobinA1C assay was evaluated. Analytical qualities were satisfactory. Imprecision was good (within-run cv was 0,5% for 4,5% of HBA(1C), 0,63% for 7,4% of HBA1C, 0,46% for 11,1% of HBA1C, between-run cv was 1,16% for 4,7% of HBA1C, 1,01% for 7,6% of HBA1C, 1,04% for 11,2% of HBA1C). Results were very well correlated with those obtained on Bio-Rad Variant II (r = 0,998). Bland and Altman graph showed good agreement between the two methods for HbA1C under 15%. The measuring range was up to 18,3% of HBA1C. There was no specimen related carry over. Triglycerides under 5,5 mmol/L and bilirubin under 734 mumol/L did not interfere. Carbamylation of HBA1C did not interfere for urea concentration under 14 mmol/L. Practicability was very good. Detection of common hemoglobin variants (HbS, C, D, E, O) is available. Fast and easy switching between short and long program allows to perform HBA1C determination for patients with hemoglobin variants. So, D10 is an interesting and easy to use small HPLC automate witch offers accurate HBA1C quantification certified by NGSP. PMID:18227011

  12. Correlation Between the Severity of Diabetic Peripheral Polyneuropathy and Glycosylated Hemoglobin Levels: A Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Jae; Jang, Sol; Lee, Seung-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy and their correlation with the quantified severity of nerve dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods A total of 187 diabetic patients with clinically suspected polyneuropathy (PN) were subclassified into 2 groups according to electrodiagnostic testing: a DM-PN group of 153 diabetic patients without electrophysiological abnormality and a DM+PN group of 34 diabetic patients with polyneuropathy. For all patients, age, sex, height, weight, duration of DM, and plasma glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level were comparatively investigated. A composite score was introduced to quantitatively analyze the results of the nerve conduction studies. Logistic regression analysis and multiple regression analysis were used to evaluate correlations between significant risk factors and severity of diabetic polyneuropathy. Results The DM+PN group showed a significantly higher HbA1c level and composite score, as compared with the DM-PN group. Increased HbA1c level and old age were significant predictive factors for polyneuropathy in diabetic patients (odds ratio=5.233 and 4.745, respectively). In the multiple linear regression model, HbA1c and age showed a significant positive association with composite score, in order (β=1.560 and 0.253, respectively). Conclusion Increased HbA1c level indicative of a state of chronic hyperglycemia was a risk factor for polyneuropathy in diabetic patients and a quantitative measure of its severity. PMID:27152276

  13. The relationship between glycated hemoglobin and blood glucose levels of 75 and 100 gram oral glucose tolerance test during gestational diabetes diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mert, Meral; Purcu, Serhat; Soyluk, Ozlem; Okuturlar, Yildiz; Karakaya, Pinar; Tamer, Gonca; Adas, Mine; Ekin, Murat; Hatipoglu, Sami; Ure, Oznur Sari; Harmankaya, Ozlem; Kumbasar, Abdulbaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an important issue in terms of prevention of maternal and fetal complications. In our study we aimed to evaluate the relation of HbA1c and blood glucose levels of 75 and 50-100 gram oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in pregnant patients who were screened for GDM. Materials and methods: The parameters of 913 pregnant women screened for GDM are evaluated retrospectively. The two steps screening with 50-100 gram OGTT were used in 576 patients. The remaining 337 patients were screened with 75 gram OGTT. Results: The HbA1c levels of patients having high blood glucose (≥153 mg/dl) levels at 2nd hour in 75 gram OGTT were significantly higher than patients having normal blood glucose levels at 2nd hour of 75 gram OGTT (P=0.038). Correlation analyses showed no significant relation between any blood glucose level of 100 gram OGTT and HbA1c level. Whereas in 75 gram OGTT 1st and 2nd hour blood glucose levels were found to have a significant relation with A1c levels (P=0.001, P=0.001 respectively). Conclusion: HbA1c may be used as an important tool in the diagnosis of GDM. But due to the variation of HbA1c in pregnant women and there is not an absolute cut-off level for A1c, it may be more reliable to evaluate HbA1c level together with the blood glucose levels in OGTT. PMID:26550262

  14. Sub-antimicrobial Doxycycline for Periodontitis Reduces Hemoglobin A1c in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Engebretson, Steven P.; Hey-Hadavi, Judith

    2011-01-01

    In vitro and animal studies suggest a possible role for the tetracycline class of drugs in the inhibition of non-enzymatic protein glycation. We conducted a 3-month, randomized placebo-controlled pilot clinical trial of conventional sub-gingival debridement, (periodontal therapy) combined with either a three month regimen of sub-antimicrobial-dose doxycycline (SDD), a two week regimen of antimicrobial-dose doxycycline (ADD), or placebo in 45 patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes (mean duration 9 years) and untreated chronic periodontitis. Subjects were taking stable doses of oral hypoglycemic medications and/or insulin. Treatment response was assessed by measuring hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c),plasma glucose, and clinical periodontal disease measures. At one-month and three-month follow-up, clinical measures of periodontitis were decreased in all groups(data to be presented elsewhere). At three months, mean HbA1c levels in the SDD group were reduced 0.9% unitsfrom 7.2% units ± 2.2(±SD), to 6.3% units ±1.1, which represents a 12.5% improvement. In contrast, there was no significant change in HbA1c in the ADD (7.5%± 2.0 to 7.8%± 2.1) or placebo (8.5%± 2.0 to 8.5%± 2.6) groups. Mean HbA1c change from baseline was significantly greater in the SDD group compared with the ADD group (p=0.04) but not placebo (p=0.22). Moreover, a larger proportion of subjects in the SDD group experienced improvement (p<0.05) compared to the ADD or placebo groups. Mean plasma glucose levels were not significantly different between or within the groups. The results of this pilot study suggest that the treatment of periodontitis with sub-gingival debridement and 3-months of daily sub-antimicrobial-dose doxycycline may decrease HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes taking normally prescribed hypoglycemic agents. PMID:21782948

  15. A1c Variability Can Predict Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Mean A1c Levels Greater than 7

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, You Jeong; Kim, Tae Nyun; Kim, Tae Ik; Lee, Won Kee; Park, Jeong Hyun; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggested that the association of acute glucose variability and diabetic complications was not consistent, and that A1c variability representing long term glucose fluctuation may be related to coronary atherosclerosis in patients with type 1 diabetes. In this study, we attempt to determine whether or not A1c variability can predict coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We reviewed data of patients with type 2 diabetes who had undergone coronary angiography (CAG) and had been followed up with for 5 years. The intrapersonal standard deviation (SD) of serially-measured A1c levels adjusted by the different number of assessments among patients (adj-A1c-SD) was considered to be a measure of the variability of A1c. Results Among the 269 patients, 121 of them had type 2 diabetes with CAD. In patients with A1c ≥7%, the mean A1c levels and A1c levels at the time of CAG among the three groups were significantly different. The ratio of patients with CAD was the highest in the high adj-A1c-SD group and the lowest in the low adj-A1c-SD group (P=0.017). In multiple regression analysis, adj-A1c-SD was an independent predictor for CAD in subjects with A1c ≥7% (odds ratio, 2.140; P=0.036). Conclusion Patients with higher A1c variability for several years showed higher mean A1c levels. A1c variability can be an independent predictor for CAD as seen in angiographs of patients with type 2 diabetes with mean A1c levels over 7%. PMID:24396666

  16. Factors Influencing Changes in Hemoglobin A1c and Body Weight During Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes With Ipragliflozin: Interim Analysis of the ASSIGN-K Study

    PubMed Central

    Iemitsu, Kotaro; Iizuka, Takashi; Takihata, Masahiro; Takai, Masahiko; Nakajima, Shigeru; Minami, Nobuaki; Umezawa, Shinichi; Kanamori, Akira; Takeda, Hiroshi; Kawata, Takehiro; Ito, Shogo; Kikuchi, Taisuke; Amemiya, Hikaru; Kaneshiro, Mizuki; Mokubo, Atsuko; Takuma, Tetsuro; Machimura, Hideo; Tanaka, Keiji; Asakura, Taro; Kubota, Akira; Aoyagi, Sachio; Hoshino, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Masashi; Obana, Mitsuo; Sasai, Nobuo; Kaneshige, Hideaki; Miyakawa, Masaaki; Tanaka, Yasushi; Terauchi, Yasuo; Matsuba, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Ipragliflozin is a selective sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor that blocks glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubules. SGLT2 inhibitors are expected to be effective in patients with insulin resistance and obesity, but it is important to select treatment according to patient background factors that minimizes the risk of adverse events. There have been a limited number of investigations into the relationship between the clinical efficacy (reducing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and body weight (BW)) or safety of SGLT2 inhibitors and patient characteristics. Methods ASSIGN-K is an investigator-initiated, multicenter, prospective observational study examining the efficacy and safety of ipragliflozin (50 - 100 mg/day for 52 weeks) in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who had inadequate glycemic control with HbA1c ≥ 6.0% (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program) despite diet and exercise therapy or diet and exercise plus antidiabetic drug therapy. We conducted an interim analysis of the relationship between changes in HbA1c or BW and characteristics in patients who had been on treatment for more than 12 weeks. Results In 257 patients completing 12 weeks of treatment, HbA1c decreased significantly from 8.23% to 7.55% (-0.68%, P < 0.01). The change in HbA1c after 12 weeks was -0.17%, -0.33%, and -1.16% when baseline HbA1c was < 7%, 7% to < 8%, and ≥ 8%, respectively (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01, respectively), and -1.30%, -0.62%, and -0.62% when baseline body mass index (BMI) was < 25, 25 to < 30, and ≥ 30, respectively (all P < 0.01). Stratified analysis showed that age, gender, or BMI did not have a significant influence on the improvement in HbA1c. Multiple regression analysis showed that reduction in HbA1c was greater as baseline HbA1c increased and the duration of diabetes decreased. A higher baseline HbA1c was associated with less weight loss. Conclusions Ipragliflozin significantly improved HbA1c in

  17. Association Between Glycosylated Hemoglobin Level and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Diabetic Patients After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia; Cheng, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Qi, Cuijuan; Wang, Tong; Xiao, Xinhua

    2016-05-01

    Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a critical measure of glycemic control, which may be a reliable predictor of complications after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the association between HbA1c levels and clinical outcomes in diabetic patients after PCI.Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases (dated to December 2015) were screened for relevant studies. Appropriate diabetic cases and controls, assessed using blood HbA1c levels, were extracted, and statistical analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3 software. Summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to calculate the associations between HbA1c levels and clinical outcomes in diabetic patients after PCI. Ethics review and approval was not necessary because this systematic meta-analysis did not involve any direct human trials or animal experiments.Eight studies that reported HbA1c levels for a total of 3290 diabetic subjects after PCI were included in this meta-analysis. Comprehensive integration and analysis revealed a significant correlation between higher HbA1c levels and the risk of target vessel revascularization progression (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03-1.82) and nonfatal myocardial infarction after PCI (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.38-4.44). However, no significant association was found between HbA1c levels and major adverse cardiovascular events (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.83-1.27), all-cause mortality (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.52-1.02), cardiac death (OR 1.12, 95% CI 0.62-2.03), or in-stent thrombosis (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.23-1.87) among diabetic patients after PCI. Sensitivity analysis indicated a statistically robust result and revealed no publication bias.Our meta-analysis demonstrated that blood HbA1c levels might be associated with higher risks of target vessel revascularization progression and nonfatal myocardial infarction among diabetic patients after PCI. However, further studies with larger sample sizes are required to verify the association

  18. Quantitative, single-step dual measurement of hemoglobin A1c and total hemoglobin in human whole blood using a gold sandwich immunochromatographic assay for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Ang, Shu Hwang; Rambeli, Musalman; Thevarajah, T Malathi; Alias, Yatimah Binti; Khor, Sook Mei

    2016-04-15

    We describe a gold nanoparticle-based sandwich immunoassay for the dual detection and measurement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and total hemoglobin in the whole blood (without pretreatment) in a single step for personalized medicine. The optimized antibody-functionalized gold nanoparticles immunoreact simultaneously with HbA1c and total hemoglobin to form a sandwich at distinctive test lines to transduce visible signals. The applicability of this method as a personal management tool was demonstrated by establishing a calibration curve to relate % HbA1c, a useful value for type 2 diabetes management, to the signal ratio of captured HbA1c to all other forms of hemoglobin. The platform showed excellent selectivity (100%) toward HbA1c at distinctive test lines when challenged with HbA0, glycated HbA0 and HbA2. The reproducibility of the measurement was good (6.02%) owing to the dual measurement of HbA1c and total hemoglobin. A blood sample stability test revealed that the quantitative measurement of % HbA1c was consistent and no false-positive results were detected. Also, this method distinguished the blood sample with elevated HbF from the normal samples and the variants. The findings of this study highlight the potential of a lateral flow immunosensor as a simple, inexpensive, consistent, and convenient strategy for the dual measurement of HbA1c and total Hb to provide useful % HbA1c values for better on-site diabetes care. PMID:26606311

  19. Investigating biomedical research literature in the blogosphere: a case study of diabetes and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c)*†‡

    PubMed Central

    Gruzd, Anatoliy; Black, Fiona A; Le, Thi Ngoc Yen; Amos, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The research investigated the relationship between biomedical literature and blogosphere discussions about diabetes in order to explore the role of Web 2.0 technologies in disseminating health information. Are blogs that cite biomedical literature perceived as more trustworthy in the blogosphere, as measured by their popularity and interconnections with other blogs? Methods: Web mining, social network analysis, and content analysis were used to analyze a large sample of blogs to determine how often biomedical literature is referenced in blogs on diabetes and how these blogs interconnect with others in the health blogosphere. Results: Approximately 10% of the 3,005 blogs analyzed cite at least 1 article from the dataset of 2,246 articles. The most influential blogs, as measured by in-links, are written by diabetes patients and tend not to cite biomedical literature. In general, blogs that do not cite biomedical literature tend not to link to blogs that do. Conclusions: There is a large communication gap between health professional and personal diabetes blogs. Personal blogs do not tend to link to blogs by health professionals. Diabetes patients may be turning to the blogosphere for reasons other than authoritative information. They may be seeking emotional support and exchange of personal stories. PMID:22272157

  20. Effect of Long-Term Periodontal Care on Hemoglobin A1c in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Merchant, A T; Georgantopoulos, P; Howe, C J; Virani, S S; Morales, D A; Haddock, K S

    2016-04-01

    This was a prospective cohort study evaluating 126,805 individuals with diabetes and periodontal disease receiving care at all Veterans Administration medical centers and clinics in the United States from 2005 through 2012. The exposures were periodontal treatment at baseline (PT0) and at follow-up (PT2). The outcomes were change in HbA1c following initial treatment (ΔHbA1c1) and follow-up treatment (ΔHbA1c2), and diabetes control was defined as HbA1c at <7% and <9% following initial and follow-up treatment, respectively. Marginal structural models were used to account for potential confounding and selection bias. The objective was to evaluate the impact of long-term treatment of periodontal disease on glycemic control among individuals with type 2 diabetes. Participants were 64 y old on average, 97% were men, and 71% were white. At baseline, the average diabetes duration was 4 y, 12% of participants were receiving insulin, and 60% had HbA1c <7%. After an average 1.7 y of follow-up, the mean HbA1c increased from 7.03% to 7.21%. About 29.4% of participants attended their periodontal maintenance visit following baseline. Periodontal treatment at baseline and follow-up reduced HbA1c by -0.02% and -0.074%, respectively. Treatment at follow-up increased the likelihood of individuals achieving diabetes control by 5% and 3% at the HbA1c <7% and HbA1c <9% thresholds, respectively, and was observed even among never smokers. HbA1c reduction after periodontal treatment at follow-up was greater (ΔHbA1c2 = -0.25%) among individuals with higher baseline HbA1c. Long-term periodontal care provided in a clinical setting improved long-term glycemic control among individuals with type 2 diabetes and periodontal disease. PMID:26701348

  1. Apolipoprotein A1/C3/A5 haplotypes and serum lipid levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the apolipoprotein (Apo) A1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster and serum lipid profiles is inconsistent. The present study was undertaken to detect the association between the ApoA1/C3/A5 gene polymorphisms and their haplotypes with serum lipid levels ...

  2. Neue biosensorische Prinzipien für die Hämoglobin-A1c Bestimmung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöllner, Daniela

    2002-06-01

    Hämoglobin-A1c (HbA1c) ist ein Hämoglobin (Hb)-Subtypus, der durch nicht-enzymatische Glykierung des N-terminalen Valinrestes der Hämoglobin-beta-Kette entsteht. Das gemessene Verhältnis von HbA1c zum Gesamt-Hämoglobin (5-20 % bei Diabetikern) repräsentiert den Mittelwert der Blutglucosekonzentration über einen zweimonatigen Zeitraum und stellt zur Beurteilung der diabetischen Stoffwechsellage eine Ergänzung zur Akutkontrolle der Glukosekonzentration dar. Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit war es, einen amperometrischen Biosensor für die Bestimmung des medizinisch relevanten Parameters HbA1c zu entwickeln. Durch Selektion geeigneter Bioerkennungselemente und deren Immobilisierung unter Erhalt der Bindungsfunktion für die Zielmoleküle Hämoglobin bzw. HbA1c wurden spezifische, hochaffine und regenerationsstabile Sensoroberflächen geschaffen. Für die Entwicklung des HbA1c-Biosensors wurden zwei Konzepte - Enzymsensor und Immunosensor - miteinander verglichen. Die enzymatische Umsetzung von HbA1c erfolgte mit der Fructosylamin Oxidase (FAO) aus Pichia pastoris N 1-1 unter Freisetzung von H2O2, welches sowohl optisch über eine Indikatorreaktion als auch elektrochemisch nach Einschluss der FAO in PVA-SbQ und Fixierung des Immobilisats vor einer H2O2-Elektrode nachgewiesen wurde. Die Kalibration des Enzymsensors mit der HbA1c-Modellsubstanz Fructosyl-Valin ergab Nachweisgrenzen, die ausserhalb des physiologisch relevanten HbA1c-Konzentrationsbereich lagen. Aus der Umsetzung von glykierten Peptiden mit einer nicht HbA1c analogen Aminosäurensequenz, z.B. Fructosyl-Valin-Glycin wurde zudem eine geringe HbA1c-Spezifität abgeleitet. Für den Immunosensor wurden zwei heterogene Immunoassay-Formate unter Verwendung von hochaffinen und spezifischen Antikörpern in Kombination mit Glucose Oxidase (GOD) als Markerenzym zum Nachweis von HbA1c untersucht. Beim indirekt-kompetitiven Immunoassay wurde anstelle des kompletten HbA1c-Moleküls das glykierte Pentapeptid

  3. Impact of corpulence parameters and haemoglobin A1c on metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients: comparison of apolipoprotein B/A-I ratio with fasting and postprandial conventional lipid ratios

    PubMed Central

    Diaf, Mustapha; Khaled, Boumediene M.; Sellam, Fériel

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective The incidence of diabetes co-morbidities could probably be better assessed by studying its associations with major corpulence parameters and glycaemic control indicators. We assessed the utility of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in metabolic control for type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Fasting and postprandial blood samples were collected from 238 type 2 diabetic patients aged 57.4±11.9 years. The sera were analysed for glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), and apolipoproteins (apoA-I and apoB). Ratios of lipids and apolipoproteins were calculated and their associations with BMI, WC, and HbA1c levels were analysed. Results Our investigation showed increases in most fasting and postprandial lipid parameters according to BMI and WC. In men, postprandial HDL-c and TG levels were significantly higher (p<0.05) in overweight and obese patients, respectively, as well as in patients with abdominal obesity. Contrariwise, postprandial TC levels were significantly higher (p<0.01) in overweight and abdominal obese women. However, elevations of apoA-I and apoB levels were according to BMI and WC in both genders. There was a strong influence of BMI, WC, and HbA1c levels on the apoB/apoA-I ratio compared to traditional fasting and postprandial lipid ratios in both men and women. The apoB/apoA-I ratio was more correlated with postprandial TC/HDL and LDL-c/HDL-c ratios in men and with postprandial TG/HDL-c in women. Conclusion The apoB/apoA-I ratio is helpful in assessing metabolic risk caused by overall obesity, abdominal obesity and impaired glycaemia in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:25959906

  4. Treated glycosylated hemoglobin levels in individuals with diabetes mellitus vary little by health status

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Finlay A.; Youngson, Erik; Eurich, Dean T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As choosing wisely has raised the issue of whether some individuals with type 2 diabetes may be overtreated, we examined the intensity of glycemic control across health status strata defined by comorbidities or frailty. This is a retrospective cohort study of commercially insured patients from 50 US states (Clinformatics Data Mart). We evaluated treated HbA1c levels in adults with new diabetes diagnosed between January 2004 and December 2009 who had HbA1C measured after at least 1 year of follow-up. Of 191,590 individuals with diabetes, 78.5% were otherwise healthy, 10.6% had complex health status (3 or more chronic conditions), and 10.9% were very complex (Johns Hopkins Adjusted Clinical Groups frailty marker or end-stage chronic disease). The proportion of patients who were tightly controlled (HbA1C <7%) was similar in otherwise healthy patients (66.1%) and in complex patients (65.8%, P = 0.37), and although it was lower (60.9%, P < 0.0001) in very complex patients, the magnitude of the difference was small. A substantial proportion of complex/very complex patients were taking sulfonylurea or insulin despite being at an increased risk for adverse effects from these agents and having tightly controlled HbA1C: 40.6% had HbA1C <7% and 24% had HbA1C <6.5%. Among patients with HbA1C <7%, use of insulin or sulfonylureas was associated with an increased risk for all-cause hospitalization [aHR 1.54, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.45–1.64] and for emergency room visits (aHR 1.44, 95% CI 1.35–1.53) over the subsequent median 6 months follow-up. Diabetic control was similar regardless of comorbidity burden and frailty status. Despite being at a higher risk for adverse effects, nearly half of complex and very complex patients were still receiving insulin or sulfonylureas despite having treated HbA1C levels <7%, and these patients did exhibit higher risk of all-cause hospitalizations or emergency visits subsequently. PMID:27310986

  5. Knowledge of A1c Predicts Diabetes Self-Management and A1c Level among Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengnan; Kong, Weimin; Hsue, Cunyi; Fish, Anne F; Chen, Yufeng; Guo, Xiaohui; Lou, Qingqing; Anderson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This study was to identify current A1c understanding status among Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes, assess if knowledge of A1c affects their diabetes self-management and their glycemic control and recognize the factors influencing knowledge of A1c among patients with type 2 diabetes. A multi-center, cross-sectional survey was conducted between April and July 2010 in 50 medical centers in the Mainland China. Participants were recruited from inpatients and outpatients who were admitted to or visited those medical centers. The survey included core questions about their demographic characteristics, diabetes self-management behavior, and A1c knowledge. Overall, of 5957 patients, the percentage of patients with good understanding was 25.3%. In the multivariable logistic regression model, the variables related to the knowledge of A1c status are presented. We discovered that patients with longer diabetes duration (OR = 1.05; 95%CI = 1.04-1.06) and having received diabetes education (OR = 1.80; 95%CI = 1.49-2.17) were overrepresented in the good understanding of A1c group. In addition, compared to no education level, higher education level was statistically associated with good understanding of A1c (P<0.001). The percentage of patients with good understanding varied from region to region (P<0.001), with Eastern being highest (OR = 1.54; 95%CI = 1.32-1.80), followed by Central (OR = 1.25; 95%CI = 1.02-1.53), when referring to Western. Only a minority of patients with type 2 diabetes in China understood their A1c value. The patients who had a good understanding of their A1c demonstrated significantly better diabetes self-management behavior and had lower A1c levels than those who did not. PMID:26959422

  6. Association between Glycosylated Haemoglobin Level and Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Akyuz, Sukru; Kemaloglu Oz, Tugba; Altay, Servet; Karaca, Mehmet; Yaylak, Baris; Gungor, Baris; Yazici, Selcuk; Erdogan, Guney; Nurkalem, Zekeriya; Kasikcioglu, Hulya

    2014-01-01

    Background There are several reports suggesting that admission hyperglycaemia increases the risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). However, it is not clear whether there has been an association between long-standing poor glycaemic control and the incidence of CI-AKI. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of poor glycaemic control or elevated glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) on the incidence of CI-AKI in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods The present study prospectively enrolled 133 patients with T2DM undergoing elective coronary angiography (CAG) and/or intervention. All patients had an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Patients were divided into two groups: those with an optimal HbA1c (<7%) and those with an elevated HbA1c (≥7%). All had similar baseline characteristics and were hydrated appropriately. The outcome was assessed by the incidence of CI-AKI. Results CI-AKI occurred in 2 of 41 patients (4.9%) with optimal HbA1c levels and 5 of 92 patients (5.4%) with elevated HbA1c levels (p = 0.89). The cutoff point of HbA1c was set at 6.5%, but no statistically significant difference between the two groups was observed [1 of 24 patients (4.1%) vs. 6 of 109 patients (5.5%), p = 0.79]. However, despite a high variability in the incidence of CI-AKI, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups when varying CI-AKI definitions were considered. Conclusion An elevated HbA1c level is not associated with a higher incidence of CI-AKI compared to optimal HbA1c levels in patients with T2DM (patients with an eGFR of ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m2) undergoing CAG and/or intervention. PMID:25254031

  7. Treated glycosylated hemoglobin levels in individuals with diabetes mellitus vary little by health status: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    McAlister, Finlay A; Youngson, Erik; Eurich, Dean T

    2016-06-01

    As choosing wisely has raised the issue of whether some individuals with type 2 diabetes may be overtreated, we examined the intensity of glycemic control across health status strata defined by comorbidities or frailty.This is a retrospective cohort study of commercially insured patients from 50 US states (Clinformatics Data Mart). We evaluated treated HbA1c levels in adults with new diabetes diagnosed between January 2004 and December 2009 who had HbA1C measured after at least 1 year of follow-up.Of 191,590 individuals with diabetes, 78.5% were otherwise healthy, 10.6% had complex health status (3 or more chronic conditions), and 10.9% were very complex (Johns Hopkins Adjusted Clinical Groups frailty marker or end-stage chronic disease). The proportion of patients who were tightly controlled (HbA1C <7%) was similar in otherwise healthy patients (66.1%) and in complex patients (65.8%, P = 0.37), and although it was lower (60.9%, P < 0.0001) in very complex patients, the magnitude of the difference was small. A substantial proportion of complex/very complex patients were taking sulfonylurea or insulin despite being at an increased risk for adverse effects from these agents and having tightly controlled HbA1C: 40.6% had HbA1C <7% and 24% had HbA1C <6.5%. Among patients with HbA1C <7%, use of insulin or sulfonylureas was associated with an increased risk for all-cause hospitalization [aHR 1.54, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.45-1.64] and for emergency room visits (aHR 1.44, 95% CI 1.35-1.53) over the subsequent median 6 months follow-up.Diabetic control was similar regardless of comorbidity burden and frailty status. Despite being at a higher risk for adverse effects, nearly half of complex and very complex patients were still receiving insulin or sulfonylureas despite having treated HbA1C levels <7%, and these patients did exhibit higher risk of all-cause hospitalizations or emergency visits subsequently. PMID:27310986

  8. The performance of hemoglobin A1c against fasting plasma glucose and oral glucose tolerance test in detecting prediabetes and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Jale; Akin, Safak; Karagaoglu, Ergun; Gurlek, Alper

    2014-01-01

    Background: In recent years, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is accepted among the algorithms used for making diagnosis for diabetes and prediabetes since it does not require subjects to be prepared for giving a blood sample. The aim of this study is to assess the performance of HbA1c against fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in detecting prediabetes and diabetes. Materials and Methods: A total of 315 subjects were included in this study. The success of HbA1c in distinguishing the three diagnostic classes was examined by three-way receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The best cut-off points for HbA1c were found for discriminating the three disease status. Results: The performance of HbA1c, measured by the volume under the ROC surface (VUS), is found to be statistically significant (VUS = 0.535, P < 0.001). The best cut-off points for discriminating between normal and prediabetes groups and between prediabetes and diabetes groups are c1 = 5.2% and c2 = 6.4% respectively. Conclusion: The performance of HbA1c in distinguishing between the prediabetes and diabetes groups was higher than its ability in distinguishing between healthy and prediabetes groups. This study provides enough information to understand what proportion of diabetes patients were skipped with the HbA1c especially when the test result is healthy or prediabetes. If a subject was diagnosed as healthy or prediabetes by HbA1c, it would be beneficial to verify the status of that subject by the gold standard test (OGTT and FPG). PMID:25657750

  9. Using poly(3-aminophenylboronic acid) thin film with binding-induced ion flux blocking for amperometric detection of hemoglobin A1c.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Yuan; Chou, Tse-Chuan; Chen, Lin-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2015-01-15

    This study reports a novel enzyme-free, label-free amperometric method for direct detection of hemoglobin A1c (Hb(A1c)), a potent biomarker for diabetes diagnosis and prognosis. The method relies on an electrode modified with poly(3-aminophenylboronic acid) (PAPBA) nanoparticles (20-50 nm) and a sensing scheme named "binding-induced ion flux blocking." The PAPBA nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR, XPS, TEM, and SEM. Being a polyaniline derivative, PAPBA showed an ion-dependent redox behavior, in which insertion or extraction of ions into or out of PABPA occurred for charge balance during the electron transfer process. The polymer allowed Hb(A1c) selectively bound to its surface via forming the cis-diol linkage between the boronic acid and sugar moieties. Voltammetric analyses showed that Hb(A1c) binding decreased the redox current of PAPBA; however, the binding did not alter the redox potentials and the apparent diffusivities of ions. This suggests that the redox current of PAPBA decreased due to an Hb(A1c) binding-induced ion flux blocking mechanism, which was then verified and characterized through an in situ electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) study. Assay with Hb(A1c) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) indicates that the peak current of a PAPBA electrode has a linear dependence on the logarithm of Hb(A1c) concentration ranging from 0.975 to 156 μM. The Hb(A1c) assay also showed high selectivity against ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid, glucose and bovine serum albumin. This study has demonstrated a new method for developing an electrochemical Hb(A1c) biosensor and can be extended to other label-free, indicator-free protein biosensors based on a similar redox polymer electrode. PMID:25113050

  10. Changes in Body Fat Distribution and Fitness Are Associated With Changes in Hemoglobin A1c After 9 Months of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Sénéchal, Martin; Swift, Damon L.; Johannsen, Neil M.; Blair, Steven N.; Earnest, Conrad P.; Lavie, Carl J.; Church, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the associations between changes in body composition and fitness after exercise training and changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in individuals with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants (n = 201) were randomized to aerobic, resistance, or combined training for 9 months. HbA1c, waist circumference, total and trunk fat mass, appendicular fat mass, lean body mass, isokinetic leg muscle strength, peak O2 uptake, and estimated METs were assessed at baseline and follow-up. Change in HbA1c was evaluated across quartiles of change in body composition and fitness. RESULTS Change in HbA1c was associated with changes in body weight (r = 0.13, P = 0.052), waist circumference (r = 0.17, P = 0.013), trunk fat mass (r = 0.19, P = 0.005), and estimated METs (r = −0.16, P = 0.023). There was a trend in change in HbA1c across quartiles of waist circumference (P = 0.011), trunk fat mass (P = 0.020), and estimated METs (P = 0.011). Participants with increased estimated METs and reduced trunk fat mass had greater odds of having reduced HbA1c after training (3.48, 1.46–8.31). Finally, participants with increased estimated METs and reduced waist circumference were 2.81 (1.13–6.98) times more likely to have reduced HbA1c and type 2 diabetes medication use than those without improved fitness and central adiposity. CONCLUSIONS In patients with type 2 diabetes, a reduction in central adiposity and increase in fitness were the most prominent predictors of the change in HbA1c in response to exercise training. PMID:23670995

  11. Neue biosensorische Prinzipien für die Hämoglobin-A1c Bestimmung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöllner, Daniela

    2002-06-01

    Hämoglobin-A1c (HbA1c) ist ein Hämoglobin (Hb)-Subtypus, der durch nicht-enzymatische Glykierung des N-terminalen Valinrestes der Hämoglobin-beta-Kette entsteht. Das gemessene Verhältnis von HbA1c zum Gesamt-Hämoglobin (5-20 % bei Diabetikern) repräsentiert den Mittelwert der Blutglucosekonzentration über einen zweimonatigen Zeitraum und stellt zur Beurteilung der diabetischen Stoffwechsellage eine Ergänzung zur Akutkontrolle der Glukosekonzentration dar. Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit war es, einen amperometrischen Biosensor für die Bestimmung des medizinisch relevanten Parameters HbA1c zu entwickeln. Durch Selektion geeigneter Bioerkennungselemente und deren Immobilisierung unter Erhalt der Bindungsfunktion für die Zielmoleküle Hämoglobin bzw. HbA1c wurden spezifische, hochaffine und regenerationsstabile Sensoroberflächen geschaffen. Für die Entwicklung des HbA1c-Biosensors wurden zwei Konzepte - Enzymsensor und Immunosensor - miteinander verglichen. Die enzymatische Umsetzung von HbA1c erfolgte mit der Fructosylamin Oxidase (FAO) aus Pichia pastoris N 1-1 unter Freisetzung von H2O2, welches sowohl optisch über eine Indikatorreaktion als auch elektrochemisch nach Einschluss der FAO in PVA-SbQ und Fixierung des Immobilisats vor einer H2O2-Elektrode nachgewiesen wurde. Die Kalibration des Enzymsensors mit der HbA1c-Modellsubstanz Fructosyl-Valin ergab Nachweisgrenzen, die ausserhalb des physiologisch relevanten HbA1c-Konzentrationsbereich lagen. Aus der Umsetzung von glykierten Peptiden mit einer nicht HbA1c analogen Aminosäurensequenz, z.B. Fructosyl-Valin-Glycin wurde zudem eine geringe HbA1c-Spezifität abgeleitet. Für den Immunosensor wurden zwei heterogene Immunoassay-Formate unter Verwendung von hochaffinen und spezifischen Antikörpern in Kombination mit Glucose Oxidase (GOD) als Markerenzym zum Nachweis von HbA1c untersucht. Beim indirekt-kompetitiven Immunoassay wurde anstelle des kompletten HbA1c-Moleküls das glykierte Pentapeptid

  12. Combining glycosylated hemoglobin A1c and fasting plasma glucose for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in Chinese adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has been applied to identify type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the U.S. and European countries. It has not been used in China mainly due to lack of a standardized approach to measure HbA1c, short of knowledge about racial-specific standard and deficiency of an optimal cut-off point. Methods To evaluate combination of HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in diagnosing T2DM in Chinese adults, a multistage sampling cross-sectional study was conducted in Shanghai, China, in 2009. The FPG measurement, HbA1c assay, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed in 6,661 Chinese adults (3057 men, 3604 women) who had no prior history of diabetes to identify the unrecognized T2DM. Results A total of 454 participants were identified as T2DM based on the 1999 World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria. Of these patients, 239 were detected using an FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/l and 141 were further identified using an HbA1c ≥ 43 mmol/mol (6.1%), achieving a sensitivity of 83.7% and a specificity of 89.3% for combining use of FPG and HbA1c. In subjects at high risk of diabetes, the combining use of FPG and HbA1c produced a higher sensitivity and an improved positive predictive value (PPV), and had a satisfactory specificity and negative predictive value (NPV). Conclusions The combining use of FPG and HbA1c is a potential screening and diagnosis approach for T2DM in Chinese adults, especially among those at high risk of the disease. PMID:24099651

  13. Glycated Hemoglobin Level and Risk of Hip Fracture in Older People with Type 2 Diabetes: A Competing Risk Analysis of Taiwan Diabetes Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Meng, Nai-Hsin; Chen, Ching-Chu; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-07-01

    Hip fracture, which is associated with substantial morbidity and long-term mortality, imposes a major burden on the healthcare system. Diabetes is a risk factor for osteoporosis, which is a crucial risk factor of hip fracture. However, epidemiological studies investigating the risk of hip fracture among patients with type 2 diabetes are limited. This study explored the association between hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and the risk of hip fracture in people with type 2 diabetes aged 65 years and older. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 20,025 older patients with type 2 diabetes who participated in the National Diabetes Case Management Program in Taiwan. The HbA1c level at the baseline and hip fracture incidence over an average of 7.41 years of follow-up were analyzed (maximum and standard deviation were 10.9 and 2.42 years, respectively). A total of 1514 hip fracture cases were recorded. The incidence rates of hip fracture were 9.15, 8.02, 9.58, 10.61, 12.51, and 13.43 per 1000 person-years in patients with baseline HbA1c levels of < 6%, 6-7%, 7%-8%, 8%-9%, 9%-10%, and ≥ 10%, respectively. After multivariate adjustment, the risk of hip fracture increased among patients with HbA1c levels of 9%-10% and ≥ 10.0% compared with patients with HbA1c levels of 6-7% (hazard ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.49 and 1.32; 1.09-1.58, respectively). Significant linear trends among various HbA1c levels were observed (P  < 0.05). Patients with type 2 diabetes whose HbA1c levels exceeded 9.0% exhibited an increased risk of hip fracture, confirming a linear relationship. Our study's findings demonstrated the importance of glycemic control for fracture prevention in older adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25598134

  14. Impact of Educational Intervention Based on Interactive Approaches on Beliefs, Behavior, Hemoglobin A1c, and Quality of Life in Diabetic Women

    PubMed Central

    Didarloo, Alireza; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Alizadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a public health challenge worldwide and to manage it the patient is required to make some fundamental changes in behavior. Patients should be involved in care program to improve their diabetes condition and quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to examine the effect of educational program on beliefs, behavior, glycemic control indicator, and QOL among diabetic women. Methods: In this interventional study, 90 female outpatients with type 2 diabetes were randomly selected from those referred to diabetes clinic in Khoy, Iran, during 2011. They were divided into two groups, 45 participants as the intervention group and 45 subjects as the comparison group. Knowledge, beliefs, and behavior by valid and reliable questionnaires, and health-related QOL (HRQOL) by means of WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire were assessed. Hemoglobin A1c level (HbA1c) was measured by the colorimetric method, educational program was conducted on the intervention group for 4 weeks, and changes were compared in two groups after a 3-month follow-up. Results: After intervention, there was a significant difference between two groups in terms of the mean scores of knowledge (P < 0.001), attitude (P < 0.01), self-efficacy (P < 0.001), and behavior (P < 0.001). The findings also indicated that there were significant differences between the groups in mean scores of physical, psychological, and social domains of QOL after intervention (P < 0.001). In addition, there was a statistically significant difference between two groups in the mean value of HbA1c after educational intervention (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Instructional interventions based on interactive approaches can be useful, and applicable for behavior modification and improvement of HbA1c level and HRQOL in people with DM. PMID:27014430

  15. Hb G-Waimanalo [A1] or α64(E13)Asp→Asn (α1) (HBA1: c.193G>A) Observed in a Bulgarian Family.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Georgi; Dimishkovska, Marija; Tsoneva Ivanova, Vanya; Yordanov, Georgi; Zdraveski, Alexandar; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2015-01-01

    The abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) with an aspartic acid to asparagine substitution at α64 has been found on both the α2- and α1-globin genes. It has been described in many different populations under different names, but never in Bulgaria. Using the recently proposed nomenclature, Hb G-Waimanalo [A1] refers to the HBA1: c.193G > A, while Hb G-Waimanalo [A2] refers to the HBA2: c.193G > A mutation. Here, we present the first family from Bulgaria with Hb G-Waimanalo [A1]. PMID:26212674

  16. The Usefulness of the Glycosylated Hemoglobin Level for the Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ah Jeong; Moon, Hyuk Jin; Na, Joo Ok; Kim, Sang Jin; Mo, Sang Il; Byun, Jeong Ran

    2015-01-01

    Background An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is the current method used for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). OGTT is a relatively complicated procedure and is expensive. Thus, new strategies that do not require fasting or more than a single blood draw may improve the diagnosis of GDM and increase the rate of GDM testing. We investigated the utility of monitoring glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels for the diagnosis of GDM. Methods The data from 992 pregnant women with estimated gestational ages ranging from 24 to 28 weeks were retrospectively reviewed. There were 367 women with plasma glucose levels ≥140 mg/dL 1 hour after a 50-g OGTT. GDM was diagnosed according to the Carpenter-Coustan criteria for a 3-hour 100 g OGTT. A HbA1c assessment was performed at the same time. Results We enrolled 343 women in this study, and there were 109 women with GDM. The area under the curve the receiver operating characteristic curve for HbA1c detection of GDM was 0.852 (95% confidence interval, 0.808 to 0.897). A HbA1c cutoff value ≥5.35% had maximal points on the Youden index (0.581). The sensitivity was 87.2% and the specificity was 70.9% for diagnosing GDM. A threshold value ≥5.35% indicated that 163 patients had GDM and that 68 (41.7%) were false positive. The positive predictive value was 58.3% at this threshold value. Conclusion Despite substantial progress in methodology, HbA1c values cannot replace OGTT for the diagnosis of GDM. PMID:26616593

  17. A Review of the Challenge in Measuring Hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Weykamp, Cas; Garry John, W.; Mosca, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The attraction of the simple biochemical concept combined with a clinical requirement for a long-term marker of glycolic control in diabetes has made hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) one of the most important assays undertaken in the medical laboratory. The diversity in the biochemistry of glycation, clinical requirements, and management demands has resulted in a broad range of methods being developed since HbA1c was described in the late 1960s. A range of analytic principles are used for the measurement of HbA1c. The charge difference between hemoglobin A0 and HbA1c has been widely utilized to separate these two fractions, most notably found these days in ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography systems; the difference in molecular structure (affinity chromatography and immunochemical methods) are becoming widely available. Different results found in different laboratories using a variety of HbA1c analyses resulted in the need for standardization, most notably in the United States, Japan, and Sweden. Designated comparison methods are now located in these three countries, but as they are arbitrarily chosen and have differences in specificity, results of these methods and the reference values and action limits of the methods differ and only harmonized HbA1c in specific geographic areas. A reference measurement system within the concept of metrological traceability is now globally accepted as the only valid analytic anchor. However, there is still discussion over the units to be reported. The consensus statement of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC), the American Diabetes Association, the International Diabetes Federation, and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes suggests reporting HbA1c in IFCC units (mmol/mol), National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program units (%), and estimated average glucose (either in mg/dl or mmol/liter). The implementation of this consensus statement raised new questions, to be answered in a

  18. A rare haemoglobin variant (Hb Phnom Penh) manifesting as a falsely high haemoglobin A1c value on ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Fen; Tai, Yen-Kuang

    2014-08-01

    Most haemoglobin (Hb) variants are clinically silent. However, some Hb variants may interfere with the measurement of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), resulting in spurious values depending on the assays used. We herein report the case of a 53-year-old Taiwanese man with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who presented with an abnormal HbA1c peak on ion-exchange chromatography. Additional investigations, including intensified self-monitored blood glucose tests, an alternative HbA1c assay, and a glycaemic indicator based on a different method, revealed that the HbA1c values were falsely elevated. Subsequent DNA analysis confirmed that the patient was heterozygous for the insertion of an isoleucine residue at codons 117/118 of the a1-globin gene, Hb Phnom Penh. Clinical laboratorians should be aware of the interfering factors in their HbA1c analysis. Cautious inspection of the chromatogram may provide a valuable clue to the presence of an Hb variant. PMID:25189312

  19. Change in glycated haemoglobin levels after initiating second-line therapy in type 2 diabetes: a primary care database study.

    PubMed

    Rathmann, W; Bongaerts, B; Kostev, K

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the absolute reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels at 6 months after initiating second-line glucose-lowering therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin monotherapy in general practices. A total of 7009 patients were identified (Disease Analyser Germany: January 2004 to December 2014). The patients' mean ± standard deviation (s.d.) age was 63 ± 11 years, 55.5% were male and their mean ± s.d. HbA1c level was 8.0 ± 1.6%. The initiated second-line therapies included: dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (38.7%); sulphonylureas (36.3%); insulin (13.3%); glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs; 2.5%); thiazolidinediones (5%); and other agents (glinides, aldose-reductase inhibitors; 4.1%). The mean absolute HbA1c change from baseline was -0.9% (DPP-4 inhibitors, -0.9%; sulphonylureas, -0.9%; insulin, -1.1%; GLP-1RAs, -0.7%; thiazolidinediones, -0.9%; and other, -0.7%; all p < 0.001). Overall, 58% of patients reached the HbA1c target of <7% (DPP-4 inhibitors, 61.7%; sulphonylureas, 56.7%; insulin, 45.6%; GLP-1RAs, 62.2%; thiazolidinediones, 69.7%; and other, 57.5%). Compared with sulphonlyureas, DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1RAs and thiazolidinediones were associated with an increased odds of reaching HbA1c <7% [odds ratio (OR) 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.40; OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.01-2.04; and OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.30-2.23, respectively], whereas insulin was related to a lower odds (0.66, 95% CI 0.55-0.78). In conclusion, in patients with type 2 diabetes very similar reductions in HbA1c after 6 months of second-line therapy were achieved regardless of the type of therapy. PMID:27062643

  20. Catechol-O-methyltransferase association with hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Kathryn T.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Chen, Ling; Harden, Maegan; Tolkin, Benjamin R.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Bray, George A.; Ridker, Paul M.; Florez, Jose C.; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Catecholamines have metabolic effects on blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and blood glucose. Genetic variation in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that degrades catecholamines, is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). Here we examined COMT effects on glycemic function and type 2 diabetes. Methods We tested whether COMT polymorphisms were associated with baseline HbA1c in the Women’s Genome Health Study (WGHS), and Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC), and with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in WGHS, DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis consortium (DIAGRAM), and the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Given evidence that COMT modifies some drug responses, we examined association with type 2 diabetes and randomized metformin and aspirin treatment. Results COMT rs4680 high-activity G-allele was associated with lower HbA1c in WGHS (β = −0.032% [0.012], p = 0.008) and borderline significant in MAGIC (β = −0.006% [0.003], p = 0.07). Combined COMT per val allele effects on type 2 diabetes were significant (OR = 0.98 [0.96–0.998], p = 0.03) in fixed-effects analyses across WGHS, DIAGRAM, and DPP. Similar results were obtained for 2 other COMT SNPs rs4818 and rs4633. In the DPP, the rs4680 val allele was borderline associated with lower diabetes incidence among participants randomized to metformin (HR = 0.81 [0.65–1.00], p = 0.05). Conclusions COMT rs4680 high-activity G-allele was associated with lower HbA1c and modest protection from type 2 diabetes. The directionality of COMT associations was concordant with those previously observed for cardiometabolic risk factors and CVD. PMID:27282867

  1. A1C

    MedlinePlus

    A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 ... A1C alone or in combination with other diabetes tests to make a diagnosis. They also use the ...

  2. Increased circulating heat shock protein 70 (HSPA1A) levels in gestational diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garamvölgyi, Zoltán; Prohászka, Zoltán; Rigó, János; Kecskeméti, András; Molvarec, Attila

    2015-07-01

    Recent data indicate that serum Hsp70 (HSPA1A) levels are increased in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is no report in the literature on circulating Hsp70 levels in gestational diabetes mellitus. In this pilot study, we measured serum Hsp70 levels in 11 pregnant women with pregestational diabetes, 38 women with gestational diabetes, and 40 healthy pregnant women with ELISA. Plasma glucose levels, serum insulin concentrations, HbA1c values, and the Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index were also determined. According to our results, serum Hsp70 concentrations were significantly higher in women with pregestational and gestational diabetes mellitus than in healthy pregnant women. In addition, pregestational diabetic women had significantly higher Hsp70 levels than those with gestational diabetes. Furthermore, in the group of women with gestational diabetes mellitus, serum Hsp70 levels showed a significant positive correlation with HbA1c values. However, there was no other relationship between clinical features and metabolic parameters of the study subjects and their serum Hsp70 levels in either study group. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time in the literature that serum Hsp70 levels are increased and correlate with HbA1c values in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to determine whether circulating Hsp70 plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes or elevated serum Hsp70 levels are only consequences of the disease. PMID:25720752

  3. A1C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to minimize the complications caused by chronically elevated glucose levels, such as progressive damage to body organs like the kidneys, eyes, cardiovascular system, and nerves. The A1c test result ...

  4. The effect of Persian shallot (Allium hirtifolium Boiss.) extract on blood sugar and serum levels of some hormones in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Mahmoodi; Javad, Hosseini; Seyed-Mostafa, Hosseini-Zijoud; Mohammadreza, Mirzaee; Ebrahim, Mirzajani

    2013-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is caused by hyperglycemia, resulting from defective insulin secretion or function. It is widely believed that the antioxidant micronutrients obtained from plants afford significant protection against diseases like diabetes mellitus. Present study was aimed to examine the effects of Persian shallot (Allium hirtifolium Boiss) on FBS, HbA1c, insulin, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) levels in type 1 diabetic rats. Thirty two male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups of 8. The diabetic groups received 100 and 200 mg/kg Persian shallot extract, diabetic control and normal control received %0.9 saline for 30 days. At the end of treatments, fasting blood specimens were collected. The levels of FBS, HbA1c, insulin, T3 and T4 were measured. Our findings indicated that hydroalcoholic extract of Persian shallot significantly decreased serum levels of FBS and HbA1c in treated groups (in a dose dependent manner) (p<0.05). The serum levels of insulin and T3 slightly increased by Persian shallot but the T4 serum level was declined. These beneficial effects of Persian shallot extracts in diabetic rats could probably be due to the antioxidant capacity of its phenolic and diallyl disulfide content. PMID:23455213

  5. Associations of serum Magnesium levels with diabetes mellitus and diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Arpaci, D; Tocoglu, A G; Ergenc, H; Korkmaz, S; Ucar, A; Tamer, A

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnesium (Mg) deficiency is a common problem in diabetic patients. Deficiency of Mg may increase the incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and occurrence of diabetic complications. In this study, our aim was to evaluate an association between serum Mg level,  glycemic regulation, and diabetic complications. Material-Methods In this retrospective study 673 diabetic patients were evaluated. According to Mg levels, the patients were divided into two groups; as normomagnesemic patients and hypomagnesemic patients. Results Among the patients, 57.8% were men and 42.2% were women. Mean age was 55.6 years and the mean duration of diabetes was 81 ± 86.9 months. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was 9.0 ±2.4 % (4.5-18); mean magnesium level was 1.97 ± 0.25 (1.13 to 3.0) mg / dl.  There were 55 patients (8.2%) with diabetic retinopathy and 95 patients (14.1%) with diabetic neuropathy. Five hundred patients (74.3%)  had normoalbuminuria; 133 patients (19. 8%) had microalbuminuria (MA) and 40 patients (5.9%) had overt proteinuria. One hundred and seventy one patients (25.4%) had HbA1c levels equal or below 7%; and 502 patients (74.6%) had HbA1c levels above 7%. There was no statistical difference in age or duration of diabetes between the groups formed according to Mg levels. Although there were no differences between the groups for retinopathy and neuropathy, MA was more common in hypomagnesemic patients (p =0.004). HbA1c levels did not differ between the groups (p =0.243). However there was a weak negative correlation between serum Mg and HbA1c levels (r =-0.110, p =0.004) and also between serum Mg and urine protein level  (r =-0.127, p =0.018). Conclusion Mg depletion is a common problem in patients with DM. It affects both glycemic regulation and the occurence of complications. Also, poor glycemic regulation affects serum Mg levels. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):153-157.

  6. Comparison of the clinical characteristics of diabetes mellitus diagnosed using fasting plasma glucose and haemoglobin A1c: The 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sangmo; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Chul Sik; Lee, Seong Jin; Lee, Chang Beom; Ihm, Sung-Hee

    2016-03-01

    We compared the characteristics of a Korean adult population diagnosed with diabetes using only a fasting plasma glucose criterion or an HbA1c criterion. The single difference between these two groups was age. Further studies should be undertaken to clarify whether age-specific diagnostic criteria would be appropriate in Korean populations. PMID:26972956

  7. Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Inhibitor Increases Circulating Zinc-Α2-Glycoprotein Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xin; Wang, Xuemei; Li, Haopeng; Li, Ling; Zhang, Guohao; Yang, Mengliu; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Hua; Yang, Gangyi; Gao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    ZAG has recently been characterized as a potent metabolic regulator, but the effect of anti-diabetic agents on ZAG in humans remains unknown. Our aim was to study the effects of SGLT2 inhibitor on circulating ZAG and ADI in nT2DM. 162 subjects with nT2DM were treated by a placebo or DAPA. After 3-months of DAPA therapy, HbA1c, FBG, 2h-PBG, FFA, TG, blood pressure, BMI, WHR, body weight, FAT%, FINS, and HOMA-IR in T2DM patients decreased significantly, whereas HDL-C was significantly increased. Importantly, circulating ZAG and ADI levels in these patients were also significantly increased after DAPA therapy. Basal ZAG levels were associated with changes in BMI, FAT%, TC, HbA1c, HDL-C and ADI at post-treatment, whereas basal ADI levels were associated with changes in FAT%, TC, HbA1c, FFA and HDL-c. In vitro, DAPA treatment showed increased ZAG expression and secretion in HepG2 cells. When combined with a PPAR-γinhibitor GW9662, the effect of DAPA on ZAG was abrogated. These findings suggest that circulating ZAG can be regulated by DAPA, and DAPA promotes the expression and secretion of ZAG in the liver via the activation of PPAR-γ. The changes in ZAG induced by DAPA may play a physiologic role in enhancing insulin sensitivity. PMID:27611858

  8. Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Inhibitor Increases Circulating Zinc-Α2-Glycoprotein Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xin; Wang, Xuemei; Li, Haopeng; Li, Ling; Zhang, Guohao; Yang, Mengliu; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Hua; Yang, Gangyi; Gao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    ZAG has recently been characterized as a potent metabolic regulator, but the effect of anti-diabetic agents on ZAG in humans remains unknown. Our aim was to study the effects of SGLT2 inhibitor on circulating ZAG and ADI in nT2DM. 162 subjects with nT2DM were treated by a placebo or DAPA. After 3-months of DAPA therapy, HbA1c, FBG, 2h-PBG, FFA, TG, blood pressure, BMI, WHR, body weight, FAT%, FINS, and HOMA-IR in T2DM patients decreased significantly, whereas HDL-C was significantly increased. Importantly, circulating ZAG and ADI levels in these patients were also significantly increased after DAPA therapy. Basal ZAG levels were associated with changes in BMI, FAT%, TC, HbA1c, HDL-C and ADI at post-treatment, whereas basal ADI levels were associated with changes in FAT%, TC, HbA1c, FFA and HDL-c. In vitro, DAPA treatment showed increased ZAG expression and secretion in HepG2 cells. When combined with a PPAR-γinhibitor GW9662, the effect of DAPA on ZAG was abrogated. These findings suggest that circulating ZAG can be regulated by DAPA, and DAPA promotes the expression and secretion of ZAG in the liver via the activation of PPAR-γ. The changes in ZAG induced by DAPA may play a physiologic role in enhancing insulin sensitivity. PMID:27611858

  9. Effects of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic indices and hs-CRP levels in gestational diabetes mellitus patients: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yazdchi, Roya; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Sahhaf, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Vitamin D plays an important role in the etiology of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). This study evaluated the effect of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic indices and hs-C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in GDM patients. SUBJECTS/METHODS The study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Seventy-six pregnant women with GDM and gestational age between 24-28 weeks were assigned to receive four oral treatments consisting of 50,000 IU of vitamin D3 (n = 38) or placebo (n = 38) once every 2 weeks for 2 months. Fasting blood glucose (FG), insulin, HbA1c, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, lipid profile, hs-CRP, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured before and after treatment. Independent and paired t-tests were used to determine intra- and intergroup differences, respectively. ANCOVA was used to assess the effects of vitamin D supplementation on biochemical parameters. RESULTS Compared with the placebo group, in the vitamin D group, the serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D increased (19.15 vs. -0.40 ng/ml; P < 0.01) and that of FG (-4.72 vs. 5.27 mg/dl; P = 0.01) as well as HbA1c (-0.18% vs. 0.17%; P = 0.02) decreased. Improvements in the lipid profiles were observed in the vitamin D group, but without statistical significance. Significant increases in concentrations of hs-CRP, FG, HbA1c, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol were observed in the placebo group. No significant change in fasting insulin and HOMA-IR was observed in either group. CONCLUSIONS In GDM patients, vitamin D supplementation improved FG and HbA1c but had no significant effects on lipid profile or hs-CRP. PMID:27247730

  10. Cardiometabolic Risk Profiles in Patients With Impaired Fasting Glucose and/or Hemoglobin A1c 5.7% to 6.4%: Evidence for a Gradient According to Diagnostic Criteria: The PREDAPS Study.

    PubMed

    Giráldez-García, Carolina; Sangrós, F Javier; Díaz-Redondo, Alicia; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Serrano, Rosario; Díez, Javier; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; García-Soidán, F Javier; Artola, Sara; Ezkurra, Patxi; Carrillo, Lourdes; Millaruelo, J Manuel; Seguí, Mateu; Martínez-Candela, Juan; Muñoz, Pedro; Goday, Albert; Regidor, Enrique

    2015-11-01

    It has been suggested that the early detection of individuals with prediabetes can help prevent cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the current study was to examine the cardiometabolic risk profile in patients with prediabetes according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and/or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) criteria.Cross-sectional analysis from the 2022 patients in the Cohort study in Primary Health Care on the Evolution of Patients with Prediabetes (PREDAPS Study) was developed. Four glycemic status groups were defined based on American Diabetes Association criteria. Information about cardiovascular risk factors-body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glomerular filtration-and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed. Mean values of clinical and biochemical characteristics and frequencies of metabolic syndrome were estimated adjusting by age, sex, educational level, and family history of diabetes.A linear trend (P < 0.001) was observed in most of the cardiovascular risk factors and in all components of metabolic syndrome. Normoglycemic individuals had the best values, individuals with both criteria of prediabetes had the worst, and individuals with only one-HbA1c or FPG-criterion had an intermediate position. Metabolic syndrome was present in 15.0% (95% confidence interval: 12.6-17.4), 59.5% (54.0-64.9), 62.0% (56.0-68.0), and 76.2% (72.8-79.6) of individuals classified in normoglycemia, isolated HbA1c, isolated FPG, and both criteria groups, respectively.In conclusion, individuals with prediabetes, especially those with both criteria, have worse cardiometabolic risk profile than normoglycemic individuals. These results suggest the need to use both criteria in the clinical practice to identify those individuals with the highest cardiovascular risk, in order to offer them special attention with intensive lifestyle intervention programs. PMID:26554799

  11. Cardiometabolic Risk Profiles in Patients With Impaired Fasting Glucose and/or Hemoglobin A1c 5.7% to 6.4%: Evidence for a Gradient According to Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Giráldez-García, Carolina; Sangrós, F. Javier; Díaz-Redondo, Alicia; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Serrano, Rosario; Díez, Javier; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; García-Soidán, F. Javier; Artola, Sara; Ezkurra, Patxi; Carrillo, Lourdes; Millaruelo, J. Manuel; Seguí, Mateu; Martínez-Candela, Juan; Muñoz, Pedro; Goday, Albert; Regidor, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It has been suggested that the early detection of individuals with prediabetes can help prevent cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the current study was to examine the cardiometabolic risk profile in patients with prediabetes according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and/or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) criteria. Cross-sectional analysis from the 2022 patients in the Cohort study in Primary Health Care on the Evolution of Patients with Prediabetes (PREDAPS Study) was developed. Four glycemic status groups were defined based on American Diabetes Association criteria. Information about cardiovascular risk factors–body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glomerular filtration–and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed. Mean values of clinical and biochemical characteristics and frequencies of metabolic syndrome were estimated adjusting by age, sex, educational level, and family history of diabetes. A linear trend (P < 0.001) was observed in most of the cardiovascular risk factors and in all components of metabolic syndrome. Normoglycemic individuals had the best values, individuals with both criteria of prediabetes had the worst, and individuals with only one–HbA1c or FPG–criterion had an intermediate position. Metabolic syndrome was present in 15.0% (95% confidence interval: 12.6–17.4), 59.5% (54.0–64.9), 62.0% (56.0–68.0), and 76.2% (72.8–79.6) of individuals classified in normoglycemia, isolated HbA1c, isolated FPG, and both criteria groups, respectively. In conclusion, individuals with prediabetes, especially those with both criteria, have worse cardiometabolic risk profile than normoglycemic individuals. These results suggest the need to use both criteria in the clinical practice to identify those individuals with the highest cardiovascular risk, in order to offer them special attention with intensive lifestyle intervention programs. PMID:26554799

  12. Prostacyclin receptor expression on platelets of humans with type 2 diabetes is inversely correlated with hemoglobin A1c levels.

    PubMed

    Knebel, Stephanie M; Sprague, Randy S; Stephenson, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate platelet aggregation can result in thrombosis and tissue ischemia. When compared to healthy human platelets, those of humans with type 2 diabetes (DM2) exhibit increased aggregation when stimulated. Activation of the platelet prostacyclin receptor (IPR) results in cAMP accumulation and inhibition of platelet aggregation. We hypothesized that DM2 platelets express decreased IPR when compared to platelets of healthy humans, resulting in decreased IPR agonist-induced cAMP accumulation. We measured IPR expression with radioligand binding of [(3)H]-iloprost, a stable prostacyclin analog, and with Western blotting of the IPR protein. Iloprost-stimulated platelet cAMP levels were used to identify the functional response to IPR activation. IPR binding, expression of the IPR protein and the levels of cAMP in platelets incubated with iloprost were significantly decreased in DM2 platelets when compared to platelets of healthy humans. IPR expression decreased in platelets as glycemic control of the subjects worsened, as indicated by increased hemoglobin A1c levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that reduced IPR expression in DM2 platelets may contribute to platelet hyperactivity in humans with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25617843

  13. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Parathyroid Hormone Levels Are Independently Associated with the Hemoglobin A1c Level of Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients: The Dong-Gu Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Su; Rhee, Jung-Ae; Nam, Hae-Sung; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Park, Kyeong-Soo; Kim, Hee Nam; Shin, Min-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In type 2 diabetic patients, the relationships between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels, and glycemic control, remain unclear. We evaluated associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and hemoglobin A1c levels after adjusting for other covariates, including log transformed 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and log transformed parathyroid hormone levels, in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. In total, 1,175 patients with type 2 diabetes were selected from 8,857 individuals who completed the baseline survey of the Dong-gu study, conducted in Korea from 2007 to 2010. After adjusting for other covariates, we found that the mean hemoglobin A1c level was inversely associated with the 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (Q1: 7.47% [7.30–7.63], Q2: 7.25% [7.09–7.40], Q3: 7.17% [7.02–7.32], Q4: 7.19% [7.02–7.35]; p for trend = 0.021, p for between groups = 0.050) and the parathyroid hormone level (Q1: 7.35% [7.19–7.51], Q2: 7.34% [7.19–7.50], Q3: 7.28% [7.13–7.43], Q4: 7.09% [6.94–7.24]; p for trend = 0.022, p for between groups = 0.048). However, the mean fasting glucose level was not associated with either the 25-hydroxyvitamin D or parathyroid hormone level. In conclusion, inverse associations were evident between hemoglobin A1c, 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. The associations remained significant after adjusting for other covariates, including the log transformed 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and log transformed parathyroid hormone levels. PMID:27362844

  14. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Parathyroid Hormone Levels Are Independently Associated with the Hemoglobin A1c Level of Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients: The Dong-Gu Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Woo; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Lee, Young-Hoon; Ryu, So-Yeon; Choi, Jin-Su; Rhee, Jung-Ae; Nam, Hae-Sung; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Park, Kyeong-Soo; Kim, Hee Nam; Shin, Min-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In type 2 diabetic patients, the relationships between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels, and glycemic control, remain unclear. We evaluated associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and hemoglobin A1c levels after adjusting for other covariates, including log transformed 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and log transformed parathyroid hormone levels, in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. In total, 1,175 patients with type 2 diabetes were selected from 8,857 individuals who completed the baseline survey of the Dong-gu study, conducted in Korea from 2007 to 2010. After adjusting for other covariates, we found that the mean hemoglobin A1c level was inversely associated with the 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (Q1: 7.47% [7.30-7.63], Q2: 7.25% [7.09-7.40], Q3: 7.17% [7.02-7.32], Q4: 7.19% [7.02-7.35]; p for trend = 0.021, p for between groups = 0.050) and the parathyroid hormone level (Q1: 7.35% [7.19-7.51], Q2: 7.34% [7.19-7.50], Q3: 7.28% [7.13-7.43], Q4: 7.09% [6.94-7.24]; p for trend = 0.022, p for between groups = 0.048). However, the mean fasting glucose level was not associated with either the 25-hydroxyvitamin D or parathyroid hormone level. In conclusion, inverse associations were evident between hemoglobin A1c, 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. The associations remained significant after adjusting for other covariates, including the log transformed 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and log transformed parathyroid hormone levels. PMID:27362844

  15. Contributions of Basal and Postprandial Hyperglycemia Over a Wide Range of A1C Levels Before and After Treatment Intensification in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Matthew; Umpierrez, Guillermo; DiGenio, Andres; Zhou, Rong; Rosenstock, Julio

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the relative contributions of basal hyperglycemia (BHG) versus postprandial hyperglycemia (PPHG) before and after treatment intensification in patients with glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1C) >7.0% while on prior oral therapy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Self-measured, plasma-referenced glucose profiles and A1C values were evaluated from participants in six studies comparing systematically titrated insulin glargine with an alternative regimen (adding basal, premixed, or prandial insulin, or increasing oral agents). Hyperglycemic exposure (>100 mg/dL [5.6 mmol/L]) as a result of BHG versus PPHG was calculated. RESULTS On prior oral therapy, 1,699 participants (mean age 59 years, diabetes duration 9 years) had mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG) of 194 mg/dL (10.8 mmol/L), and mean A1C was 8.7%. BHG contributed an average of 76–80% to hyperglycemia over the observed range of baseline A1C levels. Adding basal insulin for 24 or 28 weeks lowered mean FPG to 117 mg/dL (6.5 mmol/L), A1C to 7.0%, and BHG contribution to 32–41%. Alternative regimens reduced FPG to 146 mg/dL (8.1 mmol/L), A1C to 7.1%, and the contribution of BHG to 64–71%. BHG contributions for patients with A1C averaging 7.6–7.7% were 76% at baseline and 34 and 68% after adding basal insulin or other therapies, respectively. CONCLUSIONS When A1C is >7.0% despite oral therapy, BHG routinely dominates exposure. Intensified therapy reduces A1C and changes this relationship, but BHG amenable to further intervention still accounts for one-third of total hyperglycemia after basal insulin treatment and two-thirds after alternative methods. PMID:22028279

  16. Interference with hemoglobin A(1C) determination by the hemoglobin variant Shelby.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, Richard T; Griffin, Terrance L; Mehta, Shruti P; Herold, David A; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2007-09-01

    Hemoglobin variant carrier status was found in a 46-year-old African American man following detection of a falsely elevated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by ionexchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, VARIANT A1c, Bio-Rad Laboratories, Hercules, CA). Additional analysis of the hemoglobin variant using the Beta Thal Short program (Bio-Rad) revealed an unknown peak with a retention time of 4.84 minutes and a proportion of 26.3%. No mass shift in alpha-globin or beta-globin proteins was observed by mass spectrometry. DNA sequencing revealed a missense mutation in 1 beta-globin allele corresponding to the hemoglobin Shelby trait. The patient was asymptomatic with a normal hemoglobin value of 13.6 g/dL (136 g/L) but had increased target cells on a peripheral blood smear. An alternative method for HbA1c determination using boronate-affinity HPLC provided a value of 3.9% (0.04; reference range, 4.0%-6.9% [0.04-0.07]), more consistent with the patient's recent blood glucose values in the normal range. PMID:17709318

  17. Description of the phenotypes of 63 heterozygous, homozygous and compound heterozygous patients carrying the Hb Groene Hart [α119(H2)Pro→Ser; HBA1: c.358C>T] variant.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Francina, Alain

    2014-01-01

    We here report the phenotypes and genotypes of 63 patients of North African origin, carriers of Hb Groene Hart [Hb GH, α119(H2)Pro → Ser; HBA1: c.358C>T], an α(+)-thalassemia (α(+)-thal) hemoglobin (Hb) variant. Fifty patients were heterozygous, five were homozygous and eight also carried the common -α(3.7) (rightward) deletion in compound heterozygosity. The expression of the α(GH)-globin chain is increased in the following order: heterozygous, compound heterozygous and homozygous. Parallel significant changes of mean corpuscular Hb (MCH) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were also observed. Our large cohort of Hb GH carriers could have been obtained by the systematic realization of globin chain separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) in our routine Hb testing. PMID:24111644

  18. Parsimonious model for blood glucose level monitoring in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Ma, Yan Fen; Wen, Jing Xiao; DU, Yan Fang; Li, Chun Lin; Li, Guang Wei

    2014-07-01

    To establish the parsimonious model for blood glucose monitoring in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving oral hypoglycemic agent treatment. One hundred and fifty-nine adult Chinese type 2 diabetes patients were randomized to receive rapid-acting or sustained-release gliclazide therapy for 12 weeks. Their blood glucose levels were measured at 10 time points in a 24 h period before and after treatment, and the 24 h mean blood glucose levels were measured. Contribution of blood glucose levels to the mean blood glucose level and HbA1c was assessed by multiple regression analysis. The correlation coefficients of blood glucose level measured at 10 time points to the daily MBG were 0.58-0.74 and 0.59-0.79, respectively, before and after treatment (P<0.0001). The multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the blood glucose levels measured at 6 of the 10 time points could explain 95% and 97% of the changes in MBG before and after treatment. The three blood glucose levels, which were measured at fasting, 2 h after breakfast and before dinner, of the 10 time points could explain 84% and 86% of the changes in MBG before and after treatment, but could only explain 36% and 26% of the changes in HbA1c before and after treatment, and they had a poorer correlation with the HbA1c than with the 24 h MBG. The blood glucose levels measured at fasting, 2 h after breakfast and before dinner truly reflected the change 24 h blood glucose level, suggesting that they are appropriate for the self-monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetes patients receiving oral anti-diabetes therapy. PMID:25073916

  19. Serum Chromium Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients and Its Association with Glycaemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, Senthil; Nair, Lal Devayanivasudevan; Karuthodiyil, Rajendran; Vijayarajan, Nikhilan; Gnanasekar, Rajiv; Kapil, Vivian V.; Mohamed, Azeem S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chromium is an essential micronutrient which is required for the normal functioning of insulin and regulation of blood sugar levels. It acts as a vital antioxidant for maintaining insulin homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the free radical production is increased and levels of antioxidants like chromium, vanadium, selenium and manganese are reduced. There have been previous studies to suggest that low serum levels of chromium are associated with poorer glycaemic control. Aim To study the level of serum chromium in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its association with glycaemic control. Materials and Methods Serum chromium concentration was determined by using inductively coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectophotometry in 42 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients without any pre-existing complications. They were divided into 2 groups – well controlled (HbA1c ≤7.0%) and uncontrolled groups (HbA1c >7.0%). Results Mean serum chromium concentration measured in uncontrolled type 2 diabetic patients was significantly lower (0.065 ± 0.03 mcg/L vs 0.103 ± 0.04 mcg/L, p< 0.05). There was a statistically significant inverse linear correlation of the HbA1c values and the serum chromium concentration (r= -0.6514, p < 0.0001). There was also a decrease in chromium levels across both the groups with advancing age and the decrease being significant beyond 40 years of age (p<0.05). Conclusion The results of our study describes the relationship between serum chromium levels and control of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Significant reduction in chromium levels are probable indicators of metabolic response to oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further large scale studies relating serum chromium and type 2 diabetes mellitus may help to understand more about the exact relationship. PMID:26676175

  20. A1C Test and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... laboratory tests. How does the A1C relate to estimated average glucose? Estimated average glucose (eAG) is calculated from the A1C. ... levels have the A1C test twice a year. Estimated average glucose (eAG) is calculated from the A1C ...

  1. Changes in the Levels of Cytokines in Both Diabetic/Non-Diabetic Type I Children Living in a Moderate Altitude Area in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Adnan A.; Alghamdi, Hamed; Alswat, Hameed; Edrees, Burhan M.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Nasr, Amre

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Allam, Gamal, Adnan A. Alsulaimani, Hamed Alghamdi, Hameed Alswat, Burhan M. Edrees, Iftikhar Ahmad, and Amre Nasr. Changes in the levels of cytokines in both diabetic/non-diabetic type I children living in a moderate altitude area in Saudi Arabia. High Alt Med Biol 15:380–387, 2014.—The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible effects of living in moderate altitude area on pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines profile (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-10, and IL-4) among type I diabetic (T1D) and non- T1D children compared with those living at sea level area. A prospective clinical study was carried out at pediatric outpatient endocrine clinics in Taif City, which is a moderate altitude area in Saudi Arabia, that stands about 1800–2000 meters above sea-level; and in Mecca City, which is a sea level area, that lies in the middle west of Saudi Arabia. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) percentage was estimated and cytokine measurements were performed in sera by flow cytometry using Cytometric Bead Array (CBA) technology. In this study we included 600 children who were consecutively enrolled (sex and age were matched). The HbA1c was statistically significantly higher in children living in moderate altitude compared to those living at sea level (overall p<0.001). Furthermore, T1D patients had higher values of serum cytokine levels (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-4, and IL-10) in comparison to non-T1D control group (overall p<0.001). In conclusion, the data of the present study clearly showed that in both T1D and non-T1D children, moderate altitude-natives expressed high HbA1c and both pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Type I diabetic children living in moderate altitude or at sea level showed elevated levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-4, and IL-10 than control subjects. Glycemic control in non-diabetic children was affected by living in moderate altitude, however, HbA1c significantly increased in diabetic children living in moderate altitude

  2. Comprehensive investigation of postmortem glucose levels in blood and body fluids with regard to the cause of death in forensic autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Michiue, Tomomi; Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Ikeda, Sayuko; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    The serum glucose level is regulated within a narrow range by multiple factors under physiological conditions, but is greatly modified in the death process and after death. The present study comprehensively investigated glucose levels in blood and body fluids, including pericardial fluid (PCF), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and vitreous humor, reviewing forensic autopsy cases (n=672). Right heart blood glucose level was often higher than at other sites, and the CSF glucose level was the lowest, showing greater dissociation in acute/subacute death cases. The glucose level was higher in the diabetic (high HbA1c) than in the non-diabetic (low HbA1c) group at each site (p<0.01-0.0001). Fatal diabetic ketoacidosis cases had evidently high glucose levels at each site; whereas in the non-diabetic group, blood glucose level was higher in fatal alcohol abuse, saltwater drowning, electrocution, cerebrovascular disease and sudden cardiac death due to ischemic heart disease. Fatal methamphetamine (MA) abuse, sepsis, malnutrition (starvation) and hypoglycemia due to antidiabetics showed markedly lower blood glucose levels. Ketones in bilateral cardiac blood and PCF were increased in diabetic ketoacidosis and fatal alcohol abuse as well as in most cases of hyperthermia (heatstroke), hypothermia (cold exposure) and malnutrition. These findings suggest that combined analysis of glucose, HbA1c and ketones in blood and body fluids is useful to investigate not only fatal diabetic metabolic disorders but also death processes due to other causes, including alcohol and MA abuse, as well as thermal disorders, sepsis and malnutrition. PMID:26593993

  3. Association of Vitamin D Levels with Type 2 Diabetes in Older Working Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mauss, Daniel; Jarczok, Marc N.; Hoffmann, Kristina; Thomas, G. Neil; Fischer, Joachim E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increasing evidence suggests that vitamin D plays a role in the development of chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes (DM). Aim of the study was to explore the association of vitamin D levels with prevalent DM in a sample of predominantly healthy working adults older than 45 years. METHODS: This cross-sectional study (2009-2011) involved 1821 employees of a German engineering company (83.1% male, mean age 51.9 ±5.6 years). Sociodemographics and medical history were assessed by self-report. Clinical characteristics were obtained including blood samples to determine vitamin D levels and diabetes status by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Vitamin D was grouped into one of four categories (<10 ng/ml, 10-19.9 ng/ml, 20-29.9 ng/ml, ≥30 ng/ml). Bivariate associations between vitamin D categories and a composite indicator for DM (FPG ≥126 mg/dl or HbA1c ≥6.5% or self-reported diagnosis) were calculated; multivariable models tested this association further, controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: Severe vitamin D deficiency (<10 ng/ml) was associated with increasing FPG (β 3.13; 95%CI: 0.78, 5.47; p≤0.01) and HbA1c (β 0.15; 95%CI: 0.08, 0.23; p≤0.001) values in adjusted linear regression models. In multivariable models, severe vitamin D deficiency was associated with DM (OR 2.55; 95%CI 1.16, 5.62; p≤0.05) after controlling for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with prevalent DM in working older adults. The findings highlight that the workplace may be a unique location for conducting large-scale health screening to identify those at risk of DM using vitamin D. PMID:26005370

  4. Daily walking decreases casual glucose level among pregnant women in the second trimester.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ayako; Matsuzaki, Masayo; Kusaka, Momoko; Shiraishi, Mie; Haruna, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between carbohydrate metabolism and the number of steps walked daily, as evaluated by accelerometer, among Japanese women in the second trimester of pregnancy. This longitudinal study was conducted at a university hospital in Tokyo, Japan, from August 2012 to January 2013. Healthy pregnant women at 14 to 18 gestational weeks were recruited. Participants wore accelerometers on the waist for 4 weeks. Casual glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were compared between two groups based on whether participants habitually walked ≥ 6,000 steps/day or < 6,000 steps/day. Fifty-one pregnant women were included in the present study; data from 35 were analyzed. There were 22 women in the group that habitually walked ≥ 6,000 steps/day and 13 in the group habitually walking < 6,000 steps/day. Although the median serum casual glucose level at the end of the investigation was 90.0 mg/dL in the group walking < 6,000 steps/day, the level in the group walking ≥ 6000 steps/day was 83.5 mg/dL (p = 0.01). HbA1c levels were not significantly different between the two groups. Our results suggest that walking as a daily habitual physical activity is effective for controlling casual glucose levels in the second trimester of pregnancy. PMID:27594297

  5. Correlation of hemoglobin A1C level with surgical outcomes: Can tight perioperative glucose control reduce infection and cardiac events?

    PubMed

    Shaw, Palma; Saleem, Taimur; Gahtan, Vivian

    2014-12-01

    "Optimal" control of serum glucose levels is an important principle in the successful management of diabetes mellitus. Conversely, poorly controlled serum glucose levels are associated with negative sequelae, including accelerated progression of cardiovascular disease, increased mortality, and increased perioperative complications. The importance of glycemic control as a part of appropriate perioperative management is reviewed and target values are recommended. PMID:26073825

  6. Chlorophytum borivilianum Root Extract Maintains near Normal Blood Glucose, Insulin and Lipid Profile Levels and Prevents Oxidative Stress in the Pancreas of Streptozotocin-Induced Adult Male Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Giribabu, Nelli; Kumar, Kilari Eswar; Rekha, Somesula Swapna; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    The effect of C. borivilianum root on blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbAIc), insulin and lipid profile levels in diabetes mellitus are not fully understood. This study therefore investigated the effect of C. borivilianum root on the above parameters and oxidative stress of the pancreas in diabetes. Methods: C. borivilianum root aqueous extract (250 and 500 mg/kg/day) was administered to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced male diabetic rats for 28 days. Body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipid profile levels and glucose homeostasis indices were determined. Histopathological changes and oxidative stress parameters i.e. lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant enzymes activity levels of the pancreas were investigated. Results: C. borivilianum root extract treatment to diabetic rats maintained near normal body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile and insulin levels with higher HOMA-β cell functioning index, number of Islets/pancreas, number of β-cells/Islets however with lower HOMA-insulin resistance (IR) index as compared to non-treated diabetic rats. Negative correlations between serum insulin and blood glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) levels were observed. C. borivilianum root extract administration prevented the increase in lipid peroxidation and the decrease in activity levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) with mild histopathological changes in the pancreas of diabetic rats. Conclusions: C. borivilianum root maintains near normal levels of these metabolites and prevented oxidative stress-induced damage to the pancreas in diabetes. PMID:25249786

  7. Effect of scaling and root planing on serum interleukin-10 levels and glycemic control in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Anirudh Balakrishna; Thakur, Srinath; Muddapur, Mahadevayya Veerayya

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Chronic periodontal disease (CPD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) share common pathogenic pathways involving the cytokine network resulting in increased susceptibility to both diseases, leading to increased inflammatory destruction, insulin resistance, and poor glycemic control. Periodontal treatment may improve glycemic control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scaling and root planing (SRP) of T2DM patients with CPD on hyperglycemia and the levels of serum interleukin-10 (IL-10). Materials and Methods: Forty-five subjects were divided into three groups comprising 15 subjects each as Group 1 (healthy controls), Group 2 (CPD patients), and Group 3 (T2DM patients with CPD). Plaque index, gingival index (GI), probing pocket depths (PPD), clinical attachment loss (AL), bleeding on probing (BoP), random blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), and serum IL-10 were measured at baseline; SRP was performed on Groups 2 and 3 and the selected parameters recorded again at 6 months. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.05) differences were observed in the variables at baseline and 6 months after SRP between the three groups using one-way ANOVA. The paired samples t-test for PPD and AL in Group 3 was statistically significant. Group 3 revealed positive correlations between PPD and HbA1C, BoP and IL-10, respectively, at 6 months and a predictable association of HbA1C with PPD and GI, and IL-10 levels with BoP, respectively, at 6 months. Conclusion: Scaling and root planing is effective in reducing blood glucose levels in T2DM patient with pocket depths and effective in elevating systemic IL-10 levels in CPD patients and CPD patients with T2DM. PMID:26015670

  8. Adding glimepiride to current insulin therapy increases high-molecular weight adiponectin levels to improve glycemic control in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To observe the efficacy and safety of adding glimepiride to established insulin therapy in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) and to assess the relationship of changes in the serum high-molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels and glycemic control after glimepiride treatment. Methods Fifty-six subjects with poorly controlled insulin-treated T2D were randomly assigned to either the glimepiride-added group (the group A, n = 29) or the insulin-increasing group (the group B, n = 27) while continuing current insulin-based therapy. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) value, daily insulin dose, body weight, waist circumference, plasma lipid concentration, serum HMW adiponectin level and the number of hypoglycemic events were evaluated before and after treatment. Results At the end of study, insulin doses were significantly reduced, and the mean HbA1c, fasting blood glucose (FBG) and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose (P2BG) were improved greater in the group A compared with the group B. The serum HMW adiponectin levels were significantly increased in the group A compared with the group B. Most importantly, we found that changes in HbA1c were inversely correlated with changes in serum HMW adiponectin in the group A (r = −0.452, p = 0.02). Conclusions Adding glimepiride to current insulin treatment led to better improvement in glycemic control with a significant smaller daily insulin dose, and the increases in the serum HMW adiponectin levels may directly contribute to improvement glycemic control. PMID:24650537

  9. Effects of bromocriptine mesylate on homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Niafar, Mitra; Pourafkari, Leili; Shahsavarinia, Kavus; Milanchian, Nushin; Niafar, Farhad; Nader, Nader D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Quick release bromocriptine (BROM-QR), currently approved for glycemic control, reduces the risk of cardiovascular events in adults with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study evaluates the effect of BROM-QR on homocysteine (HOMC) and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), the biochemical markers of coronary atherosclerosis/inflammation, in patients with uncontrolled T2DM. Methods: In this non-randomized, before-and-after clinical trial, patients with uncontrolled T2DM on stable doses of two oral hypoglycemic agents received BROM-QR for 6 months. The change in serum concentrations of HOMC was the primary endpoint. Anthropometric measurements such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were measured at the baseline and at the completion of treatment along with fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, total cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine and hs-CRP. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with changes in the levels of HOMC. Results: In 64 patients (46 completed 6 months of treatment), age was 55±7 years and the duration of T2DM was 8.0 ± 4.4 years. On enrollment, mean HbA1c, FPG, hs-CRP and HOMC levels were 9.0± 1.3 percent, 184 ± 42 mg/dL, 3.8± 3.4 mg/dl and 10.8 ± 6.2 micromole/L; respectively. Mean decrease of 0.7 ± 1.1 percent for HbA1c (P = 0.001) and 22 ± 44 mg/dL for FPG was observed (P = 0.002). HOMC levels decreased to 8.5 ± 5.2 micromole/L (P = 0.011) while hs-CRP levels remained unchanged at 3.7 ± 2.9 mg/dL (P = 0.835). Conclusion: While HOMC and HbA1c levels decreased significantly after 6 months of treatment with BROM-QR in patients with T2DM, serum levels of hs-CRP, total cholesterol and triglyceride did not significantly change. PMID:27069561

  10. Short-Term Stability in Refractive Status Despite Large Fluctuations in Glucose Levels in Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Huntjens, Byki; Charman, W. Neil; Workman, Helena; Hosking, Sarah L.; O’Donnell, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This work investigates how short-term changes in blood glucose concentration affect the refractive components of the diabetic eye in patients with long-term Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Methods Blood glucose concentration, refractive error components (mean spherical equivalent MSE, J0, J45), central corneal thickness (CCT), anterior chamber depth (ACD), crystalline lens thickness (LT), axial length (AL) and ocular aberrations were monitored at two-hourly intervals over a 12-hour period in: 20 T1DM patients (mean age ± SD) 38±14 years, baseline HbA1c 8.6±1.9%; 21 T2DM patients (mean age ± SD) 56±11 years, HbA1c 7.5±1.8%; and in 20 control subjects (mean age ± SD) 49±23 years, HbA1c 5.5±0.5%. The refractive and biometric results were compared with the corresponding changes in blood glucose concentration. Results Blood glucose concentration at different times was found to vary significantly within (p<0.0005) and between groups (p<0.0005). However, the refractive error components and ocular aberrations were not found to alter significantly over the day in either the diabetic patients or the control subjects (p>0.05). Minor changes of marginal statistical or optical significance were observed in some biometric parameters. Similarly there were some marginally significant differences between the baseline biometric parameters of well-controlled and poorly-controlled diabetic subjects. Conclusion This work suggests that normal, short-term fluctuations (of up to about 6 mM/l on a timescale of a few hours) in the blood glucose levels of diabetics are not usually associated with acute changes in refractive error or ocular wavefront aberrations. It is therefore possible that factors other than refractive error fluctuations are sometimes responsible for the transient visual problems often reported by diabetic patients. PMID:23285232

  11. The Effect of Scaling and Root Planing on Glycaemic Control, Periodontal Status and Gingival Crevicular Fluid TNF-α Levels in an Indian Population- To Reveal the Ambivalent Link

    PubMed Central

    A, Suchetha; P, Lakshmi; N, Sapna; S M, Apoorva; Bhat, Divya; Mundinamane, Darshan B

    2014-01-01

    Context: Periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus(DM) share a two - way relationship. It can be hypothesized that successful management of periodontal infection in diabetes will lead not only to reduction of local signs and symptoms of the disease, but also to better control of glucose metabolism. Aims: To monitor the effect of Scaling and Root planing (SRP) on glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus by estimating the HbA1c and GCF TNF-α levels. Settings and Design: This Interventional clinicobiochemical study was carried out over a period of 6 months from December 2010-May 2011 in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: Fifteen well-controlled, 15 moderately controlled and 15 poorly controlled diabetic subjects were enrolled in this study. All participants were subjected to non-surgical periodontal (SRP) therapy. GCF sampling and clinical periodontal parameters assessment were done at baseline and 3 months post-therapy. TNF-α levels in GCF were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at baseline and 3 months post therapy. The improvement in glycaemic control was assessed using HbA1c levels at 3 months reevaluation. Statistical analysis: The data obtained were statistically analysed using Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney test and Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. Results: Following periodontal treatment, all patients demon- strated a significant improvement in periodontal status. A reduction in TNF-α level and the HbA1c values were also observed. Conclusion: The result indicates that SRP is effective in improving metabolic control in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients possibly through the reduction of TNF-α which in turn might improve the insulin resistance. PMID:25584310

  12. Led Astray by Hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jean; Diesburg-Stanwood, Amy; Bodor, Geza; Rasouli, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (A1c) is used frequently to diagnose and treat diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is important be aware of factors that may interfere with the accuracy of A1c measurements. This is a case of a rare hemoglobin variant that falsely elevated a nondiabetic patient’s A1c level and led to a misdiagnosis of diabetes. A 67-year-old male presented to endocrine clinic for further management after he was diagnosed with diabetes based on an elevated A1c of 10.7%, which is approximately equivalent to an average blood glucose of 260 mg/dL. Multiple repeat A1c levels remained >10%, but his home fasting and random glucose monitoring ranged from 92 to 130 mg/dL. Hemoglobin electrophoresis and subsequent genetic analysis diagnosed the patient with hemoglobin Wayne, a rare hemoglobin variant. This variant falsely elevates A1c levels when A1c is measured using cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. When the boronate affinity method was applied instead, the patient’s A1c level was actually 4.7%. Though hemoglobin Wayne is clinically silent, this patient was erroneously diagnosed with diabetes and started on an antiglycemic medication. Due to this misdiagnosis, the patient was at risk of escalation in his “diabetes management” and hypoglycemia. Therefore, it is important that providers are aware of factors that may result in hemoglobin A1c inaccuracy including hemoglobin variants. PMID:26848480

  13. Weight-HbA1c-insulin-glucose model for describing disease progression of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choy, S; Kjellsson, M C; Karlsson, M O; de Winter, W

    2016-01-01

    A previous semi-mechanistic model described changes in fasting serum insulin (FSI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in patients with type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) by modeling insulin sensitivity and β-cell function. It was later suggested that change in body weight could affect insulin sensitivity, which this study evaluated in a population model to describe the disease progression of T2DM. Nonlinear mixed effects modeling was performed on data from 181 obese patients with newly diagnosed T2DM managed with diet and exercise for 67 weeks. Baseline β-cell function and insulin sensitivity were 61% and 25% of normal, respectively. Management with diet and exercise (mean change in body weight = -4.1 kg) was associated with an increase of insulin sensitivity (30.1%) at the end of the study. Changes in insulin sensitivity were associated with a decrease of FPG (range, 7.8-7.3 mmol/L) and HbA1c (6.7-6.4%). Weight change as an effector on insulin sensitivity was successfully evaluated in a semi-mechanistic population model. PMID:26844011

  14. Increased Glycated Hemoglobin Level is Associated With SYNTAX Score II in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Karakoyun, Süleyman; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Rencüzoğulları, İbrahim; Karabağ, Yavuz; Altıntaş, Bernas; Topçu, Selim; Lazoğlu, Zakir; Tanboğa, İbrahim Halil; Sevimli, Serdar

    2016-04-01

    SYNTAX score II (SS II) uses 2 anatomical and 6 clinical variables for the prediction of mortality after coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous coronary intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), and SYNTAX Score (SS) and SS II in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease (CAD). We enrolled 215 consecutive diabetic patients with stable angina pectoris who underwent coronary angiography. The SS II was calculated using a nomogram that was based on the findings of a previous study. There was a moderate correlation between HbA1c and SS (r = .396, P < .001), but there was a good correlation between HbA1c and SS II (r = .535, P < .001). There was also a weak correlation between FBG (r = .270, P = .001), PPG (r = .177, P = .027), and SS, but there was a weak-moderate correlation between FBG (r = .341, P < .001), PPG (r = .256, P = .001), and SS II. A better correlation has been detected between HbA1c and SS II compared to the correlation between HbA1c and SS. PMID:26101367

  15. Relationship of Caffeine with Adiponectin and Blood Sugar Levels in Subjects with and without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bhaktha, Geetha; Mayya, Shreemathi; Shantaram, Manjula

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coffee though not usually thought of as healthy food but can be treated as one of the beneficial drink. Many researchers have found strong evidence that coffee reduces the risk of several serious ailments, including diabetes, heart disease, cirrhosis of the liver, etc. The long term beneficial effect of coffee on diabetes is now understood to be more influential and obliging. Materials and Methods: This study comprised 220 healthy subjects of which 143 consumed coffee and 77 did not. These were matched with 90 diabetic subjects. Among the 90 diabetics, 48 consumed coffee and 42 did not consume coffee. Results: The mean adiponectin value was significantly higher in coffee consumed normal and diabetic subjects than the subjects who did not consume coffee. The decrease in fasting blood sugar and HbA1c values were also observed in normal and diabetic subjects who consumed coffee than the other groups who did not consume coffee. Significant difference (p<0.05) in mean FBG, PPBS, HbA1c and adiponectin were observed between coffee consumed and no coffee consumed groups. Conclusion: The long term use of caffeine is more efficient on blood sugar and adiponectin levels, which needed in the prevention of complications in diabetic subjects. PMID:25737971

  16. Serum Oxidized LDL Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Retinopathy in Mthatha Region of the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is a powerful natural prooxidant derived from native LDL by cell-mediated oxidation. Such oxidation occurs more easily in glycated LDL as observed in diabetes mellitus. We evaluated and compared selected biomarkers of oxidative stress and total antioxidant (TAO) levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with and without retinopathy in the Mthatha region of the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. The participants totaled to 140 and this number comprised 98 diabetic patients on treatment, stratified by diabetes (54) and diabetes with retinopathy (44). Forty-two nondiabetic healthy controls made up the 140. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profile, serum ox-LDL, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and TAO levels were measured. A statistically significant increase in FPG, HbA1c, TBARS, and ox-LDL and a significant decrease in TAO levels were seen in T2DM patients with retinopathy as compared to controls. A significant negative correlation was observed between TAO and ox-LDL levels in the diabetic group. In multiple linear regression analyses, duration of diabetes, triglyceride, TAO, and LDL cholesterol were found to be significantly associated with ox-LDL. In multiple logistic regression analyses, ox-LDL [OR 1.02 (1.01–1.03), P = 0.005] was the only risk factor and was significantly associated with the presence of retinopathy. PMID:27433285

  17. Serum electrolyte levels in relation to macrovascular complications in Chinese patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of diabetes in China is increasing rapidly. However, scarce data are available on serum electrolyte levels in Chinese adults with diabetes, especially in those with cardiovascular complications. This study measured serum electrolyte levels and examined their relationship with macrovascular complications in Chinese adults with diabetes. Methods The three gender- and age-matched groups were enrolled into this analysis, which were 1,170 subjects with normal glucose regulation (NGR), 389 with impaired glucose regulation (IGR) and 343 with diabetes. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-hour post-load plasma glucose (2hPG), glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and serum electrolyte levels were measured. Data collection included ankle brachial index results. Results Serum sodium and magnesium levels in the diabetes group were significantly decreased compared to the NGR group (sodium: 141.0 ± 2.4 vs. 142.1 ± 2.0 mmol/l; magnesium: 0.88 ± 0.08 vs. 0.91 ± 0.07 mmol/l, all P < 0.01), while the serum calcium level was significantly increased (2.36 ± 0.11 vs. 2.33 ± 0.09 mmol/l, P < 0.01). Multiple linear regression showed that serum sodium and magnesium levels in the diabetes group were negatively correlated with FPG, 2hPG and HbA1c (sodium: Std β = −0.35, -0.19, -0.25; magnesium: Std β = −0.29, -0.17, -0.34, all P < 0.01), while the serum calcium level was positively correlated with HbA1c (Std β = 0.17, P < 0.05). In diabetic subjects, serum sodium, magnesium and potassium levels were decreased in the subjects with the elevation of estimated glomerular filtration rates (P < 0.05). ANCOVA analysis suggested that serum magnesium level in subjects with diabetic macrovascular complications was significantly decreased compared with diabetic subjects without macrovascular complications after the effect of some possible confounding being removed (P < 0.05). Conclusions Serum sodium and

  18. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    MedlinePlus

    ... the person's average blood sugar levels over that time. Why It's Done Doctors use the hemoglobin A1c test to determine if your child's diabetes management plan needs to be adjusted. Typically the test ...

  19. Cadmium Level, Glycemic Control, and Indices of Renal Function in Treated Type II Diabetics: Implications for Polluted Environments

    PubMed Central

    Anetor, John I.; Uche, Chukwuemelie Z.; Ayita, Emmanuel B.; Adedapo, Solomon K.; Adeleye, Jokotade O.; Anetor, Gloria O.; Akinlade, Sola K.

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has recently emerged as a major concern not only in environmental toxicology but also in metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and its complications. Conflicting data aside, these studies have not been examined in a clinical population undergoing management as well as possible modulation by the prominent metabolic antagonist of Cd such as zinc (Zn). This study examined the relationship between cadmium levels, glycemic control, and renal pathology in established type II diabetic patients with focus on populations exposed to modern environmental health hazards (MEHHs). Sixty-five participants, consisting of 45 type-2 diabetics and 20 non-diabetics were enrolled for the study, mean age 61.51 ± 5.27 years. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was used to classify them into three sub-groups: (A) good glycemic control (44.4%), (B) fair glycemic control (24.4%), and (C) poor glycemic control (31.1%). Plasma levels of glucose, Cd, Zn, HbA1c, creatinine, urinary creatinine, microalbuminuria, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were determined in all participants using standard methods. Fasting plasma glucose was higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics (p = 0.000) as well as Zn level, though not significantly. Interestingly, Cd level, Cd/Zn ratio, and urinary creatinine were significantly lower in diabetics than in non-diabetics. The group with poor glycemic control (C) had significantly higher Cd level compared to the one with good glycemic control (group A). The renal function revealed that microalbuminuria and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics, while eGFR was found to be similar in both diabetics and non-diabetics. UACR inversely correlated with Cd level, while plasma creatinine level positively correlated with Cd but not significantly. Correlation between Cd and HbA1c revealed non-significant inverse correlation (r = −0.007; p > 0.05), while Zn showed a

  20. Cadmium Level, Glycemic Control, and Indices of Renal Function in Treated Type II Diabetics: Implications for Polluted Environments.

    PubMed

    Anetor, John I; Uche, Chukwuemelie Z; Ayita, Emmanuel B; Adedapo, Solomon K; Adeleye, Jokotade O; Anetor, Gloria O; Akinlade, Sola K

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has recently emerged as a major concern not only in environmental toxicology but also in metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and its complications. Conflicting data aside, these studies have not been examined in a clinical population undergoing management as well as possible modulation by the prominent metabolic antagonist of Cd such as zinc (Zn). This study examined the relationship between cadmium levels, glycemic control, and renal pathology in established type II diabetic patients with focus on populations exposed to modern environmental health hazards (MEHHs). Sixty-five participants, consisting of 45 type-2 diabetics and 20 non-diabetics were enrolled for the study, mean age 61.51 ± 5.27 years. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was used to classify them into three sub-groups: (A) good glycemic control (44.4%), (B) fair glycemic control (24.4%), and (C) poor glycemic control (31.1%). Plasma levels of glucose, Cd, Zn, HbA1c, creatinine, urinary creatinine, microalbuminuria, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were determined in all participants using standard methods. Fasting plasma glucose was higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics (p = 0.000) as well as Zn level, though not significantly. Interestingly, Cd level, Cd/Zn ratio, and urinary creatinine were significantly lower in diabetics than in non-diabetics. The group with poor glycemic control (C) had significantly higher Cd level compared to the one with good glycemic control (group A). The renal function revealed that microalbuminuria and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics, while eGFR was found to be similar in both diabetics and non-diabetics. UACR inversely correlated with Cd level, while plasma creatinine level positively correlated with Cd but not significantly. Correlation between Cd and HbA1c revealed non-significant inverse correlation (r = -0.007; p > 0.05), while Zn showed a

  1. Possible Increase in Serum FABP4 Level Despite Adiposity Reduction by Canagliflozin, an SGLT2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Furuhashi, Masato; Matsumoto, Megumi; Hiramitsu, Shinya; Omori, Akina; Tanaka, Marenao; Moniwa, Norihito; Yoshida, Hideaki; Ishii, Junnichi; Miura, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Background Fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4/A-FABP/aP2) is secreted from adipocytes in association with catecholamine-induced lipolysis, and elevated serum FABP4 level is associated with obesity, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Secreted FABP4 as a novel adipokine leads to insulin resistance via increased hepatic glucose production (HGP). Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors decrease blood glucose level via increased urinary glucose excretion, though HGP is enhanced. Here we investigated whether canagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, modulates serum FABP4 level. Methods Canagliflozin (100 mg/day) was administered to type 2 diabetic patients (n = 39) for 12 weeks. Serum FABP4 level was measured before and after treatment. Results At baseline, serum FABP4 level was correlated with adiposity, renal dysfunction and noradrenaline level. Treatment with canagliflozin significantly decreased adiposity and levels of fasting glucose and HbA1c but increased average serum FABP4 level by 10.3% (18.0 ± 1.0 vs. 19.8 ± 1.2 ng/ml, P = 0.008), though elevation of FABP4 level after treatment was observed in 26 (66.7%) out of 39 patients. Change in FABP4 level was positively correlated with change in levels of fasting glucose (r = 0.329, P = 0.044), HbA1c (r = 0.329, P = 0.044) and noradrenaline (r = 0.329, P = 0.041) but was not significantly correlated with change in adiposity or other variables. Conclusions Canagliflozin paradoxically increases serum FABP4 level in some diabetic patients despite amelioration of glucose metabolism and adiposity reduction, possibly via induction of catecholamine-induced lipolysis in adipocytes. Increased FABP4 level by canagliflozin may undermine the improvement of glucose metabolism and might be a possible mechanism of increased HGP by inhibition of SGLT2. Trial Registration UMIN-CTR Clinical Trial UMIN000018151 PMID:27124282

  2. Effects of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors on Hyperglycemia and Blood Cyclosporine Levels in Renal Transplant Patients with Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jaehyun; Lee, Min Jung; Choe, Eun Yeong; Jung, Chang Hee; Wang, Hye Jin; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors is increasing among renal transplant patients with diabetes. However, the glucose-lowering efficacies of various DPP-4 inhibitors and their effects on blood cyclosporine levels have not been fully investigated. We compared the glucose-lowering efficacies of DPP 4 inhibitors and evaluate their effects on the blood levels of cyclosporine in renal transplant recipients with diabetes. Methods Sixty-five renal allograft recipients who received treatment with DPP-4 inhibitors (vildagliptin, sitagliptin, or linagliptin) following kidney transplant were enrolled. The glucose-lowering efficacies of the DPP-4 inhibitors were compared according to the changes in the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels after 3 months of treatment. Changes in the trough levels of the cyclosporine were also assessed 2 months after treatment with each DPP-4 inhibitor. Results HbA1c significantly decreased in the linagliptin group in comparison with other DPP-4 inhibitors (vildagliptin –0.38%±1.03%, sitagliptin –0.53%±0.95%, and linagliptin –1.40±1.34; P=0.016). Cyclosporine trough levels were significantly increased in the sitagliptin group compared with vildagliptin group (30.62±81.70 ng/mL vs. –24.22±53.54 ng/mL, P=0.036). Cyclosporine trough levels were minimally changed in patients with linagliptin. Conclusion Linagliptin demonstrates superior glucose-lowering efficacy and minimal effect on cyclosporine trough levels in comparison with other DPP-4 inhibitors in kidney transplant patients with diabetes. PMID:26754588

  3. Glycated albumin and direct low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) has been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. We evaluated the ut...

  4. Direct Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Glycated Albumin Levels in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) have been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. The aim in this st...

  5. Factors Increasing Physical Activity Levels in Diabetes Mellitus: A Survey of Patients after an Inpatient Diabetes Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Murano, Isamu; Asakawa, Yasutsugu; Mizukami, Masafumi; Takihara, Jun; Shimizu, Kaoru; Imai, Taihei

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to understand the factors involved in increasing physical activity levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients for improved glycemic control. [Subjects] The subjects were 101 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who had completed an inpatient diabetes education program. [Methods] The survey evaluated physical activity levels on the basis of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and a questionnaire listing physical and psychosocial factors. [Results] Four variables—participation or non-participation in farm work, presence or absence of a job, stage of change in attitude toward exercise behavior, and social support—accounted for 34% of physical activity levels in these diabetes mellitus patients. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient between physical activity level and HbA1c was −0.31. [Conclusion] Intervention in terms of practical use of living environments, promotion of exercise behavior, and social support may be effective in helping to improve glycemic control. PMID:24926134

  6. Effects of gliclazide add on metformin on serum omentin-1 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Al-Gareeb, Ali I.; Alrubai, Haidar F.; Suliaman, Sammar M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Omentin is a newly identified adipokine that has beneficial influence against cardiovascular disorders. Hence, considering the impact of anti-diabetic drug on omentin levels may provide an adjuvant strategy to protect diabetic patients against valuable clinical hazards. Aim of the Study: To investigate the influence of metformin alone or in combination with gliclazide on the level of serum omentin among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients and Methods: A total of 70 newly diagnosed patients with T2DM were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind prospective study, and divided into two equal groups based on treatment regimen in which Group 1 treated with metformin (1000 mg) and Group 2 treated with metformin (1000 mg) plus gliclazide (80 mg). Blood glucose levels, HbA1C, insulin levels, and serum omentin-1 were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. Result: Use of gliclazide as an add-on therapy to metformin in patients with T2DM result in better glycemic control evidenced by significant reductions in the levels of blood glucose levels and HbA1C and much more improvement in insulin sensitivity evidenced by significant decreased in insulin resistance index, whereas it has adverse impact on serum omentin-1 levels evidenced by significant decrement in omentin-1 level in comparison to their pretreatment levels among Group 2 patients. Conclusions: Adding of gliclazide to metformin in treatment of patients with T2DM might extend the therapeutic action of metformin in regarding much better controlling of glycemic indices, but, at the same time, it might attenuate the cardioprotective effects of metformin by its adverse influence on serum omentin-1 levels. PMID:27042415

  7. Shiftwork and impaired glucose metabolism: a 14-year cohort study on 7104 male workers.

    PubMed

    Suwazono, Yasushi; Dochi, Mirei; Oishi, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Kumihiko; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakata, Kouichi

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of shiftwork on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level, as an index of glucose metabolism. A 14 yr prospective cohort study was conducted on day (n = 4219) and alternating shiftworkers (n = 2885) who received annual health checkups between 1991 and 2005 at a Japanese steel company. The endpoints were either a 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, or 30% increase in HbA1c during the period of observation, compared to HbA1c at entry to the study. The association between the type of job schedule and increase in HbA1c was investigated after adjusting for age, body mass index, mean arterial pressure, total serum cholesterol, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, uric acid, drinking habit, smoking habit, and habitual exercise using multivariate pooled logistic regression analyses. Shiftwork was significantly associated with the various HbA1c endpoints (> or =10% HbA1c increase, odds ratio 1.35 [95% confidence interval 1.26-1.44]; > or =15% HbA1c increase, odds ratio 1.29 [95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.40]; > or =20% HbA1c increase, odds ratio 1.23 [95% confidence interval 1.11-1.37]; and > or =25% HbA1c increase, odds ratio 1.19 [95% confidence interval 1.03-1.36]). Age, body mass index, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase were associated positively with all five HbA1c endpoints. Uric acid was associated negatively with all five HbA1c endpoints. Our study on male Japanese workers revealed alternating shiftwork (in addition to other established factors, such as age and body mass index) was a consistent risk factor for impaired glucose metabolism. PMID:19637051

  8. A Boronate Affinity-Assisted SERS Tag Equipped with a Sandwich System for Detection of Glycated Hemoglobin in the Hemolysate of Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Usta, Duygu Deniz; Salimi, Kouroush; Pinar, Asli; Coban, İlknur; Tekinay, Turgay; Tuncel, Ali

    2016-05-18

    Phenylboronic acid-functionalized, Ag shell-coated, magnetic, monodisperse polymethacrylate microspheres equipped with a glycoprotein-sensitive sandwich system were proposed as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for quantitative determination of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). The magnetization of the SERS tag and the formation of the Ag shell on the magnetic support were achieved using the bifunctional reactivity of newly synthesized polymethacrylate microspheres. The hemolysate of human red blood cells containing both HbA1c and nonglycated hemoglobin was used for determination of HbA1c. The working principle of the proposed SERS tag is based on the immobilization of HbA1c by cyclic boronate ester formation between glycosyl residues of HbA1c and boronic acid groups of magnetic polymethacrylate microspheres and the binding of p-aminothiophenol (PATP)-functionalized Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) carrying another boronic acid ligand via cyclic boronate ester formation via unused glycosyl groups of bound HbA1c. Then, in situ formation of a Raman reporter, 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene from PATP under 785 nm laser irradiation allowed for the quantification of HbA1c bound onto the magnetic SERS tag, which was proportional to the HbA1c concentration in the hemolysate of human erythrocytes. The sandwich system provided a significant enhancement in the SERS signal intensity due to the plasmon coupling between Ag NPs and Ag shell-coated magnetic microspheres, and low HbA1c concentrations down to 50 ng/mL could be detected. The calibration curve obtained with a high correlation coefficient between the SERS signal intensity and HbA1c level showed the usability of the SERS protocol for the determination of the HbA1c level in any person. PMID:27149109

  9. Low Vitamin D Levels Do Not Predict Hyperglycemia in Elderly Endurance Athletes (but in Controls)

    PubMed Central

    Nistler, Sonja; Batmyagmar, Delgerdalai; Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth; Perkmann, Thomas; Scherzer, Thomas M.; Kundi, Michael; Endler, Georg; Ratzinger, Franz; Pilger, Alexander; Wagner, Oswald F.; Winker, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Recent studies revealed a link between hypovitaminosis D3 and the risk for hyperglycemia. Further mechanistic and interventional investigations suggested a common reason for both conditions rather than a causal relationship. Exposure to sunlight is the most relevant source of vitamin D3 (25(OH)D), whereas adipose tissue is able to store relevant amounts of the lipophilic vitamin. Since running/bicycling leads to increased out-door time and alters physiological response mechanisms, it can be hypothesized that the correlation between hypovitaminosis D3 and hyperglycemia might be disturbed in outdoor athletes. Methods 47 elderly marathoners/bicyclists and 47 age/sex matched controls were studied in a longitudinal setting at baseline and after three years. HbA1c as a surrogate for (pre-)diabetic states was quantified via HPLC, 25(OH)D levels were measured by means of chemiluminescent assays. Physical performance was assessed by ergometry. Results When adjusted for seasonal variations, 25(OH)D was significantly higher in athletes than in controls. 25(OH)D levels inversely correlated with triglycerides in both groups, whereas only in controls an association between high BMI or low physical performance with hypovitaminosis D3 had been found. Likewise, the presence of hypovitaminosis D3 at baseline successfully predicted hyperglycemia at the follow up examinations within the control group (AUC = 0.85, 95% CI [0.74, 0.96], p < .001, statistically independent from BMI), but not in athletes. Conclusion Our data suggest that mechanisms of HbA1c elevation might differ between athletes and controls. Thus, intense physical activity must be taken into account as a potential pre-analytic confounder when it is aimed to predict metabolic risk by vitamin D3 levels. PMID:27304888

  10. The Effects of 6 Isocaloric Meals Pattern on Blood Lipid Profile, Glucose, Hemoglobin A1c, Insulin and Malondialdehyde in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Moosa; Kazemi, Asma; Hasan Zadeh, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present clinical trial study aims at investigating the effect of daily energy intake in 6 isocaloric meals in comparison with the current meal pattern (3 meals and 2 small snacks per day) on type 2 diabetes risk markers in diabetes during 3-month period. Methods: Eighty four type 2 diabetes patients were randomly divided into 6 isocaloric meal diet or a balanced diet (3 meals and 2 snacks previous meal pattern). The planned reduced calorie diets for both groups were identical except for the meal pattern. Blood samples were analyzed before and after the investigation for fasting blood sugar (FBS), two-hour post-prandial glucose (2hPP), insulin, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-C, LDL-C, and molondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. Results: HbA1c (P=0.00) and body mass index (BMI) (P=0.04) values decreased significantly in the 6 isocaloric meal pattern compared with the controls. There were no significant differences in fasting serum glucose (P=0.09), insulin (P=0.65), total cholesterol (P=0.32), LDL-C (P=0.43), HDL-C (P=0.40) cholesterol, triglyceride (P=0.40), MDA (P=0.13) and 2hPP serum glucose (P=0.30) concentrations between the 6 isocaloric meal and tradition meal pattern. Conclusion: Six isocaloric meal pattern in comparison with the current meal pattern led to weight loss and improved glycemic control. Serum lipid profile and MDA did not change significantly. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201205179780N1 PMID:25242841

  11. Effect of dietary fructose on portal and systemic serum fructose levels in rats and in KHK-/- and GLUT5-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag; Sugimoto, Keiichiro; Douard, Veronique; Shah, Ami; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Toshikazu; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2015-11-01

    Elevated blood fructose concentrations constitute the basis for organ dysfunction in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that diet-induced changes in blood fructose concentrations are regulated by ketohexokinase (KHK) and the fructose transporter GLUT5. Portal and systemic fructose concentrations determined by HPLC in wild-type mice fed for 7 days 0% free fructose were <0.07 mM, were independent of time after feeding, were similar to those of GLUT5(-/-), and did not lead to hyperglycemia. Postprandial fructose levels, however, increased markedly in those fed isocaloric 20% fructose, causing significant hyperglycemia. Deletion of KHK prevented fructose-induced hyperglycemia, but caused dramatic hyperfructosemia (>1 mM) with reversed portal to systemic gradients. Systemic fructose in wild-type and KHK(-/-) mice changed by 0.34 and 1.8 mM, respectively, for every millimolar increase in portal fructose concentration. Systemic glucose varied strongly with systemic, but not portal, fructose levels in wild-type, and was independent of systemic and portal fructose in KHK(-/-), mice. With ad libitum feeding for 12 wk, fructose-induced hyperglycemia in wild-type, but not hyperfructosemia in KHK(-/-) mice, increased HbA1c concentrations. Increasing dietary fructose to 40% intensified the hyperfructosemia of KHK(-/-) and the fructose-induced hyperglycemia of wild-type mice. Fructose perfusion or feeding in rats also caused duration- and dose-dependent hyperfructosemia and hyperglycemia. Significant levels of blood fructose are maintained independent of dietary fructose, KHK, and GLUT5, probably by endogenous synthesis of fructose. KHK prevents hyperfructosemia and fructose-induced hyperglycemia that would markedly increase HbA1c levels. These findings explain the hyperfructosemia of human hereditary fructosuria as well as the hyperglycemia of fructose-induced metabolic syndrome. PMID:26316589

  12. Level of sustained glycemic control and associated factors among patients with diabetes mellitus in Ethiopia: a hospital-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Solomon Mekonnen; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu; Alemu, Shitaye; Mesfin, Nebiyu

    2015-01-01

    Background The level of sustained glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major determinant of the occurrence of both acute and chronic complications. However, information about the level of glycemic control among patients in the follow-up care at the University of Gondar Referral Hospital is scanty. The study assessed the degree of glycemic control and associated factors among diabetic patients in the study area. Method A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted at the University of Gondar Referral Hospital. All diabetic patients aged ≥18 years who visited the Diabetes Clinic in January and February 2013 for follow-up medical evaluation and medication participated in the study. Patients with glycosylated hemoglobin test (HbA1c) of ≥7% were classified as having a poor level of glycemic control. Propensity score was used to estimate the treatment effect. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was applied to determine the associated factors. Result Two hundred and fifty three (64.7%) of the 391 diabetic patients included in the study had a poor level of glycemic control, as evidenced by HbA1c ≥7%. Poor glycemic control was much higher among Type 1 patients (82.9%) compared with Type 2 patients (57.5%). Being on insulin treatment (AOR =2.51; 95% CI =1.25, 5.04) and reporting poor medication adherence (AOR =3.19; 95% CI =1.76, 5.80) were found to be associated with poor glycemic control among Type 2 DM patients. High waist circumference was inversely associated with a poor level of glycemic control in Type 1 DM patients (AOR =0.05; 95% CI =0.01, 0.85). Conclusion The proportion of diabetic patients with a poor level of glycemic control is high. We recommend a comprehensive intervention to improve the overall treatment adherence with special attention to DM patients receiving insulin. PMID:25657591

  13. Are proton pump inhibitors a new antidiabetic drug? A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Boj-Carceller, Diana; Bocos-Terraz, Pilar; Moreno-Vernis, Miguel; Sanz-Paris, Alejandro; Trincado-Aznar, Pablo; Albero-Gamboa, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on glycemic control (HbA1c) in type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of consecutive in-patients admitted to hospital in any department during the first semester of the year 2010 who had a recent HbA1c measurement. The study excluded those with a diagnosis of hyperglycemic decompensation, diabetic onset or pregnancy. It compared HbA1c levels of those taking PPIs and those not. RESULTS: A total of 97 patients were recruited. The average HbA1C level was 7.0% ± 1.2%. Overall PPI consumption was 55.7%. HbA1c was significantly lower in individuals who took PPIs: -0.6%, 95% CI: -0.12 to -0.83. People who used PPIs with some type of insulin therapy had a HbA1c reduction by -0.8%, 95% CI: -0.12 to -1.48. For the rest of subgroup analysis based on the antidiabetic drug used, PPI consumption always exhibited lower HbA1c levels. CONCLUSION: PPIs seems to be consistently associated with better glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. HbA1c reduction observed is similar to incretin-based therapies. PMID:22174957

  14. A mixture of Salacia oblonga extract and IP-PA1 reduces fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Kazue; Taniguchi, Yoshie; Yoshioka, Noriko; Yoshida, Aya; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Takeru; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Miyake, Shin-Ichiro; Kohchi, Chie; Kuroki, Masahide; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2011-10-01

    At present, lifestyle-related diseases are one of the most critical health issues worldwide. It has been reported that lipopolysaccharide derived from a Gram-negative bacteria (IP-PA1) symbiotic with wheat exhibited several advantageous biological effects, such as the reduction of plasma glucose levels in NOD mice and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels in WHHL rabbits. In this study, the beneficial effects on plasma glucose and lipids of a tea (SI tea) consisting of IP-PA1 and Salacia (which contains an inhibitor of α-glucosidase) were investigated in the KK-Ay/TaJcl type 2 diabetic model mice and in human subjects with premetabolic syndrome in a double-blind, randomized study. SI tea significantly decreased plasma glucose levels in KK-Ay/TaJcl mice. A clinical trial of SI tea was performed with 41 subjects between the ages of 40 and 69, who belonged either to a high plasma glucose group (HG: FPG 100-125 mg/dl) or to a hyperlipidemia group (HL: TG ≥ 150 mg/dl, or LDL ≥ 120 mg/dl, or HDL < 40 mg/dl). These subjects ingested either Salacia without IP-PA1 (the control) or SI tea. Blood samples were collected at 0, 30, and 60 days after initiating SI tea treatment, and were measured for FPG, HbA1c, TG, LDL, and HDL. These results showed that SI tea reduced FPG and HbA1c more rapidly than the control in the HL group, and also significantly improved LDL and HDL levels in the HG group. Thus, SI tea may be helpful in preventing lifestyle-related diseases. PMID:22125681

  15. A mixture of Salacia oblonga extract and IP-PA1 reduces fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Kazue; Taniguchi, Yoshie; Yoshioka, Noriko; Yoshida, Aya; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Takeru; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Miyake, Shin-ichiro; Kohchi, Chie; Kuroki, Masahide

    2011-01-01

    At present, lifestyle-related diseases are one of the most critical health issues worldwide. It has been reported that lipopolysaccharide derived from a Gram-negative bacteria (IP-PA1) symbiotic with wheat exhibited several advantageous biological effects, such as the reduction of plasma glucose levels in NOD mice and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels in WHHL rabbits. In this study, the beneficial effects on plasma glucose and lipids of a tea (SI tea) consisting of IP-PA1 and Salacia (which contains an inhibitor of α-glucosidase) were investigated in the KK-Ay/TaJcl type 2 diabetic model mice and in human subjects with premetabolic syndrome in a double-blind, randomized study. SI tea significantly decreased plasma glucose levels in KK-Ay/TaJcl mice. A clinical trial of SI tea was performed with 41 subjects between the ages of 40 and 69, who belonged either to a high plasma glucose group (HG: FPG 100-125 mg/dl) or to a hyperlipidemia group (HL: TG ≥ 150 mg/dl, or LDL ≥ 120 mg/dl, or HDL < 40 mg/dl). These subjects ingested either Salacia without IP-PA1 (the control) or SI tea. Blood samples were collected at 0, 30, and 60 days after initiating SI tea treatment, and were measured for FPG, HbA1c, TG, LDL, and HDL. These results showed that SI tea reduced FPG and HbA1c more rapidly than the control in the HL group, and also significantly improved LDL and HDL levels in the HG group. Thus, SI tea may be helpful in preventing lifestyle-related diseases. PMID:22125681

  16. The Relationship between Glycated Hemoglobin and Complexity of Coronary Artery Lesions among Older Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yutang; Zhao, Yuexiang; Gao, Meng; Li, Xiaoqian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between HbA1c levels and the complexity of coronary artery lesions among the older patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods This retrospective study enrolled a total of 3805 consecutive type 2 DM patients aged 60 years and older who underwent their first elective coronary angiography and had their HbA1c levels measured at the Chinese PLA General Hospital between December 2005 and December 2012.The complexity of the coronary artery lesions was evaluated using the Syntax score, and the subjects were divided into three groups according to their HbA1c levels. Logistic regression and Pearson correlation were used to analyze the association between the measured HbA1c levels and Syntax score. Results The mean age was 72.3±10.6 years. The higher HbA1c levels were significantly associated with higher Syntax score (p<0.001). The unadjusted correlation coefficient of HbA1c levels and the Syntax score was 0. 371 (p<0.001). In addition, the higher HbA1c categories were able to independently predict patients with intermediate or high Syntax score (Syntax score ≥23) after adjustment for age, sex, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia and creatinine levels in the logistic regression analysis. Conclusion HbA1c is significantly associated with the complexity of coronary lesions among older patients with DM. A higher HbA1c value is an independent predictor of the prevalence of complex coronary lesions. Further prospective multi-centre studies are needed to confirm this finding. PMID:24658008

  17. Evaluation of Serum Fibrinogen, Plasminogen, α2-Anti-Plasmin, and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Levels (PAI) and Their Correlation with Presence of Retinopathy in Patients with Type 1 DM

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Sefika Burcak; Ugurlu, Nagihan; Yulek, Fatma; Simavli, Huseyin; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir; Erel, Ozcan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in the world. Retinopathy can still progress despite optimal metabolic control. The aim of the study was to determine whether different degrees of DR (proliferative or nonproliferative) were associated with abnormally modulated hemostatic parameters in patients with T1DM. Method. 52 T1DM patients and 40 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Patients were subdivided into three categories. Group I was defined as those without retinopathy, group II with NPRP, and group III with PRP. We compared these subgroups with each other and the control group (Group IV) according to the serum fibrinogen, plasminogen, alpha2-anti-plasmin (α2-anti-plasmin), and PAI. Results. We detected that PAI-1, serum fibrinogen, and plasminogen levels were similar between the diabetic and control groups (P = 0.209, P = 0.224, and P = 0.244, resp.), whereas α2-anti-plasmin was higher in Groups I, II, and III compared to the control group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, and P < 0.001, resp.). There was a positive correlation between serum α2-anti-plasmin and HbA1c levels (r = 0,268, P = 0.031). Conclusion. To our knowledge there is scarce data in the literature about α2-anti-plasmin levels in type 1 diabetes. A positive correlation between α2-anti-plasmin with HbA1c suggests that fibrinolytic markers may improve with disease regulation and better glycemic control. PMID:24818165

  18. Is There a Relationship between Mean Blood Glucose and Glycated Hemoglobin?

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Konstantinos; Spanou, Loukia

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is considered the gold standard for monitoring chronic glycemia of diabetes patients. Hemoglobin A1c indicates an average of blood glucose levels over the past 3 months. Its close association with the risk for the development of long-term complications is well established. However, HbA1c does not inform patients about blood glucose values on a daily basis; therefore, frequent measurements of blood glucose levels are necessary for the day-to-day management of diabetes. Clinicians understand what HbA1c means and how it relates to glucose, but this is not the case with patients. Therefore, the translation of the HbA1c results into something more familiar to patients seemed a necessity. The scope of this article is to review the literature to search for enough scientific evidence to support the idea of a close relationship between HbA1c and mean blood glucose (MBG), and to justify the translation of HbA1c into something that reflects the MBG. Most studies confirm a close relationship between HbA1c and MBG, although different studies result in different linear equations. Factors affecting this relationship may limit the usefulness and applicability of a unique mathematical equation to all diabetes populations. PMID:22226280

  19. Saliva: A tool in assessing glucose levels in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Satish, B N V S; Srikala, P; Maharudrappa, B; Awanti, Sharanabasappa M; Kumar, Prashant; Hugar, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder affecting people worldwide, which require constant monitoring of their glucose levels. Commonly employed procedures include collection of blood or urine samples causing discomfort to the patients. Hence the need for an alternative non invasive technique is required to monitor glucose levels. Saliva present in the oral cavity not only maintains the health of the oral cavity but plays a important role in diagnosis of cancers of the oral cavity, periodontal diseases, HIV, heart diseases etc. The aim of the present study was undertaken to correlate the glucose levels in saliva and blood of diabetic and healthy non diabetic individuals and to determine the efficacy of saliva as a diagnostic tool. Materials & Methods: A total of 30 individuals of which 20 patients were diabetic patients and on medication and 10 patients were healthy non diabetic individuals were included in the study. Blood and saliva were collected under resting conditions and were subjected to glucose estimation. Results: Salivary and blood glucose concentrations were determined in non diabetic healthy individuals (n=10) and Type II Diabetes mellitus patients (n=20). Glycosylated haemoglobin A1c was also determined in both Type II diabetic patients and Control group and a significant correlation (r=0.73) and (r=0.46) was found between HbA1c and serum glucose concentrations in diabetic and control group respectively. A significant correlation (r=0.54) and (r=0.45) was found between fasting blood glucose and fasting salivary glucose for diabetic group and control group respectively. A positive correlation (r=0.39) and (r=0.38) was found between fasting salivary glucose and HbA1c for diabetic and control group respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the saliva can be used in the assessment of the blood glucose concentration in diabetes mellitus patients. How to cite the article: Satish BN, Srikala P, Maharudrappa B, Awanti M, Kumar P

  20. The Potential for Glycemic Control Monitoring and Screening for Diabetes at Dental Visits Using Oral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Rosedale, Mary T.; Pesce, Michael A.; Rindskopf, David M.; Kaur, Navjot; Juterbock, Caroline M.; Wolff, Mark S.; Malaspina, Dolores; Danoff, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes in a dental setting among adults (n = 408) with or at risk for diabetes. Methods. In 2013 and 2014, we performed hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests on dried blood samples of gingival crevicular blood and compared these with paired “gold-standard” HbA1c tests with dried finger-stick blood samples in New York City dental clinic patients. We examined differences in sociodemographics and diabetes-related risk and health care characteristics for 3 groups of at-risk patients. Results. About half of the study sample had elevated HbA1c values in the combined prediabetes and diabetes ranges, with approximately one fourth of those in the diabetes range. With a correlation of 0.991 between gingival crevicular and finger-stick blood HbA1c, measures of concurrence between the tests were extremely high for both elevated HbA1c and diabetes-range HbA1c levels. Persons already diagnosed with diabetes and undiagnosed persons aged 45 years or older could especially benefit from HbA1c testing at dental visits. Conclusions. Gingival crevicular blood collected at the dental visit can be used to screen for diabetes and monitor glycemic control for many at-risk patients. PMID:25713975

  1. A1C Test and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association JDRF MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations ​There are many organizations who provide ... KB). Alternate Language URL The A1C Test and Diabetes Page Content On this page: What is the ...

  2. Glycosylated hemoglobin and hyperbaric oxygen coverage denials.

    PubMed

    Moffat, A D; Worth, E R; Weaver, L K

    2015-01-01

    Some Medicaid and Medicare fiscal intermediaries are denying hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients if the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 7.0%. We performed multiple PubMed searches for any diabetic wound healing clinical trial that documented HbA1c and had a wound healing endpoint. We scrutinized 30 peer-reviewed clinical trials, representing more than 4,400 patients. The average HbA1c from the intervention side of the studies was 8.6% (7.2% - 9.9%) and the control/sham side was 8.3% (6.0% - 10.6%). Twelve studies made a direct attempt to link HbA1c and wound healing. Four retrospective studies and one prospective cohort study assert that lower HbA1c favors wound healing, but review of the studies reveal design flaws that invalidate these conclusions. In total, 25 studies showed no direct correlation between HbA1c levels and wound healing. There was no randomized controlled trial (RCT) data demonstrating that HbA1c < 7.0% improves diabetic wound healing. In every study reviewed, wounds healed with high HbA1c levels that would be considered poorly controlled by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Frequently, patients lack optimal blood glucose control when they have a limb-threatening DFU. The evidence supports that denying hyperbaric oxygen to those with HbA1c > 7.0% is unfounded. PMID:26152104

  3. Tracking Diabetes: New York City's A1C Registry

    PubMed Central

    Chamany, Shadi; Silver, Lynn D; Bassett, Mary T; Driver, Cynthia R; Berger, Diana K; Neuhaus, Charlotte E; Kumar, Namrata; Frieden, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    Context: In December 2005, in characterizing diabetes as an epidemic, the New York City Board of Health mandated the laboratory reporting of hemoglobin A1C laboratory test results. This mandate established the United States’ first population-based registry to track the level of blood sugar control in people with diabetes. But mandatory A1C reporting has provoked debate regarding the role of public health agencies in the control of noncommunicable diseases and, more specifically, both privacy and the doctor-patient relationship. Methods: This article reviews the rationale for adopting the rule requiring the reporting of A1C test results, experience with its implementation, and criticisms raised in the context of the history of public health practice. Findings: For many decades, public health agencies have used identifiable information collected through mandatory laboratory reporting to monitor the population's health and develop programs for the control of communicable and noncommunicable diseases. The registry program sends quarterly patient rosters stratified by A1C level to more than one thousand medical providers, and it also sends letters, on the provider's letterhead whenever possible, to patients at risk of diabetes complications (A1C level >9 percent), advising medical follow-up. The activities of the registry program are similar to those of programs for other reportable conditions and constitute a joint effort between a governmental public health agency and medical providers to improve patients’ health outcomes. Conclusions: Mandatory reporting has proven successful in helping combat other major epidemics. New York City's A1C Registry activities combine both traditional and novel public health approaches to reduce the burden of an epidemic chronic disease, diabetes. Despite criticism that mandatory reporting compromises individuals’ right to privacy without clear benefit, the early feedback has been positive and suggests that the benefits will

  4. The impact of intra-articular methylprednisolone acetate injection on fructosamine levels in diabetic patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Habib, George; Sakas, Fahed; Artul, Suheil; Khazin, Fadi; Hakim, Geries; Jabbour, Adel; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen

    2016-06-01

    Fructosamine is a glycated protein that reflects blood glucose control over the last 2-3 weeks. There are no studies that address the impact of intra-articular injection (IAI) of methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) on fructosamine levels among patients with type-2 diabetes and osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK). Non-selected patients attending the rheumatology or orthopedic clinic with type-2 diabetes and painful OAK, who failed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and physical therapy, were asked to participate in our study. After consent blood tests were drown for fructosamine, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level, complete blood count, lipid profile, serum albumin, serum protein, c-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Demographic and different clinical parameters were also documented. Immediately after that, patients had IAI of 80 mg of MPA at the knee joint (group 1). Two to three weeks later, the same blood tests were repeated (except for HbA1c). Age- and sex-matched group of patients with type-2 diabetes and painful OAK attending the same clinics, but who were managed by NSAIDS were asked to participate as a control group (group 2) and had the same evaluation at enrollment and 2-3 weeks later, after consent. Eighteen patients from either group completed the study. Mean fructosamine level in group 1 patients was 263.7 ± 31.8 mg% prior to the IAI vs. 274.6 ± 39.3 mg% (p = 0.035), 2-3 weeks later, while mean fructosamine level in the control group (group 2) at enrollments was 274.2 ± 31.2 mg% vs. 269 ± 30.2 mg%, p = 0.509, 2-3 weeks later. There was no significant change in any other parameter tested at enrollment in either group, compared to those obtained 2-3 weeks afterwards. Body mass index was on the edge of significance as a predictor for a significant change in fructosamine level in group 1 patients. IAI of 80 mg of MPA in patients with type-2 diabetes and OAK had resulted in a significant, though mild

  5. Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on MDA and TNF-α Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Mihriban; Ipekci, Suleyman Hilmi; Kebapcilar, Levent; Dogan Dede, Nesrin; Kurban, Sevil; Erbay, Ekrem; Gonen, Mustafa Sait

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with low-grade inflammation. The benefits of regular exercise for the DM are well established, whereas less is known about the impact of aerobic exercise on malondialdehyde (MDA) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the DM. Methods. We randomised 64 participants, who do not exercise regularly, without any diabetic chronic complications in parallel to 12 weeks of aerobic exercise (three times per week, n = 31) and no exercise (control; n = 33). Plasma levels of soluble TNF-α and MDA levels were measured before-after physical training programme and control group. Results. Sixty-four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were analysed. When comparing the two groups of patients with age, gender, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, lipid profile, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and class of treatment for diabetes were not different between groups. While soluble TNF-α remained essentially unaffected by physical training, plasma concentrations of MDA markedly decreased (P < 0.05); physical training also decreased body weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Exercise training favorably affected body weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure. A three-weekly, 12-week, aerobic-training programme, without a concomitant weight loss diet, was associated with significant decrease in MDA levels in type 2 diabetic individuals.

  6. Cognitive Function and Brain Structure in Persons With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus After Intensive Lowering of Blood Pressure and Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Jeff D.; Launer, Lenore J.; Bryan, R. Nick; Coker, Laura H.; Lazar, Ronald M.; Gerstein, Hertzel C.; Murray, Anne M.; Sullivan, Mark D.; Horowitz, Karen R.; Ding, Jingzhong; Marcovina, Santica; Lovato, Laura; Lovato, James; Margolis, Karen L.; Davatzikos, Christos; Barzilay, Joshua; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Linz, Peter E.; Miller, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk for decline in cognitive function, reduced brain volume, and increased white matter lesions in the brain. Poor control of blood pressure (BP) and lipid levels are risk factors for T2DM-related cognitive decline, but the effect of intensive treatment on brain function and structure is unknown. OBJECTIVE To examine whether intensive therapy for hypertension and combination therapy with a statin plus a fibrate reduces the risk of decline in cognitive function and total brain volume (TBV) in patients with T2DM. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A North American multicenter clinical trial including 2977 participants without baseline clinical evidence of cognitive impairment or dementia and with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels less than 7.5% randomized to a systolic BP goal of less than 120 vs less than 140 mm Hg (n = 1439) or to a fibrate vs placebo in patients with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels less than 100 mg/dL (n = 1538). Participants were recruited from August 1, 2003, through October 31, 2005, with the final follow-up visit by June 30, 2009. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Cognition was assessed at baseline and 20 and 40 months. A subset of 503 participants underwent baseline and 40-month brain magnetic resonance imaging to assess for change in TBV and other structural measures of brain health. RESULTS Baseline mean HbA1c level was 8.3%; mean age, 62 years; and mean duration of T2DM, 10 years. At 40 months, no differences in cognitive function were found in the intensive BP-lowering trial or in the fibrate trial. At 40 months, TBV had declined more in the intensive vs standard BP-lowering group (difference, −4.4 [95% CI, −7.8 to −1.1] cm3; P = .01). Fibrate therapy had no effect on TBV compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In participants with long-standing T2DM and at high risk for cardiovascular events, intensive BP control and fibrate therapy in the presence of

  7. Effect of Biochanin A on Serum Visfatin Level of Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Reza; Goodarzi, Mohamad Taghi; Salemi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bioflavonoids are well known for their multi directional biologic activity including antidiabetic effect. It has been demonstrated that flavonoids can act as insulin secretagogue or insulin mimetic agents. Objectives: This experimental study was designed in Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran, to investigate the effects of biochanin A (a bioflavonoid) on fasting blood glucose (FBG), body weight, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lipid profile, serum enzymes, and visfatin of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. Patients and Methods: We used 24 male Wistar rats and randomly allocated them to four groups of six rats. One group was randomly assigned as control and diabetes was induced in three other groups by administration of streptozocin (35 mg/kg of body weight) intraperitoneally. The groups received the following treatments: group 1 (control), 5% DMSO; group 2 (diabetic control), 0.5% DMSO; and group 3 and 4, respectively 10 and 15 mg/kg biochanin A for 30 days. Body weight and biochemical parameters including FBG, HbA1c, lipid profile, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and visfatin were measured in all rats. Results: FBG level was significantly reduced in treated diabetic rats (139.8 ± 9.3 and 206 ± 11 mg/dL in groups 3 and 4, respectively) in comparison to the diabetic control (295.1 ± 14 mg/dL) (P < 0.05). Administration of biochanin A significantly decreased HbA1c in group 3 (6.66 ± 0.33) and group 4 (7.11 ± 0.31) in comparison to the diabetic control group (8.26 ± 0.44) (P < 0.05). Levels of serum visfatin were improved to near normal levels in the treated rats (249 ± 35.5 and 161.33 ± 13.07 in groups 3 and 4, respectively) in comparison to the diabetic control (302.17 ± 19.4) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, biochanin A showed a protective effect against weight loss in diabetic rats (P < 0.05). In treated rats, serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein

  8. Urinary N-acetyl-β-d-Glucosaminidase Levels are Positively Correlated With 2-Hr Plasma Glucose Levels During Oral Glucose Tolerance Testing in Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ouchi, Motoshi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Masao; Motoyama, Masayuki; Ohara, Makoto; Suzuki, Kazunari; Igari, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakano, Hiroshi; Oba, Kenzo

    2012-01-01

    Background Urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) excretion is increased in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). This study investigated when during the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) the plasma glucose, urine glucose, and insulin levels correlate most strongly with urinary N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG) levels in prediabetic subjects. Methods The OGTT was administered to 80 subjects who had not yet received a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM) and in whom HbA1c levels were ≤6.8% and fasting plasma glucose levels were <7.0 mmol/l. Forty-two subjects had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 31 had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 7 had DM according to World Health Organization criteria. Serum levels of cystatin C, the estimated glomerular filtration rate, the urinary albumin-to-creatinine (Cr) ratio, urinary and serum β2-microglobulin, and urinary NAG were measured as markers of renal function. Results NAG levels were significantly higher in subjects with DM and in subjects with IGT than in subjects with NGT. No significant associations were observed between glycemic status and other markers of renal function. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the NAG level was positively correlated with plasma glucose levels at 120 min of the OGTT and was associated with the glycemic status of prediabetic patients. Conclusion These results suggest that postprandial hyperglycemia is an independent factor that causes renal tubular damage in prediabetes patients. PMID:23143631

  9. Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Sitagliptin in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tada, Yuko; Kanazawa, Ippei; Notsu, Masakazu; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Kiyohara, Nobuaki; Sasaki, Motofumi; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Objective We herein conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of sitagliptin treatment in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods We analyzed the changes in glycemic control in 112 Japanese type 2 diabetes patients over 65 years of age treated with 50 mg/day sitagliptin. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, liver and kidney functions, and usage of hypoglycemic agents were recorded for 24 months. Results HbA1c levels were significantly decreased, and the significance of HbA1c reduction was maintained during the observation period [from 7.7±1.1% to 7.2±0.7% (p<0.001) at the end of observational period]. The %change in HbA1c levels was significantly and negatively correlated with the baseline HbA1c levels (r=-0.51, p<0.001), but not with age, duration of diabetes, or the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). No patient experienced severe hypoglycemia episodes, and aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and the eGFR remained unchanged. The dose of sulfonylurea was finally decreased in 72% of patients treated with sulfonylurea. Conclusion Sitagliptin treatment continually decreases the HbA1c level for 24 months and is useful to reduce the dose of sulfonylurea in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27181532

  10. Awareness of Prediabetes and Diabetes among Persons with Clinical Depression

    PubMed Central

    Rosedale, Mary; Strauss, Shiela M.; Knight, Candice; Malaspina, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Background. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is highly comorbid with diabetes, a relationship underappreciated by clinicians. Purpose. Examine the proportion of nonpregnant individuals ≥20 years with MDD and elevated glucose and the demographic and clinical characteristics associated with unrecognized elevated glucose. Methods. 14,373 subjects who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007–2012) completed the PHQ-9 depression screen and had hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) measured. PHQ-9 scores ≥10 and HbA1c scores ≥5.7% were defined as MDD and elevated HbA1c, respectively. Data were analyzed using complex survey sampling software. Results. 38.4% of the sample with MDD had elevated HbA1c readings. Compared with nondepressed subjects, they were significantly more likely to have elevated glucose readings (P = 0.003) and to be aware of their elevated glucose levels if they had a higher body mass index, family history of diabetes, more doctor visits in the past year, a usual care source, health insurance, or were taking hypertension or hypercholesterolemia medications. Conclusions. Many adults with MDD have elevated HbA1c levels, have never been advised of elevated HbA1c, have not received diabetes screening, and have minimal contact with a healthcare provider. Additional opportunities for diabetes risk screening in people with MDD are needed. PMID:26060495

  11. Importance of measuring glycosylated hemoglobin in patients with myocardial infarction and known diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Stolker, Joshua M; Sun, Dazhong; Conaway, Darcy G; Jones, Philip G; Masoudi, Frederick A; Peterson, Pamela N; Krumholz, Harlan M; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Spertus, John A

    2010-04-15

    Although medical co-morbidities commonly affect clinical outcomes after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), current performance measures of AMI quality focus exclusively on the management of the AMI itself. However, patients with AMIs frequently present with other co-morbidities, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), that also warrant assessment and management. To date, the quality of DM evaluation in patients presenting with AMIs has not been described. From January 2003 to June 2004, the Prospective Registry Evaluating Myocardial Infarction Patients: Events and Recovery-Quality Improvement (PREMIER-QI) enrolled 3,953 patients with AMIs at 19 centers in the United States. The frequency of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) assessment, either during the hospitalization or documented in the chart from the preceding 3 months, was prospectively evaluated. Among 1,168 patients with AMIs with preexisting DM, only 47% had recent HbA(1c) levels available, with marked variability in HbA(1c) assessment among hospitals (range 7% to 81%). Among those with available HbA(1c) levels, 39% had good control (HbA(1c) <7%), 36% had suboptimal control (HbA(1c) 7% to 9%), and 25% had poor control (HbA(1c) >9%). Patients with suboptimal and poor control were more likely to have their DM treatment intensified than those without HbA(1c) assessment (for HbA(1c) 7% to 9%, rate ratio 1.38, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.85; for HbA(1c) >9%, rate ratio 2.20, 95% confidence interval 1.68 to 2.88). Similarly, patients with DM who had HbA(1c) measured were more likely to receive instructions on DM disease management before discharge. In conclusion, the assessment of chronic glycemic control is highly variable among patients with AMIs and DM. Because much of this variability occurs at the hospital level, the evaluation of DM control could represent an additional quality indicator and an opportunity to advance patient-centered AMI care. PMID:20381658

  12. Free Triiodothyronine Levels Are Associated with Diabetic Nephropathy in Euthyroid Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingcheng; Li, Xiaohua; Tao, Yang; Wang, Yufei; Peng, Yongde

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the association of thyroid function and diabetic nephropathy (DN) in euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. A total of 421 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. The following parameters were assessed: anthropometric measurements, fast plasma glucose, serum creatinine, lipid profile, HbA1c, free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). Patients with UACR of ≥30 mg/g were defined as those suffering from DN. Results. Of the 421 patients, 203 (48.2%) suffered from DN, and no difference was found between males and females. The patients with DN yielded significantly lower FT3 levels than those without DN (P < 0.01). The prevalence of DN showed a significantly decreasing trend across the three tertiles based on FT3 levels (59.6%, 46.4%, and 38.6%, P < 0.01). After adjustment for gender and age, FT3 levels were found to correlate positively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.03) and negatively with UACR (P < 0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that FT3 level was independently associated with UACR (β = -0.18, t = -3.70, and P < 0.01). Conclusion. Serum FT3 levels are inversely associated with DN in euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes, independent of traditional risk factors. PMID:26697065

  13. Free Triiodothyronine Levels Are Associated with Diabetic Nephropathy in Euthyroid Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingcheng; Li, Xiaohua; Tao, Yang; Wang, Yufei; Peng, Yongde

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the association of thyroid function and diabetic nephropathy (DN) in euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. A total of 421 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. The following parameters were assessed: anthropometric measurements, fast plasma glucose, serum creatinine, lipid profile, HbA1c, free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). Patients with UACR of ≥30 mg/g were defined as those suffering from DN. Results. Of the 421 patients, 203 (48.2%) suffered from DN, and no difference was found between males and females. The patients with DN yielded significantly lower FT3 levels than those without DN (P < 0.01). The prevalence of DN showed a significantly decreasing trend across the three tertiles based on FT3 levels (59.6%, 46.4%, and 38.6%, P < 0.01). After adjustment for gender and age, FT3 levels were found to correlate positively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.03) and negatively with UACR (P < 0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that FT3 level was independently associated with UACR (β = −0.18, t = −3.70, and P < 0.01). Conclusion. Serum FT3 levels are inversely associated with DN in euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes, independent of traditional risk factors. PMID:26697065

  14. Raised Serum Adenosine Deaminase Level in Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Bagchi, Debajit; Sen, Oishimaya; Bir, Aritri; Chakrabarti, Sasanka; Banerjee, Anindita

    2013-01-01

    The role of inflammation being minimal in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in nonobese patients; the aim of the study was to investigate the role of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and see its association with diabetes mellitus. The preliminary case control study comprised of 56 cases and 45 healthy controls which were age and sex matched. 3 mL venous blood samples were obtained from the patients as well as controls after 8–10 hours of fasting. Serum ADA and routine biochemical parameters were analyzed. Serum ADA level was found significantly higher among nonobese T2DM subjects with respect to controls (38.77 ± 14.29 versus 17.02 ± 5.74 U/L; P < 0.0001). Serum ADA level showed a significant positive correlation with fasting plasma glucose (r = 0.657; P < 0.0001) level among nonobese T2DM subjects, but no significant correlation was observed in controls (r = −0.203; P = 0.180). However, no correlation was observed between serum ADA level compared to BMI and HbA1c levels. Our study shows higher serum ADA, triglycerides (TG) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels in nonobese T2DM patients, and a strong correlation between ADA and FPG which suggests an association between ADA and nonobese T2DM subjects. PMID:24453844

  15. Raised serum adenosine deaminase level in nonobese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Khemka, Vineet Kumar; Bagchi, Debajit; Ghosh, Arindam; Sen, Oishimaya; Bir, Aritri; Chakrabarti, Sasanka; Banerjee, Anindita

    2013-01-01

    The role of inflammation being minimal in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in nonobese patients; the aim of the study was to investigate the role of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and see its association with diabetes mellitus. The preliminary case control study comprised of 56 cases and 45 healthy controls which were age and sex matched. 3 mL venous blood samples were obtained from the patients as well as controls after 8-10 hours of fasting. Serum ADA and routine biochemical parameters were analyzed. Serum ADA level was found significantly higher among nonobese T2DM subjects with respect to controls (38.77 ± 14.29 versus 17.02 ± 5.74 U/L; P < 0.0001). Serum ADA level showed a significant positive correlation with fasting plasma glucose (r = 0.657; P < 0.0001) level among nonobese T2DM subjects, but no significant correlation was observed in controls (r = -0.203; P = 0.180). However, no correlation was observed between serum ADA level compared to BMI and HbA1c levels. Our study shows higher serum ADA, triglycerides (TG) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels in nonobese T2DM patients, and a strong correlation between ADA and FPG which suggests an association between ADA and nonobese T2DM subjects. PMID:24453844

  16. A COMPARISON OF SERUM LEVELS OF 25-HYDROXY VITAMIN D IN PREGNANT WOMEN AT RISK FOR GESTATIONAL DIABETES MELLITUS AND WOMEN WITHOUT RISK FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Lobat; Motamedi, Akram; Behradmanesh, Masoud; Hashemi, Raziyeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: During pregnancy, Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin-D [25(OH)D] concentration is even more critical. This deficiency leads to higher incidences of preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, preterm birth, bacterial vaginosis, and also affects the health of the infants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and differences in high-risk pregnant women and women without risk factors for GDM. Methods: This cross sectional study including 155 pregnant women, who are still in the first trimester of pregnancy (less than 12 weeks gestation), were randomized to two groups of high and low risk for GDM. For these people, once at the gestational age less than 12 times a week and once at for 24 to 28 weeks of pregnancy, tests of FBS / BS / HbA1C / 25OHD / insulin / Ca / Albumin was requested. Besides, the OGTT test was performed with 75 g glucose at 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy to diagnose GDM. Results: Serum levels of 25(OH)D in the second trimester of pregnancy ng / ml (24.1 ± 39.5) was significantly lower than that of the first trimester ng / ml (25.9 ± 45.6) (p <0.001). But serum 25(OH)D levels in the first and second trimester of pregnancy was significantly different in women at high risk for GDM than women who had no risk factors (p =0.584 and p =0.99). Serum levels of 25(OH)D has an inverse and significant relationship with HbA1C at the beginning of pregnancy (p=0.007). In addition, a significant and inverse relationship was shown between serum levels of 25(OH)D in the second trimester with insulin (p=0.047) and blood sugar 2 hours after ingestion of 75 g glucose (p=0.045) at 24-28 weeks of gestation. Conclusion: Regarding to the relationship between serum levels of 25(OH)D and blood sugar and insulin at the second trimester of pregnancy, it is recommended for pregnant women to take vitamin D supplementation. PMID:26622198

  17. Relationship between dyslipidaemia and glycaemic status in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Thambiah, S C; Samsudin, I N; George, E; Zahari Sham, S Y; Lee, H M; Muhamad, M A; Hussei, Z; Mohd Noor, N; Mohamad, M

    2016-08-01

    The risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) is dramatically increased in diabetic patients due to their atherogenic lipid profile. The severity of CHD in diabetic patients has been found to be directly associated with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). According to the Malaysian Clinical Practice Guidelines on diabetes mellitus (DM), HbA1c level less than 6.5% reduces the risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications. Hence, this study aimed to determine the relationship between dyslipidaemia and glycaemic status in patients with type 2 DM (T2DM) patients in Hospital Putrajaya, a tertiary endocrine centre in Malaysia. This was a cross sectional, retrospective study of 214 T2DM patients with dyslipidaemia who had visited the endocrine clinic between January 2009 and December 2012. Significant correlations were found between fasting blood glucose (FBG) and HbA1c with total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL), LDL/HDL ratio and TC/HDL ratio; greater correlation being with HbA1c than FBG. In patients with HbA1c ≥ 6.5%, TC, TG, non-HDL and TC/HDL ratio were significantly higher than in patients with HbA1c < 6.5%. Non-HDL, LDL/HDL ratio, TC/HDL ratio and HbA1c were significantly lower in patients on statin treatment than nontreated patients (p<0.05). This significant association between glycaemic status and dyslipidaemia emphasises the additional possible use of HbA1c as a biomarker for dyslipidaemia as well as a potential indirect predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in T2DM patients. PMID:27568669

  18. Glycosylated Hemoglobin Threshold for Predicting Diabetes and Prediabetes from the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sangmo; Kim, Chul Sik; Lee, Seong Jin; Park, Cheol-Young; Lee, Chang Beom; Ihm, Sung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the threshold level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) for the fasting plasma glucose of 100 and 126 mg/dL in the Korean adult population, using the 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A total of 4,481 participants over 19 years of age without diabetic medications and conditions to influence the interpretation of HbA1c levels, such as anemia, renal insufficiency, liver cirrhosis, and cancers, were analyzed. A point-wise area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to estimate the optimal HbA1c cutoff value. A HbA1c threshold of 6.35% was optimal for predicting diabetes with a sensitivity of 86.9% and a specificity of 99.1%. Furthermore, the threshold of HbA1c was 5.65% for prediabetes, with a sensitivity of 69.3% and a specificity of 71%. Further prospective studies are needed to evaluate the HbA1c cutoff point for diagnosing prediabetes and diabetes in the Korean population. PMID:27126887

  19. Glycosylated Hemoglobin Threshold for Predicting Diabetes and Prediabetes from the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sangmo; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Chul Sik; Lee, Seong Jin; Park, Cheol Young; Lee, Chang Beom; Ihm, Sung Hee

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to estimate the threshold level of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) for the fasting plasma glucose of 100 and 126 mg/dL in the Korean adult population, using the 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A total of 4,481 participants over 19 years of age without diabetic medications and conditions to influence the interpretation of HbA1c levels, such as anemia, renal insufficiency, liver cirrhosis, and cancers, were analyzed. A point-wise area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to estimate the optimal HbA1c cutoff value. A HbA1c threshold of 6.35% was optimal for predicting diabetes with a sensitivity of 86.9% and a specificity of 99.1%. Furthermore, the threshold of HbA1c was 5.65% for prediabetes, with a sensitivity of 69.3% and a specificity of 71%. Further prospective studies are needed to evaluate the HbA1c cutoff point for diagnosing prediabetes and diabetes in the Korean population. PMID:27126887

  20. Plasma levels of mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2 are elevated in type 1 diabetes and correlate with glycaemic control

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, L; Ajjan, R; King, R; Thiel, S; Schroeder, V

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the complement system plays an important role in diabetes and the development of diabetic vascular complications. In particular, mannan-binding lectin (MBL) levels are elevated in diabetes patients, and diabetes patients with diabetic nephropathy have higher MBL levels than diabetes patients with normal renal function. The MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs) MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3 and MBL-associated protein MAp44 have not yet been studied in diabetes patients. We therefore measured plasma levels of MASP-1, MASP-2, MASP-3 and MAp44 in 30 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and 17 matched control subjects, and in 45 adults with T1DM and 31 matched control subjects. MASP-1 and MASP-2 levels were significantly higher in children and adults with T1DM than in their respective control groups, whereas MASP-3 and MAp44 levels did not differ between patients and controls. MASP-1 and MASP-2 levels correlated with HbA1c, and MASP levels decreased when glycaemic control improved. Because MASP-1 and MASP-2 have been shown to interact directly with blood coagulation, elevated levels of these proteins may play a role in the enhanced thrombotic environment and consequent vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:25533914

  1. A case of type 2 diabetes with high levels of plasma and urinary C-peptide.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Oka, Y; Taniyama, M; Murata, C; Atsumi, Y; Matsuoka, K

    2004-12-01

    By screening 204 diabetes patients, a male with age 38 was found to have increased C-peptide levels in plasma (over 6 ng/ml) and urine (430 microg/day), both of which were the highest among the screened subjects. He developed type 2 diabetes at age 31, without history of obesity (weight was 52 kg and height 170 cm). He had bilateral testicular atrophy. Fasting plasma glucose level was 160 mg/dl and HbA1c was 8% at age 38. There was hypertriglycemia (290-662 mg/dl). There were no abnormal peaks of IRI or CPR in the serum fractionated by gel filtration (Biogel P 30). Molar ratio of p-CPR/s-IRI was 10.8. Islet cell antibody, anti-insulin binding antibody and anti-insulin receptor antibody were negative. LSH and FSH were both elevated, and free testosterone was decreased. TSH and Leptin levels were elevated. Other laboratory data were within normal range. CT scan revealed fatty liver and horse-shoe kidney. These clinical pictures do not match the criteria to known syndromes associated with diabetes. Although the single case report is insufficient to discuss the C-peptide mechanism of action, this case may give us a hint to understand an aspect of the pathophysiology of C-peptide's bioactivity dysfunction. PMID:15563962

  2. Cardiorespiratory fitness is a stronger indicator of cardiometabolic risk factors and risk prediction than self-reported physical activity levels.

    PubMed

    Gray, Benjamin J; Stephens, Jeffrey W; Williams, Sally P; Davies, Christine A; Turner, Daniel; Bracken, Richard M

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the relationships of self-reported physical activity levels and cardiorespiratory fitness in 81 males to assess which measurement is the greatest indicator of cardiometabolic risk. Physical activity levels were determined by the General Practice Physical Activity Questionnaire tool and cardiorespiratory fitness assessed using the Chester Step Test. Cardiovascular disease risk was estimated using the QRISK2, Framingham Lipids, Framingham body mass index and Joint British Societies' Guidelines-2 equations, and type 2 diabetes mellitus risk calculated using QDiabetes, Leicester Risk Assessment, Finnish Diabetes Risk Score and Cambridge Risk Score models. Categorising employees by cardiorespiratory fitness categories ('Excellent/Good' vs 'Average/Below Average') identified more differences in cardiometabolic risk factor (body mass index, waist circumference, total cholesterol, total cholesterol:high-density lipoprotein ratio, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, HbA(1c)) scores than physical activity (waist circumference only). Cardiorespiratory fitness levels also demonstrated differences in all four type 2 diabetes mellitus risk prediction models and both the QRISK2 and Joint British Societies' Guidelines-2 cardiovascular disease equations. Furthermore, significant negative correlations (p < 0.001) were observed between individual cardiorespiratory fitness values and estimated risk in all prediction models. In conclusion, from this preliminary observational study, cardiorespiratory fitness levels reveal a greater number of associations with markers of cardiovascular disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to physical activity determined by the General Practice Physical Activity Questionnaire tool. PMID:26361778

  3. Plasma Periostin Levels Are Increased in Chinese Subjects with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes and Are Positively Correlated with Glucose and Lipid Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuanyuan; Qu, Hua; Wang, Hang; Wei, Huili; Wu, Jing; Duan, Yang; Liu, Dan; Deng, Huacong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relations among plasma periostin, glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin resistance and inflammation in Chinese patients with obesity (OB), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Plasma periostin levels in the T2DM group were significantly higher than the NGT group (P < 0.01). Patients with both OB and T2DM had the highest periostin levels. Correlation analysis showed that plasma periostin levels were positively correlated with weight, waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h postchallenge plasma glucose (2 h PG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), fasting insulin (FINS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), TNF-α, and IL-6 (P < 0.05 or 0.001) and negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (P < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that TG, TNF-α, and HOMA-IR were independent related factors in influencing the levels of plasma periostin (P < 0.001). These results suggested that Chinese patients with obesity and T2DM had significantly higher plasma periostin levels. Plasma periostin levels were strongly associated with plasma TG, chronic inflammation, and insulin resistance. PMID:27313402

  4. The effects of Low Level LASER Therapy (LLLT) on blood glucose levels in patients with Diabetes Mellitus type I : a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Postiglione, Marco; Buccioni, Tommaso; Longo, Diego

    2009-06-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a widespread disease and a serious public health problem. Low Level LASER Therapy (LLLT) has been found to reduce glycaemia on DM type 1 patients, an observation requiring further research especially as regards characteristics of treatment protocol. The purpose of this work is to continue the line of research and propose a specific protocol for LLLT use. In spring 2008 a 48 year old man, DM type 1 insulin dependent patient has been submitted to 810 nm wavelength LLLT treatment in specific body areas daily for 3 weeks and then once a week for 4 weeks until normalization of glycaemia. Medical supervision was present before, during and after application. Insulin was reduced progressively and then stopped. A gradual reduction of glycaemia was noted during the course of treatment. In successive follow-ups a reduction in HbA1c was noted. Results confirm previous observations and need for further research on large cohorts. The indication that LASER may become a valuable addition to DM type 1 treatment is confirmed and the proposed protocol appears to be effective. The case presented merits review since it reports a therapeutic challenge, contributes to advance in medical science and spawns research.

  5. Promotive effect of comprehensive management on achieving blood glucose control in senile type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Yan, S-T; Li, C-X; Li, C-L; Li, J; Shao, Y-H; Liu, Y; Zhong, W-W; Fang, F-S; Sun, B-R; Tian, H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the control of blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and its influencing factors, in elderly type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) patients undergoing comprehensive management. After years of comprehensive prevention of and control measures for diabetes, elderly T2DM patients who were receiving long-term health care were comprehensively evaluated through an annual physical examination. In addition to routine health examination, the patients were required to undergo HbA1c measurement. Among 688 patients, 652 were men and 36 were women, with a mean age of 78.2 ± 9.1 years. The average HbA1c was 6.6 ± 0.9%. A total of 50.6% of the patients had HbA1c <6.5%, whereas 76.3% had HbA1c <7.0%. Among all patients, 77.1, 46.4, 66.1, 67.8, 36.3, and 57.4% achieved the target total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglyceride (TG), blood pressure, and body mass index (BMI) levels, respectively. The duration of disease and type of treatment, as well as the LDL, HDL, TG, BMI, and blood pressure levels, were significantly associated with HbA1c control. No patient was admitted because of ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar nonketotic diabetic coma in 10 years. Approximately half of the T2DM patients achieved the target HbA1c level. The more effective blood glucose control observed in our study compared with previous studies can be attributed to the effective monitoring of medical conditions and comprehensive management of patients. PMID:25966070

  6. Glycated Hemoglobin, Fasting Insulin and the Metabolic Syndrome in Males. Cross-Sectional Analyses of the Aragon Workers’ Health Study Baseline

    PubMed Central

    Saravia, Gabriela; Civeira, Fernando; Hurtado-Roca, Yamilee; Andres, Eva; Leon, Montserrat; Pocovi, Miguel; Ordovas, Jose; Guallar, Eliseo; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Casasnovas, Jose Antonio; Laclaustra, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is currently used to diagnose diabetes mellitus, while insulin has been relegated to research. Both, however, may help understanding the metabolic syndrome and profiling patients. We examined the association of HbA1c and fasting insulin with clustering of metabolic syndrome criteria and insulin resistance as two essential characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. Methods We used baseline data from 3200 non-diabetic male participants in the Aragon Workers' Health Study. We conducted analysis to estimate age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) across tertiles of HbA1c and insulin. Fasting glucose and Homeostatic model assessment - Insulin Resistance were used as reference. Here we report the uppermost-to-lowest tertile ORs (95%CI). Results Mean age (SD) was 48.5 (8.8) years and 23% of participants had metabolic syndrome. The ORs for metabolic syndrome criteria tended to be higher across HbA1c than across glucose, except for high blood pressure. Insulin was associated with the criteria more strongly than HbA1c and similarly to Homeostatic model assessment - Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). For metabolic syndrome, the OR of HbA1c was 2.68, of insulin, 11.36, of glucose, 7.03, and of HOMA-IR, 14.40. For the clustering of 2 or more non-glycemic criteria, the OR of HbA1c was 2.10, of insulin, 8.94, of glucose, 1.73, and of HOMA-IR, 7.83. All ORs were statistically significant. The areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves for metabolic syndrome were 0.670 (across HbA1c values) and 0.770 (across insulin values), and, for insulin resistance, 0.647 (HbA1c) and 0.995 (insulin). Among non-metabolic syndrome patients, a small insulin elevation identified risk factor clustering. Conclusions HbA1c and specially insulin levels were associated with metabolic syndrome criteria, their clustering, and insulin resistance. Insulin could provide early information in subjects prone to develop metabolic syndrome. PMID:26241903

  7. Long-Term Impact of a Community Health Worker Intervention on Diabetes Control in American Samoa

    PubMed Central

    DePue, Judith D.; Dunsiger, Shira; Elsayed, Mohammad; Nu'usolia, Ofeira; McGarvey, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes Care in American Samoa (DCAS) was a randomized controlled trial of a 12-month intervention facilitated by community health workers (CHWs) that demonstrated improved HbA1c levels compared with usual care at trial completion. We sought to evaluate the long-term impact of this intervention on diabetes control. Methods We retrospectively collected HbA1c measurements from medical records of DCAS participants (n = 268). The study group received the intervention during the trial, and the control group received the intervention after the trial. We used mixed-effects longitudinal regression models to assess change in HbA1c within each trial arm during 3 time periods: DCAS (12 months of the study group’s intervention), the first year after DCAS (control group’s intervention), and the second year after DCAS. Models were adjusted for baseline characteristics that differed significantly for participants with a low number of HbA1c measurements from those with a high number of HbA1c measurements. Results After adjustment for confounders, the experiment group experienced a decrease in HbA1c of 0.28 units per year (95% confidence interval [CI], −0.64 to 0.07) during DCAS (intervention). HbA1c decreased by 0.88 units per year (95% CI, −1.31 to −0.45) during the year after the intervention. No significant change was observed the following year. HbA1c of the control group did not significantly change during DCAS (usual care) but decreased by 1.31 units per year (95% CI, −1.72 to −0.91) during its intervention. During the year after the control group’s intervention, HbA1c increased by 1.18 units per year (95% CI, 0.42 to 1.93). Conclusion Both groups had initial improvements in glycemic control, but HbA1c later plateaued or increased. These results suggest that time-limited CHW programs improve diabetes control in the short term, but ongoing programs are needed for sustained impact. PMID:26491815

  8. Blood glucose levels in diabetic patients following corticosteroid injections into the hand and wrist

    PubMed Central

    Stepan, Jeffrey G.; London, Daniel A.; Boyer, Martin I.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To quantify diabetic patients’ change in blood glucose levels after corticosteroid injection for common hand diseases and to assess which patient-level risk factors may predict an increase in blood glucose levels. Methods Patients were recruited for this case-crossover study in the clinic of fellowship-trained hand surgeons at a tertiary care center. Patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2 receiving a corticosteroid injection recorded their morning fasting blood glucose levels for 14 days after their injection. Fasting glucose levels on days 1–7 after injection qualified as “case” data with levels on days 10–14 providing control data. A mixed model with a priori contrasts were used to compare post-injection blood glucose levels to baseline levels. A linear regression model was used to determine patient predictors of a post-injection rise in blood glucose levels. Results Forty of 67 patients (60%) recruited for the study returned completed blood glucose logs. There was a significant increase in fasting blood glucose levels following injection limited to post-injection days 1 and 2. Among patient risk factors in our linear regression model, type 1 diabetes and use of insulin each predicted a post-injection increase in blood glucose levels from baseline while higher HbA1c levels did not predict increases. Discussion Corticosteroid injections in the hand transiently increase blood glucose levels in diabetic patients. Patients with type 1 diabetes and insulin-dependent diabetics are more likely to experience this transient rise in blood glucose levels. Level of Evidence Therapeutic Level III PMID:24679910

  9. Glycation and Carboxymethyllysine Levels in Skin Collagen Predict the Risk of Future 10-Year Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy and Nephropathy in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Participants With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Genuth, Saul; Sun, Wanjie; Cleary, Patricia; Sell, David R.; Dahms, William; Malone, John; Sivitz, William; Monnier, Vincent M.

    2009-01-01

    Several mechanistic pathways linking hyperglycemia to diabetes complications, including glycation of proteins and formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), have been proposed. We investigated the hypothesis that skin collagen glycation and AGEs predict the risk of progression of microvascular disease. We measured glycation products in the skin collagen of 211 Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) volunteers in 1992 who continued to be followed in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study for 10 years. We determined whether the earlier measurements of glycated collagen and AGE levels correlated with the risk of progression of retinopathy and nephropathy from the end of the DCCT to 10 years later. In multivariate analyses, the combination of furosine (glycated collagen) and carboxymethyllysine (CML) predicted the progression of retinopathy (χ2 = 59.4, P < 0.0001) and nephropathy (χ2 = 18.2, P = 0.0001), even after adjustment for mean HbA1c (A1C) (χ2 = 32.7, P < 0.0001 for retinopathy) and (χ2 = 12.8, P = 0.0016 for nephropathy). The predictive effect of A1C vanished after adjustment for furosine and CML (χ2 = 0.0002, P = 0.987 for retinopathy and χ2 = 0.0002, P = 0.964 for nephropathy). Furosine explained more of the variation in the 10-year progression of retinopathy and nephropathy than did CML. These results strengthen the role of glycation of proteins and AGE formation in the pathogenesis of retinopathy and nephropathy. Glycation and subsequent AGE formation may explain the risk of these complications associated with prior A1C and provide a rational basis for the phenomenon of “metabolic memory” in the pathogenesis of these diabetes complications. PMID:16249432

  10. Diabetes treatment and hypoglycaemic episodes in elderly patients at nursing homes in Uppsala County

    PubMed Central

    Walfridsson, Angelica; Sehlberg, Maja; Gillespie, Ulrika; Dahlkvist, Jonathan; Johansson, Hans-Erik

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to examine the situation for elderly patients with diabetes living in nursing homes with regard to diabetes treatment, clinical variables, and vascular complications associated with diabetes. A second aim was to evaluate if the patients were at risk of hypoglycaemia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study including diabetes patients from all 30 nursing homes in Uppsala County, Sweden. Current antidiabetic medications, HbA1c, hypoglycaemic events, and diabetes complications were registered from the medical records. The patients were stratified into a general group and divided into three groups according to HbA1c (<52, 52–73, and >73 mmol/mol). Results Of 1,350 individuals, 218 patients were identified with diabetes mellitus. The diabetes duration was 11.2 ± 9.4 years and their serum HbA1c concentration 56.0 ± 1.2 mmol/mol. Hypoglycaemic events were reported in 24% of the diabetic individuals, and 43.1% of them had HbA1c <52 mmol/mol (mean value 44.0 ± 1.1 mmol/mol). Of these, 36% were taking antidiabetic drugs. Another 35.8% of the patients had HbA1c values between 52–73 mmol/mol (mean value 60.0 ± 1.1 mmol/mol), and 82% of these patients were taking antidiabetic drugs. Almost 80% of the diabetic patients had either micro- or macrovascular complications, with diabetes duration as an association for both micro- or macrovascular complications and hypoglycaemic events. Conclusions A reduction of the use of antidiabetic drugs with follow-up of HbA1c level should be considered, especially for multimorbid elderly patients with low HbA1c and hypoglycaemia. PMID:27356590

  11. Prevalence of Elevated Glycated Hemoglobin Concentrations in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Anthropometrical and Metabolic Relationship in Amazonian Women

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Sebastiao Freitas; Yamamoto, Marcia Marly Winck; Bueno, Herica Bernardes; Belizario, Danilla; Barbosa, Jacklyne Silva

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and to examine its relationship with other carbohydrate metabolic parameter among Brazilian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods A cross-sectional study including 288 PCOS patients was conducted. Anthropometrical, clinical, biochemical and endocrine parameters were evaluated. Results The mean age was 26.92 ± 5.51 years. HbA1c mean concentration was 5.83±1.34%. In 38.54% of patients, HbA1c was ≥ 5.7%. HbA1c was positively correlated with body weight (r = 0.142, P = 0.017), body mass index (P = 0.000), waist:hip ratio (P = 0.000), fat mass (P = 0.000), conicity index (P = 0.000), triglyceride (P = 0.001), C-peptide (P = 0.000), total testosterone (P = 0.003), free testosterone (P = 0.000), free androgen index (P = 0.006) and fasting insulin (P = 0.025). Using the oral glucose tolerance test, HbA1c showed positive correlation with glucose concentrations at any point in time (P < 0.05). Conclusions HbA1c was elevated in nearly 40% of PCOS patients and it showed positive correlation with several anthropometric and metabolic factors and androgen levels. The current study provides further evidence that HbA1C is higher in PCOS patients and may have a potential role in the prediction of dysglycemic disease in these women. PMID:24883154

  12. The ratio of glycated albumin to hemoglobin A1c measured in IFCC units accurately represents the glycation gap.

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Junya; Mochizuki, Mie; Musha, Ikuma; Ohtake, Akira; Kobayashi, Kisho; Kikuchi, Toru; Kikuchi, Nobuyuki; Kawamura, Tomoyuki; Urakami, Tatsuhiko; Sugihara, Shigetaka; Hoshino, Tadao; Amemiya, Shin

    2015-01-01

    The glycation gap (G-gap: difference between measured hemoglobin A1c [A1C] and the value predicted by its regression on the fructosamine level) is stable and associated with diabetic complications. Measuring A1C level in International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) units (A1C-SI; mmol/mol) and National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program units (A1C-NGSP; %) and using glycated albumin (GA) level instead of fructosamine level for calculating the G-gap, we investigated whether the G-gap is better represented by GA/A1C ratio if expressed in SI units (GA/A1C-SI ratio) rather than in NGSP units (GA/A1C-% ratio). We examined 749 Japanese children with type 1 diabetes using simultaneous GA and A1C measurements. Of these, 369 patients were examined more than five times to assess the consistency of the G-gap and the GA/A1C ratio within individuals. The relationship of GA/A1C-% ratio to the corresponding A1C-NGSP was stronger than that of GA/A1C-SI ratio to A1C-IFCC. At enrollment, the inverse relationship between the GA/A1C-SI ratio and G-gap was highly significant (R(2) = 0.95) compared with that between the GA/A1C-% ratio and G-gap (R(2) = 0.69). A highly significant inverse relationship was also observed between the mean GA/A1C-SI ratio and the mean G-gaps obtained individually over time (R(2) = 0.95) compared with that using the corresponding A1C-NGSP (R(2) = 0.67). We conclude that the G-gap is better represented by the GA/A1C-SI ratio. We propose the use of mean GA/A1C-SI ratios easily obtained individually over time as reference values in Japanese children with type 1 diabetes (6.75 ± 0.60 [means ± SD]). PMID:25367400

  13. Clinical Characteristics of the Responders to Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors in Korean Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tae Jung; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kim, Yeong Gi; Park, Kyeong Seon; Cho, Young Min; Park, Kyong Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon

    2013-01-01

    We investigated characteristics associated with the efficacy of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP4i) in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. We reviewed medical records of 477 patients who had taken sitagliptin or vildagliptin longer than 40 weeks. Response to DPP4i was evaluated with HbA1c change after therapy (ΔHbA1c). The Student's t-test between good responders (GR: ΔHbA1c > 1.0%) and poor responders (PR: ΔHbA1c < 0.5%), a correlation analysis among clinical parameters, and a linear multivariate regression analysis were performed. The mean age was 60 yr, duration of diabetes 11 yr and HbA1c was 8.1%. Baseline fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, C-peptide, and creatinine were significantly higher in the GR compared to the PR. Duration of diabetes, FPG, HbA1c, C-peptide and creatinine were significantly correlated with ΔHbA1c. In the multivariate analysis, age (r2 = 0.006), duration of diabetes (r2 = 0.019), HbA1c (r2 = 0.296), and creatinine levels (r2 = 0.024) were independent predictors for the response to DPP4i. Body mass index and insulin resistance were not associated with the response to DPP4i. In conclusion, better response to DPP4i would be expected in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes who have higher baseline HbA1c and creatinine levels with shorter duration of diabetes. PMID:23772153

  14. Serum magnesium levels in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Dipankar; Osta, Manish; Mandal, Tridibeswar; Bandyopadhyay, Ujjwal; Ray, Debes; Gautam, Divyendu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Hypomagnesemia has been reported to occur at an increased frequency among patients with type 2 diabetes compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Hypomagnesemia has been linked to poor glycemic control. Many studies have been undergone to find out the precipitated factors of retinopathy such as duration and type of diabetes, hyperglycemia, hypomagnesemia and increased urinary total protein levels. Aim: This study was carried out to study the correlation between serum magnesium levels, glycosylated hemoglobin and urinary total protein levels in diabetic patients with retinopathy. Materials and Methods: The study population comprised of 30 type 2 diabetic patients without retinopathy as Group 2, 30 type 2 diabetic patients with retinopathy as Group 3 in the age group 45-75 years as cases and 60 age and sex matched healthy individuals as controls (Group 1). Determination of Serum Magnesium (photometric xylidyl blue method), glycosylated hemoglobin, Hb1C (IFCC), fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose (glucose oxidase method) and urine total protein (Pyrogallol red method) was carried out. The statistical software SPSS 11.0 and Systat 8.0 were used for the analysis of the data. Results: Hypomagnesemia was observed in cases compared with both Group 2 and Group 3. FBS, PPBS, HbA1c, Urine total protein levels were increased in cases (without retinopathy and with retinopathy) compared with controls. Conclusion: Hypomagnesemia and albuminuria individually or in conjunction serve as indicators for dysglycemia and could be used as marker for the risk of development of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:23633845

  15. Data analytics identify glycated haemoglobin co-markers for type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Herbert F; Stranieri, Andrew; Yatsko, Andrew; Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    2016-08-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is being more commonly used as an alternative test for the identification of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or to add to fasting blood glucose level and oral glucose tolerance test results, because it is easily obtained using point-of-care technology and represents long-term blood sugar levels. HbA1c cut-off values of 6.5% or above have been recommended for clinical use based on the presence of diabetic comorbidities from population studies. However, outcomes of large trials with a HbA1c of 6.5% as a cut-off have been inconsistent for a diagnosis of T2DM. This suggests that a HbA1c cut-off of 6.5% as a single marker may not be sensitive enough or be too simple and miss individuals at risk or with already overt, undiagnosed diabetes. In this study, data mining algorithms have been applied on a large clinical dataset to identify an optimal cut-off value for HbA1c and to identify whether additional biomarkers can be used together with HbA1c to enhance diagnostic accuracy of T2DM. T2DM classification accuracy increased if 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OhdG), an oxidative stress marker, was included in the algorithm from 78.71% for HbA1c at 6.5% to 86.64%. A similar result was obtained when interleukin-6 (IL-6) was included (accuracy=85.63%) but with a lower optimal HbA1c range between 5.73 and 6.22%. The application of data analytics to medical records from the Diabetes Screening programme demonstrates that data analytics, combined with large clinical datasets can be used to identify clinically appropriate cut-off values and identify novel biomarkers that when included improve the accuracy of T2DM diagnosis even when HbA1c levels are below or equal to the current cut-off of 6.5%. PMID:27268735

  16. Local descriptive norms for overweight/obesity and physical inactivity, features of the built environment, and 10-year change in glycosylated haemoglobin in an Australian population-based biomedical cohort.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Suzanne J; Paquet, Catherine; Howard, Natasha J; Coffee, Neil T; Taylor, Anne W; Niyonsenga, Theo; Daniel, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Descriptive norms vary between places. Spatial variation in health-related descriptive norms may predict individual-level health outcomes. Such relationships have rarely been investigated. This study assessed 10-year change in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in relation to local descriptive norms for overweight/obesity (n = 1890) and physical inactivity (n = 1906) in models accounting for features of the built environment. HbA1c was measured three times over 10 years for a population-based biomedical cohort of adults in Adelaide, South Australia. Environmental exposures were expressed for cohort participants using 1600 m road-network buffers centred on participants' residential address. Local descriptive norms (prevalence of overweight/obesity [body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)] and of physical inactivity [<150 min/week]) were aggregated from responses to a separate geocoded population survey. Built environment measures were public open space (POS) availability (proportion of buffer area) and walkability. Separate sets of multilevel models analysed different predictors of 10-year change in HbA1c. Each model featured one local descriptive norm and one built environment variable with area-level education and individual-level covariates (age, sex, employment status, education, marital status, and smoking status). Interactions between local descriptive norms and built environment measures were assessed. HbA1c increased over time. POS availability and local descriptive norms for overweight/obesity and physical inactivity were each associated with greater rates of HbA1c increase. Greater walkability was associated with a reduced rate of HbA1c increase, and reduced the influence of the overweight/obesity norm on the rate of increase in HbA1c. Local descriptive health-related norms and features of the built environment predict 10-year change in HbA1c. The impact of local descriptive norms can vary according to built environment features. Little researched thus far

  17. Pharmacological primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention among diabetic patients in a multiethnic general practice population: still room for improvements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnic minority groups have higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We assessed general practitioners’ (GPs’) performance with respect to the pharmacological prevention of CVD in patients with T2DM from different ethnic backgrounds in Oslo. Methods Of 1653 T2DM patients cared for by 49 GPs in 2005, 380 had a diagnosis of CVD. Ethnicity was categorized as Norwegian, South Asian and other. Risk factor levels, medication use, achievement of treatment targets (HbA1c ≤ 7.5%, systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤ 140 mmHg, total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol < 4) and therapeutic intensity (number of drugs targeting each risk factor) were recorded. Chi-square, Wald tests and multiple linear regression analyses were used. Results Of the 1273 patients receiving primary prevention, 1.5% had their Hb1Ac, 4.8% SBP and 12.7% lipids levels above treatment thresholds without relevant prescriptions. Among patients on pharmacological therapy, 66% reached the HbA1c, 62% SBP and 62% lipid target. Proportions not achieving the HbA1c target were 26% in Norwegians, 38% in South Asians and 29% in others (p = 0.008). Proportions not achieving the SBP target were 42% in Norwegians, 22% in South Asians and 25% in others (p ≤ 0.001). Of those not achieving the HbA1c and SBP targets, 43% and 35% respectively, used only one agent. In secondary prevention, 0.8% of the patients had their HbA1c, 0.5% SBP and 7.4% lipid levels above treatment thresholds without relevant prescriptions. Among patients on pharmacological therapy, 65% reached the HbA1c, 64% SBP and 66% lipid target. Proportions not achieving the HbA1c target were 26% in Norwegians, 47% in South Asians and 40% in others (p = 0.03). Proportions not achieving the SBP target were 36% in Norwegians, 22% in South Asians and 56% in others (p = 0.050). Of those not achieving HbA1c and SBP targets, 49% and 21% respectively, were on mono-therapy. Conclusions Norwegian GPs comply

  18. Relationship Between A1C and Fasting Plasma Glucose in Dysglycemia or Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Ambady; Riddle, Matthew C.; Kabali, Conrad; Gerstein, Hertzel C.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A1C measurement has advantages over measures of plasma glucose. Few studies have evaluated the A1C–fasting plasma glucose (FPG) relationship and whether oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) and ethnic or geographic variations affect the relationship. Baseline A1C and FPG data from the Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN) trial participants were analyzed to 1) elucidate the relationship between A1C and FPG in people with moderate dysglycemia (A1C 5.6–9.0% [38–75 mmol/mol]) and additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, 2) determine whether this relationship is altered by use of an OAD, and 3) study whether geographic and ethnic differences exist. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Analysis was performed of 12,527 participants with dysglycemia or early type 2 diabetes recruited in North America, South America, Europe, Australia, and Asia who comprised white, Latin American, Asian, black, and other ethnicities. The A1C-FPG relationships were analyzed using cubic B spline curves in all participants and in subgroups not using an OAD or using an OAD and comprising persons of different ethnic or geographic origin. RESULTS A strong relationship between FPG in the range of 5.6–9.0 mmol/L and the corresponding A1C was seen across different geographic regions and ethnic groups. A smaller increase in A1C per unit increase in FPG occurred for persons taking an OAD versus those not taking an OAD. CONCLUSIONS The strong relationship between A1C and FPG in moderate dysglycemia is not significantly affected by ethnic or geographic differences. Use of an OAD alters the relationship and should be considered when interpreting A1C level. PMID:22323416

  19. The Association Between A1C and Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, Marguerite J.; McClelland, Robyn L.; Bild, Diane E.; Jacobs, David R.; Tracy, Russell P.; Cushman, Mary; Goff, David C.; Astor, Brad C.; Shea, Steven; Siscovick, David S.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that A1C is associated with subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a population without evident diabetes, after adjusting for traditional CVD risk factors and BMI. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study of 5,121 participants without clinically evident CVD or diabetes (fasting glucose ≥7.0 mmol/l or use of diabetes medication), aged 47–86 years, enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Measurements included carotid intimal-medial wall thickness (CIMT) and coronary artery calcification (CAC). Results were adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, smoking, systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, antihypertensive medication use, lipid-lowering medication use, and BMI. RESULTS Compared with those in the lowest quartile for A1C ([mean ± SD] 5.0 ± 0.2%), participants in the highest quartile (6.0 ± 0.3%) had higher adjusted mean values for common CIMT (0.85 vs. 0.87 mm, P = 0.003) and internal CIMT (1.01 vs. 1.08 mm, P = 0.003). A1C quartile was not associated with prevalence of CAC in the entire cohort (P = 0.27); however, the association was statistically significant in women (adjusted prevalence of CAC in lowest and highest A1C quartiles 37.5 vs. 43.0%, P = 0.01). Among those with some CAC, higher A1C quartile tended to be associated with higher CAC score, but the results were not statistically significant (adjusted P = 0.11). CONCLUSIONS In this multiethnic cohort, there were small, positive associations between A1C, common CIMT, and internal CIMT in the absence of clinically evident diabetes. An association between higher A1C and CAC prevalence was evident only in women. PMID:19549732

  20. Glycosylated haemoglobin for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Eileen; Al-Barazan, Abdul Majeed; Nikakis, Irena; Radford, Andrea; Clarkson, Wade; Trevett, Clinton; Brain, Terry; Gebski, Val; Corbould, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a cumbersome test that is time consuming, labour intensive and often poorly tolerated by pregnant women. To date, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is the most accepted measure of chronic glycaemia outside of pregnancy. HbA1c is an uncomplicated test, less time consuming, does not require any specific patient preparation and is considered straightforward compared with the OGTT. Therefore, we prospectively tested the utility of the HbA1c when used as a screening tool in pregnancy for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Settings Primary health care. Single tertiary referral centre, Tasmania, Australia. Participants A direct comparison between HbA1c levels and the OGTT results in pregnant women, tested concurrently at the 24–28 gestational week, was undertaken. A full profile of 480 pregnant women during the period from September 2012 to July 2014 was completed. Median and mean age of participants was 29 years (range 18–47 years). Interventions A simultaneous prospective assessment of HbA1c versus standard OGTT in a cohort of consecutive pregnant women presenting to our institute was performed. Results The number of women who had GDM according to OGTT criteria was 57, representing 11.9% of the evaluated 480 pregnant women. Using a cut-off value for HbA1c at 5.1% (32 mmol/mol) for detecting GDM showed sensitivity of 61% and specificity of 68% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 93%, versus sensitivity of 27% and specificity of 95% with NPV of 91% when using HbA1c cut-off value of 5.4% (36 mmol/mol). Conclusions Our results suggest that pregnant women with an HbA1c of≥5.4% (36 mmol/mol) should proceed with an OGTT. This may result in a significant reduction in the burden of testing on both patients and testing facility staff and resources. Further investigations are required to integrate and optimise the HbA1c as a single, non-fasting, screening tool for GDM. Trial registration number ACTRN

  1. Improving Care in Older Patients with Diabetes: A Focus on Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eric A; Gibbs, Nancy E; Martin, John; Ziel, Fred; Polzin, Jennifer K; Palmer-Toy, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 25% of Americans older than age 65 years. The medical care of older patients must differ from the care of their younger counterparts. Older patients are at high risk of drug toxicity. A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level less than 7.0% has historically been the goal of all patients with diabetes, regardless of age. Recent research has demonstrated that using medications to achieve such tight glycemic control is not necessary and is often not safe. This article discusses the seminal research findings that strongly suggest that HbA1c goals should be relaxed in older patients. The authors then recommend an age-specific and functionally appropriate HbA1c reference range for patients receiving medications to improve glycemic control. Other interventions are suggested that should make diabetes care safer in older patients receiving hypoglycemic medications. PMID:27352408

  2. Improving Care in Older Patients with Diabetes: A Focus on Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Gibbs, Nancy E; Martin, John; Ziel, Fred; Polzin, Jennifer K; Palmer-Toy, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 25% of Americans older than age 65 years. The medical care of older patients must differ from the care of their younger counterparts. Older patients are at high risk of drug toxicity. A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level less than 7.0% has historically been the goal of all patients with diabetes, regardless of age. Recent research has demonstrated that using medications to achieve such tight glycemic control is not necessary and is often not safe.This article discusses the seminal research findings that strongly suggest that HbA1c goals should be relaxed in older patients. The authors then recommend an age-specific and functionally appropriate HbA1c reference range for patients receiving medications to improve glycemic control. Other interventions are suggested that should make diabetes care safer in older patients receiving hypoglycemic medications. PMID:27352408

  3. Selective label-free electrochemical impedance measurement of glycated haemoglobin on 3-aminophenylboronic acid-modified eggshell membranes.

    PubMed

    Boonyasit, Yuwadee; Heiskanen, Arto; Chailapakul, Orawan; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida

    2015-07-01

    We propose a novel alternative approach to long-term glycaemic monitoring using eggshell membranes (ESMs) as a new immobilising platform for the selective label-free electrochemical sensing of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), a vital clinical index of the glycaemic status in diabetic individuals. Due to the unique features of a novel 3-aminophenylboronic acid-modified ESM, selective binding was obtained via cis-diol interactions. This newly developed device provides clinical applicability as an affinity membrane-based biosensor for the identification of HbA1c over a clinically relevant range (2.3 - 14 %) with a detection limit of 0.19%. The proposed membrane-based biosensor also exhibited good reproducibility. When analysing normal and abnormal HbA1c levels, the within-run coefficients of variation were 1.68 and 1.83%, respectively. The run-to-run coefficients of variation were 1.97 and 2.02%, respectively. These results demonstrated that this method achieved the precise and selective measurement of HbA1c. Compared with a commercial HbA1c kit, the results demonstrated excellent agreement between the techniques (n = 15), demonstrating the clinical applicability of this sensor for monitoring glycaemic control. Thus, this low-cost sensing platform using the proposed membrane-based biosensor is ideal for point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:25956596

  4. Randomized trial showing efficacy and safety of twice-daily remogliflozin etabonate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sykes, A P; O'Connor-Semmes, R; Dobbins, R; Dorey, D J; Lorimer, J D; Walker, S; Wilkison, W O; Kler, L

    2015-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of twice-daily doses of remogliflozin etabonate (RE) and once-daily pioglitazone with placebo for reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration. In this 12-week, double-blind, randomized, active- and placebo-controlled trial, 336 treatment-naïve subjects with type 2 diabetes and an HbA1c of 7.0-9.5% (53-80 mmol/mol) were randomized to RE (50, 100, 250, 500 or 1000 mg twice daily), matching placebo or 30 mg pioglitazone once daily. The primary endpoint was change in HbA1c from baseline. Other endpoints included changes in body weight, lipid levels, safety and tolerability. RE produced a decreasing dose response in HbA1c at week 12 (p < 0.001), with reductions in HbA1c versus placebo ranging from 0.64 to 1.07% (p < 0.001). Statistically significant reductions in body weight for RE compared with placebo were also observed. Twice-daily RE resulted in a dose-ordered improvement in glycaemic control and was generally well tolerated. PMID:25223369

  5. Improvement in glycated haemoglobin evaluated by baseline body mass index: a meta-analysis of the liraglutide phase III clinical trial programme.

    PubMed

    Montanya, E; Fonseca, V; Colagiuri, S; Blonde, L; Donsmark, M; Nauck, M A

    2016-07-01

    In the liraglutide clinical trial programme, liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg were found to effectively lower glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). It is unknown whether baseline body mass index (BMI) is a predictor of change in HbA1c observed during a clinical trial with liraglutide or placebo treatment. The present meta-analysis of patient-level data, using pooled data from seven phase III trials [LEAD-1-6 and the liraglutide versus sitagliptin trial (LIRA-DPP-4)] for liraglutide 1.2, 1.8 mg and placebo (n = 3222), identified no significant correlation between baseline BMI (<20 kg/m(2) up to 45 kg/m(2) ) and HbA1c reduction for placebo or liraglutide 1.2 mg, and a modest, clinically non-relevant, association for liraglutide 1.8 mg [-0.010 (95% confidence interval -0.020, -0.001)], whereby a 10 kg/m(2) increase in baseline BMI corresponded to 0.10%-point (1.1 mmol/mol) greater HbA1c reduction. In summary, reductions in HbA1c obtained during clinical trials with liraglutide or placebo treatment were independent of baseline BMI. PMID:26662611

  6. Flexible Lifestyles for Youth (FL3X) behavioural intervention for at-risk adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: a randomized pilot and feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Davis, E. J.; Seid, M.; Crandell, J.; Dolan, L.; Lagarde, W. H.; Letourneau, L.; Maahs, D. M.; Marcovina, S.; Nachreiner, J.; Standiford, D.; Thomas, J.; Wysocki, T.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine the potential effect sizes for the Flexible Lifestyle for Youth (FL3X) behavioural intervention to improve glycaemic control (HbA1c) and quality of life for at-risk adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. Methods Participants [n=61; age 12–16 years, HbA1c 64–119 mmol/mol (8–13%)] were randomized to FL3X (minimum three sessions) or usual care. Effect sizes (Cohen’s d), comparing the mean difference between the groups, were calculated. Results Study retention (95%), attendance at intervention sessions (87% attended all three sessions) and acceptability were high (100% of the adolescents and 91% of parents would recommend the programme to others). Overall, 41% of participants in the intervention group and 24% of participants in the control group were ‘responders’ [HbA1c decreased by > 6 mmol/mol (0.5%); d=0.37]. HbA1c levels decreased (d= −0.18), diabetes-specific quality of life increased (d=0.29), but generic quality of life decreased (d= −0.23) in the intervention compared with the control group. Conclusions The FL3X programme merits further study for improving HbA1c and diabetes-specific quality of life in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. PMID:25424501

  7. Selecting an A1C Point-of-Care Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Ee Vonn; Rasinen, Casey

    2015-01-01

    A1C point-of-care (POC) instruments benefit patients with diabetes by facilitating clinician decision making that results in significant glycemic improvements. Three National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP)–certified POC products are available in the United States: the handheld A1CNow (formerly manufactured by Bayer Diabetes Care but now made by Chek Diagnostics) and two bench-top models called the Axis-Shield Afinion Analyzer and the Siemens DCA Vantage. This article compares the three available NGSP-certified POC products in terms of accuracy, precision, ease of use, cost, and additional features. Its goal is to aid health care facilities in conveniently identifying the A1C POC product that best meets their needs. It additionally reviews evidence that supports the continued use of A1C POC instruments in the clinical arena. PMID:26300614

  8. Implication of Low HDL-c Levels in Patients with Average LDL-c Levels: A Focus on Oxidized LDL, Large HDL Subpopulation, and Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas-Melo, Filipa; Sereno, José; Teixeira-Lemos, Edite; Marado, Daniela; Palavra, Filipe; Pinto, Rui; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Teixeira, Frederico; Reis, Flávio

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) on patients with LDL-c average levels, focusing on oxidative, lipidic, and inflammatory profiles. Patients with cardiovascular risk factors (n = 169) and control subjects (n = 73) were divided into 2 subgroups, one of normal HDL-c and the other of low HDL-c levels. The following data was analyzed: BP, BMI, waist circumference and serum glucose Total-c, TGs, LDL-c, oxidized LDL, total HDL-c and subpopulations (small, intermediate, and large), paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, hsCRP, uric acid, TNF-α, adiponectin, VEGF, and iCAM1. In the control subgroup with low HDL-c levels, significantly higher values of BP and TGs and lower values of PON1 activity and adiponectin were found, versus control normal HDL-c subgroup. However, differences in patients' subgroups were clearly more pronounced. Indeed, low HDL-c subgroup presented increased HbA1c, TGs, non-HDL-c, Ox-LDL, hsCRP, VEGF, and small HDL-c and reduced adiponectin and large HDL. In addition, Ox-LDL, large-HDL-c, and adiponectin presented interesting correlations with classical and nonclassical markers, mainly in the normal HDL-c patients' subgroup. In conclusion, despite LDL-c average levels, low HDL-c concentrations seem to be associated with a poor cardiometabolic profile in a population with cardiovascular risk factors, which is better evidenced by traditional and nontraditional CV biomarkers, including Ox-LDL, large HDL-c, and adiponectin. PMID:24282340

  9. Glycated Albumin versus Glycated Hemoglobin as a Glycemic Indicator in Diabetic Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroki; Abe, Masanori; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Hiroko; Maruyama, Noriaki; Okada, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), glycated albumin (GA) is superior in estimating glycemic control in diabetic patients on hemodialysis (HD). However, the better index for assessment of glycemic control in diabetic patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) and the impact of protein loss on GA are unknown. Twenty diabetic patients on HD were matched by age, sex, and baseline postprandial plasma glucose (PG) levels to 20 PD patients. PG, HbA1c, GA, and serum albumin levels were measured for six months. Protein loss in PD patients was estimated by measuring the protein concentration in the peritoneal dialysate and by 24 h urine collection. Although PG and HbA1c did not differ significantly between the groups, the PD group had significantly lower GA (17.8% versus 20.8%, p < 0.001) and GA/HbA1c ratio (2.95% versus 3.45%, p < 0.0001) than the HD group. Although the PG level correlated significantly with the GA levels in both groups, it was not correlated with the HbA1c levels in both groups. HbA1c level was negatively associated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) dose in both groups, whereas GA was not significantly associated with serum albumin, hemoglobin concentration, ESA dose, and protein loss. Multiple regression analysis identified GA as the only independent factor associated with PG in PD patients. Our results suggested that GA was not significantly associated with protein loss, hemoglobin, serum albumin, and ESA dose. Although GA might underestimate glycemic status, it provided a significantly better measure for estimating glycemic control than HbA1c, even in PD patients. PMID:27120597

  10. Glycated Albumin versus Glycated Hemoglobin as a Glycemic Indicator in Diabetic Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroki; Abe, Masanori; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Hiroko; Maruyama, Noriaki; Okada, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), glycated albumin (GA) is superior in estimating glycemic control in diabetic patients on hemodialysis (HD). However, the better index for assessment of glycemic control in diabetic patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) and the impact of protein loss on GA are unknown. Twenty diabetic patients on HD were matched by age, sex, and baseline postprandial plasma glucose (PG) levels to 20 PD patients. PG, HbA1c, GA, and serum albumin levels were measured for six months. Protein loss in PD patients was estimated by measuring the protein concentration in the peritoneal dialysate and by 24 h urine collection. Although PG and HbA1c did not differ significantly between the groups, the PD group had significantly lower GA (17.8% versus 20.8%, p < 0.001) and GA/HbA1c ratio (2.95% versus 3.45%, p < 0.0001) than the HD group. Although the PG level correlated significantly with the GA levels in both groups, it was not correlated with the HbA1c levels in both groups. HbA1c level was negatively associated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) dose in both groups, whereas GA was not significantly associated with serum albumin, hemoglobin concentration, ESA dose, and protein loss. Multiple regression analysis identified GA as the only independent factor associated with PG in PD patients. Our results suggested that GA was not significantly associated with protein loss, hemoglobin, serum albumin, and ESA dose. Although GA might underestimate glycemic status, it provided a significantly better measure for estimating glycemic control than HbA1c, even in PD patients. PMID:27120597

  11. High Serum Irisin Level as an Independent Predictor of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Ji Hye; Ahn, Song Vogue; Choi, Jung Hye; Koh, Sang Baek; Chung, Choon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, has been suggested to regulate energy homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. However, it remains unclear whether circulating irisin plays a role in the development of DM in human. We investigated the possible association between circulating irisin levels and incident DM in a 2.6-year longitudinal study of a population-based cohort comprised of rural Korean subjects. We conducted a longitudinal study within the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study on Atherosclerosis Risk of Rural Areas in the Korean General Population (KoGES-ARIRANG) study from November 2005 to January 2008. Cases (n=85) were patients with incident DM during the follow-up period and controls (n = 85) were matched to incident DM cases based on sex and age at baseline. The relative risk of serum irisin/adiponectin level for incident DM was analyzed using conditional logistic regression analysis. Baseline irisin_ENREF_1 levels were significantly higher in subjects who developed DM than in subjects who did not. The serum irisin level was positively associated with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and postprandial glucose. Irisin was negatively associated with adiponectin (R = –0.189, P = 0.014). After adjustment for potential confounders, including body mass index, the odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for incident DM increased in a graded manner as the serum irisin level increased (Quartile 1 vs Quartile 2 vs Quartile 3 vs Quartile 4 = 1 vs 0.80 [0.28–2.35] vs 3.33 [1.11–10.00] vs 4.10 [1.35–12.44], respectively), whereas the odds ratios for incident DM decreased in a graded manner as the serum adiponectin level increased. High serum irisin was independently associated with the development of DM, indicating that irisin may be a useful predictor of DM in Korean adults. PMID:27281072

  12. Effects of a low-carbohydrate diet on glycemic control in outpatients with severe type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Haimoto, Hajime; Sasakabe, Tae; Wakai, Kenji; Umegaki, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a loosely restricted 45%-carbohydrate diet led to greater reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) compared to high-carbohydrate diets in outpatients with mild type 2 diabetes (mean HbA1c level: 7.4%) over 2 years. To determine whether good glycemic control can be achieved with a 30%-carbohydrate diet in severe type 2 diabetes, 33 outpatients (15 males, 18 females, mean age: 59 yrs) with HbA1c levels of 9.0% or above were instructed to follow a low-carbohydrate diet (1852 kcal; %CHO:fat:protein = 30:44:20) for 6 months in an outpatient clinic and were followed to assess their HbA1c levels, body mass index and doses of antidiabetic drugs. HbA1c levels decreased sharply from a baseline of 10.9 ± 1.6% to 7.8 ± 1.5% at 3 months and to 7.4 ± 1.4% at 6 months. Body mass index decreased slightly from baseline (23.8 ± 3.3) to 6 months (23.5 ± 3.4). Only two patients dropped out. No adverse effects were observed except for mild constipation. The number of patients on sulfonylureas decreased from 7 at baseline to 2 at 6 months. No patient required inpatient care or insulin therapy. In summary, the 30%-carbohydrate diet over 6 months led to a remarkable reduction in HbA1c levels, even among outpatients with severe type 2 diabetes, without any insulin therapy, hospital care or increase in sulfonylureas. The effectiveness of the diet may be comparable to that of insulin therapy. PMID:19419563

  13. A Five-Year Prospective Study of Diabetic Retinopathy Progression in Chinese Type 2 Diabetes Patients with “Well-Controlled” Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Peiyao; Peng, Jinjuan; Zou, Haidong; Wang, Weiwei; Fu, Jiong; Shen, Binjie; Bai, Xuelin; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the progression rate and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients who have reached the target hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level recommended by the American Diabetes Association. Methods This was a 5-year community-based prospective study. The study population consisted of patients with type 2 diabetes with HbA1c less than 7.0%. Demographic information, systemic examination results and ophthalmological test results for each participant were collected. The outcome of this study was the progression of DR, which was defined as an increase in DR grade in one or both eyes at the final visit in comparison to the baseline status. The association between each potential risk factor and DR progression was studied. Results A total of 453 patients with HbA1c less than 7.0% were included in the study group. In 146 patients (32.22%), DR developed or progressed during the five-year follow-up. Baseline HbA1c level was the only independent risk factor for DR progression (p<0.01, OR = 2.84, 95%CI: 2.11~3.82). The logistic regression function suggested that the possibility of DR progression increased fastest when baseline HbA1c increased from 5.2% to 6.4%. The 5-year DR progression rate in patients with baseline HbA1c less than 5.2%, between 5.2% and 6.4%, and over 6.4% were 19.62%, 24.41%, and 76.83%, respectively. Conclusions To slow the progression of DR in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes, more intensive glucose control is recommended. PMID:25849536

  14. Once Daily Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Improves Glycemic Control in Oral Hypoglycemic Agents (OHA)–Treated Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Harashima, Shin-ichi; Nishimura, Akiko; Ikeda, Kaori; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yanyan; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare glycemic control between SMBG-continued and -discontinued subjects with type 2 diabetes in the SMBG-OHA study. Method: Of the 96 subjects from the SMBG-OHA study, 59 were recruited for the 24-week, comparison follow-up study. The study outcomes were the differences in change in HbA1c levels at 24 weeks between the 2 groups, and change in SMBG frequency in SMBG-continued subjects. Results: Although health insurance does not cover the cost of SMBG, 22.0% of subjects continued SMBG of their own will after the SMBG-OHA study was completed. HbA1c levels were maintained from 6.81 ± 0.55% to 6.64 ± 0.53% in SMBG-continued subjects. Conversely, HbA1c levels were increased from 7.18 ± 0.63% to 7.48 ± 0.84% in SMBG-discontinued subjects. HbA1c levels were significantly different by 0.83 ± 0.25% (95% CI: −1.33 to −0.36). The difference in change in HbA1c between the groups was −0.46% (95% CI: −0.78 to −0.15). SMBG frequency was decreased from 2.02 ± 1.06 to 1.53 ± 0.86 times a day. Conclusions: HbA1c levels were maintained in SMBG-continued subjects but increased in SMBG-discontinued subjects. The study implied that almost once daily SMBG is helpful to maintain glycemic control in non-insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. PMID:26428934

  15. Therapeutic effects of Citrullus colocynthis fruit in patients with type II diabetes: A clinical trial study

    PubMed Central

    Barghamdi, Batol; Ghorat, Fereshteh; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Peyghambari, Robab; Abangah, Ghobad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Citrullus colocynthis plant was traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in Sabzevar city, Iran. This study aimed to investigate the effects of C. colocythis on fasting blood sugar (FBS) and HbA1c in patients with type II diabetes. Materials and Methods: Totally 70 patients with type II diabetes attending the diabetes clinic in Sabzevar city were investigated. Patients were divided into two groups of intervention and placebo randomly and were studied for 2 months. Mean serum level of FBS and HbA1c was compared within and between groups at the end of the study. Data were analyzed using student and paired t-tests via SPSS software version 16. Results: A significant difference was revealed between before and after intervention for HbA1c and FBS levels in the intervention group (P = 0.01 and P = 0.04, respectively). The difference between before and after intervention for FBS and HbA1c levels in the placebo group were not significant (P = 0.8, P = 0.68 respectively). This study showed a negative relationship between either the mean ± standard deviation serum level of FBS or HbA1c and body mass index in the treatment group significantly (P = 0.03, 0.008, respectively). The present study did not identify any side effects during the study period among the treatment group. Conclusion: According to the findings of this study, application of 125 mg C. colocynthis once per day for 2 months can lead to considerable decrease in the mean levels of HbA1c and FBS among the patients with type II diabetes without any side effects. PMID:27134465

  16. High Serum Irisin Level as an Independent Predictor of Diabetes Mellitus: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Huh, Ji Hye; Ahn, Song Vogue; Choi, Jung Hye; Koh, Sang Baek; Chung, Choon Hee

    2016-06-01

    Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, has been suggested to regulate energy homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. However, it remains unclear whether circulating irisin plays a role in the development of DM in human. We investigated the possible association between circulating irisin levels and incident DM in a 2.6-year longitudinal study of a population-based cohort comprised of rural Korean subjects.We conducted a longitudinal study within the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study on Atherosclerosis Risk of Rural Areas in the Korean General Population (KoGES-ARIRANG) study from November 2005 to January 2008. Cases (n=85) were patients with incident DM during the follow-up period and controls (n = 85) were matched to incident DM cases based on sex and age at baseline. The relative risk of serum irisin/adiponectin level for incident DM was analyzed using conditional logistic regression analysis.Baseline irisin_ENREF_1 levels were significantly higher in subjects who developed DM than in subjects who did not. The serum irisin level was positively associated with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and postprandial glucose. Irisin was negatively associated with adiponectin (R = -0.189, P = 0.014). After adjustment for potential confounders, including body mass index, the odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for incident DM increased in a graded manner as the serum irisin level increased (Quartile 1 vs Quartile 2 vs Quartile 3 vs Quartile 4 = 1 vs 0.80 [0.28-2.35] vs 3.33 [1.11-10.00] vs 4.10 [1.35-12.44], respectively), whereas the odds ratios for incident DM decreased in a graded manner as the serum adiponectin level increased.High serum irisin was independently associated with the development of DM, indicating that irisin may be a useful predictor of DM in Korean adults. PMID:27281072

  17. Adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes can benefit from coaching: a case report and discussion.

    PubMed

    Ammentorp, Jette; Thomsen, Jane; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2013-09-01

    Traditional interventions aimed at improving patient self-management and at motivating the patients to change behaviour seem to be insufficient in adolescents with very high HbA1c. In this paper we present a case consisting of nine adolescents with poorly controlled diabetes type 1. They had previously shown continuously high levels of HbA1c for 2 years despite intensive follow-up and were therefore invited to participate in a coaching program. The coaching program was conducted by professional certified coaches and consisted of two group and eight individual coaching sessions. After completing the coaching sessions, HbA1c had decreased significantly in six out of nine of the adolescents. The participants were interviewed twice following the coaching sessions. All participants reported that they found the sessions very rewarding, and several explained that they now saw themselves differently and had gained more self-esteem and more energy. PMID:23900748

  18. Efficacy of five-element gymnastics in glucose and lipid control in Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiu-Ling; Tai, Yen-Kuang; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine the efficacy of Five-Element Gymnastics (FEG) in controlling glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) at the 8th and the 16th weeks of intervention for patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan. FEG consolidates several traditional Chinese exercises including Qigong, Xiang Gong, and martial arts with gymnastics. The experimental group (n = 31) practiced FEG at home for 16 weeks. The control group (n = 35) maintained usual activities. FEG was associated with decrease of HbA1C, TG, and LDL-C levels at the 8th week and continuous decrease of HbA1C through the 16th week. FEG could be an exercise choice for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22495908

  19. Uncontrolled diabetes predicts poor response to novel antiandrogens.

    PubMed

    Karantanos, Theodoros; Karanika, Styliani; Gignac, Gretchen

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic abnormalities including hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia have been associated with worse prognosis of prostate cancer (PCa), but there are limited data regarding their impact on the prognosis of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and the response of novel antiandrogens, namely abiraterone acetate (AA) and enzalutamide. Retrospective analysis of 61 patients with CRPC on AA or enzalutamide, treated at the Boston Medical Center, was performed. We evaluated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), HDL, LDL, Triglycerides and BMI within 2months before the initiation of treatment with AA or enzalutamide and progression-free survival (PFS) under this treatment. Regression analysis and analysis of variance were used to evaluate the data. HbA1c levels were found to predict adversely the PFS on the novel agents (df (1, 37), P=0.00, R(2)=0.40, coeff=-3.28). The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that there is significant difference in survival between the HbA1c 4.7-5.9% compared with patients with HbA1c 7.8-11.6% (6.72±1.3months, log rank test P<0.0001) LDL (P=0.07), HDL (P=0.14), and triglycerides (P=0.33) were not found to predict PFS. BMI predicted PFS positively (df (1.59), P=0.02, R(2)=0.09, coeff=0.03), but not independently of HbA1c (P=0.07). No significant implications of social and family history, previous chemotherapy regimen, and Gleason score with PFS were found. Multiple markers of patients' health state were not associated with HbA1c values. Uncontrolled diabetes can predict for poor response of CRPC patients to AA and enzalutamide determining PFS under this treatment. Elevated BMI can positively affect PFS at this stage of disease. PMID:27515296

  20. Evaluation Series on Safety and Efficacy of Nutritional Supplements in Newly Diagnosed Hyperglycemia: A Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Hemant; Bantwal, Ganapati; Jain, Sunil; Kalra, Sanjay; Kale, Shailaja; Saboo, Banshi; Gupta, Jugal B.; Sivam, Sakthivel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is endemic with developing economies contributing to the bulk of this pandemic. Despite the evidence of incremental benefit of glycemic control starting early in life, acceptance of and adherence to modern medications remain suboptimal. Aims: To determine the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)-lowering efficacy and safety of nutritional supplement, PreCrea®, in adult Indians with newly diagnosed hyperglycemia. Materials and Methods: Double-blind, randomized study conducted in six diabetes centers in India. A total of 193 treatment-naïve subjects with newly diagnosed hyperglycemia and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) >100 mg/dL were randomized into either PreCrea® 600 mg (n = 90) or matched placebo (n = 89) capsules twice daily, along with lifestyle modification, for 12 weeks. The main outcomes were changes in HbA1c and FPG levels, attainment of the American Diabetes Association (ADA)-defined goals for HbA1c, and clinical and biochemical measures of safety. Results: At 12 weeks, mean HbA1c in PreCrea® group reduced by 0.91% compared with 0.08% increase in the placebo group (P < .001). The reductions in the mean FPG at week 4 (P < .001) and week 12 (P = 0.04) were significant compared to the baseline. ADA goal of HbA1c <7% increased from 15.5% at the baseline to 35.6% at week 12 in PreCrea® subjects. Clinical safety and biochemical safety did not change. Hypoglycemia and weight gain were not observed with PreCrea®. Conclusions: Nearly 1% point reduction in HbA1c at week 12 with PreCrea® is comparable with most first-line glucose-lowering drugs. The safety and tolerability of PreCrea® highlights its potential as a first-line therapy in newly detected hyperglycemia. PMID:27042609

  1. PPAR-α Agonist Fenofibrate Decreased RANTES Levels in Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomeng; Gao, Xia; Jia, Yumei; Zhang, Heng; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Regulated upon activation, normal T cells expressed and secreted (RANTES) is associated with inflammation and atherosclerosis. We investigated the effect of fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) agonist, on RANTES in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with hypertriglyceridemia. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study evaluated cross-sectional and interventional studies of 25 T2DM patients with hypertriglyceridemia (group A) and 32 controls (group B). Group A was treated with fenofibrate (200 mg/day) for 8 weeks. Serum RANTES and clinical characteristics were examined. RESULTS Serum RANTES was significantly higher in group A compared with group B (59.04±16.74 vs. 38.57±12.98 ng/ml, P<0.001) and correlated with triglycerides (TG) (r=0.535, P<0.001), fasting blood glucose (FBG) (r=0.485, P<0.001), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (r=0.485, P<0.001), homocysteine (Hcy) (r=0.520, P<0.001), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) (r=0.701, P<0.001). In multiple regression analysis after controlling for confounders, increased hsCRP levels (β=7.430, P<0.001) and T2DM with hypertriglyceridemia (β=11.496, P=0.002) were independently related to high serum RANTES levels. After 8 weeks of fenofibrate treatment, serum RANTES significantly decreased in group A compared with baseline (52.75±17.41 vs. 59.04±16.74 ng/ml, P=0.018). CONCLUSIONS Fenofibrate decreased serum RANTES levels in T2DM patients with hypertriglyceridemia, indicating that PPAR-a agonists may play an important role in inhibiting inflammatory responses. PMID:26944934

  2. PPAR-α Agonist Fenofibrate Decreased RANTES Levels in Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaomeng; Gao, Xia; Jia, Yumei; Zhang, Heng; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Regulated upon activation, normal T cells expressed and secreted (RANTES) is associated with inflammation and atherosclerosis. We investigated the effect of fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) agonist, on RANTES in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Material/Methods This study evaluated cross-sectional and interventional studies of 25 T2DM patients with hypertriglyceridemia (group A) and 32 controls (group B). Group A was treated with fenofibrate (200 mg/day) for 8 weeks. Serum RANTES and clinical characteristics were examined. Results Serum RANTES was significantly higher in group A compared with group B (59.04±16.74 vs. 38.57±12.98 ng/ml, P<0.001) and correlated with triglycerides (TG) (r=0.535, P<0.001), fasting blood glucose (FBG) (r=0.485, P<0.001), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (r=0.485, P<0.001), homocysteine (Hcy) (r=0.520, P<0.001), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) (r=0.701, P<0.001). In multiple regression analysis after controlling for confounders, increased hsCRP levels (β=7.430, P<0.001) and T2DM with hypertriglyceridemia (β=11.496, P=0.002) were independently related to high serum RANTES levels. After 8 weeks of fenofibrate treatment, serum RANTES significantly decreased in group A compared with baseline (52.75±17.41 vs. 59.04±16.74 ng/ml, P=0.018). Conclusions Fenofibrate decreased serum RANTES levels in T2DM patients with hypertriglyceridemia, indicating that PPAR-α agonists may play an important role in inhibiting inflammatory responses. PMID:26944934

  3. Options for intensification of basal insulin in type 2 diabetes: Premeal insulin or short-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists?

    PubMed

    Darmon, P; Raccah, D

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is an evolutive disease with a progressive defect of beta-cell insulin secretion. This characteristic points to a need for treatment that takes into account such a natural history. When oral antidiabetic drugs fail to achieve the patient's target HbA1c level, basal insulin treatment is usually initiated and titrated in association with oral drugs to manage fasting hyperglycaemia. Over a period of time, it is enough to simply achieve the HbA1c target. However, when even a good fasting blood glucose level is no longer sufficient to control overall glycaemia, then prandial treatment must be combined with the titrated basal insulin to deal with the postprandial hyperglycaemia responsible for the elevation of HbA1c. Of the different therapeutic options now available for this, rapid-acting insulins and GLP-1 receptor agonists (RAs) can be used. Rapid-acting insulins can be added either at each meal, achieving full insulin supplementation with a basal-bolus regimen, or at the main meal only as a "basal-plus" regimen. Compared with the full basal-bolus, the basal-plus strategy is associated with fewer injections, yet provides similar efficacy in terms of HbA1c improvement, but with less weight gain and lower hypoglycaemic risk. As for GLP-1 RAs, numerous studies, and especially those using short-acting GLP-1 RAs, have demonstrated more pronounced effects on postprandial hyperglycaemia, good complementary effects with basal insulin, and significant improvement of HbA1c with no weight gain and a low risk of hypoglycaemia. Similarly, direct and indirect comparisons of the use of rapid-acting insulins and GLP-1 RAs to intensify basal insulin have shown comparable efficacy in terms of HbA1c control, but with less weight gain and fewer hypoglycaemic episodes with GLP-1 RAs. PMID:26774016

  4. A Pharmacy Student–Facilitated Interprofessional Diabetes Clinic With the Penobscot Nation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Evan; Huerth, Benjamin; Robinson, J. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background American Indians/Alaska Natives have a greater increased risk for diabetes than non-Hispanic whites. Lifestyle interventions are effective in preventing and treating diabetes, and an interprofessional approach is important in diabetes management. Community Context The Penobscot Nation has a health center with a wide range of services. Our goal with the Nation was to 1) establish an interprofessional, student-facilitated diabetes clinic in the health center; 2) assess the clinic’s preliminary impact. Methods Relationship building and problem solving was instrumental in working toward the first goal. A survey was developed to assess satisfaction with the clinic. The clinical outcomes, mean and median values of HbA1c, were calculated at baseline (spring 2013) and were used to establish 2 groups of patients: those with controlled levels (<7%) and those with uncontrolled levels (≥ 7%). HbA1c was reassessed in fall 2013. Changes in HbA1c were calculated and compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Outcomes The student-facilitated, interprofessional diabetes clinic has operated for 2 years, and changes are under way. More than 90% of participants reported being well satisfied with the clinic in the first year. Among the group with uncontrolled HbA1c (n = 18), mean HbA1c values declined from 9.3% to 7.6% (P = .004). Among the group with controlled HbA1c (n = 30), 83% were controlled at follow-up. Interpretation The Penobscot diabetes clinic is evolving to meet the needs of community members, and pharmacy students have an interprofessional practice site well suited for experiential learning. PMID:26542142

  5. Evidence for Association between SH2B1 Gene Variants and Glycated Hemoglobin in Nondiabetic European American Young Adults: The Add Health Study.

    PubMed

    Lange, Leslie A; Graff, Mariaelisa; Lange, Ethan M; Young, Kristin L; Richardson, Andrea S; Mohlke, Karen L; North, Kari E; Harris, Kathleen M; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2016-09-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is used to classify glycaemia and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Body mass index (BMI) is a predictor of HbA1c levels and T2D. We tested 43 established BMI and obesity loci for association with HbA1c in a nationally representative multiethnic sample of young adults from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health [Add Health: age 24-34 years; n = 5641 European Americans (EA); 1740 African Americans (AA); 1444 Hispanic Americans (HA)] without T2D, using two levels of covariate adjustment (Model 1: age, sex, smoking, and geographic region; Model 2: Model 1 covariates plus BMI). Bonferroni adjustment was made for 43 SNPs and we considered P < 0.0011 statistically significant. Means (SD) for HbA1c were 5.4% (0.3) in EA, 5.7% (0.4) in AA, and 5.5% (0.3) in HA. We observed significant evidence for association with HbA1c for two variants near SH2B1 in EA (rs4788102, P = 2.2 × 10(-4) ; rs7359397, P = 9.8 × 10(-4) ) for Model 1. Both results were attenuated after adjustment for BMI (rs4788102, P = 1.7 × 10(-3) ; rs7359397, P = 4.6 × 10(-3) ). No variant reached Bonferroni-corrected significance in AA or HA. These results suggest that SH2B1 polymorphisms are associated with HbA1c, largely independent of BMI, in EA young adults. PMID:27530450

  6. Continuation or discontinuation of pioglitazone when starting bedtime insulin in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in an inner-city population

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedzadeh, Mona; Lee, Martin L.; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We studied the impact of continuing versus discontinuing pioglitazone on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and weight when starting bedtime insulin in patients with poor glycemic control. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from a 13-month randomized control trial on 77 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), who despite maximum doses of three oral diabetes medications (metformin, sulfonylurea and pioglitazone) had HbA1C levels above 7.5%. Patients were randomized to either continuing or discontinuing pioglitazone in addition to starting and up-titrating bedtime insulin. HbA1C, FPG, and weight were assessed at baseline, 3 months, 7 months and 13 months with the differences from baseline for the two groups compared at each of the three time points using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results We found that HbA1c was significantly lower at the 7-month (p=0.01) and 13-month time points (p=0.036) and FPG was significantly lower at all three time points in the group continuing pioglitazone compared with those discontinuing pioglitazone. Continuing pioglitazone resulted in a greater increase in weight at the 3-month (p=0.002), 7-month (P=0.0001) and 13-month (P=0.00003) time points. Patients with the lowest HbA1c (< 8.2%) at baseline were more likely to benefit from continuing pioglitazone than those with higher baseline HbA1c. Patients who started insulin and discontinued pioglitazone had similar HbA1c, FPG and weight at the three time points as at baseline, suggesting that pioglitazone and bedtime insulin has similar glycemic effect in this population. Conclusions We conclude that in patients with uncontrolled type 2 DM, continuing pioglitazone while concurrently starting bedtime insulin within a 13-month period led to a significant decrease in both HbA1c and FPG levels compared with those who did not receive pioglitazone; however weight increased during this period. PMID:26215435

  7. Evaluation of plasma H2S levels and H2S synthesis in streptozotocin induced Type-2 diabetes-an experimental study based on Swietenia macrophylla seeds

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Moumita; Biswas, Utpal Kumar; Chakraborty, Runu; Banerjee, Piyasa; Raychaudhuri, Utpal; Kumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the plasma H2S levels and H2S synthesis activity in streptozotocin induced type 2 diabetes rats compared to the healthy controls and also to observe the effect of the aqueous extract of Swietenia macrophylla (S. macrophylla) seeds on the experimental groups. Methods Seeds of S. macrophylla were separated, washed, shed-dried and finally extract was prepared. Thirty two wistar rats were selected for the experimental study. Streptozotocin was used for the induction of diabetes. H2S concentration in plasma was measured. H2S synthesizing activity in plasma was measured. Statistical analysis have done using Microsoft excel, Office 2003. Values were expressed by mean±SD. P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Fasting blood glucose level (7.74±0.02) mmol/L was significantly increased in diabetic rats. The glucose levels are significantly lowered in the rats treated with metformin (5.48±0.03) mmol/L as well as with aqueous extract of S. macrophylla seeds (3.72±0.04) mmol/L. The HbA1c percentages in different groups of study subjects also indicate similar trends. Our study shows both the plasma H2S levels (22.07±0.73) mmol/L and plasma H2S synthesis activity (0.411±0.005 mmol/100 g) are significantly reduced in the streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Conclusions Although considering a small sample size, it can conclude that the fasting blood glucose levels are inversely related to plasma H2S levels as well as H2S synthesis activity in plasma and the extract of S. macrophylla is associated with increased plasma H2S levels with effective lowering of blood glucose in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. PMID:25183134

  8. Association between serum vitamin D levels and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and plaque burden/composition in young adult population

    PubMed Central

    Satilmis, Seckin; Celik, Omer; Biyik, Ismail; Ozturk, Derya; Celik, Kubra Asik; Akın, Fatih; Ayca, Burak; Yalcin, Burce; Dagdelen, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that low 25-OH vitamin D 25(OH)D concentrations may increase the risk of several cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, myocardial infarction, heart failure and cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies suggested a possible relationship between vitamin D deficiency and increased carotid intima-media wall thickness and vascular calcification. We hypothesized that low 25(OH)D may be associated with coronary atherosclerosis and coronary plaque burden and composition, and investigated the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and coronary atherosclerosis, plaque burden or structure, in young adult patients by using dual-source 128x2 slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). We included 98 patients with coronary atherosclerosis and 110, age and gender matched, subjects with normal findings on CCTA examinations. Patients with subclinical atherosclerosis had significantly higher serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, hs-CRP, uric acid, HbA1c and creatinine levels and lower serum 25(OH)D levels in comparison with controls. There was no significant correlation between 25(OH)D and plaque morphology. There was also a positive relationship between 25(OH)D and plaque burden of coronary atherosclerosis. In multivariate analysis, coronary atherosclerosis was associated high hs-CRP (adjusted OR: 2.832), uric acid (adjusted OR: 3.671) and low 25(OH)D (adjusted OR: 0.689). Low levels of 25(OH)D were associated with coronary atherosclerosis and plaque burden, but there was no significant correlation between 25(OH)D and plaque morphology. PMID:25725147

  9. Feasibility of a Patient-Centered, Smartphone-Based, Diabetes Care System: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ky; Kwak, Soo Heon; Baek, Seungsu; Lee, Seung Lyeol; Jang, Hak Chul; Park, Kyong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background We developed a patient-centered, smartphone-based, diabetes care system (PSDCS). This study aims to test the feasibility of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction with the PSDCS. Methods This study was a single-arm pilot study. The participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus were instructed to use the PSDCS, which integrates a Bluetooth-connected glucometer, digital food diary, and wearable physical activity monitoring device. The primary end point was the change in HbA1c from baseline after a 12-week intervention. Results Twenty-nine patients aged 53.9±9.1 years completed the study. HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose levels decreased significantly from baseline (7.7%±0.7% to 7.1%±0.6%, P<0.0001; 140.9±39.1 to 120.1±31.0 mg/dL, P=0.0088, respectively). The frequency of glucose monitoring correlated with the magnitude of HbA1c reduction (r=–0.57, P=0.0013). The components of the diabetes self-care activities, including diet, exercise, and glucose monitoring, were significantly improved, particularly in the upper tertile of HbA1c reduction. There were no severe adverse events during the intervention. Conclusion A 12-week application of the PSDCS to patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes resulted in a significant HbA1c reduction with tolerable safety profiles; these findings require confirmation in a future randomized controlled trial. PMID:27098508

  10. Treatment of Patients with Obese Type 2 Diabetes with Tantalus-DIAMOND® Gastric Electrical Stimulation: Normal Triglycerides Predict Durable Effects for at Least 3 Years.

    PubMed

    Lebovitz, H E; Ludvik, B; Yaniv, I; Schwartz, T; Zelewski, M; Gutterman, D D

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the present work are to evaluate long-term benefit of nonexcitatory gastric electrical stimulation (GES) by the DIAMOND(®) device on glycemic control and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral agents and to determine the magnitude of the modulating effects of fasting plasma triglyceride (FTG) levels on these effects of GES. Sixty one patients with type 2 diabetes [HbA1c > 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) to < 10.5% (91 mmol/mol)] were implanted with the DIAMOND(®) GES device and treated with meal-mediated antral electrical stimulation for up to 36 months. The effects of baseline HbA1c and FTG on glycemic control, body weight, and systolic blood pressure were measured. GES reduced mean HbA1c by 0.9% and body weight by 5.7%. The effects were greater in patients with normal fasting plasma triglycerides (NTG) as compared to those with hypertriglyceridemia. The mean decrease in HbA1c in patients with NTG averaged 1.1% and was durable over 3 years of follow-up. ANCOVA indicated that improvement in HbA1c was a function of both baseline FTG group (p = 0.02) and HbA1c (p = 0.001) and their interaction (p = 0.01). Marked weight loss (≥ 10%) was observed in a significant proportion of NTG patients by 12 months of treatment and persisted through the 3 years. GES improves glycemic control and reduces body weight by a triglyceride-dependent mechanism in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on oral agents. It is postulated that this is through a gut-brain interaction that modulates effects on the liver and pancreatic islets. PMID:25993254

  11. A Real-World Study of the Effect of Timing of Insulin Initiation on Outcomes in Older Medicare Beneficiaries with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Rituparna; Zhou, Steve; Wei, Wenhui; Ajmera, Mayank; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare clinical and economic outcomes of early insulin initiation with those of delayed initiation in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING Humana Medicare Advantage health insurance plan. PARTICIPANTS Older (≥65) Medicare beneficiaries with T2DM. MEASUREMENTS Subjects were grouped according to number of classes of oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) they had taken before initiation of insulin: one (early insulin initiators), two, or three or more (delayed insulin initiators). One-year follow-up outcomes included change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), percentage of older adults with HbA1c less than 8.0%, hypoglycemic events, and total healthcare costs. RESULTS Overall, 14,669 individuals were included in the analysis. Baseline and 1-year follow-up HbA1c levels were available for 4,028 (27.5%) individuals. Insulin was initiated early in 32% and delayed in 20%. At follow-up, unadjusted reduction in HbA1c was 0.9 ± 3.7% for the group with one OAD, 0.7 ± 2.4% for those with two, and 0.5 ± 3.6% for those with three or more. Early insulin initiation was associated with significantly greater reduction in HbA1c (0.4%; adjusted P <.001), 30% greater likelihood of achieving HbA1c less than 8.0% (adjusted odds ratio = 1.30, 95% confidence interval = 1.18–1.43), and no significant differences in total costs or hypoglycemia events (11.5% of early initiators vs 10.2% of delayed initiators; P = .32). CONCLUSION This study suggests beneficial effects of early insulin initiation in older adults with T2DM who do not have adequate glycemic control, without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or greater total direct healthcare costs. PMID:25955280

  12. The cross-sectional associations between sense of coherence and diabetic microvascular complications, glycaemic control, and patients' conceptions of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sense of coherence (SOC) has been associated with various self-care behaviours in the general population. As the management of type 1 diabetes heavily relies on self-management, the SOC concept could also prove important in this population. This paper is a report of a study conducted among patients with type 1 diabetes to assess the associations between SOC and glycaemic control, microvascular complications, and patients' conceptions of their disease. Methods Altogether 1,264 adult patients (45% men, age range 18-82 years) with type 1 diabetes participated in this cross-sectional study. SOC was evaluated using a 13-item SOC questionnaire. Standardized assays were used to determine HbA1c. Nephropathy status was based on albumin excretion rate and retinal laser-treatment was used as an indication of severe retinopathy. Patients' subjective conceptions of diabetes were studied using a questionnaire. Results Higher SOC scores, reflecting stronger SOC, were associated with lower HbA1c values. Strong SOC was independently associated with reaching the HbA1c level <7.5%. Adjusting for diabetes duration, age at onset, socioeconomic status and HbA1c, weak SOC was associated with the presence of nephropathy among men, but not women. No associations were observed between SOC and severe retinopathy. Four dimensions describing patients' conceptions of HbA1c, complications, diabetes control and hypoglycaemia were formed from the diabetes questionnaire. Weak SOC was independently associated with worse subjective conceptions in the dimensions of HbA1c and hypoglycaemia. Furthermore among men, an association between weak SOC and the complications factor was observed. Conclusion Interventions to improve patients' SOC, if available, could improve patients' metabolic control and therefore also reduce the incidence of diabetic complications. PMID:21110902

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Alogliptin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Analysis of the ATTAK-J Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Sasai, Nobuo; Ito, Shogo; Obana, Mitsuo; Takuma, Tetsuo; Takai, Masahiko; Kaneshige, Hideaki; Machimura, Hideo; Kanamori, Akira; Nakajima, Kazumi; Matsuba, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been shown to reduce hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in patients with type 2 diabetes, but the reduction varies between patients and adequate glycemic control may not be achieved. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the DPP-4 inhibitor alogliptin in the real clinical setting, and analyzed factors associated with the improvement of HbA1c by alogliptin treatment. Methods A retrospective observational study was performed in patients with type 2 diabetes attending hospitals or clinics belonging to the Kanagawa Physicians Association who received treatment with alogliptin for 1 year or longer. Patients using insulin were excluded from the study. The efficacy endpoints were HbA1c (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program value), blood glucose (fasting/postprandial), body weight, blood pressure (systolic/diastolic), liver function (glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase), kidney function (serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate), serum lipids (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides), and serum amylase. Adverse events were compiled to assess safety. Results Of 330 patients whose case records were collected, 27 patients were excluded for protocol violations, leaving 303 patients to form the full analysis set. Compared with baseline, HbA1c showed a decrease by 0.54±1.22% (mean ± standard deviation) after 12 months of alogliptin treatment. Factor analysis demonstrated that the change of HbA1c after 12 months was significantly influenced by the baseline HbA1c level, duration of diabetes, concomitant use of sulfonylureas, and compliance with diet therapy. In addition, there was a significant reduction of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the estimated glomerular filtration rate after 12 months of alogliptin treatment, as well as a

  14. Assessing Quality of Diabetes Care by Measuring Longitudinal Changes in Hemoglobin A1c in the Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Wes; Wang, Hongwei; Xie, Minge; Kolassa, John; Rajan, Mangala; Tseng, Chin-Lin; Crystal, Stephen; Zhang, Quanwu; Vardi, Yehuda; Pogach, Leonard; Safford, Monika M

    2005-01-01

    Context A1c levels are widely used to assess quality of diabetes care provided by health care systems. Currently, cross-sectional measures are commonly used for such assessments. Objective To study within-patient longitudinal changes in A1c levels at Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities as an alternative to cross-sectional measures of quality of diabetes care. Design Longitudinal study using institutional data on individual patient A1c level over time (October 1, 1998–September 30, 2000) with time variant and invariant covariates. Setting One hundred and twenty-five VHA facilities nationwide, October 1, 1998–September 30, 2000. Patients Diabetic veteran users with A1c measurement performed using National Glycosylated Hemoglobin Standardization Project certified A1c lab assay methods. Exposures Characteristics unlikely to reflect quality of care, but known to influence A1c levels, demographics, and baseline illness severity. Main Outcome Measure Monthly change in A1c for average patient cared for at each facility. Results The preponderance of facilities showed monthly declines in within-patient A1c over the study period (mean change of −0.0148 A1c units per month, range −0.074 to 0.042). Individual facilities varied in their monthly change, with 105 facilities showing monthly declines (70 significant at .05 level) and 20 showing monthly increases (5 significant at .05 level). Case-mix adjustment resulted in modest changes (mean change of −0.0131 case-mix adjusted A1c units per month, range −0.079 to 0.043). Facilities were ranked from worst to best, with attached 90 percent confidence intervals. Among the bottom 10 ranked facilities, four remained within the bottom decile with 90 percent confidence. Conclusions There is substantial variation in facility-level longitudinal changes in A1c levels. We propose that evaluation of change in A1c levels over time can be used as a new measure to reflect quality of care provided to populations of

  15. Relevance and clinical significance of serum resistin level in obese T2DM rhesus monkey models.

    PubMed

    Qi, S-D; He, Z-L; Chen, Y; Ma, J; Yu, W-H; Li, Y-Y; Yang, F-M; Wang, J-B; Chen, L-X; Zhao, Y; Lu, S-Y

    2015-09-01

    Resistin is a type of hormone-like adipocytokines, which is secreted specifically by adipocytes. It may be a key factor in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from obesity- associated insulin resistance due to results that show that it has a close relationship with insulin resistance in rodents. We utilized the rhesus monkeys as study objects to preliminarily test the association with glucose metabolism and to conduct a correlation analysis for clinical parameters and serum resistin levels in obese rhesus monkey models of T2DM. The results suggested that resistin was significantly increased in T2DM monkeys (P <0.01), and that resistin had a positive correlation respectively with total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (FPI) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), Insulin resistance index (HOA-IR), but a negative correlation with islet β-cell function (HOMA-β). In the course of glucose metabolism, reverse release change of resistin and insulin in T2DM monkeys occurred, but the phenomenon that was not observed in the control group, these findings indicated that resistin negatively regulated and interfered with carbohydrate metabolism in T2DM monkey models. The character of the releasing change of resistin might be a unique process in T2DM. Therefore, all of the results could provide references for clinical diagnostic criteria for human cases of T2DM, and could have clinical significance for obese T2DM diagnosis and degree of insulin resistance. PMID:26069076

  16. The Accuracy of Diagnostic Methods for Diabetic Retinopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the recommended glycemic measures for diagnosing diabetic retinopathy. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science databases from inception to July 2015 for observational studies comparing the diagnostic accuracy of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and 2-hour plasma glucose (2h-PG). Random effects models for the diagnostic odds ratio (dOR) value computed by Moses’ constant for a linear model and 95% CIs were used to calculate the accuracy of the test. Hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curves (HSROC) were used to summarize the overall test performance. Results Eleven published studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled dOR values for the diagnosis of retinopathy were 16.32 (95% CI 13.86–19.22) for HbA1c and 4.87 (95% CI 4.39–5.40) for FPG. The area under the HSROC was 0.837 (95% CI 0.781–0.892) for HbA1c and 0.735 (95% CI 0.657–0.813) for FPG. The 95% confidence region for the point that summarizes the overall test performance of the included studies occurs where the cut-offs ranged from 6.1% (43.2 mmol/mol) to 7.8% (61.7 mmol/mol) for HbA1c and from 7.8 to 9.3 mmol/L for FPG. In the four studies that provided information regarding 2h-PG, the pooled accuracy estimates for HbA1c were similar to those of 2h-PG; the overall performance for HbA1c was superior to that for FPG. Conclusions The three recommended tests for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in nonpregnant adults showed sufficient accuracy for their use in clinical settings, although the overall accuracy for the diagnosis of retinopathy was similar for HbA1c and 2h-PG, which were both more accurate than for FPG. Due to the variability and inconveniences of the glucose level-based methods, HbA1c appears to be the most appropriate method for the diagnosis diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27123641

  17. Poor glycaemic control in Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes attending the public healthcare system: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Luciana V; Leitão, Cristiane B; Kramer, Caroline K; Zucatti, Alessandra T N; Jezini, Deborah L; Felício, João; Valverde, Ana B; Chacra, Antonio R; Azevedo, Mirela J; Gross, Jorge L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the clinical profile of Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes attending the public healthcare system and identify factors associated with poor glycaemic control. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting 14 centres in five regions of Brazil, including primary care units and outpatient clinics of University Hospitals. Participants Patients with type 2 diabetes attending outpatient clinics of public healthcare system. Main outcome measured Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), centrally measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program certified). Results A total of 5750 patients aged 61±10 years, with 11±8 years of diabetes duration (66% women, 56% non-white, body mass index: 28.0±5.3 kg/m2) were analysed. Mean HbA1c was 8.6±2.2%, and median HbA1c was 8.1% (6.9% to 9.9%). HbA1c <7% was observed in only 26% of patients. Mean HbA1c was higher (p < 0.01) in the North (9.0±2.6%) and Northeast (8.9±2.4%) than in the Midwest (8.1±2%), Southeast (8.4±2.1%) and South regions (8.3±1.9%). Using the cut-off value of HbA1c above the median, age (0.986 (0.983 to 0.989)), white ethnicity (0.931 (0.883 to 0.981)) and being from Midwest region (0.858 (0.745 to 0.989)) were protective factors, while diabetes duration (1.015 (1.012 to 1.018)), use of insulin (1.710 (1.624 to 1.802)) and living in the Northeast region (1.197 (1.085 to 1.321)) were associated with HbA1c >8%. Conclusions The majority of Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes attending the public healthcare system had HbA1c levels above recommended targets. The recognition of Northeast residents and non-white patients as vulnerable populations should guide future policies and actions to prevent and control diabetes. PMID:24052610

  18. Association of glycaemia with lipids in adults with type 1 diabetes: modification by dyslipidaemia medication

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, L. G.; Dabelea, D.; Snell-Bergeon, J. K.; Daniels, S. R.; Hamman, R. F.; Rewers, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia are common metabolic abnormalities in adults with type 1 diabetes and both increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The hypothesis of this study was that change in HbA1c over 6 years would be associated with change in fasting lipids in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods The Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study examined 652 patients with type 1 diabetes (54% female); 559 and 543 had follow-up visits at 3 and 6 years. Baseline age (mean ± SD) was 37±9 years, diabetes duration 23±9 years, and HbA1c 8.0±1.3%. Use of dyslipidaemia medication was 17%, 32%, and 46% at the three visits. Separate longitudinal mixed models were fitted to examine the relationship between change in HbA1c and change in fasting total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c), log triacylglycerols (TG), and non-HDL-cholesterol (non- HDL-c). Because of an interaction between dyslipidaemia medication use and association of HbA1c with lipids, results were stratified by dyslipidaemia medication use. Results Among patients not using dyslipidaemia medication, a higher HbA1c was associated with significantly worse levels of the lipids TC, LDL-c, TG and non-HDL-c (per 1% change in HbA1c, TC 0.101 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.050, 0.152; LDL-c 0.103 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.058, 0.148; TG 0.052 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.024, 0.081; and non-HDL-c 0.129 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.078, 0.180) but not HDL-c (−0.20 mmol/l, 95% CI −0.047, 0.007). The associations between HbA1c and any lipid outcome among those on dyslipidaemia medication were in the same direction, but attenuated compared with persons not on medication. Conclusions/interpretation Change in HbA1c is significantly associated with change in fasting lipids, but dyslipidaemia medications may be required to optimise lipid and cardiovascular health. PMID:20820753

  19. Are changes in glycaemic control associated with diabetes-specific quality of life and health status in screen-detected type 2 diabetes patients? Four-year follow up of the ADDITION-Cambridge cohort

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, L; Long, G H; Griffin, S J; Simmons, R K

    2015-01-01

    Background Interventions that improve HbA1c levels do not necessarily improve health-related quality of life (QoL). This issue may be particularly relevant in asymptomatic diabetes patients detected earlier in the course of the disease. Methods HbA1c, diabetes-specific QoL (ADDQoL) and health status were measured in 510 screen-detected diabetes patients from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial at 1 and 5 years post diagnosis. Multivariable logistic/linear regression was used to quantify the longitudinal association between change in HbA1c from 1 to 5 years and ADDQoL and health status at 5 years, adjusting for age, sex, education and trial group; alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, plasma vitamin C, HbA1c, ADDQoL or health status at 1 year, and glucose-lowering medication at 5 years. Results From 1 to 5 years, median HbA1c interquartile range increased from 6.3% (5.9–6.8) to 6.8% (6.4–7.4); the median ADDQoL score and mean health status physical health summary score decreased from -0.4 (-1 to -0.08) to -0.5 (-1.08 to -0.09) (suggesting an adverse impact of diabetes on QoL) and by -0.79 (8.94) points, respectively. Increases in HbA1c were independently associated with reporting a negative impact of diabetes on QoL (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.85) but not with the health status summary scores. Conclusions Increases in HbA1c from 1 to 5 years post-diagnosis were independently associated with increased odds of reporting a negative impact of diabetes on QoL. While our results suggest that efforts to reduce HbA1c do not adversely affect health-related QoL, large numbers of participants still report a negative impact of diabetes on their QoL 5 years post-diagnosis. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24817063

  20. The effectiveness of regular leisure-time physical activities on long-term glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Lee-Wen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hwu, Yueh-Juen; Chang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Li-Li; Chang, Pi-Ying

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically review the effectiveness of different types of regular leisure-time physical activities and pooled the effect sizes of those activities on long-term glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes compared with routine care. This review included randomized controlled trials from 1960 to May 2014. A total of 10 Chinese and English databases were searched, following selection and critical appraisal, 18 randomized controlled trials with 915 participants were included. The standardized mean difference was reported as the summary statistic for the overall effect size in a random effects model. The results indicated yoga was the most effective in lowering glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Meta-analysis also revealed that the decrease in HbA1c levels of the subjects who took part in regular leisure-time physical activities was 0.60% more than that of control group participants. A higher frequency of regular leisure-time physical activities was found to be more effective in reducing HbA1c levels. The results of this review provide evidence of the benefits associated with regular leisure-time physical activities compared with routine care for lowering HbA1c levels in people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26822261

  1. High Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Levels Associated With Low Hemoglobin Levels in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 3 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Leu, Jyh-Gang; Fang, Yu-Wei; Liou, Hung-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In chronic kidney disease (CKD), decreased erythropoietin production, low serum active vitamin D levels, and high renin-angiotensin-aldosterone activities had been regarded as major causes of renal anemia. At present, no clinical data are available to elucidate the association between renal anemia and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels in CKD. This study aimed to access whether FGF23 is involved in the pathogenesis of renal anemia. This cross-sectional observational study included 53 stable outpatients with CKD stages 3 and 4. Our primary predictor was serum FGF23 levels and outcome was hemoglobin levels. Measurements contained hemoglobin, FGF23, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, intact parathyroid hormone, plasma renin, serum aldosterone, HbA1C levels, lipid and iron profiles, and serum and urine electrolytes. Mean age of our patients was 66.4 ± 12.8 (SD) years, mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 33.5 ± 13.9 mL/min/1.73 m2, median FGF23 level 200 (25th–75th percentile, 124–303) pg/mL, vitamin D level 19.5 (25th–75th percentile, 14.0–25.9) ng/mL, and hemoglobin level 12.7 (25th–75th percentile, 10.7–13.75) g/dL. Even after adjusting multiple variables, lower hemoglobin levels correlated significantly with FGF23 levels that were higher than the median value (>200 pg/mL). Moreover, after adjusting for aldosterone, but not 25-hydroxyvitamin D, it decreased the association with FGF23 that higher than median level and hemoglobin levels. We also observed a significant decrease of hemoglobin level in the higher FGF23 group who had a diabetes history. High FGF23 levels were observed to be associated with low hemoglobin levels, which may be partially mediated through the effects of serum aldosterone levels in our patients with CKD stages 3 and 4. Furthermore, we also presumed that diabetes itself may have an impact on the loop among FGF23, hemoglobin, and aldosterone levels in these CKD patients. PMID:26986127

  2. Physical activity, glycemic control, and diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a national sample.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Hager, Kathy K; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2014-01-01

    To determine if physical activity and/or blood glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) are associated with the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) in a representative population of diabetics. Three hundred thirty-nine diabetic participants (40-85 yrs) taking part in 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were studied. Participants were defined as having peripheral neuropathy if examination determined ≥1 insensate area in either foot. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was objectively-measured using accelerometry. After adjustments, MVPA was not significantly associated with PN (OR=1.16; 95% CI: 0.48-2.78), nor was HbA1c (OR=0.55; 95% CI: 0.28-1.04). However, there was evidence of statistical interaction (OR=0.24; 95% CI: 0.06-0.87) between MVPA and HbA1c status, showing that diabetics engaging in higher levels of MVPA and having normal HgbA1c levels were less likely to have PN than what would be expected based on the individual effects of MVPA and HbA1c alone. Although MVPA was not directly associated with PN, these findings suggest that proper physical activity, coupled with good glycemic control, is associated with less neuropathy. Future longitudinal studies are required to evaluate whether physical activity and improved glycemic control may help prevent or slow the progression of diabetic end-organ damage, particularly diabetic neuropathy. PMID:24090951

  3. Serum uric acid levels predict the development of albuminuria over 6 years in patients with type 1 diabetes: Findings from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Diana I.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Johnson, Richard J.; Maahs, David M.; McFann, Kimberly; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Recent studies suggest that uric acid is a mediator of diabetic nephropathy. We hypothesized that elevated serum uric acid levels are a strong predictor of albuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods. We analyzed data from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study, a prospective observational study. A stepwise logistic regression model was applied to predict the development of micro- or macroalbuminuria after 6 years of follow-up in 324 participants who had no evidence of micro- or macroalbuminuria at baseline. A P-value <0.1 was used as the criteria for entry into and removal from the model. Results. The following factors were selected in the stepwise multivariate model as predictors of micro- or macroalbuminuria at the 6-year follow-up visit: baseline serum uric acid levels, HbA1c and pre-albuminuria. For every 1-mg/dl increase in serum uric acid levels at baseline, there was an 80% increased risk of developing micro- or macroalbuminuria at 6 years (odds ratio 1.8; 95% confidence interval 1.2, 2.8; P = 0.005). Additional covariates considered in the stepwise model were sex, age, duration of diabetes, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment, waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, smoking, serum creatinine, cystatin C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. Conclusion. Elevated serum uric acid levels are a strong predictor of the development of albuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:20064950

  4. The MILE study: a motivational, individual and locally anchored exercise intervention among 30–49 year-olds with low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness: a randomised controlled study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with high risk of non-communicable diseases and all-cause mortality. Physical activity level is the primary determinant of cardiorespiratory fitness in adults. However, knowledge on how to motivate people to engage in physical activity and maintain an active lifestyle is lacking. This study aims to investigate whether a motivational, individual, and locally anchored exercise intervention, in primary care, can improve cardiorespiratory fitness in 30 to 49 year olds with a low or very low cardiorespiratory fitness. Methods/Design Two-armed randomised controlled trial with 6 and 12 months follow-up. The primary outcome is cardiorespiratory fitness estimated via a maximal incremental exercise test. Secondary outcomes include physical activity level and sedentary behavior (objectively measured), self-reported physical activity, biochemical parameters (HbA1C, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol, and triglyceride), anthropometric parameters and health-related quality of life. A total of 236 participants with low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness classified at a local health check programme will be randomised. The intervention consists of four motivational interviews, a six months membership to a sport club, and a global positioning watch to upload training activity to Endomondo.com. The comparison group will receive standard care: a one hour motivational interview followed by another interview if requested. Effects will be estimated by evaluating the differences in mean changes in cardiorespiratory fitness between the two groups. Discussion In new and innovative ways the focus of this study will be to improve cardiorespiratory fitness among a 30–49 year-old at-risk group using social media, Global Positioning System-technology, on-going personal support and individually tailored physical activity. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (no.NCT01801956). PMID:24365174

  5. Aleglitazar, a dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α/γ agonist, improves insulin sensitivity, glucose control and lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes: findings from a randomized, double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Stirban, A O; Andjelkovic, M; Heise, T; Nosek, L; Fischer, A; Gastaldelli, A; Herz, M

    2016-07-01

    The present single-centre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study investigated the effect of the balanced dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α/γ agonist aleglitazar on whole-body and liver insulin sensitivity, β-cell function and other components of cardiometabolic syndrome after 16 weeks of treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy who received once-daily 150 µg aleglitazar or matching placebo as add-on therapy to metformin. Baseline and 16-week assessments included a two-step hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp, followed by a hyperglycaemic clamp, as well as evaluation of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), lipids and safety variables. The primary endpoint was change in whole-body insulin sensitivity (M-value) from baseline compared with placebo, derived from the second clamp step. M-value improved significantly from baseline with aleglitazar (n = 16) compared with placebo (n = 24; p = 0.05 for difference between arms). We found statistically significant treatment differences with aleglitazar versus placebo in fasting hepatic insulin resistance index (p = 0.01), and in total glucose disposal (p = 0.03) at the second insulin infusion step. Aleglitazar treatment resulted in significant improvements in HbA1c and lipids and was well tolerated. PMID:26663152

  6. Fiber in Diet Is Associated with Improvement of Glycated Hemoglobin and Lipid Profile in Mexican Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-López, Lubia; Muñoz-Torres, Abril Violeta; García-Peña, Carmen; López-Alarcón, Mardia; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Escobedo-de la Peña, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the association of dietary fiber on current everyday diet and other dietary components with glycated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c), glucose, lipids profile, and body weight body weight, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of 395 patients with type 2 diabetes was performed. HbA1c, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and lipids profile were measured. Weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, and body composition were measured. Everyday diet with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was evaluated. ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression were used in statistical analysis. Results. Higher fiber intake was associated with a low HbA1c, high HDL-c levels, low weight, and waist circumference. The highest tertile of calories consumption was associated with a higher fasting glucose level and weight. The highest tertile of carbohydrate consumption was associated with a lower weight. The lowest tertile of total fat and saturated fat was associated with the highest tertile of HDL-c levels, and lower saturated fat intake was associated with lower weight (p < 0.05). Conclusions. A higher content of fiber in the diet reduces HbA1c and triglycerides, while improving HDL-c levels. Increasing fiber consumption while lowering calorie consumption seems to be an appropriate strategy to reduce body weight and promote blood glucose control. PMID:27144178

  7. Fiber in Diet Is Associated with Improvement of Glycated Hemoglobin and Lipid Profile in Mexican Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-López, Lubia; Muñoz-Torres, Abril Violeta; García-Peña, Carmen; López-Alarcón, Mardia; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Escobedo-de la Peña, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the association of dietary fiber on current everyday diet and other dietary components with glycated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c), glucose, lipids profile, and body weight body weight, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of 395 patients with type 2 diabetes was performed. HbA1c, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and lipids profile were measured. Weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, and body composition were measured. Everyday diet with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was evaluated. ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression were used in statistical analysis. Results. Higher fiber intake was associated with a low HbA1c, high HDL-c levels, low weight, and waist circumference. The highest tertile of calories consumption was associated with a higher fasting glucose level and weight. The highest tertile of carbohydrate consumption was associated with a lower weight. The lowest tertile of total fat and saturated fat was associated with the highest tertile of HDL-c levels, and lower saturated fat intake was associated with lower weight (p < 0.05). Conclusions. A higher content of fiber in the diet reduces HbA1c and triglycerides, while improving HDL-c levels. Increasing fiber consumption while lowering calorie consumption seems to be an appropriate strategy to reduce body weight and promote blood glucose control. PMID:27144178

  8. Gender differences in cognitive deficits in schizophrenia with and without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao Hua; Han, Mei; Zhang, Xiang Yang; Hui, Li; Jiang, Shu Rong; Yang, Fu De; Tan, Yun Long; Wang, Zhi Ren; Li, Juan; Huang, Xu Feng

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated gender differences in cognition in schizophrenia with and without diabetes. Cognition was assessed in 263 individuals with schizophrenia with age range (40-68): 67 males and 34 females with schizophrenia with diabetes; and 125 males and 37 females with schizophrenia without diabetes according to the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). Fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and lipid levels were measured. Results showed that male individuals performed worse on most cognitive tasks, especially attention, in schizophrenia with than without diabetes. This result was not observed in female individuals. Also, individuals of both genders showed higher fasting glucose and HbA1c in schizophrenia with than without diabetes. In schizophrenia with diabetes, males had significantly worse cognition than females in all cognitive domains. Higher HbA1c, lower high-density lipoprotein, and an earlier age of onset of schizophrenia were found in males compared with female individuals. HbA1c was negatively associated with attention and the RBANS total score for males but not for females. In schizophrenia without diabetes, males showed worse performance in immediate and delayed memory than females. This study support cognition was worse for males with schizophrenia irrespective of whether they have diabetes. However, diabetes exemplified the gender differences, especially in attention. PMID:26555485

  9. Self-Care Management among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in East Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daoud, Nihaya; Osman, Amira; Hart, Trevor A.; Berry, Elliott M.; Adler, Bella

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Little research exists on diabetes self-care management (DSCM) in Arab populations. We examined the contribution of health belief constructs, socioeconomic position (SEP) and clinical factors (glycated haemoglobin [HbA1C] level, type of diabetes treatments, and receiving professional guidance) to DSCM among Arab patients in East…

  10. Clinical effects of liraglutide are possibly influenced by hypertriglyceridemia and remaining pancreatic β-cell function in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Akihito; Kaneto, Hideaki; Kamei, Shinji; Hirukawa, Hidenori; Shimoda, Masashi; Kimura, Tomohiko; Obata, Atsushi; Okauchi, Seizo; Tatsumi, Fuminori; Kohara, Kenji; Mune, Tomoatsu; Kaku, Kohei

    2016-08-01

    We searched for factors influencing the clinical effects of GLP-1 analogue liraglutide in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Multivariate analyses showed that hypertriglyceridemia and baseline HbA1c levels were independent predictors for the efficacy of liraglutide and that CPR index was an independent predictor for the durability of liraglutide. PMID:27220544

  11. A randomized controlled clinical trial of vildagliptin plus metformin combination therapy in patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    SU, YONG; SU, YA-LI; LV, LI-FANG; WANG, LI-MIN; LI, QUAN-ZHONG; ZHAO, ZHI-GANG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin plus metformin combination therapy in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Type II diabetic patients with poor glycemic control following at least three months of metformin treatment were selected and randomized into two groups. Vildagliptin or placebo was administered with metformin. Body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood lipid and hepatorenal function levels were analyzed in the patients prior to and 24-weeks after the trial. FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels of the patients in the vildagliptin group significantly decreased following the trial, whereas no statistically significant differences were observed in the various indicators of the placebo group prior to and following the trial. The FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in the vildagliptin group were significantly lower compared with the placebo group 24-weeks after the trial. Comparisons of body weight, blood lipid and hepatorenal function between the groups prior to and following the trial exhibited no statistically significant differences. Therefore, vildagliptin plus metformin combination therapy effectively reduced FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in patients with no risk of weight gain or hepatorenal dysfunction. PMID:24669235

  12. Effect of combined application insulin and insulin detemir on continous glucose monitor in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Yun; Dong, Qing; Li, Gui-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Insulin detemir is a soluble long-acting human insulin analogue at neutral pH with a unique mechanism of action, which could strengthen the effects of insulin. This study aims to explore the effects of insulin combined with insulin detemir on the continous glucose in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. In this study, 150 patients with type 1 diabetes enrolled were included and randomly divided into 3 groups: insulin group (group A), insulin detemir group (group B) and insulin combined with insulin detemir group (group C). Each subject underwent 72 h of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). MAGE, HbA1c and Noctumal Hypoglycemia levels were examined by using the ELISA kits. The body weight changes were also detected in this study. The results indicated that the information including age, body weight, disease duration and glucose level and HbA1c percentage on the start time point among three groups indicated no statistical differences. Insulin combined with insulin detemir decrease MAGE and HbA1c level in Group C compared to Group A and Group A (P < 0.05). Insulin combined with insulin detemir decreas noctumal hypoglycemia levels and body weight changes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this study confirmed efficacy of insulin detemir by demonstrating non-inferiority of insulin detemir compared with insulin with respect to HbA1c, with an improved safety profile including significantly fewer hypoglycaemic episodes and less undesirable weight gain in children. PMID:26064343

  13. Effect of pantoprazole on insulin secretion in drug-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    González-Ortiz, Manuel; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Mercado-Sesma, Arieh R; Álvarez-Carrillo, Rebeca

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of pantoprazole during 45 days on insulin secretion in drug-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes, a randomized, double blind, placebo control clinical trial was performed in 14 drug-naïve volunteers. Significant increases in late insulin phase and total insulin secretion, and decreases in HbA1c levels were found. PMID:25704601

  14. Treatment with insulin analogs, especially Glargine and Lispro, associates with better renal function and higher hemoglobin levels in Type 1 diabetic patients with impaired kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Hasslacher, Christoph; Kulozik, Felix; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The influence of type of insulin treatment - insulin analogs versus human insulin - on the development of diabetes related vascular complications has been sparsely investigated. We examine here possible differences regarding kidney function and hemoglobin levels. Methods: Multiple linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between the following characteristics measured in 509 type 1 diabetic patients who were recruited in an outpatient practice: current clinical status and treatment modalities, type of injected insulin and the routine laboratory parameters hemoglobin, HbA1c, serum creatinine, eGFR, hs CRP and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Results: Compared with human insulin, multiple regression analysis taking into account possible confounders revealed that treatment with insulin analogs was associated with increased eGFR (+7.1 ml/min; P=0.0002), lower urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ratio logarithm -0.4; P=0.003) and higher hemoglobin concentration (+0.31 g/dl; P=0.04). Stratification by type of insulin showed the best renal status for treatment with insulins Glargine and Lispro. Differences were consistent both for patients with normal (eGFR → 90 ml/min) and with an impaired (eGFR ← 90 ml/min) kidney function. Conclusions: Present results suggest that treatment of type 1 diabetic patients with normal and impaired renal function with insulin analogs, especially Glargine and Lispro, is associated with better kidney function, lower urinary albumin/creatinine ratio and lower hemoglobin concentration compared to therapy with human insulin. If confirmed by other studies, treatment with insulin analogs may be a further possibility in delaying progression of nephropathy and in preventing early hemoglobin decline. PMID:27540462

  15. Cardioprotective effects of rutin via alteration in TNF-α, CRP, and BNP levels coupled with antioxidant effect in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Saklani, Ravi; Gupta, Suresh Kumar; Mohanty, Ipseeta Ray; Kumar, Binit; Srivastava, Sushma; Mathur, Rajani

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a dreadful complication of diabetes responsible for 80 % mortality in diabetic patients, but unfortunately its pharmacotherapy is still incomplete. Rutin is a naturally occurring flavonoid having a long history of use in nutritional supplements for its action against oxidative stress, inflammation, and hyperglycemia, the key players involved in the progression of DCM, but remains unexplored for its role in DCM. This study was conducted to address this lacuna. It was performed in 4-week-old Streptozotocin-induced (45 mg/kg) diabetic rats for a period of 24 weeks to mimic the cardiotoxic effect of chronic hyperglycemia in diabetic patient's heart and to investigate the effect of rutin (50 mg/kg/day) in ameliorating these effects. Heart of the diabetic rats showed altered ECG parameters, reduced total antioxidant capacity, increased inflammatory assault, and degenerative changes. Interestingly, rutin treatment significantly ameliorated these changes with decrease in blood glucose level (p > 0.001), % HbA1c (p > 0.001) and reduced expression of TNF-α (p < 0.001), CRP (p < 0.001), and BNP (p < 0.01) compared to diabetic control rats. In addition, rutin provided significant protection against diabetes associated oxidative stress (p < 0.05), prevented degenerative changes in heart, and improved ECG parameters compared to diabetic control rats. The heart-to-body weight ratio was significantly reduced in rutin treatment group compared to diabetic control rats (p < 0.001). In conclusion, this study implicates that oxidative stress and inflammation are the central players involved in the progression of DCM and rutin ameliorates DCM through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions on heart. PMID:27443845

  16. Interleukin-17A Gene Variability in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Periodontitis: Its Correlation with IL-17 Levels and the Occurrence of Periodontopathic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kastovsky, Jakub; Lucanova, Svetlana; Bartova, Jirina; Fassmann, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-17 contributes to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and chronic periodontitis (CP). We analyzed IL-17A −197A/G and IL-17F +7488C/T polymorphisms in T1DM and CP and determined their associations with IL-17 production and occurrence of periopathogens. Totally 154 controls, 125 T1DM, and 244 CP patients were genotyped using 5′ nuclease TaqMan® assays. Bacterial colonization was investigated by a DNA-microarray kit. Production of IL-17 after in vitro stimulation of mononuclear cells by mitogens and bacteria was examined by the Luminex system. Although no differences in the allele/genotype frequencies between patients with CP and T1DM + CP were found, the IL-17A −197 A allele increased the risk of T1DM (P < 0.05). Levels of HbA1c were significantly elevated in carriers of the A allele in T1DM patients (P < 0.05). Production of IL-17 by mononuclear cells of CP patients (unstimulated/stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis) was associated with IL-17A A allele (P < 0.05). IL-17A polymorphism increased the number of Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola in patients with CP and T1DM + CP, respectively (P < 0.05). IL-17A gene variability may influence control of T1DM and the “red complex” bacteria occurrence in patients with CP and T1DM + CP. Our findings demonstrated the functional relevance of the IL-17A polymorphism with higher IL-17 secretion in individuals with A allele. PMID:26924897

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Richard; Moher, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review clinical evidence supporting complementary and alternative medicine interventions for improving glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from January 1966 to August 2008 using the term type 2 diabetes in combination with each of the following terms for specific therapies selected by the authors: cinnamon, fenugreek, gymnema, green tea, fibre, momordica, chromium, and vanadium. Only human clinical trials were selected for review. MAIN MESSAGE Chromium reduced glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels in a large meta-analysis. Gymnema sylvestre reduced HbA1c levels in 2 small open-label trials. Cinnamon improved FBG but its effects on HbA1c are unknown. Bitter melon had no effect in 2 small trials. Fibre had no consistent effect on HbA1c or FBG in 12 small trials. Green tea reduced FBG levels in 1 of 3 small trials. Fenugreek reduced FBG in 1 of 3 small trials. Vanadium reduced FBG in small, uncontrolled trials. There were no trials evaluating microvascular or macrovascular complications or other clinical end points. CONCLUSION Chromium, and possibly gymnema, appears to improve glycemic control. Fibre, green tea, and fenugreek have other benefits but there is little evidence that they substantially improve glycemic control. Further research on bitter melon and cinnamon is warranted. There is no complementary and alternative medicine research addressing microvascular or macrovascular clinical outcomes. PMID:19509199

  18. Socioeconomic status and glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes: a mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Janie; Lauzier-Jobin, François; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of health behaviors (self-management and coping), quality of care, and individual characteristics (depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, illness representations) as mediators in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and glycemic control. Methods A sample of 295 adult patients with type 2 diabetes was recruited at the end of a diabetes education course. Glycemic control was evaluated through glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Living in poverty and education level were used as indicators of SES. Results Bootstrapping analysis showed that the significant effects of poverty and education level on HbA1c were mediated by avoidance coping and depressive symptoms. The representation that diabetes is unpredictable significantly mediated the relationship between living in poverty and HbA1c, while healthy diet mediated the relationship between education level and HbA1c. Conclusions To improve glycemic control among patients with low SES, professionals should regularly screen for depression, offering treatment when needed, and pay attention to patients' illness representations and coping strategies for handling stress related to their chronic disease. They should also support patients in improving their self-management skills for a healthy diet. PMID:27239316

  19. Managing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus through Periodical Hospital Visits in the Aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Yoshitaka; Fukuda, Yuji; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nomura, Shuhei; Saito, Yasutoshi

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster on daily diabetes practice and to determine the feasibility of controlling type 2 diabetes mellitus in an outpatient department. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the data on disaster-affected patients with type 2 diabetes who periodically attended outpatient department of Soma Central Hospital. There were 767 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in total. The primary outcome measure was the change in HbA1c. Results HbA1c levels of 58 patients with periodical hospital visits did not deteriorate after the disasters. Moreover, there observed no significant difference in the mean of HbA1c levels among all age and sex throughout the year. While several changes in diabetes medication usage occurred, DPP4-inhibitor was the only oral diabetic agent that increased in frequency (+60%). Conclusions Patients with type 2 diabetes who were managed with periodical hospital visits did not show significant deterioration in HbA1c levels. PMID:25946187

  20. A microfluidic device integrating dual CMOS polysilicon nanowire sensors for on-chip whole blood processing and simultaneous detection of multiple analytes.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Da-Han; Wang, I-Shun; Lin, Jiun-Rue; Yang, Chao-Han; Huang, Chi-Hsien; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lin, Chih-Ting; Huang, Nien-Tsu

    2016-08-01

    The hemoglobin-A1c test, measuring the ratio of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) to hemoglobin (Hb) levels, has been a standard assay in diabetes diagnosis that removes the day-to-day glucose level variation. Currently, the HbA1c test is restricted to hospitals and central laboratories due to the laborious, time-consuming whole blood processing and bulky instruments. In this paper, we have developed a microfluidic device integrating dual CMOS polysilicon nanowire sensors (MINS) for on-chip whole blood processing and simultaneous detection of multiple analytes. The micromachined polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microfluidic device consisted of a serpentine microchannel with multiple dam structures designed for non-lysed cells or debris trapping, uniform plasma/buffer mixing and dilution. The CMOS-fabricated polysilicon nanowire sensors integrated with the microfluidic device were designed for the simultaneous, label-free electrical detection of multiple analytes. Our study first measured the Hb and HbA1c levels in 11 clinical samples via these nanowire sensors. The results were compared with those of standard Hb and HbA1c measurement methods (Hb: the sodium lauryl sulfate hemoglobin detection method; HbA1c: cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography) and showed comparable outcomes. Finally, we successfully demonstrated the efficacy of the MINS device's on-chip whole blood processing followed by simultaneous Hb and HbA1c measurement in a clinical sample. Compared to current Hb and HbA1c sensing instruments, the MINS platform is compact and can simultaneously detect two analytes with only 5 μL of whole blood, which corresponds to a 300-fold blood volume reduction. The total assay time, including the in situ sample processing and analyte detection, was just 30 minutes. Based on its on-chip whole blood processing and simultaneous multiple analyte detection functionalities with a lower sample volume requirement and shorter process time, the MINS device can be

  1. No difference in pain reduction after epidural steroid injections in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Francis; Namdari, Bahram; Dupler, Suzanne; Kovac, Mario Farias; Makarova, Natalya; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Diabetes affects peripheral and central neurons causing paresthesia, allodynia, hyperalgesia, and spontaneous pain. However, the effect of diabetes on response to epidural steroid injection (ESI) remains unknown. We hypothesized that diabetic patients receiving ESI will have different pain scores compared to nondiabetic patients. We tested a secondary hypothesis that pain reduction differs at different levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) for patients with diabetes. Material and Methods: Data from 284 consecutive patients given ESIs for radiculopathy were obtained via a manual review of electronic medical records. We initially compared diabetic and nondiabetic groups with respect to balance on baseline demographic and morphometric characteristics. Next, a linear regression model was developed to evaluate the association between existing diabetes and postinjection reduction in pain scores. And finally, we univariably characterized the association between HbA1c and pain reduction. Results: After exclusion of nine patients, 275 patients were analysed, including 55 (20%) who were diabetic. Pain reduction after ESI was comparable in diabetic and nondiabetic patients (Wald test P = 0.61). The degree of pain reduction generally decreased with the level of HbA1c until reaching HbA1c levels of approximately 7.5%, after which point it stayed fairly constant. Conclusion: There was no difference in pain reduction after ESIs comparing diabetic with nondiabetic patients; however, for diabetic patients, pain reduction may decrease with uncontrolled diabetes determined by high HbA1c values, thus suggesting pain physicians to take an active role in guiding their patients to have their blood glucose levels better regulated to improve outcomes of their ESIs. PMID:27006548

  2. Alexithymia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the role of anxiety, depression, and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Dilek; Kelleci, Meral

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of alexithymia in patients with type 2 DM and the factors affecting it. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted with 326 patients with type 2 DM. Study data were collected with the Personal Information Form, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Glycemic control was assessed by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) results. The analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, chi-square test, Pear-son’s correlation, and logistic regression analysis. Results Of the patients, 37.7% were determined to have alexithymia. A significant relationship was determined between alexithymia and HbA1c, depression, and anxiety. According to binary logistic regression analyses, alexithymia was 2.63 times higher among those who were in a paid employment than those who were not, 2.09 times higher among those whose HbA1c levels were ≥7.0% than those whose HbA1c levels were <7.0%, 3.77 times higher among those whose anxiety subscale scores were ≥11 than those whose anxiety subscale scores were ≤10, and 2.57 times higher among those whose depression subscale scores were ≥8 than those whose depression subscale scores were ≤7. Conclusion In this study, it was determined that two out of every five patients with DM had alexithymia. Therefore, their treatment should be arranged to include mental health care services. PMID:27499615

  3. Younger adult type 2 diabetic patients have poorer glycaemic control: a cross-sectional study in a primary care setting in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim was to study the glycaemic control of type 2 diabetic patients, and to identify factors associated with unacceptable glycaemic control (defined as HbA1c >8.0%). Methods Analysis of data collected in a cross-sectional survey of type 2 diabetic patients in eight SingHealth Polyclinics in January 2009. HbA1c value was measured on the day of the survey, while information on patient and diabetic characteristics was obtained through a questionnaire. Odds ratio of having unacceptable glycaemic control was estimated for selected variables using multiple logistic regression models. Results A total of 688 patients were included in the analysis. The mean (± standard deviation) and median (range) HbA1c levels were 7.6% (± 1.35) and 7.3% (5.0% to 14.0%), respectively. 25.4% of the patients had an unacceptable HbA1c level of >8.0% and the odds of this were higher (p < 0.05) in patients with the following characteristics: younger age, longer diabetes duration, presence of insulin treatment, and poorer compliance to medication. Conclusion Younger adult patients were found to have poorer glycaemic control, and hence targeted educational and behaviour modification programmes would be required to effectively manage this group of patients. PMID:23725198

  4. Randomized controlled clinical trial of a combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor for patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    SU, YONG; SU, YA-LI; LV, LI-FANG; WANG, LI-MIN; LI, QUAN-ZHONG; ZHAO, ZHI-GANG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor for patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Type II diabetic patients exhibiting poor glycemic control following α-glucosidase inhibitor treatment for at least two months were selected and randomly distributed into vildagliptin and placebo groups. The body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c) and blood lipid levels and hepatorenal functions of the patients were determined before and 12 weeks after the trial. Following the trial, the FBG, PPG, HbA1c, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglyceride (TG) levels in the vildagliptin group were significantly decreased compared with the pretreatment levels (P<0.05), whereas only the PPG level in the placebo group decreased (P<0.05). The FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in the vildagliptin group were markedly lower than those in the placebo group 12 weeks after the trial. A comparison of the body weights and hepatorenal functions before and after the trial or between groups did not show statistically significant differences. The combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor effectively reduced the FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in patients without inducing weight gain or hepatorenal dysfunction. However, the therapy may have caused a reduction in the blood lipid levels. PMID:24926379

  5. Prediction of the effect on antihyperglycaemic action of sitagliptin by plasma active form glucagon-like peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Kikuchi, Takako; Tanaka, Kentaro; Tahara, Tazu; Takao, Toshiko; Onishi, Yukiko; Yoshida, Yoko; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a prediction Factor of Effect of sitagliptin on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (GLP-1 FEST:UMIN000010645). METHODS: Seventy-six patients with type 2 diabetes, who had insufficient glycemic control [Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 7%] in spite of treatment with metformin and/or sulfonylurea, were included in the investigation. Patients were divided into three groups by tertiles of fasting plasma active GLP-1 level, before the administration of 50 mg sitagliptin. RESULTS: At baseline, body mass index, serum UA, insulin and HOMA-IR were higher in the high active GLP-1 group than in the other two groups. The high active GLP-1 group did not show any decline of HbA1c (7.6% ± 1.4% to 7.5% ± 1.5%), whereas the middle and low groups indicated significant decline of HbA1c (7.4 ± 0.7 to 6.8 ± 0.6 and 7.4 ± 1.2 to 6.9 ± 1.3, respectively) during six months. Only the low and middle groups showed a significant increment of active GLP-1, C-peptide level, a decreased log and proinsulin/insulin ratio after administration. In logistic analysis, the low or middle group is a significant explanatory variable for an HbA1c decrease of ≥ 0.5%, and its odds ratio is 4.5 (1.40-17.6) (P = 0.01) against the high active GLP-1 group. This remains independent when adjusted for HbA1c level before administration, patients’ medical history, medications, insulin secretion and insulin resistance. CONCLUSION: Plasma fasting active GLP-1 is an independent predictive marker for the efficacy of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor sitagliptin. PMID:27326345

  6. Associations of Circulating Oxidized LDL and Conventional Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of the Navajo Population

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Molly E.; Campen, Matthew J.; Miller, Curtis; Shuey, Chris; Cajero, Miranda; Lucas, Selita; Pacheco, Bernadette; Erdei, Esther; Ramone, Sandy; Nez, Teddy; Lewis, Johnnye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalences of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have increased among the Navajo Native American community in recent decades. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a novel CVD biomarker that has never been assessed in the Navajo population. We examined the relationship of oxLDL to conventional CVD and T2D risk factors and biomarkers in a cross-sectional population of Navajo participants. This cross-sectional study included 252 participants from 20 Navajo communities from the Diné Network for Environmental Health Project. Plasma samples were tested for oxLDL levels by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the relationship of oxLDL and oxidized- to non-oxidized lipoprotein ratios to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL6) and demographic and health variables. Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and obesity are very prevalent in this Navajo population. HbA1c, CRP, body mass index (BMI), high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides were at levels that may increase risk for CVD and T2D. Median oxLDL level was 47 (36.8–57) U/L. Correlational analysis showed that although oxLDL alone was not associated with HbA1c, oxLDL/HDL, oxLDL/LDL and CRP were significantly associated with HbA1c and glucose. OxLDL, oxLDL/HDL and oxLDL/LDL were significantly associated with CRP. Multivariate analysis showed that triglycerides were a common and strong predictor of oxLDL, oxLDL/HDL and oxLDL/LDL. OxLDL was trended with HbA1c and glucose but did not reach significance, however, HbA1c was an independent predictor of OxLDL/HDL. CRP trended with oxLDL/HDL and was a weak predictor of oxLDL/LDL. This Navajo subset appears to have oxLDL levels comparable to subjects without evidence of CVD reported in other studies. The high prevalence of T2D, hypertension and obesity along with abnormal levels of other biomarkers including HbA1c indicate that the Navajo population

  7. Associations of Circulating Oxidized LDL and Conventional Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease in a Cross-Sectional Study of the Navajo Population.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Molly E; Campen, Matthew J; Miller, Curtis; Shuey, Chris; Cajero, Miranda; Lucas, Selita; Pacheco, Bernadette; Erdei, Esther; Ramone, Sandy; Nez, Teddy; Lewis, Johnnye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalences of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have increased among the Navajo Native American community in recent decades. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a novel CVD biomarker that has never been assessed in the Navajo population. We examined the relationship of oxLDL to conventional CVD and T2D risk factors and biomarkers in a cross-sectional population of Navajo participants. This cross-sectional study included 252 participants from 20 Navajo communities from the Diné Network for Environmental Health Project. Plasma samples were tested for oxLDL levels by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the relationship of oxLDL and oxidized- to non-oxidized lipoprotein ratios to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL6) and demographic and health variables. Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and obesity are very prevalent in this Navajo population. HbA1c, CRP, body mass index (BMI), high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides were at levels that may increase risk for CVD and T2D. Median oxLDL level was 47 (36.8-57) U/L. Correlational analysis showed that although oxLDL alone was not associated with HbA1c, oxLDL/HDL, oxLDL/LDL and CRP were significantly associated with HbA1c and glucose. OxLDL, oxLDL/HDL and oxLDL/LDL were significantly associated with CRP. Multivariate analysis showed that triglycerides were a common and strong predictor of oxLDL, oxLDL/HDL and oxLDL/LDL. OxLDL was trended with HbA1c and glucose but did not reach significance, however, HbA1c was an independent predictor of OxLDL/HDL. CRP trended with oxLDL/HDL and was a weak predictor of oxLDL/LDL. This Navajo subset appears to have oxLDL levels comparable to subjects without evidence of CVD reported in other studies. The high prevalence of T2D, hypertension and obesity along with abnormal levels of other biomarkers including HbA1c indicate that the Navajo population has

  8. Relationship between glycated hemoglobin, Intensive Care Unit admission blood sugar and glucose control with ICU mortality in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Shadvar, Kamran; Beigmohammadi, Mohammadtaghi; Iranpour, Afshin; Sanaie, Sarvin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The association between hyperglycemia and mortality is believed to be influenced by the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM). In this study, we evaluated the effect of preexisting hyperglycemia on the association between acute blood glucose management and mortality in critically ill patients. The primary objective of the study was the relationship between HbA1c and mortality in critically ill patients. Secondary objectives of the study were relationship between Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission blood glucose and glucose control during ICU stay with mortality in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients admitted to two ICUs were enrolled. Blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations on ICU admission were measured. Age, sex, history of DM, comorbidities, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, sequential organ failure assessment score, hypoglycemic episodes, drug history, mortality, and development of acute kidney injury and liver failure were noted for all patients. Results: Without considering the history of diabetes, nonsurvivors had significantly higher HbA1c values compared to survivors (7.25 ± 1.87 vs. 6.05 ± 1.22, respectively, P < 0.001). Blood glucose levels in ICU admission showed a significant correlation with risk of death (P < 0.006, confidence interval [CI]: 1.004–1.02, relative risk [RR]: 1.01). Logistic regression analysis revealed that HbA1c increased the risk of death; with each increase in HbA1c level, the risk of death doubled. However, this relationship was not statistically significant (P: 0.161, CI: 0.933–1.58, RR: 1.2). Conclusions: Acute hyperglycemia significantly affects mortality in the critically ill patients; this relation is also influenced by chronic hyperglycemia. PMID:27076705

  9. The impact of knowledge about diabetes, resilience and depression on glycemic control: a cross-sectional study among adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between glycemic control and the factors of knowledge about diabetes, resilience, depression and anxiety among Brazilian adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods This cross-sectional study included 85 adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes, aged between 11–22 years, with an average age of 17.7 ± 3.72 years. Glycemic control degree was evaluated through HbA1c. To assess psychosocial factors, the following questionnaires were used: resilience (Resilience Scale, RS) and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). The Diabetes Knowledge Assessment Scale (DKNA) was used to assess knowledge about diabetes. Results Significant correlations were found between HbA1c and resilience, anxiety and depression. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the only variable which presented significant association with the value of HbA1c was depression. Conclusions Depression has a significant association with higher HbA1c levels, as demonstrated in a regression analysis. The results suggest that depression, anxiety and resilience should be considered in the design of a multidisciplinary approach to type 1 diabetes, as these factors were significantly correlated with glycemic control. Glycemic control was not correlated with knowledge of diabetes, suggesting that theoretical or practical understanding of this disease is not by itself significantly associated with appropriate glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 7.5%). PMID:24289093

  10. Pilot Study of a Web-Delivered Multicomponent Intervention for Rural Teens with Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Christiano, Ann S.; Casella, Samuel J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a web-delivered multicomponent behavioral and family-based intervention targeting self-regulation and self-monitoring of blood glucose levels (SMBG) and glycemic control (HbA1c) in teens with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) living in rural US. Methods. 15 teens with poorly controlled T1DM participated in a 25-week web-delivered intervention with two phases, active treatment (weekly treatment sessions and working memory training program) and maintenance treatment (fading of treatment sessions). Results. Almost all (13 of 15) participants completed at least 14 of 15 treatment sessions and at least 20 of 25 working memory training sessions. SMBG was increased significantly at end of active and maintenance treatment, and HbA1c was decreased at end of active treatment (p's ≤ 0.05). Executive functioning improved at end of maintenance treatment: performance on working memory and inhibitory control tasks significantly improved (p's ≤ 0.02) and parents reported fewer problems with executive functioning (p = 0.05). Improvement in inhibitory control was correlated with increases in SMBG and decreases in HbA1c. Conclusions. An innovative web-delivered and multicomponent intervention was feasible for teens with poorly controlled T1DM and their families living in rural US and associated with significant improvements in SMBG and HbA1c. PMID:27610391

  11. Mobile Diabetes Intervention for Glycemic Control in 45- to 64-Year-Old Persons With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charlene C; Shardell, Michelle D; Terrin, Michael L; Barr, Erik A; Park, DoHwan; Shaikh, Faraz; Guralnik, Jack M; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess effects of a mobile coaching system on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in younger versus older patients over 1 year. Participants (n = 118) included adult patients with Type 2 diabetes cared for by community physicians. Intervention patients received mobile phone coaching and individualized web portal. Control patients received usual care. Patients were stratified into two age groups: younger (<55 years) and older (≥ 55 years). The intervention resulted in greater 12-month declines in HbA1c, compared with usual care, for patients in both age groups (p < .0001). Among older patients, HbA1c changed by -1.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] = [-2.4, -1.1]) in the intervention group and -0.3% (95% CI = [-0.9, +0.3]) in the control group. Among younger patients, HbA1c changed by -2.0% (95% CI = [-2.5, -1.5]) in the intervention group and -1.0% (95% CI = [-1.6, -0.4]) in the control group. The mobile health intervention was as effective at managing Type 2 diabetes in older adults as younger persons. PMID:25098253

  12. Pilot Study of a Web-Delivered Multicomponent Intervention for Rural Teens with Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lansing, Amy Hughes; Stanger, Catherine; Budney, Alan; Christiano, Ann S; Casella, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a web-delivered multicomponent behavioral and family-based intervention targeting self-regulation and self-monitoring of blood glucose levels (SMBG) and glycemic control (HbA1c) in teens with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) living in rural US. Methods. 15 teens with poorly controlled T1DM participated in a 25-week web-delivered intervention with two phases, active treatment (weekly treatment sessions and working memory training program) and maintenance treatment (fading of treatment sessions). Results. Almost all (13 of 15) participants completed at least 14 of 15 treatment sessions and at least 20 of 25 working memory training sessions. SMBG was increased significantly at end of active and maintenance treatment, and HbA1c was decreased at end of active treatment (p's ≤ 0.05). Executive functioning improved at end of maintenance treatment: performance on working memory and inhibitory control tasks significantly improved (p's ≤ 0.02) and parents reported fewer problems with executive functioning (p = 0.05). Improvement in inhibitory control was correlated with increases in SMBG and decreases in HbA1c. Conclusions. An innovative web-delivered and multicomponent intervention was feasible for teens with poorly controlled T1DM and their families living in rural US and associated with significant improvements in SMBG and HbA1c. PMID:27610391

  13. Mobile phone text messaging and Telephone follow-up in type 2 diabetic patients for 3 months: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate and to compare the effectiveness of a nurse short message service (SMS) by cellular phone and telephone follow-up by nurse on Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Methods Semi experimental study consisted of 77 patients with type 2 diabetes that randomly assigned to two groups: telephone follow-up (n = 39) and short message service (n = 38). Telephone interventions were applied by researcher for 3 months. SMS group that received message daily for 12 weeks. Data gathering instrument include data sheet to record HbA1c and questionnaire that consisted of demographic characteristics. Data gathering was performed at two points: initial the study and after 12 weeks. Data analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics methods with SPSS version 11.5. Results Demographic variables were compared and all of them were homogenous. Results of this study showed that both interventions had significant mean changes in HbA1c; for the telephone group (p = 0.001), with a mean change of −0.93% and for the SMS group (p = 0.001), with a mean change of −1.01%. Conclusion Finding of this research showed that intervention using SMS via cellular phone and nurse-led-telephone follow up improved HbA1c for three months in type 2 diabetic patients and it can consider as alternative methods for diabetes control. PMID:23497735

  14. Hemorheological and Glycemic Parameters and HDL Cholesterol for the Prediction of Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Woo; Kim, Byung Gyu; Kim, Byung Ok; Byun, Young Sup; Goh, Choong Won; Rhee, Kun Joo; Kwon, Hyuck Moon; Lee, Byoung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemorheological and glycemic parameters and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are used as biomarkers of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Objective To investigate the association and clinical relevance of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and HDL cholesterol in the prediction of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and coronary heart disease (CHD) in an outpatient population. Methods 708 stable patients who visited the outpatient department were enrolled and followed for a mean period of 28.5 months. Patients were divided into two groups, patients without MACE and patients with MACE, which included cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, newly diagnosed CHD, and cerebral vascular accident. We compared hemorheological and glycemic parameters and lipid profiles between the groups. Results Patients with MACE had significantly higher ESR, fibrinogen, fasting glucose, and HbA1c, while lower HDL cholesterol compared with patients without MACE. High ESR and fibrinogen and low HDL cholesterol significantly increased the risk of MACE in multivariate regression analysis. In patients with MACE, high fibrinogen and HbA1c levels increased the risk of multivessel CHD. Furthermore, ESR and fibrinogen were significantly positively correlated with HbA1c and negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol, however not correlated with fasting glucose. Conclusion Hemorheological abnormalities, poor glycemic control, and low HDL cholesterol are correlated with each other and could serve as simple and useful surrogate markers and predictors for MACE and CHD in outpatients. PMID:26690693

  15. Glycemic Variability and Diabetes Complications: Does It Matter? Simply Put, There Are Better Glycemic Markers!

    PubMed

    Bergenstal, Richard M

    2015-08-01

    There is no argument that improving mean levels of glycemic control as judged by assays for glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) reduces the risks of microvascular complications and cardiovascular disease events in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, observations in some trials have suggested that targeting HbA(1c) to suggested targets may not always result in improved outcomes for people with long-standing type 2 diabetes. The reasons why the glycemic control strategies that primarily use HbA(1c) in these studies did not have predicted outcomes are not clear. Thus, controversy remains as to whether there are glycemic metrics beyond HbA(1c) that can be defined as effective measures that can be used in addition to HbA(1c) to help in assessing the risk of an individual developing diabetes complications. In this regard, the concept of "glycemic variability" (GV) is one metric that has attracted a lot of attention. GV can be simply defined as the degree to which a patient's blood glucose level fluctuates between high (peaks) and low (nadir) levels. The best and most precise way to assess GV is also one that is still debated. Thus, while there is universal agreement that HbA(1c) is the current gold standard for the primary clinical target, there is no consensus as to whether other proposed glycemic metrics hold promise to provide additional clinical data or whether there should be additional targets beyond HbA(1c). Therefore, given the current controversy, we provide a Point-Counterpoint debate on this issue. In the preceding point narrative, Dr. Hirsch provides his argument that fluctuations in blood glucose as assessed by GV metrics are deleterious and control of GV should be a primary treatment target. In the counterpoint narrative below, Dr. Bergenstal argues that there are better markers to assess the risk of diabetes than GV and provides his consideration of other concepts. PMID:26207055

  16. Glycemic Variability and Diabetes Complications: Does It Matter? Of Course It Does!

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Irl B

    2015-08-01

    There is no argument that improving mean levels of glycemic control as judged by assays for glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) reduces the risks of microvascular complications and cardiovascular disease events in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, observations in some trials have suggested that targeting HbA(1c) to suggested targets may not always result in improved outcomes for people with long-standing type 2 diabetes. The reasons why the glycemic control strategies that primarily use HbA(1c) in these studies did not have predicted outcomes are not clear. Thus, controversy remains as to whether there are glycemic metrics beyond HbA(1c) that can be defined as effective measures that can be used in addition to HbA(1c) to help in assessing the risk of an individual developing diabetes complications. In this regard, the concept of "glycemic variability" (GV) is one metric that has attracted a lot of attention. GV can be simply defined as the degree to which a patient's blood glucose level fluctuates between high (peaks) and low (nadir) levels. The best and most precise way to assess GV is also one that is still debated. Thus, while there is universal agreement that HbA(1c) is the current gold standard for the primary clinical target, there is no consensus as to whether other proposed glycemic metrics hold promise to provide additional clinical data or whether there should be additional targets beyond HbA(1c). Therefore, given the current controversy, we provide a Point-Counterpoint debate on this issue. In the point narrative below, Dr. Hirsch provides his argument that fluctuations in blood glucose as assessed by GV metrics are deleterious and control of GV should be a primary treatment target. In the following counterpoint narrative, Dr. Bergenstal argues that there are better markers to assess the risk of diabetes than GV and provides his consideration of other concepts. PMID:26207054

  17. Vitamin D and L-cysteine levels correlate positively with GSH and negatively with insulin resistance levels in the blood of type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S K; Micinski, D; Huning, L; Kahlon, G; Bass, P F; Levine, S N

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Vitamin D, L-cysteine (LC) and glutathione (GSH) levels are lower in the blood of diabetic patients. This study examined the hypothesis that the levels of vitamin D and LC correlate with those of GSH in the blood of type 2 diabetic patients (T2D), and that vitamin D and LC upregulate glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCLC), which catalyzes GSH biosynthesis, in cultured monocytes. Subjects/Methods: Fasting blood was obtained after written informed consent from T2D (n=79) and healthy controls (n=22). U937 monocytes were pretreated with 1,25 (OH)2 vitamin D (0–25 nM) or LC (0–500 μM) for 24 h and then exposed to control or high glucose (25 mM) for 4 h. Results: Plasma levels of vitamin D, LC, GSH and GCLC protein were significantly lower in T2D versus those in age-matched healthy controls. Multiple linear regression analyses and adjustment for body weight showed a significant positive correlation between plasma levels of vitamin D (r=0.26, P=0.05) and LC (r=0.81, P=0.001) and that of GSH, and between LC and vitamin D (r=0.27, P=0.045) levels. Plasma levels of GSH (r=−0.34, P=0.01) and LC (r=−0.33, r=0.01) showed a negative correlation with triglyceride levels. Vitamin D correlated inversely with HbA1C (−0.30, P=0.01) and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (r=−0.31, P=0.03), which showed a significant positive correlation with triglycerides (r=0.44, P=0.001) in T2D. Cell culture studies demonstrate that supplementation with vitamin D and LC significantly increased GCLC expression and GSH formation in control and high-glucose-treated monocytes. Conclusions: This study suggests a positive relationship between the concentrations of the micronutrients vitamin D and LC and that of GSH. Some of the beneficial effects of vitamin D and LC supplementation may be mediated by an increase in the levels of GSH and a decrease in triglyceride levels in T2D patients. PMID:24961547

  18. Glycosylated haemoglobin as a predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavero-Redondo, I; Peleteiro, B; Álvarez-Bueno, C; Rodríguez-Artalejo, F; Martínez-Vizcaíno, V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glycosylated haemoglobin level (HbA1c) is an indicator of the average blood glucose concentrations over the preceding 2–3 months and is used as a convenient and well-known biomarker in clinical practice. Currently, epidemiological evidence suggests that HbA1c level is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary heart disease and heart failure. This protocol aim is to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine relationships of HbA1c levels with cardiovascular outcomes and cause of death, and to analyse the range of HbA1c levels that is a predictor of cardiovascular disease and/or mortality based on data from published observational studies. Methods and analysis The search will be conducted using Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Web of Science databases from their inception. Observational studies written in Portuguese, Spanish or English will be included. The Quality In Prognosis Studies tool will be used to assess the risk of bias for the studies included in the systematic review or meta-analysis. HRs for cardiovascular outcomes and causes of death with 95% CIs will be determined as primary outcomes. Subgroup analyses will be performed based on cardiovascular outcomes, cause of death studied, and type of population included in the studies. Ethics and dissemination This systematic review will synthesise evidence on the potential of using HbA1c level as a prognostic marker for cardiovascular disease outcomes and/or mortality. The results will be disseminated by publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Ethics approval will not be needed because the data used for this systematic review will be obtained from published studies and there will be no concerns about privacy. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42015032552. PMID:27401368

  19. Glycated Hemoglobin Independently Predicts Stroke Recurrence within One Year after Acute First-Ever Non-Cardioembolic Strokes Onset in A Chinese Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuolin; Shi, Yuzhi; Wang, Chunxue; Jia, Qian; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Gaifen; Wang, Yilong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia is related to stroke. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) can reflect pre-stroke glycaemia status. However, the information on the direct association between HbA1c and recurrence after non-cardioembolic acute ischemic strokes is rare and there is no consistent conclusion. Methods The ACROSS-China database comprised of 2186 consecutive first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients with baseline HbA1c values. After excluding patients who died from non-stroke recurrence and patients lost to follow up, 1817 and 1540 were eligible for 3-month and 1-year analyses, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to evaluate the associations between HbA1c and 3-month and 1-year stroke recurrence. Results The HbA1c values at admission were divided into 4 levels by quartiles: Q1 (<5.5%); Q2 (5.5 to <6.1%); Q3 (6.1% to <7.2%); and Q4 (≥7.2%). The cumulative recurrence rates were 8.3% and 11.0% for 3 months and 1 year, respectively. In multivariate analyses, when compared with Q1, the adjusted hazard ratios (AHRs) were 2.83 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-6.26) in Q3 and 3.71(95% CI 1.68-8.21) in Q4 for 3-month stroke recurrence; 3.30 (95% CI 1.31-8.34) in Q3 and 3.35 (95% CI 1.36-8.21) in Q4 for 1-year stroke recurrence. Adding fasting plasma glucose in the multivariate analyses did not modify the association: AHRs were 2.75 (95% CI 1.24-6.11) in Q3 and 3.67 (95% CI 1.59-8.53) in Q4 for 3-month analysis; AHRs were 3.08 (95% CI 1.10-8.64) in Q3 and 3.31(95% CI 1.35-8.14) in Q4 for 1-year analysis. Conclusions A higher “normal” HbA1c level reflecting pre-stroke glycaemia status independently predicts stroke recurrence within one year after non-cardioembolic acute ischemic stroke onset. HbA1c is recommended as a routine test in acute ischemic stroke patients. PMID:24236195

  20. Glycated Hemoglobin Measurement and Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Angelantonio, Emanuele Di; Gao, Pei; Khan, Hassan; Butterworth, Adam S.; Wormser, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Kondapally Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao; Thompson, Alex; Sarwar, Nadeem; Willeit, Peter; Ridker, Paul M; Barr, Elizabeth L.M.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Psaty, Bruce M.; Brenner, Hermann; Balkau, Beverley; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Daimon, Makoto; Willeit, Johann; Njølstad, Inger; Nissinen, Aulikki; Brunner, Eric J.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Price, Jackie F.; Sundström, Johan; Knuiman, Matthew W.; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Verschuren, W. M. M.; Wald, Nicholas; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Whincup, Peter H.; Ford, Ian; Goldbourt, Uri; Gómez-de-la-Cámara, Agustín; Gallacher, John; Simons, Leon A.; Rosengren, Annika; Sutherland, Susan E.; Björkelund, Cecilia; Blazer, Dan G.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Onat, Altan; Marín Ibañez, Alejandro; Casiglia, Edoardo; Jukema, J. Wouter; Simpson, Lara M.; Giampaoli, Simona; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Selmer, Randi; Wennberg, Patrik; Kauhanen, Jussi; Salonen, Jukka T.; Dankner, Rachel; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Kavousi, Maryam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Evans, Denis; Wallace, Robert B.; Cushman, Mary; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Umans, Jason G.; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Hidaeki; Sato, Shinichi; Gillum, Richard F.; Folsom, Aaron R.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Moons, Karel G.; Griffin, Simon J.; Sattar, Naveed; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Thompson, Simon G.; Danesh, John

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The value of measuring levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) for the prediction of first cardiovascular events is uncertain. OBJECTIVE To determine whether adding information on HbA1c values to conventional cardiovascular risk factors is associated with improvement in prediction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Analysis of individual-participant data available from 73 prospective studies involving 294 998 participants without a known history of diabetes mellitus or CVD at the baseline assessment. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Measures of risk discrimination for CVD outcomes (eg, C-index) and reclassification (eg, net reclassification improvement) of participants across predicted 10-year risk categories of low (<5%), intermediate (5%to <7.5%), and high (≥7.5%) risk. RESULTS During a median follow-up of 9.9 (interquartile range, 7.6-13.2) years, 20 840 incident fatal and nonfatal CVD outcomes (13 237 coronary heart disease and 7603 stroke outcomes) were recorded. In analyses adjusted for several conventional cardiovascular risk factors, there was an approximately J-shaped association between HbA1c values and CVD risk. The association between HbA1c values and CVD risk changed only slightly after adjustment for total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations or estimated glomerular filtration rate, but this association attenuated somewhat after adjustment for concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein. The C-index for a CVD risk prediction model containing conventional cardiovascular risk factors alone was 0.7434 (95% CI, 0.7350 to 0.7517). The addition of information on HbA1c was associated with a C-index change of 0.0018 (0.0003 to 0.0033) and a net reclassification improvement of 0.42 (−0.63 to 1.48) for the categories of predicted 10-year CVD risk. The improvement provided by HbA1c assessment in prediction of CVD risk was equal to or better than estimated improvements for

  1. Social capital - a neglected issue in diabetes control: a cross-sectional survey in Iran.

    PubMed

    Farajzadegan, Ziba; Jafari, Najmeh; Nazer, Saeed; Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Zamani, Ahmadreza

    2013-01-01

    Glycaemic control is an essential component in diabetes management. There is growing attention on the protective effects of social capital on health, where social capital comprises features of society that facilitate co-operation for mutual benefit. The aim of this study was to investigate its role as a social determinant of health in the glycaemic control of diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a diabetes care charity institute, Isfahan, Iran from July 2010 to September 2010. Based on the level of HbA1c, all patients were divided into two groups: HbA1c level ≤ 7 as controlled diabetes and HbA1c level > 7 as uncontrolled diabetes. Sixty patients were randomly selected from each group (controlled diabetes and uncontrolled diabetes) and all agreed to participate. Social capital was measured using the Integrated Questionnaire for the Measurement of Social Capital (SC-IQ). The mean age of participants in the controlled diabetes group was 51.3 (SD: 7.8) years and 50.1(SD: 7.2) in the uncontrolled group. The mean social capital score was 185.1 (CI 95% 181.4-188.6) in the controlled group and 175.4 (CI 95% 171.8-178.8) in the uncontrolled group. There was a significant negative correlation between empowerment and political action and trust and solidarity dimensions and the level of HbA1c. In multiple regression analysis, trust and solidarity and empowerment and political action were significant predictors of the HbA1c. The results of this study suggest that social participation, trust, and empowerment and political action may determine how effectively the patient's diabetes has been managed. This initial finding warrants subsequent experimental investigations designed to identify strategies that can be used to foster the creation of social capital to improve diabetes control. PMID:23057630

  2. Short Sleep Duration Measured by Wrist Actimetry Is Associated With Deteriorated Glycemic Control in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Anne-Laure; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Nasse, Laure; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Netter, Sophie; Benhamou, Pierre-Yves

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sleep restriction has been associated with deteriorated insulin sensitivity. The effects of short sleep duration have been explored little in patients with type 1 diabetes. This study addresses the question of whether sleep curtailment affects HbA1c levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Seventy-nine adult patients with type 1 diabetes (median age 40 years [IQR 23–49]; 47% men) were recruited to wear a wrist actimetry sensor during 3 consecutive days to assess mean sleep duration during normal daily life. A subsample of 37 patients also performed 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Medical history, sleep questionnaires, and diabetes-related quality of life (DQOL) were assessed. RESULTS Patients having shorter sleep duration—less than 6.5 h (n = 21)—had higher levels of HbA1c (P = 0.01) than patients with longer sleep duration, above 6.5 h (n = 58). In a multivariable regression model including shorter versus longer sleep duration, diabetes duration, DQOL score, and daily activity, sleep duration was the only variable independently associated with HbA1c (R2 = 10%). In patients who performed 24-h ABPM, patients with a nondipping pattern of blood pressure exhibited shorter sleep duration than patients with a dipping pattern of blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS Shorter sleep duration is associated with higher HbA1c levels in patients with type 1 diabetes, as well as with a nondipping pattern of blood pressure, anticipating a long-term deleterious impact on the risk of microvascular complications. Further studies should test whether extending the duration of sleep may improve both HbA1c and blood pressure in type 1 diabetes. PMID:23715755

  3. Adding Once-Daily Lixisenatide for Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled by Established Basal Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Matthew C.; Aronson, Ronnie; Home, Philip; Marre, Michel; Niemoeller, Elisabeth; Miossec, Patrick; Ping, Lin; Ye, Jenny; Rosenstock, Julio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the efficacy and safety of adding the once-daily glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) lixisenatide to established basal insulin therapy alone or together with metformin, in people with type 2 diabetes and elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial. Patients (n = 495) with established basal insulin therapy but inadequate glycemic control were randomized to add lixisenatide 20 μg or placebo for 24 weeks. Basal insulin dosage was unchanged except to limit hypoglycemia. HbA1c reduction from baseline was the primary end point. RESULTS Mean duration of diabetes was 12.5 years, duration of insulin use was 3.1 years, insulin dosage was 55 units/day, and baseline HbA1c was 8.4%. With lixisenatide, the placebo-corrected change of HbA1c from baseline was –0.4% (95% CI –0.6 to –0.2; P = 0.0002), and mean HbA1c at end point was 7.8%. HbA1c <7.0% (53 mmol/mol) was attained by more lixisenatide (28%) than placebo (12%; P < 0.0001) participants. Lixisenatide reduced plasma glucose levels after a standardized breakfast (placebo-corrected reduction, –3.8 mmol/L; P < 0.0001); seven-point glucose profiles showed a reduction persisting through the day. Reductions in body weight (placebo corrected, –1.3 kg; P < 0.0001) and insulin dosage (–3.7 units/day; P = 0.012) were greater with lixisenatide. Main adverse events (AEs) with lixisenatide were gastrointestinal. Symptomatic hypoglycemia was 28% for lixisenatide and 22% for placebo; 4 of 328 subjects (1.2%) had severe hypoglycemia with lixisenatide vs. 0 of 167 with placebo. CONCLUSIONS By improving HbA1c and postprandial hyperglycemia without weight gain in type 2 diabetes with inadequate glycemic control despite stable basal insulin, lixisenatide may provide an alternative to rapid-acting insulin or other treatment options. PMID:23628617

  4. Serum Soluble (Pro)Renin Receptor Levels in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Yoshifumi; Morimoto, Satoshi; Nakajima, Fumitaka; Ando, Takashi; Ichihara, Atsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] is cleaved by furin to generate soluble (P)RR [s(P)RR], which reflects the status of the tissue renin-angiotensin system. Hemodialysis patients have advanced atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between serum s(P)RR levels and background factors, including indices of atherosclerosis, in hemodialysis patients. Serum s(P)RR levels were measured in hemodialysis patients and clearance of s(P)RR through the membrane of the dialyzer was examined. Furthermore, relationships between serum s(P)RR levels and background factors were assessed. Serum s(P)RR levels were significantly higher in hemodialysis patients (30.4 ± 6.1 ng/ml, n = 258) than those in subjects with normal renal function (21.4 ± 6.2 ng/ml, n = 39, P < 0.0001). Clearance of s(P)RR and creatinine were 56.9 ± 33.5 and 147.6 ± 9.50 ml/min, respectively. Serum s(P)RR levels were significantly higher in those with ankle-brachial index (ABI) of < 0.9, an indicator of severe atherosclerosis, than those with ABI of ≥ 0.9 (32.2 ± 5.9 and 30.1 ± 6.2 ng/ml, respectively, P < 0.05). An association between low ABI and high serum s(P)RR levels was observed even after correction for age, history of smoking, HbA1c, and LDL-C. Serum s(P)RR levels were significantly higher in hemodialysis patients when compared with subjects with normal renal function, although s(P)RR is dialyzed to some extent, but to a lesser extent than creatinine. High serum s(P)RR levels may be associated with atherosclerosis independent of other risk factors, suggesting that serum s(P)RR could be used as a marker for atherosclerotic conditions in hemodialysis patients. PMID:27367528

  5. Effect of Pioglitazone on the Course of New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tafuri, Kimberly Sue; Godil, Mushtaq Ahmed; Lane, Andrew Harry; Wilson, Thomas Allen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is caused by insulin deficiency resulting from progressive destruction of β cells. The histological hallmark of the diabetic islet is mononuclear cell infiltration. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) activate PPARg and enhance the actions of insulin. Studies in non-obese diabetic and streptocotozin-treated mouse models demonstrated that pretreatment with TZDs prevented the development of T1DM. The purpose of this study was to examine whether pioglitazone, given with insulin, preserved β cell function in patients with new-onset T1DM. Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study. Subjects received pioglitazone or placebo. Blood sugar, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-peptide, and liver enzymes were measured at baseline. Boost© stimulated C-peptide responses were measured at baseline and at 24 weeks. Blood sugar, insulin dose, height, weight, and liver enzymes were monitored at each visit. HbA1c was performed every 12 weeks. Results: Of the 15 patients, 8 received pioglitazone, and 7 - placebo. There was no clinical improvement in HbA1c between or within groups at the completion of the study. Mean peak C-peptide values were similar between groups at baseline. Mean peak C-peptide level was slightly higher at 24 weeks in the pioglitazone group compared to the placebo (1.8 vs. 1.5 ng/mL) which was considered as clinically insignificant. The interaction of HbA1c and insulin dose (HbA1c* insulin/kg/day), which combines degree of diabetic control and dose of insulin required to achieve this control, showed transient improvement in the pioglitazone group at 12 weeks but was not sustained at 24 weeks. Conclusion: In this pilot study, pioglitazone did not preserve β cell function when compared to placebo. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24379032

  6. Comparison of vildagliptin as an add-on therapy and sulfonylurea dose-increasing therapy in patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes using metformin and sulfonylurea (VISUAL study): A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Hong, A Ram; Lee, Jeun; Ku, Eu Jeong; Hwangbo, Yul; Kim, Kyoung Min; Moon, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sung Hee; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2015-07-01

    The aim of present study is to compare the efficacy and safety of adding vildagliptin with sulfonylurea dose-increasing as an active comparator in patients who had inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using metformin plus sulfonylurea in real clinical practice. Patients using metformin plus sulfonylurea were assigned to either vildagliptin add-on (50 mg twice a day, n=172) or sulfonylurea dose-increasing by 50% (n=172) treatment groups. The primary endpoint was a change in HbA(1c) after 24 weeks. The secondary endpoints were patients achieving HbA(1c)≤7.0% (53 mmol/mol) and changes in the fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial glucose (2pp), lipid profiles, and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Body weight and hypoglycemia were also investigated. The mean HbA(1c) at baseline was 8.6% (70 mmol/mol) in both groups. At week 24, the adjusted mean HbA(1c) levels decreased by -1.19% (-13.09 mmol/mol) with vildagliptin add-on and -0.46% (-5.06 mmol/mol) with sulfonylurea (P<0.001). Significantly more vildagliptin add-on patients achieved HbA(1c)≤7.0% (53 mmol/mol) than did sulfonylurea patients (40.1% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001). Greater reductions in FPG and 2pp were observed with vildagliptin add-on than with sulfonylurea (P<0.001). The vildagliptin add-on group exhibited no clinically relevant weight gain and had a lower incidence of hypoglycemia compared with the sulfonylurea group. Vildagliptin add-on therapy might be a suitable option for patients with T2DM that is controlled inadequately by metformin and sulfonylurea, based on its greater glucose control and better safety profile (ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01099137). PMID:26003889

  7. Glucose Metabolism Disorder Is Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Individuals with Respiratory Symptoms from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Simone; Cafezeiro, Aparecida S.; Daltro, Carla; Netto, Eduardo M.; Kornfeld, Hardy; Andrade, Bruno B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been associated with increased risk for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in endemic settings but it is unknown whether PTB risk is also increased by pre-DM. Here, we prospectively examined the association between glucose metabolism disorder (GMD) and PTB in patients with respiratory symptoms at a tuberculosis primary care reference center in Brazil. Methods Oral glucose tolerance test was performed and levels of fasting plasma glucose and glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured in a cohort of 892 individuals presenting with respiratory symptoms of more than two weeks duration. Patients were also tested for PTB with sputum cultures. Prevalence of pre-DM and DM (based on HbA1c) was estimated and tested for association with incident PTB. Other TB risk factors including smoking history were analyzed. Results The majority of the study population (63.1%) exhibited GMD based on HbA1c ≥5.7%. Patients with GMD had higher prevalence of PTB compared to normoglycemic patients. Individuals with DM exhibited increased frequency of TB-related symptoms and detection of acid-fast bacilli in sputum smears. Among patients with previous DM diagnosis, sustained hyperglycemia (HbA1c ≥7.0%) was associated with increased TB prevalence. Smoking history alone was not significantly associated with TB in our study population but the combination of smoking and HbA1c ≥7.0% was associated with 6 times higher odds for PTB. Conclusions Sustained hyperglycemia and pre-DM are independently associated with active PTB. This evidence raises the question whether improving glycemic control in diabetic TB patients would reduce the risk of TB transmission and simultaneously reduce the clinical burden of disease. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying these associations, especially those suggesting that pre-DM may be a factor driving susceptibility to TB is warranted. PMID:27078026

  8. Characteristics and Determinants of Partial Remission in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Using the Insulin-Dose-Adjusted A1C Definition

    PubMed Central

    Barrea, Thierry; Vandooren, Valérie; Beauloye, Véronique; Robert, Annie; Lysy, Philippe A.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristics and determinants of partial remission (PR) in Belgian children with type 1 diabetes (T1D), we analyzed records of 242 children from our center. Clinical and biological features were collected at diagnosis and during follow-up. PR was defined using the insulin-dose-adjusted A1C definition. PR occurred in 56.2% of patients and lasted 9.2 months (0.5 to 56.6). 25.6% of patients entered T1D with DKA, which correlated with lower PR incidence (17.6% versus 82.3% when no DKA). In our population, lower A1C levels at diagnosis were associated with higher PR incidence and in young children (0–4 years) initial A1C levels negatively correlated with longer PR. Early A1C levels were predictive of PR duration since 34% of patients had long PRs (>1 year) when A1C levels were ≤6% after 3 months whereas incidence of long PR decreased with higher A1Cs. C-peptide levels were higher in patients entering PR and remained higher until 3 years after diagnosis. Initial antibody titers did not influence PR except for anti-IA2 titers that correlated with A1C levels after 2 years. Presence of 2 versus 1 anti-islet antibodies correlated with shorter PR. PR duration did not influence occurrence of severe hypoglycemia or diabetes-related complications but was associated with lower A1C levels after 18 months. We show that, at diagnosis of T1D, parameters associated with β-cell mass reserve (A1C, C-peptide, and DKA) correlate with the occurrence of PR, which affects post-PR A1C levels. Further research is needed to determine the long-term significance of PR. PMID:25254220

  9. Troponin T and NT ProBNP Levels in Gestational, Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetic Mothers and Macrosomic Infants.

    PubMed

    Mert, Mustafa Kurthan; Satar, Mehmet; Özbarlas, Nazan; Yaman, Akgün; Özgünen, Fatma Tuncay; Asker, Hüseyin Selim; Çekinmez, Eren Kale; Tetiker, Tamer

    2016-01-01

    This study compares NT proBNP and troponin T levels in umbilical cord arterial blood and postnatal echocardiographic findings for infants of gestational and pregestational diabetic mothers and macrosomic infants. Twenty-seven infants of pregestational diabetic mothers, 61 infants of gestational diabetic mothers and 37 macrosomic infants of nondiabetic mothers were prospectively enrolled in this study along with a control group of 58 healthy infants of mothers without any pregestational or gestational disorders as the control group. All enrollees were born after 34 weeks of gestation. For this study, umbilical cord blood was drawn during delivery to determine NT proBNP and troponin T levels. Echocardiography was performed 24-72 h after the delivery. Umbilical cord troponin T and NT proBNP levels were found to be higher in the diabetic and macrosomic groups than in the control group (all of them p < 0.001). NT proBNP levels were positively correlated with interventricular septum thickness in the pregestational and gestational infants of diabetic mothers groups (r = 0.564 and r = 0.560, respectively, p < 0.01). Both pregestational and gestational diabetic mothers were divided into two groups according to HbA1c levels in the third trimester as good (<6.1 %) and suboptimal (>6.1 %) metabolic control. In the good and suboptimal metabolic control diabetic groups, NT proBNP levels were also positively correlated with interventricular septum thickness (r = 0.536 and r = 0.576, respectively, p < 0.01). In the suboptimal metabolic control diabetic group, NT proBNP was only found to be positively correlated with the left ventricular mass index (r = 0.586, p < 0.01). While there was no correlation in the myocardial performance index between infants of diabetic mothers and the control group, the myocardial performance index of macrosomic infants was lower than that of the control group (p = 0.017). Cardiac biomarkers (NT proBNP and troponin T) were

  10. Association of serum SPARC level with severity of coronary artery lesion in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Song, Hai-Yan; An, Meng-Meng; Zhu, Li-Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association of serum SPARC level with the severity of coronary artery lesion in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary heart disease. Methods: 120 patients with type 2 diabetic patients were the subjects. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect levels of serum SPARC and Gensini score was used to assess extent of coronary artery lesions. The patients were divided into 4 groups: A group was the healthy control group with 40 patients. According to angiography and the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria for diabetes the rest were divided into B, C, D group: there were 40 cases in group B (simple type 2 diabetes mellitus group), 40 cases were in group C (simple CHD group), and 40 cases were in D group (type 2 diabetes combined with coronary heart disease group). Results: Compared with that in group A, the serum SPARC level in group B, C and D increased significantly (4.22±1.19) μg/L, (3.71±1.05) μg/L and (5.96±1.40) μg/L vs (3.60±0.40) μg/L (P<0.05 ). Moreover, the serum SPARC level in group D was the highest (P<0.05). Serum SPARC level, insulin resistance (IR), and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were the vital factors contributing to coronary heart disease. Serum SPARC level was positively correlated with the Gensini scores in group D (r=0.770, P<0.05), whereas it was not related to the Gensini scores in group C (r=0.520, P>0.05). Pearson correlation analysis showed that serum SPARC level was positively correlated with triglyceride, fasting insulin, Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance Index (r=0.780, 0.762 and 0.891, respectively; P<0.05). Conclusion: Serum SPARC level elevated in T2DM patients with coronary heart disease, which was correlated with the severity of coronary artery disease significantly. PMID:26770566

  11. Frequent Monitoring of A1C During Pregnancy as a Treatment Tool to Guide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovič, Lois; Savas, Hatice; Mehta, Manish; Trujillo, Angelina; Pettitt, David J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE No guidelines for A1C measurement exist for women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aim of this study was to document the rate of A1C decline in women with GDM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Women with GDM in the Santa Barbara County Endocrine Clinic are managed with a carbohydrate-restricted diet and self-monitored blood glucose before and 1-h postprandial. Insulin is started if the preprandial glucose concentration is ≥90 mg/dl and/or a 1-h postprandial glucose concentration is ≥120 mg/dl. Capillary A1C was tested weekly using the DCA2000+ analyzer. RESULTS Twenty-four women with GDM (aged 29.0 ± 7.3 years) with initial A1C ≥7.0% were recruited. Baseline A1C was 8.8 ± 1.8%. Mean A1C decline was 0.47% per week (range 0.10–1.15%); the maximum was 4.3% in 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS This study documents rapid decline in A1C during pregnancy and the utility of weekly A1C to guide therapy. PMID:20921215

  12. Metabolic, Anthropometric, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Related Risk Factors in Normal and Pre-Diabetic Adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Thani, Mohamed H; Nasser, Heba S; Sayegh, Suzan; Haddad, Alexandra; Sadoun, Eman

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major global health problem. The present study examines the relationship between the metabolic, anthropometric and Finnish risk score (FINDRISC) among normal and pre-diabetic adults. Subjects (n = 1319, aged above 18 years) from the Qatari population were classified into two groups based on their hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements (non-diabetic A1c<5.6% and pre-diabetic 5.6% ≤ A1c ≤ 6.4%) were examined for their anthropometric (height, weight and waist circumference), metabolic [fat, fat free mass (FFM), muscle mass (MM), total body water (TBW), bone mass, degree of obesity, basal metabolic rate (BMR), body mass index (BMI), metabolic age, visceral fat rating, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total cholesterol (Total-C), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG), fasting / random plasma glucose (FPG / RPG), HbA1c and vitamin D (VitD)] and FINDRISC. Means and frequencies were determined in aggregate and by subgroups for all variables and correlations between categorical variables were tested to estimate the association between the anthropometric and metabolic risk factors with the FINDRISC. A percentage of 74.8% (n = 987) of the study population aged below 45 years old and their overall BMI was 28.8±5.2kg/m2 (overweight). Pre-diabetic subgroup have shown a statistically higher FINDRISC compared to their non-diabetic counterparts (11.2±4.1 vs. 9.8±4, p<0.001). The FINDRISC was significantly and directly correlated with the BMI, HbA1c and FPG. However, HbA1c was correlated directly with BMI, SBP, DBP, FPG / RPG and indirectly with the levels of HDL. This study demonstrates an apparent relationship between the HbA1c and FINDRISC score. Pursuing further research on this association may permit using HbA1c with the FINDRISC in predicting the risk of T2DM to be a better tool rather than using the current FPG/RPG, OGTT methods. PMID:27530580

  13. The Effect of Family-centered Care on Management of Blood Glucose Leve