Science.gov

Sample records for a1c hba1c values

  1. Haemoglobin J-Baltimore can be detected by HbA1c electropherogram but with underestimated HbA1c value.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Valéry; Lahary, Agnčs; Chagraoui, Abdeslam; Thuillez, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) is considered the gold standard for assessing diabetes compensation and treatment. In addition, fortuitous detection of haemoglobin variants during HbA1c measurement is not rare. Recently, two publications reported different conclusions on accuracy of HbA(1c) value using capillary electrophoresis method in presence of haemoglobin J-Baltimore (HbJ).
Here we describe the fortuitous detection of unknown HbJ using capillary electrophoresis for measurement of HbA(1c). A patient followed for gestational diabetes in our laboratory presented unknown haemoglobin on Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing analyser which was identified as HbJ. HbJ is not associated with haematological abnormalities. High Performance Liquid Chromatography methods are known to possibly underestimate HbA(1c) value in the presence of this variant. This variant and its glycated form are clearly distinguished on electropherogram but HbJ was responsible for underestimating the true area of HbA(1c).
 Capillary electrophoresis is a good method for detecting HbJ but does not seem suitable for evaluation of HbA(1C) value in patients in presence of HbJ variant.

  2. Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c): Clinical Applications of a Mathematical Concept

    PubMed Central

    Leow, Melvin Khee Shing

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reflects the cumulative glucose exposure of erythrocytes over a preceding time frame proportional to erythrocyte survival. HbA1c is thus an areal function of the glucose-time curve, an educationally useful concept to aid teaching and clinical judgment. Methods: An ordinary differential equation is formulated as a parsimonious model of HbA1c. The integrated form yields HbA1c as an area-under-the-curve (AUC) of a glucose-time profile. The rate constant of the HbA1c model is then derived using the validated regression equation in the ADAG study that links mean blood glucose and HbA1c with a very high degree of goodness-of-fit. Results: This model has didactic utility to enable patients, biomedical students and clinicians to appreciate how HbA1c may be conceptually inferred from discrete blood glucose values using continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) or self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) glucometer readings as shown in the examples. It can be appreciated how hypoglycemia can occur with rapid HbA1c decline despite poor glycemic control. Conclusions: Being independent of laboratory assay pitfalls, computed ‘virtual’ HbA1c serves as an invaluable internal consistency cross-check against laboratory-measured HbA1c discordant with SMBG readings suggestive of inaccurate/fraudulent glucometer records or hematologic disorders including thalassemia and hemoglobinopathy. This model could be implemented within portable glucometers, CGMS devices and even smartphone apps for deriving tentative ‘virtual’ HbA1c from serial glucose readings as an adjunct to measured HbA1c. Such predicted ‘virtual’ HbA1c readily accessible via glucometers may serve as feedback to modify behavior and empower diabetic patients to achieve better glycemic control. PMID:27708483

  3. Value of the combined examination of Cys-C and HbA1c for diagnosis of early renal injury in pediatric diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Tong; Tian, Lijun; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Zhenru; Tian, Xiuying; Sun, Dan

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the combined application of measuring cystatin C (Cys-C) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels for early renal injury in pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 130 children with type 2 diabetes admitted to our hospital from May 2013 to July 2015 were selected. Patients were divided according to whether there was complication of renal injury. In group A (n=65), the patients had renal injury and in group B (n=65), the patients did not have renal injury. The levels of Cys-C and HbA1c in the two groups were examined. The results showed that the levels of Cys-C and HbA1c of patients in group A were significantly higher than those in group B (P<0.05), and the positive rate of the combined examination of Cys-C and HbA1c in group A was 92.3%, and was higher than that of the individual examinations of either Cys-C or HbA1c (P<0.05). The Spearman's correlation coefficient analysis was applied to group B and showed that Cys-C was positively correlated with HbA1c (r=0.842, P<0.05). From analysis of the receiver operating characteristic curves, the combined examination of Cys-C and HbA1c surpassed the individual examinations of Cys-C or HbA1c in sensitivity and specificity (P<0.05). In conclusion, the positive detection rate of early renal injury was significantly increased by the combined examination of Cys-C and HbA1c in pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes, which is beneficial for early identification and diagnosis of this diseases and is worthy of clinical application.

  4. Long-term prognostic value of admission haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Ozgur; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Erturk, Mehmet; Surgit, Ozgur; Celik, Omer; Ozturk, Derya; Uzun, Fatih; Akkaya, Emre; Yildirim, Aydın

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many studies have reported the diagnostic and prognostic value of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome. However, the short- and long-term prognostic value of HbA1c level in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is controversial. Aim To investigate whether admission HbA1c level has a prognostic value for in-hospital, short-, and long-term cardiovascular (CV) mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. Material and methods This prospective study included 443 consecutive patients with STEMI who underwent primary PCI between September 2010 and July 2012. The patients were divided into three groups based on admission HbA1c levels: group I (HbA1c ≤ 5.6%), group II (HbA1c 5.7–6.4%), and group III (HbA1c ≥ 6.5%). The in-hospital, 1-month, and 1-year CV events of all 3 patient groups were followed up. Results A significant association was found between HbA1c level and 1-year primary clinical outcomes, including CV mortality, non-fatal reinfarction, and stroke (p = 0.037). In addition, age, Killip class > 1, and left ventricular ejection fraction were found to be independent predictors of long-term CV mortality in multivariate analysis (hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) 1.081 (1.020–1.146), 4.182 (1.171–14.935), and 0.832 (0.752–0.920); p = 0.009, p = 0.028, and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased admission HbA1c levels were associated with higher rates of major adverse CV events, including mortality, non-fatal reinfarction, and stroke, in patients with STEMI who underwent primary PCI. PMID:25489302

  5. Cutoff Point of HbA1c for Diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus in Chinese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Chuan; Li, Xin-Yu; Liu, Xu-Han; Feng, Qiu-Xia; Lu, Lu; Zhu, Zhu; Liu, Ying-Shu; Zhao, Wei; Gao, Zheng-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to find the optimal threshold of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) for diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in Chinese individuals. Methods A total of 8 391 subjects (including 2 133 men and 6 258 women) aged 40–90 years with gradable retinal photographs were recruited. The relationship between HbA1c and diabetic retinopathy (DR) was examined. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to find the optimal threshold of HbA1c in screening DR and diagnosing diabetes. Results HbA1c values in patients with DR were significantly higher than in those with no DR. The ROC curve for HbA1c had an area under the curve of 0.881 (95%CI 0.857–0.905; P = 0.000). HbA1c at a cutoff of 6.5% had a high sensitivity (80.6%) and specificity (86.9%) for detecting DR. Conclusions HbA1c can be used to diagnose diabetes in a Chinese population, and the optimal HbA1c cutoff point for diagnosis is 6.5%. PMID:27861599

  6. What is the Role of HbA1c in Diabetic Hemodialysis Patients?

    PubMed

    Coelho, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The definition of a good glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis is far from settled. In the general population, hemoglobin A1c is highly correlated with the average glycemia of the last 8-12 weeks. However, in hemodialysis patients, the correlation of hbA1c with glycemia is weaker as it also reflects changes in hemoglobin characteristics and red blood cells half-life. As expected, studies show that the association between HbA1c and outcomes in these patients differ from the general population. Therefore, the value of HbA1c in the treatment of hemodialysis patients has been questioned. Guidelines are generally cautious in their recommendations about possible targets of HbA1c in this population. Indeed, the risk of not treating hyperglycemia should be weighed against the particularly high risk of precipitating hypoglycemia in dialysis patients. In this review, a critical analysis of the current role of HbA1c in the care of hemodialysis patients is presented.

  7. Challenges in HbA1c Analysis and Reporting in Patients with Variant Hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Sultana, T A; Sheme, Z A; Sultana, G S; Sultana, B; Mishu, F A; Khan, N Z; Sarkar, B C; Muttalib, M A; Khan, S A; Choudhury, S; Mahtab, H

    2016-04-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA(1)c) is a well-established indicator of mean glycemia. The presence of genetic variants of hemoglobin can profoundly affect the accuracy of HbA(1)c measurements. Variants of hemoglobin especially Hemoglobin E (HbE) is prevalent in South East Asia including Bangladesh. The objective of our study is to compare the HbA(1)c values measured on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Turbidimetric Inhibition Immunoassay (TINIA) in diabetic patients with variant hemoglobins including HbE. A total of 7595 diabetic patients receiving treatment at BIRDEM General Hospital were analyzed for HbA(1)c results within a period of two months from December 2013 to January 2014. Seventy two cases out of 7595 (0.95%) had either undetectable or below normal HbA(1)c levels (males-33 and females-39; ratio = 0.82:1) by HPLC method. In 34(0.45%) cases, HbA(1)c value was undetectable by HPLC method but was in the reportable range by TINIA method. In the other 38 (0.55%) cases, HbA(1)c levels were below the reportable range (<4%) by HPLC method but were in the normal or higher range by TINIA method. TINIA method did not agree with HPLC method on Bland Altman plot in the 38 cases with below normal HbA(1)c levels, [Mean bias -5.2(-9.3 to 1.0), 95% CI] but agreed very well [mean bias -0.21 (-0.84 to 0.42), y=1.1037+0.776X; r(2)=0.30, p<0.01] in controls. In control group mean MCV was 83.80±7.48 and in study group was 73.65±10.44. Alkaline electrophoresis confirmed the variant hemoglobin to be HbE. The fasting blood sugar levels of all the 72 cases correlated strongly with TINIA method (r(2) =0.75, p<0.0001) but not with HPLC (r = 0.24, p=0.13). In our regions where populations have a high prevalence of Hb variant, proper knowledge of hemoglobin variants which affect the measurements HbA(1)c level is essential. MCV of 80fl or below may serve as a rough guide to select samples that require analysis by TINIA method. Moreover, HPLC may be a convenient and inexpensive

  8. The Long and Winding Road to Optimal HbA1c Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Little, Randie R.; Rohlfing, Curt

    2016-01-01

    The importance of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as an indicator of mean glycemia and risks for complications in patients with diabetes mellitus was established by the results of long-term clinical trials, most notably the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), published in 1993 and 1998 respectively. However, clinical application of recommended HbA1c targets that were based on these studies was difficult due to lack of comparability of HbA1c results among assay methods and laboratories. Thus, the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP) was initiated in 1996 with the goal of standardizing HbA1c results to those of the DCCT/UKPDS. HbA1c standardization efforts have been highly successful; however, a number of issues have emerged on the “long and winding road” to better HbA1c, including the development of a higher-order HbA1c reference method by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC), recommendations to use HbA1c to diagnose as well as monitor diabetes, and point-of-care (POC) HbA1c testing. Here, we review the past, present and future of HbA1c standardization and describe the current status of HbA1c testing, including limitations that healthcare providers need to be aware of when interpreting HbA1c results. PMID:23318564

  9. Use of fructosyl peptide oxidase for HbA1c assay.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Satoshi; Inamura, Norio; Fukuda, Miho; Sugiyama, Koji

    2015-03-01

    ARKRAY, Inc developed the world's first automatic glycohemoglobin analyzer based on HPLC (1981). After that, ARKRAY developed enzymatic HbA1c assay "CinQ HbA1c" with the spread and diversification of HbA1c measurement (2007). CinQ HbA1c is the kit of Clinical Chemistry Analyzer, which uses fructosyl peptide oxidase (FPOX) for a measurement reaction. This report mainly indicates the developmental background, measurement principle, and future of the enzymatic method HbA1c reagent.

  10. [Evaluation of HbA1c using different methods in haemoglobin variant, Hb J-Bangkok].

    PubMed

    Sawaragi, Wakana; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Suzuki, Haruki; Shimizu, Chikara; Matsuno, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-01

    A 31-year-old Japanese man with haemoglobin variant, Hb J-Bangkok [beta56 (D7) Gly-->Asp], was found by discrepant values between HbA1c and glycated-albumin. We measured HbA1c using three different methods, HPLC, enzyme assay and turbidimetric immunoassay. HbA1c value measured by HPLC was much lower than those by others. Furthermore, we estimated calculated glyco-haemoglobin value measured by high-resolution HPLC, revealing that HbA1c values measured by enzyme assay and turbidimetric immunoassay were comparable with calculated value. When measuring HbA1c value in haemoglobin variant, Hb J Bangkok, enzyme assay and turbidimetric immunoassay are useful methods.

  11. A study assessing the association of glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) associated variants with HbA1C, chronic kidney disease and diabetic retinopathy in populations of Asian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Tay, Wan-Ting; Sim, Xueling; Ali, Mohammad; Xu, Haiyan; Suo, Chen; Liu, Jianjun; Chia, Kee-Seng; Vithana, Eranga; Young, Terri L; Aung, Tin; Lim, Wei-Yen; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Tai, E-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) level is used as a diagnostic marker for diabetes mellitus and a predictor of diabetes associated complications. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with HbA1C level. Most of these studies have been conducted in populations of European ancestry. Here we report the findings from a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of HbA1C levels in 6,682 non-diabetic subjects of Chinese, Malay and South Asian ancestries. We also sought to examine the associations between HbA1C associated SNPs and microvascular complications associated with diabetes mellitus, namely chronic kidney disease and retinopathy. A cluster of 6 SNPs on chromosome 17 showed an association with HbA1C which achieved genome-wide significance in the Malays but not in Chinese and Asian Indians. No other variants achieved genome-wide significance in the individual studies or in the meta-analysis. When we investigated the reproducibility of the findings that emerged from the European studies, six loci out of fifteen were found to be associated with HbA1C with effect sizes similar to those reported in the populations of European ancestry and P-value ≤ 0.05. No convincing associations with chronic kidney disease and retinopathy were identified in this study.

  12. Determination of the value of glycated hemoglobin HbA1c and fructosamine in assessing the risk of perioperative complications after cardiac surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wróbel, Marta; Rokicka, Dominika; Szymborska-Kajanek, Aleksandra; Foremny, Jerzy; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Zembala, Marian; Strojek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with diabetes have a worse postoperative course and longer length of hospital stay after surgery. A good indicator of proper long-term (3 months) glycemic control is glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and fructosamine in the short term (2–3 weeks). Aim To determine the degree of glycemic control evaluated preoperatively by HbA1c and/or fructosamine influence on the postoperative course of patients with diabetes undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in 2014–2015. Material and methods Before the operation HbA1c (N < 7.0) and fructosamine (N < 280 µmol/l) were measured and depending on the results the respondents were divided into 4 groups: group I (n = 46) – normal both parameters; group II (n = 22) – high both values; group III (n = 4) – normal fructosamine/HbA1c high; group IV (n = 33) – high HbA1c/fructosamine normal. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test assuming p < 0.05 to be statistically significant. Results One hundred and five patients were treated by CABG/OPCAB (39 female, 66 males). The mean age was 65.7 ±7.3, HbA1c: 7.23 ±1.2%, fructosamine: 261.8 ±43.8. There was no difference in the incidence of other postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusions Glycated hemoglobin and fructosamine levels to a similar extent define the risk of perioperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. In patients in whom there is a need to quickly compensate for elevated blood glucose consider enabling determination of fructosamine. PMID:28096825

  13. Falsely increased HbA1c values by HPLC and falsely decreased values by immunoassay lead to identification of Hb Okayama and help in the management of a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Frers, C R; Dorn, S; Schmidt, W; Kochhan, L; Simon-Schultz, J; Arndt, R

    2000-01-01

    A falsely increased HbA1c value of 47.1% was determined by cation exchange chromatography during a routine HbA1c measurement of the blood sample from a 63-year-old diabetic male patient living in Hamburg, Germany. In former determinations by immunological assays falsely decreased values in the range of 5.0 to 5.5% were obtained. The sample was inconspicuous in alkaline hemoglobin electrophoresis. But acid hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed the falsely increased value. These facts let us consider the existence of a heterozygous "silent hemoglobin variant", such as hemoglobin Okayama, with an amino acid substitution in one of the first four amino acids of the beta chain, representing the epitope of common immunoassays. DNA analyses confirmed this presumption and we found the heterozygous mutation hemoglobin Okayama [beta 2 (NA 2) His (CAC)-->Gln (CAA)]. Knowing that an immunological assay only detects about half of the present HbA1c, the obtained values can be used for therapeutic management of this diabetic patient.

  14. Is There a Role for HbA1c in Pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ruth C E; Rowan, Janet; Florkowski, Chris M

    2016-01-01

    Outside pregnancy, HbA1c analysis is used for monitoring, screening for and diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes. During pregnancy, the role for HbA1c analysis is not yet established. Physiological changes lower HbA1c levels, and pregnancy-specific reference ranges may need to be recognised. Other factors that influence HbA1c are also important to consider, particularly since emerging data suggest that, in early pregnancy, HbA1c elevations close to the reference range may both identify women with underlying hyperglycaemia and be associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. In later pregnancy, HbA1c analysis is less useful than an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at detecting gestational diabetes. Postpartum, HbA1c analysis detects fewer women with abnormal glucose tolerance than an OGTT, but the ease of testing may improve follow-up rates and combining HbA1c analysis with fasting plasma glucose or waist circumference may improve detection rates. This article discusses the relevance of HbA1c testing at different stages of pregnancy.

  15. Association of HbA1c and cardiovascular and renal disease in an adult Mediterranean population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests a mechanistic link between the glycemic environment and renal and cardiovascular events, even below the threshold for diabetes. We aimed to assess the association between HbA1c and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods A cross-sectional study involving a random representative sample of 2270 adults from southern Spain (Malaga) was undertaken. We measured HbA1c, serum creatinine and albuminuria in fasting blood and urine samples. Results Individuals without diabetes in the upper HbA1c tertile had an unfavorable cardiovascular and renal profile and shared certain clinical characteristics with the patients with diabetes. Overall, a higher HbA1c concentration was strongly associated with CKD or CVD after adjustment for traditional risk factors. The patients with known diabetes had a 2-fold higher odds of CKD or CVD. However, when both parameters were introduced in the same model, the HbA1c concentration was only significantly associated with clinical endpoints (OR: 1.4, 95% CI, 1.1-1.6, P = 0.002). An increase in HbA1c of one percentage point was associated with a 30% to 40% increase in the rate of CKD or CVD. This relationship was apparent in persons with and without known diabetes. ROC curves illustrated that a HbA1c of 37 mmol/mol (5.5%) was the optimal value in terms of sensitivity and specificity for predicting endpoints in this population. Conclusion HbA1c levels were associated with a higher prevalence of CKD and CVD cross-sectionally, regardless of diabetes status. These data support the value of HbA1c as a marker of cardiovascular and renal disease in the general population. PMID:23865389

  16. Quality of HbA1c Measurement in Trinidad and Tobago

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Maynika V.; Ladenson, Paul; Goldstein, David E.; Little, Randie R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Monitoring of HbA1c is the standard of care to assess diabetes control. In Trinidad & Tobago (T&T) there are no existing data on the quality of HbA1c measurement. Our study examined the precision and accuracy of HbA1c testing in T&T. Methods: Sets of 10 samples containing blinded duplicates were shipped to laboratories in T&T. This exercise was repeated 6 months later. Precision and accuracy were estimated for each laboratory/method. Results: T&T methods included immunoassay, capillary electrophoresis, and boronate affinity binding. Most, but not all, laboratories demonstrated acceptable precision and accuracy. Conclusions: Continuous oversight of HbA1c testing (eg, through proficiency testing) in T&T is recommended. These results highlight the lack of oversight of HbA1c testing in some developing countries. PMID:26553021

  17. HbA(1c)--an analyte of increasing importance.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Trefor

    2012-09-01

    Since the incorporation in 1976 of HbA(1c) into a monitoring program of individuals with diabetes, this test has become the gold standard for assessment of glycemic control. Analytical methods have steadily improved in the past two decades, largely through the efforts of the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization program (NGSP). The new definition of HbA(1c) and the introduction of an analytically pure calibrator have increased the possibility for greater improvements in analytical performance. Controversies exist in the reporting of HbA(1c). The use of HbA(1c) has expanded beyond the use solely as a measure of glycemic control into a test for screening and diagnosing diabetes. With improvements in analytical performance, the effects of demographic factors such as age and ethnicity and clinical factors such as iron deficiency have been observed. In this review, the history, formation, analytical methods and parameters that affect HbA(1c) analysis are discussed.

  18. Luminol chemiluminescence biosensor for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in human blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kwang-Soo; Lee, JungHoon; Park, Jong-Myeon; Choi, Han Nim; Lee, Won-Yong

    2016-01-15

    Luminol chemiluminescence (CL) biosensor based on boronic acid modified gold substrate has been developed for the determination of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in human blood samples. In order to selectively capture HbA1c in sample, carboxy-EG6-undecanethiol was self-assembled on a gold thin-film substrate, followed by covalent coupling of 3-aminophenyl boronic acid (3-APBA). The captured HbA1c containing four iron heme groups plays as a catalyst for luminol CL reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, and thus the luminol CL response is linearly proportional to the amount of HbA1c captured on the biosensor surface. The present biosensor showed linear dynamic range of HbA1c from 2.5% to 17.0%, which well covers the clinically important concentration range. In addition, the present biosensor exhibited negligible response to interfering species such as hemoglobin, fructose, and sorbitol. The present HbA1c biosensor was applied to the determination of HbA1c in human blood samples and the results were well agreed with that obtained with a conventional method.

  19. Measurement of HbA1c from stored whole blood samples in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study

    PubMed Central

    SELVIN, Elizabeth; CORESH, Josef; ZHU, Hong; FOLSOM, Aaron; STEFFES, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Background The aims of the present study were to demonstrate the reliability of HbA1c measurements across two time periods and to compare these measurements with HbA1c distribution in the general US population. Methods HbA1c was measured in 14 069 whole blood samples in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study using different HPLC instruments during two time periods, namely 2003–2004 and 2007–2008. At the time of measurement, samples had been in storage at –70°C for 14–18 years. To assess differences in values, HbA1c measurements were repeated in 383 samples at both periods. Indirect comparisons were made by comparing our measurements against those from a nationally representative study. Results The coefficients of variation for quality control samples were 1.8% (n = 89) in 2003–2004 and 1.4% (n = 259) in 2007–2008. The correlation between measurements at the two time points was high (r = 0.99), but with a slight bias: 0.29% points higher in 2007–2008 versus 2003–2004 (n = 383; P < 0.0001). The comparison yielded the following Deming regression equation: y(2007–2008) = 0.073+1.034x(2003–2004). After alignment using this equation, the distribution of HbA1c in the ARIC study was similar to that in the national study using fresh samples. Conclusions Measurements of HbA1c from samples stored for 14–18 years are highly reliable when using state-of-the-art HPLC instruments, but with some bias introduced over time. The HbA1c data now available in the ARIC study should be invaluable for investigations into the clinical utility of HbA1c as a diagnostic test for diabetes. PMID:20923494

  20. A history of HbA1c through Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gillery, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    HbA(1c) was discovered in the late 1960s and its use as marker of glycemic control has gradually increased over the course of the last four decades. Recognized as the gold standard of diabetic survey, this parameter was successfully implemented in clinical practice in the 1970s and 1980s and internationally standardized in the 1990s and 2000s. The use of standardized and well-controlled methods, with well-defined performance criteria, has recently opened new directions for HbA(1c) use in patient care, e.g., for diabetes diagnosis. Many reports devoted to HbA1c have been published in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) journal. This review reminds the major steps of HbA(1c) history, with a special emphasis on the contribution of CCLM in this field.

  1. Detection of HbA(1c) by boronate affinity immunoassay using bacterial magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Matsunaga, T

    2001-12-01

    We have developed a boronate affinity immunoassay system using m-aminophenylboronic acid (mAPB) coupling to bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs). Homobifunctional crosslinker, Bis-(succcimidyl)suberate (BS3), was employed for preparation of mAPB-BMPs conjugates (mAPB-BMPs). Quantities of HbA(1c) on mAPB-BMPs were evaluated based on luminescence from alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-Hb antibody (ALP-antibody) binding to HbA(1c) on the BMP surface. The binding of HbA(1c) to mAPB-BMPs occurred gradually and was almost completed within 10 mm. The coupling reaction is enhanced due to static electric interaction between the positive charges on HbA(1c) and negative charges on BMPs. The amount of HbA(1c) binding to mAPB-BMPs increased with increasing sodium chloride concentrations in the range of 0-100 mM. However, the amount of Hb binding to mAPB-BMPs also increased in high concentration of sodium chloride. The Hb binding to mAPB-BMPs was detached from mAPB-BMPs when Hb-mAPB-BMPs were washed with low salt buffer. This indicates that Hb is nonspecifically adsorbed onto the surface of mAPB-BMPs in high concentration of sodium chloride. These results suggest that selective separation of HbA(1c) using mAPB-BMPs can be achieved with these conditions. A dose-response curve was obtained between luminescence intensity and HbA(1c) concentration using a fully automated boronate affinity immunoassay. A linear relationship between luminescence intensity and HbA(1c) concentration was obtained in the range of 10-10(4) ng/ml.

  2. Significance of HbA1c Test in Diagnosis and Prognosis of Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Shariq I.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Ekhzaimy, Aishah; Masood, Afshan; Sakharkar, Meena K.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a global endemic with rapidly increasing prevalence in both developing and developed countries. The American Diabetes Association has recommended glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as a possible substitute to fasting blood glucose for diagnosis of diabetes. HbA1c is an important indicator of long-term glycemic control with the ability to reflect the cumulative glycemic history of the preceding two to three months. HbA1c not only provides a reliable measure of chronic hyperglycemia but also correlates well with the risk of long-term diabetes complications. Elevated HbA1c has also been regarded as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke in subjects with or without diabetes. The valuable information provided by a single HbA1c test has rendered it as a reliable biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of diabetes. This review highlights the role of HbA1c in diagnosis and prognosis of diabetes patients. PMID:27398023

  3. Association of Genomic Instability with HbA1c levels and Medication in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grindel, Annemarie; Brath, Helmut; Nersesyan, Armen; Knasmueller, Siegfried; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) is associated with increased cancer risk. Instability of the genetic material plays a key role in the aetiology of human cancer. This study aimed to analyse genomic instability with the micronucleus cytome assay in exfoliated buccal cells depending on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and medication in 146 female DM2 patients. The occurrence of micronuclei was significantly increased in DM2 patients compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, it was doubled in DM2 patients with HbA1c > 7.5% compared to subjects with HbA1c ≤ 7.5%. Positive correlations were found between micronuclei frequencies and HbA1c as well as fasting plasma glucose. Patients under insulin treatment showed a two-fold increase in micronuclei frequencies compared to subjects under first-line medication (no drugs or monotherapy with non-insulin medication). However, after separation of HbA1c (cut-off 7.5%) only patients with severe DM2 characterised by high HbA1c and insulin treatment showed higher micronuclei frequencies but not patients with insulin treatment and low HbA1c. We demonstrated that the severity of DM2 accompanied by elevated micronuclei frequencies predict a possible enhanced cancer risk among female DM2 patients. Therapy, therefore, should focus on a strict HbA1c control and personalised medical treatments. PMID:28150817

  4. Development of an electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of HbA1c in serum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guozhen; Khor, Sook Mei; Iyengar, Sridhar G; Gooding, J Justin

    2012-02-21

    An electrochemical immuno-biosensor for detecting glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is reported based on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes with a mixed layer of an oligo(phenylethynylene) molecular wire (MW) and an oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG). The mixed layer is formed from in situ-generated aryl diazonium cations. To the distal end of the MW, a redox probe 1,1'-di(aminomethyl)ferrocene (FDMA) was attached followed by the covalent attachment of an epitope N-glycosylated pentapeptide (GPP), an analogon to HbA1c, to which an anti-HbA1c monocolonal antibody IgG can selectively bind. HbA1c was detected by a competitive inhibition assay based on the competition for binding to anti-HbA1c IgG antibodies between the analyte in solution, HbA1c, and the surface bound epitope GPP. Exposure of the GPP modified sensing interface to the mixture of anti-HbA1c IgG antibody and HbA1c results in the attenuation of ferrocene electrochemistry due to free antibody binding to the interface. Higher concentrations of analyte led to higher Faradaic currents as less anti-HbA1c IgG is available to bind to the electrode surface. It was observed that there is a good linear relationship between the relative Faradaic current of FDMA and the concentration of HbA1c from 4.5% to 15.1% of total haemoglobin in serum without the need for washing or rinsing steps.

  5. HbA1c as a Screening tool for Ketosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bing; Bu, Le; Zhang, Manna; Gusdon, Aaron M.; Zheng, Liang; Rampersad, Sharvan; Li, Jue; Qu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    Ketosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is overlooked due to atypical symptoms. The objective of this study is to evaluate the value of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a screening tool for ketosis in T2DM patients. This retrospective study consisted of 253 T2DM patients with ketosis at Shanghai 10th People’s Hospital during a period from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2015. A control group consisted of 221 T2DM patients without ketosis randomly selected from inpatients during the same period. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to examine the sensitivity and specificity of HbA1c as an indicator for ketosis. Higher HbA1c levels were correlated with ketosis. In patients with newly diagnosed T2DM, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.832, with 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.754–0.911. The optimal threshold was 10.1% (87 mmol/mol). In patients with previously diagnosed T2DM, the AUC was 0.811 (95% CI: 0.767–0.856), with an optimal threshold of 8.6% (70 mmol/mol). HbA1c is a potential screening tool for ketosis in patients with T2DM. Ketosis is much more likely with HbA1c values at ≥10.1% in patients with newly diagnosed T2DM and HbA1c values at ≥8.6% in patients with previously diagnosed T2DM. PMID:28009017

  6. Stability study for magnetic reagent assaying Hb and HbA1c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Chieh, J. J.; Yang, C. C.; Yang, S. Y.; Chen, Po-Yu; Huang, Yu-Hao; Hong, Y. W.; Horng, H. E.

    2013-01-01

    Reagents for magnetically labeled immunoassay on human Hb and human HbA1c have been synthesized. The reagents consist of Fe3O4 magnetic particles biofunctionalized with antibodies against Hb and HbA1c. It has been demonstrated that the reagents can be applied to quantitatively detect Hb and HbA1c by using immunomagnetic reduction assay. In addition to characterizing the assay properties, such as the standard curve and the low-detection limit, the stability of reagents is investigated. To do this, the temporal dependence of particle sizes and the bio-activity of reagents are monitored. The results show that the reagents are highly stable when stored at 2-8 °C. This means that the reagents synthesized in this work are promising for practical applications.

  7. Impact of glutathione-HbA1c on HbA1c measurement in diabetes diagnosis via array isoelectric focusing, liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Guo, Chen-Gang; Chen, Lu; Yin, Xiao-Yang; Wu, Yi-Xin; Fan, Liu-Yin; Fan, Hui-Zhi; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2013-10-15

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has been proven to be a key biomarker for diabetes screening, and glutathiolation of HbA1c (viz., GSS-HbA1c) has been identified. However, the impact of GSS-HbA1c on the measurement of HbA1c for diabetes screening has not been quantitatively assessed yet. To address the issue, the micropreparative capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) developed in our previous work was used for the high resolution separation and purification of hemoglobin (Hb) species. The main fractions of HbA0, HbA3 and HbA1c extracted from the developed cIEF were identified by validated Mono S method. The proposed GSS-HbA1c fractions in the cIEF were pooled and identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The HbA1c enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit was employed for further quantitative analysis of GSS-HbA1c. A total of 34 blood samples with HbA1c levels from 4.2% to 13.4% were assessed via the above comprehensive strategy of IEF-HPLC-MS-ELISA. It was demonstrated that the HbA1c levels detected by cation exchange LC were considerably influenced by the glutathiolation of Hb and the range of detected GSS-HbA1c values was between 0.23% and 0.74%. The results and developed cIEF methods have considerable significances for investigation of diabetes and clinical diagnosis.

  8. Independent association of HbA(1c) and incident cardiovascular disease in people without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert J; Appleton, Sarah L; Hill, Catherine L; Wilson, David H; Taylor, Anne W; Chittleborough, Catherine R; Gill, Tiffany K; Ruffin, Richard E

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies have reported no association between elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) among women without diabetes. This study describes associations between HbA(1c) and new onset CVD in a representative adult population cohort. Assessment of participants in The North West Adelaide Health Study (NWAHS), a population study of randomly selected adults (age > or =18 years, n = 4,060), included measurement of height, weight, blood pressure, fasting lipids, glucose, and HbA(1c). A self-completed questionnaire assessed doctor-diagnosed diabetes, CVD and stroke, smoking status, and demographics. The cohort was followed for an average 3.5 years. Of the 2,913 adults free of diabetes at baseline and follow-up, 94 (3.5%) reported new onset coronary heart disease (CHD) and/or stroke. Compared with those with an HbA(1c) < or =5.0%, risk of new onset CVD was increased in those with HbA(1c) 5.4-5.6% (odds ratio (OR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4, 4.6), and > or =5.7% (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1, 3.4), after adjustment for other risk factors. The association was stronger in women than men (P = 0.03), and attenuated to only a small degree by addition of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, BMI, waist circumference, or smoking to the model. Elevated HbA(1c) is related to new onset CVD over a relatively short follow-up period in both men and women without diabetes and who do not develop diabetes, after adjustment for other major risk factors. Unlike previous studies, this relationship was not substantially attenuated by other traditional risk factors.

  9. HbA1c as a Diagnostic Test for Diabetes Mellitus – Reviewing the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Florkowski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The evidence base in support of HbA1c as a diagnostic test for diabetes mellitus is focused on predicting a clinical outcome, considered to be the pinnacle of the Stockholm Hierarchy applied to reference intervals and clinical decision limits. In the case of diabetes, the major outcome of interest is the long term microvascular complications for which a large body of data has been accumulated, leading to the endorsement of HbA1c for diagnosis in many countries worldwide, with some variations in cut-offs and testing strategies. PMID:24151343

  10. [Diagnostic value of fasting glucose, fructosamine, and glycated haemoglobin HbA(1c) with regard to ADA 1997 and who 1998 criteria for detecting diabetes and other glucose tolerance abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Gołembiewska, Edyta

    2004-01-01

    New diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus proposed by the American Diabetes Association in 1997 and the World Heath Organization Consultation Report in 1998 recommend lowering of the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) to 7.0 mmol/L. This change in the diagnostic FPG cut-off point was based on the results of well-documented epidemiological studies showing that increased risk of microangiopathy starts at values closer to 7.0 than 7.8 mmol/L used in the past. To facilitate the diagnosis, ADA Expert Committee recommends using FPG as the main diagnostic tool and eliminating OGTT from routine clinical practice. In contrast to ADA, WHO Consultation Group strongly recommended keeping OGTT in routine use. Due to the inconvenience, poor reproducibility, non-physiological character and labour-intensiveness of OGTT, an alternative test has been sought. The aim of this study was to determine whether fasting capillary glucose (FCG) along with fructosamine and glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) perform better for the detection of glucose tolerance abnormalities than FCG alone. OGTT was performed in 1528 patients. Serum fructosamine was determined in 480 and glycated haemoglobin in 234 of these patients. To assess the value of FCG, fructosamine and glycated haemoglobin in predicting post-load glycaemia and detecting glucose tolerance abnormalities, multiple linear regression analysis and Receiver Operating Characteristics analysis were done. Fructosamine correlated stronger with 2h-postload glucose concentrations than with fasting glucose. HbA(1c) correlated stronger with FCG than with 2h-postload glucose. Combined use of fructosamine and FCG predicted 2h-postload glucose better than combined use of FCG and HbA(1c). Receiver Operating Characteristics curve analysis showed that FCG was the best criterion in discriminating diabetes. Combined use of FCG and fructosamine slightly improved the ability to discriminate glucose tolerance abnormalities from normal glucose tolerance. The

  11. Modelling the Relative Contribution of Fasting and Post-Prandial Plasma Glucose to HbA1c in Healthy and Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollerton, Richard L.; Luzio, Steven D.; Owens, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is regarded as the gold standard of glucose homeostasis assessment in diabetes. There has been much discussion in recent medical literature of experimental results concerning the relative contribution of fasting and post-prandial glucose levels to the value of HbA1c. A mathematical model of haemoglobin glycation is…

  12. Electrochemical detection of HbA1c, a marker [correction of maker] for diabetes, using a flow immunoassay system.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Tsukube, Shoko; Izawa, Kojiro; Okochi, Mina; Lim, Tae-Kyu; Watanabe, Shugo; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2007-04-15

    An on-chip electrochemical flow immunoassay system for the detection of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was developed using anti-human hemoglobin (Hb) IgG labeled with ferrocene monocarboxylic acid (Fc-COOH) and boronate-affinity chromatography. An on-chip column packed with boronate-activated agarose beads was used for the separation of HbA1c from both non-glycated Hb and free antibody. Anti-human Hb IgG conjugated to Fc-COOH (Fc-IgG) was used for the electrochemical detection of HbA1c. The assay procedure included immunoreactions with Fc-IgG and HbA1c, separation of immunocomplexes by boronate affinity, and electrochemical detection of Fc-IgG-HbA1c immunocomplexes. The immunoreaction mixtures were injected onto a boronate-affinity column. HbA1c-antibody complexes were then trapped onto the column by the affinity of HbA1c to boronic acid. Subsequently, elution buffer containing sorbitol was applied to elute HbA1c-antibody complexes and a current was detected by applying 600 mV versus Ag/AgCl. The elution signal was an estimation of the HbA1c amount. A linear correlation between the increase of current and HbA1c concentration was obtained up to an HbA1c concentration of 500 microg/ml. The HbA1c flow immunoassay was successfully achieved using hemolysates. This electrochemical flow immunoassay system enabled us to construct a novel point-of-care testing device for the monitoring of glycated proteins including HbA1c.

  13. Role of Altered Venous Blood Lactate and HbA1c in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, N U; Krishnamurthy, N; Chethan, Chethana; Shilpashree, M K

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Being a mirror image of metabolic syndrome, Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity. Increased blood lactate concentration and alterations of substrate utilization are partly involved in development of insulin resistance in GDM. Fetuses born to such mothers have shown low umbilical vein oxygen saturation and low oxygen content and increased lactate concentrations. These changes may certainly reflect enhanced fetal metabolism as a result of hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia and therefore, these fetuses deserve intense surveillance at term and during delivery. Ideally, HbA1c should be maintained below 5% during their first trimesters and below 6% during third trimester. We planned to investigate GDM women for their HbA1c levels too. Aim To know if there is any alteration in blood lactate and/or HbA1c levels and to know if there is any correlation between these two parameters in GDM pregnancies, in comparison with the previous studies which measured lactate in cord blood and placental vessels of GDM women. Materials and Methods It was a hospital based prospective study on 40 women with gestational diabetes and 40 age-matched normal pregnant women. We analysed the biochemical and metabolic mileau in these women by estimating venous blood lactate and HbA1c levels. We paid special attention to follow them up regarding maternal complications if any and perinatal outcomes. The independent samples t-test and Pearson’s correlation test were applied. Results GDM mothers showed significantly higher lactate and HbA1c levels than normal pregnant women, both with p<0.001. Blood pressure and fetal birth weight were also significantly higher in GDM group than Normal Pregnant (NP) group, both with p-values of <0.001. Further, this increased lactate levels showed significant positive correlation with HbA1c, blood pressure and fetal birth weight. Conclusion Maternal blood lactate and HbA1c levels have a

  14. Effect of ethnicity on HbA1c levels in individuals without diabetes: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Priscila Aparecida Correa; Gross, Jorge Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Disparities in HbA1c levels have been observed among ethnic groups. Most studies were performed in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), which may interfere with results due to the high variability of glucose levels. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the effect of ethnicity on HbA1c levels in individuals without DM. Methods This is a systematic review with meta-analysis. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE up to September 2016. Studies published after 1996, performed in adults without DM, reporting HbA1c results measured by certified/standardized methods were included. A random effects model was used and the effect size was presented as weighted HbA1c mean difference (95% CI) between different ethnicities as compared to White ethnicity. Results Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria, totalling data from 49,238 individuals. There were significant differences between HbA1c levels in Blacks [0.26% (2.8 mmol/mol); 95% CI 0.18 to 0.33 (2.0 to 3.6), p <0.001; I2 = 90%, p <0.001], Asians [0.24% (2.6 mmol/mol); 95% CI 0.16 to 0.33 (1.7 to 3.6), p <0.001; I2 = 80%, p = 0.0006] and Latinos [0.08% (0.9 mmol/mol); IC 95% 0.06 to 0.10 (0.7 to 1.1); p <0.001; I2 = 0%; p = 0.72] when compared to Whites. Conclusions/Interpretation This meta-analysis shows that, in individuals without DM, HbA1c values are higher in Blacks, Asians, and Latinos when compared to White persons. Although small, these differences might have impact on the use of a sole HbA1c point to diagnose DM in all ethnic populations. PMID:28192447

  15. The Importance of HbA1c Control in Patients with Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Billic-Komarica, Edina; Beciragic, Amela; Junuzovic, Dzelaludin

    2012-01-01

    Goal: To investigate the correlation between TSH and HbA1c in the treatment of L-thyroxine in the process of glycemic control in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. Patients and methods: The sample consisted of 100 patients, mean age 51.75±3.23 years, BMI=27.97±4.52 kg/m2, with SH (TSH>4.2 mU/L and normal serum T3 and T4). Laboratory diagnosis included the determination of free T3, free T4, thyroid antibodies, Tg, insulin, C-peptide and glucose during the OGTT, HbA1c, CRP and lipid levels. 20 patients with SH had prediabetes and 38 patients had DM. All patients were treated with low doses of L-thyroxine (25-50ug) and all were physically active. Results: After 6 months of treatment with L-thyroxine, the patients had normal or decreased TSH (5.85±0.92 vs. 3.54±0.55 mU/L), insulin levels (114.64±24.11 vs. 96.44±17.26 pmol/L) significantly reduced HbA1c (6.74±1.01 vs. 6.26±1.12) is reduced. Conclusion: The correlation between TSH and HbA1c was positive and significant (r=0.46). This indicates a significant effect of treatment with L-thyroxine on glycemic control in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. PMID:23678326

  16. Inpatient HbA1c testing: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Nanayakkara, Natalie; Nguyen, Hang; Churilov, Leonid; Kong, Alvin; Pang, Nyuk; Hart, Graeme K; Owen-Jones, Elizabeth; White, Jennifer; Ross, Jane; Stevenson, Victoria; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Lam, Que; Crinis, Nicholas; Robbins, Raymond; Johnson, Doug; Baker, Scott T; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Ekinci, Elif I

    2015-01-01

    Objective To use admission inpatient glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) testing to help investigate the prevalence of unrecognized diabetes, the cumulative prevalence of unrecognized and known diabetes, and the prevalence of poor glycemic control in both. Moreover, we aimed to determine the 6-month outcomes for these patients. Finally, we aimed to assess the independent association of diabetes with these outcomes. Research, design, and methods Prospective observational cohort study conducted in a tertiary hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Patients A cohort of 5082 inpatients ≥54 years admitted between July 2013 and January 2014 underwent HbA1c measurement. A previous diagnosis of diabetes was obtained from the hospital medical record. Patient follow-up was extended to 6 months. Results The prevalence of diabetes (known and unrecognized) was 34%. In particular, we identified that unrecognized but HbA1c-confirmed diabetes in 271 (5%, 95% CI 4.7% to 6.0%) patients, previously known diabetes in 1452 (29%, 95% CI 27.3% to 29.8%) patients; no diabetes in 3359 (66%, 95% CI 64.8–67.4%) patients. Overall 17% (95% CI 15.3% to 18.9%) of patients with an HbA1c of >6.5% had an HbA1c ≥8.5%. After adjusting for age, gender, Charlson Index score, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and hemoglobin levels, with admission unit treated as a random effect, patients with previously known diabetes had lower 6-month mortality (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.87, p=0.001). However, there were no significant differences in proportions of intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation or readmission within 6 months between the 3 groups. Conclusions Approximately one-third of all inpatients ≥54 years of age admitted to hospital have diabetes of which about 1 in 6 was previously unrecognized. Moreover, poor glycemic control was common. Proportions of intensive care unit admission, mechanical ventilation, or readmission were similar between the groups. Finally, diabetes was

  17. [Indicators of glycemic control --hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), glycated albumin (GA), and 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG)].

    PubMed

    Sato, Asako

    2014-01-01

    The clinical goal of diabetes management is a good quality of life that is not different from that of a healthy subjects. To fulfill the goal, prevention of complications is needed under good glycemic control. Although blood glucose measurement is essential for glycemic control, there are diurnal variations in blood glucose levels. An indicator of long-term glycemic control is necessary. HbA1c is the gold standard measurement for the assessment of glycemic control, and worldwide large scale clinical studies of diabetes complications have greatly valued HbA1c as an indicator of glycemic control. In addition, recently, HbA1c was recommended for use in the diagnosis of diabetes in Japan and in the United States. Although HbA1c is used widely and internationally, international standardization of the HbA1c value has not been achieved. In Japan, from April 2014, it has been decided to adopt the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP) value, which is used by many countries globally, as the first step toward internationalization. Recently, cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients has been increasing in Japan. Relationships between postprandial hyperglycemia and cardiovascular disease have been noted. Therefore, the correction of postprandial hyperglycemia is one of the important goals of glycemic control to prevent cardiovascular disease. HbA1c or glycated albumin (GA) results from the glycation of hemoglobin or serum albumin and represents 2-month or 2-week glycemia, respectively. In addition, the glycation speed of GA is ten times faster than HbA1c, so GA is likely to reflect the variation in blood glucose and postprandial hyperglycemia in combination with HbA1c and its value. 1,5-anhydroglucitol (AG) is a marker of glycemia-induced glycosuria, since reabsorption of filtered 1,5-AG in the proximal tubule is competitively inhibited by glucose. It is an indicator to identify rapid changes in hyperglycemia. Understanding the characteristics of the

  18. Visceral fat area is associated with HbA1c but not dialysate-related glucose load in nondiabetic PD patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Li-Chun; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chao, Chia-Ter; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Factors associated with increased visceral fat area (VFA) have been well documented in the general population but rarely explored in nondiabetic individuals on peritoneal dialysis (PD). As glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is positively correlated with VFA in diabetic patients, we hypothesized that the same correlation would exist in nondiabetic PD patients. We enrolled 105 nondiabetic patients who had undergone chronic PD for more than 3 months. Each subject underwent an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan, and the umbilicus cut was analyzed for VFA. VFA values, corrected for body mass index and subjected to natural logarithm transformations, were examined to determine whether they were correlated with HbA1c and other parameters. PD dialysates prescribed at the time of enrollment were recorded to calculate glucose load. We found that when 105 nondiabetic PD patients were classified according to tertiles of HbA1c, higher HbA1c was associated with larger VFA. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that HbA1c was an independent determinant of VFA, while glucose load and other PD-specific factors were not. In summary, HbA1c, but not PD-related glucose load, was positively correlated with VFA in nondiabetic PD patients, suggesting clinical utility of HbA1c in the PD population.

  19. Heterogeneous behavior of lipids according to HbA1c levels undermines the plausibility of metabolic syndrome in type 1 diabetes: data from a nationwide multicenter survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) may cluster in type 1 diabetes, analogously to the metabolic syndrome described in type 2 diabetes. The threshold of HbA1c above which lipid variables start changing behavior is unclear. This study aims to 1) assess the behavior of dyslipidemia according to HbA1c values; 2) detect a threshold of HbA1c beyond which lipids start to change and 3) compare the clustering of lipids and other non-lipid CVRF among strata of HbA1c individuals with type 1 diabetes. Methods Effects of HbA1c quintiles (1st: ≤7.4%; 2nd: 7.5-8.5%; 3rd: 8.6-9.6%; 4th: 9.7-11.3%; and 5th: >11.5%) and covariates (gender, BMI, blood pressure, insulin daily dose, lipids, statin use, diabetes duration) on dyslipidemia were studied in 1275 individuals from the Brazilian multi-centre type 1 diabetes study and 171 normal controls. Results Body size and blood pressure were not correlated to lipids and glycemic control. OR (99% CI) for high-LDL were 2.07 (1.21-3.54) and 2.51 (1.46-4.31), in the 4th and 5th HbA1c quintiles, respectively. Hypertriglyceridemia increased in the 5th quintile of HbA1c, OR 2.76 (1.20-6.37). OR of low-HDL-cholesterol were 0.48 (0.24-0.98) and 0.41 (0.19-0.85) in the 3rd and 4th HbA1c quintiles, respectively. HDL-cholesterol correlated positively (0.437) with HbA1c in the 3rd quintile. HDL-cholesterol and insulin dose correlated inversely in all levels of glycemic control. Conclusions Correlation of serum lipids with HbA1c is heterogeneous across the spectrum of glycemic control in type 1 diabetes individuals. LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides worsened alongside HbA1c with distinct thresholds. Association of lower HDL-cholesterol with higher daily insulin dose is consistent and it points out to a role of exogenous hyperinsulinemia in the pathophysiology of the CVRF clustering. These data suggest diverse pathophysiological processes depending on HbA1c, refuting a unified explanation for cardiovascular risk in type 1 diabetes. PMID

  20. Xanthochromia of the skull bone associated with HbA1c.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, T; Klintschar, M; Lichtinghagen, R; Plagemann, I; Smith, A; Budde, E; Hagemeier, L

    2016-03-01

    The color of the surface of 105 skull bones (part of the parietal bone) was determined using a portable spectral colorimeter (spectro color(®)). By this means it was possible to characterize the color objectively according to the L*a*b* color system defined by the "International Commission de l'Eclairage" (CIE). Biochemical markers of carbohydrate metabolism, HbA1c from venous blood, and glucose/lactate concentrations from vitreous humor, were also determined, for assessment of the ante-mortem plasma glucose concentration using Traub's sum formula. As biochemical markers for lipid metabolism disorder, cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) were all determined from venous blood. There is a significant correlation of bone yellowing with HbA1c (p<0.001) and age (p<0.001). The literature asserts a significant correlation between diabetic condition and yellowing of the skull bone. Despite efforts to find the substance responsible for the yellowing of the bone in chronic metabolism disorder, no significant correlation was found between bone color and lipoproteins/bone extracted lipid acids.

  1. Association of high normal HbA1c and TSH levels with the risk of CHD: a 10-year cohort study and SVM analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Cui, Ying; Zhu, Yanan; Yan, Haiying; Xu, Wenge

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the association between the clinical reference range of serum glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and thyrotropin (TSH) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in non-diabetic and euthyroid patients. We examined baseline HbA1c and TSH in 538 healthy participants, and then analyzed the associations and potential value of these indicators for predicting CHD using Cox proportional hazard and support vector machine analyses. During the median follow-up of 120 months, 39 participants later developed CHD. The baseline HbA1c and TSH within the reference range were positively associated with CHD risk. No correlation and interaction were found between the baseline HbA1c and TSH for the development of CHD. Disease event-free survival varied among participants with different baseline HbA1c quintiles, whereas disease event-free survival was similar for different TSH tertiles. The combination of these baselines showed sensitivity of 87.2%, specificity of 92.7%, and accuracy of 92.3% for identifying the participants who will later develop CHD. Relatively high but clinically normal HbA1c and TSH levels may increase the risk of CHD. Therefore, the combination of these indicators can serve as a biomarker for identifying healthy individuals from those who would later develop CHD. PMID:28345646

  2. Association of high normal HbA1c and TSH levels with the risk of CHD: a 10-year cohort study and SVM analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Cui, Ying; Zhu, Yanan; Yan, Haiying; Xu, Wenge

    2017-03-27

    This study aimed to determine the association between the clinical reference range of serum glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and thyrotropin (TSH) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in non-diabetic and euthyroid patients. We examined baseline HbA1c and TSH in 538 healthy participants, and then analyzed the associations and potential value of these indicators for predicting CHD using Cox proportional hazard and support vector machine analyses. During the median follow-up of 120 months, 39 participants later developed CHD. The baseline HbA1c and TSH within the reference range were positively associated with CHD risk. No correlation and interaction were found between the baseline HbA1c and TSH for the development of CHD. Disease event-free survival varied among participants with different baseline HbA1c quintiles, whereas disease event-free survival was similar for different TSH tertiles. The combination of these baselines showed sensitivity of 87.2%, specificity of 92.7%, and accuracy of 92.3% for identifying the participants who will later develop CHD. Relatively high but clinically normal HbA1c and TSH levels may increase the risk of CHD. Therefore, the combination of these indicators can serve as a biomarker for identifying healthy individuals from those who would later develop CHD.

  3. Diabetes mellitus: the long way of standardization of HbA(1c) to the level of highest metrological order.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Patricia; Reinauer, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) measurements are used in clinical studies and for the management of diabetic patients. Various efforts were made to standardize the HbA(1c) measurements with consensus standards and standards based on a reference measurement procedure with external calibration. According to ISO 17511 a standard should meet highest accuracy possible, have a defined uncertainty of measurement and the calibration should be traceable to SI units. For HbA(1c) this has been realized using a LC-ID-MS procedure based on the existing reference measurement procedure.

  4. HbA1c for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in a developing country. A position article.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Perez, Francisco J; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Almeda-Valdes, Paloma; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Lerman Garber, Israel; Rull, Juan A

    2010-05-01

    An Expert Committee of the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommended a move to the use of HbA1c level to diagnose diabetes mellitus. Diagnosis should be made if the A1c level is > or = 6.5%. HbA1c provides a reliable measure of chronic glycemia, correlates well with the risk of long-term diabetes complications and technical limitations for standardization have been overcome in laboratories of the U.S. and Europe. The objective of this paper is to analyze critically the advantages and disadvantages of the use of HbA1c as a diagnostic method of diabetes in a developing country. The lack of a universal threshold for the diagnosis of diabetes, the cost of the test and the absence of the standardization network in the majority of the countries are major arguments for not including HbA1c as diagnostic criteria of diabetes. HbA1c diagnostic criteria has a low sensitivity. As a result, there is a lack of agreement between the HbA1c criteria with the other diagnostic methods that lead into significant variations in the number of affected cases. In addition, sensitivity and specificity vary among ethnic groups. No study has compared the diagnostic properties of the HbA1c in Latin America. In conclusion, the logistic limitations that exist in a large proportion of developing countries and the unsolved uncertainties that exist for the definition of the A1c criterion are strong arguments against the inclusion of HbA1c among the diagnostic criteria of diabetes.

  5. Implications of iron deficiency/anemia on the classification of diabetes using HbA1c

    PubMed Central

    Attard, S M; Herring, A H; Wang, H; Howard, A-G; Thompson, A L; Adair, L S; Mayer-Davis, E J; Gordon-Larsen, P

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Nonglycemic factors like iron deficiency (ID) or anemia may interfere with classification of diabetes and prediabetes using hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). However, few population-based studies of diabetes in areas with endemic ID/anemia have been conducted. We aimed to determine how mutually exclusive categories of ID alone, anemia alone and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) were each associated with prediabetes and diabetes prevalence using fasting blood glucose (FBG) versus HbA1c in a population-based study of adults with endemic ID/anemia. Subjects/Methods: We used data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey, a longitudinal, population-based study across 228 communities within nine provinces of China. This analysis included 7308 adults seen in the 2009 survey aged 18–75 years. We used descriptive and covariate-adjusted models to examine relative risk of prediabetes and diabetes using FBG alone, HbA1c alone, HbA1c and FBG, or neither (normoglycemia) by anemia alone, ID alone, IDA or normal iron/hemoglobin. Results: Approximately 65% of individuals with diabetes in our sample were concordantly classified with diabetes using both FBG and HbA1c, while 35% had a discordant diabetes classification: they were classified using either FBG or HbA1c, but not both. Fewer participants with ID alone versus normal iron/hemoglobin were classified with diabetes using HbA1c only. From covariate-adjusted, multinomial regression analyses, the adjusted prevalence of prediabetes using HbA1c only was 22% for men with anemia alone, but 13% for men with normal iron/hemoglobin. In contrast, the predicted prevalence of prediabetes using HbA1c only was 8% for women with ID alone, compared with 13% for women with normal iron/hemoglobin. Conclusions: These findings suggest potential misclassification of diabetes using HbA1c in areas of endemic ID/anemia. Estimating diabetes prevalence using HbA1c may result in under-diagnosis in women with ID and over-diagnosis in men with

  6. Association between HbA1c and carotid atherosclerosis among elderly Koreans with normal fasting glucose

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Won; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Lee, Yong-ho; Song, Bo Mi; Choi, Hansol; Park, Ji Hye; Rhee, Yumie; Kim, Chang Oh

    2017-01-01

    Aim We examined whether glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is associated to carotid atherosclerosis in an elderly Korean population with normal fasting glucose. Methods Using data from the Korean Urban Rural Elderly study, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1,133 participants (335 men and 798 women) with a mean age of 71.8 years. All participants had fasting blood glucose less than 100mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) and HbA1c level below 6.5% (48 mmol/mol). They were also free from a history of cardiovascular disease, known type 2 diabetes mellitus or use of anti-diabetes medications. Carotid atherosclerosis was assessed by intima-media thickness (IMT) using ultrasonography. The association between HbA1c and carotid IMT was investigated using multivariable linear regression analysis. Results HbA1c levels were independently and positively associated with carotid IMT (β = 0.020, p = 0.045) after adjusting for sex, age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, smoking and alcohol intake. However, fasting insulin and glucose levels were not associated with carotid IMT. Conclusion HbA1c levels were positively associated with carotid atherosclerosis, as assessed by carotid IMT, in an elderly population with normoglycemia. Our study suggested that higher HbA1c level is an effective and informative marker of carotid atherosclerosis in an elderly population. PMID:28178313

  7. Effect of the systemic inflammatory response, as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery, on HbA1c.

    PubMed

    Chadburn, Andrew J; Garman, Elizabeth; Abbas, Raad; Modupe, Anu; Ford, Clare; Thomas, Osmond L; Chugh, Sanjiv; Deshpande, Shreeram; Gama, Rousseau

    2017-01-01

    Background In acutely ill patients with new onset hyperglycaemia, plasma glucose cannot reliably distinguish between stress hyperglycaemia and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. We, therefore, investigated the diagnostic reliability of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in acute illness by prospectively evaluating the effect of the systemic inflammatory response, as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery, on HbA1c. Methods HbA1c and serum C-reactive protein concentrations were compared before and two days after elective knee or hip surgery in 30 patients without diabetes. C-reactive protein was used to assess the systemic inflammatory response. Results The mean (standard deviation) serum C-reactive protein increased following surgery (4.8 [7.5] vs. 179.7 [61.9] mg/L; P<0.0001). HbA1c was similar before and after surgery (39.2 [5.4] vs. 38.1 [5.1] mmol/moL, respectively; P = 0.4363). Conclusions HbA1c is unaffected within two days of a systemic inflammatory response as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery. This suggests that HbA1c may be able to differentiate newly presenting type 2 diabetes mellitus from stress hyperglycaemia in acutely ill patients with new onset hyperglycaemia.

  8. [Age and sex variations of HbA(1C) in a French population without known diabetes aged 6 to 79 years].

    PubMed

    Gusto, Gaëlle; Vol, Sylviane; Born, Catherine; Balkau, Beverley; Lamy, Jocelyne; Bourderioux, Christiane; Lantieri, Olivier; Tichet, Jean

    2011-01-01

    HbA(1C) is being used for screening and diagnosing diabetes. We determined mean values of HbA(1C) according to age and sex in a large population without known diabetes, in a wide age range 6-79  years. 5,138 men and women without known diabetes aged 6-79  years participated in a routine health examination provided by their medical insurance. HbA(1C) was assessed on an HPLC analyzer aligned with a DCCT method. HbA(1C) was approximately normally distributed in both men and women. Mean (SD) HbA(1C) were, for men vs women, in percentages 5.3 (0.4) vs 5.2 (0.3), in mmol/mol 34 (5) vs 34 (4) and in estimated blood glucose in mmol/L 5.83 (0.67) vs 5.75 (0.53). HbA(1C) increased with age by 0.08% every 10  years and this was attenuated to a 0.04% increase after adjustment on fasting plasma glucose. Between 15 and 49  years, women had lower values than men (p < 0.0001), but no sex differences were observed before and after this age range. In our population, 0.6% had HbA(1C) greater or equal to 6.5% and 88% (96% of men and 73% of women) of them had fasting plasma glucose greater or equal to 6,1 mmol/L. Threshold of 6.0% selected 2.8% of our population.

  9. HbA1c and Glycated Albumin Levels Are High in Gastrectomized Subjects with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Inada, Shinya; Koga, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    We report that glycated albumin (GA) is higher relative to HbA1c in non-diabetic, gastrectomized subjects without anemia, and thus is a sign of oxyhyperglycemia. It is known that gastrectomized subjects are prone to iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), and that the HbA1c levels of subjects with IDA are falsely high. In the present study, the HbA1c and GA levels of gastrectomized subjects with IDA were compared with gastrectomized subjects without anemia. Seven non-diabetic gastrectomized subjects with IDA were enrolled in the present study. Twenty-eight non-diabetic gastrectomized subjects without anemia matched with the subjects with IDA in terms of age, gender, and body mass index were used as the controls. Although there were no significant differences in fasting plasma glucose and OGTT 2-hour plasma glucose (2-h PG) between the two groups, the HbA1c and GA levels in gastrectomized subjects with IDA were significantly higher than the controls. For all of the gastrectomized subjects (n=35), ferritin exhibited a significant negative correlation with HbA1c and GA, and a significant positive correlation with 2-h PG. In addition, the HbA1c and GA levels exhibited a significant negative correlation with the mean corpuscular hemoglobin and hemoglobin. The HbA1c and GA levels in gastrectomized subjects with IDA were significantly higher than those in controls. The high GA levels are attributed to a tendency in which patients with total gastrectomy, who are prone to IDA, are susceptible to postprandial hyperglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia, which in turn leads to large fluctuations in plasma glucose.

  10. Relationship between Hb and HbA1c in Japanese adults: an analysis of the 2009 Japan Society of Ningen Dock database.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiko; Moriyama, Kengo; Yamakado, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the effect of Hb on HbA1c levels in 265,427 Japanese individuals. The divergence between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels increased with lower Hb, resulting in HbA1c levels that were higher in relation to than the FPG levels. Similarly, the correlation between FPG and HbA1c levels, stratified by Hb, weakened as Hb decreased.

  11. A semi-mechanistic model of the relationship between average glucose and HbA1c in healthy and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Lledó-García, Rocío; Mazer, Norman A; Karlsson, Mats O

    2013-04-01

    HbA1c is the most commonly used biomarker for the adequacy of glycemic management in diabetic patients and a surrogate endpoint for anti-diabetic drug approval. In spite of an empirical description for the relationship between average glucose (AG) and HbA1c concentrations, obtained from the A1c-derived average glucose (ADAG) study by Nathan et al., a model for the non-steady-state relationship is still lacking. Using data from the ADAG study, we here develop such models that utilize literature information on (patho)physiological processes and assay characteristics. The model incorporates the red blood cell (RBC) aging description, and uses prior values of the glycosylation rate constant (KG), mean RBC life-span (LS) and mean RBC precursor LS obtained from the literature. Different hypothesis were tested to explain the observed non-proportional relationship between AG and HbA1c. Both an inverse dependence of LS on AG and a non-specificity of the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program assay used could well describe the data. Both explanations have mechanistic support and could be incorporated, alone or in combination, in models allowing prediction of the time-course of HbA1c changes associated with changes in AG from, for example dietary or therapeutic interventions, and vice versa, to infer changes in AG from observed changes in HbA1c. The selection between the alternative mechanistic models require gathering of new information.

  12. Quantitative measurement of HbA1c by an immunoturbidimetric assay compared to a standard HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Hamwi, A; Schweiger, C R; Veitl, M; Schmid, R

    1995-07-01

    Determination of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is one of the most important monitoring procedures for long-term control of diabetes mellitus. Several analytical methods have been developed for the measurement of glycohemoglobin (GHb). Those most frequently used are ion-exchange chromatography for HbA1c and affinity chromatography for total GHb. In this study, a new turbidimetric immunoassay for HbA1c (Boehringer Mannheim, Germany) was evaluated that was performed on a Hitachi 911 clinical chemistry analyzer (Boehringer Mannheim). Good linearity in the range of 5% to 15% HbA1c, within-run and between-run coefficients of variation ranging from 2.4% to 5.9% were obtained. Results of 179 diabetic and nondiabetic patients showed good correlation to those of a routine HPLC method (r = 0.96). In addition, HbA2, HbS, and HbF in samples from nondiabetic patients were not detected by the immunoturbimetric assay and the "labile" HbA1c fraction (Schiff base) did not interfere with the new test.

  13. Comparison of the Current Diagnostic Criterion of HbA1c with Fasting and 2-Hour Plasma Glucose Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Karnchanasorn, Rudruidee; Huang, Jean; Feng, Wei; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% in diagnosing diabetes compared to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 126 mg/dL and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) ≥ 200 mg/dL in a previously undiagnosed diabetic cohort, we included 5,764 adult subjects without established diabetes for whom HbA1c, FPG, 2hPG, and BMI measurements were collected. Compared to the FPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 43.3% (106 subjects). Compared to the 2hPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 28.1% (110 subjects). Patients who were diabetic using 2hPG criterion but had HbA1c < 6.5% were more likely to be older (64 ± 15 versus 60 ± 15 years old, P = 0.01, mean ± STD), female (53.2% versus 38.2%, P = 0.008), leaner (29.7 ± 6.1 versus 33.0 ± 6.6 kg/m2, P = 0.000005), and less likely to be current smokers (18.1% versus 29.1%, P = 0.02) as compared to those with HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. The diagnostic agreement in the clinical setting revealed the current HbA1c ≥ 6.5% is less likely to detect diabetes than those defined by FPG and 2hPG. HbA1c ≥ 6.5% detects less than 50% of diabetic patients defined by FPG and less than 30% of diabetic patients defined by 2hPG. When the diagnosis of diabetes is in doubt by HbA1c, FPG and/or 2hPG should be obtained. PMID:27597979

  14. Changes in HbA1c, body weight, and systolic blood pressure in type 2 diabetes patients initiating dapagliflozin therapy: a primary care database study

    PubMed Central

    Scheerer, Markus F; Rist, Roland; Proske, Orm; Meng, Annika; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aims To investigate changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), body weight (BW), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in type 2 diabetes (T2D) primary care patients initiating dapagliflozin treatment. Methods T2D patients who started dapagliflozin in 985 general and 32 diabetologist practices (Disease Analyzer, Germany: December 2012–October 2014) were analyzed (3- and 6-month follow-up). Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to identify clinical characteristics and comorbidity associated with changes in HbA1c, BW, and SBP. Results The study included 1,169 T2D patients (age: 62.5 years; men: 59.3%; diabetologist care: 23%) with newly initiated dapagliflozin therapy. At the 3-month stage, dapagliflozin significantly reduced HbA1c (−0.8%±1.4%) compared to the baseline (8.5%±1.5%) (P<0.001). Changes were maintained after 6 months (−0.8%±1.5%) (P<0.001). Patients with high baseline HbA1c values (>9%) showed greater reductions in HbA1c than the overall sample (3 months −1.8%, 6 months −1.8%; both P<0.05). BW and SBP also showed statistically significant reductions with dapagliflozin over 3 and 6 months (−2.2 kg, P<0.001; −2.2 mmHg, P=0.003 and −2.5 kg, P<0.001; −2.3 mmHg, P=0.011, respectively). After 3 months, 53% of patients achieved a reduction in both HbA1c and BW; the same holds true for 45% of patients at the 6-month mark. Similar results were observed both in general and diabetologist practices. In multivariate analyses, baseline HbA1c (parameter estimate: −0.6479) and diabetologist care (−0.2553) were independent predictors of HbA1c change (6 months) (all P<0.05). Conclusion T2D patients treated with dapagliflozin therapy achieved statistically significant reductions in HbA1c, BW, and SBP in a real-world primary and diabetologist care setting. The changes were comparable to the results of the dapagliflozin clinical trial program. PMID:27822077

  15. The effect of nano-curcumin on HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and lipid profile in diabetic subjects: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Dastani, Mostafa; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Abnous, Khalil; Ghayour Mobarhan, Majid; Kazemi Oskuee, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes mellitus is defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both or insulin resistance. Curcumin inhibits NF-κB signaling pathway. The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of Nano-curcumin on HbA1C, fast blood glucose and lipid profile in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy type-2 diabetic patients (fasting blood glucose (FBG) ≥ 126 mg/dL or 2-hr postprandial blood glucose ≥200 mg/dl) randomly receivedeither Curcumin (as nano-micelle 80 mg/day) or placebo for 3 months in a double blind randomized clinical trial. Fasting blood glucose, HbA1C, and lipids profile were checked before and after the intervention. Data analyses, including parametric and nonparametric tests were done using the SPSS 11.5 software. A p value < 0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. (RCT registration code: IRCT2013081114330N1) Results: Mean age, BMI, FBG, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), LDL, HDL, HbA1c , and sex and had no significant difference at the baseline between the groups. In Nano-curcumin group, a significant decrease was found in HbA1C, FBG, TG, and BMI comparing results of each subject before and after the treatment (p<0.05). By comparing pre- and post-treatment values among the groups, HbA1c, eAG, LDL-C, and BMI variables showed significant differences (p<0.05). Conclusion: These findings suggest an HbA1c lowering effect for Nano-curcumin in type-2 diabetes; also, it is partially decrease in serum LDL-C and BMI. PMID:27761427

  16. Dietary patterns associated with HbA1c and LDL cholesterol among individuals with type 1 diabetes in China

    PubMed Central

    Jaacks, Lindsay M.; Crandell, Jamie; Mendez, Michelle A.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Liu, Wei; Ji, Linong; Du, Shufa; Rosamond, Wayne; Popkin, Barry M.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To identify dietary patterns that influence cardiometabolic risk among individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in China. Methods Data are from a cross-sectional study of T1D in China (n=99). Dietary intake was assessed using three 24-hour recalls. Reduced rank regression was used to identify dietary patterns from a set of 20 food groups that maximized the explained variation in glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Results Dietary pattern 1 was characterized by low intakes of wheat products and high-fat cakes, and high intakes of beans and pickled vegetables. Dietary pattern 2 was characterized by low intakes of high-fat cakes, nuts/seeds, fish/shellfish, and teas/coffee, and high intakes of rice and eggs. Participants in the highest tertile of dietary pattern 1 had significantly (p<0.05) higher HbA1c and LDL cholesterol compared to participants in the lowest tertile: mean difference in HbA1c was 1.0 percentage point (11mmol/mol) and in LDL cholesterol was 0.36 mmol/L after adjustment for age and household income. Dietary pattern 2 was not associated with HbA1c or LDL cholesterol. Conclusions We identified a dietary pattern that is significantly related to HbA1c and LDL cholesterol. These findings provide support for behavioral strategies to prevent complications in individuals with T1D in China. PMID:25630525

  17. Effect of low glycemic load diet on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in poorly-controlled diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Ziaee, Amir; Afaghi, Ahmad; Sarreshtehdari, Majied

    2011-12-29

    Different carbohydrate diets have been administrated to diabetic patients to evaluate the glycemic response, while Poor-controlled diabetes is increasing world wide. To investigate the role of an alternative carbohydrate diet on glycemic control, we explored the effect of a low glycemic load (Low GL)-high fat diet on glycemic response and also glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of poor-controlled diabetes patients. Hundred poorly-controlled diabetes patients, HbA1c > 8, age 52.8 ± 4.5 y, were administrated a low GL diet , GL = 67 (Energy 1800 kcal; total fat 36%; fat derived from olive oil and nuts 15%; carbohydrate 42%; protein 22%) for 10 weeks. Patients did their routine life style program during intervention. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c before and after intervention with significant reduction were: 169 ± 17, 141 ± 12; 8.85% (73 mmol/mol) ± 0.22%, and 7.81% (62 mmol/mol) ± 0.27%; respectively (P < 0.001). Mean fasting blood glucose reduced by 28.1 ± 12.5 and HbA1c by 1.1% (11 mmol/mol) ± 0.3% (P=0.001). There was positive moderate correlation between HbA1c concentration before intervention and FBS reduction after intervention (P < 0.001, at 0.01 level, R =0.52), and strong positive correlation between FBS before intervention and FBS reduction (P < 0.001, at 0.01 level, R = 0.70). This study demonstrated that our alternative low glycemic load diet can be effective in glycemic control.

  18. A Comparison of hs-CRP Levels in New Diabetes Groups Diagnosed Based on FPG, 2-hPG, or HbA1c Criteria.

    PubMed

    Tutuncu, Yildiz; Satman, Ilhan; Celik, Selda; Dinccag, Nevin; Karsidag, Kubilay; Telci, Aysegul; Genc, Sema; Issever, Halim; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Omer, Beyhan

    2016-01-01

    Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) have been used to diagnose new-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) in order to simplify the diagnostic tests compared with the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; 2-hPG). We aimed to identify optimal cut-off points of high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in new-onset DM people based on FPG, 2-hPG, or HbA1c methods. Data derived from recent population-based survey in Turkey (TURDEP-II). The study included 26,499 adult people (63% women, response rate 85%). The mean serum concentration of hs-CRP in women was higher than in men (p < 0.001). The people with new-onset DM based on HbA1c had higher mean hs-CRP level than FPG based and 2-hPG based DM cases. In HbA1c, 2-hPG, and FPG based new-onset DM people, cut-off levels of hs-CRP in women were 2.9, 2.1, and 2.5 mg/L [27.5, 19.7, and 23.5 nmol/L] and corresponding values in men were 2.0, 1.8, and 1.8 mg/L (19.0, 16.9, and 16.9 nmol/L), respectively (sensitivity 60-65% and specificity 54-64%). Our results revealed that hs-CRP may not further strengthen the diagnosis of new-onset DM. Nevertheless, the highest hs-CRP level observed in new-onset DM people diagnosed with HbA1c criterion supports the general assumption that this method might recognize people in more advanced diabetic stage compared with other diagnostic methods.

  19. A field effect transistor (FET)-based immunosensor for detection of HbA1c and Hb.

    PubMed

    Bian, Chao; Tong, Jianhua; Sun, Jizhou; Zhang, Hong; Xue, Qiannan; Xia, Shanhong

    2011-04-01

    A field effect transistor (FET)-based immunosensor was developed for diabetes monitoring by detecting the concentrations of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and hemoglobin (Hb). This immunosensor consists of a FET-based sensor chip and a disposable extended-gate electrode chip. The sensor chip was fabricated by standard CMOS process and was integrated with signal readout circuit. The disposable electrode chip, fabricated on polyester plastic board by Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technique, was integrated with electrodes array and micro reaction pool. Biomolecules were immobilized on the electrode based on self-assembled monolayer and gold nanoparticles. Experimental results showed that the immunosensor achieved a linear response to HbA1c with the concentration from 4 to 24 μg/ml, and a linear response to Hb with the concentration from 60 to 180 μg/ml.

  20. The impact of the HbA1c level of type 2 diabetics on the structure of haemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shaoying; Ruan, Ping; Yong, Junguang; Shen, Hongtao; Liao, Zhihong; Dong, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the impact of HbA1c levels on the structure of haemoglobin (Hb) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Seventy-four diabetic patients were classified into the following two groups based on their level of HbA1c: group A, patients with good glycaemic control (HbA1c < 7.0%, n = 36); group B, patients with persistent hyperglycaemia (HbA1c ≥ 9.0%, n = 38). Thirty-four healthy people served as controls (group H). Hb structure was examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and diabetic erythrocytes were modelled to estimate the impact of glucose on these cells and Hb. Increasing glucose concentrations altered both erythrocyte parameters and the Hb secondary structure. Group B differed significantly from group H (p < 0.05): in the former, the ordered Hb secondary structure had a strong tendency to transform into a disordered secondary structure, decreasing structural stability. We presumed here that high HbA1c levels might be a factor contributing to Hb structural modifications in diabetic patients. FTIR spectral analysis can provide a novel way to investigate the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27624402

  1. Implementation of the HbA1c IFCC unit --from the laboratory to the consumer: The New Zealand experience.

    PubMed

    Florkowski, Christopher; Crooke, Michael; Reed, Maxine

    2014-05-15

    In 2007, an international consensus statement recommended that HbA1c results should be reported world-wide in IFCC units (mmol/mol) and also the more familiar derived percentage units using a master equation. In New Zealand, the HbA1c IFCC units have been successfully implemented and used exclusively since 3rd October 2011 (following a 2 year period of reporting both units) for both patient monitoring and the diagnosis of diabetes, with a diagnostic cut-off of ≥50 mmol/mol. The consultation process in New Zealand dates back to 2003, well before the international recommendations were made. It reflects the close cooperation between the clinical and laboratory communities in New Zealand, particularly through the agency of the New Zealand Society for the Study of Diabetes (NZSSD), a key organisation in New Zealand open to all those involved in the care of people with diabetes and the national advisory body on scientific and clinical diabetes care and standards. There was a phased process of consultation designed to increase familiarity and comfort with the new units and the final step was coupled with the adoption of HbA1c as a diagnostic test with some evidence-based pragmatism around using the rounded cut-off. Genuine clinical engagement is vital in such a process.

  2. The Change in HbA1c Associated with Initial Adherence and Subsequent Change in Adherence among Diabetes Patients Newly Initiating Metformin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Gregory A; Rosales, A Gabriela; Kimes, Teresa M; Tunceli, Kaan; Kurtyka, Karen; Mavros, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Whether changes in adherence are associated with changes in HbA1c is assumed but not known. Methods. We conducted a observational study of 2,844 type 2 diabetes patients who initiated metformin as their first antihyperglycemic drug. Using HbA1c measures before, 6-12 months after, and up to 3 years after metformin initiation, we analyzed HbA1c change as a function of initial adherence and change in adherence. Results. Compared with no adherence, initial adherence of 50-79% was associated with an adjusted reduction in HbA1c of 0.45% while adherence ≥80% was associated with HbA1c reduction of 0.73%. Change from some initial adherence (1-79%) to total nonadherence was associated with 0.25% increase in HbA1c. Change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.15%. Those associations were accentuated among patients not in glycemic control: change from some to no adherence was associated with an HbA1c increase of 0.63% and change from some to full adherence was associated with an HbA1c decrease of 0.40%. Conclusions. Initial adherence to newly prescribed metformin therapy produces substantial HbA1c reduction. Among those with modest adherence but suboptimal glycemic control, the difference between moving to full adherence versus nonadherence results in lower HbA1c of one percentage point.

  3. Using Automated HbA1c Testing to Detect Diabetes Mellitus in Orthopedic Inpatients and Its Effect on Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Elif I.; Kong, Alvin; Churilov, Leonid; Nanayakkara, Natalie; Chiu, Wei Ling; Sumithran, Priya; Djukiadmodjo, Frida; Premaratne, Erosha; Owen-Jones, Elizabeth; Hart, Graeme Kevin; Robbins, Raymond; Hardidge, Andrew; Johnson, Douglas; Baker, Scott T.; Zajac, Jeffrey D.

    2017-01-01

    Aims The prevalence of diabetes is rising, and people with diabetes have higher rates of musculoskeletal-related comorbidities. HbA1c testing is a superior option for diabetes diagnosis in the inpatient setting. This study aimed to (i) demonstrate the feasibility of routine HbA1c testing to detect the presence of diabetes mellitus, (ii) to determine the prevalence of diabetes in orthopedic inpatients and (iii) to assess the association between diabetes and hospital outcomes and post-operative complications in orthopedic inpatients. Methods All patients aged ≥54 years admitted to Austin Health between July 2013 and January 2014 had routine automated HbA1c measurements using automated clinical information systems (CERNER). Patients with HbA1c ≥6.5% were diagnosed with diabetes. Baseline demographic and clinical data were obtained from hospital records. Results Of the 416 orthopedic inpatients included in this study, 22% (n = 93) were known to have diabetes, 4% (n = 15) had previously unrecognized diabetes and 74% (n = 308) did not have diabetes. Patients with diabetes had significantly higher Charlson comorbidity scores compared to patients without diabetes (median, IQR; 1 [0,2] vs 0 [0,0], p<0.001). After adjusting for age, gender, comorbidity score and estimated glomerular filtration rate, no significant differences in the length of stay (IRR = 0.92; 95%CI: 0.79–1.07; p = 0.280), rates of intensive care unit admission (OR = 1.04; 95%CI: 0.42–2.60, p = 0.934), 6-month mortality (OR = 0.52; 95%CI: 0.17–1.60, p = 0.252), 6-month hospital readmission (OR = 0.93; 95%CI: 0.46–1.87; p = 0.828) or any post-operative complications (OR = 0.98; 95%CI: 0.53–1.80; p = 0.944) were observed between patients with and without diabetes. Conclusions Routine HbA1c measurement using CERNER allows for rapid identification of inpatients admitted with diabetes. More than one in four patients admitted to a tertiary hospital orthopedic ward have diabetes. No statistically

  4. HbA(1c) diagnostic categories and beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recommended HbA1c diagnostic categories remain controversial and their utility in doubt in pediatrics. We hypothesized that alterations in the pathophysiologic mechanisms of type 2 diabetes may be evident in the American Diabetes Association recommended at-risk/prediabetes category (HbA(1c) 5.7 ...

  5. Medication Adherence Mediates the Association between Type D Personality and High HbA1c Level in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Six-Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuemei; Gao, Min; Zhang, Shengfa; Xu, Huiwen; Zhou, Huixuan; Wang, Xiaohua; Qu, Zhiyong; Guo, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To examine the association between Type D personality and HbA1c level and to explore the mediating role of medication adherence between them in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. 330 patients went on to complete a self-report measure of medication adherence and the HbA1c tests. Chi-square test, T test, Ordinary Least Square Regression (OLS), and Recentered Influence Function Regression (RIF) were employed. Results. Patients with Type D personality had significantly higher HbA1c value (P < 0.01). When Type D personality was operationalized as a categorical variable, SI was associated with HbA1c (P < 0.01). When NA, SI, and their interaction term were entered into regression, all of them were no longer associated with HbA1c level (P > 0.1). On the other hand, when Type D personality was operationalized as a continuous variable, only SI trait was associated with HbA1c level (P < 0.01). When NA, SI, and NA × SI term together were entered into regression, only SI was not related to HbA1c level. Furthermore, medication adherence had a significant mediation effect between Type D personality and HbA1c, accounting for 54.43% of the total effect. Conclusion. Type D personality was associated with HbA1c in direct and indirect ways, and medication adherence acted as a mediator role. PMID:28280745

  6. Application of sigma metrics for the assessment of quality assurance using the MQ-2000 PT HbA1c analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Huysal, Kağan; Budak, Yasemin U

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations measured in clinical chemistry laboratories show large differences between their interlaboratory reported values. Laboratory measurements of quality performance should be based on quantitative data. The sigma metrics model provides an objective method for the assessment of current HbA1c assays and is useful in quality management planning. The aim of our study was to evaluate the analytical performance of the MQ-2000 PT HbA1c analyzer test results in the context of our operating conditions on the sigma scale. Materials and methods The coefficient of variation was determined from the calculated mean and standard deviation evaluated from internal quality control (QC) (N = 168 days) (Shanghai Huachen Biological Reagent Co. Ltd, China) data, and records of external quality data (KBUDEK, İstanbul, Turkey) measured in the period from May to November 2013 were used to determine the bias. The resulting data and total allowable error rate (TEA = 10%) from the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA’88) were used to calculate the sigma level. Results The calculated coefficient of variations (CVs) at the two levels, normal (QC1 = 36.6 ± 2.38 mmol/mol) and pathological (QC2 = 84.7 ± 2.68 mmol/mol), were 6.5% and 3.1%, respectively. The average bias between the external QC and MQ-2000 PT during the study period was 4.3%. The calculated average sigma value was 1.19. Conclusions The MQ-2000 PT HbA1c is a new analyser in the market; there is need for improvement and the method should be controlled with greater attention to ensure quality. PMID:26527591

  7. [HbA1c is not enough in screening for impaired glucose metabolism. Glucose tolerance tests are also needed, as shown in Swedish prospective epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Margareta; Daka, Bledar; Larsson, Charlotte

    2015-09-29

    An HbA1c threshold of ≥ 42 mmol/mol has been proposed to diagnose prediabetes. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the proposed threshold for detection of individuals with prediabetes was examined in a study of 573 randomly selected individuals from Vara and Skövde. In addition, the utility of the FINDRISC questionnaire and of a fasting glucose test in combination with three short questions concerning BMI, heredity for type 2 diabetes and known hypertension was examined. Results from an oral glucose tolerance test were used as reference. The sensitivity of HbA1c and FINDRISC to detect individuals with IGT was 16 and 26 per cent respectively. Questions regarding BMI, heredity and hypertension together with a fasting glucose test yielded a sensitivity of 50%, but a lower specificity and positive predictive value. We conclude that HbA1c inefficiently detected individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and that oral glucose tolerance tests can still preferably be recommended.

  8. Efficacy of metabolic surgery on HbA1c decrease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with BMI <35 kg/m2--a review.

    PubMed

    Ngiam, Kee Yuan; Lee, Wei-Jei; Lee, Yi-Chih; Cheng, Anton

    2014-01-01

    High glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is strongly correlated with developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) complications; this study reviews the efficacy of various types of metabolic surgeries in reducing HbA1c levels in type 2 diabetics with BMI <35 kg/m(2). An electronic search of MEDLINE databases using terms 'metabolic surgery', type 2 diabetes mellitus, BMI <35 kg/m(2), and related keywords for studies published between 1987 and 2013. Data from 53 articles with 2,258 patients were selected for this review. The weighted mean change in HbA1c was -2.8 % (95 % CI -2.8 to -2.7, p < 0.01) and weighted mean BMI change was -5.5 kg/m(2) (95 % CI -5.6 to -5.4, p < 0.01). There was a strong correlation between weighted percentage mean change in HbA1c and BMI. Adjustable gastric banding and duodenal jejunal bypass were inferior to other surgeries in reducing BMI and HbA1c in BMI <35 kg/m(2). Metabolic surgery significantly decreases HbA1c in T2DM patients with BMI <35 kg/m(2) and that the magnitude of HbA1c change may be a useful surrogate of DM control.

  9. Effects of canagliflozin on body weight and relationship to HbA1c and blood pressure changes in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Stenlöf, Kaj; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Wilding, John P. H.; Blonde, Lawrence; Polidori, David; Xie, John; Sullivan, Daniel; Usiskin, Keith; Canovatchel, William; Meininger, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, reduces HbA1c, body weight and systolic BP (SBP) in patients with type 2 diabetes. As weight loss is known to reduce both HbA1c and SBP, these analyses were performed to evaluate the contribution of weight loss resulting from treatment with canagliflozin to HbA1c and SBP reductions in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Pooled data from four placebo-controlled Phase 3 studies (N=2,250) in patients with type 2 diabetes were used in the analyses. In each study, patients were treated with placebo, canagliflozin 100 mg or canagliflozin 300 mg, once daily for 26 weeks. Changes from baseline in body weight, HbA1c and SBP were measured at week 26, and the contribution of weight loss to the lowering of HbA1c and SBP was obtained using ANCOVA. Results Canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg reduced mean body weight, HbA1c and SBP compared with placebo (p<0.001 for each), and more patients had body-weight reductions >0%, ≥5% and ≥10% with canagliflozin treatment than with placebo. Weight-loss-independent and weight-loss-associated mechanisms contributed to HbA1c and SBP lowering with canagliflozin: ~85% of HbA1c lowering and ~60% of SBP lowering was independent of weight loss. Conclusions/interpretation In patients with type 2 diabetes, canagliflozin provided clinically meaningful body-weight reductions, and the weight loss contributed to reductions in HbA1c and SBP. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01081834; NCT01106625; NCT01106677; and NCT01106690 PMID:25813214

  10. The influence of sample freezing at – 80 °C for 2–12 weeks on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration assayed by HPLC method on Bio-Rad D-10® auto analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Katarzyna; Sypniewska, Grazyna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of a single freeze/thaw cycle on HbA1c concentrations measured by commercially available HPLC method. Materials and methods Study included 128 whole blood samples collected from diabetic patients (N = 60) and healthy volunteers (N = 68). HbA1c concentrations were measured in fresh blood samples. Then samples were frozen at - 80 °C for up to 12 weeks. HbA1c was assayed by ion-exchange HPLC method on Bio-Rad D-10® analyzer. Variables were compared using Wilcoxon and ANOVA Kruskal-Wallis tests. Bias between HbA1c measured in fresh and frozen samples was calculated. The comparability of HbA1c concentrations was assessed by Bland-Altman plot. Results Median (IQR) HbA1c concentration was 45.3 (36.6–61.2) mmol/mol for fresh and 45.3 (36.6–60.6) mmol/mol for frozen/thawed samples. No significant difference in HbA1c concentrations was found comparing fresh and frozen/thawed samples (P = 0.070) in the whole group, as well as in healthy and diabetic subjects. The median calculated bias between fresh and frozen/thawed samples was 0% in whole group and healthy subjects, and 1.19% in diabetic patients. No significant difference was found between the biases according to baseline HbA1c values (P = 0.150). The Bland-Altman plot analysis showed a positive bias of 0.4% (95% CI: - 2.8 - 3.7%), which indicates high compliance between HbA1c values and no relevant influence of sample freezing on clinical significance of HbA1c measurement. Conclusions Storage for up to 12 weeks at – 80 °C with a single freeze/thaw cycle does not affect HbA1c concentrations measured with HPLC method on Bio-Rad D-10® analyzer. PMID:27812303

  11. Does Iron Deficiency Anaemia and its Severity Influence HbA1C Level in Non Diabetics? An Analysis of 150 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Shivashekar; Arunachalam, Sundaram; Raja, Veena; Ramraj, Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Anaemia has a high prevalence having great impact worldwide and potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of various chronic diseases. Approximately 1/3rd of patients with anaemia have iron deficiency. American Diabetes Association (ADA) has affirmed Glycated Haemoglobin (HbA1C) ≥ 6.5% as a diagnostic criterion for Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Variation of HbA1C in Iron Deficiency Anaemia (IDA) has clashing results. Aim To decide the impact of IDA on HbA1C levels among non diabetics. To assess and analyse the variation of HbA1C according to the degree of anaemia (mild, moderate and severe). Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu from February 2016 to October 2016 and approved by our Institutional Ethical Committee. Totally 150 non diabetics (75 with IDA and 75 without IDA) were included in this study. Medical history was recorded and HbA1C, Haemoglobin (Hb), Haematocrit (Hct), red cell indices, serum iron, ferritin and Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG) were tested. Results The IDA patients in this study had a mean HbA1C (6.84±0.07%) which was higher than the non anaemic group (5.12±0.04%) and this difference was statistically significant (p< 0.05). HbA1C level was increased when severity of anaemia worsened. Also, noteworthy statistical significance was observed between no anaemia, mild, moderate and severe anaemia (p< 0.05). Conclusion In this study, we observed a positive correlation between IDA and elevated HbA1C level in non-diabetic population.

  12. Single, community-based blood glucose readings may be a viable alternative for community surveillance of HbA1c and poor glycaemic control in people with known diabetes in resource-poor settings

    PubMed Central

    Reidpath, Daniel D.; Jahan, Nowrozy K.; Mohan, Devi; Allotey, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Background The term HbA1c (glycated haemoglobin) is commonly used in relation to diabetes mellitus. The measure gives an indication of the average blood sugar levels over a period of weeks or months prior to testing. For most low- and middle-income countries HbA1c measurement in community surveillance is prohibitively expensive. A question arises about the possibility of using a single blood glucose measure for estimating HbA1c and therefore identifying poor glycaemic control in resource-poor settings. Design Using data from the 2011–2012 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, we examined the relationship between HbA1c and a single fasting measure of blood glucose in a non-clinical population of people with known diabetes (n=333). A linear equation for estimating HbA1c from blood glucose was developed. Appropriate blood glucose cut-off values were set for poor glycaemic control (HbA1c≥69.4 mmol/mol). Results The HbA1c and blood glucose measures were well correlated (r=0.7). Three blood glucose cut-off values were considered for classifying poor glycaemic control: 8.0, 8.9, and 11.4 mmol/L. A blood glucose of 11.4 had a specificity of 1, but poor sensitivity (0.37); 8.9 had high specificity (0.94) and moderate sensitivity (0.7); 8.0 was associated with good specificity (0.81) and sensitivity (0.75). Conclusions Where HbA1c measurement is too expensive for community surveillance, a single blood glucose measure may be a reasonable alternative. Generalising the specific results from these US data to low resource settings may not be appropriate, but the general approach is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27511810

  13. Single-Use Disposable Electrochemical Label-Free Immunosensor for Detection of Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV).

    PubMed

    Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Magagnin, Luca; Vena, Pasquale; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2016-07-01

    A single-use disposable in vitro electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of HbA1c in undiluted human serum using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was developed. A three-electrode configuration electrochemical biosensor consisted of 10-nm-thin gold film working and counter electrodes and a thick-film printed Ag/AgCl reference electrode was fabricated on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Micro-fabrication techniques including sputtering vapor deposition and thick-film printing were used to fabricate the biosensor. This was a roll-to-roll cost-effective manufacturing process making the single-use disposable in vitro HbA1c biosensor a reality. Self-assembled monolayers of 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were employed to covalently immobilize anti-HbA1c on the surface of gold electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the excellent coverage of MPA-SAM and the upward orientation of carboxylic groups. The hindering effect of HbA1c on the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide electron transfer reaction was exploited as the HbA1c detection mechanism. The biosensor showed a linear range of 7.5-20 µg/mL of HbA1c in 0.1 M PBS. Using undiluted human serum as the test medium, the biosensor presented an excellent linear behavior (R² = 0.999) in the range of 0.1-0.25 mg/mL of HbA1c. The potential application of this biosensor for in vitro measurement of HbA1c for diabetic management was demonstrated.

  14. Interaction between Mean Arterial Pressure and HbA1c in Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease Hospitalisation: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dahai; Zhao, Zhanzheng; Simmons, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore the relationship between mean arterial pressure (MAP), HbA1c, and cardiovascular (CV) hospitalisation risk in type 2 diabetes. Design. Population-based case-control study. Settings. Primary and secondary care level in Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom. Participants. 588 patients with type 2 diabetes from 18 English general practices recording a CV hospitalisation in 2009–2011 were included. Risk-set sampling was used to select 2920 gender, age, and practice matched control type 2 diabetes patients. Main Outcome Measure. Conditional logistic regression was used to explore further dose-response relationships between MAP, HbA1c, and CV hospitalisation risk. Results. The relationship between MAP and CV hospitalisation was nonlinear (P < 0.001 for linearity test). The MAP associated with the lowest CV hospitalisation risk was 97 (95% CI: 93–101) mmHg. An interaction between MAP and HbA1c for increased risk of cardiovascular hospitalisation was observed among those with HbA1c < 7% (53 mmol/mol) and MAP < 97 mmHg. Conclusions. In type 2 diabetes, MAP is a good predictor of CV hospitalisation risk. CV hospitalisation is lowest with a MAP between 93 and 101 mmHg. CV hospitalisation was particularly high among those with both a low MAP and a lower HbA1c. PMID:27382575

  15. Are the Same Clinical Risk Factors Relevant for Incident Diabetes Defined by Treatment, Fasting Plasma Glucose, and HbA1c?

    PubMed Central

    Balkau, Beverley; Soulimane, Soraya; Lange, Céline; Gautier, Alain; Tichet, Jean; Vol, Sylviane

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare incidences and risk factors for diabetes using seven definitions, with combinations of pharmacological treatment, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥7.0 mmol/L, and HbA1c ≥6.5%. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants aged 30–65 years from the Data from an Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (DESIR) cohort were followed for 9 years. RESULTS More men had incident diabetes as defined by FPG ≥7.0 mmol/L and/or treatment than by HbA1c ≥6.5% and/or treatment: 7.5% (140/1,867) and 5.3% (99/1,874), respectively (P < 0.009); for women incidences were similar: 3.2% (63/1,958) and 3.4% (66/1,954). Known risk factors predicted diabetes for almost all definitions. Among those with incident diabetes by FPG alone versus HbA1c alone, there were more men (78 vs. 35%), case patients were 8 years younger, and fewer were alcohol abstainers (12 vs. 35%) (all P < 0.005). A diabetes risk score discriminated well between those with and without incident diabetes for all definitions. CONCLUSIONS In men, FPG definitions yielded more incident cases of diabetes than HbA1c definitions, in contrast with women. An FPG-derived risk score remained relevant for HbA1c-defined diabetes. PMID:21346181

  16. [The figure of a nurse educator improves HbA1c levels and lipid profile in patients with type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    López-Alegría, Carmen; Núñez-Sánchez, María Ángeles; García-Palacios, María; Santaolalla-Jiménez, Beatriz; Mueses-Dismey, Alexandra; Gómez-Rivas, Pahola; Pérez-Sanz, Antonio; Ortuño-Micol, Dolores; Meoro-Avilés, Amparo Inmaculada

    2013-11-01

    Diabetes education has proved to be an essential tool in the care of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. To perform this educational task, the VII Area Murcia East Diabetes Unit, incorporated nurses in advanced diabetes education in the Hospital General Universitario Reina Sofía of Murcia. We carried out a retrospective study, which assessed the performance of these nurses by evaluating the type 1 diabetic patients attending inquiries between 2007 and 2011. We analyzed a total of 179 medical records, of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus over 11 years, with 103 (52.3%) males and 94 (47.7%) women. Patients had a mean age 38.25 ± 14.02 years and a mean duration of diabetes of 16.22 ± 11.73 years. The initial mean value of HbA1c was 8.49 ± 2.04%. Only 37 (16.2%) of the 197 patients were under 25 at the start of the study. The results showed that the decrease in HbA1c (-0.57 ± 1.80%) was significant after 6 months (p = 0.002) from the first query, reaching values of 7.86 ± 1.39% and remained from that time. Insulin doses were stable throughout the study.

  17. [Effects of applying behavior modification to improve HbA1C levels in a diabetic patient].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Chun; Huang, You-Rong; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2010-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease. To prevent and delay complications, diabetic patients must adjust their lifestyle as part of a comprehensive approach to disease control. Diabetic patients must be able to self-manage their disease and establish healthy habits in their daily routine. In this study, prior to intervention, the subject was unable to control her diet, do exercise, check sugars properly or integrate disease management effectively into her daily routine. By applying self-regulation theory through the keeping of a diary for sugar and daily activity self-monitoring, she became able to self-assess the causes of poor disease control. Such further facilitated her setting goals and developing strategies to link her habits with disease management. When failing to achieve goals even after execution, she could consider the factors contributing to the failure and modify her behaviors, goals and/or strategies accordingly. We helped this patient learn behavior modification methods in order to achieve her goal of better HbA(1)C control. This case example may help clinical nursing educators move beyond the confines of the traditional one-way educational model to guide diabetic patients to achieve good sugar control. We hope our findings help many chronic disease sufferers achieve self-management objectives in order to assume greater self-care responsibilities.

  18. Pediatric diabetes consortium type 1 diabetes new onset (NeOn) study: Factors associated with HbA1c levels one year after diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To identify determinants of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels 1 yr after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyze...

  19. HbA1c overtesting and overtreatment among US adults with controlled type 2 diabetes, 2001-13: observational population based study

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, Holly K; Ross, Joseph S; Montori, Victor M; Shah, Nilay D

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the extent and effect of excessive testing for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among adults with controlled type 2 diabetes? Methods A retrospective analysis of data from a national administrative claims database included commercially insured individuals in the USA, 2001-13. Study patients were aged 18 years or older, had type 2 diabetes with stable glycemic control (two consecutive tests showing HbA1c<7.0% within 24 months), did not use insulin, had no history of severe hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, and were not pregnant. HbA1c testing frequency was measured within 24 months after the second (index) HbA1c test, and classified as guideline recommended (≤2 times/year), frequent (3-4 times/year), and excessive (≥5 times/year). Changes in treatment regimen were ascertained within three months of the index test. Study answer and limitations Of 31 545 patients in the study cohort (mean age 58 years; mean index HbA1c 6.2%), HbA1c testing frequency was excessive in 6% and frequent in 55%. Despite good glycemic control at baseline, treatment was further intensified by addition of glucose lowering drugs or insulin in 8.4% of patients (comprising 13%, 9%, and 7% of those tested excessively, frequently, and per guidelines, respectively; P<0.001). Compared with guideline recommended testing, excessive testing was associated with treatment intensification (odds ratio 1.35 (95% confidence interval 1.22 to 1.50)). Excessive testing rates remained unchanged in 2001-08, but fell significantly after 2009. The odds of excessive testing was 46% lower in 2011 than in 2001-02. The study population is not representative of all US patients with type 2 diabetes because it was restricted to commercially insured adults with stable and controlled diabetes not receiving insulin treatment. The study design did not capture the underuse of HbA1c testing. What this study adds In this US cohort of adults with stable and controlled type 2 diabetes, more than 60% received

  20. Impact of HbA1c Measurement on Hospital Readmission Rates: Analysis of 70,000 Clinical Database Patient Records

    PubMed Central

    Strack, Beata; DeShazo, Jonathan P.; Gennings, Chris; Olmo, Juan L.; Ventura, Sebastian; Cios, Krzysztof J.; Clore, John N.

    2014-01-01

    Management of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients has a significant bearing on outcome, in terms of both morbidity and mortality. However, there are few national assessments of diabetes care during hospitalization which could serve as a baseline for change. This analysis of a large clinical database (74 million unique encounters corresponding to 17 million unique patients) was undertaken to provide such an assessment and to find future directions which might lead to improvements in patient safety. Almost 70,000 inpatient diabetes encounters were identified with sufficient detail for analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was used to fit the relationship between the measurement of HbA1c and early readmission while controlling for covariates such as demographics, severity and type of the disease, and type of admission. Results show that the measurement of HbA1c was performed infrequently (18.4%) in the inpatient setting. The statistical model suggests that the relationship between the probability of readmission and the HbA1c measurement depends on the primary diagnosis. The data suggest further that the greater attention to diabetes reflected in HbA1c determination may improve patient outcomes and lower cost of inpatient care. PMID:24804245

  1. An Elevated HbA1c Level Is Associated With Short-Term Adverse Outcomes in Patients With Gastrointestinal Cancer and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yingchun; Zheng, Huazhen; Chen, Peicong; Yang, Jin; Lin, Shaomin; Liu, Tingting; Chen, Shanwei; Lu, Siqiang; Chen, Junlian; Chen, Wenpu; Peng, Nanhai

    2017-01-01

    Background Although an elevated hemoglobin A1c (HbAc1) level is an independent predictor of worse survival in patients with both digestive cancer and diabetes mellitus, its relationship to short-term prognosis in these patients has not been addressed. This study assessed this relationship in gastrointestinal cancer (GIC) patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods A retrospective review of patients with GIC with or without T2DM from 2004 to 2014 was performed. Patients with T2DM were grouped according to HbA1c level, either normal (mean < 7.0%) or elevated (mean ≥ 7.0%). Age- and sex-matched GIC patients without T2DM served as controls. Results One hundred and eighteen patients aged 33 - 81 years with T2DM met the study eligibility criteria; 51 were in the normal HbA1c group, and 67 were in the elevated HbA1c group. The 91 patients in the non-T2DM group were randomly selected and matched to the T2DM group in terms of admittance date, age, and sex. There was a trend toward a higher 180-day mortality rate in the T2DM group compared with the non-T2DM group (15.3% vs. 7.7%, P = 0.095) and in the elevated HbA1c group compared with the normal HbA1c group (19.4% vs. 9.8%, P = 0.151); however, the differences were not significant. The duration of the hospital stay was longer in patients with T2DM than in those without T2DM (13.2 vs. 8.9 days, P < 0.05) and in patients with elevated versus normal HbA1c levels (14.5 vs. 11.4 days, P < 0.05). Diabetic GIC patients with elevated HbA1c levels had significantly more total postoperative complications than those with normal HbA1c levels (25.4% vs. 9.8%, P < 0.05). In multivariate regression analyses, short-term adverse outcomes were strongly associated with elevated HbA1c levels (odds ratio (OR): 5.276; 95% confidence level (CI): 1.73 - 16.095; P < 0.05) and no strict antidiabetic treatment (OR: 7.65; 95% CI: 2.49 - 23.54; P < 0.001). Conclusion An elevated level of HbA1c significantly correlated with and was an

  2. Universal HbA1c Measurement in Early Pregnancy to Detect Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Ethnic Disparities in Antenatal Diabetes Screening: A Population-Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In response to the type 2 diabetes epidemic, measuring HbA1c with the first-antenatal blood screen was recently recommended in NZ. This would enable prompt treatment of women with unrecognised type 2 diabetes, who may otherwise go undetected until the gestational diabetes (GDM) screen. We compare inter-ethnic antenatal screening practices to examine whether the HbA1c test would be accessed by ethnicities most at risk of diabetes, and we determined the prevalence of unrecognised type 2 diabetes and prediabetes in our pregnant population. This is an observational study of pregnancies in Christchurch NZ during 2008–2010. Utilising electronic databases, we matched maternal characteristics to first-antenatal bloods, HbA1c, and GDM screens (glucose challenge tests and oral glucose tolerance tests). Overall uptake of the first-antenatal bloods versus GDM screening was 83.1% and 53.8% respectively in 11,580 pregnancies. GDM screening was lowest in Māori 39.3%, incidence proportion ratio (IPR) 0.77 (0.71, 0.84) compared with Europeans. By including HbA1c with the first-antenatal bloods, the number screened for diabetes increases by 28.5% in Europeans, 40.0% in Māori, 28.1% in Pacific People, and 26.7% in ‘Others’ (majority of Asian descent). The combined prevalence of unrecognised type 2 diabetes and prediabetes by NZ criteria, HbA1c ≥5.9% (41mmol/mol), was 2.1% in Europeans, Māori 4.7% IPR 2.59 (1.71, 3.93), Pacific People 9.5% IPR 4.76 (3.10, 7.30), and ‘Others’ 6.2% IPR 2.99 (2.19, 4.07). Applying these prevalence data to 2013 NZ national births data, routine antenatal HbA1c testing could have identified type 2 diabetes in 0.44% and prediabetes in 3.96% of women. Routine HbA1c measurement in early pregnancy is an ideal screening opportunity, particularly benefitting vulnerable groups, reducing ethnic disparities in antenatal diabetes screening. This approach is likely to have world-wide relevance and applicability. Further research is underway to establish

  3. Integrative health coaching: a behavior skills approach that improves HbA1c and pharmacy claims-derived medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Wolever, Ruth Q; Dreusicke, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Medication adherence requires underlying behavior skills and a supporting mindset that may not be addressed with education or reminders. Founded in the study of internal motivation and health psychology, integrative health coaching (IHC) helps patients gain insight into their behaviors and make long-term, sustainable lifestyle changes. The purpose of the study is to determine whether IHC improves oral medication adherence, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and psychosocial measures, and to assess whether adherence changes are sustained after the intervention. Methods Using a prospective observational design, participants (n=56) received 14 coaching calls by telephone over 6 months. Medication possession ratio (MPR) was calculated for time intervals before, during, and after the intervention. HbA1c and patient-reported psychosocial outcomes were obtained to test interactions with MPR. Results Medication adherence (MPR) increased from 0.74±0.197 to 0.85±0.155 during coaching, and was sustained at 0.82±0.175 during a 6-month period after the study. Better adherence correlated with a greater decrease in HbA1c. HbA1c decreased from 8.0±1.92% to 7.7±1.70% over the 6-month intervention. All psychosocial measures showed significant improvement. In addition to discussing medication adherence strategies with their coach, patients discussed nutrition and exercise (86.9% of calls), stress management (39.8%), and social support and relationships (15.4%). Conclusions IHC targets internal motivation and supports behavior change by facilitating patients’ insight into their own behaviors, and it uses this insight to foster self-efficacy. This approach may yield sustainable results for medication adherence and warrants further exploration for health-related behavior change. PMID:27239318

  4. Effects of a healthier snack on snacking habits and glycated Hb (HbA1c): a 6-week intervention study.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mary R; Parsons, Andrew; Whalley, Gillian A; Rush, Elaine C

    2016-12-01

    Dietary behaviour modification may change eating habits and reduce the impact of poor nutrition. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of daily consumption of a healthier snack bar on snacking habits and glycated Hb (HbA1c) within a 6-week intervention. In all, twenty-eight participants were randomly allocated to two groups to either consume the bars as the main snack for 6 weeks (n 14) or receipt of the bars was delayed for 6 weeks (n 14) following a stepped-wedge design. All participants had HbA1c concentrations measured at weeks -1, 0, 4, 6, 10 and 12. A short dietary habits questionnaire was self-completed at weeks 0, 6 and 12. Participants consumed the bars they received instead of other snacks, and found that the healthier snack bar was acceptable as part of their daily dietary pattern. Over the 12 weeks, there was a significant reduction in intake of biscuits, cakes and pies (approximately 2 servings/week, P<0·05) in both groups. Fruit juice intake was reduced (approximately 1 serving/week, P=0·029) in the first group. In all, twenty participants (71·4 %) experienced a decrease (n 15) or no change (n 5) in HbA1c (range 0-4 mmol/mol), whereas eight participants experienced an increase in HbA1c (range 0·5-2·5 mmol/mol). There was high compliance with the healthier snack intervention and a trend towards a favourable effect on glucose homoeostasis. Habitual snacking behaviour has the potential to be improved through changes in the food supply, and in the longer term may reduce the impact of poor nutrition on public health.

  5. Group Medical Visits (GMVs) in primary care: an RCT of group-based versus individual appointments to reduce HbA1c in older people

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Karim M; Windt, Adriaan; Davis, Jennifer C; Dawes, Martin; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Madden, Ken; Marra, Carlo A; Housden, Laura; Hoppmann, Christiane; Adams, David J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects more than 1.1 million Canadians aged ≥65 years. Group Medical Visits are an emerging health service delivery method. Recent systematic reviews show that they can significantly reduce glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, but Group Visits have not been evaluated within primary care. We intend to determine the clinical effectiveness, quality of life and economic implications of Group Medical Visits within a primary care setting for older people with T2DM. Methods and analysis A 2-year proof-of-concept, single-blinded (measurement team) randomised control trial to test the efficacy of Group Medical Visits in an urban Canadian primary care setting. Participants ≥65 years old with T2DM (N=128) will be equally randomised to either eight groups of eight patients each (Group Medical Visits; Intervention) or to Individual visits (Standard Care; Controls). Those administering cointerventions are not blinded to group assignment. Our sample size is based on estimates of variance (±1.4% for HbA1c) and effect size (0.9/1.4=0.6) from the literature and from our own preliminary data. Forty participants per group will provide a β likelihood of 0.80, assuming an α of 0.05. A conservative estimation of an effect size of 0.7/1.4 changes the N in the power calculation to 59 per group. Hence, we aim to enrol 64 participants in each study arm. We will use intention-to-treat analysis and compare mean HbA1c (% glycosylated HbA1c) (primary outcome) of Intervention/Control participants at 12 months, 24 months and 1 year postintervention on selected clinical, patient-rated and economic measures. Trial registration number NCT02002143. PMID:26169803

  6. Health Coaching Reduces HbA1c in Type 2 Diabetic Patients From a Lower-Socioeconomic Status Community: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Noah; Perez, Daniel F; Kaplan, David M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adoptions of health behaviors are crucial for maintaining good health after type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) diagnoses. However, adherence to glucoregulating behaviors like regular exercise and balanced diet can be challenging, especially for people living in lower-socioeconomic status (SES) communities. Providing cost-effective interventions that improve self-management is important for improving quality of life and the sustainability of health care systems. Objective To evaluate a health coach intervention with and without the use of mobile phones to support health behavior change in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods In this noninferiority, pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT), patients from two primary care health centers in Toronto, Canada, with type 2 diabetes and a glycated hemoglobin/hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of ≥7.3% (56.3 mmol/mol) were randomized to receive 6 months of health coaching with or without mobile phone monitoring support. We hypothesized that both approaches would result in significant HbA1c reductions, although health coaching with mobile phone monitoring would result in significantly larger effects. Participants were evaluated at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The primary outcome was the change in HbA1c from baseline to 6 months (difference between and within groups). Other outcomes included weight, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), satisfaction with life, depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), positive and negative affect (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule [PANAS]), and quality of life (Short Form Health Survey-12 [SF-12]). Results A total of 138 patients were randomized and 7 were excluded for a substudy; of the remaining 131, 67 were allocated to the intervention group and 64 to the control group. Primary outcome data were available for 97 participants (74.0%). While both groups reduced their HbA1c levels, there were no significant between-group differences in

  7. Changes in HbA1c and circulating and adipose tissue androgen levels in overweight‐obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome in response to electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Maliqueo, M.; Soligo, M.; Protto, V.; Manni, L.; Jerlhag, E.; Kokosar, M.; Sazonova, A.; Behre, C. J.; Lind, M.; Ohlsson, C.; Højlund, K.; Benrick, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim Insulin sensitivity is ~40% lower in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) than in controls. We tested the hypothesis that 5 weeks of electroacupuncture treatment improves glucose regulation and androgen levels in overweight/obese women with PCOS. Material and Methods Seventeen women with PCOS, aged 18 to 38 years, with a body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2 and diagnosed with PCOS were included in this experimental and feasibility study and subjected to five weeks of electroacupuncture treatments three times/week. The primary outcome was changes in whole‐body glucose homeostasis measured by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp before and after the intervention. Secondary outcome were changes in HbA1c, circulating catecholamines, adipocyte size and adipose tissue expression of sex steroids and nerve growth factor (NGF). Results No significant change in glucose homeostasis was observed, but HbA1c decreased by 9.5% (p = 0.004), circulating testosterone decreased by 22% (p = 0.0007) and dihydrotestosterone decreased by 12% (p = 0.007). The two vagal activity markers of plasma serotonin levels and the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid decreased by 21% (p = 0.027) and 20% (p = 0.011), respectively. Adipose tissue concentrations of testosterone decreased by 18% (p = 0.049), and androstenedione decreased by 13% (p = 0.035), and mature NGF/proNGF ratio, a marker of sympathetic activity, increased (p = 0.04). These changes occurred without changes in anthropometrics. Conclusion Five weeks of electroacupuncture treatment improves HbA1c and circulating and adipose tissue androgens in women with PCOS. This effect is mediated, at least in part, via modulation of vagal activity and adipose tissue sympathetic activity. Based on these findings, we have recently initiated a randomized controlled study (NTC02647827). PMID:28090348

  8. Abnormal expression and function of Dectin-1 receptor in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c>8%).

    PubMed

    Cortez-Espinosa, Nancy; García-Hernández, Mariana H; Reynaga-Hernández, Elizabeth; Cortés-García, J Diego; Corral-Fernández, Nancy E; Rodríguez-Rivera, J Guillermo; Bravo-Ramírez, Anamaría; González-Amaro, Roberto; Portales-Pérez, Diana P

    2012-11-01

    Dectin-1 is a key innate receptor involved in various cellular responses and may have a direct role in chronic inflammatory conditions such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this work was to evaluate the expression and function of Dectin-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from T2D patients. Dectin-1 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR in monocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations from T2D patients (n=34) and healthy subjects (n=29). Functional assays were used to assess cytokine synthesis, ROS levels and oxidative stress ratio. We found increased expression (MFI) of Dectin-1 in monocytes from T2D patients. Significantly higher Dectin-1 expression was also detected in CD4(+) T, CD8(+) T, B cells and NK cells from T2D patients compared to controls. In contrast, monocytes from T2D patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c>8%) showed a diminished percentage of Dectin-1(+)/TLR2(+) cells. Negative correlations between the percent of Dectin-1(+)/TLR2(+) cells and fasting plasma glucose levels (FPG) and HbA1c levels were found. A significant reduction in basal levels of IL-10 was observed in patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c>8%) compared to patients with appropriate glycemic control (HbA1c≤6.5%) and healthy controls, an effect that was not observed in monocytes stimulated with zymosan. Higher ROS levels in zymosan-stimulated cells from patients with poor glycemic control positively correlated with FPG levels, and the oxidative stress ratio was higher in T2D cells compared with controls. Our data indicate that Dectin-1 may be involved in the abnormal immune responses that are observed in patients with T2D.

  9. Diabetes and Elevated HbA1c levels are Associated with Brain Hypometabolism but not Amyloid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosebud O.; Knopman, David S.; Cha, Ruth H.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Boeve, Bradley F.; Kantarci, Kejal; Geda, Yonas E.; Jack, Clifford R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Lowe, Val J.

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional insulin signaling may affect brain metabolism or amyloid deposition. We investigated the associations of type 2 diabetes with amyloid accumulation measured using 11C-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) and brain hypometabolism measured using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods We studied a sample of non-demented participants from the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. All subjects underwent MRI, amyloid PET and FDG PET. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) signature and region of interest (ROI) measures for PiB retention ratio and FDG ratio were measured. Diabetes was assessed from the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records-linkage system. Results Among 749 participants (median age 79.0 years; 56.5% male, 81.0% cognitively normal; 20.6% diabetics), FDG hypometabolism (FDG ratio < 1.31) in the AD signature meta-ROI was more common in diabetics (48.1%) than in non-diabetics (28.9%; p <0.001). The median FDG ratio was lower in diabetics vs. non-diabetics in the AD signature meta-ROI (1.32 vs. 1.40, p < 0.001), and in the angular (1.40 vs. 1.48, p < 0.001) and posterior cingulate gyri ROIs (1.63 vs. 1.72, p < 0.001). The odds ratio (OR [95% confidence interval]) for abnormal AD signature FDG hypometabolism was elevated (OR, 2.28 [1.56, 3.33]) in diabetics vs. non-diabetics after adjustment for age, sex, and education, and after additional adjustment for Apolipoprotein ε4 allele, glycemic level, and cognitive status (OR, 1.69 [1.10, 2.60]). However, AD signature PiB retention ratio was similar in diabetics vs. non-diabetics (OR, 1.03 [0.71, 1.51]; p = 0.87). In post-hoc analyses in non-diabetics, a 1% increase in HBA1c was associated with greater AD signature hypometabolism in cognitively normal subjects (OR, 1.93 [1.03, 3.62; p = 0.04]) and in the total cohort (OR 1.59 [0.92, 2.75; p = 0.10). Conclusion Diabetes and poor glycemic control in non-diabetics may enhance glucose hypometabolism in AD signature regions

  10. DPP-4 inhibitor treatment: β-cell response but not HbA1c reduction is dependent on the duration of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kozlovski, Plamen; Bhosekar, Vaishali; Foley, James E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors reduce hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) by enhancing insulin and suppressing glucagon secretion. Since T2DM is associated with progressive loss of β-cell function, we hypothesized that the DPP-4 inhibitor action to improve β-cell function would be attenuated with longer duration of T2DM. Methods Data from six randomized, placebo-controlled trials of 24 weeks duration, where β-cell response to vildagliptin 50 mg twice daily was assessed, were pooled. In each study, the insulin secretory rate relative to glucose (ISR/G 0–2h) during glucose load (standard meal or oral glucose tolerance test) was assessed at baseline and end of study. The mean placebo-subtracted difference (PSD) in the change in ISR/G 0–2h from baseline for each study was evaluated as a function of age, duration of T2DM, baseline ISR/G 0–2h, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, body mass index, and mean PSD in the change in HbA1c from baseline, using univariate model. Results There was a strong negative association between the PSD in the change from baseline in ISR/G 0–2h and duration of T2DM (r= −0.89, p<0.02). However, there was no association between the PSD in the change from baseline in ISR/G 0–2h and the PSD in the change from baseline in HbA1c (r=0.33, p=0.52). None of the other characteristics were significantly associated with mean PSD change in ISR/G 0–2h. Conclusion These findings indicate that the response of the β-cell, but not the HbA1c reduction, with vildagliptin is dependent on duration of T2DM. Further, it can be speculated that glucagon suppression may become the predominant mechanism via which glycemic control is improved when treatment with a DPP-4 inhibitor, such as vildagliptin, is initiated late in the natural course of T2DM.

  11. An indirect comparison of HbA1c treatment effect with albiglutide and exenatide 2.0 mg QW using the Bucher method

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alan A; Parks, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    No head-to-head comparisons exist between once-weekly (QW) glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists; accordingly, this indirect comparison was conducted to evaluate the comparative efficacy of QW albiglutide vs QW exenatide. Following a systematic literature search, it was determined that HARMONY 7 and DURATION 6, Phase III trials for albiglutide and exenatide, respectively, were similar in study design and baseline characteristics and included a common comparator arm, making them suitable for an indirect comparison using the Bucher method. The primary endpoint of change from baseline in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with albiglutide 50 mg QW and exenatide 2.0 mg QW was compared and tested for noninferiority. The indirect comparison showed a treatment difference of 0.0% (95% confidence interval: −0.189% to 0.189%) in mean change in HbA1c from baseline, and albiglutide 50 mg was noninferior to exenatide 2.0 mg QW at the noninferiority margin of 0.3%. In the absence of a head-to-head trial, these results can be used in pharmacoeconomic analysis and to inform health technology assessment and clinical decision making. PMID:27274297

  12. C-Peptide Level in Fasting Plasma and Pooled Urine Predicts HbA1c after Hospitalization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Remi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Kikuchi, Takako; Onishi, Yukiko; Takao, Toshiko; Tahara, Tazu; Yoshida, Yoko; Suzawa, Naoki; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Kushiyama, Akifumi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how measures of insulin secretion and other clinical information affect long-term glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Between October 2012 and June 2014, we monitored 202 diabetes patients who were admitted to the hospital of Asahi Life Foundation for glycemic control, as well as for training and education in diabetes management. We measured glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) six months after discharge to assess disease management. In univariate analysis, fasting plasma C-peptide immunoreactivity (F-CPR) and pooled urine CPR (U-CPR) were significantly associated with HbA1c, in contrast to ΔCPR and C-peptide index (CPI). This association was strongly independent of most other patient variables. In exploratory factor analysis, five underlying factors, namely insulin resistance, aging, sex differences, insulin secretion, and glycemic control, represented patient characteristics. In particular, insulin secretion and resistance strongly influenced F-CPR, while insulin secretion affected U-CPR. In conclusion, the data indicate that among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, F-CPR and U-CPR may predict improved glycemic control six months after hospitalization.

  13. The Individualized Target HbA1c: A New Method for Improving Macrovascular Risk and Glycemia Without Hypoglycemia and Weight Gain.

    PubMed

    Eldor, Roy; Raz, Itamar

    2009-01-01

    Both the DCCT and UKPDS trials demonstrated that improved glycemic control reduces microvascular complications. Inconclusive evidence, however, has remained on the question of the effect of glycemic control on macrovascular disease (with special emphasis on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality). In the last year, the data from four large trials were published, directly addressing this question (ACCORD, ADVANCE, VADT and UKPDS-80), yet the results were conflicting. Close inspection of the structure of three of these trials (ACCORD, ADVANCE and VADT) revealed inadequacies that may explain the unfavorable results, such as the inclusion of mainly elderly patients with previous macrovascular complications. It is not surprising that intensive glycemic control resulted in a rise of hypoglycemic events yet did not decrease macrovascular morbidity or mortality in these cohorts. On the other hand, the UKPDS-80 trial, a follow-up of the original UKPDS, showed that intensive glycemic control was beneficial when initiated in newly diagnosed patients. These results led us to develop a new individualized method of determining the target HbA1c based on the characteristics of the individual. This method considers the patient's possible benefit from glycemic control, the risk of suffering hypoglycemic events and consequences suffered from the hypoglycemic event. It is essential that the target HbA1c be tailored to the patient, with different goals set for the recently diagnosed "healthy" and young patient on the one hand, and the elderly patient with co-morbidities and polypharmacy on the other hand. We further suggest a method of comparing and choosing between the different hypoglycemic drugs available. Drugs should be considered not only based on their hypoglycemic effect but also on several other attributes such as effects on weight, glycemic durability, cardiovascular protection, individual experience with the drug, method of delivery and side effect profiles. Scoring the

  14. The Effects of a Mindfulness-Based Intervention on Emotional Distress, Quality of Life, and HbA1c in Outpatients With Diabetes (DiaMind)

    PubMed Central

    van Son, Jenny; Nyklíček, Ivan; Pop, Victor J.; Blonk, Marion C.; Erdtsieck, Ronald J.; Spooren, Pieter F.; Toorians, Arno W.; Pouwer, François

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Emotional distress is common in outpatients with diabetes, affecting ∼20–40% of the patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of group therapy with Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), relative to usual care, for patients with diabetes with regard to reducing emotional distress and improving health-related quality of life and glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In the present randomized controlled trial, 139 outpatients with diabetes (type 1 or type 2) and low levels of emotional well-being were randomized to MBCT (n = 70) or a waiting list group (n = 69). Primary outcomes were perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale), anxiety and depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), mood (Profiles of Mood States), and diabetes-specific distress (Problem Areas In Diabetes). Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life (12-Item Short-Form Health Survey), and glycemic control (HbA1c). Assessments were conducted at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks of follow-up. RESULTS Compared with control, MBCT was more effective in reducing stress (P < 0.001, Cohen d = 0.70), depressive symptoms (P = 0.006, d = 0.59), and anxiety (P = 0.019, d = 0.44). In addition, MBCT was more effective in improving quality of life (mental: P = 0.003, d = 0.55; physical: P = 0.032, d = 0.40). We found no significant effect on HbA1c or diabetes-specific distress, although patients with elevated diabetes distress in the MBCT group tended to show a decrease in diabetes distress (P = 0.07, d = 0.70) compared with the control group. CONCLUSIONS Compared with usual care, MBCT resulted in a reduction of emotional distress and an increase in health-related quality of life in diabetic patients who had lower levels of emotional well-being. PMID:23193218

  15. Burden of Diabetes and First Evidence for the Utility of HbA1c for Diagnosis and Detection of Diabetes in Urban Black South Africans: The Durban Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Hird, Thomas R.; Pirie, Fraser J.; Esterhuizen, Tonya M.; O’Leary, Brian; McCarthy, Mark I.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Motala, Ayesha A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is recommended as an additional tool to glucose-based measures (fasting plasma glucose [FPG] and 2-hour plasma glucose [2PG] during oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]) for the diagnosis of diabetes; however, its use in sub-Saharan African populations is not established. We assessed prevalence estimates and the diagnosis and detection of diabetes based on OGTT, FPG, and HbA1c in an urban black South African population. Research Design and Methods We conducted a population-based cross-sectional survey using multistage cluster sampling of adults aged ≥18 years in Durban (eThekwini municipality), KwaZulu-Natal. All participants had a 75-g OGTT and HbA1c measurements. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the overall diagnostic accuracy of HbA1c, using OGTT as the reference, and to determine optimal HbA1c cut-offs. Results Among 1190 participants (851 women, 92.6% response rate), the age-standardised prevalence of diabetes was 12.9% based on OGTT, 11.9% based on FPG, and 13.1% based on HbA1c. In participants without a previous history of diabetes (n = 1077), using OGTT as the reference, an HbA1c ≥48 mmol/mol (6.5%) detected diabetes with 70.3% sensitivity (95%CI 52.7–87.8) and 98.7% specificity (95%CI 97.9–99.4) (AUC 0.94 [95%CI 0.89–1.00]). Additional analyses suggested the optimal HbA1c cut-off for detection of diabetes in this population was 42 mmol/mol (6.0%) (sensitivity 89.2% [95%CI 78.6–99.8], specificity 92.0% [95%CI: 90.3–93.7]). Conclusions In an urban black South African population, we found a high prevalence of diabetes and provide the first evidence for the utility of HbA1c for the diagnosis and detection of diabetes in black Africans in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27560687

  16. A comparative evaluation of the analytical performances of Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing, Tosoh HLC-723 G8, Premier Hb9210, and Roche Cobas c501 Tina-quant Gen 2 analyzers for HbA1c determination

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaobin; Chao, Yan; Wan, Zemin; Wang, Yunxiu; Ma, Yan; Ke, Peifeng; Wu, Xinzhong; Xu, Jianhua; Zhuang, Junhua; Huang, Xianzhang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is widely used in the management of diabetes. Therefore, the reliability and comparability among different analytical methods for its detection have become very important. Materials and methods A comparative evaluation of the analytical performances (precision, linearity, accuracy, method comparison, and interferences including bilirubin, triglyceride, cholesterol, labile HbA1c (LA1c), vitamin C, aspirin, fetal haemoglobin (HbF), and haemoglobin E (Hb E)) were performed on Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing (Capillarys 2FP) (Sebia, France), Tosoh HLC-723 G8 (Tosoh G8) (Tosoh, Japan), Premier Hb9210 (Trinity Biotech, Ireland) and Roche Cobas c501 (Roche c501) (Roche Diagnostics, Germany). Results A good precision was shown at both low and high HbA1c levels on all four systems, with all individual CVs below 2% (IFCC units) or 1.5% (NGSP units). Linearity analysis for each analyzer had achieved a good correlation coefficient (R2 > 0.99) over the entire range tested. The analytical bias of the four systems against the IFCC targets was less than ± 6% (NGSP units), indicating a good accuracy. Method comparison showed a great correlation and agreement between methods. Very high levels of triglycerides and cholesterol (≥ 15.28 and ≥ 8.72 mmol/L, respectively) led to falsely low HbA1c concentrations on Roche c501. Elevated HbF induced false HbA1c detection on Capillarys 2FP (> 10%), Tosoh G8 (> 30%), Premier Hb9210 (> 15%), and Roche c501 (> 5%). On Tosoh G8, HbE induced an extra peak on chromatogram, and significantly lower results were reported. Conclusions The four HbA1c methods commonly used with commercial analyzers showed a good reliability and comparability, although some interference may falsely alter the result. PMID:27812304

  17. Multi-ethnic differences in HbA1c, blood pressure, and low-density-lipid cholesterol control among South Africans living with type 2 diabetes, after a 4-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pinchevsky, Yacob; Shukla, Varada J; Butkow, Neil; Chirwa, Tobias; Raal, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our study set out to examine if disparities in control of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP), and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) existed among an urban multi-ethnic cohort of South Africans, living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients and methods This longitudinal, retrospective study consisted of 261 men and women with previously diagnosed T2DM who attended Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, South Africa across two time periods 2009 and 2013. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from consecutive medical records. The primary outcome was to determine achievements in HbA1c, BP, and LDL-C among ethnic groups using evidence-based goals. Results The mean age of the cohort was 64 (±10.6) years, females represented 55%, and the self-reported diabetes duration was 16 (±10.6) years as at 2013. Black Africans (42.9%, n=112 of 261) were more likely to reach the HbA1c target (<7%) and less likely to have had retinopathy, nephropathy, or cardiovascular disease. Over two-thirds of mixed-ancestry patients attained the BP target (<140/80 mmHg), while 90.2% of Caucasians achieved LDL-C goals (<2.5 mmol/L). Overall, across the ethnic groups studied, we found that HbA1c control deteriorated over time, although BP levels remained the same and LDL-C levels drastically improved. Conclusion There was poor control of HbA1c, BP, and LDL-C across all ethnic groups. Although a minority achieved recommended targets, some ethnic groups appeared to have worse control than others. Timely aggressive actions in particularly high-risk ethnic groups will prevent/delay the complications commonly associated with T2DM. PMID:27895508

  18. Effect of baseline HbA1c level on the development of diabetes by lifestyle intervention in primary healthcare settings: insights from subanalysis of the Japan Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Sakane, Naoki; Sato, Juichi; Tsushita, Kazuyo; Tsujii, Satoru; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Kawazu, Shoji; Sato, Yuzo; Usui, Takeshi; Kamae, Isao; Yoshida, Toshihide; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Sato, Shigeaki; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Takahashi, Kaoru; Kuzuya, Hideshi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effects of a lifestyle intervention on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), in particular in the subgroup with baseline glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels ≥5.7%, in primary healthcare settings. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting 32 healthcare centers in Japan. Participants Participants with IGT, aged 30–60 years, were randomly assigned to either an intensive lifestyle intervention group (ILG) or a usual care group (UCG). Interventions During the initial 6 months, participants in the ILG received four group sessions on healthy lifestyles by public health providers. An individual session was further conducted biannually during the 3 years. Participants in the UCG received usual care such as one group session on healthy lifestyles. Outcome measures The primary endpoint was the development of T2DM based on an oral glucose tolerance test. Results The mean follow-up period was 2.3 years. The annual incidence of T2DM were 2.7 and 5.1/100 person-years of follow-up in the ILG (n=145) and UCG (n=149), respectively. The cumulative incidence of T2DM was significantly lower in the ILG than in the UCG among participants with HbA1c levels ≥5.7% (log-rank=3.52, p=0.06; Breslow=4.05, p=0.04; Tarone-Ware=3.79, p=0.05), while this was not found among participants with HbA1c levels <5.7%. Conclusions Intensive lifestyle intervention in primary healthcare setting is effective in preventing the development of T2DM in IGT participants with HbA1c levels ≥5.7%, relative to those with HbA1c levels <5.7%. Trial registration number UMIN000003136. PMID:25452854

  19. Shifting from glucose diagnosis to the new HbA1c diagnosis reduces the capability of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) to screen for glucose abnormalities within a real-life primary healthcare preventive strategy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate differences in the performance of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) as a screening tool for glucose abnormalities after shifting from glucose-based diagnostic criteria to the proposed new hemoglobin (Hb)A1c-based criteria. Methods A cross-sectional primary-care study was conducted as the first part of an active real-life lifestyle intervention to prevent type 2 diabetes within a high-risk Spanish Mediterranean population. Individuals without diabetes aged 45-75 years (n = 3,120) were screened using the FINDRISC. Where feasible, a subsequent 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test and HbA1c test were also carried out (n = 1,712). The performance of the risk score was calculated by applying the area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver operating characteristic, using three sets of criteria (2-hour glucose, fasting glucose, HbA1c) and three diagnostic categories (normal, pre-diabetes, diabetes). Results Defining diabetes by a single HbA1c measurement resulted in a significantly lower diabetes prevalence (3.6%) compared with diabetes defined by 2-hour plasma glucose (9.2%), but was not significantly lower than that obtained using fasting plasma glucose (3.1%). The FINDRISC at a cut-off of 14 had a reasonably high ability to predict diabetes using the diagnostic criteria of 2-hour or fasting glucose (AUC = 0.71) or all glucose abnormalities (AUC = 0.67 and 0.69, respectively). When HbA1c was used as the primary diagnostic criterion, the AUC for diabetes detection dropped to 0.67 (5.6% reduction in comparison with either 2-hour or fasting glucose) and fell to 0.55 for detection of all glucose abnormalities (17.9% and 20.3% reduction, respectively), with a relevant decrease in sensitivity of the risk score. Conclusions A shift from glucose-based diagnosis to HbA1c-based diagnosis substantially reduces the ability of the FINDRISC to screen for glucose abnormalities when applied in this real-life primary-care preventive strategy. PMID

  20. Impact of age, BMI and HbA1c levels on the genome-wide DNA methylation and mRNA expression patterns in human adipose tissue and identification of epigenetic biomarkers in blood.

    PubMed

    Rönn, Tina; Volkov, Petr; Gillberg, Linn; Kokosar, Milana; Perfilyev, Alexander; Jacobsen, Anna Louisa; Jørgensen, Sine W; Brøns, Charlotte; Jansson, Per-Anders; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Groop, Leif; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Vaag, Allan; Nilsson, Emma; Ling, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    Increased age, BMI and HbA1c levels are risk factors for several non-communicable diseases. However, the impact of these factors on the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue remains unknown. We analyzed the DNA methylation of ∼480 000 sites in human adipose tissue from 96 males and 94 females and related methylation to age, BMI and HbA1c. We also compared epigenetic signatures in adipose tissue and blood. Age was significantly associated with both altered DNA methylation and expression of 1050 genes (e.g. FHL2, NOX4 and PLG). Interestingly, many reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging in blood, including ELOVL2, FHL2, KLF14 and GLRA1, also showed significant correlations between adipose tissue DNA methylation and age in our study. The most significant association between age and adipose tissue DNA methylation was found upstream of ELOVL2. We identified 2825 genes (e.g. FTO, ITIH5, CCL18, MTCH2, IRS1 and SPP1) where both DNA methylation and expression correlated with BMI. Methylation at previously reported HIF3A sites correlated significantly with BMI in females only. HbA1c (range 28-46 mmol/mol) correlated significantly with the methylation of 711 sites, annotated to, for example, RAB37, TICAM1 and HLA-DPB1. Pathway analyses demonstrated that methylation levels associated with age and BMI are overrepresented among genes involved in cancer, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Our results highlight the impact of age, BMI and HbA1c on epigenetic variation of candidate genes for obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer in human adipose tissue. Importantly, we demonstrate that epigenetic biomarkers in blood can mirror age-related epigenetic signatures in target tissues for metabolic diseases such as adipose tissue.

  1. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to HbA1c in Japanese obese adults: a cross-sectional analysis of the Saku Control Obesity Program

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary glycemic index or load is thought to play an important role in glucose metabolism. However, few studies have investigated the relation between glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and glycemia in Asian populations. In this cross-sectional analysis of a randomized controlled trial, the Saku Control Obesity Program, we examined the relation between the baseline GI or GL and glycemia (HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose [FPG] levels), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), β-cell function (HOMA-β), and other metabolic risk factors (lipid levels, diastolic and systolic blood pressure, and adiposity measures). Methods The participants were 227 obese Japanese women and men. We used multiple linear regression models and logistic regression models to adjust for potential confounding factors such as age, sex, visceral fat area, total energy intake, and physical activity levels. Results After adjustments for potential confounding factors, GI was not associated with HbA1c, but GL was positively associated with HbA1c. For increasing quartiles of GI, the adjusted mean HbA1c were 6.3%, 6.7%, 6.4%, and 6.4% (P for trend = 0.991). For increasing quartiles of GL, the adjusted mean HbA1c were 6.2%, 6.2%, 6.6%, and 6.5% (P for trend = 0.044). In addition, among participants with HbA1c ≥ 7.0%, 20 out of 28 (71%) had a high GL (≥ median); the adjusted odds ratio for HbA1c ≥ 7.0% among participants with higher GL was 3.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2 to 8.1) compared to the participants with a lower GL (

  2. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Hasanato, Rana Muhammed

    2015-11-13

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12-16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12-17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5-6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Muhammed Hasanato, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12–16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12–17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5–6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26580639

  4. Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Visit-to-Visit HbA1c Variability Predict Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Preserved Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Takenouchi, Akiko; Tsuboi, Ayaka; Kurata, Miki; Fukuo, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims. Subclinical atherosclerosis and long-term glycemic variability have been reported to predict incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the general population. However, these associations have not been investigated in patients with type 2 diabetes with preserved kidney function. Methods. We prospectively followed up 162 patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age, 62.3 years; 53.6% men) and assessed whether carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) measured by B-mode ultrasound and visit-to-visit HbA1c variability are associated with deterioration of CKD (incident CKD defined as estimated GFR [eGFR] < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and progression of CKD stages) over a median follow-up of 6.0 years. At baseline, 25 patients (15.4%) had CKD. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used for identifying associated factors of CKD deterioration. Results. Estimated GFR decreased from 75.8 ± 16.3 to 67.4 ± 18.2 mL/min/1.73 m2 (p < 0.01). Of 162 patients, 32 developed CKD and 8 made a progression of CKD stages. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that carotid IMT (HR: 4.0, 95% CI: 1.1–14.226.7, and p = 0.03) and coefficient of variation of HbA1c (HR: 1.12, 95%: 1.04–1.21, and p = 0.003) were predictors of deterioration of CKD independently of age, mean HbA1c, urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, baseline eGFR, uric acid, and leucocyte count. Conclusions. Subclinical atherosclerosis and long-term glycemic variability predict deterioration of chronic kidney disease (as defined by incident or worsening CKD) in type 2 diabetic patients with preserved kidney function. PMID:28090540

  5. A Comparison Between the Effect of Cuminum Cyminum and Vitamin E on the Level of Leptin, Paraoxonase 1, HbA1c and Oxidized LDL in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Samani Keihan, Ghatreh; Gharib, Mohammad Hossein; Momeni, Ali; Hemati, Zohreh; Sedighin, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most common metabolic diseases in the world. Vitamin E reduces protein glycation and improves insulin sensitivity, while cumin is effective in remission of diabetes. Therefore this study was designed to evaluate the effects of vitamin E and cumin essential oil, on the blood level of leptin,glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and also on lipid profile in diabetic patients.In this double blind clinical trial, 95 diabetic patients were selected and randomly dividedinto three groups.The first group received cumin essential oil in capsule form. The second group received Vitamin E, and the third group was used ascontrol receiving oral gelatin capsules as placebo for three months period.Blood glucose, lipid profile, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), leptin, HbA1c, oxidized LDL (oxLDL), and paraoxonase1 activity were measured. The results showed reduction in oxLDL and significant increase in paraoxonase 1 in Vitamin E group by the end of the third month period (P<0.05). Cumin group showed decrease in blood glucose, HbA1C, triglyceride, leptin and ox-LDL. ApoA1 and paraoxonase1 were also increased by cumin treatment (P<0.05).Diabetic complications may have been reduced by intake of Vitamin E and cumin essential oil. Cumin in comparison with vitamin E has broader impact and it is more beneficial in terms of ability to reduce the diabetic index. PMID:28357199

  6. The difference between oats and beta-glucan extract intake in the management of HbA1c, fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    He, Li-xia; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Yuan-sheng; Li, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Increasing oats and beta-glucan extract intake has been associated with improved glycemic control, which is associated with the reduction in the development of diabetes. This study aims to assess the different effects between oat (whole and bran) and beta-glucan extract intake on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. PubMed, Embase, Medline, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Web of Science were searched up to February 2014. We included randomized controlled trials with interventions that lasted at least four weeks that compared oats and beta-glucan (extracted from oats or other sources) intake with a control. A total of 1351 articles were screened for eligibility, and relevant data were extracted from 18 studies (n = 1024). Oat product dose ranged from 20 g d(-1) to 136 g d(-1), and beta-glucan extract dose ranged from 3 g d(-1) to 10 g d(-1). Compared with the control, oat intake resulted in a greater decrease in fasting glucose and insulin of subjects (P < 0.05), but beta-glucan extract intake did not. Furthermore, oat intake resulted in a greater decrease in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (P < 0.001, I(2) = 0%) and fasting glucose (P < 0.001, I(2) = 68%) after removing one study using a concentrate and a different design and fasting insulin of type 2 diabetes (T2D) (P < 0.001, I(2) = 0%). The intake of oats and beta-glucan extracted from oats were effective in decreasing fasting glucose (P = 0.007, I(2) = 91%) and fasting insulin of T2D (P < 0.001, I(2) = 0%) and tented to lower HbA1c (P = 0.09, I(2) = 92%). Higher consumption of whole oats and oat bran, but not oat or barley beta-glucan extracts, are associated with lower HbA1c, fasting glucose and fasting insulin of T2D, hyperlipidaemic and overweight subjects, especially people with T2D, which supports the need for clinical trials to evaluate the potential role of oats in approaching to the management of glycemic control and insulin sensitivity of diabetes or metabolic syndrome subjects.

  7. Influence of HbA1c levels on platelet function profiles associated with tight glycemic control in patients presenting with hyperglycemia and an acute coronary syndrome. A subanalysis of the CHIPS Study ("Control de HIperglucemia y Actividad Plaquetaria en Pacientes con Síndrome Coronario Agudo").

    PubMed

    Vivas, David; García-Rubira, Juan C; Bernardo, Esther; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Martín, Patricia; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Núñez-Gil, Iván; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    Patients with hyperglycemia, an acute coronary syndrome and poor glycemic control have increased platelet reactivity and poor prognosis. However, it is unclear the influence of a tight glycemic control on platelet reactivity in these patients. This is a subanalysis of the CHIPS study. This trial randomized patients with hyperglycemia to undergo an intensive glucose control (target blood glucose 80-120 mg/dL), or conventional glucose control (target blood glucose <180 mg/dL). We analyzed platelet function at discharge on the subgroup of patients with poor glycemic control, defined with admission levels of HbA1c higher than 6.5%. The primary endpoint was maximal platelet aggregation following stimuli with 20 μM ADP. We also measured aggregation following collagen, epinephrine, and thrombin receptor-activated peptide, as well as P2Y12 reactivity index and surface expression of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P-selectin. A total of 67 patients presented HbA1c ≥ 6.5% (37 intensive, 30 conventional), while 42 had HbA1c < 6.5% (20 intensive, 22 conventional). There were no differences in baseline characteristics between groups. At discharge, patients with HbA1c ≥6.5% had significantly reduced MPA with intensive glucose control compared with conventional control (46.1 ± 22.3 vs. 60.4 ± 20.0%; p = 0.004). Similar findings were shown with other measures of platelet function. However, glucose control strategy did not affect platelet function parameters in patients with HbA1c < 6.5%. Intensive glucose control in patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome and hyperglycemia results in a reduction of platelet reactivity only in the presence of elevated HbA1c levels.

  8. [Biological variation of glycation and mean blood glucose have greater influence on Hba1c levels in type 1 young diabetic patients than glucose instability].

    PubMed

    Abourazzak, Sana; Dorchy, Harry; Willems, Dominique; Melot, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the relative influence of mean blood glucose (MBG), glucose instability (GI) and biological variation of glycohemoglobin (BVG) on HbA1c. The study included 378 unselected young type 1 diabetic patients with a diabetes duration > 1 year. There were 1,409 visits with simultaneous HbA1c determinations and self-monitoring of BG meter downloads. GI was quantified by measuring the standard deviation (SD) of the recorded BG values. A statistical model was developed to predict HbA1c from MBG. Hemoglobin glycation index (HGI) was calculated (HGI = observed HbA1c--predicted HbA1c) for each visit to assess BVG based on the directional deviation of observed HbA1c from that predicted by MBG in the model. Afterwards, the population was divided by thirds into high-, moderate-, and low-HGI groups, i.e. high-, moderate-, and low-glycators, reflecting BVG. A total of 246,000 preprandial BG measurements were analysed, with a mean of 177 per visit. Grand MBG +/- SD was 171 +/- 40 mg/dl. Predicted HbA1c was calculated from the equation: 3.8399 + 0.0242 x MBG (r = 0.66; p < 0.0001). A MBG change of 40 mg/dl corresponded to 1% change in HbA1c, within the range 6-12%. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant relationship between SD and HbA1c, after adjustment for MBG. MBG was 10 times more important than SD to predict HbA1c. MBG was not statistically different between the high- and low glycators, but HbA1c was significantly different. Multiple linear regression was used to predict HbA1c from MBG, SD and BVG (measured by HGI), adjusted for age, duration, gender and ethnic origin. BVG and MBG had large influences on HbA1c, the impact of BVG being 84% of the impact of MBG. On the other hand, GI had only 17% of the impact of MBG. In conclusion the effect of BVG on HbA1c is independent and much greater that the influence attributable to GI. Hemoglobin glycation phenotype, responsible for BVG, may be important for the clinical assessment of diabetic

  9. Identification of a rare variant haemoglobin (Hb Sinai-Baltimore) causing spuriously low haemoglobin A(1c) values on ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoff; Murray, Heather; Brennan, Stephen O

    2013-01-01

    Commonly used methods for assay of haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) are susceptible to interference from the presence of haemoglobin variants. In many systems, the common variants can be identified but scientists and pathologists must remain vigilant for more subtle variants that may result in spuriously high or low HbA(1c) values. It is clearly important to recognize these events whether HbA(1c) is being used as a monitoring tool or, as is increasingly the case, for diagnostic purposes. We report a patient with a rare haemoglobin variant (Hb Sinai-Baltimore) that resulted in spuriously low values of HbA(1c) when assayed using ion exchange chromatography, and the steps taken to elucidate the nature of the variant.

  10. Effectiveness of PRECEDE model for health education on changes and level of control of HbA1c, blood pressure, lipids, and body mass index in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Individual health education is considered to be essential in the overall care of patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2), although there is some uncertainty regarding its metabolic control benefits. There have been very few randomized studies on the effects of individual education on normal care in DM2 patients with a control group, and none of these have assessed the long-term results. Therefore, this study aims to use this design to assess the effectiveness of the PRECEDE (Predisposing, Reinforcing, Enabling, Causes in Educational Diagnosis, and Evaluation) education model in the metabolic control and the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods An open community effectiveness study was carried out in 8 urban community health centers in the North-East Madrid Urban Area (Spain). Six hundred patients with DM2 were randomized in two groups: PRECEDE or conventional model for health promotion education. The main outcome measures were glycated hemoglobin A1c, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipids and control criteria during the 2-year follow-up period. Results Glycated hemoglobin A1c and systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels decreased significantly in the PRECEDE group (multivariate analysis of covariance, with baseline glycated hemoglobin A1c, SBP, and variables showing statistically significant differences between groups at baseline visits). The decrease levels in diastolic blood pressure (DBP), triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were nonsignificant. PRECEDE increased compliance in all control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. BMI did not change during the study in either of the two models analyzed. Conclusions PRECEDE health education model is a useful method in the overall treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes, which contributes to decrease glycated hemoglobin A1c and SBP levels and increase the compliance in all the control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. Trial registration number Clinical

  11. A rare haemoglobin variant (Hb Phnom Penh) manifesting as a falsely high haemoglobin A1c value on ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Fen; Tai, Yen-Kuang

    2014-08-01

    Most haemoglobin (Hb) variants are clinically silent. However, some Hb variants may interfere with the measurement of haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), resulting in spurious values depending on the assays used. We herein report the case of a 53-year-old Taiwanese man with type 2 diabetes mellitus, who presented with an abnormal HbA1c peak on ion-exchange chromatography. Additional investigations, including intensified self-monitored blood glucose tests, an alternative HbA1c assay, and a glycaemic indicator based on a different method, revealed that the HbA1c values were falsely elevated. Subsequent DNA analysis confirmed that the patient was heterozygous for the insertion of an isoleucine residue at codons 117/118 of the a1-globin gene, Hb Phnom Penh. Clinical laboratorians should be aware of the interfering factors in their HbA1c analysis. Cautious inspection of the chromatogram may provide a valuable clue to the presence of an Hb variant.

  12. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    MedlinePlus

    ... few minutes. previous continue What to Expect Either method (finger or heel sticking or vein withdrawal) of ... that since labs and offices may use different methods to measure HbA1c, the range of normal values ...

  13. Effects of Hemoglobin Variants on Hemoglobin A1c Values Measured Using a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Method

    PubMed Central

    De-La-Iglesia, Silvia; Ropero, Paloma; Nogueira-Salgueiro, Patricia; Santana-Benitez, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is routinely used to monitor long-term glycemic control and for diagnosing diabetes mellitus. However, hemoglobin (Hb) gene variants/modifications can affect the accuracy of some methods. The potential effect of Hb variants on HbA1c measurements was investigated using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method compared with an immunoturbimetric assay. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels were measured in 42 371 blood samples. Samples producing abnormal chromatograms were further analyzed to characterize any Hb variants. Fructosamine levels were determined in place of HbA1c levels when unstable Hb variants were identified. Abnormal HPLC chromatograms were obtained for 160 of 42 371 samples. In 26 samples HbS was identified and HbA1c results correlated with FPG. In the remaining 134 samples HbD, Hb Louisville, Hb Las Palmas, Hb N-Baltimore, or Hb Porto Alegre were identified and HbA1c did not correlate with FPG. These samples were retested using an immunoturbidimetric assay and the majority of results were accurate; only 3 (with the unstable Hb Louisville trait) gave aberrant HbA1c results. Hb variants can affect determination of HbA1c levels with some methods. Laboratories should be aware of Hb variants occurring locally and choose an appropriate HbA1c testing method. PMID:25355712

  14. Methods, units and quality requirements for the analysis of haemoglobin A1c in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Penttilä, Ilkka; Penttilä, Karri; Holm, Päivi; Laitinen, Harri; Ranta, Päivi; Törrönen, Jukka; Rauramaa, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The formation of glycohemoglobin, especially the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) fraction, occurs when glucose becomes coupled with the amino acid valine in the β-chain of Hb; this reaction is dependent on the plasma concentration of glucose. Since the early 1970s it has been known that diabetics display higher values OF HbA1C because they have elevated blood glucose concentrations. Thus HbA1c has acquired a very important role in the treatment and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. After the introduction of the first quantitative measurement OF HbA1C, numerous methods for glycohemoglobin have been introduced with different assay principles: From a simple mini-column technique to the very accurate automated high-pressure chromatography and lastly to many automated immunochemical or enzymatic assays. In early days, the results of the quality control reports for HbA1c varied extensively between laboratories, therefore in United States and Canada working groups (WG) of the Diabetes Controls and Complications Trial (DCCT) were set up to standardize the HbA1c assays against the DCCT/National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program reference method based on liquid chromatography. In the 1990s, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) appointed a new WG to plan a reference preparation and method for the HBA1c measurement. When the reference procedures were established, in 2004 IFCC recommended that all manufacturers for equipment used in HbA1c assays should calibrate their methods to their proposals. This led to an improvement in the coefficient of variation (CV%) associated with the assay. In this review, we describe the glycation of Hb, methods, standardization of the HbA1c assays, analytical problems, problems with the units in which HbA1c values are expressed, reference values, quality control aspects, target requirements for HbA1c, and the relationship of the plasma glucose values to HbA1c concentrations. We also note that the acceptance

  15. Methods, units and quality requirements for the analysis of haemoglobin A1c in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Ilkka; Penttilä, Karri; Holm, Päivi; Laitinen, Harri; Ranta, Päivi; Törrönen, Jukka; Rauramaa, Rainer

    2016-06-26

    The formation of glycohemoglobin, especially the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) fraction, occurs when glucose becomes coupled with the amino acid valine in the β-chain of Hb; this reaction is dependent on the plasma concentration of glucose. Since the early 1970s it has been known that diabetics display higher values OF HbA1C because they have elevated blood glucose concentrations. Thus HbA1c has acquired a very important role in the treatment and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. After the introduction of the first quantitative measurement OF HbA1C, numerous methods for glycohemoglobin have been introduced with different assay principles: From a simple mini-column technique to the very accurate automated high-pressure chromatography and lastly to many automated immunochemical or enzymatic assays. In early days, the results of the quality control reports for HbA1c varied extensively between laboratories, therefore in United States and Canada working groups (WG) of the Diabetes Controls and Complications Trial (DCCT) were set up to standardize the HbA1c assays against the DCCT/National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program reference method based on liquid chromatography. In the 1990s, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) appointed a new WG to plan a reference preparation and method for the HBA1c measurement. When the reference procedures were established, in 2004 IFCC recommended that all manufacturers for equipment used in HbA1c assays should calibrate their methods to their proposals. This led to an improvement in the coefficient of variation (CV%) associated with the assay. In this review, we describe the glycation of Hb, methods, standardization of the HbA1c assays, analytical problems, problems with the units in which HbA1c values are expressed, reference values, quality control aspects, target requirements for HbA1c, and the relationship of the plasma glucose values to HbA1c concentrations. We also note that the acceptance

  16. Effect of Iron Deficiency Anemia on Hemoglobin A1c Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nitin; Mishra, T.K.; Singh, Tejinder

    2012-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia in India. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used in diabetic patients as an index of glycemic control reflecting glucose levels of the previous 3 months. Like blood sugar levels, HbA1c levels are also affected by the presence of variant hemoglobins, hemolytic anemias, nutritional anemias, uremia, pregnancy, and acute blood loss. However, reports on the effects of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels are inconsistent. We conducted a study to analyze the effects of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels and to assess whether treatment of iron deficiency anemia affects HbA1c levels. Methods Fifty patients confirmed to have iron deficiency anemia were enrolled in this study. HbA1c and absolute HbA1c levels were measured both at baseline and at 2 months after treatment, and these values were compared with those in the control population. Results The mean baseline HbA1c level in anemic patients (4.6%) was significantly lower than that in the control group (5.5%, p<0.05). A significant increase was observed in the patients' absolute HbA1c levels at 2 months after treatment (0.29 g/dL vs. 0.73 g/dL, p<0.01). There was a significant difference between the baseline values of patients and controls (0.29 g/dL vs. 0.74 g/dL, p<0.01). Conclusions In contrast to the observations of previous studies, ours showed that HbA1c levels and absolute HbA1c levels increased with treatment of iron deficiency anemia. This could be attributable to nutritional deficiency and/or certain unknown variables. Further studies are warranted. PMID:22259774

  17. Hemoglobin A1c in predicting progression to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Tomoko; Tajima, Naoko; Oizumi, Toshihide; Karasawa, Shigeru; Wada, Kiriko; Kameda, Wataru; Susa, Shinji; Kato, Takeo; Daimon, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The predictive value of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in comparison to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) is evaluated for 5-year incident diabetes (DM), as HbA1c may be more practical than FPG in the screening for DM in the future. Of 1189 non-DM subjects aged 35-89 years old from the Funagata Study, 57 subjects (4.8%) had developed DM on the WHO criteria at 5-year follow-up. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval: CI) for a one standard deviation increase in FPG/HbA1c was 3.40 (2.44-4.74)/3.49 (2.42-5.02). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for FPG/HbA1c was 0.786 (95% CI: 0.719-0.853)/0.785 (0.714-0.855). The HbA1c corresponding to FPG 5.56 mmol/l was HbA1c 5.3%. There was no statistical difference in sensitivity between FPG 5.56 mmol/l and HbA1c 5.3% (61.4% vs. 56.1%), while specificity was higher in HbA1c 5.3% than FPG 5.56 mmol/l (87.8% vs. 82.5%, p-value<0.001). The fraction of incident case from those with baseline IGT was similar between the groups, however the fraction of people above the cut-off was significantly lower in HbA1c 5.3% than FPG 5.56 mmol/l (14.3% vs. 19.6%, p-value<0.001). HbA1c is similar to FPG to evaluate DM risk, and HbA1c could be practical and efficient to select subjects for intervention.

  18. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    HbA1C test; Glycated hemoglobin test; Glycohemoglobin test; Hemoglobin A1C; Diabetes - A1C; Diabetic - A1C ... gov/pubmed/26696680 . Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb, glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, HbA1a, HbA1b, HbA1c - blood. ...

  19. Inaccuracy of haemoglobin A1c among HIV-infected men: effects of CD4 cell count, antiretroviral therapies and haematological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Laurence; Palella, Frank J.; Abraham, Alison G.; Li, Xiuhong; Vigouroux, Corinne; Pialoux, Gilles; Kingsley, Lawrence; Lake, Jordan E.; Brown, Todd T.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Crain, Barbara; Dobs, Adrian; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Gallant, Joel; Johnson-Hill, Lisette; Plankey, Michael; Sacktor, Ned; Selnes, Ola; Shepard, James; Thio, Chloe; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Phair, John P.; Badri, Sheila; O'Gorman, Maurice; Ostrow, David; Palella, Frank; Ragin, Ann; Detels, Roger; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Aronow, Aaron; Bolan, Robert; Breen, Elizabeth; Butch, Anthony; Jamieson, Beth; Miller, Eric N.; Oishi, John; Vinters, Harry; Wiley, Dorothy; Witt, Mallory; Yang, Otto; Young, Stephen; Zhang, Zuo Feng; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Becker, James T.; Cranston, Ross D.; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Mellors, John W.; Silvestre, Anthony J.; Stall, Ronald D.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Munoz, Alvaro; Abraham, Alison; Althoff, Keri; Cox, Christopher; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Golub, Elizabeth; Schollenberger, Janet; Seaberg, Eric C.; Su, Sol; Huebner, Robin E.; Dominguez, Geraldina

    2014-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence that among HIV-infected patients haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values may not accurately reflect glycaemia. We assessed HbA1c discordance (observed HbA1c − expected HbA1c) and associated factors among HIV-infected participants in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). Methods Fasting glucose (FG) and HbA1c were measured at each semi-annual MACS visit since 1999. All HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men for whom at least one FG and HbA1c pair measurement was available were evaluated. Univariate median regression determined the association between HbA1c and FG by HIV serostatus. The relationship between HbA1c and FG in HIV-uninfected men was used to determine the expected HbA1c. Generalized estimating equations determined factors associated with the Hb1Ac discordance among HIV-infected men. Clinically significant discordance was defined as observed HbA1c − expected HbA1c ≤−0.5%. Results Over 13 years, 1500 HIV-uninfected and 1357 HIV-infected men were included, with a median of 11 visits for each participant. At an FG of 125 mg/dL, the median HbA1c among HIV-infected men was 0.21% lower than among HIV-uninfected men and the magnitude of this effect increased with FG >126 mg/dL. Sixty-three percent of HIV-infected men had at least one visit with clinically significant HbA1c discordance, which was independently associated with: low CD4 cell count (<500 cells/mm3); a regimen containing a protease inhibitor, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor or zidovudine; high mean corpuscular volume; and abnormal corpuscular haemoglobin. Conclusion HbA1c underestimates glycaemia in HIV-infected patients and its use in patients with risk factors for HbA1c discordance may lead to under-diagnosis and to under-treatment of established diabetes mellitus. PMID:25096078

  20. Managing type 2 diabetes: balancing HbA1c and body weight.

    PubMed

    Mavian, Annie A; Miller, Stephan; Henry, Robert R

    2010-05-01

    Most patients with type 2 diabetes present with comorbid overweight or obesity. Reaching and maintaining acceptable glycemic control is more difficult in overweight and obese patients, and these conditions are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and other diseases. Glycemic management for these patients is complicated by the fact that insulin and many of the oral medications available to treat type 2 diabetes produce additional weight gain. However, an increasing number of therapeutic options are available that are weight neutral or lead to weight loss in addition to their glycemic benefits. This article evaluates the evidence from clinical trials regarding the relative glycemic benefits, measured in terms of glycated hemoglobin change, versus the impact on body weight of each medication currently approved for type 2 diabetes. In general, the sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, and D-phenylalanine derivatives have been shown to promote weight gain. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are weight neutral, while the biguanides, incretin mimetics, and amylin mimetics promote weight loss. Trials examining the glycemic benefits of the weight loss agents orlistat and sibutramine are also examined. Awareness of this evidence base can be used to inform medication selection in support of weight management goals for patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Therapies for type 2 diabetes: lowering HbA1c and associated cardiovascular risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To summarize data supporting the effects of antidiabetes agents on glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Studies reporting on the effects of antidiabetes agents on glycemic control, body weight, lipid levels, and blood pressure parameters are reviewed and summarized for the purpose of selecting optimal therapeutic regimens for patients with type 2 diabetes. Results National guidelines recommend the aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes, including weight loss and achieving lipid and blood pressure treatment goals. All antidiabetes pharmacotherapies lower glucose; however, effects on cardiovascular risk factors vary greatly among agents. While thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, and insulin are associated with weight gain, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are considered weight neutral and metformin can be weight neutral or associated with a small weight loss. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylinomimetics (e.g. pramlintide) result in weight loss. Additionally, metformin, thiazolidinediones, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated beneficial effects on lipid and blood pressure parameters. Conclusion Management of the cardiovascular risk factors experienced by patients with type 2 diabetes requires a multidisciplinary approach with implementation of treatment strategies to achieve not only glycemic goals but to improve and/or correct the underlying cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:20804556

  2. A hemoglobin A1C immunoassay method not affected by carbamylated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Rose, A M; Tongate, C; Valdes, R

    1995-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) methods based on charge separation of Hb species are subject to interference from carbamylated Hb (carb Hb). Carb Hb adducts are formed via interaction of terminal amino groups of HbA with isocyanic acid, after the spontaneous dissociation of urea to cyanate. It is hypothesized that a new immunoassay method, using a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the N-terminus of the Hb beta-chain and its sugar moiety, should be refractory to cross-reactive interference from carb Hb. To test this hypothesis, Hb was carbamylated in vitro and co-migration of carb Hb assessed with HbA1C using an electrophoretic method. Densitometric scans - post sodium cyanate incubation and electrophoretic separation - showed a 5 to 7 fold elevation of the HbA1C peak only, while HbA1C values obtained using immunoassay were unaffected. Also assessed was carbamylation interference in vivo, and a positive proportional bias with the electrophoretic system (Y) was observed compared to the immunoassay system (X) (y = 1.2x - 0.21 percent). Others have shown that carb Hb may cause a clinically significant false elevation in patient HbA1C values, when methods based on charge separation of Hb species are used. It is our conclusion, however, that while carb Hb may play a role, the differences observed in this study are largely due to calibration.

  3. Performance of the Roche second generation hemoglobin A1c immunoassay in the presence of HB-S or HB-C traits.

    PubMed

    Abadie, Jude M; Koelsch, Angela A

    2008-01-01

    Blood HbA1c determination is a powerful tool for the evaluation and management of patients with diabetes mellitus. Many HbA1c analytical methods demonstrate bias in samples from patients with hemoglobinopathies. This study evaluated the analytical performance of Roche Diagnostics' 1st and 2nd generation HbA1c assays in patients with or without hemoglobinopathies whose HbA1c levels were elevated or normal, respectively. Boronate-affinity high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) served as the reference method. Whole blood samples were collected from 80 patients with HbS or HbC whose group mean HbA1c value was elevated and also from 80 patients without hemoglobinopathy whose HbA1c values were in the well-controlled range. Each sample was assayed for HbA1c by the Primus boronate-affinity HPLC technique and by Roche's 1st and 2nd generation immunoassays using a Cobas Integra 800 analytical system. Results by the HPLC technique were compared with the results of both Roche assays by linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis. The 1st and 2nd generation assays yielded regression lines and correlation values vs HPLC assay of y = 1.43x - 1.59; R(2) = 0.83, and y = 0.94x + 0.10; R(2) = 0.92, respectively, in the 80 patients with hemoglobinopathies. The mean difference and the +/-2SD range were greater in the 1st than in the 2nd generation assay (2.68, +/-2.07 vs -0.54, +/-0.86, respectively). The 2nd generation assay also showed better performance than the 1st generation assay in samples from the 80 patients without hemoglobinopathy. In conclusion, this study validates the accuracy of Roche's 2nd generation assay, which is substantially improved over Roche's 1st generation HbA1c assay.

  4. Development of hemoglobin A1c certified reference material by liquid chromatography isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bi, Jiaming; Wu, Liqing; Yang, Bin; Yang, Yi; Wang, Jing

    2012-04-01

    We report the development of a National Institute of Metrology (NIM) hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) certified reference material (CRM). Each CRM unit contains about 10 μL of hemoglobin. Both hemoglobin and glycated hemoglobin were quantitatively determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) with synthesized VHLTPE and glycated VHLTPE as standards. The mass fraction of synthesized VHLTPE or glycated VHLTPE was also quantitatively determined by HPLC-IDMS with NIM amino acid CRMs as standards. The homogeneity and stability of the CRMs were examined with a commercial HbA(1c) analyzer based on the HPLC principle. Fifteen units were randomly selected for homogeneity examination, and statistical analysis showed there was no inhomogeneity. Examination of the stability showed that the CRM was stable for at least 6 months at -80 °C. Uncertainty components of the balance, amino acid purity, hydrolysis and proteolysis efficiency, method reproducibility, homogeneity, and stability were taken into consideration for uncertainty evaluation. The certified value of NIM HbA(1c) CRM was expressed as the ratio of HbA(1c) to total hemoglobin in moles, and was (9.6 ± 1.9)%. The CRM can be used as a calibration or validation standard for clinical diagnostics. It is expected to improve the comparability for HbA(1c) measurement in China.

  5. [Rapid hemoglobin A1c determination (a new possibility in diabetes care)].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, G; Nádas, J; Farkas, K

    1999-05-30

    To assess the long-term metabolic control, immunochemical method was used for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) determinations in diabetic patients. The use of DCA 2000 device (Bayer) resulted in immediate (< 6 min) HbA1c values. The reproducibility of this method was acceptable (within-run coefficients of variations were 3.48% and 4.80%). A close, linear correlation (r = 0.974; p < 0.001; n = 106) between HbA1c-values measured simultaneously by DCA 2000 and DIAMAT (Bio-Rad, method: high pressure liquid chromatography) was observed in diabetic patients. The new immunochemical method proved to be simple and reliable. The immediate (within 6 min) result makes the therapeutic decision easier during the care of diabetic patients.

  6. Hemoglobin A1c and Self-Monitored Average Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris P.; Breton, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previously we have introduced the eA1c—a new approach to real-time tracking of average glycemia and estimation of HbA1c from infrequent self-monitoring (SMBG) data, which was developed and tested in type 2 diabetes. We now test eA1c in type 1 diabetes and assess its relationship to the hemoglobin glycation index (HGI)—an established predictor of complications and treatment effect. Methods: Reanalysis of previously published 12-month data from 120 patients with type 1 diabetes, age 39.15 (14.35) years, 51/69 males/females, baseline HbA1c = 7.99% (1.48), duration of diabetes 20.28 (12.92) years, number SMBG/day = 4.69 (1.84). Surrogate fasting BG and 7-point daily profiles were derived from these unstructured SMBG data and the previously reported eA1c method was applied without any changes. Following the literature, we calculated HGI = HbA1c – (0.009 × Fasting BG + 6.8). Results: The correlation of eA1c with reference HbA1c was r = .75, and its deviation from reference was MARD = 7.98%; 95% of all eA1c values fell within ±20% from reference. The HGI was well approximated by a linear combination of the eA1c calibration factors: HGI = 0.007552*θ1 + 0.007645*θ2 – 3.154 (P < .0001); 73% of low versus moderate-high HGIs were correctly classified by the same factors as well. Conclusions: The eA1c procedure developed in type 2 diabetes to track in real-time changes in average glycemia and present the results in HbA1c-equivalent units has shown similar performance in type 1 diabetes. The eA1c calibration factors are highly predictive of the HGI, thereby explaining partially the biological variation causing discrepancies between HbA1c and its linear estimates from SMBG data. PMID:26553023

  7. A Novel Glycated Hemoglobin A1c-Lowering Traditional Chinese Medicinal Formula, Identified by Translational Medicine Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tsai-Chung; Li, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Hui-Chi; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Ho, Tin-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder that has a significant impact on the health care system. The reduction of glycated hemoglobin A1c is highly associated with the improvements of glycemic control and diabetic complications. In this study, we identified a traditional Chinese medicinal formula with a HbA1c-lowering potential from clinical evidences. By surveying 9,973 diabetic patients enrolled in Taiwan Diabetic Care Management Program, we found that Chu-Yeh-Shih-Kao-Tang (CYSKT) significantly reduced HbA1c values in diabetic patients. CYSKT reduced the levels of HbA1c and fasting blood glucose, and stimulated the blood glucose clearance in type 2 diabetic mice. CYSKT affected the expressions of genes associated with insulin signaling pathway, increased the amount of phosphorylated insulin receptor in cells and tissues, and stimulated the translocation of glucose transporter 4. Moreover, CYSKT affected the expressions of genes related to diabetic complications, improved the levels of renal function indexes, and increased the survival rate of diabetic mice. In conclusion, this was a translational medicine study that applied a “bedside-to-bench” approach to identify a novel HbA1c-lowering formula. Our findings suggested that oral administration of CYSKT affected insulin signaling pathway, decreased HbA1c and blood glucose levels, and consequently reduced mortality rate in type 2 diabetic mice. PMID:25133699

  8. Common Variants at 10 Genomic Loci Influence Hemoglobin A1C Levels via Glycemic and Nonglycemic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Soranzo, Nicole; Sanna, Serena; Wheeler, Eleanor; Gieger, Christian; Radke, Dörte; Dupuis, Josée; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga; Stolerman, Elliot; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Heeney, Matthew M.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ricketts, Sally L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), used to monitor and diagnose diabetes, is influenced by average glycemia over a 2- to 3-month period. Genetic factors affecting expression, turnover, and abnormal glycation of hemoglobin could also be associated with increased levels of HbA1c. We aimed to identify such genetic factors and investigate the extent to which they influence diabetes classification based on HbA1c levels. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied associations with HbA1c in up to 46,368 nondiabetic adults of European descent from 23 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and 8 cohorts with de novo genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We combined studies using inverse-variance meta-analysis and tested mediation by glycemia using conditional analyses. We estimated the global effect of HbA1c loci using a multilocus risk score, and used net reclassification to estimate genetic effects on diabetes screening. RESULTS Ten loci reached genome-wide significant association with HbA1c, including six new loci near FN3K (lead SNP/P value, rs1046896/P = 1.6 × 10−26), HFE (rs1800562/P = 2.6 × 10−20), TMPRSS6 (rs855791/P = 2.7 × 10−14), ANK1 (rs4737009/P = 6.1 × 10−12), SPTA1 (rs2779116/P = 2.8 × 10−9) and ATP11A/TUBGCP3 (rs7998202/P = 5.2 × 10−9), and four known HbA1c loci: HK1 (rs16926246/P = 3.1 × 10−54), MTNR1B (rs1387153/P = 4.0 × 10−11), GCK (rs1799884/P = 1.5 × 10−20) and G6PC2/ABCB11 (rs552976/P = 8.2 × 10−18). We show that associations with HbA1c are partly a function of hyperglycemia associated with 3 of the 10 loci (GCK, G6PC2 and MTNR1B). The seven nonglycemic loci accounted for a 0.19 (% HbA1c) difference between the extreme 10% tails of the risk score, and would reclassify ∼2% of a general white population screened for diabetes with HbA1c. CONCLUSIONS GWAS identified 10 genetic loci reproducibly associated with HbA1c. Six are novel and seven map to loci where rarer variants cause hereditary anemias and iron

  9. Is hemoglobin A1c level effective in predicting the prognosis of Fournier gangrene?

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Haluk; Bayrak, Omer; Erturhan, Sakip; Borazan, Ersin; Koc, Mustafa Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of immune failure and/or diabetes mellitus (DM) association on the mortality and morbidity of the Fournier's Gangrene (FG), and interrelatedly, the usability of HbA1c level in the prediction of prognosis. Materials and Methods: The data of 38 patients with the diagnosis of FG were investigated retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups as patients with DM (Group 1, n = 18) and non-diabetics (Group 2, n = 20). The patients in group 1 were also divided into two subgroups as patients with HbA1c value ≥7 (Group 1a) and HbA1c value <7 (Group 1b). Results: The mean age of all 38 male patients was 66.3 ± 6.4 years. The initial symptoms were scrotal rash and swelling (n = 20, 52.6%), high fever (>38°C) (n = 22, 57.8%), purulent discharge from genital or perineal areas (n = 13, 34.2%), skin bruises (n = 11, 28.9%) and general state disorder in five patients that were admitted from day care center (13.1%). DM, as the most often comorbid disease, was detected in 18 patients (47.3%). Six patients (15.7%) were deceased during the follow-up period. Conclusion: In the present study, the researchers determined that diabetic patients with HbA1c level of 7 or higher had worse prognosis, and increased mortality. PMID:27453658

  10. Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1C

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Hemoglobin A1c A A A What's in this article? ... de sangre: hemoglobina A1c What It Is A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test is used to monitor long- ...

  11. Diagnostic Value of Adenosine Deaminase and Its Isoforms in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Larijani, Bagher; Heshmat, Ramin; Ebrahimi-Rad, Mina; Khatami, Shohreh; Valadbeigi, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. In the present study, we have investigated the activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) as a diagnostic marker in type 2 (or II) diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Design and Methods. The deaminase activity of ADA1 and ADA2 was determined in serum from 33 patients with type 2 (or II) diabetes mellitus and 35 healthy controls. We also determined the proportion of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Results. Our results showed significant differences between total serum ADA (tADA) and ADA2 activities in the diabetic groups with HbA1c < 8 (%) and HbA1c ≥ 8 (%) with respect to the values in healthy individuals (p < 0.001). ADA2 activity in patients with high HbA1c was found to be much higher than that in patients with low HbA1c (p = 0.0001). In addition, total ADA activity showed a significant correlation with HbA1c (r = 0.6, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Total serum ADA activity, specially that due to ADA2, could be useful test for the diagnosis of type 2 (or II) diabetes mellitus. PMID:28050278

  12. Interpreting Hemoglobin A1C in Combination With Conventional Risk Factors for Prediction of Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Jarmul, Jamie A.; Pignone, Michael; Pletcher, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events, but its use for prediction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in combination with conventional risk factors has not been well defined. Methods and Results To understand the effect of HbA1C on CVD risk in the context of other CVD risk factors, we analyzed HbA1C and other CVD risk factor measurements in 2000 individuals aged 40-79 years old without pre-existing diabetes or cardiovascular disease from the 2011-2012 NHANES survey. The resulting regression model was used to predict the HbA1C distribution based on individual patient characteristics. We then calculated post-test 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk incorporating the actual versus predicted HbA1C, according to established methods, for a set of example scenarios. Age, gender, race/ethnicity and traditional cardiovascular risk factors were significant predictors of HbA1C in our model, with the expected HbA1C distribution being significantly higher in non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic Asian and Hispanic individuals than non-Hispanic white/other individuals. Incorporating the expected HbA1C distribution into pretest ASCVD risk has a modest effect on post-test ASCVD risk. In the patient examples we assessed, having an HbA1C < 5.7% reduced post-test risk by 0.4%-2.0% points, whereas having an HbA1C ≥ 6.5% increased post-test risk by 1.0%-2.5% points, depending on the scenario. The post-test risk increase from having an HbA1C ≥ 6.5 % tends to approximate the risk increase from being five years older in age. Conclusions HbA1C has modest effects on predicted ASCVD risk when considered in the context of conventional risk factors. PMID:26349840

  13. Identification of haemoglobin New York by haemoglobin A1c measurement using the Sebia Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing system.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yan; Wan, Zemin; Wu, Xiaobin; Qiu, Feng; Wu, Xinzhong; Wang, Yunxiu; Ke, Peifeng; Xu, Jianhua; Zhuang, Junhua; Huang, Xianzhang

    2017-01-01

    Haemoglobinopathies may interfere with the haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement, leading to incorrect diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. It is essential that HbA1c assays are capable of identifying haemoglobinopathies. We report two cases of haemoglobin New York (HbNY) discovered through HbA1c analysis using capillary electrophoresis (Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing [C2FP], Sebia). We used these samples to evaluate the ability of three other HbA1c assays to identify this variant: ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (Variant II Turbo [VII-T], Bio-Rad); boronate affinity high-performance liquid chromatography (Ultra(2), Trinity Biotech) and immunoassay (Cobas c501 Tina-quant Generation 3, Roche Diagnostics). Each method was used for HbA1c assay of in samples from two cases of heterozygous haemoglobinopathy: β(0)-thalassemia/HbNY (Case 1) and HbA/NY (Case 2). Only the C2FP system detected HbNY (an additional peak appeared between HbA1c and HbA0). Clinical laboratories should be aware of the limitations of their HbA1c assay methods especially in geographic areas, where haemoglobinopathy prevalence is high.

  14. A1cNow® InView™: A New Simple Method for Office-Based Glycohemoglobin Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Mattewal, Amarbir; Aldasouqi, Saleh; Solomon, David; Gossain, Ved; Koller, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycohemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a universally accepted tool for glycemic control. Portable HbA1c devices for use in physicians' offices are desirable because they provide immediate results that physicians can share with their patients. This has been shown to enhance self-management in patients with diabetes. We undertook this study to evaluate the accuracy and precision of a recently introduced device, the A1cNow® InView™ capillary monitor. Methods Previously tested EDTA-preserved whole blood samples from our laboratory pool were preselected based on the results of HbA1c to cover a range from 4 to 13%. HbA1c was then measured using an A1cNow InView capillary monitor. Blinded aliquots of these samples were then sent to a National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP)-certified reference laboratory for comparison. One sample with a laboratory HbA1c result of 9.2% was measured with the InView device nine successive times to assess the device precision. The consistency between the measurement of HbA1c measured by the reference laboratory and the A1cNow InView device was analyzed via linear regression. Results Thirty-five samples were tested. The correlation between HbA1c measured by the InView device and the reference laboratory, as well as our own laboratory, was 0.96. The coefficient of variation was 2.71%. Conclusions Results of this study confirm the accuracy and precision of the InView capillary HbA1c monitor. However, the feasibility, reproducibility, and cost-effectiveness of this promising device in the real-life settings of physicians' offices must be verified by prospective clinical studies. PMID:19885160

  15. Factors Influencing Changes in Hemoglobin A1c and Body Weight During Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes With Ipragliflozin: Interim Analysis of the ASSIGN-K Study

    PubMed Central

    Iemitsu, Kotaro; Iizuka, Takashi; Takihata, Masahiro; Takai, Masahiko; Nakajima, Shigeru; Minami, Nobuaki; Umezawa, Shinichi; Kanamori, Akira; Takeda, Hiroshi; Kawata, Takehiro; Ito, Shogo; Kikuchi, Taisuke; Amemiya, Hikaru; Kaneshiro, Mizuki; Mokubo, Atsuko; Takuma, Tetsuro; Machimura, Hideo; Tanaka, Keiji; Asakura, Taro; Kubota, Akira; Aoyagi, Sachio; Hoshino, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Masashi; Obana, Mitsuo; Sasai, Nobuo; Kaneshige, Hideaki; Miyakawa, Masaaki; Tanaka, Yasushi; Terauchi, Yasuo; Matsuba, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Ipragliflozin is a selective sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor that blocks glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubules. SGLT2 inhibitors are expected to be effective in patients with insulin resistance and obesity, but it is important to select treatment according to patient background factors that minimizes the risk of adverse events. There have been a limited number of investigations into the relationship between the clinical efficacy (reducing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and body weight (BW)) or safety of SGLT2 inhibitors and patient characteristics. Methods ASSIGN-K is an investigator-initiated, multicenter, prospective observational study examining the efficacy and safety of ipragliflozin (50 - 100 mg/day for 52 weeks) in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who had inadequate glycemic control with HbA1c ≥ 6.0% (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program) despite diet and exercise therapy or diet and exercise plus antidiabetic drug therapy. We conducted an interim analysis of the relationship between changes in HbA1c or BW and characteristics in patients who had been on treatment for more than 12 weeks. Results In 257 patients completing 12 weeks of treatment, HbA1c decreased significantly from 8.23% to 7.55% (-0.68%, P < 0.01). The change in HbA1c after 12 weeks was -0.17%, -0.33%, and -1.16% when baseline HbA1c was < 7%, 7% to < 8%, and ≥ 8%, respectively (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01, respectively), and -1.30%, -0.62%, and -0.62% when baseline body mass index (BMI) was < 25, 25 to < 30, and ≥ 30, respectively (all P < 0.01). Stratified analysis showed that age, gender, or BMI did not have a significant influence on the improvement in HbA1c. Multiple regression analysis showed that reduction in HbA1c was greater as baseline HbA1c increased and the duration of diabetes decreased. A higher baseline HbA1c was associated with less weight loss. Conclusions Ipragliflozin significantly improved HbA1c in

  16. A review of variant hemoglobins interfering with hemoglobin A1c measurement.

    PubMed

    Little, Randie R; Roberts, William L

    2009-05-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used routinely to monitor long-term glycemic control in people with diabetes mellitus, as HbA1c is related directly to risks for diabetic complications. The accuracy of HbA1c methods can be affected adversely by the presence of hemoglobin (Hb) variants or elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF). The effect of each variant or elevated HbF must be examined with each specific method. The most common Hb variants worldwide are HbS, HbE, HbC, and HbD. All of these Hb variants have single amino acid substitutions in the Hb beta chain. HbF is the major hemoglobin during intrauterine life; by the end of the first year, HbF falls to values close to adult levels of approximately 1%. However, elevated HbF levels can occur in certain pathologic conditions or with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. In a series of publications over the past several years, the effects of these four most common Hb variants and elevated HbF have been described. There are clinically significant interferences with some methods for each of these variants. A summary is given showing which methods are affected by the presence of the heterozygous variants S, E, C, and D and elevated HbF. Methods are divided by type (immunoassay, ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, boronate affinity, other) with an indication of whether the result is artificially increased or decreased by the presence of a Hb variant. Laboratorians should be aware of the limitations of their method with respect to these interferences.

  17. Dramatic change in a young woman's perception of her diabetes and remarkable reduction in HbA1c after an individual course of Guided Self-Determination.

    PubMed

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Prip, Anne; Christiansen, Anette Wendelboe

    2015-07-06

    A 24-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes participated in a randomised controlled trial proving effectiveness of a flexible Guided Self-Determination (GSD) intervention. She had for 10 years been living with a complex situation of eating disorder, poor glycaemic control, non-attendance and psychosocial distress. She managed to change her perception of diabetes dramatically and improved her glycaemic control. Considering the complexity of her case, we explored how she achieved these changes. A GSD-trained nurse delivered the intervention, which involves reflection sheets and advanced professional communication. Glycated hemoglobin was reported in the patient's record and an interview conducted by external interviewers was analysed thematically, indicating that a four-stage process of empowerment had taken place: 'focusing on life prior to numbers', 'unpacking a heavy burden', 'breaking out of isolation through communication' and 'finding strength within oneself'. The article emphasises that GSD works by breaking isolation through communication as an appropriate way to achieve good diabetes control.

  18. Diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus: implications of recent changes in diagnostic criteria and role of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c).

    PubMed

    Hanna, Fahmy W; Duff, Christopher J; Shelley-Hitchen, Ann; Hodgson, Ellen; Fryer, Anthony A

    2017-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; approximately 5% of pregnancies) represents the most important risk factor for development of later-onset diabetes mellitus. We examined concordance between GDM diagnosis defined using the original 1999 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria and the more recent 2013 WHO criteria and 2015 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) criteria. We studied two groups: a case-control group of 257 GDM positive and 266 GDM negative cases, and an incident cohort 699 GDM positive and 6,231 GDM negative cases. In the incident cohort, GDM prevalence was 3.7% (WHO 1999 criteria), 11.4% (NICE 2015 criteria) and 13.7% (WHO 2013 criteria). Our results showed that a significant number of additional cases are detected using the more recent NICE and WHO criteria than the original 1999 WHO criteria, but these additional cases represent an intermediate group with 'moderate' dysglycaemia (abnormal blood glucose levels). Our results also show that use of these newer criteria misses a similar group of intermediate cases that were defined as GDM by the 1999 WHO criteria and that glycated haemoglobin in isolation is unlikely to replace the oral glucose tolerance test in GDM diagnosis.

  19. [Comparison of HbA1c, fructosamine and the main metabolic parameters in a non-insulin-dependent diabetic population].

    PubMed

    Magnati, G; Arsenio, L; Baroni, M C; Bodria, P; Bossi, S; Delsignore, R; Ippolito, L; Mineo, F; Strata, A

    1990-01-01

    Our objective was the checking of clinical data obtainable from the assay of some parameters in NID diabetic individuals. To this end, we studied 133 patients--57 males and 76 females, average age 74.36 +/- 1.01 years, 72.6% of which were above 65 years of age. The control population was subdivided as follows: 50 subjects, 26 F and 24 M; average age 71.25 +/- 1.32 years, with normal glucidic tolerance as assessed by OGTT. Current glycemia, average glycemia, fructosamine, glycosylated hemoglobin, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B were obviously much higher than normal in the individuals admitted to the study. A statistically significant correlation was found between average glycemia, glycosylated hemoglobin, LDL-cholesterol and blood triglycerides (p less than 0.05). No correlation was found between current glycemia, fructosamine and glycosylated hemoglobin. Similarly, serum fructosamine was unrelated to the parameters studied. In our study, fructosamine, glycosylated hemoglobin and current glycemia offered unrelatable data. Hence, in our opinion it is necessary to assay these three parameters contemporaneously for a reliable assessment of metabolic compensation.

  20. HBA1c: clinical and biological agreement for standardization of assay methods. Report by the experts of ALFEDIAM (Association de Langue Française pour lEtude du Diabète et des Maladies Métabolique) and SFBC (Société Française de Biologie Clinique).

    PubMed

    Gillery, P; Bordas-Fonfrède, M; Chapelle, J P; Drouin, P; Hue, G; Lévy-Marchal, C; Périer, C; Sélam, J L; Slama, G; Thivolet, C; Vialettes, B

    1999-09-01

    Glycohaemoglobin, and particularly haemoglobin A1c(HbA1c), assays have been used for many years to retrospectively evaluate the glycaemic control of diabetic patients. Cut-off values have been established for deciding treatment modifications. The techniques used in the laboratories however exhibit varying quality, and all of them are not yet standardized. The consequence is an under-utilization of this test, especially in non-hospital practice. In this context, working groups of Société Française de Biologie Clinique (SFBC), Association de Langue Française pour l'Etude du Diabète et des Maladies Métaboliques (ALFEDIAM) and Société Française d'Endocrinologie (SFE) have met together, in order to analyze the national status, and to propose practical recommendations for implementing a standardization process on the basis of international experiences. It is recommended to exclusively express results as HbA1c percentage, using methods standardized and certified by comparison to reference methods such as those using Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) values. Simultaneously, contacts have been established with manufacturers, and the realisation of periodic quality control surveys was encouraged.

  1. Elevated hemoglobin A1c Is Associated with Carotid Plaque Vulnerability: Novel Findings from Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in Hypertensive Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Beibei; Zhao, Huilin; Liu, Xiaosheng; Lu, Qing; Zhao, Xihai; Pu, Jun; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    The association between hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level and carotid plaque vulnerability has been rarely studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present study of MRI-identified carotid atherosclerotic lesions in hypertensive patients with acute stroke therefore sought to determine the associations between HbA1c level and plaque morphological and compositional characteristics and acute cerebral infarction (ACI) severity. Eighty hypertensive patients with acute stroke were enrolled; stratified into high (≥6.5%) and low (<6.5%) HbA1c groups; and underwent carotid and brain MRI to assess carotid plaque features and ACI volume in the region supplied by the internal carotid artery (ICA) in the symptomatic side. Plaque burden [percent wall volume (PWV), max wall thickness (max-WT)] and lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC) were larger in the high as compared to the low HbA1c group. High HbA1c was an independent risk factor for the presence of plaque (odds ratio [OR] = 3.71) and LRNC plaque (OR = 7.08). HbA1c independently correlated with ACI severity among patients with ICA region cerebral infarction and carotid plaque. Our study suggested that an elevated HbA1c may have an adverse effect on carotid plaque vulnerability especially those with larger LRNC volumes in hypertensive stroke patients, which might exacerbate the severity of ACIs. PMID:27629481

  2. Diabetes mellitus, hemoglobin A1C, and the incidence of total joint arthroplasty infection.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Richard; Williams, Kelly M; Marcantonio, Andrew J; Specht, Lawrence M; Tilzey, John F; Healy, William L

    2012-05-01

    Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of infection after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) than patients without diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are a marker for blood glucose control in diabetic patients. A total of 3468 patients underwent 4241 primary or revision total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty at one institution. Hemoglobin A1c levels were examined to evaluate if there was a correlation between the control of HbA1c and infection after TJA. There were a total of 46 infections (28 deep and 18 superficial [9 cellulitis and 9 operative abscesses]). Twelve (3.43%) occurred in diabetic patients (n = 350; 8.3%) and 34 (0.87%) in nondiabetic patients (n = 3891; 91.7%) (P < .001). There were 9 deep (2.6%) infections in diabetic patients and 19 (0.49%) in nondiabetic patients. In noninfected, diabetic patients, HbA1c level ranged from 4.7% to 15.1% (mean, 6.92%). In infected diabetic patients, HbA1c level ranged from 5.1% to 11.7% (mean, 7.2%) (P < .445). The average HbA1c level in patients with diabetes was 6.93%. Diabetic patients have a significantly higher risk for infection after TJA. Hemoglobin A1c levels are not reliable for predicting the risk of infection after TJA.

  3. Whole Blood Donation Affects the Interpretation of Hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Lenters-Westra, Erna; de Kort, Wim; Bokhorst, Arlinke G.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Slingerland, Robbert J.; Vos, Michel J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Several factors, including changed dynamics of erythrocyte formation and degradation, can influence the degree of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) formation thereby affecting its use in monitoring diabetes. This study determines the influence of whole blood donation on HbA1c in both non-diabetic blood donors and blood donors with type 2 diabetes. Methods In this observational study, 23 non-diabetic blood donors and 21 blood donors with type 2 diabetes donated 475 mL whole blood and were followed prospectively for nine weeks. Each week blood samples were collected and analyzed for changes in HbA1c using three secondary reference measurement procedures. Results Twelve non-diabetic blood donors (52.2%) and 10 (58.8%) blood donors with type 2 diabetes had a significant reduction in HbA1c following blood donation (reduction >-4.28%, P < 0.05). All non-diabetic blood donors with a normal ferritin concentration predonation had a significant reduction in HbA1c. In the non-diabetic group the maximum reduction was -11.9%, in the type 2 diabetes group -12.0%. When eligible to donate again, 52.2% of the non-diabetic blood donors and 41.2% of the blood donors with type 2 diabetes had HbA1c concentrations significantly lower compared to their predonation concentration (reduction >-4.28%, P < 0.05). Conclusion Patients with type 2 diabetes contributing to whole blood donation programs can be at risk of falsely lowered HbA1c. This could lead to a wrong interpretation of their glycemic control by their general practitioner or internist. PMID:28118412

  4. Association between Inflammation and Biological Variation in Hemoglobin A1c in U.S. Nondiabetic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuqian; Hempe, James M.; McCarter, Robert J.; Li, Shengxu

    2015-01-01

    Context: Inflammation is associated with higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Whether the relationship is independent of blood glucose concentration remains unclear. Objective: The hemoglobin glycation index (HGI) was used to test the hypothesis that interindividual variation in HbA1c is associated with inflammation. Participants: This study used nondiabetic adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2008). Main Outcome Measures: A subsample of participants was used to estimate the linear regression relationship between HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Predicted HbA1c were calculated for 7323 nondiabetic participants by inserting FPG into the equation, HbA1c = 0.017× FPG (mg/dL) + 3.7. HGI was calculated as the difference between the observed and predicted HbA1c and the population was divided into low, moderate, and high HGI subgroups. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL), monocytes, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were used as biomarkers of inflammation. Results: Mean HbA1c, CRP, monocyte, and PMNL levels, but not FPG, progressively increased in the low, moderate, and high HGI subgroups. There were disproportionately more Blacks than whites in the high HGI subgroup. CRP (ß, 0.009; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.0001–0.017), PMNL (ß, 0.036; 95% CI, 0.010–0.062), and monocyte count (ß, 0.072; 95% CI, 0.041–0.104) were each independent predictors of HGI after adjustment for age, sex, race, triglycerides, hemoglobin level, mean corpuscular volume, red cell distribution width, and obesity status. Conclusions: HGI reflects the effects of inflammation on HbA1c in a nondiabetic population of U.S. adults and may be a marker of risk associated with inflammation independent of FPG, race, and obesity. PMID:25867810

  5. Interference of the Hope Hemoglobin With Hemoglobin A1c Results.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Chanda, Dalia; Gain, Mithun; Krishnan, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is now considered to be the marker of choice in diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus, based on the results of certain landmark clinical trials. Herein, we report the case of a 52-year-old ethnic Southeast Asian Indian man with impaired glucose tolerance whose glycated hemoglobin (ie, HbA1c) levels, as measured via Bio-Rad D10 high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Roche Tina-quant immunoassay were 47.8% and 44.0%, respectively. No variant hemoglobin (Hb) peak was observed via the D10 chromatogram. We assayed the patient specimen on the Sebia MINICAP capillary electrophoresis platform; the HbA1c level was 6.8%, with a large variant Hb peak of 42.0%. This finding suggested the possible presence of the heterozygous Hb Hope, which can result in spuriously elevated HbA1c results on HPLC and turbidimetric immunoassays. Although the capillary electrophoresis system was able to identify the variant, the A1c results should not be considered accurate due to overlapping of the variant and adult Hb peaks on the electrophoretogram reading. Hb Hope is usually clinically silent but can present such analytical challenges. Through this case study, we critically discuss the limitations of various HbA1c assay methods, highlighting the fact that laboratory professionals need to be aware of occurrences of Hb Hope, to help ensure patient safety.

  6. The Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Persons with Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Periodontitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Engebretson, Steven P.; Hyman, Leslie G.; Michalowicz, Bryan S.; Schoenfeld, Elinor R.; Gelato, Marie C.; Hou, Wei; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Reddy, Michael S.; Lewis, Cora E.; Oates, Thomas W.; Tripathy, Devjit; Katancik, James A.; Orlander, Philip R.; Paquette, David W.; Hanson, Naomi Q.; Tsai, Michael Y.

    2014-01-01

    .31mm (95% CI: 0.23, 0.39), 16.5% (95% CI: 12.9, 20.0) and 0.28 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.35), respectively; all p values <0.0001). Conclusions and Relevance Non-surgical periodontal therapy did not improve glycemic control in patients with DM and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. These findings do not support the use of nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with diabetes for the purpose of lowering HbA1c. PMID:24346989

  7. Prognostic value of glycated hemoglobin in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Patrizia; Formica, Vincenzo; Della-Morte, David; Lucchetti, Jessica; Spila, Antonella; D'Alessandro, Roberta; Riondino, Silvia; Guadagni, Fiorella; Roselli, Mario

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the clinical significance of routinely used glycemic parameters in a cohort of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. METHODS Pre-treatment fasting blood glucose, insulin, HbA1c and homeostasis model of risk assessment (HOMA-IR) were retrospectively evaluated in a case-control study of 224 CRC and 112 control subjects matched for sex, obesity and diabetes frequency and blood lipid profile. Furthermore, the prognostic value of routinely used glycemic parameters towards progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was prospectively evaluated. RESULTS Fasting blood glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and HbA1c (all P < 0.0001) levels were higher in non-diabetic CRC patients compared with obesity-matched controls. All parameters were associated with increased CRC risk at ROC analysis, but no relationship with clinical-pathological variables or survival outcomes was observed for glycemia, insulinemia or HOMA-IR. Conversely, advanced CRC stage (P = 0.018) was an independent predictor of increased HbA1c levels, which were also higher in patients who had disease progression compared with those who did not (P = 0.05). Elevated HbA1c levels showed a negative prognostic value both in terms of PFS (HR = 1.24) and OS (HR = 1.36) after adjustment for major confounders, which was further confirmed in a subgroup analysis performed after exclusion of diabetic patients. CONCLUSION HbA1c might have a negative prognostic value in CRC, thus suggesting that glycemic metabolic markers should be carefully monitored in these patients, independently of overt diabetes. PMID:28018105

  8. Gold nanoparticles-coated magnetic microspheres as affinity matrix for detection of hemoglobin A1c in blood by microfluidic immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Peng; Yu, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2011-08-15

    A novel microfluidic immunoassay system for specific detection of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was developed based on a three-component shell/shell/core structured magnetic nanocomposite Au/chitosan/Fe(3)O(4), which was synthesized with easy handling feature of Fe(3)O(4) by magnet, high affinity for gold nanoparticles of chitosan and good immobilization ability for anti-human hemoglobin-A1c antibody (HbA1c mAb) of assembled colloidal gold nanoparticles. The resulting HbA1c mAb/Au/chitosan/Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles were then introduced into microfluidic devices coupled with a gold nanoband microelectrode as electrochemical detector. After that, three-step rapid immunoreactions were carried out in the sequence of HbA1c, anti-human hemoglobin antibodies (Hb mAb) and the secondary alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated antibody within 20 min. The current response of 1-naphtol obtained from the reaction between the secondary AP-conjugated antibody and 1-naphthyl phosphate (1-NP) increased proportionally to the HbA1c concentration. Under optimized electrophoresis and detection conditions, HbA1c responded linearly in the concentration of 0.05-1.5 μg mL(-1), with the detection limit of 0.025 μg mL(-1). This system was successfully employed for detection of HbA1c in blood with good accuracy and renewable ability. The proposed method proved its potential use in clinical immunoassay of HbA1c.

  9. Neue biosensorische Prinzipien für die Hämoglobin-A1c Bestimmung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöllner, Daniela

    2002-06-01

    Hämoglobin-A1c (HbA1c) ist ein Hämoglobin (Hb)-Subtypus, der durch nicht-enzymatische Glykierung des N-terminalen Valinrestes der Hämoglobin-beta-Kette entsteht. Das gemessene Verhältnis von HbA1c zum Gesamt-Hämoglobin (5-20 % bei Diabetikern) repräsentiert den Mittelwert der Blutglucosekonzentration über einen zweimonatigen Zeitraum und stellt zur Beurteilung der diabetischen Stoffwechsellage eine Ergänzung zur Akutkontrolle der Glukosekonzentration dar. Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit war es, einen amperometrischen Biosensor für die Bestimmung des medizinisch relevanten Parameters HbA1c zu entwickeln. Durch Selektion geeigneter Bioerkennungselemente und deren Immobilisierung unter Erhalt der Bindungsfunktion für die Zielmoleküle Hämoglobin bzw. HbA1c wurden spezifische, hochaffine und regenerationsstabile Sensoroberflächen geschaffen. Für die Entwicklung des HbA1c-Biosensors wurden zwei Konzepte - Enzymsensor und Immunosensor - miteinander verglichen. Die enzymatische Umsetzung von HbA1c erfolgte mit der Fructosylamin Oxidase (FAO) aus Pichia pastoris N 1-1 unter Freisetzung von H2O2, welches sowohl optisch über eine Indikatorreaktion als auch elektrochemisch nach Einschluss der FAO in PVA-SbQ und Fixierung des Immobilisats vor einer H2O2-Elektrode nachgewiesen wurde. Die Kalibration des Enzymsensors mit der HbA1c-Modellsubstanz Fructosyl-Valin ergab Nachweisgrenzen, die ausserhalb des physiologisch relevanten HbA1c-Konzentrationsbereich lagen. Aus der Umsetzung von glykierten Peptiden mit einer nicht HbA1c analogen Aminosäurensequenz, z.B. Fructosyl-Valin-Glycin wurde zudem eine geringe HbA1c-Spezifität abgeleitet. Für den Immunosensor wurden zwei heterogene Immunoassay-Formate unter Verwendung von hochaffinen und spezifischen Antikörpern in Kombination mit Glucose Oxidase (GOD) als Markerenzym zum Nachweis von HbA1c untersucht. Beim indirekt-kompetitiven Immunoassay wurde anstelle des kompletten HbA1c-Moleküls das glykierte Pentapeptid

  10. Evaluation of 1,5-Anhydroglucitol, Hemoglobin A1c, and Glucose Levels in Youth and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sanjeev N.; Schwartz, Natalie; Wood, Jamie R.; Svoren, Britta M.; Laffel, Lori M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective Serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) is a marker of hyperglycemic excursions in adults with diabetes and HbA1c <8%. We compared 1,5-AG levels among youth and young adults with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D) and investigated the utility of 1,5-AG in the assessment of glycemic status in pediatric T1D. Methods We compared 1,5-AG, HbA1c, and plasma glucose levels in 138 patients with T1D (duration ≥1 year) and 136 healthy controls, ages 10–30 years. Within each group, we investigated associations between 1,5-AG and clinical characteristics, HbA1c and random plasma glucose. For patients with T1D, 1,5-AG was further analyzed according to HbA1c strata: <8%, 8–9%, and >9%. Results Compared to controls, patients with T1D had higher HbA1c (8.5±1.6% vs. 5.1±0.4%, p<0.0001), lower 1,5-AG (4.0±2.0 vs. 24.7±6.4 μg/mL, p<0.0001), and higher glucose (11.1±5.2 vs. 5.1±0.9 mmol/L, p<0.0001). Males had higher 1,5-AG than females within patients (4.5±2.3 vs. 3.4±1.6 μg/mL, p=0.003) and controls (26.0±6.6 vs. 23.5±6.0 μg/mL, p=0.02). 1,5-AG was not correlated with glucose in either group. 1,5-AG was significantly correlated to HbA1c in patients, but not controls. For patients with HbA1c <8%, 1,5-AG demonstrated the widest range and was not predicted by HbA1c; 1,5-AG levels were narrowly distributed among patients with HbA1c ≥8%. Conclusions Youth and young adults with T1D demonstrate similar 1,5-AG levels which are distinct from controls. 1,5-AG assessment may provide unique information beyond that provided by HbA1c in the mid-term assessment of glycemic control in young patients with T1D and HbA1c <8%. PMID:22060802

  11. Combined use of fasting plasma glucose and glycated hemoglobin A1c in a stepwise fashion to detect undiagnosed diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Tomoko; Tominaga, Makoto; Nishimura, Rimei; Daimon, Makoto; Oizumi, Toshihide; Yoshiike, Nobuo; Tajima, Naoko

    2007-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common and serious condition related with considerable morbidity. Screening for DM is one strategy for reducing this burden. In Japan National Diabetes Screening Program (JNDSP) guideline, the combined use of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in a stepwise fashion has been recommended to identify the group of people needing life-style counseling or medical care. However, the efficacy of this program has not been fully evaluated, as an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is not mandatory in the guideline. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of the screening test scenario, in which an OGTT would be applied to people needing life-style counseling or medical care on this guideline: FPG 110-125 mg/dl and HbA1c over 5.5%. Subjects were 1,726 inhabitants without a previous history of DM in the Funagata study, which is a population-based survey conducted in Yamagata prefecture to clarify the risk factors, related conditions, and consequences of DM. DM was diagnosed according to the 1999 World Health Organization criteria. The prevalence of undiagnosed DM was 6.6%. The tested screening scenario gave a sensitivity of 55.3%, a specificity of 98.4%, a positive predictive value of 70.8%, and a negative predictive value of 96.9% for undiagnosed DM. In conclusion, the screening test scenario, in which an OGTT would be followed by the combined use of FPG and HbA1c in a stepwise fashion according to the JNDSP guideline, was not effective in identifying people with undiagnosed DM.

  12. What Do We Need beyond Hemoglobin A1c to Get the Complete Picture of Glycemia in People with Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Hinzmann, Rolf; Schlaeger, Christof; Tran, Cam Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is currently the most commonly used marker for the determination of the glycemic status in people with diabetes and it is frequently used to guide therapy and especially medical treatment of people with diabetes. The measurement of HbA1c has reached a high level of analytical quality and, therefore, this biomarker is currently also suggested to be used for the diagnosis of diabetes. Nevertheless, it is crucial for people with diabetes and their treating physicians to be aware of possible interferences during its measurement as well as physiological or pathological factors that contribute to the HbA1c concentration without being related to glycemia, which are discussed in this review. We performed a comprehensive review of the literature based on PubMed searches on HbA1c in the treatment and diagnosis of diabetes including its most relevant limitations, glycemic variability and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Although the high analytical quality of the HbA1c test is widely acknowledged, the clinical relevance of this marker regarding risk reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is still under debate. In this respect, we argue that glycemic variability as a further risk factor should deserve more attention in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:23055818

  13. [Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c as a diagnostic test for diabetes mellitus in adolescents with overweight and obesity].

    PubMed

    Rivera-Hernández, Aleida; Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nallely; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Fiorentini-Fayad, Gigliola Margaretta; Nishimura-Meguro, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: en 2009 se introdujo un criterio diagnóstico para la diabetes mellitus 2 (DM2) en población adulta, basado en los niveles de hemoglobina glucosilada (HbA1c) mayor o igual a 6.5 %; el punto de corte en población pediátrica podría ser menor. Se buscó determinar la utilidad de este criterio en adolescentes mexicanos con sobrepeso u obesidad. Métodos: se hizo somatometría completa, revisión del estadio de Tanner y presión arterial, glucemia, curva de tolerancia a la glucosa (CTOG) y HbA1c. Se calculó especificidad, sensibilidad, valores predictivos positivos y negativos y curva ROC para el diagnóstico de DM con HbA1c. Resultados: se estudiaron 109 pacientes entre 10 y 16 años referidos por obesidad o sobrepeso más comorbilidades, 58 % mujeres, edad 13 ± 1.74 años, IMC percentil 95.3 y HbA1c 5.73 ± 0.9 %. Se estableció el diagnóstico de DM en 9 casos (8.3 %), prediabetes en 8 (7.3 %) y tolerancia normal a la glucosa en 92 (84.4 %), el promedio de HbA1c fue de 5.6 ± 0.04, 5.7 ± 0.4 y 5.6 ± 0.73 %, respectivamente. La HbA1c mayor o igual a 6.5 % tuvo una sensibilidad de 12.5 %, especificidad de 89.8 %, VPP 10.65 y VPN 14.28. El mejor punto de corte para diagnosticar DM por curva ROC de HbA1c fue de 5.45 %, con sensibilidad de 62.5 % y especificidad de 57.1 %, VPP 2.53 y VPN 33.3. Conclusiones: el nivel de HbA1c mayor o igual a 6.5% tuvo baja sensibilidad y especificidad para diagnosticar DM. Un punto de corte menor es insuficiente para utilizar la HbA1c como criterio diagnóstico.

  14. Association Between the Presence of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Hemoglobin A1c in Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae W.; Ku, Cheol R.; Noh, Jung H.; Ko, Kyung S.; Rhee, Byoung D.; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have investigated the clinical effect of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) on the use of the Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a screening parameter for diabetes or prediabetes. We investigated the association between IDA and HbA1c levels in Korean adults. Among the 11,472 adults (≥19 years of age) who participated in the 2011–2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (a cross-sectional and nationally representative survey conducted by the Korean Center for Disease Control for Health Statistics), 807 patients with diabetes currently taking anti-diabetes medications were excluded from this study. We compared the weighted HbA1c levels and weighted proportion (%) of HbA1c levels of ≥5.7%, ≥6.1%, and ≥6.5% according to the range of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels and the presence of IDA. Among 10,665 participants (weighted n = 35,229,108), the prevalence of anemia and IDA was 7.3% and 4.3%, respectively. The HbA1c levels were higher in participants with IDA (5.70% ± 0.02%) than in normal participants (5.59% ± 0.01%; P < 0.001), whereas there was no significant difference in FPG levels. In participants with an FPG level of <100 mg/dL and 100 to 125 mg/dL, the weighted HbA1c level was higher in those with IDA (5.59% ± 0.02% and 6.00% ± 0.05%) than in normal participants (5.44% ± 0.01% and 5.82% ± 0.01%) after adjusting for confounders such as age, sex, FPG level, heavy alcohol drinking, waist circumference, and smoking status as well as after exclusion of an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (P < 0.001, <0.01). The weighted proportions (%) of an HbA1c level of ≥5.7% and ≥6.1% were also higher in participants with IDA than in normal participants (P < 0.001, <0.05). However, the weighted HbA1c levels in individuals with an FPG level ≥126 mg/dL and a weighted proportion (%) of an HbA1c level of ≥6.5% showed no significant differences according to

  15. Continuous glucose monitors: use of waveform versus glycemic values in the improvements of glucose control, quality of life, and fear of hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tomas C; Yucha, Carolyn B

    2014-05-01

    How patients are benefitting from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) remains poorly understood. The focus on numerical glucose values persists, even though access to the glucose waveform and rate of change may contribute more to improved control. This pilot study compared outcomes of patients using CGMs with or without access to the numerical values on their CGM. Ten persons with type 1 diabetes, naïve to CGM use, enrolled in a 12-week study. Subjects were randomly assigned to either unmodified CGM receivers, or to CGM receivers that had their numerical values obscured but otherwise functioned normally. HbA1c, quality of life (QLI-D), and fear of hypoglycemia (HFS) were assessed, at baseline and at week 12. Baseline HbA1c for the entire group was 7.46 ± 1.27%. At week 12 the experimental group HbA1c reduction was 1.5 ± 0.9% (p < .05), the control group's reduction was 0.06 ± 0.61% (p > .05). Repeated measures testing revealed no significant difference in HbA1c reduction between groups. Both groups had reductions in HFS; these reductions were statistically significant within groups (p < .05), but not between groups. QLI-D indices demonstrated improvements (p < .05) in QLI-D total and the health and family subscales, but not between groups. The results of this pilot study suggest that benefits of CGM extend beyond reductions in HbA1c to reductions in fear of hypoglycemia and improvements in quality of life. The display of a numerical glucose value did not improve control when compared to numerically blinded units.

  16. Factor Analysis of Changes in Hemoglobin A1c After 12 Months of Sitagliptin Therapy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yuasa, Shouhei; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Takai, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Masashi; Umezawa, Shinichi; Kubota, Akira; Maeda, Hajime; Kanamori, Akira; Miyakawa, Masaaki; Tanaka, Yasushi; Terauchi, Yasuo; Matsuba, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, is an effective oral antidiabetic agent as both monotherapy and when combined with insulin. Data from three observational studies performed in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving sitagliptin therapy in the routine clinical setting were integrated to conduct factor analysis of the changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), body weight, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over 12 months. Methods Among patients with type 2 diabetes attending medical institutions affiliated with Kanagawa Physicians Association, those using sitagliptin were followed for 1 year. In the ASSET-K and ASSIST-K studies, patients were managed by diabetologists, while they were managed by non-diabetologists in the ATTEST-K study. Patients were not administered insulin in ASSET-K, whereas insulin was administered in ASSIST-K. HbA1c (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program), blood glucose (fasting/postprandial), body weight, and renal function (serum creatinine and eGFR) were the efficacy endpoints. Factor analysis was performed by analysis of variance using the magnitude of the change in HbA1c, body weight, and eGFR after 12 months of sitagliptin therapy as response variables, and the study, sex, and age as explanatory variables. Results Of 1,327 patients registered in ASSET-K (diabetologists/without insulin), 1,167 patients in ASSIST-K (diabetologists/with insulin), and 530 patients in ATTEST-K (non-diabetologists), statistical analysis was carried out on 1,074, 854, and 411 patients, respectively. There were significant inter-study differences in patient characteristics (complications, duration of diabetes, and baseline HbA1c), the sitagliptin dose, and the use of other antidiabetic agents. HbA1c decreased significantly in all three studies. According to factor analysis, the magnitude of the change in HbA1c over 12 months showed significant inter-study differences and was also significantly influenced by the age

  17. [Introduction of the NGSP value in clinical practice and later].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Midori

    2013-07-01

    Currently, the NGSP value for HbA1c is widely used as the global standard. In Japan, the JDS value was replaced with the NGSP value in clinical practice on April 1, 2012. From April 2013, the NGSP value will also be used in health examinations. In April 2014, the HbA1c value will be consolidated into the NGSP value. Since the JDS did not finalize the timeline for the replacement until the last moment, clinical laboratories and manufacturers were left behind with little time for preparation; however, introduction of the NGSP value caused little confusion in clinical practice. It is speculated that the reason for the lack of confusion was either because dissemination of the NGSP replacement among clinicians, patients, and co-medicals was effective, or JDS and NGSP values were listed side by side in current clinical practice. Real confusion might occur when consolidation of the NGSP value becomes effective in April 2014. The final goal of international standardization of the HbAlc value will be achieved by enabling the measurement of HbA1c, which will be traced back to SI units in the future.

  18. The Associations Between Smoking Habits and Serum Triglyceride or Hemoglobin A1c Levels Differ According to Visceral Fat Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Koda, Michiko; Kitamura, Itsuko; Okura, Tomohiro; Otsuka, Rei; Ando, Fujiko; Shimokata, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether smokers and former smokers have worse lipid profiles or glucose levels than non-smokers remains unclear. Methods The subjects were 1152 Japanese males aged 42 to 81 years. The subjects were divided according to their smoking habits (nonsmokers, former smokers, and current smokers) and their visceral fat area (VFA) (<100 cm2 and ≥100 cm2). Results The serum triglyceride (TG) levels of 835 males were assessed. In the VFA ≥100 cm2 group, a significantly greater proportion of current smokers (47.3%) exhibited TG levels of ≥150 mg/dL compared with former smokers (36.4%) and non-smokers (18.8%). The difference in TG level distribution between former smokers and non-smokers was also significant. However, among the subjects with VFA of <100 cm2, the TG levels of the three smoking habit groups did not differ. The serum hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of 877 males were also assessed. In the VFA <100 cm2 group, significantly higher proportions of current smokers (17.9%) and former smokers (14.9%) demonstrated HbA1c levels of ≥5.6% compared with non-smokers (6.3%). In contrast, in the VFA ≥100 cm2 group, significantly fewer former smokers displayed HbA1c levels of ≥5.6% compared with non-smokers and current smokers. Furthermore, the interaction between smoking habits and VFA was associated with the subjects’ TG and HbA1c concentrations, and the associations of TG and HbA1c concentrations and smoking habits varied according to VFA. Conclusions Both smoking habits and VFA exhibited associations with TG and HbA1c concentrations. The associations between smoking habits and these parameters differed according to VFA. PMID:26616395

  19. Association between Alcohol Intake and Hemoglobin A1c in the Korean Adults: The 2011-2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Although alcohol consumption is commonly encountered in clinical practice, few studies have investigated the clinical significance of alcohol intake on the use of the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level. Objectives This study was performed to investigate the association between alcohol intake and HbA1c level in the general population. Methods Among the 24,594 participants who participated in the 2011–2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 12,923 participants were analyzed in this study. We excluded diabetic patients currently taking antidiabetes medication. We compared the HbA1c level and proportions of patients with an HbA1c level of ≥5.7%, ≥6.1%, and ≥6.5% according to the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) concentration range and the amount of alcohol intake. The average amounts of daily alcohol intake were categorized into three groups: 0 g/day, <30 g/day, ≥30 g/day. Results The mean HbA1c level was 5.65%, and the mean FPG concentration was 95.3 mg/dl. The percentages of patients with an HbA1c level of ≥5.7%, ≥6.1%, and ≥6.5% were 42.6%, 13.4%, and 4.5%, respectively. The average amount of alcohol intake was 12.3 g/day. The percentages of subjects with alcohol intake 0, <30, and ≥ 30 g/day were 16.5%, 69.7%, and 13.8%, respectively. There was a significant positive relationship between alcohol intake and FPG concentration (P < 0.001), the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (P < 0.001), and the prevalence of diabetes (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant relationship between the alcohol intake and HbA1c level. Overall, the adjusted HbA1c levels decreased across alcohol intake (5.70% ± 0.01%, 5.66% ± 0.01%, and 5.55% ± 0.01%) after adjustment for confounding factors such as age, sex, FPG concentration, college graduation, smoking history, presence of hypertension, waist circumference, serum total cholesterol concentration, serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration, serum triglyceride

  20. Are the ADA hemoglobin A(1c) criteria relevant for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in youth?

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Chirag R

    2013-02-01

    Diagnostic criteria for diabetes in children have not been established with nearly the rigor as that employed in adults. Recently revised American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria allowed utilization of hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5 % for diagnosis of diabetes. A recent series of pediatric studies appear to show that HbA1c has lower sensitivity than Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). However, FPG and OGTT have themselves never been validated in children. Studies to validate diagnostic thresholds in children appear unlikely to take place. Thus, accepting the major ADA diagnostic criteria appears to be the best course of action for the pediatric community. One area in which correlation studies between HbA1c and FPG or OGTT might shed light is in the definition of criteria for intervention in 'pre-diabetes,' as the Diabetes Prevention Program Trial did not use HbA1c. However, such treatment, and the exact diagnostic thresholds at which it should be initiated in children, remains unproven.

  1. Achieving comparability with IFCC reference method for the measurement of hemoglobin A1c by use of an improved isotope-dilution mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Wong, Lingkai; Yong, Sharon; Liu, Qinde; Lee, Tong Kooi

    2015-10-01

    The development of reference measurement methods for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is important for quality assurance in diabetes management. The IFCC reference method using purified proteins as calibration standards is the recommended accuracy-based reference method for the standardization of HbA1c measurement. We developed a highly precise and accurate liquid chromatography-isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-IDMS/MS) procedure, which can serve as an alternative accuracy-based method for HbA1c measurement. In this method, enzymatic proteolysis was applied to sample preparation, followed by LC-IDMS/MS measurement of hemoglobin A0 (HbA0) and HbA1c, using two "signature" hexapeptides for calibration. The concentrations of the signature hexapeptide calibration solutions were, in turn, determined using a hydrolysis method with HCl, followed by LC-IDMS/MS measurement using amino acid solutions as calibration standards. These solutions were gravimetrically prepared from pure amino acid certified reference materials (CRMs). The developed LC-IDMS/MS method was used in participation in an IFCC ring trial for reference laboratories (RELA 2013 and 2014) for HbA1c, where our results were compared with those using the IFCC reference method. The deviations were found to be 0.4-1.7 mmol mol(-1) [or 0.04-0.16% in National Glygohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP) units], revealing good comparability with the IFCC reference method. The relative expanded uncertainty of the LC-IDMS/MS was in the range of 2.6% to 2.8% (1.6% to 2.2% after converting to NGSP units). With excellent method precision, good comparability with the IFCC reference method, and a small measurement uncertainty, the developed LC-IDMS/MS method may be used as an alternative accuracy-based reference method for HbA1c measurement.

  2. Serum Uric Acid Levels were Dynamically Coupled with Hemoglobin A1c in the Development of Type 2 Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fengjiang; Chang, Baocheng; Yang, Xilin; Wang, Yaogang; Chen, Liming; Li, Wei-Dong

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to decipher the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in both type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and normal subjects. A total of 2,250 unrelated T2DM patients and 4,420 Han Chinese subjects from a physical examination population were recruited for this study. In T2DM patients SUA levels were negatively correlated with HbA1c (rs = ‑0.109, P = 0.000) and 2 h plasma glucose levels (rs = ‑0.178, P = 0.000). In the physical examination population, SUA levels were inversely correlated with HbA1c (rs = ‑0.175, P = 0.000) and FPG (rs = ‑0.131, P = 0.009) in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c (rs = 0.040, P = 0.012) and FPG (rs = 0.084, P = 0.000) in normal-glucose subjects. Multivariate analyses showed that HbA1c was significantly negatively associated with HUA both in T2DM patients (OR = 0.872, 95% CI: 0.790~0.963) and in the physical examination T2DM patients (OR = 0.722, 95% CI: 0.539~0.968). Genetic association studies in T2DM patients showed that alleles of two glucose-uric acid transporter genes, ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were significantly associated with SUA levels (P < 0.05). SUA level is inversely correlated with HbA1c in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c in normal-glucose subjects. The reverse transporting of uric acid and glucose in renal tubules might be accounted for these associations.

  3. The Relationship Between Vegetables and Fruits Intake and Glycosylated Hemoglobin Values, Lipids Profiles and Nitrogen Status in Type II Inactive Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tabesh, Marjan; Hariri, Mitra; Askari, Gholamreza; Ghiasvand, Reza; Tabesh, Maryam; Heydari, Asieh; Darvishi, Leila; Khorvash, Fariba

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of obesity and associated chronic disease such as diabetes is rapidly increasing in all part of the world. The World Health Organization has predicted that between 1997 and 2025 the number of diabetic patients will increase from 143 million to about 300 million. In diabetic patients, oxidative stress leads to non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins such as hemoglobin and albumin, these proteins can play a significant role in pathogenesis of diabetes and development of chronic disorders in diabetic patients. Antioxidant nutrients can reduce the chronic disorders and complications of diabetes by inhibiting the oxidative reactions. Some important antioxidant such as vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium occur in vegetables and fruits. Our objective of this study was investigation of the relationship between vegetables and fruits intake ssand glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) values in diabetic patients. Methods: One hundred and five diabetic patients participated in this cross-sectional study. The patients were referred to health center in Khomeini shahr. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) values were measured by chromatography method. Data on dietary intake and vegetables and fruits consumption were obtained from validated food frequency questionnaires. Results: The unadjusted mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) is significantly associated with the amount of vegetables and fruits intake (P = 0.014), but the relationship between consumption of fruits and HbA1C is not significant and the relationship between consumption of vegetables and HbA1C was roughly significant (P = 0.049). There were no significant relationship between vegetables and fruits intake and lipids profiles, BUN/creatinine and 24 h urinary protein (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Intake of vegetables and fruits may reduce the glycosylated hemoglobin, therefore choosing the appropriate diet with high fruits and vegetables may help to develop antioxidant defense and reduce the HbA1C

  4. Catechol-O-methyltransferase association with hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Kathryn T.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Chen, Ling; Harden, Maegan; Tolkin, Benjamin R.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Bray, George A.; Ridker, Paul M.; Florez, Jose C.; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Catecholamines have metabolic effects on blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and blood glucose. Genetic variation in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that degrades catecholamines, is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors and incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). Here we examined COMT effects on glycemic function and type 2 diabetes. Methods We tested whether COMT polymorphisms were associated with baseline HbA1c in the Women’s Genome Health Study (WGHS), and Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC), and with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in WGHS, DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis consortium (DIAGRAM), and the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Given evidence that COMT modifies some drug responses, we examined association with type 2 diabetes and randomized metformin and aspirin treatment. Results COMT rs4680 high-activity G-allele was associated with lower HbA1c in WGHS (β = −0.032% [0.012], p = 0.008) and borderline significant in MAGIC (β = −0.006% [0.003], p = 0.07). Combined COMT per val allele effects on type 2 diabetes were significant (OR = 0.98 [0.96–0.998], p = 0.03) in fixed-effects analyses across WGHS, DIAGRAM, and DPP. Similar results were obtained for 2 other COMT SNPs rs4818 and rs4633. In the DPP, the rs4680 val allele was borderline associated with lower diabetes incidence among participants randomized to metformin (HR = 0.81 [0.65–1.00], p = 0.05). Conclusions COMT rs4680 high-activity G-allele was associated with lower HbA1c and modest protection from type 2 diabetes. The directionality of COMT associations was concordant with those previously observed for cardiometabolic risk factors and CVD. PMID:27282867

  5. Effects of Sleep Disorders on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Ahmet; Ünalacak, Murat; Bilge, Uğur; Yildiz, Pinar; Güler, Seda; Selçuk, Engin Burak; Bilgin, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have reported the presence of sleep disorders in approximately 50–70% of diabetic patients, and these may contribute to poor glycemic control, diabetic neuropathy, and overnight hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of sleep disorders in diabetic patients, and to investigate possible relationships between scores of these sleep disorders and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and diabetic parameters (fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c], and lipid levels). Methods: We used the Berlin questionnaire (BQ) for OSAS, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to determine the frequency of sleep disorders and their possible relationships with fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, and lipid levels. Results: The study included 585 type 2 diabetic patients admitted to family medicine clinics between October and December 2014. Sleep, sleep quality, and sleep scores were used as the dependent variables in the analysis. The ESS scores showed that 54.40% of patients experienced excessive daytime sleepiness, and according to the PSQI, 64.30% experienced poor-quality sleep. The BQ results indicated that 50.20% of patients were at high-risk of OSAS. HbA1c levels correlated significantly with the ESS and PSQI results (r = 0.23, P < 0.001 and r = 0.14, P = 0.001, respectively), and were significantly higher in those with high-risk of OSAS as defined by the BQ (P < 0.001). These results showed that HbA1c levels were related to sleep disorders. Conclusions: Sleep disorders are common in diabetic patients and negatively affect the control of diabetes. Conversely, poor diabetes control is an important factor disturbing sleep quality. Addressing sleep disturbances in patients who have difficulty controlling their blood glucose has dual benefits: Preventing diabetic complications caused by sleep disturbance and improving diabetes control. PMID:26668142

  6. Local Population Characteristics and Hemoglobin A1c Testing Rates among Diabetic Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Yasaitis, Laura C.; Bubolz, Thomas; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Chandra, Amitabh

    2014-01-01

    Background Proposed payment reforms in the US healthcare system would hold providers accountable for the care delivered to an assigned patient population. Annual hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests are recommended for all diabetics, but some patient populations may face barriers to high quality healthcare that are beyond providers' control. The magnitude of fine-grained variations in care for diabetic Medicare beneficiaries, and their associations with local population characteristics, are unknown. Methods HbA1c tests were recorded for 480,745 diabetic Medicare beneficiaries. Spatial analysis was used to create ZIP code-level estimated testing rates. Associations of testing rates with local population characteristics that are outside the control of providers – population density, the percent African American, with less than a high school education, or living in poverty – were assessed. Results In 2009, 83.3% of diabetic Medicare beneficiaries received HbA1c tests. Estimated ZIP code-level rates ranged from 71.0% in the lowest decile to 93.1% in the highest. With each 10% increase in the percent of the population that was African American, associated HbA1c testing rates were 0.24% lower (95% CI −0.32–−0.17); for identical increases in the percent with less than a high school education or the percent living in poverty, testing rates were 0.70% lower (−0.95–−0.46) and 1.6% lower (−1.8–−1.4), respectively. Testing rates were lowest in the least and most densely populated ZIP codes. Population characteristics explained 5% of testing rate variations. Conclusions HbA1c testing rates are associated with population characteristics, but these characteristics fail to explain the vast majority of variations. Consequently, even complete risk-adjustment may have little impact on some process of care quality measures; much of the ZIP code-related variations in testing rates likely result from provider-based differences and idiosyncratic local factors not related to

  7. Cardiometabolic Risk Profiles in Patients With Impaired Fasting Glucose and/or Hemoglobin A1c 5.7% to 6.4%: Evidence for a Gradient According to Diagnostic Criteria: The PREDAPS Study.

    PubMed

    Giráldez-García, Carolina; Sangrós, F Javier; Díaz-Redondo, Alicia; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Serrano, Rosario; Díez, Javier; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; García-Soidán, F Javier; Artola, Sara; Ezkurra, Patxi; Carrillo, Lourdes; Millaruelo, J Manuel; Seguí, Mateu; Martínez-Candela, Juan; Muñoz, Pedro; Goday, Albert; Regidor, Enrique

    2015-11-01

    It has been suggested that the early detection of individuals with prediabetes can help prevent cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the current study was to examine the cardiometabolic risk profile in patients with prediabetes according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and/or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) criteria.Cross-sectional analysis from the 2022 patients in the Cohort study in Primary Health Care on the Evolution of Patients with Prediabetes (PREDAPS Study) was developed. Four glycemic status groups were defined based on American Diabetes Association criteria. Information about cardiovascular risk factors-body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glomerular filtration-and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed. Mean values of clinical and biochemical characteristics and frequencies of metabolic syndrome were estimated adjusting by age, sex, educational level, and family history of diabetes.A linear trend (P < 0.001) was observed in most of the cardiovascular risk factors and in all components of metabolic syndrome. Normoglycemic individuals had the best values, individuals with both criteria of prediabetes had the worst, and individuals with only one-HbA1c or FPG-criterion had an intermediate position. Metabolic syndrome was present in 15.0% (95% confidence interval: 12.6-17.4), 59.5% (54.0-64.9), 62.0% (56.0-68.0), and 76.2% (72.8-79.6) of individuals classified in normoglycemia, isolated HbA1c, isolated FPG, and both criteria groups, respectively.In conclusion, individuals with prediabetes, especially those with both criteria, have worse cardiometabolic risk profile than normoglycemic individuals. These results suggest the need to use both criteria in the clinical practice to identify those individuals with the highest cardiovascular risk, in order to offer them special attention with intensive lifestyle intervention programs.

  8. Cardiometabolic Risk Profiles in Patients With Impaired Fasting Glucose and/or Hemoglobin A1c 5.7% to 6.4%: Evidence for a Gradient According to Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Giráldez-García, Carolina; Sangrós, F. Javier; Díaz-Redondo, Alicia; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Serrano, Rosario; Díez, Javier; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; García-Soidán, F. Javier; Artola, Sara; Ezkurra, Patxi; Carrillo, Lourdes; Millaruelo, J. Manuel; Seguí, Mateu; Martínez-Candela, Juan; Muñoz, Pedro; Goday, Albert; Regidor, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It has been suggested that the early detection of individuals with prediabetes can help prevent cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the current study was to examine the cardiometabolic risk profile in patients with prediabetes according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and/or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) criteria. Cross-sectional analysis from the 2022 patients in the Cohort study in Primary Health Care on the Evolution of Patients with Prediabetes (PREDAPS Study) was developed. Four glycemic status groups were defined based on American Diabetes Association criteria. Information about cardiovascular risk factors–body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, gamma-glutamyltransferase, glomerular filtration–and metabolic syndrome components were analyzed. Mean values of clinical and biochemical characteristics and frequencies of metabolic syndrome were estimated adjusting by age, sex, educational level, and family history of diabetes. A linear trend (P < 0.001) was observed in most of the cardiovascular risk factors and in all components of metabolic syndrome. Normoglycemic individuals had the best values, individuals with both criteria of prediabetes had the worst, and individuals with only one–HbA1c or FPG–criterion had an intermediate position. Metabolic syndrome was present in 15.0% (95% confidence interval: 12.6–17.4), 59.5% (54.0–64.9), 62.0% (56.0–68.0), and 76.2% (72.8–79.6) of individuals classified in normoglycemia, isolated HbA1c, isolated FPG, and both criteria groups, respectively. In conclusion, individuals with prediabetes, especially those with both criteria, have worse cardiometabolic risk profile than normoglycemic individuals. These results suggest the need to use both criteria in the clinical practice to identify those individuals with the highest cardiovascular risk, in order to offer them special attention with intensive lifestyle intervention programs. PMID:26554799

  9. Evaluation of hemoglobin A1c measurement from filter paper using high-performance liquid chromatography and immunoturbidimetric assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghua; Yang, Xu; Wang, Haining; Li, Zhenrong; Wang, Tiancheng

    2017-04-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) measurement from whole blood (WB) samples is inconvenient for epidemic surveillance and self-monitoring of glycemic level. We evaluated HbA1c measurement from WB blotted on filter paper (FP), which can be easily transported to central laboratories, with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and immunoturbidimetric assay (ITA). WB was applied to Whatman filter paper. By using HPLC and WB samples as reference methods, these FP samples were evaluated on HPLC and ITA. Inter- and intra-assay variation, WB vs. FP agreement and sample stability at 20-25 °C and -70 °C were assessed by statistical analysis. Results showed that the coefficient of variation (CV, %) of FP samples for HPLC and ITA were 0.44-1.02% and 1.47-2.72%, respectively (intra-assay); 2.13-3.56% and 3.21-4.82%, respectively (inter-assay). The correlation of WB HPLC with FP analyzed using HPLC and ITA are both significant (p < 0.001). Sample stability showed that FP method up to 5 days at 20-25 °C and 5 weeks at -70 °C is accurate and reproducible. In conclusion, FP samples analyzed by HPLC and ITA can both provide an alternative to WB for HbA1c measurement, supporting the use of FP method in epidemic surveillance and healthcare units.

  10. The value of admission glycosylated hemoglobin level in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Mahmut; Cakmak, Nazmiye; Cetemen, Sebnem; Tanriverdi, Halil; Enc, Yavuz; Teskin, Onder; Kilic, I Dogu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level on admission is a prognostic factor for mortality in patients with and without diabetes after myocardial infarction. In the present study, the authors examined the relationship between admission HbA1c level and myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients with acute myocardial infarction. METHODS: One hundred consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction who were treated with thrombolytic therapy were included in the present prospective study. Blood glucose and HbA1c levels of all patients were measured within 3 h of admission. Patients were divided into three groups according to HbA1c level: 4.5% to 6.4% (n=25), 6.5% to 8.5% (n=28) and higher than 8.5% (n=47). All patients then underwent exercise thallium-201 imaging and coronary angiography to determine ischemic scores and the number of diseased coronary arteries four weeks after admission. RESULTS: Seven patients died within the four-week follow-up period. There was a significant relationship between admission HbA1c level and mortality (P=0.009). Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between HbA1c level and total ischemic scores in patients with acute myocardial infarction (r=0.482; P=0.001). Ischemic scores increased as HbA1c levels increased in patients with acute myocardial infarction. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated that admission plasma glucose and HbA1c levels are prognostic factors associated with mortality after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:18464942

  11. A multiplexed three-dimensional paper-based electrochemical impedance device for simultaneous label-free affinity sensing of total and glycated haemoglobin: The potential of using a specific single-frequency value for analysis.

    PubMed

    Boonyasit, Yuwadee; Chailapakul, Orawon; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida

    2016-09-14

    A novel three-dimensional paper-based electrochemical impedance device (3D-PEID) is first introduced for measuring multiple diabetes markers. Herein, a simple 3D-PEID composed of a dual screen-printed electrode on wax-patterned paper coupled with a multilayer of magnetic paper was fabricated for label-free electrochemical detection. The results clearly demonstrated in a step-wise manner that the haptoglobin (Hp)-modified and 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA)-modified eggshell membranes (ESMs) were highly responsive to a clinically relevant range of total (0.5-20 g dL(-1); r(2) = 0.989) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (2.3%-14%; r(2) = 0.997) levels with detection limits (S/N = 3) of 0.08 g dL(-1) and 0.21%, respectively. The optimal binding frequencies of total haemoglobin and HbA1c to their specific recognition elements were 5.18 Hz and 9.99 Hz, respectively. The within-run coefficients of variation (CV) were 1.84%, 2.18%, 1.72%, and 2.01%, whereas the run-to-run CVs were 2.11%, 2.41%, 2.08%, and 2.21%, when assaying two levels of haemoglobin and HbA1c, respectively. The CVs for the haemoglobin and HbA1c levels measured on ten independently fabricated paper-based sheets were 1.96% and 2.10%, respectively. These results demonstrated that our proposed system achieved excellent precision for the simultaneous detection of total haemoglobin and HbA1c, with an acceptable reproducibility of fabrication. The long-term stability of the Hp-modified eggshell membrane (ESM) was 98.84% over a shelf-life of 4 weeks, enabling the possibility of storage or long-distance transport to remote regions, particularly in resource-limited settings; however, for the APBA-modified ESM, the stability was 92.35% over a one-week period. Compared with the commercial automated method, the results demonstrated excellent agreement between the techniques (p-value < 0.05), thus permitting the potential application of 3D-PEID for the monitoring of the glycaemic status in diabetic

  12. Increased blood glycohemoglobin A1c levels lead to overestimation of arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-enzymatic glycation increases hemoglobin-oxygen affinity and reduces oxygen delivery to tissues by altering the structure and function of hemoglobin. Objectives We investigated whether an elevated blood concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) could induce falsely high pulse oximeter oxygen saturation (SpO2) in type 2 diabetic patients during mechanical ventilation or oxygen therapy. Methods Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) were determined with simultaneous monitoring of SpO2 in 261 type 2 diabetic patients during ventilation or oxygen inhalation. Results Blood concentration of HbA1c was >7% in 114 patients and ≤ 7% in 147 patients. Both SaO2 (96.2 ± 2.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 95.7-96.7% vs. 95.1 ± 2.8%, 95% CI 94.7-95.6%) and SpO2 (98.0 ± 2.6%, 95% CI 97.6-98.5% vs. 95.3 ± 2.8%, 95% CI 94.9-95.8%) were significantly higher in patients with HbA1c >7% than in those with HbA1c ≤ 7% (Data are mean ± SD, all p < 0.01), but PO2 did not significantly differ between the two groups. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a significant bias between SpO2 and SaO2 (1.83 ±0.55%, 95% CI 1.73% -1.94%) and limits of agreement (0.76% and 2.92%) in patients with HbA1c >7%. The differences between SpO2 and SaO2 correlated closely with blood HbA1c levels (Pearson’s r = 0.307, p < 0.01). Conclusions Elevated blood HbA1c levels lead to an overestimation of SaO2 by SpO2, suggesting that arterial blood gas analysis may be needed for type 2 diabetic patients with poor glycemic control during the treatment of hypoxemia. PMID:22985301

  13. A1C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... eAG on their DiabetesPro web site . The NGSP web site also provides a calculator to convert hemoglobin A1c in SI units mmol/mol into percentage. ^ Back to top Is there anything else I should know? The A1c test will not reflect temporary, acute blood glucose increases ...

  14. A1C

    MedlinePlus

    A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 ... A1C alone or in combination with other diabetes tests to make a diagnosis. They also use the ...

  15. Description of the phenotypes of 63 heterozygous, homozygous and compound heterozygous patients carrying the Hb Groene Hart [α119(H2)Pro→Ser; HBA1: c.358C>T] variant.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Francina, Alain

    2014-01-01

    We here report the phenotypes and genotypes of 63 patients of North African origin, carriers of Hb Groene Hart [Hb GH, α119(H2)Pro → Ser; HBA1: c.358C>T], an α(+)-thalassemia (α(+)-thal) hemoglobin (Hb) variant. Fifty patients were heterozygous, five were homozygous and eight also carried the common -α(3.7) (rightward) deletion in compound heterozygosity. The expression of the α(GH)-globin chain is increased in the following order: heterozygous, compound heterozygous and homozygous. Parallel significant changes of mean corpuscular Hb (MCH) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were also observed. Our large cohort of Hb GH carriers could have been obtained by the systematic realization of globin chain separation by reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) in our routine Hb testing.

  16. The Effect of Periodontal Treatment on Hemoglobin A1c Levels of Diabetic Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Han, Xu; Guo, Xiaojing; Luo, Xiaolong; Wang, Dalin

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that periodontal treatment may affect glycemic control in diabetic patients. And several systematic reviews have been conducted to assess the effect of periodontal treatment on diabetes outcomes. Researches of this aspect are widely concerned, and several new controlled trials have been published. The aim of this study was to update the account for recent findings. Methods A literature search (until the end of January 2014) was carried out using various databases with language restriction to English. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was selected if it investigated periodontal therapy for diabetic subjects compared with a control group received no periodontal treatment for at least 3 months of the follow-up period. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and secondary outcomes were periodontal parameters included probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Results Ten trials of 1135 patients were included in the analysis. After the follow-up of 3 months, treatment substantially lowered HbA1c compared with no treatment after periodontal therapy (–0.36%, 95%CI, −0.52% to −0.19%, P<0.0001). Clinically substantial and statistically significant reduction of PPD and CAL were found between subjects with and without treatment after periodontal therapy (PPD −0.42 mm, 95%CI: −0.60 to −0.23, P<0.00001; CAL −0.34 mm, 95%CI: −0.52 to −0.16, P = 0.0002). And there is no significant change of the level of HbA1c at the 6-month comparing with no treatment (–0.30%, 95%CI, −0.69% to 0.09%, P = 0.13). Conclusions Periodontal treatment leads to the modest reduction in HbA1c along with the improvement of periodontal status in diabetic patients for 3 months, and this result is consistent with previous systematic reviews. And the effect of periodontal treatment on HbA1c cannot be observed at 6-month after treatment. PMID:25255331

  17. A1C Test and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis The A1C Test & Diabetes The A1C Test & Diabetes What is the A1C test? The A1C test ... A1C test be used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Yes. In 2009, an international expert ...

  18. Effects of thyroid status on glycated hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Rana; Thukral, Anubhav; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Roy, Ajitesh; Goswami, Soumik; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) can be altered in different conditions. We hypothesize that HbA1c levels may change due to altered thyroid status, possibly due to changes in red blood cell (RBC) turnover. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of altered thyroid status on HbA1c levels in individuals without diabetes, with overt hyper- and hypo-thyroidism, and if present, whether such changes in HbA1c are reversed after achieving euthyroid state. Methods: Euglycemic individuals with overt hypo- or hyper-thyroidism were selected. Age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Baseline HbA1c and reticulocyte counts (for estimation of RBC turnover) were estimated in all the patients and compared. Thereafter, stable euthyroidism was achieved in a randomly selected subgroup and HbA1c and reticulocyte count was reassessed. HbA1c values and reticulocyte counts were compared with baseline in both the groups. Results: Hb A1c in patients initially selected was found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid group. HbA1c values in hyperthyroid patients were not significantly different from controls. HbA1c reduction and rise in reticulocyte count were significant in hypothyroid group following treatment without significant change in glucose level. Hb A1c did not change significantly following treatment in hyperthyroid group. The reticulocyte count, however, decreased significantly. Conclusion: Baseline HbA1c levels were found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid patients, which reduced significantly after achievement of euthyroidism without any change in glucose levels. Significant baseline or posttreatment change was not observed in hyperthyroid patients. Our study suggests that we should be cautious while interpreting HbA1c data in patients with hypothyroidism. PMID:28217494

  19. Distribution of Glycated Haemoglobin According to Early-Life and Contemporary Characteristics in Adolescents and Adults without Diabetes: The 1982 and 1993 Pelotas Birth Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo-Méndez, María Clara; Silveira, Vera M.; Miranda, Jaime J.; Gonçalves, Helen D.; Oliveira, Isabel O.; Horta, Bernardo L.; Gigante, Denise P.; Menezes, Ana Maria; Assunção, Maria Cecília F.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), a marker of glucose control in individuals with diabetes mellitus, is also related with the incidence of cardiometabolic risk in populations free of disease. The aim of this study was to describe the distribution of HbA1c levels according to early-life and contemporary factors in adolescents and adults without diabetes mellitus. Methods HbA1c was measured in adults aged 30 years and adolescents aged 18 years who are participants in the 1982 and 1993 Pelotas Birth Cohorts, respectively. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to describe the HbA1c mean values according to early-life and contemporary characteristics collected prospectively since birth. Results The distribution of the HbA1c was approximately normal in both cohorts, with a mean (SD) 5.10% (0.43) in the 1982 cohort, and 4.89% (0.50) in the 1993 cohort. HbA1c mean levels were significantly higher in individuals self-reported as black/brown skin color compared to those self-reported as white in both cohorts. Parental history of diabetes was associated with higher HbA1c mean in adults, while stunting at one year old presented an inverse relation with the outcome in adolescents. No other early and contemporary factors were associated with HbA1c levels in adults or adolescents. Conclusions We found a consistent relationship between HbA1c and skin color in both cohorts. Further research is needed to understand the role of genomic ancestry on levels of HbA1c concentrations which may inform policies and preventive actions for diabetes mellitus and cardiometabolic risk. PMID:27626274

  20. A1C and eAG

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complications DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones Kidney Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin Pregnancy ...

  1. BIOMARKERS IN DIABETES: HEMOGLOBIN A1c, VASCULAR AND TISSUE MARKERS

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Timothy J; Basu, Arpita

    2012-01-01

    Biomarkers are conventionally defined as ‘biological molecules that represent health and disease states.’ They typically are measured in readily available body fluids (blood or urine), lie outside the causal pathway, are able to detect sub-clinical disease, and are used to monitor clinical and sub-clinical disease burden and response to treatments. Biomarkers can be “direct” endpoints of the disease itself, or “indirect” or surrogate endpoints. New technologies (such as metabolomics, proteomics, genomics) bring a wealth of opportunity to develop new biomarkers. Other new technologies enable the development of non-molecular, functional or bio-physical tissue-based biomarkers. Diabetes mellitus is a complex disease affecting almost every tissue and organ system, with metabolic ramifications extending far beyond impaired glucose metabolism. Biomarkers may reflect the presence and severity of hyperglycemia (i.e. diabetes itself), or the presence and severity of the vascular complications of diabetes. Illustrative examples are considered in this brief review. In blood, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) may be considered as a biomarker for the presence and severity of hyperglycemia, implying diabetes or pre-diabetes, or, over time, as a “biomarker for a risk factor”, i.e. hyperglycemia as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and other vascular complications of diabetes. In tissues, glycation and oxidative stress resulting from hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia lead to widespread modification of biomolecules by advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Some of these altered species may serve as biomarkers, whereas others may lie in the causal pathway for vascular damage. New non-invasive technologies can detect tissue damage mediated by AGE formation: these include indirect measures such as pulse wave analysis (a marker of vascular dysfunction) and more direct markers such as skin autofluorescence (a marker of long-term accumulation of AGEs). In the future

  2. The Potential for Glycemic Control Monitoring and Screening for Diabetes at Dental Visits Using Oral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Rosedale, Mary T.; Pesce, Michael A.; Rindskopf, David M.; Kaur, Navjot; Juterbock, Caroline M.; Wolff, Mark S.; Malaspina, Dolores; Danoff, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes in a dental setting among adults (n = 408) with or at risk for diabetes. Methods. In 2013 and 2014, we performed hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests on dried blood samples of gingival crevicular blood and compared these with paired “gold-standard” HbA1c tests with dried finger-stick blood samples in New York City dental clinic patients. We examined differences in sociodemographics and diabetes-related risk and health care characteristics for 3 groups of at-risk patients. Results. About half of the study sample had elevated HbA1c values in the combined prediabetes and diabetes ranges, with approximately one fourth of those in the diabetes range. With a correlation of 0.991 between gingival crevicular and finger-stick blood HbA1c, measures of concurrence between the tests were extremely high for both elevated HbA1c and diabetes-range HbA1c levels. Persons already diagnosed with diabetes and undiagnosed persons aged 45 years or older could especially benefit from HbA1c testing at dental visits. Conclusions. Gingival crevicular blood collected at the dental visit can be used to screen for diabetes and monitor glycemic control for many at-risk patients. PMID:25713975

  3. Field test of a group education program for type 2 diabetes: measures and predictors of success on individual and group levels.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, A; Rosenqvist, U

    2001-08-01

    We performed field testing of a previously described group education program for type 2 diabetes. HbA(1c) levels at start, 6 and 12 months were collected and demographic factors examined to identify predictors of long-term glycemic control on individual and group levels. "Glycemic success" comprised of (1) achieving target values of HbA(1c) < or =6.5% and/or (2) decreasing HbA(1c) progressively, depending on initial values. Groups in the field test and previous pilot-study (N=105) decreased their mean HbA(1c) significantly after 6 months, implying that diabetes mass education led by pharmacists could be possible in the future. Target HbA(1c) < or =6.5% was seen in 51% at start and 63% after 12 months (P=0.023). Initial HbA(1c) and BMI were the most important success predictors; age, sex, duration, and civil status showed no effects. Overweight individuals relapsed after initially decreasing their HbA(1c), emphasizing the need for long-term support in weight management. Experienced loneliness affected outcomes, indicating interaction between diet self-care and social relations.

  4. Factors associated with improved glycemic control following continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled with bolus-basal insulin regimens: an analysis from the OpT2mise randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Muriel; Castañeda, Javier; Reznik, Yves; Giorgino, Francesco; Conget, Ignacio; Aronson, Ronnie; de Portu, Simona; Runzis, Sarah; Lee, Scott W; Cohen, Ohad

    2017-04-04

    This analysis investigated factors associated with the decrease in HbA1c in patients receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in the OpT2mise randomized trial. In this study, patients with type 2 diabetes and HbA1C >8% following multiple daily injections (MDI) optimization were randomized to receive CSII (n = 168) or MDI (n = 163) for 6 months. Patient-related and treatment-related factors associated with decreased HbA1c in the CSII arm were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. CSII produced a significantly greater reduction in HbA1c than MDI, and the treatment difference increased with baseline HbA1c . In the CSII arm, the only factors significantly associated with decreased HbA1C were higher baseline HbA1C (P<0.001), geographical region (P<0.001), higher educational level (P=0.012), higher total cholesterol level (P=0.002), lower variability of baseline glucose values on continuous glucose monitoring (P<0.001), and the decrease in average fasting self-monitored blood glucose at 6 months (P<0.001). These findings suggest that CSII offers an option to improve glycemic control in a broad range of type 2 diabetes patients in whom control cannot be achieved with MDI. OpT2mise ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01182493 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/).

  5. Individualizing treatment targets for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: factors influencing clinical decision making in the 24-week, randomized INTERVAL study.

    PubMed

    Strain, W David; Agarwal, Abhijit S; Paldánius, Päivi M

    2017-03-05

    We tested the feasibility of setting individualized glycemic goals and factors influencing targets set in a clinical trial in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes.A 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 45 outpatient centers in seven European countries. 278 drug-naïve or inadequately controlled (mean HbA1c 7.9%) patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥70 years with HbA1c levels ≥7.0% and ≤10.0% were enrolled. Investigator-defined individualized HbA1c targets and the impact of baseline characteristics on individualized treatment targets was evaluated.The average individualized HbA1c target was set at 7.0%. HbA1c at baseline predicted a target setting such that higher the HbA1c, more aggressive was the target (P<0.001). Men were more likely to be set aggressive targets than women (P=0.026). Frailty status of patients showed a trend towards significance (P=0.068), whereas diabetes duration, age, or polypharmacy did not. There was heterogeneity between countries regarding how baseline factors were viewed.Despite training and guidance to individualize HbA1c goals, targets were still set in line with conventional values. A strong influence of country-specific guidelines on target setting was observed; confirming the importance of further education to implement new international guidelines in older adults.

  6. Is social support universally adaptive in diabetes? A correlational study in an Arabic-speaking population with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Howard, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between diabetes self-care, diabetes-specific emotional distress, and social support and glycemic control (hemoglobin A1C levels: HbA1c) among a sample of Lebanese adults with type 2 diabetes. A descriptive correlational design was adapted with descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regressions for analyses. A convenience sample of 140 adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes was recruited from 2 diabetes clinics in Greater Beirut. Participants were asked to complete 4 questionnaires in Arabic. Significant associations (P < .05) were found between following a general diet for more than 3.5 days per week and higher social support and HbA1c levels of 7% or more. Social support was positively associated with HbA1c levels such that participants with uncontrolled glycemic levels, as evidenced by higher values for HbA1c, received more support from their social network.

  7. Effect of calibration on dispersion of glycohemoglobin values determined by 111 laboratories using 21 methods.

    PubMed

    Weykamp, C W; Penders, T J; Muskiet, F A; van der Slik, W

    1994-01-01

    One hundred eleven laboratories, using 21 different methods based on five different principles, determined glycohemoglobin (GHb) percentages in two identical series of six lyophilized hemolysates and three similarly processed calibrators, distributed 3 months apart. To assign GHb percentages to calibrators, we used HbA1c results from nine participants who used the Bio-Rad Diamat high-performance liquid chromatographic method. Three-point calibration with assigned values improved mean intralaboratory variation (CV) from 6.6% to 3.5%. For samples with low (5.5%) and high (14.1%) GHb percentages, respectively, calibration decreased interlaboratory variation per method (from 10% to 4% and from 6% to 3%), inter-method variation (from 18% to 4% and from 16% to 3%), and overall interlaboratory variation (from 25% to 7% and from 15% to 4%). Without calibration, 71% of the laboratories did not meet the clinically desirable intralaboratory CV of 3.5%; calibration reduced this proportion to 39%. We conclude that, irrespective of the analytical method used, calibration greatly reduces all sources of GHb variation.

  8. Automatic laboratory-based strategy to improve the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Leiva-Salinas, Maria; Lugo, Javier; Pomares, Francisco J; Asencio, Alberto; Ahumada, Miguel; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To study the pre-design and success of a strategy based on the addition of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in the blood samples of certain primary care patients to detect new cases of type 2 diabetes. Materials and methods In a first step, we retrospectively calculated the number of HbA1c that would have been measured in one year if HbA1c would have been processed, according to the guidelines of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Based on those results we decided to prospectively measure HbA1c in every primary care patient above 45 years, with no HbA1c in the previous 3 years, and glucose concentration between 5.6-6.9 mmol/L, during an 18 months period. We calculated the number of HbA1c that were automatically added by the LIS based on our strategy, we evaluated the medical record of such subjects to confirm whether type 2 diabetes was finally confirmed, and we calculated the cost of our intervention. Results In a first stage, according to the guidelines, Hb1Ac should have been added to the blood samples of 13,085 patients, resulting in a cost of 14,973€. In the prospective study, the laboratory added Hb1Ac to 2092 patients, leading to an expense of 2393€. 314 patients had an HbA1c value ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/mol). 82 were finally diagnosed as type 2 diabetes; 28 thanks to our strategy, with an individual cost of 85.4€; and 54 due to the request of HbA1c by the general practitioners (GPs), with a cost of 47.5€. Conclusion The automatic laboratory-based strategy detected patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care, at a cost of 85.4€ per new case. PMID:26981026

  9. Risk factors for progression of microvascular complications in the Stockholm Diabetes Intervention Study (SDIS).

    PubMed

    Reichard, P

    1992-05-01

    Ninety-six patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), non-proliferative retinopathy, normal s-creatinine and previously high blood glucose levels were followed for 5 years. In multivariate analyses the mean HbA1c level (14 values during 6-60 months) was significantly correlated with albumin excretion level (P less than 0.01), retinopathy (P less than 0.001), motoric and sensoric nerve conduction velocities (P less than 0.01), thermal threshold on the foot (P less than 0.01), the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (P less than 0.01), the valsalva ratio (P less than 0.05) and the orthostatic blood pressure reaction (P = 0.05) after 5 years. Neuropathy was related to both the HbA1c value at baseline (P less than 0.05) and the mean HbA1c value during the study (P less than 0.001). Smoking habits were correlated with the total number of complications deteriorating (P less than 0.05), as was HbA1c during the study (P less than 0.001). Patients with an initial HbA1c of 9% or more could reduce the risks for deterioration of microvascular complications to 10-15% by reducing their HbA1c below this level.

  10. Glycosylated Hemoglobin Testing in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, Katie; Schumm, L. Philip; McClintock, Martha K.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Longitudinal biomeasures of health are still new in nationally representative social science survey research. Data measuring blood sugar control provide opportunities for understanding the development of diabetes and its complications in older adults, but researchers must be aware that some of the differences across time can be due to variations in measurement procedures. This is a well-recognized issue whenever all samples cannot be assayed at the same time and we sought to present the analytic methods to quantify and adjust for the variation. Method. We collected and analyzed HbA1C, glycated hemoglobin, a biomeasure of average blood sugar concentrations within the past few months. Improvements were made in the collection protocol for Wave 2, and assays were performed by a different lab. Results. The HbA1C data obtained during Wave 1 and Wave 2 are consistent with the expected population distributions for differences by gender, age, race/ethnicity, and diabetes status. Age-adjusted mean HbA1C declined slightly from Wave 1 to Wave 2 by −0.19 (95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.27, −0.10), and the average longitudinal change was −0.12 (95% CI: −0.18, −0.06). Discussion. Collection of HbA1C in Wave 2 permits researchers to examine the relationship between HbA1C and new health and social measures added in Wave 2, and to identify factors related to the change in HbA1C. Changes in collection protocol and labs between waves may have yielded small systematic differences that require analysts to carefully interpret absolute HbA1C values. We recommend analytic methods for cross wave differences in HbA1C and steps to ensure cross wave comparability in future studies PMID:25360021

  11. Effect of dietary polyphenols from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) pomace on adipose tissue mass, fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and plasma monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels in OLETF rats.

    PubMed

    Yui, Kazuki; Uematsu, Hiroki; Muroi, Keisuke; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Baba, Minako; Osada, Kyoichi

    2013-01-01

    Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) pomace contains procyanidin-rich polyphenols, which are large oligomeric compounds of catechin. We studied the effect of high dose (1%) of dietary hop pomace polyphenols (HPs) in Otsuka Long-EvansTokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes. By 70 days, the rats fed HPs tended to have a lower body weight and reduced mesenteric white adipose tissue weight than the rats fed a control diet. Triglyceride levels in both plasma and liver tended to be lower in the HPs-fed group than in the control group. Dietary HPs substantially suppressed the activities of hepatic fatty acid synthetase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and malic enzyme, through the suppression of SREBP1c mRNA expression in OLETF rats. Moreover, in the HPs-fed group, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression and fasting blood glucose levels at 40 days, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels at 70 days were significantly lower than those in the control group. Thus, dietary HPs may exert an ameliorative function on hepatic fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, and inflammatory response accompanying the increase of the adipose tissue mass in OLETF rats.

  12. PROGENS-HbA1c study: safety and effectiveness of premixed recombinant human insulin (Gensulin M30)

    PubMed Central

    Walicka, Magdalena; Jóźwiak, Jacek; Rzeszotarski, Jacek; Zarzycka-Lindner, Grażyna; Zonenberg, Anna; Bijoś, Paweł; Masierek, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Insulin analogues have gained widespread popularity. However, in many countries the use of these drugs is limited by their relatively high cost, so there is still a need for more cost-effective human insulin therapies. The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of the premixed recombinant human insulin (rhuI) Gensulin M30 in a real-life setting. Material and methods The study group consisted of 4257 patients (2196 female, 2061 male) with type 2 diabetes, aged 63.7 ±9.4, with body mass index (BMI) 30.3 ±4.5 kg/m2 and diabetes duration 9 ±5.5 years. All patients were treated with premixed rhuI Gensulin M30. In 91.7% of patients, insulin was used in combination with metformin. In 3.7% of patients, it was used with sulphonylureas. The patients were observed for a period of 6 months. Results The total insulin dose on visit 1 was 36.1 ±18.7 U (0.42 ±0.22 U/kg), and by the end of the study it reached 40.3 ±18.9 U (0.48 ±0.22 U/kg). A significant, continuous decrease of the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), along with fasting and postprandial plasma glucose, was observed during the study period. The frequency of hypoglycemia increased slightly during the study, although these figures remained low, especially with regard to severe hypoglycemic episodes (0.02 episodes/patient/year). The lowest number of hypoglycemic episodes occurred in patients treated with insulin and metformin, while the highest number of episodes was observed in patients treated with insulin alone. No weight changes were noted in the patients during the study. Conclusions This study shows rhuI Gensulin M30 to be effective and safe in a real-life setting. PMID:27695488

  13. Glycated Hemoglobin Level and Mortality in a Nondiabetic Population with CKD

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Marie; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Flamant, Martin; Vrtovsnik, François; Houillier, Pascal; Stengel, Benedicte; Thervet, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is used to diagnose diabetes mellitus (DM) and guide its management. The association between higher HbA1c and progression to ESRD and mortality has been demonstrated in populations with DM. This study examined the association between HbA1c and these end points in a population with CKD and without DM. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In the hospital-based NephroTest cohort study, measured GFR (mGFR) was taken by 51Cr-EDTA renal clearance and HbA1c in 1165 adults with nondialysis CKD stages 1–5 and without DM between January 2000 and December 2010. The median follow-up was 3.48 years (interquartile range, 1.94–5.82) for the competing events of ESRD and pre-ESRD mortality. Time-fixed and time-dependent Cox models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for ESRD and mortality according to HbA1c, treated continuously or in tertiles. Results At inclusion, the mean mGFR was 42.2±19.9 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and the mean HbA1c value was 5.5%±0.5%. During follow-up, 109 patients died, and 162 patients reached ESRD. Pre-ESRD mortality was significantly associated with HbA1c treated continuously: for every 1% higher HbA1c, the crude HR was 2.16 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.27 to 3.68), and it was 1.85 (95% CI, 1.05 to 3.24) after adjustment for mGFR and other risk factors of death. After excluding incident diabetes over time, the updated mean of HbA1c remained significantly associated with higher mortality risk: adjusted HR for the highest (5.7%–6.4%) versus the lowest tertile (<5.3%) was 2.62 (95% CI, 1.16 to 5.91). There was no association with ESRD risk after adjustment for risk factors of CKD progression. Conclusions In a CKD cohort, HbA1c values in the prediabetes range are associated with mortality. Such values should be therefore included among the risk factors for negative outcomes in CKD populations. PMID:25979978

  14. Insufficient Sensitivity of Hemoglobin A1C (A1C) Determination in Diagnosis or Screening of Early Diabetic States

    PubMed Central

    Fajans, Stefan S.; Herman, William H.; Oral, Elif A.

    2010-01-01

    An International Expert Committee made recommendations for using the hemoglobin A1C (A1C) assay as the preferred method for diagnosis of diabetes in nonpregnant individuals. A concentration of ≥ 6.5% was considered as diagnostic. It is the aim of this study to compare the sensitivity of A1C with that of plasma glucose concentrations in subjects with early diabetes or IGT. We chose two groups of subjects who had A1C of ≤ 6.4%. The first group of 89 subjects had family histories of diabetes (MODY or T2DM) and had OGTT and A1C determinations. They included 36 subjects with diabetes or IGT and 53 with normal OGTT. The second group of 58 subjects was screened for diabetes in our Diabetes Clinic by FPG or 2HPG or OGTT and A1C and similar comparisons were made. Subjects with diabetes or IGT, including those with fasting hyperglycemia, had A1C ranging from 5.0 – 6.4%, mean 5.8%. The subjects with normal OGTT had A1C of 4.2 – 6.3%, mean 5.4% or 5.5% for the two groups. A1C may be in the normal range in subjects with diabetes or IGT, including those with fasting hyperglycemia. Approximately one third of subjects with early diabetes and IGT have A1C <5.7%, the cut-point that ADA recommends as indicating the onset of risk of developing diabetes in the future. The results of our study are similar to those obtained by a large Dutch epidemiological study. If our aim is to recognize early diabetic states to apply effective prophylactic procedures to prevent or delay progression to more severe diabetes, A1C is not sufficiently sensitive or reliable for diagnosis of diabetes or IGT. A combination of A1C and plasma glucose determinations, where necessary, are recommended for diagnosis or screening of diabetes or IGT. PMID:20723948

  15. Hypoglycemia Reduction and Changes in Hemoglobin A1c in the ASPIRE In-Home Study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Ram; Garg, Satish K.; Bode, Bruce W.; Bailey, Timothy S.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Schultz, Kenneth A.; Welsh, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: ASPIRE In-Home randomized 247 subjects with type 1 diabetes to sensor-augmented pump therapy with or without the Threshold Suspend (TS) feature, which interrupts insulin delivery at a preset sensor glucose value. We studied the effects of TS on nocturnal hypoglycemia (NH) in relation to baseline hemoglobin A1c (A1C) and change in A1C during the study. Materials and Methods: NH event rates and mean area under curve (AUC) of NH events were evaluated at different levels of baseline A1C (<7%, 7–8%, and >8%) and at different levels of changes in A1C (less than −0.3% [decreased], −0.3% to 0.3% [stable], and >0.3% [increased]), in the TS Group compared with the Control Group (sensor-augmented pump only). Results: In the TS Group, 27.9% of the NH events were accompanied by a confirmatory blood glucose value, compared with 39.3% in the Control Group. Among subjects with baseline A1C levels of <7% or 7–8%, those in the TS Group had significantly lower NH event rates than those in the Control Group (P=0.001 and P=0.004, respectively). Among subjects with decreased or stable A1C levels, those in the TS Group had significantly lower NH event rates, and the events had lower AUCs (P≤0.001 for each). Among subjects with increased A1C levels, those in the TS Group had NH events with significantly lower AUCs (P<0.001). Conclusions: Use of the TS feature was associated with decreases in the rate and severity (as measured by AUC) of NH events in many subjects, including those with low baseline A1C levels and those whose A1C values decreased during the study period. Use of the TS feature can help protect against hypoglycemia in those wishing to intensify diabetes management to achieve target glucose levels. PMID:26237308

  16. Reductions in regimen distress are associated with improved management and glycemic control over time.

    PubMed

    Hessler, Danielle; Fisher, Lawrence; Glasgow, Russell E; Strycker, Lisa A; Dickinson, L Miriam; Arean, Patricia A; Masharani, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among regimen distress (RD), self-management, and glycemic control were undertaken to explore mechanisms of operation among these variables. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a behavioral randomized control trial (RCT) to reduce RD, 392 adults with type 2 diabetes were assessed for RD, diet, exercise, medication adherence, and HbA1c at baseline and at 4 and 12 months. Associations among RD, self-management, and HbA1c were examined in cross-sectional analyses at baseline, in prospective analyses using baseline values to predict change over time, and in time-varying analyses. RESULTS At baseline, greater RD and poorer medication adherence were independently associated with higher HbA1c (P = 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively), and greater RD was associated with poorer medication adherence (P = 0.03). No consistent pattern of significant prospective associations was found. Significant time-varying findings showed that decreases in RD were associated with improvements in medication adherence (P < 0.01), physical activity (P < 0.001), and HbA1c (P = 0.02) over time following intervention. Changes in self-management were not associated with changes in HbA1c over time. CONCLUSIONS In the context of an RCT to reduce distress, RD, self-management, and HbA1c were interrelated in cross-sectional and time-varying analyses. Decreases in RD were associated with improvements in both self-management and HbA1c over 12 months. Findings point to the complex and likely multifaceted pathways of association among these key constructs, with results indicating significant linkages between RD and both self-management and glycemic control over time.

  17. Endothelial dysfunction and metabolic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mañas, L; Angulo, J; Peiró, C; Llergo, J L; Sánchez-Ferrer, A; López-Dóriga, P; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F

    1998-04-01

    1. The aim of this work was to study the influence of the metabolic control, estimated by the levels of glycosylated haemoglobin in total blood samples (HbA1c), in developing vascular endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Four groups of animals with different levels of insulin treatment were established, by determining HbA1c values in 5.5 to 7.4%, 7.5 to 9.4%, 9.5 to 12% and > 12%, respectively. 2. The parameters analysed were: (1) the endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh) in isolated aorta and mesenteric microvessels; (2) the vasodilator responses to exogenous nitric oxide (NO) in aorta: and (3) the existence of oxidative stress by studying the influence of the free radical scavenger superoxide dismutase (SOD) on the vasodilator responses to both ACh and NO. 3. In both isolated aortic segments and mesenteric microvessels, the endothelium-mediated concentration-dependent relaxant responses elicited by ACh were significantly decreased when the vessels were obtained from diabetic animals but only with HbA1c values higher than 7.5%. There was a high correlation between HbA1c levels and the impairment of ACh-induced relaxations, measured by pD2 values. 4. The concentration-dependent vasorelaxant responses to NO in endothelium-denuded aortic segments were significantly reduced only in vessels from diabetic animals with HbA1c values higher than 7.5%. Again, a very high correlation was found between the HbA1c values and pD2 for NO-evoked responses. 5. In the presence of SOD, the responses to ACh or NO were only increased in the segments from diabetic rats with HbA1c levels higher than 7.5%, but not in those from non-diabetic or diabetic rats with a good metabolic control (HbA1c levels <7.5%). 6. These results suggest the existence of: (1) a close relation between the degree of endothelial dysfunction and the metabolic control of diabetes, estimated by the levels of HbA1c; and (2) an increased production of superoxide anions in

  18. Glycosylated haemoglobin for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Eileen; Al-Barazan, Abdul Majeed; Nikakis, Irena; Radford, Andrea; Clarkson, Wade; Trevett, Clinton; Brain, Terry; Gebski, Val; Corbould, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a cumbersome test that is time consuming, labour intensive and often poorly tolerated by pregnant women. To date, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is the most accepted measure of chronic glycaemia outside of pregnancy. HbA1c is an uncomplicated test, less time consuming, does not require any specific patient preparation and is considered straightforward compared with the OGTT. Therefore, we prospectively tested the utility of the HbA1c when used as a screening tool in pregnancy for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Settings Primary health care. Single tertiary referral centre, Tasmania, Australia. Participants A direct comparison between HbA1c levels and the OGTT results in pregnant women, tested concurrently at the 24–28 gestational week, was undertaken. A full profile of 480 pregnant women during the period from September 2012 to July 2014 was completed. Median and mean age of participants was 29 years (range 18–47 years). Interventions A simultaneous prospective assessment of HbA1c versus standard OGTT in a cohort of consecutive pregnant women presenting to our institute was performed. Results The number of women who had GDM according to OGTT criteria was 57, representing 11.9% of the evaluated 480 pregnant women. Using a cut-off value for HbA1c at 5.1% (32 mmol/mol) for detecting GDM showed sensitivity of 61% and specificity of 68% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 93%, versus sensitivity of 27% and specificity of 95% with NPV of 91% when using HbA1c cut-off value of 5.4% (36 mmol/mol). Conclusions Our results suggest that pregnant women with an HbA1c of≥5.4% (36 mmol/mol) should proceed with an OGTT. This may result in a significant reduction in the burden of testing on both patients and testing facility staff and resources. Further investigations are required to integrate and optimise the HbA1c as a single, non-fasting, screening tool for GDM. Trial registration number ACTRN

  19. Data analytics identify glycated haemoglobin co-markers for type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Herbert F; Stranieri, Andrew; Yatsko, Andrew; Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    2016-08-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is being more commonly used as an alternative test for the identification of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or to add to fasting blood glucose level and oral glucose tolerance test results, because it is easily obtained using point-of-care technology and represents long-term blood sugar levels. HbA1c cut-off values of 6.5% or above have been recommended for clinical use based on the presence of diabetic comorbidities from population studies. However, outcomes of large trials with a HbA1c of 6.5% as a cut-off have been inconsistent for a diagnosis of T2DM. This suggests that a HbA1c cut-off of 6.5% as a single marker may not be sensitive enough or be too simple and miss individuals at risk or with already overt, undiagnosed diabetes. In this study, data mining algorithms have been applied on a large clinical dataset to identify an optimal cut-off value for HbA1c and to identify whether additional biomarkers can be used together with HbA1c to enhance diagnostic accuracy of T2DM. T2DM classification accuracy increased if 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OhdG), an oxidative stress marker, was included in the algorithm from 78.71% for HbA1c at 6.5% to 86.64%. A similar result was obtained when interleukin-6 (IL-6) was included (accuracy=85.63%) but with a lower optimal HbA1c range between 5.73 and 6.22%. The application of data analytics to medical records from the Diabetes Screening programme demonstrates that data analytics, combined with large clinical datasets can be used to identify clinically appropriate cut-off values and identify novel biomarkers that when included improve the accuracy of T2DM diagnosis even when HbA1c levels are below or equal to the current cut-off of 6.5%.

  20. Prediction of glycated hemoglobin levels at 3 months after metabolic surgery based on the 7-day plasma metabolic profile.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Nam; Lee, Yeon Ji; Kang, Ju-Hee; Choi, Ji-Ho; An, Yong Jin; Kang, Sunmi; Lee, Dae Hyun; Suh, Young Ju; Heo, Yoonseok; Park, Sunghyouk

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic surgery has been shown to provide better glycemic control for type 2 diabetes than conventional therapies. Still, the outcomes of the surgery are variable, and prognostic markers reflecting the metabolic changes by the surgery are yet to be established. NMR-based plasma metabolomics followed by multivariate regression was used to test the correlation between the metabolomic profile at 7-days after surgery and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels at 3-months (and up to 12 months with less patients), and to identify the relevant markers. Metabolomic profiles at 7-days could differentiate the patients according to the HbA1c improvement status at 3-months. The HbA1c values were predicted based on the metabolomics profile with partial least square regression, and found to be correlated with the observed values. Metabolite analysis suggested that 3-Hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) and glucose contributes to this prediction, and the [3-HB]/[glucose] exhibited a modest to good correlation with the HbA1c level at 3-months. The prediction of 3-month HbA1c using 7-day metabolomic profile and the suggested new criterion [3-HB]/[glucose] could augment current prognostic modalities and help clinicians decide if drug therapy is necessary.

  1. GLP-1 Cleavage Product Reverses Persistent ROS Generation After Transient Hyperglycemia by Disrupting an ROS-Generating Feedback Loop

    PubMed Central

    Giacco, Ferdinando; Du, Xueliang; Carratú, Anna; Gerfen, Gary J.; D’Apolito, Maria; Giardino, Ida; Rasola, Andrea; Marin, Oriano; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Murphy, Anne N.; Shah, Manasi S.

    2015-01-01

    The assumption underlying current diabetes treatment is that lowering the level of time-averaged glucose concentrations, measured as HbA1c, prevents microvascular complications. However, 89% of variation in risk of retinopathy, microalbuminuria, or albuminuria is due to elements of glycemia not captured by mean HbA1c values. We show that transient exposure to high glucose activates a multicomponent feedback loop that causes a stable left shift of the glucose concentration-reactive oxygen species (ROS) dose-response curve. Feedback loop disruption by the GLP-1 cleavage product GLP-1(9–36)amide reverses the persistent left shift, thereby normalizing persistent overproduction of ROS and its pathophysiologic consequences. These data suggest that hyperglycemic spikes high enough to activate persistent ROS production during subsequent periods of normal glycemia but too brief to affect the HbA1c value are a major determinant of the 89% of diabetes complications risk not captured by HbA1c. The phenomenon and mechanism described in this study provide a basis for the development of both new biomarkers to complement HbA1c and novel therapeutic agents, including GLP-1(9–36)amide, for the prevention and treatment of diabetes complications. PMID:26294429

  2. Glycated Hemoglobin Levels in Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Satapathy, Sanjaya K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of this study is to determine if HbA1c levels are a reliable predictor of glycemic control in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Methods. 200 unique patients referred for liver transplantation at University of Tennessee/Methodist University Transplant Institute with a HbA1c result were included. Three glucose levels prior to the “measured” A1c (MA1c) were input into an HbA1c calculator from the American Diabetes Association website to determine the “calculated” A1c (CA1c). The differences between MA1c and CA1c levels were computed. Patients were divided into three groups: group A, difference of <0.5; group B, 0.51–1.5; and group C, >1.5. Results. 97 (49%) patients had hemoglobin A1c of less than 5%. Discordance between calculated and measured HbA1c of >0.5% was seen in 47% (n = 94). Higher level of discordance of greater than >1.5 was in 12% of patients (n = 24). Hemoglobin was an independent predictor for higher discordance (odds ratio 0.77 95%, CI 0.60–0.99, and p value 0.04). HbA1c was an independent predictor of occurrence of HCC (OR 2.69 955, CI 1.38–5.43, and p value 0.008). Conclusion. HbA1c is not a reliable predictor of glycemic control in patients with decompensated cirrhosis, especially in those with severe anemia. PMID:27882051

  3. Correlation Between Glycated Hemoglobin and Homa Indices in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Prediction of Beta-Cell Function from Glycated Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakeim, Hussein Kadhem; Abdulzahra, Mohammed Saied

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The present study aimed to determine the most efficient insulin resistance function related to glycemic control expressed as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (T2DM). The other aim is to derive equations for the prediction of beta cell functions containing HbA1c as a parameter in addition to fasting glucose and insulin. Methods T2DM Patients were grouped according to the following: (1) degree of control (good, fair, and poor control) and (2) insulin resistance as observed in obtained data and significant differences revealed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of related parameters (insulin resistance = HOMA2IR, beta-cell function = HOMA%B, and insulin sensitivity = HOMA%S) among groups. Correlations and forecasting regression analysis were calculated. Results HbA1c was found to be correlated with insulin resistance parameters in T2DM subgroups. This correlation was also significantly correlated with HOMA%B and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in fair and poor control groups. Regression analysis was used to predict the forecasting equations for HOMA%B. The best applicable equations were derived for healthy control (HOMA2%B=−1.76*FBG+5.00*Insulin+4.69*HbA1c+189.84) and poor control groups (HOMA2%B=0.001* FBG+0.5*Insulin-8.67*HbA1c+101.96). These equations could be used to predict β-cell function (HOMA%B) after FBG, insulin and HbA1c values were obtained for healthy and poor control groups. In the good and fair control groups, the applicability of the HOMA model fails to yield appropriate results. Conclusions Beta-cell function is correlated with QUICKI and HbA1c and could be predicted properly from HbA1c, insulin, and glucose in the healthy and poor control groups. New regression equations were established that involve HbA1c. PMID:28356831

  4. Real-world evaluation of glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with canagliflozin versus dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Sarah; Chow, Wing; Korrer, Stephanie; Aguilar, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Objective To evaluate glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with canagliflozin (CANA) vs. dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. Methods Using integrated claims and lab data from a US health plan of commercial and Medicare Advantage enrollees, this matched-control cohort study assessed adult T2DM patients receiving treatment with CANA or DPP-4 inhibitors (1 April 2013-31 December 2013). Cohorts were chosen hierarchically; the first pharmacy claim for CANA was identified as the index date; then the first pharmacy claim for a DPP-4 inhibitor was identified and index date set. Eligible patients had 6 months of continuous health plan enrollment before the index date (baseline) and 9 months after (follow-up) and no evidence of index drug in baseline. Patients were matched 1:1 using propensity score matching. Changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and percentages of patients with HbA1c <8% and <7% during the follow-up were evaluated. Results The matched CANA and DPP-4 inhibitor cohorts (53.2% treated with sitagliptin) included 2766 patients each (mean age: 55.7 years). Among patients with baseline and follow-up HbA1c results, mean baseline HbA1c values were similar, 8.62% and 8.57% (p = 0.615) for the CANA (n = 729) and DPP-4 inhibitor (n = 710) cohorts, respectively. Change in HbA1c was greater among patients in the CANA cohort than for those in the DPP-4 inhibitor cohort (-0.92% vs. -0.63%, p < 0.001), and also among the subset of patients with baseline HbA1c ≥7% (-1.07% [n = 624] vs. -0.79% [n = 603], p = 0.004). During follow-up, greater percentages of the CANA cohort relative to the DPP-4 inhibitor cohort achieved HbA1c of <8% (66.0% vs. 58.6%, p = 0.004) and <7% (35.4% vs. 29.9%, p = 0.022). Limitations This study was observational and residual confounding remains a possibility. Conclusions In this real-world study of patients with T2DM, CANA use was associated with greater HbA1c

  5. Advantages and Pitfalls of Fructosamine and Glycated Albumin in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Elisa; Montagnana, Martina; Nouvenne, Antonio; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The efficient diagnosis and accurate monitoring of diabetic patients are cornerstones for reducing the risk of diabetic complications. The current diagnostic and prognostic strategies in diabetes are mainly based on two tests, plasma (or capillary) glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Nevertheless, these measures are not foolproof, and their clinical usefulness is biased by a number of clinical and analytical factors. The introduction of other indices of glucose homeostasis in clinical practice such as fructosamine and glycated albumin (GA) may be regarded as an attractive alternative, especially in patients in whom the measurement of HbA1c may be biased or even unreliable. These include patients with rapid changes of glucose homeostasis and larger glycemic excursions, and patients with red blood cell disorders and renal disease. According to available evidence, the overall diagnostic efficiency of GA seems superior to that of fructosamine throughout a broad range of clinical settings. The current method for measuring GA is also better standardized and less vulnerable to preanalytical variables than those used for assessing fructosamine. Additional advantages of GA over HbA1c are represented by lower reagent cost and being able to automate the GA analysis on many conventional laboratory instruments. Although further studies are needed to definitely establish that GA can complement or even replace conventional measures of glycemic control such as HbA1c, GA may help the clinical management of patients with diabetes in whom HbA1c values might be unreliable. PMID:25591856

  6. Association of depressive symptomology and psychological trauma with diabetes control among older American Indian women: Does social support matter?

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Carolyn; Gonzales, Kelly; Winchester, Blythe; Bradley, Vickie L.

    2017-01-01

    Aims Among older American Indian women with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we examined the association between mental health and T2DM control and if social support modifies the association. Methods Survey data were linked to T2DM medical record information. Mental health measures were the Center for Epidemiologic Studies – Depression Scale and the National Anxiety Disorders Screening Day instrument. T2DM control was all HbA1c values taken post mental health measures. Results There was not a significant association between depressive symptomatology and higher HbA1c although increased depressive symptomatology was associated with higher HbA1c values among participants with low social support. There was a significant association between psychological trauma and higher HbA1c values 12 months [mean 7.5, 95% CI 7.0–8.0 for no trauma vs. mean 7.0, 95% CI 6.3–7.6 for trauma with no symptoms vs. mean 8.4, 95% CI 7.7–9.1 for trauma with =1 symptom(s)] and 6 months later [mean 7.2, 95% CI 6.7–7.7 for no trauma vs. mean HbA1c 6.8, 95% CI 6.2–7.4 for trauma with no symptoms vs. mean 8.4, 95% CI 7.6–9.2 for trauma with ≥1 symptom(s)]. High social support attenuated the association between psychological trauma and HbA1c values. Conclusions T2DM programs may consider activities that would strengthen participants’ social support and thereby building on an intrinsic community strength. PMID:28161383

  7. A 7-year follow-up retrospective, international, multicenter study of insulin pump therapy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Chiara; Scaramuzza, Andrea E; Ho, Josephine; Cardona-Hernandez, Roque; Suarez-Ortega, Larisa; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated the long-term glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes, using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for at least 5 years in three diabetes centers from three different countries: Canada, Italy and Spain. This was an observational retrospective multicenter cohort study. Subjects were included if they were followed at one of the participating centers, had type 1 diabetes, age 5-20 years at time of data collection and used CSII for more than 5 years. Data collected included gender, age, disease duration, age at CSII initiation, body mass index (BMI), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), insulin requirement and serious adverse events (SAE) at baseline and every 12 months during follow-up. One hundred fifteen patients were included in the study (55% males), aged 5-20 years (mean: 13.5 ± 3.8 years), with mean diabetes duration of 6.3 ± 3.4 years, using CSII for mean of 6.9 ± 1.2 years (range 5-12 years.). HbA1c significantly improved after 1 year of CSII treatment and during follow-up (p = 0.02). When HbA1c was compared between countries, a difference was observed, with slightly lower values in Italy than in Canada and Spain (p = 0.04). When evaluated by gender, HbA1c was similar at baseline, but significantly improved only in males during all follow-up (p = 0.004). No significant differences were observed for BMI, insulin requirement or SAE. Insulin pump therapy is safe and effective in the pediatric population, although in this study, the major benefit in HbA1c was seen in males. The use of advanced pump features was associated with greater improvement in HbA1c.

  8. A numerical scale to assess the outcomes of metabolic/bariatric surgery (NOMS)

    PubMed Central

    Michalik, Maciej; Buchwald, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Absent today is a simple numerical system of outcomes assessment that recognizes that bariatric surgery is metabolic surgery and incorporates weight loss, hypertension control, and type 2 diabetes control. Aim To introduce a simple, new Numerical Scale to Assess the Outcomes of Metabolic Surgery (NOMS). Material and methods For the stratification of weight outcomes, we used the percentage excess weight loss (%EWL); for hypertension, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) combined with medication usage; and for type 2 diabetes, the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) value combined with medication usage. Results Utilizing the guidelines of the American Diabetes Association, the Working Group of the European Society of Hypertension, the European Society of Cardiology, and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association, we propose for %EWL: W1 ≥ 50, W2 > 25 and < 50, and W3 ≤ 25; for hypertension H1 SBP/DPB < 140/90 mm Hg on no medication, H2 SBP/DBP ≥ 140/90 mm Hg with improvement of SBP or possible reduction of antihypertensive medication, and H3 no change or SBP higher than before surgery; for diabetes mellitus D1 HbA1c ≤ 7% and no medication, D2 HbA1c > 7% with a decrease of the HbA1c level or possible reduction of medication, D3 no change in HbA1c or HbA1c higher than before surgery. Designations of H0 and D0 are given if hypertension or diabetes was not present before surgery. Patient examples for numerical scores are provided. Conclusions The introduction of our numerical scale (NOMS) can be of benefit in metabolic/bariatric outcomes assessment; communications among metabolic/bariatric surgery centers, physicians, and patients; and for more precise reporting in the evidence-based literature. PMID:26649080

  9. Dynamic Stress Factor (DySF): A Significant Predictor of Severe Hypoglycemic Events in Children with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Ra; Yuan, L; Shi, H; Brehm, W; Pop-Busui, R; Nelson, Pw

    2012-02-28

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is the current standard used in the clinical treatment of patients with diabetes. However, it has been shown that patients with similar HbA1c values may have widely different fluctuations in blood glucose values over the same period of time, including time spent in hyper- and/or hypo-glycemia. Hence, there exists a need for quantitative measures that can supplement HbA1c in managing patients with diabetes. We introduce and compare the Dynamic Stress Factor, DySF, a newly developed metric that quantifies glycemic volatility based on patient-specific glucose transition density profiles with HbA1c and with currently used glucose variability metrics in predicting severe hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes. DySF, the daily weighted number of large monotonic glycemic transitions that occur within one hour, was calculated for 441 total subjects with type 1 diabetes (146 children, aged 8-14 yrs) to assess the magnitude and frequency of glucose transitions per day. Severe hypoglycemic episodes (HE) were quantified for all subjects and evaluated against HbA1c and existing measures of glucose variability, including SD, MAGE, MODD, and CONGA using logistic regression models. DySF was found to be a predictor of severe HE in children (p = 0.018) with the likelihood of a child, aged 8-14 yrs, experiencing severe hypoglycemia increasing by up to 20% with decreasing values of up to 60% of DySF. Patients of any age who had one or multiple severe hypoglycemic episodes had on average a lower DySF when compared to those with no HE. Additionally, when considering mean glucose levels, DySF/mean was a preliminary predictor of severe HE in patients with HbA1c ≤ 6.5% (p = 0.062). DySF is a dynamic, quantitative, measure of daily glucose "volatility" that separates patients, within the same strata of HbA1c, into visually distinct patient profiles. DySF can be used as a preliminary predictor of clinically severe hypoglycemia in children and "well

  10. Blood spot-based measures of glucose homeostasis and diabetes prevalence in a nationally representative population of young U.S. adults

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh C.; Whitsel, Eric A.; Tabor, Joyce W.; Cuthbertson, Carmen C.; Wener, Mark H.; Potter, Alan J.; Halpern, Carolyn T.; Killeya-Jones, Ley A; Hussey, Jon M.; Suchindran, Chirayath; Harris, Kathleen Mullan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We investigated under-studied, biomarker-based diabetes among young U.S. adults, traditionally characterized by low cardiovascular disease risk. Methods We examined 15,701 participants aged 24–32 years at Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health, 2008). The study used innovative and relatively non-invasive methods to collect capillary whole blood via finger prick at in-home examinations in all fifty states. Results Assays of dried blood spots produced reliable and accurate values of HbA1c. Reliability was lower for fasting glucose and lowest for random glucose. Mean (standard deviation) HbA1c was 5.6% (0.8%). More than a quarter (27.4%) had HbA1c-defined pre-diabetes. HbA1c was highest in the black, non-Hispanic race/ethnic group; inversely associated with education; and more common among the overweight/obese, and physically inactive. The prevalence of diabetes defined by previous diagnosis or use of anti-diabetic medication was 2.9%. Further incorporating HbA1c and glucose values, the prevalence increased to 6.8%, and among these participants, 38.9% had a previous diagnosis of diabetes (i.e., aware). Among those aware, 37.6% were treated and 64.0% were controlled (i.e., HbA1c < 7%). Conclusions A contemporary cohort of young adults faces a historically high risk of diabetes but there is ample opportunity for early detection and intervention. PMID:25444890

  11. Comparative study of glycated hemoglobin by ion exchange chromatography and affinity binding nycocard reader in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gautam, N; Dubey, R K; Jayan, A; Nepaune, Y; Padmavathi, P; Chaudhary, S; Jha, S K; Sinha, A K

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the level of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients by two different methods namely Ion Exchange Chromatography and Affinity Binding Nycocard Reader. This is a cross-sectional study conducted on confirmed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (n = 100) who visited Out Patients Department of the Universal College of Medical Sciences Teaching hospital, Bhairahawa, Nepal from November 2012 to March 2013. The diagnosis of diabetes mellitus was done on the basis of their fasting (164.46 ± 45.33 mg/dl) and random (187.93 ± 78.02 mg/dl) serum glucose level along with clinical history highly suggestive of type 2 DM. The HbA1c values of (7.8 ± 1.9%) and (8.0 ± 2.2%) were found in DM patients as estimated by those two different methods respectively. The highest frequency was observed in HbA1c > 8.0% indicating maximum cases were under very poor glycemic control. However, there were no significant differences observed in HbA1c value showing both methods are comparable in nature and can be used in lab for ease of estimation. The significant raised in HbA1c indicates complications associated with DM and monitoring of therapy become hard for those patients. Despite having standard reference method for HbA1c determination, the availability of report at the time of the patient visit can be made easy by using Nycocard Reader and Ion Exchange Chromatography techniques without any delay in communicating glycemic control, clinical decision-making and changes in treatment regimen.

  12. Subgroup analysis of phase 3 studies of dulaglutide in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Yukiko; Oura, Tomonori; Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Sumika; Takeuchi, Masakazu; Iwamoto, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of once weekly dulaglutide 0.75 mg in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) were evaluated by subgroups defined by key demographic characteristics. This post hoc analysis included data from patients who received dulaglutide 0.75 mg for up to 26 weeks in three phase 3 trials (one open-label, randomized; one double-blind and open-label, randomized; one open-label, nonrandomized). Patients were classified into subgroups on the basis of sex (male, female), age (<65, ≥65 years), body weight (<70, ≥70 kg), body mass index (BMI; <25, ≥25 kg/m(2)), duration of diabetes (<7, ≥7 years), HbA1c (≤8.5, >8.5%), use of concomitant sulfonylurea (yes, no), and use of concomitant biguanide (yes, no). Efficacy measures analyzed were changes from baseline in HbA1c and body weight and percentages of patients achieving HbA1c <7.0%. Safety measures analyzed were incidence of hypoglycemia and nausea and change from baseline in seated pulse rate. A total of 855 patients were analyzed. Once weekly dulaglutide 0.75 mg improved blood glucose control as measured by HbA1c regardless of patient characteristics; patients with higher baseline HbA1c values had greater improvements compared to patients with lower baseline values. Weight loss was greater in patients with lower baseline HbA1c and in patients taking concomitant biguanides. Concomitant use of sulfonylureas had the greatest effect on the incidence of hypoglycemia. Treatment of T2D with once weekly dulaglutide 0.75 mg for 26 weeks was associated with significant improvement in glycemic control irrespective of age, sex, duration of diabetes, body weight, BMI, or concomitant medication.

  13. An Audit of Clinical Practice in a Single Centre in Kuwait: Management of Children on Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion and Cardiovascular Risk Factors Screening

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Dina; Alsanae, Hala; Al Khawari, Mona; Abdulrasoul, Majedah; Rahme, Zahraa; Al Refaei, Faisal; Behbehani, Kazem; Shaltout, Azza

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To audit the current clinical practice of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) in children and adolescents attending a single centre in Kuwait. Methods: A one year retrospective audit was performed in children and adolescents with T1D on CSII, who attended the paediatric diabetes clinic, Dasman Diabetes Institute during 2012. The primary outcome measure was glycaemic control as evidenced by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level and the secondary outcome measures were the frequency of monitoring of the risk for microvascular complications and occurrence of acute complications and adverse events. Results: 58 children and adolescents (mean age ± SD: 12.6 ± 4.1 years) were included. Mean HbA1c at baseline was 8.8% (72.7 mmol/mol) and 8.9% (73.8 mmol/mol) at the end of a 12 months observation period. Children with poor control (HbA1c >9.5% (80 mmol/mol) had a significant 1.4% reduction in HbA1c compared with the overall reduction of 0.1% (p=0.7). Rate of screening for cardiovascular risk factors and for long term complications were well documented. However, there was underreporting of acute complications such as severe hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis. Only 1.7% of patients discontinued the pump. Conclusion: There was no significant change in HbA1c values at the end of 12 months follow up. However, HbA1c values in poorly controlled children improved. CSII requires care by skilled health professionals as well as education and selection of motivated parents and children.

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Alogliptin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Analysis of the ATTAK-J Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Sasai, Nobuo; Ito, Shogo; Obana, Mitsuo; Takuma, Tetsuo; Takai, Masahiko; Kaneshige, Hideaki; Machimura, Hideo; Kanamori, Akira; Nakajima, Kazumi; Matsuba, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been shown to reduce hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in patients with type 2 diabetes, but the reduction varies between patients and adequate glycemic control may not be achieved. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the DPP-4 inhibitor alogliptin in the real clinical setting, and analyzed factors associated with the improvement of HbA1c by alogliptin treatment. Methods A retrospective observational study was performed in patients with type 2 diabetes attending hospitals or clinics belonging to the Kanagawa Physicians Association who received treatment with alogliptin for 1 year or longer. Patients using insulin were excluded from the study. The efficacy endpoints were HbA1c (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program value), blood glucose (fasting/postprandial), body weight, blood pressure (systolic/diastolic), liver function (glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase), kidney function (serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate), serum lipids (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides), and serum amylase. Adverse events were compiled to assess safety. Results Of 330 patients whose case records were collected, 27 patients were excluded for protocol violations, leaving 303 patients to form the full analysis set. Compared with baseline, HbA1c showed a decrease by 0.54±1.22% (mean ± standard deviation) after 12 months of alogliptin treatment. Factor analysis demonstrated that the change of HbA1c after 12 months was significantly influenced by the baseline HbA1c level, duration of diabetes, concomitant use of sulfonylureas, and compliance with diet therapy. In addition, there was a significant reduction of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the estimated glomerular filtration rate after 12 months of alogliptin treatment, as well as a

  15. Risk Factors for the Development and Progression of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Advanced Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Hye Ji; Kim, Mee Kyoung; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Roh, Young Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) do not develop diabetic kidney disease (DKD) despite the presence of advanced diabetic retinopathy (DR). We aimed to investigate the presence of DKD and its risk factors in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in 317 patients with T2DM and advanced DR. The phenotypes of DKD were divided into three groups according to the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (uACR, mg/g) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL/min/1.73 m2): no DKD (uACR <30 and eGFR ≥60), non-severe DKD (uACR ≥30 or eGFR <60), and severe DKD (uACR ≥30 and eGFR <60). Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, and HbA1c variability (standard deviation [SD] of serial HbA1c values or HbA1c-SD) were calculated for the preceding 2 years. Results The prevalence of no DKD, non-severe DKD, and severe DKD was 37.2% (n=118), 37.0% (n=117), and 25.8% (n=82), respectively. HbA1c-SD and the triglyceride/high density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio correlated positively with uACR and negatively with eGFR. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the HbA1c-SD and TG/HDL-C ratio were significantly related with eGFR. Multiple logistic regression analyses after adjusting for several risk factors showed that HbA1c-SD and the TG/HDL-C ratio were significant risk factors for severe DKD. Conclusion The prevalence of DKD was about 60% in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. HbA1c variability and TG/HDL-C ratio may affect the development and progression of DKD in these patients. PMID:27766790

  16. Predicting glycated hemoglobin levels in the non-diabetic general population: Development and validation of the DIRECT-DETECT prediction model - a DIRECT study

    PubMed Central

    Heymans, Martijn W.; Koopman, Anitra D. M.; Nijpels, Giel; Stehouwer, Coen D.; Thorand, Barbara; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Meisinger, Christa; Peters, Annette; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Glümer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Oluf; Cederberg, Henna; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Pearson, Ewan R.; Franks, Paul W.; Rutters, Femke; Dekker, Jacqueline M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis To develop a prediction model that can predict HbA1c levels after six years in the non-diabetic general population, including previously used readily available predictors. Methods Data from 5,762 initially non-diabetic subjects from three population-based cohorts (Hoorn Study, Inter99, KORA S4/F4) were combined to predict HbA1c levels at six year follow-up. Using backward selection, age, BMI, waist circumference, use of anti-hypertensive medication, current smoking and parental history of diabetes remained in sex-specific linear regression models. To minimize overfitting of coefficients, we performed internal validation using bootstrapping techniques. Explained variance, discrimination and calibration were assessed using R2, classification tables (comparing highest/lowest 50% HbA1c levels) and calibration graphs. The model was externally validated in 2,765 non-diabetic subjects of the population-based cohort METSIM. Results At baseline, mean HbA1c level was 5.6% (38 mmol/mol). After a mean follow-up of six years, mean HbA1c level was 5.7% (39 mmol/mol). Calibration graphs showed that predicted HbA1c levels were somewhat underestimated in the Inter99 cohort and overestimated in the Hoorn and KORA cohorts, indicating that the model’s intercept should be adjusted for each cohort to improve predictions. Sensitivity and specificity (95% CI) were 55.7% (53.9, 57.5) and 56.9% (55.1, 58.7) respectively, for women, and 54.6% (52.7, 56.5) and 54.3% (52.4, 56.2) for men. External validation showed similar performance in the METSIM cohort. Conclusions/interpretation In the non-diabetic population, our DIRECT-DETECT prediction model, including readily available predictors, has a relatively low explained variance and moderate discriminative performance, but can help to distinguish between future highest and lowest HbA1c levels. Absolute HbA1c values are cohort-dependent. PMID:28187151

  17. Poor glycaemic control in Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes attending the public healthcare system: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Luciana V; Leitão, Cristiane B; Kramer, Caroline K; Zucatti, Alessandra T N; Jezini, Deborah L; Felício, João; Valverde, Ana B; Chacra, Antonio R; Azevedo, Mirela J; Gross, Jorge L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the clinical profile of Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes attending the public healthcare system and identify factors associated with poor glycaemic control. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting 14 centres in five regions of Brazil, including primary care units and outpatient clinics of University Hospitals. Participants Patients with type 2 diabetes attending outpatient clinics of public healthcare system. Main outcome measured Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), centrally measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program certified). Results A total of 5750 patients aged 61±10 years, with 11±8 years of diabetes duration (66% women, 56% non-white, body mass index: 28.0±5.3 kg/m2) were analysed. Mean HbA1c was 8.6±2.2%, and median HbA1c was 8.1% (6.9% to 9.9%). HbA1c <7% was observed in only 26% of patients. Mean HbA1c was higher (p < 0.01) in the North (9.0±2.6%) and Northeast (8.9±2.4%) than in the Midwest (8.1±2%), Southeast (8.4±2.1%) and South regions (8.3±1.9%). Using the cut-off value of HbA1c above the median, age (0.986 (0.983 to 0.989)), white ethnicity (0.931 (0.883 to 0.981)) and being from Midwest region (0.858 (0.745 to 0.989)) were protective factors, while diabetes duration (1.015 (1.012 to 1.018)), use of insulin (1.710 (1.624 to 1.802)) and living in the Northeast region (1.197 (1.085 to 1.321)) were associated with HbA1c >8%. Conclusions The majority of Brazilian patients with type 2 diabetes attending the public healthcare system had HbA1c levels above recommended targets. The recognition of Northeast residents and non-white patients as vulnerable populations should guide future policies and actions to prevent and control diabetes. PMID:24052610

  18. The Glucose-lowering Efficacy of Sitagliptin in Obese Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kodera, Ryo; Shikata, Kenichi; Nakamura, Akihiko; Okazaki, Satoru; Nagase, Ryo; Nakatou, Tatsuaki; Haisa, Shigeru; Hida, Kazuyuki; Miyashita, Katsuhiro; Makino, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    Objective Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are the most frequently prescribed oral hypoglycemic agents in Japan. Although a relationship between the efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitors and the body mass index (BMI) has been reported, this relationship is controversial. We investigated whether the BMI value affects the glucose-lowering efficacy of sitagliptin in obese Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods One hundred sixty-two outpatients with inadequate glycemic control were divided into four groups based on their baseline BMI values. They were then treated with sitagliptin (a DPP-4 inhibitor) for 3 months and followed-up for 12 months. Results Sitagliptin significantly reduced the hemoglobin A1c level (HbA1c: -0.71±0.55%) after 3 months, and continued to reduce the HbA1c level until 12 months. There was no significant difference in the efficacy of sitagliptin among the four BMI groups. A multiple linear regression analysis indicated that the factors contributing to the change in the HbA1c level were the baseline level of HbA1c and the homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β). In terms of the relationship between the baseline BMI value and the efficacy of sitagliptin treatment, the number of patients who responded to sitagliptin treatment after 3 months was lowest in the group of patients with the highest BMI values. A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the baseline HOMA-β function and HbA1c level and a baseline BMI value of ≥30 kg/m(2) significantly contributed to the response to sitagliptin treatment. Conclusion The results indicated that sitagliptin treatment was effective in controlling glucose metabolism disorder in obese Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the efficacy of sitagliptin treatment might be attenuated in severely obese patients, such as those with a BMI value of ≥30 kg/m(2).

  19. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Beyond A1C for diabetes treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the 'resources' section of MedlinePlus.gov's A1C health topic page . The National Diabetes Education Program provides additional information ... the 'resources' section of MedlinePlus.gov's A1C health topic page. MedlinePlus.gov's A1C health topic page additionally provides ...

  20. Effect of Vitamin D3 Supplement in Glycemic Control of Pediatrics with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, Sakineh; Zaeri, Hossein; Vakili, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glycemic control prevents microvascular complications in patients with type I diabetes mellitus such as retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy that influences quality of life. Some studies show the immunomodulatory effect of vitamin D in synthesis and secretion of insulin. Aims: In this study we evaluate glycemic changes after vitamin D3 supplement in children with type I diabetes mellitus and vitamin D deficiency. Materials and Methods: In children with type I diabetes mellitus, level of vitamin D and HbA1C was measured. Patients with type I diabetes mellitus who had vitamin D deficiency (25OHD < 50 nmol/lit) treated with 300,000 units of vitamin D3. Calcium supplement (40mg/kg/day) divided in two doses in order to avoid hungry bone was also used. After three months, 25OHD and HbA1C were measured again. Differences, in mean ± SD HbA1C and 25OHD were evaluated before and after the study. Results: Mean ± SD HbA1C was 9.73±1.85 before the study which was diminished to 8.55±1.91 after vitamin D3 supplement treatment. This decline has a significant difference (p-value < 0.0001). Mean ± SD 25OHD was 17.33±8.97 nmol/lit before the study which is increased to 39.31±14.38 nmol/lit after treatment with vitamin D3 supplement. This increase also has a significant difference (p-value < 0.0001). Vitamin D3 supplement causes the improvement of HbA1C in all groups of glycemic control including HbA1C <7.8, 7.8-9.9, and >9.9. This supplement transfer patients toward better glycemic control for the entire group (p-value < 0.0001). Conclusion: Vitamin D3 supplement improves HbA1C in pediatrics with type I diabetes mellitus and vitamin D deficiency. PMID:25954674

  1. Engaging South Asian women with type 2 diabetes in a culturally relevant exercise intervention: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Alamelu; Nimbal, Vani C; Ivey, Susan L; Wang, Elsie J; Madsen, Kristine A; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the efficacy of a culturally relevant exercise program in improving glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among South Asian women with type 2 diabetes, compared with usual care. Methods This was a randomized controlled 8-week pilot study of Bollywood dance among South Asian women with type 2 diabetes. The intervention consisted of 1 h Bollywood dance classes offered twice per week. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c. The effect of attendance on this outcome was also examined. Results The intervention group demonstrated a decrease in HbA1c from baseline (−0.18% (0.2%); p=0.018) compared with a non-significant increase in the usual care group (+0.03% (0.2%)); p value for difference between groups was 0.032. Participants attending at least 10 of 16 sessions had a statistically significant reduction in weight (−0.69 kg (0.76 kg)) compared with those attending fewer sessions (+0.86 kg (0.71 kg)). Conclusions These results support culturally relevant dance as a successful exercise intervention to promote HbA1c control, compared with usual care. Trial registration number NCT02061618. PMID:26566446

  2. The impact of knowledge about diabetes, resilience and depression on glycemic control: a cross-sectional study among adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between glycemic control and the factors of knowledge about diabetes, resilience, depression and anxiety among Brazilian adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods This cross-sectional study included 85 adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes, aged between 11–22 years, with an average age of 17.7 ± 3.72 years. Glycemic control degree was evaluated through HbA1c. To assess psychosocial factors, the following questionnaires were used: resilience (Resilience Scale, RS) and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). The Diabetes Knowledge Assessment Scale (DKNA) was used to assess knowledge about diabetes. Results Significant correlations were found between HbA1c and resilience, anxiety and depression. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the only variable which presented significant association with the value of HbA1c was depression. Conclusions Depression has a significant association with higher HbA1c levels, as demonstrated in a regression analysis. The results suggest that depression, anxiety and resilience should be considered in the design of a multidisciplinary approach to type 1 diabetes, as these factors were significantly correlated with glycemic control. Glycemic control was not correlated with knowledge of diabetes, suggesting that theoretical or practical understanding of this disease is not by itself significantly associated with appropriate glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 7.5%). PMID:24289093

  3. Evaluation of Hemoglobin A1c Criteria to Assess Preoperative Diabetes Risk in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Sima; Zrull, Christina A.; Patil, Preethi V.; Jha, Leena; Kling-Colson, Susan C.; Gandia, Kenia G.; DuBois, Elizabeth C.; Plunkett, Cynthia D.; Bodnar, Tim W.; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) has recently been recommended for diagnosing diabetes mellitus and diabetes risk (prediabetes). Its performance compared with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h post-glucose load (2HPG) is not well delineated. We compared the performance of A1C with that of FPG and 2HPG in preoperative cardiac surgery patients. Methods Data from 92 patients without a history of diabetes were analyzed. Patients were classified with diabetes or prediabetes using established cutoffs for FPG, 2HPG, and A1C. Sensitivity and specificity of the new A1C criteria were evaluated. Results All patients diagnosed with diabetes by A1C also had impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes by other criteria. Using FPG as the reference, sensitivity and specificity of A1C for diagnosing diabetes were 50% and 96%, and using 2HPG as the reference they were 25% and 95%. Sensitivity and specificity for identifying prediabetes with FPG as the reference were 51% and 51%, respectively, and with 2HPG were 53% and 51%, respectively. One-third each of patients with prediabetes was identified using FPG, A1C, or both. When testing A1C and FPG concurrently, the sensitivity of diagnosing dysglycemia increased to 93% stipulating one or both tests are abnormal; specificity increased to 100% if both tests were required to be abnormal. Conclusions In patients before cardiac surgery, A1C criteria identified the largest number of patients with diabetes and prediabetes. For diagnosing prediabetes, A1C and FPG were discordant and characterized different groups of patients, therefore altering the distribution of diabetes risk. Simultaneous measurement of FGP and A1C may be a more sensitive and specific tool for identifying high-risk individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:21854260

  4. High cortisol levels are associated with low quality food choice in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Duong, Michelle; Cohen, Jessica I; Convit, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis control may be impaired in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Glucocorticoids increase consumption of low quality foods high in calories, sugar, and fat. We explored the relationship between cortisol levels, poor blood glucose control, and food quality choice in T2DM. Twenty-seven healthy controls were age-, gender- and education-matched to 27 T2DM participants. Standard clinical blood tests and cortisol values were measured from fasting blood samples. Participants recorded all consumed food and drink items in a consecutive 3-day food diary. Diaries were analyzed for "high quality" and "low quality" foods using a standardized method with high reliability (0.97 and 0.86, respectively). Controlling for education, body mass index (BMI) and hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), log-transformed cortisol (LogC) predicted the percent of low quality foods (R (2) = 0.092, β = 0.360, P < 0.05), but not the percent of high quality foods chosen. Controlling for education, BMI, and LogC, HbA1C significantly predicted both the percent of low quality foods (ΔR (2) = 0.079, β = 0.348, P = 0.024) and high quality foods chosen (ΔR (2) = 0.085, β = -0.362, P = 0.022). The relationship between HbA1C and low quality food choice may be mediated by cortisol, controlling for BMI and education (P < 0.01). HbA1C displayed both an indirect (cortisol-mediated) effect (P < 0.05) and direct effect on low quality food choice (P < 0.05). The relationship between HbA1C and low quality food choice may be partially mediated by cortisol. Poor blood glucose control may cause HPA axis disruption, increased consumption of low quality foods.

  5. Gastric electrical stimulation treatment of type 2 diabetes: effects of implantation versus meal-mediated stimulation. A randomized blinded cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    Lebovitz, Harold E; Ludvik, Bernhard; Kozakowski, Jaroslaw; Tarnowski, Wieslaw; Zelewski, Mateusz; Yaniv, Irit; Schwartz, Tse’ela

    2015-01-01

    Gastric electrical stimulation with the implanted DIAMOND device has been shown to improve glycemic control and decrease weight and systolic blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic agents. The objective of this study was to determine if device implantation alone (placebo effect) contributes to the long-term metabolic benefits of DIAMOND® meal-mediated gastric electrical stimulation in patients with type 2 diabetes. The study was a 48 week randomized, blinded, cross-over trial in university centers comparing glycemic improvement of DIAMOND® implanted patients with type 2 diabetic with no activation of the electrical stimulation (placebo) versus meal-mediated activation of the electrical signal. The endpoint was improvement in glycemic control (HbA1c) from baseline to 24 and 48 weeks. In period 1 (0–24 weeks), equal improvement in HbA1c occurred independent of whether the meal-mediated electrical stimulation was turned on or left off (HbA1c −0.80% and −0.85% [−8.8 and −9.0 mmol/mol]). The device placebo improvement proved to be transient as it was lost in period 2 (25–48 weeks). With electrical stimulation turned off, HbA1c returned toward baseline values (8.06 compared to 8.32%; 64.2 to 67.4 mmol/mol, P = 0.465). In contrast, turning the electrical stimulation on in period 2 sustained the decrease in HbA1c from baseline (−0.93%, −10.1mmol/mol, P = 0.001) observed in period 1. The results indicate that implantation of the DIAMOND device causes a transient improvement in HbA1c which is not sustained beyond 24 weeks. Meal-mediated electrical stimulation accounts for the significant improvement in HbA1c beyond 24 weeks. PMID:26177957

  6. Hb A1c Separation by High Performance Liquid Chromatography in Hemoglobinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, Vani

    2016-01-01

    Hb A1c measurement is subject to interference by hemoglobin traits and this is dependent on the method used for determination. In this paper we studied the difference between Hb A1c measured by HPLC in hemoglobin traits and normal chromatograms. We also studied the correlation of Hb A1c with age. Hemoglobin analysis was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography. Spearman's rank correlation was used to study correlation between A1c levels and age. Mann-Whitney U test was used to study the difference in Hb A1c between patients with normal hemoglobin and hemoglobin traits. A total of 431 patients were studied. There was positive correlation with age in patients with normal chromatograms only. No correlation was seen in Hb E trait or beta thalassemia trait. No significant difference in Hb A1c of patients with normal chromatograms and patients with hemoglobin traits was seen. There is no interference by abnormal hemoglobin in the detection of A1c by high performance liquid chromatography. This method cannot be used for detection of A1c in compound heterozygous and homozygous disorders. PMID:26989559

  7. Evaluation of efficacy and tolerability of glimepiride and metformin combination: a multicentric study in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus, uncontrolled on monotherapy with sulfonylurea or metformin.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Anil; Chandurkar, Nitin B; Salkar, Harsha R; Borkar, Mangala S; Tiwari, Dharmendra

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of glimepiride plus extended release metformin (MET) on glycemic control in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus uncontrolled on monotherapy with sulfonylurea or MET. This was a prospective, open-labeled, multicentric study over 12 weeks. Patients who were diagnosed with type-2 diabetes and were uncontrolled on monotherapy with single oral hypoglycemic agents such as glimepiride or MET and characterized by glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥7% and ≤10% and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 140 mg/dL were enrolled in this study. Treatment regimen was started at 1 mg of glimepiride plus 500 mg of MET once a day and was titrated to next dose level depending on the clinician's judgment, not exceeding a total daily dose of 8 mg of glimepiride and 2000 mg of MET. After 12-weektreatment, glimepiride plus MET combination showed improvement in metabolic control as assessed by changes in HbA1c, FPG, and post prandial glucose (PPG). Primary efficacy parameter, HbA1c, was significantly reduced to (7.65 ± 1.70) at the end of the treatment from the baseline value (8.35 ± 0.93) (P < 0.001). Of the patients, 65.79% showed ≥0.5% reduction in HbA1c and or HbA1c <7% at the end of the therapy. FPG and PPG were significantly reduced at the end of the therapy as compared with baseline values (P < 0.001). Moreover, the lipid profile was also improved during the treatment period. The addition of glimepiride to MET is an effective treatment for patients inadequately controlled on sulfonylurea or Met alone. A combination of glimepiride with MET achieves good glycemic control with better tolerability profile.

  8. Detection of total and A1c-glycosylated hemoglobin in human whole blood using sandwich immunoassays on polydimethylsiloxane-based antibody microarrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huang-Han; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Huang, Yi-Jing; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2012-10-16

    The percentage of glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (%GHbA1c) in human whole blood indicates the average plasma glucose concentration over a prolonged period of time and is used to diagnose diabetes. However, detecting GHbA1c in the whole blood using immunoassays has limited detection sensitivity due to its low percentage in total hemoglobin (tHb) and interference from various glycan moieties in the sample. We have developed a sandwich immunoassay using an antibody microarray on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate modified with fluorinated compounds to detect tHb and glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (GHbA1c) in human whole blood without sample pretreatment. A polyclonal antibody against hemoglobin (Hb) immobilized on PDMS is used as a common capture probe to enrich all forms of Hb followed by detection via monoclonal anti-Hb and specific monoclonal anti-GHbA1c antibodies for tHb and GHbA1c detection, respectively. This method prevents the use of glycan binding molecules and dramatically reduces the background interference, yielding a detection limit of 3.58 ng/mL for tHb and 0.20 ng/mL for GHbA1c. The fluorinated modification on PDMS is superior to the glass substrate and eliminates the need for the blocking step which is required in commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Moreover, the detection sensitivity for GHbA1c is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher, but the required sample amount is 25 times less than the commercial method. On the basis of patient sample data, a good linear correlation between %GHbA1c values determined by our method and the certified high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) standard method is shown with R(2) > 0.98, indicating the great promise of the developed method for clinical applications.

  9. Association between obstructive sleep apnea severity and glucose control in patients with untreated versus treated diabetes.

    PubMed

    Priou, Pascaline; Le Vaillant, Marc; Meslier, Nicole; Chollet, Sylvaine; Pigeanne, Thierry; Masson, Philippe; Bizieux-Thaminy, Acya; Humeau, Marie-Pierre; Goupil, François; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the association between obstructive sleep apnea severity and glucose control differs between patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes, and patients with known and treated type 2 diabetes. This multicentre cross-sectional study included 762 patients investigated by sleep recording for suspected obstructive sleep apnea, 497 of whom were previously diagnosed and treated for type 2 diabetes (treated diabetic patients), while 265 had no medical history of diabetes but had fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg dL(-1) and/or glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c ) ≥6.5% consistent with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (untreated diabetic patients). Multivariate regression analyses were performed to evaluate the independent association between HbA1c and obstructive sleep apnea severity in treated and untreated patients with diabetes. In untreated diabetic patients, HbA1c was positively associated with apnea-hypopnea index (P = 0.0007) and 3% oxygen desaturation index (P = 0.0016) after adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, alcohol habits, metabolic dyslipidaemia, hypertension, statin use and study site. The adjusted mean value of HbA1c increased from 6.68% in the lowest quartile of the apnea-hypopnea index (<17) to 7.20% in the highest quartile of the apnea-hypopnea index (>61; P = 0.033 for linear trend). In treated patients with diabetes, HbA1c was associated with non-sleep variables, including age, metabolic dyslipidaemia and insulin use, but not with obstructive sleep apnea severity. Obstructive sleep apnea may adversely affect glucose control in patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes, but may have a limited impact in patients with overt type 2 diabetes receiving anti-diabetic medications.

  10. Effect of Pioglitazone on the Course of New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tafuri, Kimberly Sue; Godil, Mushtaq Ahmed; Lane, Andrew Harry; Wilson, Thomas Allen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is caused by insulin deficiency resulting from progressive destruction of β cells. The histological hallmark of the diabetic islet is mononuclear cell infiltration. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) activate PPARg and enhance the actions of insulin. Studies in non-obese diabetic and streptocotozin-treated mouse models demonstrated that pretreatment with TZDs prevented the development of T1DM. The purpose of this study was to examine whether pioglitazone, given with insulin, preserved β cell function in patients with new-onset T1DM. Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 24-week study. Subjects received pioglitazone or placebo. Blood sugar, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-peptide, and liver enzymes were measured at baseline. Boost© stimulated C-peptide responses were measured at baseline and at 24 weeks. Blood sugar, insulin dose, height, weight, and liver enzymes were monitored at each visit. HbA1c was performed every 12 weeks. Results: Of the 15 patients, 8 received pioglitazone, and 7 - placebo. There was no clinical improvement in HbA1c between or within groups at the completion of the study. Mean peak C-peptide values were similar between groups at baseline. Mean peak C-peptide level was slightly higher at 24 weeks in the pioglitazone group compared to the placebo (1.8 vs. 1.5 ng/mL) which was considered as clinically insignificant. The interaction of HbA1c and insulin dose (HbA1c* insulin/kg/day), which combines degree of diabetic control and dose of insulin required to achieve this control, showed transient improvement in the pioglitazone group at 12 weeks but was not sustained at 24 weeks. Conclusion: In this pilot study, pioglitazone did not preserve β cell function when compared to placebo. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24379032

  11. Evaluation and interference study of hemoglobin A1c measured by turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Chang, J; Hoke, C; Ettinger, B; Penerian, G

    1998-03-01

    The technical performance of the turbidimetric immunoinhibition (TI) assay for hemoglobin (Hb) A1c (Tina-quant Hb A1c, Boehringer Mannheim, Indianapolis, Ind) was evaluated by using the BM/Hitachi 911 analyzer. Intra-assay imprecision was less than 2.7%, and interassay imprecision was less than 2.8% as measured by coefficient of variation. In 93 subjects with diabetes who did not have hemoglobin variants, results of the TI assay for Hb A1c correlated strongly with those obtained by using a high-performance liquid chromatography analyzer (Diamat, BioRad Laboratories, Hercules, Calif). Among 241 subjects who had or did not have hemoglobin variants, the TI assay for Hb A1c correlated strongly with results of affinity chromatography for total glycated hemoglobin (Glyc-Affin GHb, IsoLab, Akron, Ohio). We also studied the effect of various percentages of hemoglobin S, C, E, and F on the accuracy of the TI Hb A1c assay. Only high hemoglobin F percentages caused interference. More than 14 times as many samples can be analyzed per hour by using the TI Hb A1c assay than can be analyzed by using the HPLC assay. For high-volume reference laboratories, using the fully automated TI Hb A1c assay to monitor glycemic control in patients with diabetes may be preferable to using the conventional ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography Hb A1c assay because the TI assay measures Hb A1c more accurately in patients with diabetes who have hemoglobin variants, and it requires less time.

  12. Markers of glycemic control in the mouse: comparisons of 6-h- and overnight-fasted blood glucoses to Hb A1c.

    PubMed

    Han, Byoung Geun; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Tchekneva, Elena E; Wang, Ying-Ying; Lee, Chieh Allen; Ebrahim, Benyamin; Harris, Raymond C; Kern, Timothy S; Wasserman, David H; Breyer, Matthew D; Qi, Zhonghua

    2008-10-01

    The present studies examined the relationship between fasting blood glucose and Hb A(1c) in C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, and KK/HlJ mice with and without diabetes mellitus. Daily averaged blood glucose levels based on continuous glucose monitoring and effects of 6-h vs. overnight fasting on blood glucose were determined. Daily averaged blood glucose levels were highly correlated with Hb A(1c), as determined with a hand-held automated device using an immunodetection method. R(2) values were 0.90, 0.95, and 0.99 in KK/HIJ, C57BL/6J, and DBA/2J, respectively. Six-hour fasting blood glucose correlated more closely with the level of daily averaged blood glucose and with Hb A(1c) than did blood glucose following an overnight fast. To validate the immunoassay-determined Hb A(1c), we also measured total glycosylated hemoglobin using boronate HPLC. Hb A(1c) values correlated well with total glycosylated hemoglobin in all three strains but were relatively lower than total glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic DBA/2J mice. These results show that 6-h fasting glucose provides a superior index of glycemic control and correlates more closely with Hb A(1c) than overnight-fasted blood glucose in these strains of mice.

  13. Vildagliptin efficacy in combination with metformin among Jordanian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with metformin.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, Mousa; Khader, Yousef; Dauod, Ali Shakir; Beni Yonis, Othman Ahmed; Khassawneh, Adi Harbi Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin added to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy. Methods: This was a 12-week prospective observational study where vildagliptin 50 mg twice daily was added to patients with T2DM inadequately controlled (glycosylated hemoglobin type A1c (Hba1c) 7-10%) by a daily dose of metformin ≥1700 mg between June 2012 and May 2013. Efficacy was assessed by change in Hba1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels, and safety was assessed by reported adverse events (AEs). Results: A total of 58 patients were enrolled in this study. Their age ranged between 39.0 and 71.0 years, with a mean of 52.6 years, and a standard deviation (SD) of 7.8. The average duration of diabetes mellitus (DM) was 4.0 years (SD 3.0) and half of the patients have had DM for more than three years. The mean baseline levels of Hba1c and FPG were 8% and 10.8 mmol/L, respectively. Patients treated with vildagliptin achieved clinically significant reductions in Hba1c of 1.1% (p value <.005) and reduction in FPG of 1.8 mmol/L (p value <.005) from baseline. Overall, 62.1% had achieved the target of Hba1c of <7% after vildagliptin use. Greater reductions in Hba1c were linked to higher baseline levels as well as to the daily frequency of metformin use. Mild AEs were reported by 16 patients. There was no incidence of hypoglycemia and there were no significant changes in body weight after treatment. Conclusions: Vildagliptin as add-on therapy to metformin improved glycemic control and was highly tolerable in T2DM patients who were inadequately controlled by metformin monotherapy.

  14. Vildagliptin efficacy in combination with metformin among Jordanian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with metformin

    PubMed Central

    Al Omari, Mousa; Khader, Yousef; Dauod, Ali Shakir; Beni Yonis, Othman Ahmed; Khassawneh, Adi Harbi Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective : To assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin added to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled with metformin monotherapy. Methods: This was a 12-week prospective observational study where vildagliptin 50 mg twice daily was added to patients with T2DM inadequately controlled (glycosylated hemoglobin type A1c (Hba1c) 7–10%) by a daily dose of metformin ≥1700 mg between June 2012 and May 2013. Efficacy was assessed by change in Hba1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels, and safety was assessed by reported adverse events (AEs). Results: A total of 58 patients were enrolled in this study. Their age ranged between 39.0 and 71.0 years, with a mean of 52.6 years, and a standard deviation (SD) of 7.8. The average duration of diabetes mellitus (DM) was 4.0 years (SD 3.0) and half of the patients have had DM for more than three years. The mean baseline levels of Hba1c and FPG were 8% and 10.8 mmol/L, respectively. Patients treated with vildagliptin achieved clinically significant reductions in Hba1c of 1.1% (p value <.005) and reduction in FPG of 1.8 mmol/L (p value <.005) from baseline. Overall, 62.1% had achieved the target of Hba1c of <7% after vildagliptin use. Greater reductions in Hba1c were linked to higher baseline levels as well as to the daily frequency of metformin use. Mild AEs were reported by 16 patients. There was no incidence of hypoglycemia and there were no significant changes in body weight after treatment. Conclusions: Vildagliptin as add-on therapy to metformin improved glycemic control and was highly tolerable in T2DM patients who were inadequately controlled by metformin monotherapy. PMID:27994943

  15. GLYCATED ALBUMIN AT 4 WEEKS CORRELATES WITH A1C LEVELS AT 12 WEEKS AND REFLECTS SHORT-TERM GLUCOSE FLUCTUATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Desouza, Cyrus V.; Rosenstock, Julio; Zhou, Rong; Holcomb, Richard G.; Fonseca, Vivian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the performance of glycated albumin (GA) monitoring by comparing it to other measures of glycemic control during intensification of antidiabetic therapy. Methods This 12-week, prospective, multicenter study compared the diagnostic clinical performance of GA to glycated hemoglobin A1C (A1C), fructosamine corrected for albumin (FRA), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and mean blood glucose (MBG) estimated from self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in 30 patients with suboptimally controlled type 1 or 2 diabetes. Results Mean A1C decreased from 9.5% to 8.1%. Mean SMBG correlated closely with CGM (Pearson r = 0.783 for daily estimates and r = 0.746 for weekly estimates, P<.0001). Both GA and FRA levels significantly correlated with changes from baseline in A1C and mean weekly SMBG (P<.001).The lowest observed median GA occurred at 4 weeks, followed by a small increase and then a slight reduction, mirroring changes in overall mean SMBG values. The median A1C fell throughout the treatment period, failing to reflect short-term changes in SMBG. A ≥1% reduction in GA at 4 weeks was significantly associated with a ≥0.5% change in A1C at 12 weeks (odds ratio [OR] = 19.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4, 944, P = .018). Conclusion In patients receiving glucose-lowering therapy, changes in GA at 4 weeks were concordant with changes in A1C at 12 weeks, and both GA and FRA more accurately reflected short-term blood glucose fluctuations than A1C. PMID:26214108

  16. Physician perspectives on de-intensifying diabetes medications

    PubMed Central

    Genere, Natalia; Sargis, Robert M.; Masi, Christopher M.; Nathan, Aviva G.; Quinn, Michael T.; Huang, Elbert S.; Laiteerapong, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Guidelines for diabetes care recommend that physicians select individualized glycemic goals based on life expectancy, diabetes duration, comorbidity, and resources/support. When patients have stable hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) levels, guidelines lack recommendations on when diabetes medications should be de-intensified. To understand physicians’ perspectives on de-intensifying diabetes medications in patients with type 2 diabetes. Cross-sectional survey, (February–June, 2015). Academic medical center and suburban integrated health system. Primary care and endocrinology physicians. Physicians’ self-reported: awareness, agreement, and frequency of individualizing HbA1C goals; practice of de-intensifying diabetes medications; HbA1C values at which physicians de-intensify diabetes medications; and other patient factors physicians consider when de-intensifying diabetes medications. Response rate was 73% (156/213). Most physicians (78%) responded they were familiar with recommendations to individualize HbA1C goals. For patients with stable HbA1C levels, 80% of physicians reported they had initiated conversations about stopping medications; however, physicians differed in predefined HbA1C levels used to initiate conversations (HbA1C < 5.7%: 14%; HbA1C < 6.0%: 31%; HbA1C < 6.5%: 22%; individualized level: 21%). In multiple logistic regression, women physicians (odds ratio [OR] 3.0; confidence interval [CI] 1.1–8.2; P = 0.03) and physicians practicing fewer than 20 years (OR 2.8; CI 1.01–7.7; P = 0.048) were more likely to report de-intensifying diabetes medications. Individualizing glycemic goals and de-intensifying treatments are concepts well accepted by physicians in our sample. However, physicians vary considerably in reporting how they carry out recommendations to individualize and may be missing opportunities to stop or taper diabetes medications based on patients’ individualized glycemic goals. PMID:27861373

  17. Glycemia and cognitive function in metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Avadhani, Radhika; Fowler, Kristen; Barbato, Corinne; Thomas, Sherine; Wong, Winnie; Paul, Camille; Aksakal, Mehmet; Hauser, Thomas H.; Weinger, Katie; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Higher hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is associated with lower cognitive function in type 2 diabetes. To determine if associations persist at lower levels of dysglycemia in patients who have established cardiovascular disease, cognitive performance was assessed in the Targeting Inflammation Using Salsalate in Cardiovascular Disease (TINSAL-CVD) trial. Research Design and Methods The age-adjusted relationships between HbA1c and cognitive performance measured by the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), Trail Making Test (TMT), and Categorical Verbal Fluency (CVF) were assessed in 226 men with metabolic syndrome and established stable coronary artery disease. Results 61.5% of participants had normoglycemia, 20.8% impaired fasting glucose, and 17.7% type 2 diabetes. HbA1c was associated with cognitive function tests of DSST, RAVLT, TMT and CVF (all P<0.02), but not MMSE. In an age-adjusted model, a 1% (11 mmol/mol) higher HbA1c value was associated with a 5.9 lower DSST score (95%CI: −9.58 to −2.21; P<0.0001); a 2.44 lower RAVLT score (95%CI: −4.00 to −0.87; P<0.0001); a 15.6 higher TMT score (95%CI: 5.73 to 25.6; P<0.0001); and a 3.71 lower CVF score (95%CI: −6.41 to −1.01; P<0.02). In multivariate model adjusting for age, education and cardiovascular covariates, HbA1c remains associated with cognitive function tests of RAVLT (R2=0.27, P<0.0001), TMT (R2=0.18, P<0.0001), and CVF (R2=0.20, P<0.0001) although association with DSST was reduced. Conclusion Higher HbA1c is associated with lower cognitive function performance scores across multiple domain tests in men with metabolic syndrome and coronary artery disease. Future studies may demonstrate whether glucose lowering within the normative range improves cognitive health. PMID:25220612

  18. Comparison of Combined Tofogliflozin and Glargine, Tofogliflozin Added to Insulin, and Insulin Dose-Increase Therapy in Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Katsunori; Mitsuma, Yurie; Sato, Takaaki; Anraku, Takumi; Hatta, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Background Some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on insulin have poor glycemic control and require add-on therapy to reach target glucose values. Increased insulin doses or the addition of an oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) may improve glycemic control, but many patients fail to achieve target values. The aim of this study was to compare the treatment efficacy and safety of three different therapies in such patients. Methods T2DM outpatients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥ 7.0%) despite insulin therapy (including patients on OADs other than a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor) were included. The patients had a body mass index (BMI) of ≥ 22 kg/m2 and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of ≥ 45 mL/min/1.73 m2, did not have depletion of endogenous insulin, and had stable glucose levels for 3 months before study entry on insulin therapy. Treatment was continued for 24 weeks with insulin dose-increase therapy, tofogliflozin add-on therapy, or a combination of insulin glargine + tofogliflozin. The primary endpoints were HbA1c, weight, and total insulin dose. Secondary endpoints included fasting plasma glucose (FPG), blood pressure, lipid profiles, and incidence of adverse events. Results At baseline, the participants’ median age was 59.0 years, mean BMI was 28.7 kg/m2, mean eGFR was 89.2 mL/min/1.73 m2, mean HbA1c was 8.7%, and mean FPG was 174.1 mg/dL. The mean duration of insulin therapy was approximately 7 years. The mean daily insulin dose was approximately 40 U in the three groups. Overall, 85% received other background OADs in addition to insulin. Over the 24-week period, HbA1c in the insulin group decreased slightly initially and then plateaued; daily total insulin dose and weight increased, and blood pressure increased slightly. In the insulin + tofogliflozin group and the glargine + tofogliflozin group, HbA1c decreased greatly initially, and this continued over the 24-week period, with HbA1c decreases of -1.0% and

  19. Escaping the Hemoglobin A1c-Centric World in Evaluating Diabetes Mellitus Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vigersky, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Any intervention in patients with diabetes must consider its effect on both the incidence of hypoglycemia and hemoglobin A1c. Yet, there is no single metric that expresses these key factors simultaneously. Such a composite metric would permit clinicians, regulators, manufacturers, payers, and researchers to more easily evaluate the merits of an intervention as well as enable the comparison of qualitatively different interventions. This article proposes a composite metric, the hypoglycemia-A1c score (HAS), as the basis for a more comprehensive approach for the stakeholders in diabetes treatment to better understand how an intervention affects diabetes management. The article also demonstrates how additional parameters such as effects on weight, quality of life, and costs could be included in such a scoring system. PMID:25697718

  20. Hemoglobin A1c Testing and Amputation Rates in Black, Hispanic, and White Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, Bjoern D.; Newhall, Karina A.; Bekelis, Kimon; Faerber, Adrienne E.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Stone, David H.; Goodney, Philip P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Major (above-knee or below-knee) amputation is a complication of diabetes and is seen more common among black and Hispanic patients. While amputation rates have declined for patients with diabetes in the last decade, it remains unknown if these improvements have equitably extended across racial groups and if measures of diabetic care, such as hemoglobin A1c testing, are associated with these improvements. We set out to characterize secular changes in amputation rates among black, Hispanic, and white patients, and to determine associations between hemoglobin A1c testing and amputation risk. Methods We identified 11,942,840 Medicare patients (55% female) with diabetes over the age of 65 years between 2002 and 2012 and followed them for a mean of 6.6 years. Of these, 86% were white, 11.5% were black, and 2.5% were Hispanic. We recorded the occurrence of major amputation and hemoglobin A1c testing during this time period and studied secular changes in amputation rate by race (black, Hispanic, and white). Finally, we examined associations between amputation risk and hemoglobin A1c testing. We measured both the presence of any testing and testing consistency using 3 categories: poor consistency (hemoglobin A1c testing in 0–50% of years), medium consistency (testing in 50–90% of years), and high consistency (testing in >90% of the years in the cohort). Results Between 2002 and 2012, the average major lower-extremity amputation rate in diabetic Medicare patients was 1.78 per 1,000 per year for black patients, 1.15 per 1,000 per year for Hispanic patients, and 0.56 per 1,000 per year for white patients (P < 0.001). Over the study period, the incidence of major amputation in Medicare patients with diabetes declined by 54%, from 1.15 per 1,000 in 2002 to 0.53 per 1,000 in 2012 (rate ratio = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.51–0.54). The reduction in amputation rate was similar across racial groups: 52% for black patients, 61% for Hispanic patients, and 55% for white patients

  1. Telehealth for improved glycaemic control in patients with poorly controlled diabetes after acute hospitalization - a preliminary study in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wai Leng, Chow; Jundong, Jiang; Li Wei, Cho; Joo Pin, Foo; Kwong Ming, Fock; Chen, Richard

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated a disease management and education programme delivered via telephone support (TS) to patients with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c >7%). All eligible patients were invited to participate in the programme, which involved education on lifestyle modification and disease management delivered via three scheduled monthly calls by trained nurses. Patients who declined or could not be contacted acted as the controls (usual care, UC). A per protocol analysis was conducted using a mixed effect model for two subgroups with different baseline HbA1c levels (i.e. baseline HbA1c <8.0% and HbA1c ≥8.0%). A total of 2646 patients with diabetes were eligible for enrolment. Of these, 1391 participants had HbA1c measurements available. The study comprised 633 patients (46%) who completed the programme (TS), 598 (43%) who were not contactable or refused to participate at the first telephone call (UC) and 160 patients who dropped out. In the patients with HbA1c ≥8%, TS reduced the adjusted mean HbA1c by 0.38% (P = 0.022) but the reduction in diabetes-related admissions (4.2% lower adjusted mean admission rate) was not significant. In patients with HbA1c <8%, TS had no additional effect on glycaemic control or diabetes-related admission. Telephone support appeared effective in improving glycaemic control in patients with poor diabetes control.

  2. Lifestyle and glycemic control in Japanese adults receiving diabetes treatment: an analysis of the 2009 Japan Society of Ningen Dock database.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiko; Moriyama, Kengo; Yamakado, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the level of glycemic control in 7020 patients treated with diabetes medications. We found that the overall mean HbA1c was 7.3% (56 mmol/mol). Over half had HbA1c levels ≥7.0% (53 mmol/mol) and poorer glycemic control was associated with unhealthy lifestyle habits.

  3. Application of glycated hemoglobin in the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haiyan; Qi, Xiaorong; Wang, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a special fragment formed by the binding of glucose to the C chain or D chain of hemoglobin A and as a result of non-enzymatic catalysis of mature hemoglobin and glucose, which is an indicator used to evaluate the blood glucose control in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Recent researches indicated that HbA1c could be applied in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and pregnancy combined DM, and increasing of HbA1c was close associated with adverse outcomes of women with pregnancy combined DM and GDM. HbA1c was reported to have a significant importance in monitoring congenital malformation, abortion, perinatal mortality, preeclampsia, postpartum abnormal glucose metabolism, vascular complications and so on, which could be a test item during the second trimester. Sensitivity of HbA1c in diagnoses of DM is lower than oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), thus OGTT is still the golden standard of GDM. Emphasis should be put on standardization of detection and threshold of HbA1c and establishment of HbA1c normal ranges of different trimesters, when HbA1c is used to diagnose pregnancy combined DM and GDM, and evaluate effects of treatments. PMID:25663962

  4. Vitamin D Deficiency and Glycemic Status in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Savastio, Silvia; Cadario, Francesco; Genoni, Giulia; Bellomo, Giorgio; Bagnati, Marco; Secco, Gioel; Picchi, Raffaella; Giglione, Enza; Bona, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D (25OHD) effects on glycemic control are unclear in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Aims of this study were to investigate 25OHD status among children with T1DM and its relationship with insulin sensitivity and glycemic status. Subjects and Methods A cross sectional study was carried out between 2008–2014. A total of 141 patients had a T1DM >12 months diagnosis and were enrolled in the present study. Of these 35 (24.8%) were migrants and 106 (75.2%) Italians (T2). We retrospectively analyzed data at the onset of the disease (T0)(64 subjects) and 12–24 months before the last visit (T1,124 subjects). Fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), 25OHD levels and daily insulin requirement were evaluated and Cholecalciferol 1000 IU/day supplementation for the management of vitamin D insufficiency (<75 nmol/L) was systematically added. Results A generalized 25OHD insufficiency was found at each study time, particularly in migrants. At T0, the 25OHD levels were inversely related to diabetic keto-acidosis (DKA) severity (p<0.05). At T1 and T2, subjects with 25OHD ≤25nmol/L (10 ng/mL) showed higher daily insulin requirement (p<0.05) and HbA1c values (p<0.01) than others vitamin D status. The 25OHD levels were negatively related with HbA1c (p<0.001) and daily insulin dose (p<0.05) during follow up. There was a significant difference in 25OHD (p<0.01) between subjects with different metabolic control (HbA1c <7.5%,7.5–8%,>8%), both at T1 and T2. In supplemented subjects, we found a significant increase in 25OHD levels (p<0.0001) and decrease of HbA1c (p<0.001) between T1 and T2, but this was not significant in the migrants subgroup. Multivariate regression analysis showed a link between HbA1c and 25OHD levels (p<0.001). Conclusions Children with T1DM show a generalized 25OHD deficiency that impact on metabolic status and glycemic homeostasis. Vitamin D supplementation improves glycemic control and should be considered as an

  5. The Hemoglobin Glycation Index Identifies Subpopulations With Harms or Benefits From Intensive Treatment in the ACCORD Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuqian; Myers, Leann; McCarter, Robert J.; Buse, John B.; Fonseca, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study tested the hypothesis that intensive treatment in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial disproportionately produced adverse outcomes in patients with diabetes with a high hemoglobin glycation index (HGI = observed HbA1c − predicted HbA1c). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS ACCORD was a randomized controlled trial of 10,251 patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to standard or intensive treatment with HbA1c goals of 7.0% to 7.9% (53 to 63 mmol/mol) and less than 6% (42 mmol/mol), respectively. In this ancillary study, a linear regression equation (HbA1c = 0.009 × fasting plasma glucose [FPG] [mg/dL] + 6.8) was derived from 1,000 randomly extracted participants at baseline. Baseline FPG values were used to calculate predicted HbA1c and HGI for the remaining 9,125 participants. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression were used to assess the effects of intensive treatment on outcomes in patients with a low, moderate, or high HGI. RESULTS Intensive treatment was associated with improved primary outcomes (composite of cardiovascular events) in the low (hazard ratio [HR] 0.75 [95% CI 0.59–0.95]) and moderate (HR 0.77 [95% CI 0.61–0.97]) HGI subgroups but not in the high HGI subgroup (HR 1.14 [95% CI 0.93–1.40]). Higher total mortality in intensively treated patients was confined to the high HGI subgroup (HR 1.41 [95% CI 1.10–1.80]). A high HGI was associated with a greater risk for hypoglycemia in the standard and intensive treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS HGI calculated at baseline identified subpopulations in ACCORD with harms or benefits from intensive glycemic control. HbA1c is not a one-size-fits-all indicator of blood glucose control, and taking this into account when making management decisions could improve diabetes care. PMID:25887355

  6. Nurse Practitioner Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gail Carr; Derouin, Anne L; Vorderstrasse, Allison A; Hipkens, James; Thompson, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Context Multifactorial barriers prevent primary care clinicians from helping their adult patients with type 2 diabetes achieve good control of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Patients’ depression and low self-efficacy can complicate diabetes management by impairing tasks needed for effective disease self-management. Objectives: To evaluate whether nurse practitioners in collaborative practices with primary care clinicians are effective in helping improve control of HbA1c, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia, and to assess whether nurse practitioner-guided care affects depression and self-efficacy in these patients. Design: De-identified preintervention and postintervention data were collected from prospective review of medical charts of patients in a managed care organization’s primary care clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Preintervention and postintervention HbA1c values were evaluated as the primary outcome measure. Preintervention and postintervention values for BP, LDL-C, body weight, and depression and self-efficacy scores were secondary outcome measures. Results: After intervention, 50% of 26 patients achieved HbA1c benchmarks, 95.6% achieved systolic and diastolic BP benchmarks, and 57.8% achieved LDL-C benchmarks. Wilcoxon paired samples tests showed significantly increased self-efficacy (z = −3.42, p < 0.001) from preintervention to postintervention. Depression scores decreased slightly from preintervention (mean = 0.44, standard deviation = 1.34, median < 0.001) to postintervention values (mean = 0.18, standard deviation = 0.73, median < 0.001), but this decrease was not significant. Conclusion: Integrating nurse practitioners into primary care teams to provide innovative methods of support to adults with uncontrolled hyperglycemia improves clinical outcomes and self-efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24867560

  7. Diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia, hemoglobin A1C and the risk of prosthetic joint infections in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Maradit Kremers, Hilal; Lewallen, Laura W; Mabry, Tad M; Berry, Daniel J; Berbari, Elie F; Osmon, Douglas R

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for infections but evidence is conflicting to what extent perioperative hyperglycemia, glycemic control and treatment around the time of surgery modify the risk of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs). In a cohort of 20,171 total hip and knee arthroplasty procedures, we observed a significantly higher risk of PJIs among patients with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio [HR] 1.55, 95% CI 1.11, 2.16), patients using diabetes medications (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.08, 2.25) and patients with perioperative hyperglycemia (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.07, 2.35), but the effects were attenuated after adjusting for body mass index, type of surgery, ASA score and operative time. Although data were limited, there was no association between hemoglobin A1c values and PJIs.

  8. Effect of chromium-enriched yeast on fasting plasma glucose, glycated haemoglobin and serum lipid levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with insulin.

    PubMed

    Racek, Jaroslav; Sindberg, C D; Moesgaard, S; Mainz, Josef; Fabry, Jaroslav; Müller, Luděk; Rácová, Katarína

    2013-10-01

    Chromium is required for a normal insulin function, and low levels have been linked with insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to follow the effect of chromium supplementation on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and serum lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) on insulin therapy. Eleven randomly selected patients with DM2 on insulin therapy were supplemented with a daily dose of 100 μg chromium yeast for the first supplementation period of 2 weeks. In the second supplementation period, the chromium dose was doubled and continued for the next 6 weeks. The third phase was a 6-week washout period. After each period, the levels of FPG and HbA1c were compared with the corresponding values at the end of the previous period. Serum triglycerides, total HDL and LDL cholesterol values after supplementation were compared with the baseline values. FPG decreased significantly after the first period of chromium supplementation (p < 0.001), and a tendency to a further reduction was observed after the second supplementation period. Similarly, HbA1c decreased significantly in both periods (p < 0.02 and p < 0.002, respectively). Eight weeks after withdrawal of chromium supplementation, both FPG and HbA1c levels returned to their pre-intervention values. The serum lipid concentrations were not significantly influenced by chromium supplementation. Chromium supplementation could be beneficial in patients with DM2 treated with insulin, most likely due to lowered insulin resistance leading to improved glucose tolerance. This finding needs to be confirmed in a larger study.

  9. Impact of disease-management programs on metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kun; Yang, Xiaoping; Wu, Yixi; Chen, Shuru; Yin, Guoshu; Zhan, Jianjun; Lin, Chujia; Xu, Wencan; Chen, Yongsong; Lin, Dan; Xie, Peiwen; Fang, Yishan; Lin, Qiuqiang; Lin, Shaoda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of diabetes disease management program (DMP) on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients in Shantou China. A sample of 240 participants recruited from 3C study Shantou subgroup was followed up in DMP for 3 years. The DMP provided self-management education, individualized therapy plan, diabetes complications screening, and laboratory examination periodical according to clinical practice guidelines. Primary outcomes were changes in hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c). Two hundred one of the participants completed the follow-up. There was a significant decrease in the HbA1c levels after DMP implemented. The mean (± SD) pre- and post-intervention HbA1c levels were 10.26% ± 3.30% and 8.57% ± 1.57% respectively with a P value <0.001. General linear mixed model analyse demonstrated that changes in glycemic control were associated with insulin treatment regimen, frequency of Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG), diabetes diet adherence, physical activity, and duration of diabetes. DMP helped to improve glycemic control and should be general implemented in China's T1DM. Individuals with basal-bolus regimen (multiple daily injections or pump therapy), more frequency of SMBG, following a diabetes diet, more physical activity, shorter diabetes duration may derive greater benefits from DMP. PMID:28033258

  10. Impact of disease-management programs on metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: A cohort study in Shantou, China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun; Yang, Xiaoping; Wu, Yixi; Chen, Shuru; Yin, Guoshu; Zhan, Jianjun; Lin, Chujia; Xu, Wencan; Chen, Yongsong; Lin, Dan; Xie, Peiwen; Fang, Yishan; Lin, Qiuqiang; Lin, Shaoda

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of diabetes disease management program (DMP) on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients in Shantou China.A sample of 240 participants recruited from 3C study Shantou subgroup was followed up in DMP for 3 years. The DMP provided self-management education, individualized therapy plan, diabetes complications screening, and laboratory examination periodical according to clinical practice guidelines. Primary outcomes were changes in hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c).Two hundred one of the participants completed the follow-up. There was a significant decrease in the HbA1c levels after DMP implemented. The mean (± SD) pre- and post-intervention HbA1c levels were 10.26% ± 3.30% and 8.57% ± 1.57% respectively with a P value <0.001. General linear mixed model analyse demonstrated that changes in glycemic control were associated with insulin treatment regimen, frequency of Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG), diabetes diet adherence, physical activity, and duration of diabetes.DMP helped to improve glycemic control and should be general implemented in China's T1DM. Individuals with basal-bolus regimen (multiple daily injections or pump therapy), more frequency of SMBG, following a diabetes diet, more physical activity, shorter diabetes duration may derive greater benefits from DMP.

  11. Pleiotropic effects of sitagliptin versus voglibose in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled via diet and/or a single oral antihyperglycemic agent: a multicenter, randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Yukiko; Takeshita, Yumie; Kita, Yuki; Otoda, Toshiki; Kato, Ken-ichiro; Toyama-Wakakuri, Hitomi; Akahori, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Akiko; Hamaguchi, Erika; Nishimura, Yasuyuki; Kanamori, Takehiro; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A step-up strategy for diet therapy and/or single oral antihyperglycemic agent (OHA) regimens has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a primary end point, and the pleiotropic effects on metabolic and cardiovascular parameters as secondary end points, of sitagliptin versus voglibose in patients with type 2 diabetes with inadequate glycemic control while on diet therapy and/or treatment with a single OHA. Methods In this multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group trial, a total of 260 patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c levels >6.9%) were randomly assigned to receive either sitagliptin (50 mg, once daily) or voglibose (0.6 mg, thrice daily) for 12 weeks. The primary end point was HbA1c levels. Results Patients receiving sitagliptin showed a significantly greater decrease in HbA1c levels (−0.78±0.69%) compared with those receiving voglibose (−0.30±0.78%). Sitagliptin treatment also lowered serum alkaline phosphatase levels and increased serum creatinine, uric acid, cystatin-C and homeostasis model assessment-β values. Voglibose increased low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and altered serum levels of several fatty acids, and increased Δ-5 desaturase activity. Both drugs increased serum adiponectin. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was significantly lower in the sitagliptin group, due to the decreased incidence of gastrointestinal AEs. Conclusions Sitagliptin shows superior antihyperglycemic effects compared with voglibose as a first-line or second-line therapy. However, both agents possess unique pleiotropic effects that lead to reduced cardiovascular risk in Japanese people with type 2 diabetes. Trial registration number UMIN 000003503. PMID:27110370

  12. Update on diabetes diagnosis: a historical review of the dilemma of the diagnostic utility of glycohemoglobin A1c and a proposal for a combined glucose-A1c diagnostic method.

    PubMed

    Aldasouqi, Saleh A; Gossain, Ved V

    2012-01-01

    The role of glycohemoglobin A1c (A1c) for the diagnosis of diabetes has been debated for over three decades. Recently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended adding A1c as an additional criterion for diabetes diagnosis. In view of the continued debate about the diagnostic utility of A1c, and in view of the unabated burden of undiagnosed diabetes, the search for alternative diagnostic methods is discussed. A historical literature review is provided, in view of the new ADA diagnostic guidelines, and a proposal is provided for combining A1c and a glucose measurement as a diagnostic alternative/adjunct to the use of a single criterion. This proposal is based on the non-overlapping of the advantages and disadvantages of these individual tests. The cost-effectiveness of this method remains to be tested.

  13. Glucose metabolism and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Dario; Ceriello, Antonio; Esposito, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Islet dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance are both present in type 2 diabetes and are both necessary for the development of hyperglycemia. In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, large, prospective clinical studies have shown a strong relation between time-averaged mean values of glycemia, measured as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular diabetic complications. These studies are the basis for the American Diabetes Association's current recommended treatment goal that HbA1c should be <7%. The measurement of the HbA1c concentration is considered the gold standard for assessing long-term glycemia; however, it does not reveal any information on the extent or frequency of blood glucose excursions, but provides an overall mean value only. Postprandial hyperglycemia occurs frequently in patients with diabetes receiving active treatment and can occur even when metabolic control is apparently good. Interventional studies indicate that reducing postmeal glucose excursions is as important as controlling fasting plasma glucose in persons with diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. Evidence exists for a causal relation between postmeal glucose increases and microvascular and macrovascular outcomes; therefore, it is not surprising that treatment with different compounds that have specific effects on postprandial glucose regulation is accompanied by a significant improvement of many pathways supposed to be involved in diabetic complications, including oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and nuclear factor-kappaB activation. The goal of therapy should be to achieve glycemic status as near to normal as safely possible in all 3 components of glycemic control: HbA1c, fasting glucose, and postmeal glucose peak.

  14. Aldimine Formation Reaction, the First Step of the Maillard Early-phase Reaction, Might be Enhanced in Variant Hemoglobin, Hb Himeji.

    PubMed

    Koga, Masafumi; Inada, Shinya; Shimizu, Sayoko; Hatazaki, Masahiro; Umayahara, Yutaka; Nishihara, Eijun

    2015-01-01

    Hb Himeji (β140Ala→Asp) is known as a variant hemoglobin in which glycation is enhanced and HbA1c measured by immunoassay shows a high value. The phenomenon of enhanced glycation in Hb Himeji is based on the fact that the glycation product of variant hemoglobin (HbX1c) shows a higher value than HbA1c. In this study, we investigated whether aldimine formation reaction, the first step of the Maillard early-phase reaction, is enhanced in Hb Himeji in vitro. Three non-diabetic subjects with Hb Himeji and four non-diabetic subjects without variant hemoglobin were enrolled. In order to examine aldimine formation reaction, whole blood cells were incubated with 500 mg/dl of glucose at 37°C for 1 hour and were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Both HbA1c and HbX1c were not increased in this condition. After incubation with glucose, labile HbA1c (LA1c) fraction increased in the controls (1.1±0.3%). In subjects with Hb Himeji increases in the labile HbX1c (LX1c) fraction as well as the LA1c fraction were observed, and the degree of increase in the LX1c fraction was significantly higher than that of the LA1c fraction (1.8±0.1% vs. 0.5±0.2%, P<0.01). We have shown for the first time that aldimine (LX1c) formation reaction might be enhanced in Hb Himeji in vitro. The 140th amino acid in β chain of hemoglobin is suggested to be involved in aldimine formation reaction.

  15. PERFORMANCE OF A1C VERSUS OGTT FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF PREDIABETES IN A COMMUNITY-BASED SCREENING

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Jenny E.; Shah, Vallabh O.; Schrader, Ronald; Wong, Craig S.; Burge, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Reliable identification of individuals at risk for developing diabetes is critical to instituting preventative strategies. Studies suggest that the accuracy of using A1c as a sole diagnostic criterion for diabetes may be variable across different ethnic groups. We postulate that there will be lack of concordance between A1c and the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) for diagnosing prediabetes across Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White (NHW) populations. Research Design and Methods 218 asymptomatic adults at risk for Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) were assessed with A1c and OGTT for the diagnosis of prediabetes. Glucose homeostasis status was assigned as no diabetes (A1c < 5.7%), prediabetes (A1c 5.7% – 6.4%), and T2D (A1c > 6.4%). Inclusion criteria were age > 18 years and at least one of the following: a family history of diabetes, a history of gestational diabetes, Hispanic ethnicity, non-Caucasian race, or obesity. Subjects received a fasting 75-gram OGTT and A1c on the same day. Bowker’s Test of Symmetry was employed to determine agreement between the tests. Results Data from 99 Hispanic patients and 79 NHW patients were analyzed. There was no concordance between A1c and OGTT for Hispanic (p=0.002) or NHW individuals (p=0.003) with prediabetes. Conclusions A1c is discordant with OGTT among Hispanic and NHW subjects for the diagnosis of prediabetes. Sole use of A1c to designate glycemic status will result in a greater prevalence of prediabetes among Hispanic and NHW New Mexicans. PMID:27482613

  16. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation improves the detection of hyperfiltration in Chinese diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fangya; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Junxi; Guo, Kaifeng; Wu, Mian; Yu, Haoyong; Zhang, Mingliang; Bao, Yuqian; Chen, Haibing; Jia, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Hyperfiltration confers an increased risk of diabetic nephropathy. Early detection can ensure timely intervention and improved treatment outcomes. Because GFR is known to be affected by hyperglycemia, the aim of this study was to compare the influence of hyperglycemia on GFR estimations calculated by the CKD-EPI equation, the CG equation, and the MDRD equations in estimating hyperfiltration in Chinese diabetic patients. Materials and methods: The performance of the equations, compared with the measured 99mTc-DTPA glomerular filtration rate was analyzed in 3492 diabetic patients. Bias, precision, and accuracies were compared with respect to HbA1c status. The Bland-Altman method was used to evaluate the agreement among the equations with respect to the mGFR, and the receiver-operating characteristic curve method was used to evaluate diagnostic value of the three equations with respect to the detection of moderate renal failure and hyperfiltration. Results: The mean absolute bias was the smallest for the CKD-EPI equation in the HbA1c < 7.2% cohort, and the highest accuracy within ± 15% and ± 30% was also reached with the CKD-EPI equation in both cohorts. For the detection of hyperfiltration, the CKD-EPI equation exhibited the best performance with the greatest combination of sensitivity and specificity. The biases of the three equations were significantly higher in the HbA1c ≥ 10.5% subgroup compared with the HbA1c < 7.2% cohort. Conclusion: The CKD-EPI equation can be used as a screening tool for hyperfiltration and appears to be a more generalizable and accurate equation for estimating GFR in Chinese diabetic patients. PMID:26885183

  17. Problem-solving therapy for adults with diabetic retinopathy and diabetes-specific distress: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Gwyneth; O'Hare, Fleur; Saeed, Marian; Sudholz, Bronwyn; Sturrock, Bonnie A; Xie, Jing; Speight, Jane; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2017-01-01

    Objective To provide preliminary evidence for the impact of problem-solving therapy for diabetes (PST-D) in adults with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetes distress. Research design and methods In a pilot randomized controlled trial, 40 participants with DR and diabetes distress were allocated to the PST-D or control groups. Diabetes distress (DDS), depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), self-care activities (SDSCA), and HbA1c were assessed at baseline, and 3 and 6-month follow-ups. Results At the 6-month follow-up, the PST-D group showed significant improvements relative to the control group, in ‘regimen-related distress’ (PST-D: −1.3±1.4; control: −0.4±1.1), depressive symptoms (PST-D: −4.3±6.1; control: −0.3±4.6), and HbA1c (PST-D: −1.2%±1.01; control: 0.2%±1.2%) (all p<0.05). In multiple regression analysis, adjusting for baseline values and sociodemographic factors, PST-D was associated with significant improvement in ‘regimen-related distress’, depressive symptoms, and HbA1c at the 6-month follow-up (p<0.05). Conclusions PST-D is a promising intervention for improving psychological outcomes and glycemic control. A fully powered study is required to confirm these findings and examine mechanisms of change in HbA1c. Trial registration number ACTRN12616001010482; results. PMID:28243448

  18. Teneligliptin real-world efficacy assessment of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in India (TREAT-INDIA study)

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sujoy; Trivedi, Shailesh; Sanyal, Debmalya; Modi, KD; Kharb, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Teneligliptin was introduced in India in May 2015. It has gained popularity and is already widely prescribed in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This “real life” data collection was conducted to assess the efficacy of teneligliptin in Indian T2DM patients. Methods Predesigned structured proforma was used to collect information from the prescribing physicians regarding the efficacy of teneligliptin when prescribed as monotherapy as well as combination therapy with other antidiabetic drugs in T2DM patients. Information on the glycemic parameters at baseline prior to starting teneligliptin and at the end of 3 months therapy was collected. The efficacy was assessed by analyzing the mean change in 3-month values of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and postprandial plasma glucose (PPG). Results Data of 4305 patients was available for analysis. There was statistically significant improvement in mean HbA1c, FPG, and PPG with teneligliptin therapy. Means changes in HbA1c, FPG, and PPG were −1.37%±1.15%, 51.29±35.41 mg/dL, and 80.89±54.27 mg/dL, respectively. Subgroup analysis revealed that HbA1c (%) reduction with teneligliptin when used as monotherapy, add-on to metformin or add-on to metformin plus sulfonylureas combination, add-on to metformin plus alpha glucosidase inhibitor combination or add-on to insulin was 0.98±0.53, 1.07±0.83, 1.46±1.33, 1.43±0.80, and 1.55±1.05, respectively. Conclusion Real-world data suggests that teneligliptin significantly improves glycemic control in Indian patients with T2DM when prescribed either as monotherapy or as an add-on to one or more other commonly prescribed antidiabetic drugs. PMID:27877058

  19. Current medical treatment of diabetes type 2 and long term morbidity: how to balance efficacy and safety?

    PubMed

    Carrera Boada, C A; Martínez-Moreno, J M

    2013-03-01

    Current medical treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) requires special attention to different comorbidities that often are associated with hyperglycemia, such as overweight or obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, microvascular or macrovascular complications, etc. .. The control of these factors risk to health is as important as the glucose control in diabetes type 2, it is essential for the antidiabetes drugs consider these risk factors. The consensus statement published by the ADA/EASD and AACE emphasizes that the potential effects of antidiabetes medications on CV risk factors besides hyperglycemia (ie, overweight/obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia) should be considered in pharmacotherapy selection. Since T2DM is a progressive disease with worsening HbA1C values over time, monotherapy, even with different agents, will eventually fail to maintain the glycemic target. Because insulin resistance occurs in a variety of organs and tissues, many patients may achieve fasting glycemic control but develop postprandial hyperglycemia. Other issues include the risk for hypoglycaemia or weight gain with traditional glucose-lowering medications. The AACE/ACE algorithm for glycemic control is structured according to categories of HbA1C and suggests an HbA1C goal of =6.5%, although that may not be appropriate for all patients.42 The algorithm recommends monotherapy, dual therapy, or triple therapy based on initial HbA1C level of 6.5% to 7.5%, 7.6% to 9%, and >9% and reserves initiation of insulin therapy until treatment with oral or other injectable agents has failed. GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors are novel options to improve glycemic control and reduce the incidence of weight gain. Combination therapy with newer and traditional agents improves glycemic control with a low incidence of hypoglycemia.

  20. Serum copper, zinc, and iron levels, and markers of carbohydrate metabolism in postmenopausal women with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Skalnaya, Margarita G; Skalny, Anatoly V; Tinkov, Alexey A

    2016-11-16

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate serum level of copper, zinc, iron and metabolic parameters in postmenopausal women with diabetes. A total of 413 postmenopausal women were enrolled in the current study. Women were divided into 4 groups with equal age and body mass index according to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (≤5.5; 5.5-6.0; 6.0-6.5; >6.5%). Serum Fe, Cu, and Zn levels were assessed using inductively-coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. Blood HbA1c, serum glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, and ceruloplasmin (Cp) were assessed using commercial kits. Homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and transferrin (Tf) saturation were calculated. The obtained data demonstrate that every 0.5% increase in HbA1c levels from 5.5% is associated with a significant elevation of glucose, insulin, CRP, and HOMA-IR values. Diabetic patients were characterized by significantly higher Fe (11%), Cu (8%), and Zn (6%) levels as compared to the controls. At the same time, the overall trend to increased metal levels in association with HbA1c was detected only for Fe (p<0.05) and Cu (p<0.05). Serum ferritin levels in diabetic women was 3-fold higher than in the controls, whereas Tf saturation was decreased by 35%. Serum Cp levels were significantly increased by 19% in prediabetes, whereas in diabetic postmenopausal women no such increase was observed. A significant elevation of total metal concentration in diabetic subjects without a concomitant elevation of transport proteins may be indicative of increased levels of "free" Fe and Cu, known to be toxic.

  1. Relationship between the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level and remission of diabetic nephropathy with microalbuminuria: a 3-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Seki, N; Matsumoto, T; Fukazawa, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level and progression or remission of diabetic nephropathy with microalbuminuria for 3 years. The subjects were 100 Japanese type 2 diabetes mellitus outpatients with microalbuminuria. Associations between metabolic parameters at baseline [HbA1c, systolic blood pressure (SBP), urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and BNP] and the progression or remission of diabetic nephropathy were examined for 3 years. A total of 83 patients were examined at the end of the 3-year period, including 17 with remission to normoalbuminuria, 47 with continuing microalbuminuria, and 19 with progression to macroalbuminuria. HbA1c, ACR, and BNP differed significantly among the 3 groups (p=0.024, p<0.001, p=0.002, respectively). Among baseline factors, HbA1c and BNP were significant predictors of the percentage increase in ACR for 3 years in multiple linear regression analysis (β=0.259, p=0.02; β=0.299, p=0.007, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, HbA1c and ACR were independently associated with progression of diabetic nephropathy (p=0.008, p=0.023, respectively), and ACR and BNP were independently associated with remission of diabetic nephropathy (p=0.029, p=0.012, respectively). ROC curve analysis gave a cutoff value for BNP of 14.9 pg/ml for prediction of remission of diabetic nephropathy (p=0.016). The BNP level has a relationship with diabetic nephropathy and a low BNP level predicts remission of diabetic nephropathy. Therefore, monitoring of BNP can play an important role in management of diabetic nephropathy.

  2. The changes of subtypes in pediatric diabetes and their clinical and laboratory characteristics over the last 20 years

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Eun Byul; Lee, Hae Sang; Shim, Young Seok; Jeong, Hwal Rim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We studied the changes in subtypes of diabetes mellitus (DM) in children and evaluated the characteristics of each group over the past 20 years. In addition, we also examined the correlation between the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values at the time of diagnosis and lipid profiles. Methods The patients were divided into 2 groups: there were a total of 190 patients under 20 years of age firstly diagnosed with DM in Ajou University Hospital. The patients in groups I and II were diagnosed from September 1995 to December 2004 and from January 2005 to April 2014, respectively. Results The characteristics were compared between the 2 groups of patients. The result showed an increase in percentage of type 2 diabetes and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) patients between the 2 groups. HbA1c and total cholesterol level had statistical significances to explain increasing the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level among age, HbA1c, total cholesterol level, and z-scores of weight and body mass index (BMI) in type 2 diabetes. R-square was 0.074. However, z-score of BMI and total cholesterol level, not HbA1c, had statistical significances in type 1 diabetic patients. R-square was 0.323. Conclusion The increase in the proportions of both type 2 diabetes and MODY in the last 10 years needed to be reminded when diagnosing the subtypes of DM, and the dyslipidemia should be attended more as a common problem of pediatric diabetic patients. PMID:27462584

  3. Estimating the predictive validity of diabetic animal models in rosiglitazone studies.

    PubMed

    Varga, O E; Zsíros, N; Olsson, I A S

    2015-06-01

    For therapeutic studies, predictive validity of animal models - arguably the most important feature of animal models in terms of human relevance - can be calculated retrospectively by obtaining data on treatment efficacy from human and animal trials. Using rosiglitazone as a case study, we aim to determine the predictive validity of animal models of diabetes, by analysing which models perform most similarly to humans during rosiglitazone treatment in terms of changes in standard diabetes diagnosis parameters (glycosylated haemoglobin [HbA1c] and fasting glucose levels). A further objective of this paper was to explore the impact of four covariates on the predictive capacity: (i) diabetes induction method; (ii) drug administration route; (iii) sex of animals and (iv) diet during the experiments. Despite the variable consistency of animal species-based models with the human reference for glucose and HbA1c treatment effects, our results show that glucose and HbA1c treatment effects in rats agreed better with the expected values based on human data than in other species. Induction method was also found to be a substantial factor affecting animal model performance. The study concluded that regular reassessment of animal models can help to identify human relevance of each model and adapt research design for actual research goals.

  4. Self-efficacy, self-care behaviors and glycemic control among type-2 diabetes patients attending two private clinics in Yangon, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Wynn Nyunt, Sandhi; Howteerakul, Nopporn; Suwannapong, Nawarat; Rajatanun, Thitipat

    2010-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to estimate the prevalence of glycemic control and its associated factors among type-2 diabetes patients attending two private clinics in Yangon, Myanmar. Two hundred sixty-six diabetes patients attending two private diabetes clinics in Yangon during February and March, 2009 were included in the study. The participants completed a structured questionnaire. HbA(1c) was used as the index for glycemic control. The prevalence of successful glycemic control (HbA(1c) < or =7%) was 27.1%. The median HbA(1c) value was 7.8%. About 62.0% of patients had high self-efficacy levels, and 30.8% had good self-care behavior. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed four variables associated with glycemic control: age > or =60 years (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.17-5.21), taking one oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA) (OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.26-5.19), being overweight (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.02-3.95) and having a high self-efficacy level (OR 5.29, 95% CI 2.20-12.75). Interventions to increase diabetic patient self-efficacy levels and self-care behavior, especially related to diet and exercise, are needed to reduce poor glycemic control.

  5. Sitagliptin in type 2 diabetes mellitus: Efficacy after five years of therapy.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Angela; Maffioli, Pamela

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the positive effects of sitagliptin were maintained even after five years of treatment. Starting from 2008 to today, we treated 624 patients, not well controlled by current therapy, with the addition of sitagliptin 100 mg/die. Patients included 216 subjects treated with metformin, 206 treated with sulfonylureas, and 202 treated with pioglitazone. Sitagliptin was added to metformin, sulfonylureas and pioglitazone in monotherapy, respectively, and the data were compared with those of 620 patients treated with sulfonylureas+metformin, pioglitazone+metformin and pioglitazone+sulfonylureas matched for age, sex, diabetes duration. We recorded that the addition of sitagliptin to current hypoglycemic therapy led to a reduction of HbA1c similar to that obtained with sulfonylureas after two years. After five years of treatment, changes in HbA1c suggest a better glycemic control over the long term with sitagliptin compared to other treatments, particularly when compared with sulfonylureas. The other parameters evaluated as fasting plasma glucose, post-prandial plasma glucose and insulin levels, confirm the trends observed for the value of HbA1c. Regarding BMI, it increased with sulfonylureas and pioglitazone compared to sitagliptin. Patients treated with sulfonylureas had a higher incidence of hypoglycemia compared to sitagliptin. In conclusion, sitagliptin seems to maintain its positive effects on glycemia and fasting plasma insulin on the long term.

  6. Improvement in medication adherence and self-management of diabetes with a clinical pharmacy program: a randomized controlled trial in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy at a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cani, Catarina Gomes; da Silva Girão Lopes, Laura; Queiroz, Márcia; Nery, Márcia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a clinical pharmacy program on health outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy at a teaching hospital in Brazil. METHOD: A randomized controlled trial with a 6-month follow-up period was performed in 70 adults, aged 45 years or older, with type 2 diabetes who were taking insulin and who had an HbA1c level ≥8%. Patients in the control group (CG) (n = 36) received standard care, patients in the intervention group (IG) (n = 34) received an individualized pharmacotherapeutic care plan and diabetes education. The primary outcome measure was change in HbA1c. Secondary outcomes included diabetes and medication knowledge, adherence to medication, insulin injection and home blood glucose monitoring techniques and diabetes-related quality of life. Outcomes were evaluated at baseline and 6 months using questionnaires. RESULTS: Diabetes knowledge, medication knowledge, adherence to medication and correct insulin injection and home blood glucose monitoring techniques significantly improved in the intervention group but remained unchanged in the control group. At the end of the study, mean HbA1c values in the control group remained unchanged but were significantly reduced in the intervention group. Diabetes-related quality of life significantly improved in the intervention group but worsened significantly in the control group. CONCLUSION: The program improved health outcomes and resulted in better glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy. PMID:25789518

  7. Evaluation of Antidiabetic and Antihyperlipidemic Effects of Peganum harmala Seeds in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Komeili, Gholamreza; Hashemi, Mohammad; Bameri-Niafar, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic properties of hydroalcoholic extract of Peganum harmala in streptozotocin-induced diabetic male rats. In an experimental study, 64 normal Wistar albino male rats (200–230 g) were randomly divided into 8 groups. Control and diabetic rats were treated with normal saline and three different doses (30, 60, and 120 mg/kg) of hydroalcoholic extract of Peganum harmala seeds for 4 weeks orally. At the end of treatment, blood samples were taken and glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-c, HDL-c, malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TCA), ALT, AST, GGT, bilirubin, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) were determined. STZ-induced diabetic rats showed significant changes in the values of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-c, MDA, TAC, ALT, AST, GGT, bilirubin, and HbA1C in comparison with normal rats. Administration of the extract to diabetic rats resulted in a remarkable decrease in glucose, lipid profiles, MDA, ALT, AST, GGT, bilirubin, and HbA1C levels and increase in TAC relative to diabetic group. The results of this study indicated that hydroalcoholic extract of Peganum harmala seeds possesses antidiabetic and hypolipidemic activities and could be useful in treatment of diabetes. PMID:27190643

  8. Evaluation of Antidiabetic and Antihyperlipidemic Effects of Peganum harmala Seeds in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Komeili, Gholamreza; Hashemi, Mohammad; Bameri-Niafar, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic properties of hydroalcoholic extract of Peganum harmala in streptozotocin-induced diabetic male rats. In an experimental study, 64 normal Wistar albino male rats (200-230 g) were randomly divided into 8 groups. Control and diabetic rats were treated with normal saline and three different doses (30, 60, and 120 mg/kg) of hydroalcoholic extract of Peganum harmala seeds for 4 weeks orally. At the end of treatment, blood samples were taken and glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-c, HDL-c, malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TCA), ALT, AST, GGT, bilirubin, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) were determined. STZ-induced diabetic rats showed significant changes in the values of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-c, MDA, TAC, ALT, AST, GGT, bilirubin, and HbA1C in comparison with normal rats. Administration of the extract to diabetic rats resulted in a remarkable decrease in glucose, lipid profiles, MDA, ALT, AST, GGT, bilirubin, and HbA1C levels and increase in TAC relative to diabetic group. The results of this study indicated that hydroalcoholic extract of Peganum harmala seeds possesses antidiabetic and hypolipidemic activities and could be useful in treatment of diabetes.

  9. A new hemoglobin variant found during Hb A1c measurement: Hb Hokusetsu [beta52(D3)Asp-->Gly].

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, T; Miyazaki, A; Kishikawa, M; Shimizu, A; Kishida, O; Sumi, S; Tsubakio, T; Imai, K

    1998-07-01

    A new beta chain variant was accidentally found through the assay of Hb A1c in a diabetic patient. The variant was detected by polyacrylamide gel isoelectrofocusing and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. For sequence determination, globin was cleaved with combination of trypsin and lysyl endopeptidase and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography connected to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. An abnormal betaT-5 peptide was found by reconstructed selected ion monitoring. The collision-induced dissociation spectrum of an ion derived from the abnormal betaT-5 peptide revealed a new substitution, [beta52(D3)Asp-->Gly], named Hb Hokusetsu. The sequence was confirmed with an automatic sequencer using peptides isolated by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Amplification of the beta-globin exon 2 and nucleotide sequencing revealed a GAT-->GGT mutation in codon 52 corresponding to an Asp-->Gly replacement. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis of the hemolysate showed a reasonable value of 10.4% for glycated globin. The variant migrated as Hb S on isoelectrofocusing. Hematological analysis revealed normal parameters. The patient's hemolysate showed normal stability in the isopropanol test. Oxygen equilibrium studies on the patient's red blood cells and hemolysate showed no significant change in oxygen affinity or cooperativity.

  10. Hb A1c Determination by Capillary Electrophoresis is an Efficient Method for Detecting β-Thalassemias and Hemoglobin Variants.

    PubMed

    Orts, Juan A; Zúñiga, Ángel; Bello, Yanis; Fabregat, Aleix B; Vicente, Ana I

    2016-09-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (Hb A1c) determination by multicapillary zone electrophoresis (MZE) can additionally be used to detect Hb A2, Hb F and most common hemoglobin (Hb) variants. We assessed the effectiveness of this method for detecting β-thalassemia (β-thal), δβ-thalassemia (δβ-thal) and most common Hb variants. Moreover, Hb F/Hb A2 is evaluated as an index for discriminating between β- and δβ-thal traits. The theoretical β-thalassemia major (β-TM) birth rate in our healthcare area is calculated and contrasted with real data. A MZE technique was used for Hb A1c measurements in 27,724 patients. Previous criteria for carrier detection were established and subsequently confirmed by molecular biology techniques. Positive predictive value (PPV) was 100.0%. The prevalence of β-thal trait (including δβ-thal) was 0.34%. The most prevalent mutations (estimated per 100,000 population) were HBB: c.118C > T (57.7%), HBB: c.93-21G>A (50.5%), HBB: c.92 + 1G > A (43.3%), HBB: c.92 + 6T > C (32.5%) and HBB: c.20delA (18.0%) for β-thalassemias, and Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) (32.5%) and Hb J-Baltimore (HBB:c.3880T>A) (28.9%) for Hb variants. We found a paradoxical result between the theoretical β-TM birth rate and real data. We calculated an optimal Hb F/Hb A2 index cutoff of 0.71 for discriminating between β- and δβ-thal traits. This method is highly cost-effective for detecting β-thalassemias and common Hb variants. Prevalence results match previous data for the Spanish population. Heterogeneity of mutations in Spain has markedly increased as a consequence of migration. The Hb F/Hb A2 index cutoff could be used to predict δβ-thal trait.

  11. Diabetes in midlife and cognitive change over 20 years: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive Study

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Andreea M.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Coresh, Josef; Albert, Marilyn; Couper, David; Griswold, Michael; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Windham, B. Gwen; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with dementia risk, however evidence is limited for possible associations of diabetes and pre-diabetes with cognitive decline. Objective To determine if diabetes in mid-life is associated with 20-year cognitive decline, and to characterize long-term cognitive decline across clinical categories of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Design Prospective cohort. Setting The community-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Participants 13351 black and white adults aged 48-67 years at baseline (1990-1992). Measurements Diabetes was defined by self-report of physician diagnosis or medication use or HbA1c≥6.5%. Undiagnosed diabetes, pre-diabetes, and glucose control in persons with diagnosed diabetes were defined using clinical categories of HbA1c. Delayed Word Recall, Digit Symbol Substitution, and Word Fluency tests were used to assess cognitive performance, and were summarized using a global Z-score. Results Diabetes in midlife was associated with significantly greater cognitive decline over 20 years (adjusted global Z-score difference=-0.15, 95% CI:-0.22,-0.08), representing a 19% greater decline than those without diabetes. Cognitive decline was significantly greater among persons with pre-diabetes (HbA1c 5.7-6.4%) than those without diabetes and HbA1c<5.7%. Participants with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c≥7.0%) had a larger decline compared to persons whose diabetes was controlled (adjusted global Z-score difference=-0.16,p-value=0.071). Longer duration of diabetes was also associated with greater late-life cognitive decline (p-value-for-trend=<0.001). No significant differences in the rates of declines were seen in whites compared to blacks (p-value-for-interaction=0.4357). Limitations Single measurement of HbA1c at baseline, only one test to per cognitive domain, potential geographic confounding of race comparisons. Conclusions These findings suggest that diabetes prevention and glucose control in

  12. An Analysis of the Assessment of Glycated Hemoglobin Using A1cNow+™ Point-of-Care Device Compared to Central Laboratory Testing—an Important Addition to Pharmacist-Managed Diabetes Programs?

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    The diabetes epidemic is accelerating rapidly. If no progress is made in early detection, then early intervention and treatment-to-goal diabetes care will become an overwhelming burden on our health care system. Better utilization of self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes not on insulin could be achieved with regular review of hemoglobin A1c (A1C) values. Educating patients about the importance of diet, exercise, and medication compliance is enhanced when evidence of average blood glucose control can be presented to the patient directly. Affordable, accurate point-of-care testing of A1C with A1cNow+™ (Bayer HealthCare, Terrytown, NY) utilized in pharmacist-managed outpatient diabetes programs may prove to be an important clinical tool for improving patient outcomes and reducing the cost of the expanding diabetes epidemic. PMID:19885268

  13. Determinants of Glycated Hemoglobin in Subjects With Impaired Glucose Tolerance: Subanalysis of the Japan Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Sakane, Naoki; Sato, Juichi; Tsushita, Kazuyo; Tsujii, Satoru; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Kawazu, Shoji; Sato, Yuzo; Usui, Takeshi; Kamae, Isao; Yoshida, Toshihide; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Sato, Shigeaki; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Kaoru; Kuzuya, Hideshi; Group, JDPP Research

    2017-01-01

    Background Limited evidence is available about the relationship of lifestyle factors with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. The aim of study was to identify such determinant factors of HbA1c in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Methods This cross-sectional study included 121 men and 124 women with impaired glucose tolerance, who were diagnosed based on a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Demographic and biochemical parameters, including the body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h post-load glucose (2-h PG), and HbA1c, were measured. The pancreatic β-cell function and insulin resistance were assessed using homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-β). Dietary intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Results The levels of FPG, 2-h PG, and carbohydrate intake were correlated with the HbA1c level in men, while the FPG and 2-h PG levels were correlated with the HbA1c level in women. In multiple regression analyses, BMI, FPG, 2-h PG, and white rice intake were associated with HbA1c levels in men, while BMI, FPG, HOMA-β, and bread intake were associated with HbA1c levels in women. Conclusions The present findings suggest that a substantial portion of HbA1c may be composed of not only glycemic but also several lifestyle factors in men with impaired glucose tolerance. These factors can be taken into consideration as modifiable determinants in assessing the HbA1c level for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of the disease course. PMID:28270897

  14. Hemoglobin A1C above threshold levels are associated with decreased β-cell function in overweight Latino youth

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Corral, Claudia M.; Vargas, Lisa G.; Goran, Michael I.; Weigensberg, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine, in an overweight pediatric population, if an A1C-determined high risk, pre-diabetic state (A1C ≥6.0–6.4%) is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity and β-cell dysfunction, known factors in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Study design We divided 206 healthy overweight Latino adolescents (124 male/82 female; age 13.1±2.0 yrs), into 2 groups: Lower Risk (LR, n=179) had A1C <6.0%; and High Risk (HR, n=27) had A1C 6.0–6.4%. Measures included A1C; OGTT fasting & 2-hr glucose and insulin; insulin sensitivity (SI), acute insulin response (AIR), and disposition index (DI, an index of β-cell function) by frequently sampled FSIVGTT with minimal modeling. Body fat was determined by DEXA. Results Compared with the LR group, the HR group had 21% lower SI (1.21±0.06 vs. 1.54±0.13, p<0.05), 30% lower AIR (928±102 vs. 1342±56, p<0.01), and 31% lower DI (1390±146 vs. 2023±83, p=0.001) after adjusting for age and total percent body fat. Conclusion These data provide clear evidence of greater impairment of β-cell function in those overweight Latino children with A1C 6.0–6.4%, and would thereby support the adoption of the International Expert Committee A1C-determined definition of high risk state for overweight children at risk for type 2 diabetes. PMID:22137671

  15. Current state of type 1 diabetes treatment in the U.S.: updated data from the T1D Exchange clinic registry.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kellee M; Foster, Nicole C; Beck, Roy W; Bergenstal, Richard M; DuBose, Stephanie N; DiMeglio, Linda A; Maahs, David M; Tamborlane, William V

    2015-06-01

    To examine the overall state of metabolic control and current use of advanced diabetes technologies in the U.S., we report recent data collected on individuals with type 1 diabetes participating in the T1D Exchange clinic registry. Data from 16,061 participants updated between 1 September 2013 and 1 December 2014 were compared with registry enrollment data collected from 1 September 2010 to 1 August 2012. Mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was assessed by year of age from <4 to >75 years. The overall average HbA1c was 8.2% (66 mmol/mol) at enrollment and 8.4% (68 mmol/mol) at the most recent update. During childhood, mean HbA1c decreased from 8.3% (67 mmol/mol) in 2-4-year-olds to 8.1% (65 mmol/mol) at 7 years of age, followed by an increase to 9.2% (77 mmol/mol) in 19-year-olds. Subsequently, mean HbA1c values decline gradually until ∼30 years of age, plateauing at 7.5-7.8% (58-62 mmol/mol) beyond age 30 until a modest drop in HbA1c below 7.5% (58 mmol/mol) in those 65 years of age. Severe hypoglycemia (SH) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) remain all too common complications of treatment, especially in older (SH) and younger patients (DKA). Insulin pump use increased slightly from enrollment (58-62%), and use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) did not change (7%). Although the T1D Exchange registry findings are not population based and could be biased, it is clear that there remains considerable room for improving outcomes of treatment of type 1 diabetes across all age-groups. Barriers to more effective use of current treatments need to be addressed and new therapies are needed to achieve optimal metabolic control in people with type 1 diabetes.

  16. Insulin resistance, low-grade inflammation and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Llauradó, G; Gallart, L; Tirado, R; Megia, A; Simón, I; Caixàs, A; Giménez-Palop, O; Berlanga, E; Vendrell, J; González-Clemente, J M

    2012-02-01

    To assess the relationships between insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who do not have clinical macrovascular complications. A total of 120 subjects diagnosed with T1DM 14 years before were evaluated for the following: (1) sex, age, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), blood pressure, smoking, alcohol intake, insulin dose, HbA1c and lipid profile; (2) microvascular complications; (3) plasma concentrations of soluble fractions of tumour necrosis factor-α receptors type 1 and 2, interleukin-6, adiponectin, leptin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP); and (4) insulin resistance (estimation of the glucose disposal rate-eGDR). Those subjects with an eGDR below the median of the same sex group were classified as insulin resistant and the others as insulin sensitive. Insulin-resistant men, compared to the insulin-sensitive, had higher WHR (0.89 ± 0.08 vs. 0.83 ± 0.05; P < 0.01), higher systolic [121 (118-125) vs. 114 (108-120) mmHg; P = 0.01] and diastolic [73 (66-80) vs. 67 (70-73) mmHg; P = 0.02] blood pressures, higher HbA1c values [8.7 (8.1-9.9) vs. 7.5 (7.2-8.0) %; P < 0.01] and higher hs-CRP concentrations [1.16 (0.61-3.20) vs. 0.49 (0.31-0.82) mg/dl; P = 0.01], but no other significant differences between groups were found. Insulin-resistant women had higher WHR and HbA1c values, compared to the insulin-sensitive, but they did not have any other differences. In men, hs-CRP correlated significantly with WHR and HbA1c (r = 0.363; P = 0.016 and r = 0.317; P = 0.036, respectively), after adjusting for age, alcohol intake, smoking and microvascular complications. Insulin-resistant men with T1DM have an increase in plasma concentrations of hs-CRP. Central obesity and HbA1c are its main determinants.

  17. Effectiveness of Standardized Nursing Care Plans in Health Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Two-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Valladolid, Juan; Salinero-Fort, Miguel A.; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma; de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Abánades-Herranz, Juan C.; Arnal-Selfa, Rosa; Andrés, Ana López-

    2012-01-01

    Background Implementation of a standardized language in Nursing Care Plans (SNCP) allows for increased efficiency in nursing data management. However, the potential relationship with patientś health outcomes remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SNCP implementation, based on North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), in the improvement of metabolic, weight, and blood pressure control of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) patients. Methods A two-year prospective follow-up study, in routine clinical practice conditions. 31 primary health care centers (Spain) participated with 24,124 T2DM outpatients. Data was collected from Computerized Clinical Records; SNCP were identified using NANDA and NIC taxonomies. Descriptive and ANCOVA analyses were conducted. Results 18,320 patients were identified in the Usual Nursing Care (UNC) group and 5,168 in the SNCP group. At the two-year follow-up, the SNCP group improved all parameters except LDL cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure. We analyzed data adjustming by the baseline value for these variables and variables with statistically significant differences between groups at baseline visit. Results indicated a lowering of all parameters except HbA1c, but a statistically significant reduction was only observed with diastolic blood pressure results. However, the adjusted reduction of diastolic blood pressure is of little clinical relevance. Greater differences of control values for diastolic blood pressure, HbA1c, LDL-cholesterol and Body Mass Index were found in the SNCP group, but only reached statistical significance for HbA1c. A greater proportion of patients with baseline HbA1c ≥7 decreased to <7% at the two-year follow-up in the SNCP group than in the UNC group (16.9% vs. 15%; respectively; p = 0.01). Conclusions Utilization of SNCP was helpful in achieving glycemic control targets in poorly controlled patients with T2DM

  18. Levels of Apolipoprotein A1, B100 and Lipoprotein (a) in Controlled and Uncontrolled Diabetic Patients and in Non-Diabetic Healthy People

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kinjal Prahaladbhai; Makadia, Mayur Goradhanbhai; Shah, Aashna Darshanbhai; Chaudhari, Kaushik Salubhai; Nilayangode, Haridas Neelakandan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is always a multifactorial metabolic disorder having a wide range of abnormalities in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. Dyslipidemia is a natural process of DM causing abnormal variations of different lipoproteins and it is one of the significant risk factors for Cardiovascular Disorder (CVD). There is a need to closely evaluate newer approaches in case of DM because even if dyslipidemia is treated, there is always a risk of CVDs in DM patients because of the hyperglycemia itself. So, lipid abnormalities should be assessed aggressively and treated as part of diabetes care. Apolipoprotein B100 (Apo B100), Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) and Lipoprotein (a) {Lp(a)} are newer markers which are always welcome and necessary as many of the reported cases with normal conventional lipid profile have developed cardiac events. Aim Study the correlation between glycemic control and the levels of Apo A1, Apo B100 and Lp(a). Materials and Methods Total 56 patients of (DM) diagnosed on the basis of American Diabetic Association guidelines were recruited, out of which 28 were identified as uncontrolled-diabetic patients and remaining 28 as controlled-diabetics on the basis of Glycosylated HbA1c (HbA1c). The control group consisted of normal healthy 28 individuals. Apo B100, Apo A1 and Lp(a) along with traditional lipid profile, Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS) and HbA1c were estimated in all the subjects. Results Apo B100/Apo A1 ratio and Lp(a) levels showed highly significant difference (p-value <0.001) between uncontrolled diabetics, controlled diabetics and healthy Controls. Apo B100/Apo A1 ratio and Lp(a) showed significant positive correlations with HbA1c (r= 0.494, p <0.0001) and with each other. Conclusion Apo B100/Apo A1 ratio and Lp(a) show a highly significant positive relationship with glucose tolerance of the patients as reflected in the HbA1c values. If proper glycemic control is maintained, the levels of Apo B100/Apo A1 ratio and Lp

  19. Hope matters to the glycemic control of adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fábio R M; Sigulem, Daniel; Areco, Kelsy C N; Gabbay, Monica A L; Dib, Sergio A; Bernardo, Viviane

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the association of hope and its factors with depression and glycemic control in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. A total of 113 patients were invited to participate. Significant negative correlations were found between hope and HbA1c and also between hope and depression. Hope showed a significant association with HbA1c and depression in the stepwise regression model. Among the hope factors, "inner positive expectancy" was significantly associated with HbA1c and depression. This study supports that hope matters to glycemic control and depression. Intervention strategies focusing on hope should be further explored.

  20. Effectiveness of a structured educational intervention using psychological delivery methods in children and adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes: a cluster-randomized controlled trial of the CASCADE intervention

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Deborah; Thompson, Rebecca; Sawtell, Mary; Allen, Elizabeth; Cairns, John; Smith, Felicity; Jamieson, Elizabeth; Hargreaves, Katrina; Ingold, Anne; Brooks, Lucy; Wiggins, Meg; Oliver, Sandy; Jones, Rebecca; Elbourne, Diana; Santos, Andreia; Wong, Ian C K; O'Neil, Simon; Strange, Vicki; Hindmarsh, Peter; Annan, Francesca; Viner, Russell M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children and adolescents is increasing worldwide with a particular increase in children <5 years. Fewer than 1 in 6 children and adolescents achieve recommended glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values. Methods A pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial assessed the efficacy of a clinic-based structured educational group incorporating psychological approaches to improve long-term glycemic control, quality of life and psychosocial functioning in children and adolescents with T1D. 28 pediatric diabetes services were randomized to deliver the intervention or standard care. 362 children (8–16 years) with HbA1c≥8.5% were recruited. Outcomes were HbA1c at 12 and 24 months, hypoglycemia, admissions, self-management skills, intervention compliance, emotional and behavioral adjustment, and quality of life. A process evaluation collected data from key stakeholder groups in order to evaluate the feasibility of delivering the intervention. Results 298/362 patients (82.3%) provided HbA1c at 12 months and 284/362 (78.5%) at 24 months. The intervention did not improve HbA1c at 12 months (intervention effect 0.11, 95% CI −0.28 to 0.50, p=0.584), or 24 months (intervention effect 0.03, 95% CI −0.36 to 0.41, p=0.891). There were no significant changes in remaining outcomes. 96/180 (53%) families in the intervention arm attended at least 1 module. The number of modules attended did not affect outcome. Reasons for low uptake included difficulties organizing groups and work and school commitments. Those with highest HbA1cs were less likely to attend. Mean cost of the intervention was £683 per child. Conclusions Significant challenges in the delivery of a structured education intervention using psychological techniques to enhance engagement and behavior change delivered by diabetes nurses and dietitians in routine clinical practice were found. The intervention did not improve HbA1c in children and adolescents with poor control

  1. Continuous insulin therapy versus multiple insulin injections in the management of type 1 diabetes: a longitutinal study

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria Estela Bellini; Liberatore, Raphael Del Roio; Custodio, Rodrigo; Martinelli, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy as treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: 40 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (21 female) with ages between 10 and 20 years (mean=14.2) and mean duration of diabetes of 7 years used multiple doses of insulin for at least 6 months and after that, continuous insulin infusion therapy for at least 6 months. Each one of the patients has used multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy. For analysis of HbA1c, mean glycated hemoglobin levels (mHbA1c) were obtained during each treatment period (multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy period). Results: Although mHbA1c levels were lower during continuous insulin infusion therapy the difference was not statistically significant. During multiple doses of insulin, 14.2% had mHbA1c values below 7.5% vs. 35.71% while on continuous insulin infusion therapy; demonstrating better glycemic control with the use of continuous insulin infusion therapy. During multiple doses of insulin, 15–40 patients have severe hypoglycemic events versus 5–40 continuous insulin infusion therapy. No episodes of ketoacidosis events were recorded. Conclusions: This is the first study with this design comparing multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy in Brazil showing no significant difference in HbA1c; hypoglycemic events were less frequent during continuous insulin infusion therapy than during multiple doses of insulin and the percentage of patients who achieved a HbA1c less than 7.5% was greater during continuous insulin infusion therapy than multiple doses of insulin therapy. PMID:26826879

  2. A Simple and Easy Process for the Determination of Estimated Plasma Glucose Level in Patients Presenting to Hospital: An Example of Multicentric Data Mining.

    PubMed

    Serdar, Muhittin A; Koldaş, Macit; Serteser, Mustafa; Akın, Okhan; Sonmez, Cigdem; Gülbahar, Ozlem; Akbıyık, Filiz; Ünsal, Ibrahim

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relation between the simultaneous fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1c in a large population of patients presenting to the hospital, based on various measurement methods available for HbA1c. HbA1c levels of 162,210 patients presenting to various hospitals and laboratories were measured based on seven different systems, and at the same time, eAG levels were calculated based on HbA1c levels. The correlation coefficients (r) between serum plasma glucose and HbA1c levels were found to be 0.809, 0.774, 0.779, 0.817, 0.704, 0.796, and 0.747 in Bio-Rad Variant II, Tosoh G8, ADAMS A1c, Trinity Boronate Affinity, Chromsystems HPLC, Roche Tina-quant, and Abbott Architect, respectively. The concordance correlation coefficients between the eAG levels as calculated with the formulas provided in the text and the eAG levels as calculated according to NGSP directions (where eAG = (28.7*HbA1c) - 46.7) were found to be between 0.9339 and 0.9866. Despite the progress made for the standardization of HbA1c measurements, the relation between serum glucose and HbA1c still demonstrated certain discrepancies pertaining to the differences in measurement methodologies. As a conclusion, each laboratory could determine different eAG levels depending on the data originated by their individual analyzer.

  3. Do Pre-Existing Diabetes Social Support or Depressive Symptoms Influence the Effectiveness of a Diabetes Management Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Kieffer, Edith; Spencer, Michael; Sinco, Brandy; Palmisano, Gloria; Valerio, Melissa; Nicklett, Emily; Heisler, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Objective Examine influences of diabetes-specific social support (D-SS) and depressive symptoms on glycemic control over time, among adults randomized to a diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) intervention or usual care. Methods Data were from 108 African-American and Latino participants in a six-month intervention trial. Multivariable linear regression models assessed associations between baseline D-SS from family and friends and depressive symptoms with changes in HbA1c. We then examined whether baseline D-SS or depression moderated intervention-associated effects on HbA1c. Results Higher baseline D-SS was associated with larger improvements in HbA1c (adjusted ΔHbA1c -0.39% for each +1-point D-SS, p=0.02), independent of intervention-associated HbA1c decreases. Baseline depressive symptoms had no significant association with subsequent HbA1c change. Neither D-SS nor depression moderated intervention-associated effects on HbA1c. Conclusions and Practice Implications Diabetes self-management education and support programs have potential to improve glycemic control for participants starting with varying levels of social support and depressive symptoms. Participants starting with more support for diabetes management from family and friends improved HbA1c significantly more over six months than those with less support, independent of additional significant DSME/S intervention-associated HbA1c improvements. Social support from family and friends may improve glycemic control in ways additive to DSME/S. PMID:26234800

  4. Re-evaluation of glycated hemoglobin and glycated albumin with continuous glucose monitoring system as markers of glycemia in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Isoda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Kojima, Motoyasu; Inoue, Kanako; Murayama, Kenichiro; Matsuda, Yayoi; Anzai, Keizo

    2017-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis (LC) is frequently accompanied by glucose intolerance. The present study was designed to determine whether glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and glycated albumin (GA) were predictive markers of glycemia, as determined by a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS), in patients with LC. A total of 30 patients with LC, including 3, 19, 5, 2 and 1 with LC due to hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, alcohol and unknown causes, respectively, were assessed by CGMS. The average, maximum and minimum blood glucose (BG) levels were measured by CGMS, and correlated with HbA1c and GA. The average, maximum and minimum BG in these individuals were 142±38.7, 209.3±65.7 and 85.1±25.4 mg/dl, respectively. HbA1c was significantly correlated with average BG (r=0.447, P=0.015) and maximum BG (r=0.523, P=0.004). In addition, GA was significantly correlated with average BG (r=0.687, P<0.001) and maximum BG (r=0.648, P<0.001). Neither HbA1c nor GA was significantly correlated with minimum BG. Correlation analysis yielded formulas by which HbA1c and GA were predictive of average BG in individuals with LC: Average BG=19.2 × HbA1c (%) + 36.5 and average BG=6.6 × GA (%) + 13.0, respectively. In conclusion, HbA1c and GA showed significant correlations with average and maximum BG, as determined by CGMS. The derived formulas allow for estimates of average BG based on HbA1c and GA, and may contribute to the control of glycemia in patients with LC. PMID:28123707

  5. Glycemic Control and Urinary Incontinence in Women with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Andrew J.; Thai, Julie N.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Although many studies have shown that diabetes increases the risk for urinary incontinence, it is unclear whether poor glycemic control in women with diabetes is associated with incontinence. This study aims to determine the relationship between the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level and urinary incontinence in a large, diverse cohort of older women. Methods We examined 6026 older women who responded to a survey (62% response rate) and were enrolled in the Diabetes and Aging Study, an ethnically stratified random sample of patients with diabetes enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Our primary independent variable was the mean of all HbA1c measurements in the year preceding the survey. Outcomes included the presence/absence of incontinence and limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. We used modified Poisson regression and ordinal logistic regression models to account for age, race, body mass index, parity, diabetes treatment, duration of diabetes, and comorbidity. Results Sixty-five percent of women reported incontinence (mean age 59±10 years). After adjustment, HbA1c levels were not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, among women reporting incontinence, HbA1c ≥9% was associated with more limitations due to incontinence than HbA1c <6% (adjusted odds ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval: 1.09–2.57). Conclusion In this cross-sectional analysis, HbA1c level is not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, for women with incontinence, poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥9%) is associated with more limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether improving glycemic control to HbA1c <9% leads to fewer limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. PMID:24032999

  6. Combined Pioglitazone and Metformin Treatment Maintains the Beneficial Effect of Short-Term Insulin Infusion in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Results from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Musholt, Petra B.; Schöndorf, Thomas; Pfützner, Andreas; Hohberg, Cloth; Kleine, Iris; Fuchs, Winfried; Hehenwarter, Silvia; Dikta, Gerhard; Kerschgens, Benedikt; Forst, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to examine the efficacy of short-term intravenous insulin intervention followed by oral pioglitazone/metformin therapy to prevent patients from continuous insulin application. Methods This prospective, open-label, 4-month pilot study comprised of 14 diabetes patients (5 female, 9 male; age 60 ± 2 years; body mass index 29 ± 3.2 kg/m2; hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] 7.6 ± 1.1%) with (1) insufficient glycemic control under a dose of metformin ≥1700 mg/day and/or metformin plus additional oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) and (2) appropriate residual β-cell function. Initially, an inpatient 34 h continuous intravenous insulin infusion was performed, and metformin was given (2x 850 mg/day). Insulin was stopped, and pioglitazone 30 mg/day was added at the second inpatient day. Patients were followed for four months. Efficacy parameters [change of HbA1c, fasting blood glucose [FBG], intact proinsulin, adiponectin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)] were assessed after initial normalization of blood glucose values by intravenous insulin and at the study end point. Results During the acute insulin intervention, FBG levels were stabilized in all study subjects. In the following OAD treatment period, five patients showed an improvement of HbA1c > 0.5% [35.7%; seven patients remained stable (50.0%), two patients were nonresponders (14.3%)]. Fasting glucose values dropped after insulin infusion (-17.7%; p < .001). This effect was maintained during the consecutive OAD treatment period (glucose +0.3%, not significant (NS); HbA1c -6.0%; p < .05). The initial decrease in fasting intact proinsulin levels was also maintained during the study (end value -41%, p < .05). Improvements in hsCRP values (postinsulin value, -15%, NS; end value -37%; p < .05) and adiponectin values (postinsulin value +15%, NS; end value +128%; p < .001) were demonstrated at end point only after continued glitazone intake. Conclusions Our pilot study demonstrated

  7. Elevated glycated hemoglobin predicts macrosomia among Asian Indian pregnant women (WINGS-9)

    PubMed Central

    Bhavadharini, Balaji; Mahalakshmi, Manni Mohanraj; Deepa, Mohan; Harish, Ranjani; Malanda, Belma; Kayal, Arivudainambi; Belton, Anne; Saravanan, Ponnusamy; Ranjit, Unnikrishnan; Uma, Ram; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the optimal glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) cut point for diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and to evaluate the usefulness of HbA1c as a prognostic indicator for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods: HbA1c estimations were carried out in 1459 pregnant women attending antenatal care centers in urban and rural Tamil Nadu in South India. An oral glucose tolerance test was carried out using 75 g anhydrous glucose, and GDM was diagnosed using the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria. Results: GDM was diagnosed in 195 women. Receiver operating curves showed a HbA1c cut point of ≥ 5.0% (≥31 mmol/mol) have a sensitivity of 66.2% and specificity of 56.2% for identifying GDM (area under the curve 0.679, confidence interval [CI]: 0.655–0.703). Women with HbA1c ≥ 5.0% (≥31 mmol/mol) were significantly older and had higher body mass index, greater history of previous GDM, and a higher prevalence of macrosomia compared to women with HbA1c < 5.0% (<31 mmol/mol). The adjusted odds ratio for macrosomia in those with HbA1c ≥ 5.0% (≥31 mmol/mol) was 1.92 (CI: 1.24–2.97, P = 0.003). However, other pregnancy outcomes were not significantly different. Conclusion: In Asian Indian pregnant women, a HbA1c of 5.0% (31 mmol/mol) or greater is associated with increased risk of macrosomia. PMID:28217520

  8. Glycaemic control is harder to achieve than blood pressure or lipid control in Irish adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cotter, T G; Dinneen, S F; Healy, D A; Bell, M J; Cunningham, A; O'Shea, P M; Dunne, F; O'Brien, T; Finucane, F M

    2014-12-01

    We sought to determine the attainment of targets for glycaemic control and vascular risk reduction in an Irish cohort of T1DM adults. Of 797 patients (53% male, mean age 40.3 ± 14.8 years, HbA1c 8.5 ± 1.6% (69.6 ± 17.8 mmol mol(-1))), 15%, 68% and 62% achieved targets for HbA1c, blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, respectively.

  9. High-risk glycated hemoglobin trajectories established by mid-20s: findings from a birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Dara M; Thomson, W Murray; Broadbent, Jonathan M; McLean, Rachael; Poulton, Richie; Mann, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the natural history of glycemia (as measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c)) over 12 years using group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM), and to examine baseline predictors of trajectory. Research design and methods HbA1c data collected at ages 26, 32 and 38 in the long-running, prospective Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study were used to assign study members (n=893) to trajectories applying GBTM. A generalization of the model allowed the statistical linking of baseline demographic, smoking and anthropometric characteristics to group membership probability. Results Mean HbA1c increased with age, as did prevalence of prediabetes, diabetes and dysglycemia. The greatest increase occurred between ages 26 and 32. Glycemic health status at age 26 predicted glycemic health status at age 38. 3 HbA1c trajectory groups were identified: ‘low’ (n=98, 11.0%); ‘medium’ (n=482, 54.0%); and ‘high’ (n=313, 35.0%) with mean HbA1c of 29.6, 34.1, and 38.7 mmol/mol, respectively, at age 38. High waist circumference (≥880 mm for women and ≥1020 mm for men), high waist-height ratio (≥0.50), and being a smoker at age 26 predicted membership of the least favorable trajectory over the next 12 years. High body mass index (≥30) at age 26 did not predict of trajectory. Conclusions Trajectories of HbA1c are established relatively early in adulthood. HbA1c levels, waist circumference, waist-height ratio, and smoking status at age 26 are valid clinical predictors for future dysglycemic risk. The identification of HbA1c trajectories and their predictors introduces the possibility of an individualized approach to prevention at an earlier stage than is currently done. PMID:27648291

  10. The association between self-monitoring of blood glucose, hemoglobin A1C and testing patterns in community pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    Mansell, Kerry; Evans, Charity; Tran, David; Sevany, Shellina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if pharmacists providing advice on self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) to new meter users, based on the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs), resulted in improvements in A1C. SMBG testing patterns and pharmacist interactions were also observed. Methods: A cluster randomized, pilot study was performed, with pharmacies randomized to an intervention or control group. The intervention group provided SMBG education according to the CDA CPGs at baseline, 2 weeks, 1 month and 3 months; the control group provided usual care. The primary endpoint was the mean change in A1C measured at 6 months. Secondary endpoints included a description of SMBG patterns and lifestyle changes and were determined via a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Thirty-six participants (26 intervention, 10 control) were recruited from 9 pharmacies across Saskatchewan, Canada. Mean A1C decreased by −1.69 and −0.70 in the intervention and control groups, respectively (p = 0.376). A total of 12 of 26 (46.2%) participants in the intervention group indicated they performed SMBG ≥7 times per week; 75% (9/12) of these were controlled by lifestyle or metformin alone. When applicable, most participants in the intervention group indicated they perform SMBG with exercise (62.5%), during illness (62.5%) and with hypoglycemic symptoms (81.3%) compared with 33.3%, 42.9% and 42.9% in the control group, respectively. Most participants in the intervention group (20/26; 76.9%) reported making lifestyle changes as a result of speaking with the pharmacist, with all indicating that they maintained these changes at 6 months. Conclusions: The results of this pilot study indicate that a larger study examining pharmacist interventions related to SMBG is feasible. Future studies are required to determine patient motivations and further evaluate the role of pharmacists in ensuring best practices to positively influence guideline-based blood glucose

  11. A Review on Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohsen; Asadi, Nasrin; Pouralborz, Yasna; Ghodrat, Mahshid; Habibi, Shaghayegh

    2016-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common reproductive endocrine disorders among women of reproductive age, with a variety of complications and consequences mostly due to hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance (IR). PCOS patients with IR are at risk for metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus (DM) along with its complications such as cardiovascular events. There are several methods for screening IR in patients with PCOS to predict DM and other complications. Fasting plasma glucose test, oral glucose tolerance test, and insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels are some available screening tools for IR. The American Diabetes Association recommended HbA1c to screen for DM because HbA1c is not affected by day-to-day plasma glucose levels and reflects the plasma glucose status during 2-3 months before measurement. Some studies have evaluated the role of HbA1c as a screening method to predict DM in PCOS patients, however, there are still controversies in this matter. Also some studies reported that HbA1c has a correlation with complications of PCOS such as metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular events. We found that HbA1c could be a suitable screening test for IR in PCOS patients but more studies are recommended, omitting confounding factors that could affect IR in patients with PCOS, such as antihyperglycemic agents like metformin, or lifestyle modification, which can be effective in reducing IR in patients with PCOS.

  12. Analysis of the accuracy and precision of the Axis-Shield Afinion hemoglobin A1c measurement device.

    PubMed

    Little, Randie R

    2012-03-01

    Point-of-care (POC) hemoglobin A1c measurement is now used by many physicians to make more timely decisions on therapy changes. A few studies have highlighted the drawbacks of some POC methods, e.g., poor precision and lot-to-lot variability. Evaluating performance in the clinical setting is difficult because there is minimal proficiency testing data on POC methods. In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Wood and colleagues describe their experience with the Afinion method in a pediatric clinic network, comparing these results to another POC method as well as to a laboratory high-performance liquid chromatography method. Although they conclude that the Afinion exhibits adequate performance, they do not evaluate lot-to-lot variability. As with laboratory methods, potential assay interferences must also be considered.

  13. Relative effectiveness of insulin pump treatment over multiple daily injections and structured education during flexible intensive insulin treatment for type 1 diabetes: cluster randomised trial (REPOSE).

    PubMed

    2017-03-30

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of insulin pumps with multiple daily injections for adults with type 1 diabetes, with both groups receiving equivalent training in flexible insulin treatment.Design Pragmatic, multicentre, open label, parallel group, cluster randomised controlled trial (Relative Effectiveness of Pumps Over MDI and Structured Education (REPOSE) trial).Setting Eight secondary care centres in England and Scotland.Participants Adults with type 1 diabetes who were willing to undertake intensive insulin treatment, with no preference for pumps or multiple daily injections. Participants were allocated a place on established group training courses that taught flexible intensive insulin treatment ("dose adjustment for normal eating," DAFNE). The course groups (the clusters) were then randomly allocated in pairs to either pump or multiple daily injections.Interventions Participants attended training in flexible insulin treatment (using insulin analogues) structured around the use of pump or injections, followed for two years.Main outcome measures The primary outcomes were a change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) values (%) at two years in participants with baseline HbA1c value of ≥7.5% (58 mmol/mol), and the proportion of participants achieving an HbA1c value of <7.5%. Secondary outcomes included body weight, insulin dose, and episodes of moderate and severe hypoglycaemia. Ancillary outcomes included quality of life and treatment satisfaction.Results 317 participants (46 courses) were randomised (156 pump and 161 injections). 267 attended courses and 260 were included in the intention to treat analysis, of which 235 (119 pump and 116 injection) had baseline HbA1c values of ≥7.5%. Glycaemic control and rates of severe hypoglycaemia improved in both groups. The mean change in HbA1c at two years was -0.85% with pump treatment and -0.42% with multiple daily injections. Adjusting for course, centre, age, sex, and accounting for missing values, the

  14. Effects of sitagliptin or metformin added to pioglitazone monotherapy in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Salvadeo, Sibilla A T; Ferrari, Ilaria; Ragonesi, Pietro D; Querci, Fabrizio; Franzetti, Ivano G; Gadaleta, Gennaro; Ciccarelli, Leonardina; Piccinni, Mario N; D'Angelo, Angela; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of the addition of sitagliptin or metformin to pioglitazone monotherapy in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on body weight, glycemic control, beta-cell function, insulin resistance, and inflammatory state parameters. One hundred fifty-one patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (glycated hemoglobin [HbA(1c)] >7.5%) in therapy with pioglitazone 30 mg/d were enrolled in this study. We randomized patients to take pioglitazone 30 mg plus sitagliptin 100 mg once a day, or pioglitazone 15 mg plus metformin 850 mg twice a day. We evaluated at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months these parameters: body weight, body mass index, HbA(1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), postprandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), homeostasis model assessment beta-cell function index, fasting plasma proinsulin (Pr), Pr/FPI ratio, adiponectin, resistin (R), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. A decrease of body weight and body mass index was observed with metformin, but not with sitagliptin, at the end of the study. We observed a comparable significant decrease of HbA(1c), FPG, and PPG and a significant increase of homeostasis model assessment beta-cell function index compared with baseline in both groups without any significant differences between the 2 groups. Fasting plasma insulin, fasting plasma Pr, Pr/FPI ratio, and HOMA-IR values were decreased in both groups even if the values obtained with metformin were significantly lower than the values obtained with sitagliptin. There were no significant variations of ADN, R, or TNF-alpha with sitagliptin, whereas a significant increase of ADN and a significant decrease of R and TNF-alpha values were recorded with metformin. A significant decrease of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein value was obtained in both groups without any

  15. Lifestyle weight-loss intervention outcomes in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marion J; Boucher, Jackie L; Rutten-Ramos, Stephanie; VanWormer, Jeffrey J

    2015-09-01

    The majority of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and weight loss is a recommended treatment strategy. A systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to answer the following primary question: In overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes, what are the outcomes on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from lifestyle weight-loss interventions resulting in weight losses greater than or less than 5% at 12 months? Secondary questions are: What are the lipid (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides) and blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) outcomes from lifestyle weight-loss interventions resulting in weight losses greater than or less than 5% at 12 months? And, what are the weight and metabolic outcomes from differing amounts of macronutrients in weight-loss interventions? Inclusion criteria included randomized clinical trial implementing weight-loss interventions in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes, minimum 12-month study duration, a 70% completion rate, and an HbA1c value reported at 12 months. Eleven trials (eight compared two weight-loss interventions and three compared a weight-loss intervention group with a usual care/control group) with 6,754 participants met study criteria. At 12 months, 17 study groups (8 categories of weight-loss intervention) reported weight loss <5% of initial weight (-3.2 kg [95% CI: -5.9, -0.6]). A meta-analysis of the weight-loss interventions reported nonsignificant beneficial effects on HbA1c, lipids, or blood pressure. Two study groups reported a weight loss of ≥5%: a Mediterranean-style diet implemented in newly diagnosed adults with type 2 diabetes and an intensive lifestyle intervention implemented in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial. Both included regular physical activity and frequent contact with health professionals and reported significant beneficial effects on HbA1c, lipids, and blood pressure. Five

  16. Patients' with type 2 diabetes willingness to pay for insulin therapy and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Feher, Michael D; Brazier, John; Schaper, Nicolaas; Vega-Hernandez, Gabriela; Bøgelund, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed patient preferences, using willingness to pay as a method to measure different treatment characteristics or attributes associated with injectable insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods Adults with type 2 diabetes in 12 countries, diagnosed >6 months prior and receiving insulin for >3 months, were recruited through a representative online panel. Data were collected via online questionnaire and analyzed using a standard choice model for discrete choice experiment. Results A total of 3758 patients from North America (n=646), South America (n=1537), and Europe (n=1575) completed the study. Mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in North America, South America, and Europe were 63 mmol/mol (7.9%), 75 mmol/mol (9.0%), and 64 mmol/mol (8.0%), respectively. In the three regions, monthly willingness to pay was US$116, US$74, and US$92, respectively, for a 1%-point decrease in HbA1c; US$99, US$80, and US$104 for one less major hypoglycemic event per year; and US$64, US$37 and US$60 for a 3 kg weight decrease. To avoid preinjection preparation of insulin, the respective values were US$47, US$18, and US$37, and US$25, US$25, and US$24 for one less injection per day. Among respondents on basal-only insulin who had previously tried a more intensive regimen, reasons for switching back included difficulty in handling multiple injections and risk of hypoglycemic events. Conclusions Reducing HbA1c, frequency of major hypoglycemic events and weight decrease were the highest valued outcomes in each region. The administrative burden of injections was also considered important. PMID:27158518

  17. Serum glycated hemoglobin level as a predictor of atrial fibrillation: A systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regression

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wenwei; Zhang, Nixiao; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Letsas, Konstantinos P.; Cheng, Min; Di, Fusheng; Tse, Gary; Liu, Tong; Li, Guangping

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a long-term measure of glucose control. Although recent studies demonstrated a potential association between HbA1c levels and the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), the results have been inconsistent. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the utility of HbA1c level in predicting AF. Methods PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases were searched for relevant studies up to March 2016. Prospective cohort studies and retrospective case-control studies were included. Relative risk (RR) or odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of AF development were determined for different HbA1c levels. The random effect model was conducted according to the test of heterogeneity among studies. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression models were carried out to identify potential sources of heterogeneity. Results Eight prospective cohort studies with 102,006 participants and 6 retrospective case-control studies with 57,669 patients were finally included in the meta-analysis. In the primary meta-analysis, HbA1c levels were not associated with an increased risk of AF whether as a continuous (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.96–1.18) or categorical variable (RR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.83–1.18). Nevertheless, prospective studies showed about 10% increased risk of AF with elevated HbA1c levels both as a continuous (RR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.06–1.16) and as a categorical variable (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.00–1.18). In subgroup analyses, pooled results from studies with longer follow-up durations, published after 2012, aged < 63 years, with exclusion of cardiac surgery patients demonstrated an increased risk of AF for every 1% increase in HbA1c levels, while studies conducted in the United States with longer follow-up (more than 96 months), larger sample size and higher quality score (≥6) showed an increased risk of AF for higher HbA1c level as a categorical variable. Conclusions Elevated serum HbA1c levels may be associated with an increased risk

  18. Associations of moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity and body mass index with glycated haemoglobin within the general population: a cross-sectional analysis of the 2008 Health Survey for England

    PubMed Central

    Bakrania, Kishan; Yates, Thomas; Edwardson, Charlotte L; Bodicoat, Danielle H; Esliger, Dale W; Gill, Jason M R; Kazi, Aadil; Velayudhan, Latha; Sinclair, Alan J; Sattar, Naveed; Biddle, Stuart J H; Hamer, Mark; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the associations of objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and body mass index (BMI) with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in a national sample of English adults. Methods The 2008 Health Survey for England data were used with 1109 participants aged ≥18 providing complete data. MVPA time was assessed using an accelerometer. Weighted linear regression models, adjusted for several confounders, quantified the associations between continuous measures of MVPA and BMI with HbA1c. Interaction analyses were implemented to observe whether the association of MVPA with HbA1c was modified by BMI or vice versa. Further weighted linear regression models examined the differences in HbA1c across four mutually exclusive categories of MVPA and BMI: (1) ‘physically active and non-obese’, (2) ‘physically active and obese’, (3) ‘physically inactive and non-obese’ and (4) ‘physically inactive and obese’. ‘Physically active’ was defined as: ≥150 min/week of MVPA. ‘Obese’ was defined as: BMI ≥30.0 kg/m2. A wide range of sensitivity analyses were also implemented. Results Every 30 min/day increment in MVPA was associated with a 0.7 mmol/mol (0.07% (p<0.001)) lower HbA1c level. Each 1 kg/m2 increment in BMI was associated with a 0.2 mmol/mol (0.02% (p<0.001)) higher HbA1c level. The association of MVPA with HbA1c was stronger in obese individuals (−1.5 mmol/mol (−0.13% (p<0.001))) than non-obese individuals (−0.7 mmol/mol (−0.06% (p<0.001))); p=0.004 for interaction. The association of BMI with HbA1c remained stable across MVPA categories. Compared with individuals categorised as ‘physically inactive and obese’, only those categorised as ‘physically active and obese’ or ‘physically active and non-obese’ had lower HbA1c levels by 2.1 mmol/mol (0.19% (p=0.005)) and 3.5 mmol/mol (0.32% (p<0.001)), respectively. Sensitivity analyses indicated robustness and stability

  19. Use of glucometer and fasting blood glucose as screening tools for diabetes mellitus type 2 and glycated haemoglobin as clinical reference in rural community primary care settings of a middle income country

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Thailand is considered to be a middle income country, and to control and prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the main concerns of the Thai Ministry of Public Health (MoPH). Screening for T2DM and care for T2DM patients has been integrated into the primary health care system, especially in rural areas. The intention of this investigation is to link public health research at the academic level with the local health authorities of a district of a north-eastern province of the country. Methods Epidemiological methods were applied to validate the screening tools fasting capillary blood glucose (CBG), measured by glucometer and venous blood for the determination of plasma glucose (VPG), used for screening for T2DM among asymptomatic villagers. For assessing the validity of these two methods glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) values were determined and used as the ‘clinical reference’. Results All together 669 villagers were investigated. Determinations of CBG and VPG resulted in suspected T2DM cases, with 7.3% when assessed by CBG and 6.4% by VPG using a cutoff point of 7 mmol/L (126 mg/dl). Taking HbA1c determinations with a cutoff point of 7% into account, the proportion of T2DM suspected participants increased to 10.4%. By estimating sensitivity, specificity and the positive predictive value of CBG and VPG against the ‘clinical reference’ of HbA1c, sensitivity below 50% for both screening methods has been observed. The positive predictive value was determined to be 58.5% for CBG and 56.8% for VPG. The specificity of the two screening tests was over 96%. Conclusions The low sensitivity indicates that using fasting CBG or VPG as a screening tool in the field results in a high proportion of diseased individuals remaining undetected. The equally low positive predictive values (below 60%) indicate a high working load for the curative sector in investigating suspected T2DM cases to determine whether they are truly diseased or false positive cases

  20. An efficacy driven approach for medication recommendation in type 2 diabetes treatment using data mining techniques.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haifeng; Xie, Guotong; Mei, Jing; Shen, Weijia; Sun, Wen; Li, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how data mining techniques can help recommend effective medications when physicians need to control the glucose level of patients with type 2 diabetes. We first identify the factors that may affect physicians' medication decisions and then develop a patient-similarity based approach to automatically recommend medications for a patient with the specific condition so that his blood glucose level (measured by HbA1C value) can be well controlled. The approach is validated through experiments on real data sets and compared with the recommendations by following a clinical guideline.

  1. Improving glycaemic control and life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomised, controlled intervention study using the Guided Self-Determination-Young method in triads of adolescents, parents and health care providers integrated into routine paediatric outpatient clinics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescents with type 1 diabetes face demanding challenges due to conflicting priorities between psychosocial needs and diabetes management. This conflict often results in poor glycaemic control and discord between adolescents and parents. Adolescent-parent conflicts are thus a barrier for health care providers (HCPs) to overcome in their attempts to involve both adolescents and parents in improvement of glycaemic control. Evidence-based interventions that involve all three parties (i.e., adolescents, parents and HCPs) and are integrated into routine outpatient clinic visits are lacking. The Guided Self-Determination method is proven effective in adult care and has been adapted to adolescents and parents (Guided Self-Determination-Young (GSD-Y)) for use in paediatric diabetes outpatient clinics. Our objective is to test whether GSD-Y used in routine paediatric outpatient clinic visits will reduce haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations and improve adolescents' life skills compared with a control group. Methods/Design Using a mixed methods design comprising a randomised controlled trial and a nested qualitative evaluation, we will recruit 68 adolescents age 13 - 18 years with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c > 8.0%) and their parents from 2 Danish hospitals and randomise into GSD-Y or control groups. During an 8-12 month period, the GSD-Y group will complete 8 outpatient GSD-Y visits, and the control group will completes an equal number of standard visits. The primary outcome is HbA1c. Secondary outcomes include the following: number of self-monitored blood glucose values and levels of autonomous motivation, involvement and autonomy support from parents, autonomy support from HCPs, perceived competence in managing diabetes, well-being, and diabetes-related problems. Primary and secondary outcomes will be evaluated within and between groups by comparing data from baseline, after completion of the visits, and again after a 6-month follow-up. To illustrate how GSD

  2. Changes in the levels of cytokines in both diabetic/non-diabetic type I children living in a moderate altitude area in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Allam, Gamal; Alsulaimani, Adnan A; Alghamdi, Hamed; Alswat, Hameed; Edrees, Burhan M; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Nasr, Amre

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible effects of living in moderate altitude area on pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines profile (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-10, and IL-4) among type I diabetic (T1D) and non- T1D children compared with those living at sea level area. A prospective clinical study was carried out at pediatric outpatient endocrine clinics in Taif City, which is a moderate altitude area in Saudi Arabia, that stands about 1800-2000 meters above sea-level; and in Mecca City, which is a sea level area, that lies in the middle west of Saudi Arabia. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) percentage was estimated and cytokine measurements were performed in sera by flow cytometry using Cytometric Bead Array (CBA) technology. In this study we included 600 children who were consecutively enrolled (sex and age were matched). The HbA1c was statistically significantly higher in children living in moderate altitude compared to those living at sea level (overall p<0.001). Furthermore, T1D patients had higher values of serum cytokine levels (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-4, and IL-10) in comparison to non-T1D control group (overall p<0.001). In conclusion, the data of the present study clearly showed that in both T1D and non-T1D children, moderate altitude-natives expressed high HbA1c and both pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Type I diabetic children living in moderate altitude or at sea level showed elevated levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-4, and IL-10 than control subjects. Glycemic control in non-diabetic children was affected by living in moderate altitude, however, HbA1c significantly increased in diabetic children living in moderate altitude.

  3. Association of Fructosamine to Indices of Dyslipidemia in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kim E.; Selfe, Terry Kit; Vishnu, Abhishek

    2011-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the association of serum fructosamine values to lipid profiles and to other indices of glycemia both at baseline and over time in adults with Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods Forty adults aged 45 or older with T2DM, not taking insulin, and an HbA1c of 6-10% were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial regarding the effects of an 8-week yoga program on glycemia and related cardiovascular disease risk indices in adults with T2DM. Fasting blood was drawn to assess glycemia (HbA1c, glucose, and fructosamine) and dyslipidemia (LDL, HDL, total cholesterol, cholesterol:HDL ratio, LDL:HDL ratio, and triglycerides) pre and post-intervention. Because the relation of fructosamine to other indices of glycemia and to lipid profiles did not differ between treatment groups either at baseline or over time, groups were pooled for analysis. Results Baseline fructosamine values were significantly correlated with HbA1c(r=0.77, P<0.0001), glucose(r=0.72, P<0.0001), LDL:HDL ratio(r=0.46, P=0.01), cholesterol:HDL ratio(r=0.55, P=0.002), and triglycerides(r=0.39, P=0.032), but not to other lipid indices at baseline. Change in fructosamine over 8 weeks was significantly correlated with change in HbA1c(r= 0.63, P=0.0001), glucose (r=0.39, P=0.029), cholesterol(r=0.65, P<0.0001), LDL(r=0.55, P=0.001), LDL:HDL ratio(r=0.53, P=0.003), and cholesterol:HDL ratio(r=0.52, P=0.002), and was more strongly related to change in lipid values than were other indices of glycemia. Conclusions Fructosamine was significantly correlated with measures of dyslipidemia and glycemia both at baseline and over time, and may represent a relatively sensitive and low cost index of short to medium term change in both glycemia and certain lipid profiles. However, findings from this small pilot study should be interpreted with caution, and warrant replication in larger prospective studies. PMID:25572758

  4. Periodontitis as a possible early sign of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Teeuw, Wijnand J; Kosho, Madeline X F; Poland, Dennis C W; Gerdes, Victor E A; Loos, Bruno G

    2017-01-01

    Objective The early diagnosis of (pre)diabetes mellitus is essential for the prevention of diabetes complications. It has been suggested that gum disease (periodontitis) might be an early complication of diabetes and may be a useful risk indicator for diabetes screening. Therefore, a dental office could be a good location for screening for (pre)diabetes in patients with periodontitis using a validated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) dry spot analysis. Research design and methods A total of 313 individuals from a university dental clinic participated. From 126 patients with mild/moderate periodontitis, 78 patients with severe periodontitis and 109 subjects without periodontitis, HbA1c values were obtained by the analysis of dry blood spots. Differences in mean HbA1c values and the prevalence of (pre)diabetes between the groups were analyzed. Results The mild/moderate and severe periodontitis groups showed significantly higher HbA1c values (6.1%±1.4% (43 mmol/mol±15 mmol/mol) and 6.3%±1.3% (45 mmol/mol±15 mmol/mol), respectively) compared with the control group (5.7%±0.7% (39 mmol/mol±8 mmol/mol), p=0.003). In addition, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines for diagnosis, there was a significant over-representation of subjects with suspected diabetes (23% and 14%) and pre-diabetes (47% and 46%) in the severe periodontitis group and mild/moderate periodontitis groups, respectively, compared with the control group (10% and 37%, p=0.010). Notably, 18.1% of patients with suspected new diabetes were found among subjects with severe periodontitis compared with 9.9% and 8.5% among subjects with mild/moderate periodontitis and controls, respectively (p=0.024). Conclusions The dental office, with particular focus on patients with severe periodontitis, proved to be a suitable location for screening for (pre)diabetes; a considerable number of suspected new diabetes cases were identified. The early diagnosis and treatment of (pre

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Community Health Worker Self-Management Support Intervention Among Low-Income Adults With Diabetes, Seattle, Washington, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Leslie; Silverman, Julie; Kiefer, Meghan; Hebert, Paul; Lessler, Dan; Krieger, James

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Community health workers (CHWs) can improve diabetes outcomes; however, questions remain about translating research findings into practical low-intensity models for safety-net providers. We tested the effectiveness of a home-based low-intensity CHW intervention for improving health outcomes among low-income adults with diabetes. Methods Low-income patients with glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 8.0% or higher in the 12 months before enrollment from 3 safety-net providers were randomized to a 12-month CHW-delivered diabetes self-management intervention or usual care. CHWs were based at a local health department. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c from baseline enrollment to 12 months; secondary outcomes included blood pressure and lipid levels, quality of life, and health care use. Results The change in HbA1c in the intervention group (n = 145) (unadjusted mean of 9.09% to 8.58%, change of −0.51) compared with the control group (n = 142) (9.04% to 8.71%, change of −0.33) was not significant (P = .54). In an analysis of participants with poor glycemic control (HbA1c >10%), the intervention group had a 1.23-point greater decrease in HbA1c compared with controls (P = .046). For the entire study population, we found a decrease in reported physician visits (P < .001) and no improvement in health-related quality of life (P = .07) in the intervention group compared with the control group. Conclusion A low-intensity CHW-delivered intervention to support diabetes self-management did not significantly improve HbA1c relative to usual care. Among the subgroup of participants with poor glycemic control (HbA1c >10% at baseline), the intervention was effective. PMID:28182863

  6. Serum Chromium Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients and Its Association with Glycaemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, Senthil; Nair, Lal Devayanivasudevan; Karuthodiyil, Rajendran; Vijayarajan, Nikhilan; Gnanasekar, Rajiv; Kapil, Vivian V.; Mohamed, Azeem S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chromium is an essential micronutrient which is required for the normal functioning of insulin and regulation of blood sugar levels. It acts as a vital antioxidant for maintaining insulin homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the free radical production is increased and levels of antioxidants like chromium, vanadium, selenium and manganese are reduced. There have been previous studies to suggest that low serum levels of chromium are associated with poorer glycaemic control. Aim To study the level of serum chromium in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its association with glycaemic control. Materials and Methods Serum chromium concentration was determined by using inductively coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectophotometry in 42 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients without any pre-existing complications. They were divided into 2 groups – well controlled (HbA1c ≤7.0%) and uncontrolled groups (HbA1c >7.0%). Results Mean serum chromium concentration measured in uncontrolled type 2 diabetic patients was significantly lower (0.065 ± 0.03 mcg/L vs 0.103 ± 0.04 mcg/L, p< 0.05). There was a statistically significant inverse linear correlation of the HbA1c values and the serum chromium concentration (r= -0.6514, p < 0.0001). There was also a decrease in chromium levels across both the groups with advancing age and the decrease being significant beyond 40 years of age (p<0.05). Conclusion The results of our study describes the relationship between serum chromium levels and control of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Significant reduction in chromium levels are probable indicators of metabolic response to oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further large scale studies relating serum chromium and type 2 diabetes mellitus may help to understand more about the exact relationship. PMID:26676175

  7. Optimal diabetes care outcomes following face-to-face medication therapy management services.

    PubMed

    Brummel, Amanda R; Soliman, Ahmed M; Carlson, Angeline M; de Oliveira, Djenane Ramalho

    2013-02-01

    Pharmacists play an integral role in influencing resolution of drug-related problems. This study examines the relationship between a pharmacist-led and delivered medication therapy management (MTM) program and achievement of Optimal Diabetes Care benchmarks. Data within Fairview Pharmacy Services were used to identify a group of patients with diabetes who received MTM services during a 2007 demonstration project (n=121) and a control group who were invited to receive MTM services but opted out (n=103). Rates of achieving optimal diabetes clinical management for both groups were compared using the D5 diabetes measure for years 2006, 2007, and 2008. The D5 components are: glycosolated hemoglobin (HbA1c<7%); low-density lipoprotein (<100 mg/dl); blood pressure (<130/80 mmHg); tobacco free; and daily aspirin use. Multivariate difference-in-differences (DID) estimation was used to determine the impact of 1 year of MTM services on each care component. Patients who opted in for MTM had higher Charlson scores, more complex medication regimens, and a higher percentage of diabetes with complications (P<0.05). In 2007, the percentage of diabetes patients optimally managed was significantly higher for MTM patients compared to 2006 values (21.49% vs. 45.45%, P<0.01). Nonlinear DID models showed that MTM patients were more likely to meet the HbA1c criterion in 2007 (odds ratio: 2.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-5.85, P=0.038). Linear DID models for HbA1c showed a mean reduction of 0.54% (95% CI: 0.091%-0.98%, P=0.018) for MTM patients. An MTM program contributed to improved optimal diabetes management in a population of patients with complex diabetes clinical profiles.

  8. Alternate-day dosing of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients controlled on once daily dose: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Manash P.; Bhuyan, Sonali B.; Deka, Jumi; Bora, Jatin; Bora, Smritisikha; Barkakati, Murchana

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) inhibitor with a long terminal half life, significantly inhibits the DPP 4 enzyme at a steady state up to 48 h after the last dose. The present case series examined the hypothesis that linagliptin retains its efficacy during alternate day dosing in type 2 diabetes patients when switched over from once daily (OD) dosing. Eight type 2 diabetes patients maintaining stable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with acceptable fasting plasma glucose and postprandial glucose levels and receiving linagliptin 5 mg OD for at least 6 weeks, with a stable dose of concomitant antidiabetic medications were given linagliptin 5 mg every alternate day. The median HbA1c while on the OD regimen was 6.1% (43 mmol/mol) (range: 5.8–6.9% [40–52 mmol/mol]) and median duration of diabetes was 7 years (range: 0.75–16 years). After a median follow-up period of 21weeks,the glycemic control was maintained in all patients similar to their baseline values (median HbA1c: 6.0% [42 mmol/mol], range: 5.1–7.1% [32–54 mmol/mol]). The body weight, fasting, and random glucose levels at baseline were also well maintained at the end of treatment. Optimal glycemic status maintained in our study population favors our hypothesis that linagliptin used alternate daily after switching from initial OD dose of the drug in patients on a stable background antidiabetic medications retains its efficacy. Paradoxically, alternate day dosing may affect compliance if the patient forgets when they took the last dose. Further studies including larger cohorts are needed to validate this finding and identify patients who can benefit from the alternate day regimen. PMID:27366728

  9. Pancreatic autoantibodies after pancreas-kidney transplantation - do they matter?

    PubMed

    Martins, La Salete; Henriques, Antonio C; Fonseca, Isabel M; Rodrigues, Anabela S; Oliverira, José C; Dores, Jorge M; Dias, Leonidio S; Cabrita, Antonio M; Silva, José D; Noronha, Irene L

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence has been documented in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPKT), but this diagnosis may be underestimated. Antibody monitoring is the most simple, noninvasive, screening test for pancreas autoimmune activity. However, the impact of the positive autoimmune markers on pancreas graft function remains controversial. In our cohort of 105 SPKT, we studied the cases with positive pancreatic autoantibodies. They were immunosuppressed with antithymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and steroids. The persistence or reappearance of these autoantibodies after SPKT and factors associated with their evolution and with graft outcome were analyzed. Pancreatic autoantibodies were prospectively monitored. Serum samples were collected before transplantation and at least once per year thereafter. At the end of the follow-up (maximum 138 months), 43.8% of patients were positive (from pre-transplant or after recurrence) for at least one autoantibody - the positive group. Antiglutamic acid decarboxylase was the most prevalent (31.4%), followed by anti-insulin (8.6%) and anti-islet cell autoantibodies (3.8%). Bivariate analysis showed that the positive group had higher fasting glucose, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lower C-peptide levels, and a higher number of HLA-matches. Analyzing the sample divided into four groups according to pre-/post-transplant autoantibodies profile, the negative/positive group tended to present the higher HbA1c values. Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between pancreas autoimmunity and HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Positivity for these autoantibodies pre-transplantation did not influence pancreas survival. The unfavorable glycemic profile observed in the autoantibody-positive SPKT is a matter of concern, which deserves further attention.

  10. Economic evaluation of an intensified disease management system for patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lairson, David R; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Carter, Patrick M; Greisinger, Anthony J; Talluri, Krishna C; Aggarwal, Manish; Wehmanen, Oscar

    2008-04-01

    We evaluated the effect of a disease management (DM) program on adherence with recommended laboratory tests, health outcomes, and health care expenditures for patients with type 2 diabetes. The study was a natural experiment in a primary care setting in which the intervention was available to 1 group and then compared to the experience of a matched control group. Univariate analysis and difference in differences analysis were used to test for any significant differences between the 2 groups following a 12-month intervention period. A payer perspective was used to estimate the health care cost consequences based on hospital and physician utilization weighted by Medicare prices. The results were nonsignificant at the .10 level, except for compliance with recommended tests, which showed significant results in the univariate analysis. The intervention increased compliance with testing for HbA1c, microalbuminuria, and lipids, and decreased HbA1c value and the percent of patients with HbA1c >or=9.5%. The point estimates showed small reductions in health care cost; only reductions in costs for office visits were significant at the .10 level. We concluded that while there were signs of improvement in adherence to testing, the low effectiveness may be attributed to existing diabetes management activities in this primary care setting, high compliance rates for testing at the beginning of the study, and a steep learning curve for this complex, information-technology-based DM system. The study raises questions about the incremental gains from complex systems approaches to DM and illustrates a rigorous method to assess DM programs under "real-world" conditions, with control for possible selection bias.

  11. Diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance are underdiagnosed in intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Ladeira, Renata Teixeira; Simioni, Ana Cinthia Marques; Bafi, Antonio Tonete; Nascente, Ana Paula Metran; Freitas, Flavio Geraldo Resende; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in intensive care unit inpatients. Methods The study included patients in post-surgical care for elective and emergency surgery and excluded those patients with known diabetes mellitus. To diagnose prior serum glucose level disorders, we considered the value of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at the time of admission, classifying the patients as normal (<5.7%), glucose intolerant (5.7-6.4%) or diabetic (>6.4%). During the first 3 days of the patient's hospital stay, glycemic control and clinical complications were assessed. Mortality was monitored for 28 days. For the statistical analyses, chi-square, ANOVA, student's t, Kruskal-Wallis or Mann Whitney tests were used. Results Thirty patients were included in the present study, 53% of whom were women; the patients had a mean age of 53.4±19.7 years and an APACHE II score of 13.6±6.6. The majority of patients were admitted for severe sepsis or septic shock followed by post-operative care for elective surgery, oncological surgery, multiple traumas and emergency surgery. When classifying these patients according to HbA1c, despite the absence of a prior history of diabetes mellitus, only 13.3% had a normal HbA1c level, 23.3% had levels compatible with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and 63.3% had levels compatible with impaired glucose tolerance. We found a significant association between the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance and the use of vasoactive drugs (p=0.04). Conclusion A high prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance was observed in inpatients at a general intensive care unit. PMID:23917931

  12. In-Depth Comparative Characterization of Hemoglobin Glycation in Normal and Diabetic Bloods by LC-MSMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shih-Hao; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2014-05-01

    The glycation level at β-Val-1 of the hemoglobin β chain in human blood (HbA1c%) is used to diagnose diabetes and other diseases. However, hemoglobin glycation occurs on multiple sites on different isoforms with different kinetics, but its differential profile has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, hemoglobin was extracted from the blood of normal and diabetic individuals by protein precipitation. Triplicate solutions prepared from each sample were directly analyzed or digested with multiple enzymes and then analyzed by nano-LC/MS via bottom-up approach for side-by-side characterization. Intact hemoglobin analysis indicated a single glucose-dominant glycation, which showed good correlation with the HbA1c% values. Moreover, full sequence (100 %) of α/β globin was mapped and seven glycation sites were unambiguously assigned. In addition to β-Val-1, two other major sites at α-Lys-61 and β-Lys-66, which contain the common sequence HGK K, and four minor sites (<1 %) on α-Val-1, β-Lys-132, α-Lys-127, and α-Lys-40 were identified. All sites were shown to exhibit similar patterns of site distribution despite different glucose levels. Both the intact mass measurement and bottom-up data consistently indicated that the total glycation percentage of the β-globin was twice higher than the α-globin. Using molecular modeling, the 3D structure of the consensus sequence (HGK K) was shown to contain a phosphate triangle cavity, which helps to catalyze the glycation reaction. For the first time, hemoglobin glycation in normal and diabetic bloods was comparatively characterized in-depth with 100 % sequence coverage. The results provide insight about the HbA1c parameter and help define the new and old markers.

  13. Medical treatments of elderly, French patients with type 2 diabetes: results at inclusion in the GERODIAB Cohort.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Jean A; Bauduceau, Bernard; Le Floch, Jean-Pierre; Verny, Christiane

    2016-02-01

    Prevalence of diabetes in the elderly increases, and half of the French diabetics are over the age of 75 years. The GERODIAB study is the first French multicentre, prospective, observational study designed to analyse over 5 years the influence of glycaemic control on morbidity-mortality in type 2 diabetics patients 70 years old and over. This study analysed the diabetic and geriatric factors associated with the treatment modalities, particularly insulin, at inclusion in the cohort. The cohort of 987 type 2 diabetics was divided into three groups according to the method of treatment. Slightly fewer than one-third of these patients (26.4%) were treated with insulin alone, 31% received insulin and oral antidiabetic drugs, and 42.7% oral antidiabetic drugs alone. The patients that received insulin alone were significantly older, had poorer glycaemic control (HbA1c = 7.9 ± 1.4, 7.8 ± 1.0 and 7.1 ± 1.2%, respectively; P < 0.001) and had greater alterations of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). HbA1c was below 6.5% in 15% of patients and 37.3% of patients had a GFR below 60 mL/min. The patients treated with insulin alone had significantly more hypoglycaemic episodes (respectively 53.3, 36.3 and 19.5%, P < 0.001), retinopathy, cardiovascular involvement and more specific geriatric complications, such as cognitive disorders (respectively 34.1, 31.4 and 23.6%, P = 0.006). In this specific population of elderly type 2 diabetic patients, diabetic and geriatric conditions significantly differed between the types of drug treatments. Considering low values of HbA1c and GFR, some patients seemed overtreated and other patients received inappropriate drugs.

  14. Therapeutic potential of human embryonic stem cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS: Patients with a previous history of diabetes and its associated complications were enrolled and injected with hESC lines as per the defined protocol. The patients were assessed using Nutech functional score (NFS), a numeric scoring scale to evaluate the patients for 11 diagnostic parameters. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at the end of treatment period 1 (T1). All the parameters were graded on the NFS scale from 1 to 5. Highest possible grade (HPG) of 5 was considered as the grade of best improvement. RESULTS: Overall, 94.8% of the patients showed improvement by at least one grade of NFS at the end of T1. For all the 11 parameters evaluated, 54% of patients achieved HPG after treatment. The four essential parameters (improvement in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin level, and fall in number of other oral hypoglycemic drugs with and without insulin) are presented in detail. For HbA1c, 72.6% of patients at the end of T1 met the World Health Organization cut off value, i.e., 6.5% of HbA1c. For insulin level, 65.9% of patients at the end of T1 were able to achieve HPG. After treatment, the improvement was seen in 16.3% of patients who required no more than two medications along with insulin. Similarly, 21.5% of patients were improved as their dosage regimen for using oral drugs was reduced to 1-2 from 5. CONCLUSION: hESC therapy is beneficial in patients with diabetes and helps in reducing their dependence on insulin and other medicines. PMID:27468331

  15. A Novel Physiology-Based Mathematical Model to Estimate Red Blood Cell Lifespan in Different Human Age Groups.

    PubMed

    An, Guohua; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Direct measurement of red blood cell (RBC) survival in humans has improved from the original accurate but limited differential agglutination technique to the current reliable, safe, and accurate biotin method. Despite this, all of these methods are time consuming and require blood sampling over several months to determine the RBC lifespan. For situations in which RBC survival information must be obtained quickly, these methods are not suitable. With the exception of adults and infants, RBC survival has not been extensively investigated in other age groups. To address this need, we developed a novel, physiology-based mathematical model that quickly estimates RBC lifespan in healthy individuals at any age. The model is based on the assumption that the total number of RBC recirculations during the lifespan of each RBC (denoted by N max) is relatively constant for all age groups. The model was initially validated using the data from our prior infant and adult biotin-labeled red blood cell studies and then extended to the other age groups. The model generated the following estimated RBC lifespans in 2-year-old, 5-year-old, 8-year-old, and 10-year-old children: 62, 74, 82, and 86 days, respectively. We speculate that this model has useful clinical applications. For example, HbA1c testing is not reliable in identifying children with diabetes because HbA1c is directly affected by RBC lifespan. Because our model can estimate RBC lifespan in children at any age, corrections to HbA1c values based on the model-generated RBC lifespan could improve diabetes diagnosis as well as therapy in children.

  16. Glycemic Effectiveness of Metformin-Based Dual-Combination Therapies with Sulphonylurea, Pioglitazone, or DPP4-Inhibitor in Drug-Naïve Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Ki; Song, Sun Ok; Kim, Kwang Joon; Cho, Yongin; Choi, Younjeong; Yun, Yujung; Kang, Eun-Seok; Cha, Bong Soo; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2013-01-01

    Background This study compared the glycemic effectiveness of three metformin-based dual therapies according to baseline hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) to evaluate the appropriateness of the guideline enforced by the National Health Insurance Corporation of Korea for initial medication of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods This prospective observational study was conducted across 24 weeks for drug-naïve Korean T2D patients with HbA1c greater than 7.5%. Subjects were first divided into three groups based on the agent combined with metformin (group 1, gliclazide-modified release or glimepiride; group 2, pioglitazone; group 3, sitagliptin). Subjects were also classified into three categories according to baseline HbA1c (category I, 7.5%≤HbA1c<9.0%; category II, 9.0%≤HbA1c<11.0%; category III, 11.0%≤HbA1c). Results Among 116 subjects, 99 subjects completed the study, with 88 subjects maintaining the initial medication. While each of the metformin-based dual therapies showed a significant decrease in HbA1c (group 1, 8.9% to 6.4%; group 2, 9.0% to 6.6%; group 3, 9.3% to 6.3%; P<0.001 for each), there was no significant difference in the magnitude of HbA1c change among the groups. While the three HbA1c categories showed significantly different baseline HbA1c levels (8.2% vs. 9.9% vs. 11.9%; P<0.001), endpoint HbA1c was not different (6.4% vs. 6.6% vs. 6.0%; P=0.051). Conclusion The three dual therapies using a combination of metformin and either sulfonylurea, pioglitazone, or sitagliptin showed similar glycemic effectiveness among drug-naïve Korean T2D patients. In addition, these regimens were similarly effective across a wide range of baseline HbA1c levels. PMID:24404518

  17. Serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is a biomarker in patients with diabetes and periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Preethi; Srikanth, Padma; Seshadri, Krishna G.; Barani, Ramya; Samanta, Maitreya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The role of serum Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1) as a biomarker of periodontitis is well documented; however, its role in diabetic patients with periodontitis is unknown. Aim: This study was conducted to determine the presence and concentration of serum MCP-1 in diabetic patients with and without periodontitis and correlate it glycemic status with periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Adult diabetic patients were enrolled and grouped into group I, II, and III based on their glycemic status and serum MCP-1 estimated by ELISA. Linear regression and correlation tests were performed using R statistical software, Medcalc software to observe correlation between the serum MCP-1 and glycated hemoglobin level among different groups. Results: Serum samples obtained from 37 patients tested positive for MCP-1. Mean serum MCP-1 concentration was highest (482.3 pg/ml) in group III, lowest (149.3 pg/ml) in group I, and intermediate 398.8 pg/ml in group II. Correlation and regression analysis was done between HbA1c and serum MCP-1. A significant positive correlation (P < 0.001) was observed. Serum MCP-1 increased by 37.278 pg/ml for every 1% rise in HbA1c, and the levels were raised in group II and group III than in group I irrespective of their glycemic status. With an HbA1c range of 6.5-6.9% (group II), the serum MCP-1 values cluster around 380-410 pg/ml. Elevated levels of serum MCP-1 (>500 pg/ml) in three subjects corresponded to HbA1c values more than 12.2% (group III). Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first study to document serum MCP-1 levels in diabetic patients with periodontitis. Glycemic status influences serum MCP-1, and lack of glycemic control contributes to increased serum MCP-1 levels. Serum MCP-1 may thus serve as a biomarker of inflammation and disease progression in diabetes with periodontitis. PMID:25143907

  18. Time-saving screening for diabetes in patients with coronary artery disease: a report from EUROASPIRE IV

    PubMed Central

    Gyberg, Viveca; De Bacquer, Dirk; Kotseva, Kornelia; De Backer, Guy; Schnell, Oliver; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Wood, David; Rydén, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO advocates 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) for detecting diabetes mellitus (DM). OGTT is the most sensitive method to detect DM in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Considered time consuming, the use of OGTT is unsatisfactory. A 1-hour plasma glucose (1hPG) test has not been evaluated as an alternative in patients with CAD. Objectives To create an algorithm based on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 1hPG limiting the need of a 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) in patients with CAD. Methods 951 patients with CAD without DM underwent OGTT. A 2hPG≥11.1 mmol/L was the reference for undiagnosed DM. The yield of HbA1c, FPG and 1hPG was compared with that of 2hPG. Results Mean FPG was 6.2±0.9 mmol/L, and mean HbA1c 5.8±0.4%. Based on 2hPG≥11.1 mmol/L 122 patients (13%) had DM. There was no value for the combination of HbA1c and FPG to rule out or in DM (HbA1c≥6.5%; FPG≥7.0 mmol/L). In receiver operating characteristic analysis a 1hPG≥12 mmol/L balanced sensitivity and specificity for detecting DM (both=82%; positive and negative predictive values 40% and 97%). A combination of FPG<6.5 mmol/L and 1hPG<11 mmol/L excluded 99% of DM. A combination of FPG>8.0 mmol/L and 1hPG>15 mmol/L identified 100% of patients with DM. Conclusions Based on its satisfactory accuracy to detect DM an algorithm is proposed for screening for DM in patients with CAD decreasing the need for a 2-hour OGTT by 71%. PMID:27932342

  19. Analysis of Hemoglobin Glycation Using Microfluidic CE-MS: A Rapid, Mass Spectrometry Compatible Method for Assessing Diabetes Management.

    PubMed

    Redman, Erin A; Ramos-Payan, Maria; Mellors, J Scott; Ramsey, J Michael

    2016-05-17

    Diabetes has become a significant health problem worldwide with the rate of diagnosis increasing rapidly in recent years. Measurement of glycated blood proteins, particularly glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), is an important diagnostic tool used to detect and manage the condition in patients. Described here is a method using microfluidic capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry detection (CE-MS) to assess hemoglobin glycation in whole blood lysate. Using denaturing conditions, the hemoglobin (Hb) tetramer dissociates into the alpha and beta subunits (α- and β-Hb), which are then separated via CE directly coupled to MS detection. Nearly baseline resolution is achieved between α-Hb, β-Hb, and glycated β-Hb. A second glycated β-Hb isomer that is partially resolved from β-Hb is detected in extracted ion electropherograms for glycated β-Hb. Glycation on α-Hb is also detected in the α-Hb mass spectrum. Additional modifications to the β-Hb are detected, including acetylation and a +57 Da species that could be the addition of a glyoxal moiety. Patient blood samples were analyzed using the microfluidic CE-MS method and a clinically used immunoassay to measure HbA1c. The percentage of glycated α-Hb and β-Hb was calculated from the microfluidic CE-MS data using peak areas generated from extracted ion electropherograms. The values for glycated β-Hb were found to correlate well with the HbA1c levels derived in the clinic, giving a slope of 1.20 and an R(2) value of 0.99 on a correlation plot. Glycation of human serum albumin (HSA) can also be measured using this technique. It was observed that patients with elevated glycated Hb levels also had higher levels of HSA glycation. Interestingly, the sample with the highest HbA1c levels did not have the highest levels of glycated HSA. Because the lifetime of HSA is shorter than Hb, this could indicate a recent lapse in glycemic control for that patient. The ability to assess both Hb and HSA glycation has the potential

  20. Prevalence of Elevated Glycated Hemoglobin Concentrations in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Anthropometrical and Metabolic Relationship in Amazonian Women

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Sebastiao Freitas; Yamamoto, Marcia Marly Winck; Bueno, Herica Bernardes; Belizario, Danilla; Barbosa, Jacklyne Silva

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and to examine its relationship with other carbohydrate metabolic parameter among Brazilian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods A cross-sectional study including 288 PCOS patients was conducted. Anthropometrical, clinical, biochemical and endocrine parameters were evaluated. Results The mean age was 26.92 ± 5.51 years. HbA1c mean concentration was 5.83±1.34%. In 38.54% of patients, HbA1c was ≥ 5.7%. HbA1c was positively correlated with body weight (r = 0.142, P = 0.017), body mass index (P = 0.000), waist:hip ratio (P = 0.000), fat mass (P = 0.000), conicity index (P = 0.000), triglyceride (P = 0.001), C-peptide (P = 0.000), total testosterone (P = 0.003), free testosterone (P = 0.000), free androgen index (P = 0.006) and fasting insulin (P = 0.025). Using the oral glucose tolerance test, HbA1c showed positive correlation with glucose concentrations at any point in time (P < 0.05). Conclusions HbA1c was elevated in nearly 40% of PCOS patients and it showed positive correlation with several anthropometric and metabolic factors and androgen levels. The current study provides further evidence that HbA1C is higher in PCOS patients and may have a potential role in the prediction of dysglycemic disease in these women. PMID:24883154

  1. Glycated Hemoglobin and Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Singaporean Chinese Adults: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Bancks, Michael P.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Gross, Myron D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The American Diabetes Association recently included glycated hemoglobin in the diagnostic criteria for diabetes, but research on the utility of this biomarker in Southeast Asians is scant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between percent HbA1c and incident diabetes in an Asian population of adult men and women without reported diabetes. Methods Data analysis of 5,770 men and women enrolled in the Singapore Chinese Health Study who provided a blood sample at the follow-up I visit (1999–2004) and had no cancer and no reported history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease events. Diabetes was defined as self-report of physician diagnosis, identified at the follow-up II visit (2006–2010). Results Hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) for incident diabetes by 5 categories of HbA1c were estimated with Cox regression models and continuous HbA1c with cubic spline analysis. Compared to individuals with an HbA1c ≤ 5.7% (≤39 mmol/mol), individuals with HbA1c 5.8–5.9% (40–41 mmol/mol), 6.0–6.1% (42–43 mmol/mol), 6.2–6.4% (44–47 mmol/mol), and ≥ 6.5% (≥48 mmol/mol) had significantly increased risk for incident diabetes during follow-up. In cubic spline analysis, levels below 5.7% HbA1c were not significantly associated with incident diabetes. Conclusions Our study found a strong and graded association with HbA1c 5.8% and above with incident diabetes in Chinese men and women. PMID:25775375

  2. Prevalence of Aspirin Resistance in Diabetic Patients and its Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    HABIZAL, Nor Halwani; ABDUL HALIM, Sanihah; BHASKAR, Shalini; WAN BEBAKAR, Wan Mohamed; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aspirin resistance has posed a major dilemma in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke. There have been many factors that have been associated with aspirin resistance. Among these factors, the inflammatory processes of diabetes and glycaemic control have been significantly associated with aspirin resistance. Our study evaluated the prevalence of aspirin resistance and its associated factors. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, interventional study, which was implemented from October to November 2012 at the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). Sixty-nine patients with diabetes who were taking aspirin were enrolled. The glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured in these patients. The thromboelastography (TEG) level was measured using a TEG machine by a trained technician employing standard methods. The variables obtained were analysed for prevalence of aspirin resistance, HbA1c, CRP, and TEG level. The Chi-square test (and Fisher exact test where applicable) were used to evaluate the associations between aspirin resistance with glycaemic control (HbA1c) and inflammatory markers (CRP). Results: The prevalence of aspirin resistance was 17.4% (95%; CI 9.3, 28.4). Glycaemic control (HbA1c) and inflammatory markers (CRP) were not associated with aspirin resistance. Aspirin resistance was prevalent in our study population and was comparable to other studies. The mean HbA1c in the aspirin-resistant group was 8.9%, whereas the mean HbA1c in the aspirin-sensitive group was 8.6%. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in HbA1c between the two groups. There was no significant association between CRP levels and aspirin resistance. PMID:25892950

  3. Sputum glucose and glycemic control in cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Cowley, Elise S; Newman, Dianne K; Kato, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes affects up to half of cystic fibrosis patients and is associated with increased mortality and more frequent pulmonary exacerbations. However, it is unclear to what degree good glycemic control might mitigate these risks and clinical outcomes have not previously been studied in relation to glucose from the lower airways, the site of infection and CF disease progression. We initially hypothesized that diabetic cystic fibrosis patients with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) > 6.5% have worse pulmonary function, longer and more frequent exacerbations and also higher sputum glucose levels than patients with HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5% or cystic fibrosis patients without diabetes. To test this, we analyzed spontaneously expectorated sputum samples from 88 cystic fibrosis patients. The median sputum glucose concentration was 0.70 mM (mean, 4.75 mM; range, 0-64.6 mM). Sputum glucose was not correlated with age, sex, body mass index, diabetes diagnosis, glycemic control, exacerbation frequency or length, or pulmonary function. Surprisingly, sputum glucose was highest in subjects with normal glucose tolerance, suggesting the dynamics of glycemic control, sputum glucose and pulmonary infections are more complex than previously thought. Two-year mean HbA(1c) was positively correlated with the length of exacerbation admission (p < 0.01), and negatively correlated with measures of pulmonary function (p < 0.01). While total number of hospitalizations for exacerbations were not significantly different, subjects with an HbA(1c) > 6.5% were hospitalized on average 6 days longer than those with HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5% (p < 0.01). Current clinical care guidelines for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes target HbA(1c) ≤ 7% to limit long-term microvascular damage, but more stringent glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5%) may further reduce the short-term pulmonary complications.

  4. Selection of aptamers specific for glycated hemoglobin and total hemoglobin using on-chip SELEX.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-I; Wu, Ching-Chu; Yang, Ching-Hsuan; Chang, Ko-Wei; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Shiesh, Shu-Chu

    2015-01-21

    Blood glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels reflecting average glucose concentrations over the past three months are fundamental for the diagnosis, monitoring, and risk assessment of diabetes. It has been hypothesized that aptamers, which are single-stranded DNAs or RNAs that demonstrate high affinity to a large variety of molecules ranging from small drugs, metabolites, or proteins, could be used for the measurement of HbA1c. Aptamers are selected through an in vitro process called systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), and they can be chemically synthesized with high reproducibility at relatively low costs. This study therefore aimed to select HbA1c- and hemoglobin (Hb)-specific single-stranded DNA aptamers using an on-chip SELEX protocol. A microfluidic SELEX chip was developed to continuously and automatically carry out multiple rounds of SELEX to screen specific aptamers for HbA1c and Hb. HbA1c and Hb were first coated onto magnetic beads. Following several rounds of selection and enrichment with a randomized 40-mer DNA library, specific oligonucleotides were selected. The binding specificity and affinity were assessed by competitive and binding assays. Using the developed microfluidic system, the incubation and partitioning times were greatly decreased, and the entire process was shortened dramatically. Both HbA1c- and Hb-specific aptamers selected by the microfluidic system showed high specificity and affinity (dissociation constant, Kd = 7.6 ± 3.0 nM and 7.3 ± 2.2 nM for HbA1c and Hb, respectively). With further refinements in the assay, these aptamers may replace the conventional antibodies for in vitro diagnostics applications in the near future.

  5. An integrated microfluidic system for measurement of glycated hemoglobin levels by using an aptamer-antibody assay on magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ko-Wei; Li, Jinglun; Yang, Ching-Hsuan; Shiesh, Shu-Chu; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-06-15

    Blood glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), reflecting the average blood glucose level in the proceeding 2-3 months, is recommended for screening/diagnosing and patient management of diabetes. However, accurate measurement of the HbA1c level at the point of care is hampered by costly, large-scale instruments (such as high-performance liquid chromatography) or reagent instability of classical immunologic methods, which involve antibody-based immunoturbidimetry. In this work, an integrated microfluidic system using aptamer-based testing to measure HbA1c in blood samples is therefore presented. This measuring system used nucleic-acid aptamers that exhibited high sensitivity and high specificity for hemoglobin and HbA1c to perform a stable and robust testing. The compact microfluidic system consumed less samples and reagents and significantly shortened the detection time. Combining the advantages of microfluidics and aptamers, this integrated microsystem presents a promising tool for accurate and point-of-case HbA1c detection. To demonstrate its clinical utility, whole blood samples with clinically-relevant concentrations of HbA1c and Hb were automatically measured on the integrated microfluidic system. Experimental data showed that the developed aptamer-based microfluidic system is capable of detecting HbA1c and Hb with a good linear response. The entire process was completed within 25 min. The aptamer-antibody on-chip sandwich immunoassay may be further refined to allow diabetes screening and diagnosis at lower cost and earlier phase to minimize the risk of diabetic complications.

  6. Insulin versus an oral antidiabetic agent as add-on therapy in type 2 diabetes after failure of an oral antidiabetic regimen: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, JM; Brown, Lauren C; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Background Although evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus provide clear recommendations for initial therapy, evidence on an optimal treatment strategy after secondary failure is unclear. Purpose To compare the efficacy of add-on therapy using basal insulin versus an additional oral antidiabetic agent in patients with type 2 diabetes and secondary failure. Data sources We searched the following electronic databases from inception until June 2007: MEDLINE; EMBASE; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; Web of Science; Scopus; CINAHL; International Pharmaceutical Abstracts; Academic OneFile; PASCAL; Global Health Database; LILACS; HealthSTAR; PubMed. Reference lists of potentially relevant articles and clinical trial databases were searched, pharmaceutical manufacturers were contacted, and grey literature sources were sought. Study selection Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving subjects with type 2 diabetes with secondary failure who were randomly assigned to receive additional basal insulin therapy (insulin glargine, detemir, or NPH [neutral protamine Hagedorn]) versus another oral antidiabetic agent from any class. Data extraction Two reviewers independently screened articles, extracted data and assessed methodological quality. Our primary outcome was glycemic control measured by change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and the proportion of subjects achieving a HbA1C value of ≤ 7%. Data synthesis To compare overall efficacy between the 2 treatment strategies, change in HbA1C was pooled across studies using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD). Eleven RCTs, involving 757 participants with a median age of 56 and a median known duration of diabetes of 11 years, were included in our analysis. Insulin treatment demonstrated a small but statistically significant improvement in HbA1C compared with the use of an additional oral agent as add-on therapy (WMD -0.17; 95% CI [confidence interval] -0

  7. A 6-month follow-up study of the randomized controlled Ma-Pi macrobiotic dietary intervention (MADIAB trial) in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Soare, A; Del Toro, R; Khazrai, Y M; Di Mauro, A; Fallucca, S; Angeletti, S; Skrami, E; Gesuita, R; Tuccinardi, D; Manfrini, S; Fallucca, F; Pianesi, M; Pozzilli, P

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the MADIAB trial (a 21-day randomized, controlled trial in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D)), intervention with the Ma-Pi 2 macrobiotic diet resulted in significantly greater improvements in metabolic control compared with a standard recommended diet for patients with T2D. We report on a 6-month follow-up study, which investigated, whether these benefits extended beyond the 21-day intensive dietary intervention, in real-world conditions. Subjects: At the end of the MADIAB trial (baseline of this follow-up study), all participants continued their assigned diet (Ma-Pi or control) for 6 months. The Ma-Pi 2 group followed the Ma-Pi 4 diet during this follow-up study. Forty of the original 51 subjects (78.4%) participated in the follow-up (body mass index, 27–45 kg m−2; age, 40–75 years). Primary outcome was percentage change from baseline in HbA1c; secondary outcomes were anthropometric data and lipid panel. Results: A significantly greater median percentage reduction was observed for HbA1c in the Ma-Pi group (−11.27% (95% confidence interval (CI): −10.17; −12.36)) compared with the control group (−5.88% (95% CI: −3.79; −7.98)) (P < 0.001). Total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol increased in both groups with no differences between groups (P=0.331 and P=0.082, respectively). After correcting for age and gender, the Ma-Pi diet was associated with a higher percentage reduction in HbA1c (95% CI: 2.56; 7.61) and body weight (95% CI: 0.40; 3.99), and a higher percentage increase in LDL cholesterol (95% CI: −1.52; −33.16). However, all participants' total and LDL cholesterol levels remained within recommended ranges (<200 mg dl−1 and <100 mg dl−1, respectively). The Ma-Pi diet group achieved the target median HbA1c value (<5.7% (39 mmol mol−1)) at 6 months. Conclusions: Both the Ma-Pi and control diets maintained their benefits beyond the 21-day intensive monitored intervention over a 6-month follow

  8. Metabolic Effects Associated with ICS in Patients with COPD and Comorbid Type 2 Diabetes: A Historical Matched Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Price, David B.; Burden, Anne; Skinner, Derek; Mikkelsen, Helga; Ding, Cherlyn; Brice, Richard; Chavannes, Niels H.; Kocks, Janwillem W. H.; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Haughney, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Management guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recommend that inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are prescribed to patients with the most severe symptoms. However, these guidelines have not been widely implemented by physicians, leading to widespread use of ICS in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD. Of particular concern is the potential risk of worsening diabetic control associated with ICS use. Here we investigate whether ICS therapy in patients with COPD and comorbid type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a negative impact on diabetic control, and whether these negative effects are dose-dependent. Methods and Findings This was a historical matched cohort study utilising primary care medical record data from two large UK databases. We selected patients aged ≥40 years with COPD and T2DM, prescribed ICS (n = 1360) or non-ICS therapy (n = 2642) between 2008 and 2012. The primary endpoint was change in HbA1c between the baseline and outcome periods. After 1:1 matching, each cohort consisted of 682 patients. Over the 12–18-month outcome period, patients prescribed ICS had significantly greater increases in HbA1c values compared with those prescribed non-ICS therapies; adjusted difference 0.16% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.05–0.27%) in all COPD patients, and 0.25% (95% CI: 0.10–0.40%) in mild-to-moderate COPD patients. Patients in the ICS cohort also had significantly more diabetes-related general practice visits per year and received more frequent glucose strip prescriptions, compared with those prescribed non-ICS therapies. Patients prescribed higher cumulative doses of ICS (>250 mg) had greater odds of increased HbA1c and/or receiving additional antidiabetic medication, and increased odds of being above the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) target for HbA1c levels, compared with those prescribed lower cumulative doses (≤125 mg). Conclusion For patients with COPD and comorbid T2DM, ICS therapy may have a negative impact on

  9. Echocardiographic Evidence for Valvular Toxicity of Benfluorex: A Double-Blind Randomised Trial in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Derumeaux, Geneviève; Ernande, Laura; Serusclat, André; Servan, Evelyne; Bruckert, Eric; Rousset, Hugues; Senn, Stephen; Van Gaal, Luc; Picandet, Brigitte; Gavini, François; Moulin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Objectives REGULATE trial was designed to compare the efficacy and safety of benfluorex versus pioglitazone in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Methods Double-blind, parallel-group, international, randomised, non-inferiority trial. More than half of the 196 participating centres were primary care centres. Patients eligible had type 2 DM uncontrolled on sulfonylurea. 846 were randomised. They received study treatment for 1 year. 423 patients were allocated to benfluorex (150 to 450 mg/day) and 423 were allocated to pioglitazone (30 to 45 mg/day). Primary efficacy criterion was HbA1c. Safety assessment included blinded echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac and valvular status. Results At baseline, patients were 59.1±10.5 years old with HbA1c 8.3±0.8%, and DM duration 7.1±6.0 years. During the study, mean HbA1c significantly decreased in both groups (benfluorex: from 8.30±0.80 to 7.77±1.31 versus pioglitazone: from 8.30±0.80 to 7.45±1.30%). The last HbA1c value was significantly lower with pioglitazone than with benfluorex (p<0.001) and non-inferiority of benfluorex was not confirmed (p = 0.19). Among the 615 patients with assessable paired echocardiography (310 benfluorex, 305 pioglitazone), 314 (51%) had at least one morphological valvular abnormality and 515 (84%) at least one functional valvular abnormality at baseline. Emergent morphological abnormalities occurred in 8 patients with benfluorex versus 4 with pioglitazone (OR 1.99), 95% CI (0.59 to 6.69). Emergent regurgitation (new or increased by one grade or more) occurred more frequently with benfluorex (82 patients, 27%) than with pioglitazone (33 patients, 11%) (OR 2.97), 95% CI (1.91 to 4.63) and were mainly rated grade 1; grade 2 (mild) was detected in 2 patients with benfluorex and 3 with pioglitazone. There was no moderate or severe regurgitation. Conclusion After 1 year of exposure, our results show a 2.97 fold increase in the incidence of valvular regurgitation with benfluorex and

  10. Association between socio-economic status and hemoglobin A1c levels in a Canadian primary care adult population without diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hgb A1c levels may be higher in persons without diabetes of lower socio-economic status (SES) but evidence about this association is limited; there is therefore uncertainty about the inclusion of SES in clinical decision support tools informing the provision and frequency of Hgb A1c tests to screen for diabetes. We studied the association between neighborhood-level SES and Hgb A1c in a primary care population without diabetes. Methods This is a retrospective study using data routinely collected in the electronic medical records (EMRs) of forty six community-based family physicians in Toronto, Ontario. We analysed records from 4,870 patients without diabetes, age 45 and over, with at least one clinical encounter between January 1st 2009 and December 31st 2011 and one or more Hgb A1c report present in their chart during that time interval. Residential postal codes were used to assign neighborhood deprivation indices and income levels by quintiles. Covariates included elements known to be associated with an increase in the risk of incident diabetes: age, gender, family history of diabetes, body mass index, blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Results The difference in mean Hgb A1c between highest and lowest income quintiles was -0.04% (p = 0.005, 95% CI -0.07% to -0.01%), and between least deprived and most deprived was -0.05% (p = 0.003, 95% CI -0.09% to -0.02%) for material deprivation and 0.02% (p = 0.2, 95% CI -0.06% to 0.01%) for social deprivation. After adjustment for covariates, a marginally statistically significant difference in Hgb A1c between highest and lowest SES quintile (p = 0.04) remained in the material deprivation model, but not in the other models. Conclusions We found a small inverse relationship between Hgb A1c and the material aspects of SES; this was largely attenuated once we adjusted for diabetes risk factors, indicating that an independent contribution of SES

  11. The combination of OLmesartan and a CAlcium channel blocker (azelnidipine) or candesartan and a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) in type 2 diabetic hypertensive patients: the OLCA study.

    PubMed

    Daikuhara, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Fumi; Ishida, Toshihiko

    2012-10-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) are often co-administered with a calcium channel blocker (CCB) for treating hypertension. In this open-label randomised study, untreated diabetic hypertensive patients were randomised to receive either olmesartan 20 mg/day or candesartan 8 mg/day for 12 weeks. Patients with blood pressure exceeding 130/80 mm Hg received add-on 16 mg/day azelnidipine to ongoing olmesartan (OL group) or 5 mg/day amlodipine to ongoing candesartan (CA group) for 24 weeks. Home-measured and clinic-measured blood pressure decreased in both groups. Fasting blood glucose, haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and urinary albumin levels decreased significantly in the OL group but not in the CA group. In conclusion, this study revealed clinically relevant differences between two combinations of an ARB+CCB in diabetic hypertensive patients. Olmesartan and azelnidipine had a more persistent early morning antihypertensive effect and produced greater decreases in heart rate, fasting blood glucose and HbA1c (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program values) levels, and microalbuminuria than did candesartan and amlodipine.

  12. Impact of hyperbaric oxygen on diabetic ulcers is unaffected by glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiani, Parkash; Bahktiani, Parkash; Mansuri, Owaise; Yadav, Abhijeet; Osuoha, Chima; Knight, Patty; Baynosa, Richard; McLafferty, Robert; Jakoby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy is an established intervention for treating chronic diabetic lower extremity ulcers, but the impact of glycemic control on its efficacy has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of blood glucose control at initiation of HBO2 treatment on wound healing. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was measured at start of HBO2 therapy for 22 patients undergoing treatment of chronic lower extremity ulcers at two regional wound care centers. Patients with HbA1c < 7.5% were stratified into a "good glycemic control" group (n = 12, mean HbA1c 6.5 ± 0.8%), and patients with HbA1c ≥ 7.5% were stratified into a "poor glycemic control" group (n = 10, mean HbA1c 8.8 ± 1.4%, p = 0.004 compared to "good glycemic control group"). After 20 HBO2 sessions over 30 days in addition to standard wound care interventions, there was no difference in wound healing between the two glycemic control groups as indicated by. reduction from baseline in ulcer surface area, depth, or volume. The diabetic lower extremity wound response to HBO2 therapy is unaffected by glycemic control prior to treatment, and HBO2 treatment should not be delayed for suboptimal blood glucose control.

  13. Chromium supplements for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: limited evidence of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Costello, Rebecca B; Dwyer, Johanna T; Bailey, Regan L

    2016-07-01

    Some adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) believe that chromium-containing supplements will help control their disease, but the evidence is mixed. This narrative review examines the efficacy of chromium supplements for improving glycemic control as measured by decreases in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Using systematic search criteria, 20 randomized controlled trials of chromium supplementation in T2DM patients were identified. Clinically meaningful treatment goals were defined as an FPG of ≤7.2 mmol/dL, a decline in HbA1c to ≤7%, or a decrease of ≥0.5% in HbA1c. In only a few randomized controlled trials did FPG (5 of 20), HbA1c (3 of 14), or both (1 of 14) reach the treatment goals with chromium supplementation. HbA1c declined by ≥0.5% in 5 of 14 studies. On the basis of the low strength of existing evidence, chromium supplements have limited effectiveness, and there is little rationale to recommend their use for glycemic control in patients with existing T2DM. Future meta-analyses should include only high-quality studies with similar forms of chromium and comparable inclusion/exclusion criteria to provide scientifically sound recommendations for clinicians.

  14. Genetic Variant in HK1 Is Associated With a Proanemic State and A1C but Not Other Glycemic Control–Related Traits

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefond, Amélie; Vaxillaire, Martine; Labrune, Yann; Lecoeur, Cécile; Chèvre, Jean-Claude; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Cauchi, Stéphane; Balkau, Beverley; Marre, Michel; Tichet, Jean; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Hadjadj, Samy; Gallois, Yves; Czernichow, Sébastien; Hercberg, Serge; Kaakinen, Marika; Wiesner, Susanne; Charpentier, Guillaume; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Elliott, Paul; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Horber, Fritz; Dina, Christian; Pedersen, Oluf; Sladek, Robert; Meyre, David; Froguel, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A1C is widely considered the gold standard for monitoring effective blood glucose levels. Recently, a genome-wide association study reported an association between A1C and rs7072268 within HK1 (encoding hexokinase 1), which catalyzes the first step of glycolysis. HK1 deficiency in erythrocytes (red blood cells [RBCs]) causes severe nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia in both humans and mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The contribution of rs7072268 to A1C and the RBC-related traits was assessed in 6,953 nondiabetic European participants. We additionally analyzed the association with hematologic traits in 5,229 nondiabetic European individuals (in whom A1C was not measured) and 1,924 diabetic patients. Glucose control–related markers other than A1C were analyzed in 18,694 nondiabetic European individuals. A type 2 diabetes case-control study included 7,447 French diabetic patients. RESULTS Our study confirms a strong association between the rs7072268–T allele and increased A1C (β = 0.029%; P = 2.22 × 10−7). Surprisingly, despite adequate study power, rs7072268 showed no association with any other markers of glucose control (fasting- and 2-h post-OGTT–related parameters, n = 18,694). In contrast, rs7072268–T allele decreases hemoglobin levels (n = 13,416; β = −0.054 g/dl; P = 3.74 × 10−6) and hematocrit (n = 11,492; β = −0.13%; P = 2.26 × 10−4), suggesting a proanemic effect. The T allele also increases risk for anemia (836 cases; odds ratio 1.13; P = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS HK1 variation, although strongly associated with A1C, does not seem to be involved in blood glucose control. Since HK1 rs7072268 is associated with reduced hemoglobin levels and favors anemia, we propose that HK1 may influence A1C levels through its anemic effect or its effect on glucose metabolism in RBCs. These findings may have implications for type 2 diabetes diagnosis and clinical management because anemia is a frequent complication of the diabetes state. PMID

  15. Clinically Defined Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Prognosis in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirsten; Patterson, Ruth E.; Flatt, Shirley W.; Natarajan, Loki; Parker, Barbara A.; Heath, Dennis D.; Laughlin, Gail A.; Saquib, Nazmus; Rock, Cheryl L.; Pierce, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Self-reported diabetes has been associated with poor breast cancer outcomes. Research is needed to investigate the relationship between biologically determined glycemic control and breast cancer prognosis. Methods Archived baseline blood samples from the Women's Healthy Eating and Living Study were used to measure hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) among 3,003 survivors of early-stage breast cancer (age of diagnosis, 28 to 70 years) observed for a median of 7.3 years for additional breast cancer events and 10.3 years for all-cause mortality. HbA1C levels provide an accurate, precise measure of chronic glycemic levels. Cox regression analysis was performed to assess whether baseline HbA1C levels predicted disease-free and overall survival. Results Only 5.8% of women had chronic hyperglycemia (defined as HbA1C levels ≥ 6.5%). Those with HbA1C ≥ 6.5% were older and more likely to be less educated, have nonwhite ethnicity, be obese, and have more advanced breast cancer at diagnosis. HbA1C was significantly associated with overall survival (Ptrend < .001). After adjusting for confounders, risk of all-cause mortality was twice as high in women with HbA1C ≥ 7.0% compared with women with HbA1C less than 6.5% (hazard ratio [HR], 2.35; 95% CI, 1.56 to 3.54). For disease-free survival, there was a nonsignificant 30% increase in risk for HbA1C levels ≥ 7.0% (HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.78 to 2.02). During study follow-up, previously diagnosed rather than undiagnosed diabetes seemed to account for the increased risk. Conclusion Chronic hyperglycemia is statistically significantly associated with reduced overall survival in survivors of early-stage breast cancer. Further study of diabetes and its relationship to breast cancer outcomes is warranted. PMID:21115861

  16. Can metabolic control variables of diabetic patients predict their quality of life?

    PubMed

    Dogan, Hakan; Harman, Ece; Kocoglu, Hakan; Sargin, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    The type and the complexity of regimen aimed at achieving better glycemic control may impact patient's health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in diabetic patients. But, the relationship between HbA1c levels of diabetic patients and their HRQoL is not clear. Our study aims to determine whether metabolic control variables can predict HRQoL or not and also the impact of hypertension (HT) on HRQoL in type II diabetic patients. A total of 469 patients with type II diabetes and 134 control subjects were studied. Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form-General Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire was used as a health survey tool to measure the QoL of patients in the study. SF-36 includes 8 individual subscales and two summary scales (physical component summary [PCS] and mental component summary [MCS]). Age, gender, fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, HbA1c, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride, total cholesterol, Apolipoprotein B (apoB), non-HDL-C, and body mass index values of the subjects were recorded. For statistical evaluation, SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) 15 under Windows 7 was used. MCS values of patients group were statistically lower than control group (P < .05). There was no significant difference in PCS values between groups (P > .05). Diabetic patients with HT had significantly lower PCS and MCS values than those without HT. In addition, there was a negative correlation between HbA1c level and PCS and MCS values (P < .05). Hypertensive diabetic patients had significantly higher fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, HbA1c, HDL-C, LDL-C, total cholesterol, and body mass index values than hypertensive control subjects (P < .05). Normotensive diabetic patients also had significantly lower PCS value than normotensive control subjects (P < .05). But, MCS value was not different between groups (P > .05). PCS values in diabetic male patients were significantly

  17. [The level of diabetic compensation and endogenous secretion of insulin in newly diagnosed diabetics. Prospective study: Part 1].

    PubMed

    Perusicová, J

    1999-10-01

    In a prospective study of newly detected diabetic patients in 1989-1991 the authors focused their attention on the evaluation of blood sugar levels and HbA1c during manifestation of DM and the amount of insulin secretion in relation to diabetes type 1 and 2 in adult patients. Part 1 of the paper reveals great differences in the fasting blood sugar level during manifestation of DM (26% of the group had a blood sugar level lower than 8.5 mmol/l and 14% above 15 mmol/l) even after 1-4 months treatment (3.8-17.2 mmol/l). Similar differences were found in HbA1c values (4.5-12.9%). High C-peptide levels revealed an incorrectly assessed diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in 16.7% diabetics and low C-peptide values on fasting and postporandial values were at variance with the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in 6% of the group.

  18. Alterations in White Matter Structure in Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Raman, Mira; Mazaika, Paul; Marzelli, Matthew; Hershey, Tamara; Weinzimer, Stuart A.; Aye, Tandy; Buckingham, Bruce; Mauras, Nelly; White, Neil H.; Fox, Larry A.; Tansey, Michael; Beck, Roy W.; Ruedy, Katrina J.; Kollman, Craig; Cheng, Peiyao; Reiss, Allan L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether type 1 diabetes affects white matter (WM) structure in a large sample of young children. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Children (ages 4 to <10 years) with type 1 diabetes (n = 127) and age-matched nondiabetic control subjects (n = 67) had diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans in this multisite neuroimaging study. Participants with type 1 diabetes were assessed for HbA1c history and lifetime adverse events, and glucose levels were monitored using a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) device and standardized measures of cognition. RESULTS Between-group analysis showed that children with type 1 diabetes had significantly reduced axial diffusivity (AD) in widespread brain regions compared with control subjects. Within the type 1 diabetes group, earlier onset of diabetes was associated with increased radial diffusivity (RD) and longer duration was associated with reduced AD, reduced RD, and increased fractional anisotropy (FA). In addition, HbA1c values were significantly negatively associated with FA values and were positively associated with RD values in widespread brain regions. Significant associations of AD, RD, and FA were found for CGM measures of hyperglycemia and glucose variability but not for hypoglycemia. Finally, we observed a significant association between WM structure and cognitive ability in children with type 1 diabetes but not in control subjects. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest vulnerability of the developing brain in young children to effects of type 1 diabetes associated with chronic hyperglycemia and glucose variability. PMID:24319123

  19. The effects of ginger on fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin a1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein a-I and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Khandouzi, Nafiseh; Shidfar, Farzad; Rajab, Asadollah; Rahideh, Tayebeh; Hosseini, Payam; Mir Taheri, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder, causes many complications such as micro- and macro-vascular diseases. Anti-diabetic, hypolipidemic and anti-oxidative properties of ginger have been noticed in several researches. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of ginger on fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial, a total of 41 type 2 diabetic patients randomly were assigned to ginger or placebo groups (22 in ginger group and 19 in control group), received 2 g/day of ginger powder supplement or lactose as placebo for 12 weeks. The serum concentrations of fasting blood sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde were analyzed before and after the intervention. Ginger supplementation significantly reduced the levels of fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in ginger group in comparison to baseline, as well as control group, while it increased the level of apolipoprotein A-I (p<0.05). It seems that oral administration of ginger powder supplement can improves fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I and malondialdehyde in type 2 diabetic patients. So it may have a role in alleviating the risk of some chronic complications of diabetes.

  20. Adding Once-Daily Lixisenatide for Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled With Newly Initiated and Continuously Titrated Basal Insulin Glargine

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Matthew C.; Forst, Thomas; Aronson, Ronnie; Sauque-Reyna, Leobardo; Souhami, Elisabeth; Silvestre, Louise; Ping, Lin; Rosenstock, Julio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE When oral therapy for type 2 diabetes is ineffective, adding basal insulin improves glycemic control. However, when glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) remains elevated because of postprandial hyperglycemia, the next therapeutic step is controversial. We examined the efficacy and safety of lixisenatide in patients with HbA1c still elevated after initiation of insulin glargine. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This double-blind, parallel-group trial enrolled patients with HbA1c 7–10% despite oral therapy. Insulin glargine was added and systematically titrated during a 12-week run-in, after which candidates with fasting glucose ≤7.8 mmol/L and HbA1c 7–9% were randomized to lixisenatide 20 µg or placebo for 24 weeks while insulin titration continued. The primary end point was HbA1c change after randomization. RESULTS The randomized population (n = 446) had mean diabetes duration of 9.2 years, BMI 31.8 kg/m2, and daily glargine dosage of 44 units. HbA1c had decreased during run-in from 8.6 to 7.6%; adding lixisenatide further reduced HbA1c by 0.71 vs. 0.40% with placebo (least squares mean difference, –0.32%; 95% CI, –0.46 to –0.17; P < 0.0001). More participants attained HbA1c <7% with lixisenatide (56 vs. 39%; P < 0.0001). Lixisenatide reduced plasma glucose 2 h after a standardized breakfast (difference vs. placebo –3.2 mmol/L; P < 0.0001) and had a favorable effect on body weight (difference vs. placebo –0.89 kg; P = 0.0012). Nausea, vomiting, and symptomatic hypoglycemia <3.3 mmol/L were more common with lixisenatide. CONCLUSIONS Adding lixisenatide to insulin glargine improved overall and postprandial hyperglycemia and deserves consideration as an alternative to prandial insulin for patients not reaching HbA1c goals with recently initiated basal insulin. PMID:23564915

  1. Local descriptive norms for overweight/obesity and physical inactivity, features of the built environment, and 10-year change in glycosylated haemoglobin in an Australian population-based biomedical cohort.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Suzanne J; Paquet, Catherine; Howard, Natasha J; Coffee, Neil T; Taylor, Anne W; Niyonsenga, Theo; Daniel, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Descriptive norms vary between places. Spatial variation in health-related descriptive norms may predict individual-level health outcomes. Such relationships have rarely been investigated. This study assessed 10-year change in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in relation to local descriptive norms for overweight/obesity (n = 1890) and physical inactivity (n = 1906) in models accounting for features of the built environment. HbA1c was measured three times over 10 years for a population-based biomedical cohort of adults in Adelaide, South Australia. Environmental exposures were expressed for cohort participants using 1600 m road-network buffers centred on participants' residential address. Local descriptive norms (prevalence of overweight/obesity [body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)] and of physical inactivity [<150 min/week]) were aggregated from responses to a separate geocoded population survey. Built environment measures were public open space (POS) availability (proportion of buffer area) and walkability. Separate sets of multilevel models analysed different predictors of 10-year change in HbA1c. Each model featured one local descriptive norm and one built environment variable with area-level education and individual-level covariates (age, sex, employment status, education, marital status, and smoking status). Interactions between local descriptive norms and built environment measures were assessed. HbA1c increased over time. POS availability and local descriptive norms for overweight/obesity and physical inactivity were each associated with greater rates of HbA1c increase. Greater walkability was associated with a reduced rate of HbA1c increase, and reduced the influence of the overweight/obesity norm on the rate of increase in HbA1c. Local descriptive health-related norms and features of the built environment predict 10-year change in HbA1c. The impact of local descriptive norms can vary according to built environment features. Little researched thus far

  2. [Hyperglycemia and cardiovascular risk: lessons from randomized trials].

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, André

    2010-04-20

    Diabetes is a major cardiovascular risk factor However, hyperglycemia is much more closely associated with microangiopathy than with macrovascular complications. Epidemiologic studies have shown a 15% increase of myocardial infarction for 1% increase in HbA1c level. It is accepted but not absolutely demonstrated, that reduction of HbA1c results in an equal reduction of cardiovascular events. An initial good glycemic control has long-term benefical effects on the risk of cardiovascular disease. On the contrary, benefit of an intensive glucose control is not demonstrated in diabetic patients with previous myocardial infarction. Two recent studies (ACCORD and VADT) showed an increase of cardiovascular mortality by severe hypoglycemia. In diabetic patients with previous myocardial infarction, glycemic goal must be modulated by the hypoglycaemic risk. A goal of 7.5% HbA1c seems reasonable for the diabetic patients treated by sulfonylureas or insulin, at risk of hypoglycaemia. HbA1c target < 7% remains the general goal and HbA1c target < 6.5% is appropriated to the patients treated by insulin sensitizing medications without risk of hypoglycaemia.

  3. Glucose metabolism in completed suicide: a forensic-pathological pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, Jonas; Keltanen, Terhi; Liberg, Benny; Sajantila, Antti; Masterman, Thomas; Lindroos, Katarina

    2017-01-01

    Aim To determine whether antemortem blood levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose predict completed suicide and, by extension, whether markers of glucose metabolism might be associated with a prosuicidal trait or state. Method From consecutively performed autopsies, samples of blood and vitreous humor from 17 suicide victims and 27 non-suicide controls were compared with regard to levels of glucose, lactate, and HbA1c. Results Mean HbA1c was higher and mean estimated blood glucose was lower among suicide victims, although tests revealed no significant differences (P = 0.171 and P = 0.395, respectively). HbA1c levels exceeding 48.0 mmol/mol, which were indicative of persistent hyperglycemia, were twice as common in suicide victims (59% vs 30%; P = 0.068). Conclusion The finding of this pilot study suggest that deranged glucose metabolism may reflect biological events antecedent to, or concomitant with, completed suicide, with the following clinical implications: recurring hyperglycemia due to defective glucose transport, which may give rise to depression and suicidal ideation, and elevated HbA1c levels, which may represent an assayable correlate to neurobiological conditions predisposing to suicide. PMID:28252873

  4. Selective label-free electrochemical impedance measurement of glycated haemoglobin on 3-aminophenylboronic acid-modified eggshell membranes.

    PubMed

    Boonyasit, Yuwadee; Heiskanen, Arto; Chailapakul, Orawan; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida

    2015-07-01

    We propose a novel alternative approach to long-term glycaemic monitoring using eggshell membranes (ESMs) as a new immobilising platform for the selective label-free electrochemical sensing of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), a vital clinical index of the glycaemic status in diabetic individuals. Due to the unique features of a novel 3-aminophenylboronic acid-modified ESM, selective binding was obtained via cis-diol interactions. This newly developed device provides clinical applicability as an affinity membrane-based biosensor for the identification of HbA1c over a clinically relevant range (2.3 - 14 %) with a detection limit of 0.19%. The proposed membrane-based biosensor also exhibited good reproducibility. When analysing normal and abnormal HbA1c levels, the within-run coefficients of variation were 1.68 and 1.83%, respectively. The run-to-run coefficients of variation were 1.97 and 2.02%, respectively. These results demonstrated that this method achieved the precise and selective measurement of HbA1c. Compared with a commercial HbA1c kit, the results demonstrated excellent agreement between the techniques (n = 15), demonstrating the clinical applicability of this sensor for monitoring glycaemic control. Thus, this low-cost sensing platform using the proposed membrane-based biosensor is ideal for point-of-care diagnostics.

  5. Fabrication of electrochemical interface based on boronic acid-modified pyrroloquinoline quinine/reduced graphene oxide composites for voltammetric determination of glycated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Dong, Hui; Liu, Lantao; Hao, Yuanqiang; Chang, Zhu; Xu, Maotian

    2015-02-15

    A voltammetric sensor for determination of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was developed based on the composites of phenylboronic acid-modified pyrroloquinoline quinine (PBA-PQQ) and reduced graphene oxide. After the electrodeposition of reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode, PQQ multilayer was decorated on the surface of the ERGO/GC electrode via potential cycling. Further modification with PBA would lead to the formation of the working electrode, namely PBA-PQQ/ERGO/GC electrode. PQQ on the electrode exhibited a quasi-reversible electrode process with 2-electron transfer and 2-proton participation, and the electron transfer efficiency was further enhanced by the introduction of ERGO layer. The complexation of PBA with HbA1c through specific boronic acid-diol recognition could cause the change of the oxidation peak current of PQQ on the electrode, which was utilized for HbA1c detection. Under the optimized conditions, the PBA-PQQ/ERGO/GC electrode provided high selectivity and high sensitivity for HbA1c detection with a linear range of 9.4-65.8 μg mL(-1) and a low detection limit of 1.25 μg mL(-1). The fabricated sensor was also successfully applied to determine the percentages of HbA1c in whole blood of healthy individuals.

  6. Randomized trial showing efficacy and safety of twice-daily remogliflozin etabonate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sykes, A P; O'Connor-Semmes, R; Dobbins, R; Dorey, D J; Lorimer, J D; Walker, S; Wilkison, W O; Kler, L

    2015-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of twice-daily doses of remogliflozin etabonate (RE) and once-daily pioglitazone with placebo for reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) concentration. In this 12-week, double-blind, randomized, active- and placebo-controlled trial, 336 treatment-naïve subjects with type 2 diabetes and an HbA1c of 7.0-9.5% (53-80 mmol/mol) were randomized to RE (50, 100, 250, 500 or 1000 mg twice daily), matching placebo or 30 mg pioglitazone once daily. The primary endpoint was change in HbA1c from baseline. Other endpoints included changes in body weight, lipid levels, safety and tolerability. RE produced a decreasing dose response in HbA1c at week 12 (p < 0.001), with reductions in HbA1c versus placebo ranging from 0.64 to 1.07% (p < 0.001). Statistically significant reductions in body weight for RE compared with placebo were also observed. Twice-daily RE resulted in a dose-ordered improvement in glycaemic control and was generally well tolerated.

  7. Blood pressure reduction due to hemoglobin glycosylation in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Vázquez, Miguel A Salazar; Vázquez, Beatriz Y Salazar; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Intaglietta, Marcos; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that glycosylation of hemoglobin constitutes a risk factor for hypertension. Methods: A total of 129 relative uniform diabetic subjects (86 women and 42 men) were enrolled in a cross sectional study. Exclusion criteria included alcohol consumption, smoking, ischemic heart disease, stroke, neoplasia, renal, hepatic, and chronic inflammatory disease. Systolic and diastolic pressures were recorded in subsequent days and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was determined. Hemoglobin glycosylation was measured by determining the percentage glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) by means of the automated microparticle enzyme immunoassay test. Results: MAP was found to be independent of the concentration of HbA1c; however, correcting MAP for the variability in hematocrit, to evidence the level of vasoconstriction (or vasodilatation) showed that MAP is negatively correlated with the concentration of HbA1c (p for trend <0.05), when patients treated for hypertension are excluded from the analysis. Patients treated for hypertension showed the opposite trend with increasing MAP as HbA1c increased (p for the difference in trends <0.05). Conclusions: Glycosylation per se appears to lead to blood pressure reduction in type 2 diabetic patients untreated for hypertension. Treatment for hypertension may be associated with a level of endothelial dysfunction that interferes with the antihypertensive effect of HbA1c. PMID:19066010

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Sitagliptin in Japanese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ohmura, Hirotoshi; Mita, Tomoya; Taneda, Yoshinobu; Sugawara, Masahiro; Funayama, Hideaki; Matsuoka, Joe; Watada, Hirotaka; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of sitagliptin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods A total of 3,247 subjects treated with sitagliptin were retrospectively recruited. Glucose parameters were collected at baseline, and 1, 3 and 6 months after initiation of sitagliptin. In addition, we explored factors that can be used to predict sitagliptin-induced reduction in HbA1c using linear mixed effect model. Factors associated with hypoglycemic events were examined by logistic analyses. Results We analyzed the available data of 3,201 subjects (1,287 females). Treatment of sitagliptin significantly reduced HbA1c level from 7.44±1.20% at baseline to 6.73±0.99% at 6 months (P < 0.0001). Linear mixed effect model analyses demonstrated that reduction of HbA1c was associated with higher baseline HbA1c level, younger age, lower BMI and sitagliptin monotherapy. During this study, 82 cases of hypoglycemia were recorded. Logistic analyses indicated that hypoglycemic events were more frequent in female patients, and patients with low BMI, long history of type 2 diabetes, high HbA1c and on combination therapy experienced. Other adverse events were rare and mild. Conclusions Sitagliptin is effective for diabetic management and generally well tolerated in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. This trial was registered with UMIN (no. 000004121). PMID:25699116

  9. Change of glycaemic control and predictors in diabetes patients: longitudinal observational study during the one year after hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Tai, Li-Ai; Tsai, Li-Yu; Chen, Shu-Ching

    2013-09-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) might reflect glycaemic control in persons with diabetes. Study aims were to identify changes in glycated haemoglobin values and predictors (baseline coping behaviour, fasting plasma glucose, disease-related and demographic factors) in patients during 1 year after hospital discharge. A longitudinal prospective design with convenience sampling was used. Subjects were recruited from a community hospital in Taiwan. Measures included Jalowiec Coping Scale, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c values, and demographics. Generalized estimating equation was used to determine factors of change in glycated haemoglobin. A total of 57 patients completed 1 year of follow-up. Half did not receive diabetes mellitus education and regular exercise. Patients' glycated haemoglobin levels follow controls at 6 months after discharge. Patients with higher levels of blood glucose, less problem-focused coping and greater emotion-focused coping were associated with poor glycaemic control. Education programmes should involve individual-centred care and health behaviours for prevention of diabetes complications.

  10. New direction for enhancing quality in diabetes care: utilizing telecommunications and paraprofessional outreach workers backed by an expert medical team.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Penelope Ann; Silvers, Abraham; Prendergast, J Joseph

    2010-04-01

    Abstract This article assesses the value of using telecommunications with Promatoras (paraprofessional outreach workers) and an expert medical team of registered nurses (RNs) and endocrinologists in an at-risk type 2 diabetic Hispanic population recruited for a telemedicine feasibility project from a free clinic. Nineteen patients agreed to enter the program and 16 completed the program in 3.5 years of study. A Promatoras is the primary educator and the point of communication to patient or medical personnel overseeing each patient's home glucose monitoring, medical records, and medications, regularly communicating by telephone and e-mail with patients and diabetes specialists. Between clinic visits, all routine care, including body weight, blood glucose, and blood pressure monitoring, was shared over the Internet, and each patient was interviewed by audio and camera. The endocrinologist was in his office, while the primary care physician, patient, and Promotora volunteers were at the free clinic. Four variables were considered in this longitudinal study: weight, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and HbA1c. Estimates of means, correlations, t-tests, and slopes of the repeated measures were obtained, and comparisons were made between first and last values. The most important sign of improvement in the patients' situation was the significant decrease in HbA1c to 7.2% from 9.6% (p = 0.001).

  11. Effects of Mangifera indica (Careless) on Microcirculation and Glucose Metabolism in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Buchwald-Werner, Sybille; Schön, Christiane; Frank, Sonja; Reule, Claudia

    2017-02-10

    A commercial Mangifera indica fruit powder (Careless) showed beneficial acute effects on microcirculation in a randomized, double-blind, crossover pilot study. Here, long-term effects on microcirculation and glucose metabolism were investigated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, 3-arm parallel-design study in healthy individuals. A daily dose of 100 mg or 300 mg of the fruit powder was compared to placebo after supplementation for 4 weeks. Microcirculation and endothelial function were assessed by the Oxygen-to-see System and pulse amplitude tonometry, respectively. Glucose metabolism was assessed under fasting and postprandial conditions by capillary glucose and HbA1c values.Microcirculatory reactive hyperemia flow increased, especially in the 100 mg group (p = 0.025). The 300 mg of the M. indica fruit preparation reduced postprandial glucose levels by trend if compared to placebo (p = 0.0535) accompanied by significantly lower HbA1c values compared to baseline. Furthermore, 300 mg intake significantly improved postprandial endothelial function in individuals with decreased endothelial function after high-dose glucose intake (p = 0.0408; n = 11).In conclusion, the study suggests moderate beneficial effects of M. indica fruit preparation on microcirculation, endothelial function, and glucose metabolism.

  12. Low Serum Levels of Prealbumin, Retinol Binding Protein, and Retinol Are Frequent in Adult Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bolado, Federico; Goñi, María José; Tamayo, Ibai; Ibáñez, Berta; Prieto, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To determine the serum prealbumin (PA), retinol binding protein (RBP), and retinol levels in adult patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and to analyze some factors related to those levels. Methods. A total of 93 patients (47 women) were studied. Age, gender, BMI, duration of diabetes, chronic complications, HbA1c, lipid profile, creatinine, albumin, PA, RBP, and retinol were recorded. High and low parameter groups were compared by Mann–Whitney U and χ2 tests. Correlation between parameters was analyzed by Spearman's test. Odds of low levels were analyzed by univariate logistic regression and included in the multivariate analysis when significant. Results. 49.5%, 48.4%, and 30.1% of patients displayed serum PA, RBP, and retinol levels below normal values, respectively. A high correlation (Rho > 0.8) between PA, RBP, and retinol serum levels was found. Patients presenting low levels of any of them were predominantly women, normal-weighted, and with lower levels of triglycerides and serum creatinine. No differences in age, macrovascular complications, duration of diabetes, or HbA1c values were observed when comparing low and normal parameter groups. Conclusion. Low serum levels of PA, RBP, and retinol are frequent in T1D adult patients. This alteration is influenced by female sex and serum creatinine and triglyceride levels. PMID:28018921

  13. Insulin resistance and adipokine levels correlate with early atherosclerosis – a study in prediabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Bogdan Mircea; Petriş, Antoniu Octavian; Ungureanu, Didona Anca

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk of prediabetes is still subject to controversies. We analyzed the associations between insulin resistance, adipokines and incipient atherosclerosis estimated by intima-media thickness (IMT) in a cross-sectional study on 122 prediabetic subjects without clinical signs of atherosclerotic disease. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, calculated as fasting insulin × fasting plasma glucose / 22.5), adiponectin, leptin, leptin-to-adiponectin ratio, carotid and femoral IMT were evaluated. We also assessed other parameters related to insulin resistance and adipokines (HbA1c, anthropometric and lipid parameters), as they may also influence atherosclerosis. Carotid IMT was correlated to adiponectin and leptin-to-adiponectin ratio (all p < 0.05), but not with HOMA-IR or leptin, while femoral IMT showed no relationship with these factors. After adjusting for leptin, leptin-to-adiponectin ratio, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, cholesterol-to-HDL ratio, triglycerides-to-HDL ratio and HbA1c, IMT values became correlated with HOMA-IR. Adjustment for HOMA-IR induced the appearance of new correlations between adipokines and both IMT values. In conclusion, insulin resistance and adipokines seem related to IMT in prediabetic subjects without clinical signs of arterial obstruction. PMID:28352672

  14. Autofluorescence characterization of advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshwaran, Nadanathangam; Bijukumar, Gopalakrishnapillai; Karmakar, Nivedita; Anand, Sneh; Misra, Anoop

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the analysis of autofluorescence of advanced glycation end products of hemoglobin (Hb-AGE). Formed as a result of slow, spontaneous and non-enzymatic glycation reactions, Hb-AGE possesses a characteristic autofluorescence at 308/345 nm ( λex/ λem). Even in the presence of heme as a quenching molecule, the surface presence of the glycated adduct gave rise to autofluorescence with the quantum yield of 0.19. The specificity of monoclonal antibody developed against common AGE structure with Hb-AGE was demonstrated using reduction in fluorescence polarization value due to increased molecular volume while binding. The formation of fluorescent adduct in hemoglobin in the advanced stage of glycation and the non-fluorescent HbA 1c will be of major use in distinguishing and to know the past status of diabetes mellitus. While autofluorescence correlated highly with HbA 1c value under in vivo condition ( r=0.85), it was moderate in the clinical samples ( r=0.55). The results suggest a non-linear relation between glycemia and glycation, indicating the application of Hb-AGE as a measure of susceptibility to glycation rather than glycation itself.

  15. Validation and Modification of Dried Blood Spot-Based Glycosylated Hemoglobin Assay for the Longitudinal Aging Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peifeng; Edenfield, Michael; Potter, Alan; Kale, Varsha; Risbud, Arun; Williams, Sharon; Lee, Jinkook; Bloom, David E.; Crimmins, Eileen; Seeman, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to validate a modified dried blood spot (DBS)-based glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) assay protocol, after a pretest in India showed poor correlation between the original DBS-based protocol and venous results. Methods The original protocol was tested on different chemistry analyzers and then simplified at the University of Washington (UW). A second pretest was conducted in India to validate the modified assay protocol, using 44 quality control specimens. Results Data from UW indicated that, using the original protocol, the correlation coefficients between DBS and venous results were above 0.98 on both Bio-Rad and Olympus chemistry analyzers. The protocol worked equally well on filter paper, with or without pre-treatment, and when the recommended amount of blood spot material, or less, was used. A second pretest of the modified protocol confirmed that DBS-based levels from both Olympus and Roche chemistry analyzers were well correlated with DBS results from UW (correlation coefficients were above 0.96), as well as with venous values (correlation coefficients were above 0.94). Conclusions The DBS-based HbA1c values are highly correlated with venous results. The pre-treatment of filter paper does not appear to be necessary. The poor results from the first pretest are probably due to factors unrelated to the protocol, such as problems with the chemistry analyzer or assay reagents. PMID:25472916

  16. Cardiovascular risk profiles of adults with type-2 diabetes treated at urban hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Slail, Fatima Y; Abid, Omer; Assiri, Abdullah M; Memish, Ziad A; Ali, Mohammed K

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus substantially increases cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Among Saudi Arabian citizens with diabetes, little is known about the prevalence and control of other CVD risk factors. We extracted data from medical records of a random selection of 422 patients seen between 2008 and 2012 at two diabetic clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We calculated the proportion of patients who had additional CVD risk factors: obesity (body mass index ⩾ 30 kg/m(2)), hypertension (BP ⩾ 140/90 mmHg), elevated cholesterol fractions, and multiple risk factors). Further, we calculated the proportion of patients meeting the American Diabetes Association's recommended care targets for each risk factor. Of 422 patients (mean age, 52 years), half were women, 56% were obese, 45% had hypertension, and 77% had elevated LDL concentrations. In addition to diabetes, 70% had two or more CVD risk factors. Although 9% met both target HbA1c and BP values, only 3.5% had optimum HbA1c, BP, and lipid values. In Saudi Arabia's best diabetes clinics, most patients have poor control of their disease. This huge disease burden and related care gaps have important health and financial implications for the country.

  17. Antioxidant effects of chromium supplementation with type 2 diabetes mellitus and euglycemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsing-Hsien; Lai, Ming-Hoang; Hou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Chen-Ling

    2004-03-10

    To determine the effects of chromium (Cr) supplementations on oxidative stress of type 2 diabetes and euglycemic (EU) subjects, adult having HbA(1C) values of <6.0% (EU), 6.8-8.5% (mildly hyperglycemic, MH), and >8.5% (severely hyperglycemic, SH) were supplemented for 6 months with 1000 microg/day of Cr (as Cr yeast) or with a placebo. In the beginning, the levels of the plasma Cr in the MH and SH groups were 25-30% lower than those of the EU subjects. The values of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and total antioxidative status (TAS) of the MH and SH groups were significantly higher than those of the EU ones. Following supplementations, the levels of plasma TBARS in the Cr groups of MH and SH groups were significantly decreased (the inverse was found in the EU) and showed no significant changes in the placebo group. The levels of plasma TAS in the Cr groups of EU and MH were significantly decreased (the inverse was found in the SH) and showed no significant changes in the placebo group. No significant difference was found in the antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase) activities during supplementations. These data suggest that Cr supplementation was an effective treatment strategy to minimize increased oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients whose HbA(1C) level was >8.5%, and the Cr in EU groups might act as a prooxidant.

  18. [Preliminary evaluation of the antioxidant trace elements in an Algerian patient with type 2 diabetes: special role of manganese and chromium].

    PubMed

    Harani, Hassiba; Otmane, Amel; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Ouadahi, Nacer; Abdi, Arezki; Berrah, Abdelkrim; Zenati, Akila; Alamir, Barkahoum; Koceir, Elhadj Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, the relationship between antioxidants and insuline-like trace elements is very complex during oxidative stress, being mediated by hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and inflammation. We investigated the antioxidant status, particularly Mn and Cr on the diabetes metabolic control, and their interaction with the metabolic syndrome (MS) parameters. The study was undertaken on 278 Algerian diabetic subjects who were divided in 2 groups according to glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) <7% or >7% value, attesting for a good or poor metabolic control of diabetes, respectively. The MS was defined according to NCEP-ATPIII. Insulin resistance was evaluated by HOMA-IR model. The plasma manganese concentrations was significantly increased in both diabetics groups, independently of metabolic control. However, chromium (Cr) seems to play a determinant action in metabolic control, as shown by better values of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and HbA(1c). The selenium status was positively correlated with glutathion peroxidase activity. Copper and zinc plasma levels in the diabetic patients were similar to those of control subjects. In conclusion, our results suggest that Mn play a crucial role in antioxidant capacity and we hypothesize that antioxidant defense is preserved in the cytosol (superoxide dismutase Cu/Zn -SOD), whereas it is impaired in mitochondria (Mn-SOD), which makes this cell organelle a true therapeutic target in diabetes.

  19. Recent Topics in Chemical and Clinical Research on Glycated Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuki; Matsumoto, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The measuring method for glycated albumin (GA) has been developed as a new glycemic control marker since the beginning of the 21st century. Since GA has an advantage in reflecting glycemic status over a shorter period than hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), much research and many reviews have been reported. However, so far there have been few reports on glycation sites based on the tertiary structure of human serum albumin (HSA) and the comparison of glycation rates between GA and HbA1c in detail. The present review discusses how the glycation sites of lysine residues in HSA are modified with glucose, whereas the glycation sites of lysine residues are located inside of HSA as well as the direct comparison of glycation rates between GA and HbA1c using human blood. Moreover, the most recent clinical researches on GA are described. PMID:25614014

  20. Effects of Rosiglitazone with Insulin Combination Therapy on Oxidative Stress and Lipid Profile in Left Ventricular Muscles of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kavak, Servet; Ayaz, Lokman; Emre, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that rosiglitazone (RSG) with insulin is able to quench oxidative stress initiated by high glucose through prevention of NAD(P)H oxidase activation. Methods and Materials. Male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into an untreated control group (C), a diabetic group (D) that was treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (45 mgkg−1), and rosiglitazone group that was treated with RSG twice daily by gavage and insulin once daily by subcutaneous injection (group B). HbA1c and blood glucose levels in the circulation and malondialdehyde and 3-nitrotyrosine levels in left ventricular muscle were measured. Result. Treatment of D rats with group B resulted in a time-dependent decrease in blood glucose. We found that the lipid profile and HbA1c levels in group B reached the control group D rat values at the end of the treatment period. There was an increase in 3-nitrotyrosine levels in group D compared to group C. Malondialdehyde and 3-nitrotyrosine levels were found to be decreased in group B compared to group D (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Our data suggests that the treatment of diabetic rats with group B for 8 weeks may decrease the oxidative/nitrosative stress in left ventricular tissue of rats. Thus, in diabetes-related vascular diseases, group B treatment may be cardioprotective. PMID:22829806

  1. Erythrocyte aldose reductase activity and sorbitol levels in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, A.; Balakrishna, N.; Ayyagari, Radha; Padma, M.; Viswanath, K.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Activation of polyol pathway due to increased aldose reductase (ALR2) activity has been implicated in the development of diabetic complications including diabetic retinopathy (DR), a leading cause of blindness. However, the relationship between hyperglycemia-induced activation of polyol pathway in retina and DR is still uncertain. We investigated the relationship between ALR2 levels and human DR by measuring ALR2 activity and its product, sorbitol, in erythrocytes. Methods We enrolled 362 type 2 diabetic subjects (T2D) with and without DR and 66 normal subjects in this clinical case-control study. Clinical evaluation of DR in T2D patients was done by fundus examination. ALR2 activity and sorbitol levels along with glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels in erythrocytes were determined. Results T2D patients with DR showed significantly higher specific activity of ALR2 as compared to T2D patients without DR. Elevated levels of sorbitol in T2D patients with DR, as compared to T2D patients without DR, corroborated the increased ALR2 activity in erythrocytes of DR patients. However, the increased ALR2 activity was not significantly associated with diabetes duration, age, and HbA1C in both the DR group and total T2D subjects. Conclusions Levels of ALR2 activity as well as sorbitol in erythrocytes may have value as a quantitative trait to be included among other markers to establish a risk profile for development of DR. PMID:18385795

  2. Circulating soluble CD36 is associated with glucose metabolism and interleukin-6 in glucose-intolerant men.

    PubMed

    Handberg, Aase; Lopez-Bermejo, Abel; Bassols, Judit; Vendrell, Joan; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernandez-Real, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Recently, soluble CD36 (sCD36) levels were reported to be elevated in type 2 diabetes, and to be tightly correlated with insulin resistance. Our aim was to obtain further insight into the relationship between insulin sensitivity, low-grade inflammation and sCD36. We studied glucose-tolerant (n=90) and glucose-intolerant (n=57) moderately obese men. Insulin sensitivity was measured by the frequent sample intravenous glucose tolerance test, and sCD36 by an in-house ELISA assay. In glucose-intolerant subjects, sCD36 was negatively associated with insulin sensitivity and positively with interleukin-6 (IL-6), fasting glucose, fasting triglycerides, fat-free mass and platelet count. On multiple linear regression analyses, insulin sensitivity contributed 22% of sCD36 variance, independent of age, body mass index (BMI) and IL-6, in glucose-intolerant subjects. The level of sCD36 in subjects with glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C) above the mean was higher than in those with HbA1C values below the mean. Insulin sensitivity is a predictor of sCD36 in men with impaired glucose tolerance. IL-6 is related to sCD36 but does not predict sCD36 independent of insulin sensitivity and BMI.

  3. Relationship of Clinical and Microbiological Variables in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sakalauskiene, Jurgina; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Ivanauskiene, Egle; Šaferis, Viktoras

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to analyze how metabolic control of type 1 diabetes is related to clinical and microbiological periodontal parameters. Material/Methods The study involved 56 subjects aged from 19 to 50 years divided into 2 groups: healthy subjects (the H group), and diabetic (type 1 diabetes) patients with chronic untreated generalized periodontitis (the DM group). The glycosylated hemoglobin value (HbA1c) was determined using the UniCel DxC 800 SYNCHRON System (Beckman Coulter, USA), and the concentration in blood was measured by the turbidimetric immunoinhibition method. A molecular genetic assay (Micro-IDent plus, Germany) was used to detect periodontopathogenic bacteria in plaque samples. Periodontitis was confirmed by clinical and radiological examination. Results Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga species, and Eikenella corrodens were the most frequently found bacteria in dental plaque samples (77.8%, 66.7%, and 33.4%, respectively), whereas Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was identified 40.7% less frequently in the DM group than in the H group. The strongest relationship was observed between the presence of 2 periodontal pathogens – F. nucleatum and Capnocytophaga spp. – and poorer metabolic control in type 1 diabetes patients (HbA1c) and all clinical parameters of periodontal pathology. Conclusions Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetic patients, and the prevalence of periodontitis was greatly increased in subjects with poorer metabolic control. PMID:25294115

  4. [Quality of care in diabetic patients receiving pharmacologic treatment].

    PubMed

    Lombraña, María A; Capetta, María E; Ugarte, Alejandro; Correa, Viviana; Giganti, Jorge; Saubidet, Cristian Lopez; Stryjewski, Martin E

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with an increasing prevalence. Appropriate treatment of the disease and prevention of chronic complications reduce morbidity and mortality in a cost-effective manner. These actions should be measured through the use of validated indicators for quality of care. The goal of this study was to assess the quality of care in diabetic patients under pharmacologic treatment in a private university hospital. A retrospective study was conducted in adult patients who bought insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents during a 3 month period; demographic and clinical data were obtained for 12 consecutive months following the buying period. The study included 305 adult patients; most were males (60%), with type 2 diabetes (95%), and using oral hipoglycemic agents (86%). Control of blood pressure was registered in 80%, foot exam in 5%, eye exam in 27%, HbA1C blood level in 85%, complete lipid profile in 82%, microalbuminuria in 27% and creatinine clearance in 22% of patients, respectively. Mean values were HbA1C 7.1(+/- 1.6)%, and < or = 7% in 66%, LDL 113 (+/- 33.6) mg/dl and <100 mg/dl in 30%, BP 136-79 mm Hg and < 130-80 mm Hg in 46% of patients, respectively. This study emphasizes the need for quality of care assessment through validated indicators and points out the aspects that should be improved within a health care system.

  5. Effects of metformin plus gliclazide versus metformin plus glimepiride on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Memy Hegazy; Abd-Allah, Gamil Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    High blood glucose level, lipid profile disturbances and plasma homocysteine (Hcy) are important risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare effects of glimepiride/metformin combination versus gliclazide/metformin combination on cardiovascular risk factors in type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. One hundred and eighty T2DM patients were randomly allocated for treatment with placebo (control), metformin (500 mg twice daily), glimepiride (3mg once daily), gliclazide (80 mg once daily), metformin plus glimepiride or metformin plus gliclazide for 3 months. We evaluated plasma levels of glucose (PG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), Hcy, vitamin B12, folic acid and lipid profile before treatment and 3 months post treatment. Compared to metformin treated patients, glimepiride plus metformin induced significant reductions in: fasting plasma glucose, postprandial PG level, HbA1C % and Hcy level. Conversely, plasma folic acid and vitamin B12 were significantly increased. The levels of total cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly decreased; low-density lipoprotein was markedly decreased, whereas high-density lipoprotein was significantly increased and hence risk ratio was significantly decreased. Similar results but with lower values were obtained using combination of metformin plus gliclazide on glycemic control only. Combination of glimepiride with metformin was superior to gliclazide plus metformin in alleviating the cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  6. Non-invasive Measurement of Skin Autofluorescence as a Beneficial Surrogate Marker for Atherosclerosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Temma, Jin; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Horie, Toru; Kuroda, Akio; Mori, Hiroyasu; Tamaki, Motoyuki; Endo, Itsuro; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Abe, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. Skin autofluorescence (AF) was recently reported to represent tissue AGEs accumulation with a non-invasive method. The aim of the present study was to evaluate association between AF value and diabetic vascular complications, such as retinopathy, nephropathy and cervical atherosclerosis using the carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), an established marker of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 68 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in a cross-sectional manner. AGEs accumulation was measured with AF reader. Clinical parameters were collected at the time of AF and IMT measurement. Max-IMT was correlated with age and AF (r=0.407, p=0.001), but not with HbA1c, GA, and pentosidine. Also, AF was not correlated with HbA1c, GA and pentosidine, but was correlated with age (r=0.560, p<0.001), duration of diabetes (r=0.256, p<0.05). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that AF, but not age, was an independent determinant of max-IMT. In conclusion, AF might be a beneficial surrogate marker for evaluating carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes non-invasively. J. Med. Invest. 62: 126-129, August, 2015.

  7. New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus After Transplantation in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fasicularis).

    PubMed

    Matthews, Kristin A; Tonsho, Makoto; Madsen, Joren C

    2015-08-01

    A 5.5-y-old intact male cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fasicularis) presented with inappetence and weight loss 57 d after heterotopic heart and thymus transplantation while receiving an immunosuppressant regimen consisting of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and methylprednisolone to prevent graft rejection. A serum chemistry panel, a glycated hemoglobin test, and urinalysis performed at presentation revealed elevated blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (727 mg/dL and 10.1%, respectively), glucosuria, and ketonuria. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed, and insulin therapy was initiated immediately. The macaque was weaned off the immunosuppressive therapy as his clinical condition improved and stabilized. Approximately 74 d after discontinuation of the immunosuppressants, the blood glucose normalized, and the insulin therapy was stopped. The animal's blood glucose and HbA1c values have remained within normal limits since this time. We suspect that our macaque experienced new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation, a condition that is commonly observed in human transplant patients but not well described in NHP. To our knowledge, this report represents the first documented case of new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation in a cynomolgus macaque.

  8. Vitamin D Deficiency and Its Determinants in Adults: A Sample from Community-Based Settings in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Eldeirawi, Kamal; Harfil, Sondos; Fakhry, Randa

    2017-01-01

    Background. Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) is a public health concern in adults worldwide. This study aims to explore the extent of VDD and its associated factors among adults in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Subjects and Methods. Quantitative, cross-sectional research was used to assess VDD and its associated factors in 216 adults recruited from randomly selected community-based healthcare settings over a six-month period. Recent values of vitamin D and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were abstracted from medical records, followed by interviews with participants to obtain information on factors related to VDD and other covariates and to measure their heights and weights. Results. A total of 74% of participants demonstrated VDD (vitamin D serum level ≤ 30 nmol/L). Emirati participants had higher odds of having VDD compared to non-Em