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Sample records for a2 mating-type locus

  1. Genetic and Physical Variability at the Mating Type Locus of the Oomycete, Phytophthora Infestans

    PubMed Central

    Judelson, H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mating type in the oomyceteous fungus, Phytophthora infestans, is determined by a single locus. In a previous study of a few isolates, the locus segregated in a manner genetically consistent with its linkage to a system of balanced lethal loci. To determine the prevalence of this phenomenon within P. infestans, genetic analyses were performed using isolates representative of the diversity within the species that had been selected by DNA fingerprinting using probes linked to mating type. Non-Mendelian segregation of the mating type locus was observed in crosses performed with each isolate. An unusual group of isolates was identified in which the mating type determinants had been rearranged within the genome; these strains also produced an aberrantly large number of self-fertile progeny. Curiously, in all isolates, markers linked to the mating type locus appeared prone to duplication, transposition, deletion, or other rearrangement. This was not observed for loci unlinked to mating type. Data from the crosses and analyses of marker variation were used to erect models to explain the bases of mating type determination and of the unusual segregation of the chromosomal region containing the mating type locus. PMID:8913745

  2. Mating-type locus characterization and variation in Pyrenophora semeniperda

    Treesearch

    Julie Leanna Henry

    2015-01-01

    Pyrenophora semeniperda is a generalist fungal pathogen that occurs primarily on monocot seed hosts. It is in the phylum Ascomycota, which includes both self-compatible (homothallic) and self-incompatible (heterothallic) species. Homothallic fungal species contain complementary mating-type (MAT) idiomorphs in a single unikaryotic strain, while heterothallic strains...

  3. The a2 mating-type locus genes lga2 and rga2 direct uniparental mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance and constrain mtDNA recombination during sexual development of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Fedler, Michael; Luh, Kai-Stephen; Stelter, Kathrin; Nieto-Jacobo, Fernanda; Basse, Christoph W

    2009-03-01

    Uniparental inheritance of mitochondria dominates among sexual eukaryotes. However, little is known about the mechanisms and genetic determinants. We have investigated the role of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis genes lga2 and rga2 in uniparental mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance during sexual development. The lga2 and rga2 genes are specific to the a2 mating-type locus and encode small mitochondrial proteins. On the basis of identified sequence polymorphisms due to variable intron numbers in mitochondrial genotypes, we could demonstrate that lga2 and rga2 decisively influence mtDNA inheritance in matings between a1 and a2 strains. Deletion of lga2 favored biparental inheritance and generation of recombinant mtDNA molecules in combinations in which inheritance of mtDNA of the a2 partner dominated. Conversely, deletion of rga2 resulted in predominant loss of a2-specific mtDNA and favored inheritance of the a1 mtDNA. Furthermore, expression of rga2 in the a1 partner protected the associated mtDNA from elimination. Our results indicate that Lga2 in conjunction with Rga2 directs uniparental mtDNA inheritance by mediating loss of the a1-associated mtDNA. This study shows for the first time an interplay of mitochondrial proteins in regulating uniparental mtDNA inheritance.

  4. The a2 Mating-Type Locus Genes lga2 and rga2 Direct Uniparental Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Inheritance and Constrain mtDNA Recombination During Sexual Development of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Fedler, Michael; Luh, Kai-Stephen; Stelter, Kathrin; Nieto-Jacobo, Fernanda; Basse, Christoph W.

    2009-01-01

    Uniparental inheritance of mitochondria dominates among sexual eukaryotes. However, little is known about the mechanisms and genetic determinants. We have investigated the role of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis genes lga2 and rga2 in uniparental mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance during sexual development. The lga2 and rga2 genes are specific to the a2 mating-type locus and encode small mitochondrial proteins. On the basis of identified sequence polymorphisms due to variable intron numbers in mitochondrial genotypes, we could demonstrate that lga2 and rga2 decisively influence mtDNA inheritance in matings between a1 and a2 strains. Deletion of lga2 favored biparental inheritance and generation of recombinant mtDNA molecules in combinations in which inheritance of mtDNA of the a2 partner dominated. Conversely, deletion of rga2 resulted in predominant loss of a2-specific mtDNA and favored inheritance of the a1 mtDNA. Furthermore, expression of rga2 in the a1 partner protected the associated mtDNA from elimination. Our results indicate that Lga2 in conjunction with Rga2 directs uniparental mtDNA inheritance by mediating loss of the a1-associated mtDNA. This study shows for the first time an interplay of mitochondrial proteins in regulating uniparental mtDNA inheritance. PMID:19104076

  5. Identification of the Mating-Type (MAT) Locus That Controls Sexual Reproduction of Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Walton, Eric; Averette, Anna Floyd; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Cuomo, Christina A.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is a dimorphic fungal pathogen that primarily causes blastomycosis in the midwestern and northern United States and Canada. While the genes controlling sexual development have been known for a long time, the genes controlling sexual reproduction of B. dermatitidis (teleomorph, Ajellomyces dermatitidis) are unknown. We identified the mating-type (MAT) locus in the B. dermatitidis genome by comparative genomic approaches. The B. dermatitidis MAT locus resembles those of other dimorphic fungi, containing either an alpha-box (MAT1-1) or an HMG domain (MAT1-2) gene linked to the APN2, SLA2, and COX13 genes. However, in some strains of B. dermatitidis, the MAT locus harbors transposable elements (TEs) that make it unusually large compared to the MAT locus of other dimorphic fungi. Based on the MAT locus sequences of B. dermatitidis, we designed specific primers for PCR determination of the mating type. Two B. dermatitidis isolates of opposite mating types were cocultured on mating medium. Immature sexual structures were observed starting at 3 weeks of coculture, with coiled-hyphae-containing cleistothecia developing over the next 3 to 6 weeks. Genetic recombination was detected in potential progeny by mating-type determination, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses, suggesting that a meiotic sexual cycle might have been completed. The F1 progeny were sexually fertile when tested with strains of the opposite mating type. Our studies provide a model for the evolution of the MAT locus in the dimorphic and closely related fungi and open the door to classic genetic analysis and studies on the possible roles of mating and mating type in infection and virulence. PMID:23143684

  6. The genetic instabilities of the mating type locus in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Egel, R

    1976-06-15

    Certain genetic instabilities of the "mating type locus" in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are interpreted in terms of transposition: Homothallic strains are characterized by two adjacent mating type genes (mat1-mat2+) with sexually complementary functions. One of these genes (mat2+) is able to duplicate itself, and the duplicated copy maps at the position of mat1-. The former function of mat1-is lost (owing to insertion), and only becomes reactivated when the inserted sequence (mat1+) is again excised. Analyses of analogous instabilities expressed by the partially defective mutation mat2+ -B102 have substantiated this transposition scheme. Homothallism is acribed to alternate and mutually exclusive activation of mat1- or mat2+ genes.

  7. Asexual cephalosporin C producer Acremonium chrysogenum carries a functional mating type locus.

    PubMed

    Pöggeler, Stefanie; Hoff, Birgit; Kück, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    Acremonium chrysogenum, the fungal producer of the pharmaceutically relevant beta-lactam antibiotic cephalosporin C, is classified as asexual because no direct observation of mating or meiosis has yet been reported. To assess the potential of A. chrysogenum for sexual reproduction, we screened an expressed sequence tag library from A. chrysogenum for the expression of mating type (MAT) genes, which are the key regulators of sexual reproduction. We identified two putative mating type genes that are homologues of the alpha-box domain gene, MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-2, encoding an HPG domain protein defined by the presence of the three invariant amino acids histidine, proline, and glycine. In addition, cDNAs encoding a putative pheromone receptor and pheromone-processing enzymes, as well as components of a pheromone response pathway, were found. Moreover, the entire A. chrysogenum MAT1-1 (AcMAT1-1) gene and regions flanking the MAT region were obtained from a genomic cosmid library, and sequence analysis revealed that in addition to AcMAT1-1-1 and AcMAT1-1-2, the AcMAT1-1 locus comprises a third mating type gene, AcMAT1-1-3, encoding a high-mobility-group domain protein. The alpha-box domain sequence of AcMAT1-1-1 was used to determine the phylogenetic relationships of A. chrysogenum to other ascomycetes. To determine the functionality of the AcMAT1-1 locus, the entire MAT locus was transferred into a MAT deletion strain of the heterothallic ascomycete Podospora anserina (the PaDeltaMAT strain). After fertilization with a P. anserina MAT1-2 (MAT(+)) strain, the corresponding transformants developed fruiting bodies with mature ascospores. Thus, the results of our functional analysis of the AcMAT1-1 locus provide strong evidence to hypothesize a sexual cycle in A. chrysogenum.

  8. Gene Conversion Occurs within the Mating-Type Locus of Cryptococcus neoformans during Sexual Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sheng; Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Heitman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Meiotic recombination of sex chromosomes is thought to be repressed in organisms with heterogametic sex determination (e.g. mammalian X/Y chromosomes), due to extensive divergence and chromosomal rearrangements between the two chromosomes. However, proper segregation of sex chromosomes during meiosis requires crossing-over occurring within the pseudoautosomal regions (PAR). Recent studies reveal that recombination, in the form of gene conversion, is widely distributed within and may have played important roles in the evolution of some chromosomal regions within which recombination was thought to be repressed, such as the centromere cores of maize. Cryptococcus neoformans, a major human pathogenic fungus, has an unusually large mating-type locus (MAT, >100 kb), and the MAT alleles from the two opposite mating-types show extensive nucleotide sequence divergence and chromosomal rearrangements, mirroring characteristics of sex chromosomes. Meiotic recombination was assumed to be repressed within the C. neoformans MAT locus. A previous study identified recombination hot spots flanking the C. neoformans MAT, and these hot spots are associated with high GC content. Here, we investigated a GC-rich intergenic region located within the MAT locus of C. neoformans to establish if this region also exhibits unique recombination behavior during meiosis. Population genetics analysis of natural C. neoformans isolates revealed signals of homogenization spanning this GC-rich intergenic region within different C. neoformans lineages, consistent with a model in which gene conversion of this region during meiosis prevents it from diversifying within each lineage. By analyzing meiotic progeny from laboratory crosses, we found that meiotic recombination (gene conversion) occurs around the GC-rich intergenic region at a frequency equal to or greater than the meiotic recombination frequency observed in other genomic regions. We discuss the implications of these findings with regards to the

  9. Unconventional Recombination in the Mating Type Locus of Heterothallic Apple Canker Pathogen Valsa mali

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhiyuan; Ke, Xiwang; Li, Zhengpeng; Chen, Jiliang; Gao, Xiaoning; Huang, Lili

    2017-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in filamentous ascomycetes is controlled by the mating type (MAT) locus, including two idiomorphs MAT1-1 and MAT1-2. Understanding the MAT locus can provide clues for unveiling the sexual development and virulence factors for fungal pathogens. The genus Valsa (Sordariomycetes, Diaporthales) contains many tree pathogens responsible for destructive canker diseases. The sexual stage of these ascomycetes is occasionally observed in nature, and no MAT locus has been reported to date. Here, we identified the MAT locus of the apple canker pathogen Valsa mali, which causes extensive damage, and even death, to trees. V. mali is heterothallic in that each isolate carries either the MAT1-1 or MAT1-2 idiomorph. However, the MAT structure is distinct from that of many other heterothallic fungi in the Sordariomycetes. Two flanking genes, COX13 and APN2, were coopted into the MAT locus, possibly by intrachromosomal rearrangement. After the acquisition of foreign genes, unequal recombination occurred between MAT1-1/2 idiomorphs, resulting in a reverse insertion in the MAT1-2 idiomorph. Evolutionary analysis showed that the three complete MAT1-1-2, COX13, and APN2 genes in this region diverged independently due to different selection pressure. Null hypothesis tests of a 1:1 MAT ratio of 86 V. mali isolates from four different provinces showed a relatively balanced distribution of the two idiomorphs in the fields. These results provide insights into the evolution of the mating systems in Sordariomycetes. PMID:28228472

  10. Drug Resistance Is Not Directly Affected by Mating Type Locus Zygosity in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Claude; Messer, Shawn A.; Pfaller, Michael; Soll, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, evidence was presented that in a collection of fluconazole-resistant strains of Candida albicans there was a much higher proportion of homozygotes for the mating type locus (MTL) than in a collection of fluconazole-sensitive isolates, suggesting the possibility that when cells become MTL homozygous they acquire intrinsic drug resistance. To investigate this possibility, an opposite strategy was employed. First, drug susceptibility was measured in a collection of isolates selected for MTL homozygosity. The majority of these isolates had not been exposed to antifungal drugs. Second, the level of drug susceptibility was compared between spontaneously generated MTL-homozygous progeny and their MTL-heterozygous parent strains which had not been exposed to antifungal drugs. The results demonstrate that naturally occurring MTL-homozygous strains are not intrinsically more drug resistant, supporting the hypotheses that either the higher incidence of MTL homozygosity previously demonstrated among fluconazole-resistant isolates involved associated homozygosity of a drug resistance gene linked to the MTL locus, or that MTL-homozygous strains may be better at developing drug resistance upon exposure to the drug than MTL-heterozygous strains. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that a switch by an MTL-homozygous strain from the white to opaque phenotype, the latter functioning as the facilitator of mating, does not notably alter drug susceptibility. PMID:12654648

  11. The Clr1 Locus Regulates the Expression of the Cryptic Mating-Type Loci of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Klar, AJS.

    1992-01-01

    The mat2-P and mat3-M loci of fission yeast contain respectively the plus (P) and minus (M) mating-type information in a transcriptionally silent state. That information is transposed from the mat2 or mat3 donor locus via recombination into the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) resulting in switching of the cellular mating type. We have identified a gene, named clr1 (for cryptic loci regulator), whose mutations allow expression of the mat2 and mat3 loci. clr1 mutants undergo aberrant haploid meiosis, indicative of transcription of the silent genes. Production of mRNA from mat3 is detectable in clr1 mutants. Furthermore, the ura4 gene inserted near mat3, weakly expressed in wild-type cells, is derepressed in clr1 mutants. The clr1 mutations also permit meiotic recombination in the 15-kb mat2-mat3 interval, where recombination is normally inhibited. The clr1 locus is in the right arm of chromosome II. We suggest that clr1 regulates silencing of the mat2 and mat3 loci, and participates in establishing the ``cold spot'' for recombination by organizing the chromatin structure of the mating-type region. PMID:1644273

  12. The clr1 locus regulates the expression of the cryptic mating-type loci of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Thon, G; Klar, A J

    1992-06-01

    The mat2-P and mat3-M loci of fission yeast contain respectively the plus (P) and minus (M) mating-type information in a transcriptionally silent state. That information is transposed from the mat2 or mat3 donor locus via recombination into the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) resulting in switching of the cellular mating type. We have identified a gene, named clr1 (for cryptic loci regulator), whose mutations allow expression of the mat2 and mat3 loci. clr1 mutants undergo aberrant haploid meiosis, indicative of transcription of the silent genes. Production of mRNA from mat3 is detectable in clr1 mutants. Furthermore, the ura4 gene inserted near mat3, weakly expressed in wild-type cells, is derepressed in clr1 mutants. The clr1 mutations also permit meiotic recombination in the 15-kb mat2-mat3 interval, where recombination is normally inhibited. The clr1 locus is in the right arm of chromosome II. We suggest that clr1 regulates silencing of the mat2 and mat3 loci, and participates in establishing the "cold spot" for recombination by organizing the chromatin structure of the mating-type region.

  13. Genetic structure of the mating-type locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Patrick J; Armbrust, E Virginia; Goodenough, Ursula W

    2002-01-01

    Portions of the cloned mating-type (MT) loci (mt(+) and mt(-)) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, defined as the approximately 1-Mb domains of linkage group VI that are under recombinational suppression, were subjected to Northern analysis to elucidate their coding capacity. The four central rearranged segments of the loci were found to contain both housekeeping genes (expressed during several life-cycle stages) and mating-related genes, while the sequences unique to mt(+) or mt(-) carried genes expressed only in the gametic or zygotic phases of the life cycle. One of these genes, Mtd1, is a candidate participant in gametic cell fusion; two others, Mta1 and Ezy2, are candidate participants in the uniparental inheritance of chloroplast DNA. The identified housekeeping genes include Pdk, encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, and GdcH, encoding glycine decarboxylase complex subunit H. Unusual genetic configurations include three genes whose sequences overlap, one gene that has inserted into the coding region of another, several genes that have been inactivated by rearrangements in the region, and genes that have undergone tandem duplication. This report extends our original conclusion that the MT locus has incurred high levels of mutational change. PMID:11805055

  14. Organization and Evolutionary Trajectory of the Mating Type (MAT) Locus in Dermatophyte and Dimorphic Fungal Pathogens▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Metin, Banu; White, Theodore C.; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungi is governed by a specialized genomic region, the mating type (MAT) locus, whose gene identity, organization, and complexity are diverse. We identified the MAT locus of five dermatophyte fungal pathogens (Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton equinum, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans) and a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and performed phylogenetic analyses. The identified MAT locus idiomorphs of M. gypseum control cell type identity in mating assays, and recombinant progeny were produced. Virulence tests in Galleria mellonella larvae suggest the two mating types of M. gypseum may have equivalent virulence. Synteny analysis revealed common features of the MAT locus shared among these five dermatophytes: namely, a small size (∼3 kb) and a novel gene arrangement. The SLA2, COX13, and APN2 genes, which flank the MAT locus in other Ascomycota are instead linked on one side of the dermatophyte MAT locus. In addition, the transcriptional orientations of the APN2 and COX13 genes are reversed compared to the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii. A putative transposable element, pogo, was found to have inserted in the MAT1-2 idiomorph of one P. brasiliensis strain but not others. In conclusion, the evolution of the MAT locus of the dermatophytes and dimorphic fungi from the last common ancestor has been punctuated by both gene acquisition and expansion, and asymmetric gene loss. These studies further support a foundation to develop molecular and genetic tools for dermatophyte and dimorphic human fungal pathogens. PMID:19880755

  15. Characterization of Phytophthora infestans populations in Colombia: first report of the A2 mating type.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Angela M; Quesada Ocampo, Lina M; Céspedes, Maria Catalina; Carreño, Natalia; González, Adriana; Rojas, Alejandro; Zuluaga, A Paola; Myers, Kevin; Fry, William E; Jiménez, Pedro; Bernal, Adriana J; Restrepo, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight in crops of the Solanaceae family, is one of the most important plant pathogens in Colombia. Not only are Solanum lycopersicum, and S. tuberosum at risk, but also several other solanaceous hosts (Physalis peruviana, S. betaceum, S. phureja, and S. quitoense) that have recently gained importance as new crops in Colombia may be at risk. Because little is known about the population structure of Phytophthora infestans in Colombia, we report here the phenotypic and molecular characterization of 97 isolates collected from these six different solanaceous plants in Colombia. All the isolates were analyzed for mating type, mitochondrial haplotypes, genotype for several microsatellites, and sequence of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. This characterization identified a single individual of A2 mating type (from Physalis peruviana) for the first time in Colombia. All isolates had an ITS sequence that was at least 97% identical to the consensus sequence. Of the 97 isolates, 96 were mitochondrial haplotype IIa, with the single A2 isolate being Ia. All isolates were invariant for the microsatellites. Additionally, isolates collected from S. tuberosum and P. peruviana (64 isolates) were tested for: aggressiveness on both hosts, genotype for the isozymes (glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and peptidase), and restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprint pattern as detected by RG57. Isolates from S. tuberosum were preferentially pathogenic on S. tuberosum, and isolates from P. peruviana were preferentially pathogenic on P. peruviana. The population from these two hosts was dominated by a single clonal lineage (59 of 64 individuals assayed), previously identified from Ecuador and Peru as EC-1. This lineage was mating type A1, IIa for mitochondrial DNA, invariant for two microsatellites, and invariant for both isozymes. The remaining four A1 isolates were in lineages very closely related to EC-1 (named EC-1.1, CO

  16. The mating-type locus B alpha 1 of Schizophyllum commune contains a pheromone receptor gene and putative pheromone genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, J; Vaillancourt, L J; Hegner, J; Lengeler, K B; Laddison, K J; Specht, C A; Raper, C A; Kothe, E

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the multispecific B alpha mating-type locus of Schizophyllum commune provided evidence that pheromones and pheromone receptors govern recognition of self versus non-self and sexual development in this homobasidiomycetous fungus. Four subclones of an 8.2 kb genomic fragment carrying B alpha 1 specificity induced B-regulated sexual morphogenesis when introduced into a strain with one of the eight compatible B alpha specificities that are known to exist in nature. One of these clones, which activated all other B alpha specificities, contains a gene termed bar1. The predicted protein product of bar1, as well as that of bar2, a homologous gene isolated from a B alpha 2 strain, has significant homology to known fungal pheromone receptor proteins in the rhodopsin-like superfamily of G protein-linked receptors. The other three active B alpha 1 clones were subcloned further to identify the minimal active element in each clone. Every active subclone contains a putative pheromone gene ending in a signal for possible isoprenylation. A message of approximately 600 bp was observed for one of these genes, bap1(1). This paper presents the first evidence for a system of multiple pheromones and pheromone receptors as a basis for multispecific mating types in a fungus. Images PMID:7489716

  17. The Ustilago maydis b mating type locus controls hyphal proliferation and expression of secreted virulence factors in planta.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Ramon; Zahiri, Alexander; Kämper, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Sexual development in fungi is controlled by mating type loci that prevent self-fertilization. In the phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis, the b mating type locus encodes two homeodomain proteins, termed bE and bW. After cell fusion, a heterodimeric bE/bW complex is formed if the proteins are derived from different alleles. The bE/bW complex is required and sufficient to initiate pathogenic development and sexual reproduction; for the stages of pathogenic development succeeding plant penetration, however, its role was unclear. To analyse b function during in planta development, we generated a temperature-sensitive bE(ts) protein by exchange of a single amino acid. bE(ts) strains are stalled in pathogenic development at restrictive temperature in planta, and hyphae develop enlarged, bulbous cells at their tips that contain multiple nuclei, indicating a severe defect in the control and synchronization of cell cycle and cytokinesis. DNA array analysis of bE(ts) mutant strains in planta revealed a b-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted proteins that were shown to influence fungal virulence. Our data demonstrate that in U. maydis the b heterodimer is not only essential to establish the heterodikaryon after mating of two compatible sporidia and to initiate fungal pathogenicity, but also to sustain in planta proliferation and ensure sexual reproduction.

  18. Transcription of novel genes, including a gene linked to the mating-type locus, induced by Chlamydomonas fertilization.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, P J; Goodenough, U W

    1987-01-01

    Six cDNA clones have been identified that are complementary to transcripts present in young zygotes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii but absent from vegetative and gametic cells. Five early transcripts are synthesized within 5 to 10 min of fertilization; the sixth, late, transcript is not synthesized until 90 min following fertilization. Synthesis of both classes requires cell fusion between gametes. Cycloheximide fails to inhibit early mRNA synthesis, indicating that transcription factors must preexist in the gametes and be activated by cytoplasmic confluence. By contrast, cycloheximide blocks synthesis of the late transcript, suggesting that an early protein product(s) is required for expression of the late gene. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of inter- and intraspecific genetic crosses demonstrates that one of the early genes is very tightly linked to the mating-type locus. Images PMID:3614194

  19. ATP Binding to Hemoglobin Response Gene 1 Protein Is Necessary for Regulation of the Mating Type Locus in Candida albicans*

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Alexander W.; Pendrak, Michael L.; Roberts, David D.

    2011-01-01

    HBR1 (hemoglobin response gene 1) is an essential gene in Candida albicans that positively regulates mating type locus MTLα gene expression and thereby regulates cell type-specific developmental genes. Hbr1p contains a phosphate-binding loop (P-loop), a highly conserved motif characteristic of ATP- and GTP-binding proteins. Recombinant Hbr1p was isolated in an oligomeric state that specifically bound ATP with Kd ∼2 μm. ATP but not ADP, AMP, GTP, or dATP specifically protected Hbr1p from proteolysis by trypsin. Site-directed mutagenesis of the highly conserved P-loop lysine (K22Q) and the less conserved glycine (G19S) decreased the binding affinity for soluble ATP and ATP immobilized through its γ-phosphate. ATP bound somewhat more avidly than ATPγS to wild type and mutant Hbr1p. Although Hbr1p exhibits sequence motifs characteristic of adenylate kinases, and adenylate kinase and ATPase activities have been reported for the apparent human ortholog of Hbr1p, assays for adenylate kinase activity, autophosphorylation, and ATPase activity proved negative. Overexpression of wild type but not the mutant forms of Hbr1p restored MTlα2 expression in an HBR1/hbr1 mutant, indicating that ATP binding to the P-loop is necessary for this function of Hbr1p. PMID:21372131

  20. Identification of Mating Type Genes in the Bipolar Basidiomycetous Yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides: First Insight into the MAT Locus Structure of the Sporidiobolales▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Marco A.; Rosa, André; Rodrigues, Nádia; Fonseca, Álvaro; Gonçalves, Paula

    2008-01-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides is a heterothallic, bipolar, red yeast that belongs to the Sporidiobolales, an order within a major lineage of basidiomycetes, the Pucciniomycotina. In contrast to other basidiomycetes, considerably less is known about the nature of the mating type (MAT) loci that control sexual reproduction in this lineage. Three genes (RHA1, RHA2, and RHA3) encoding precursors of the MAT A1 pheromone (rhodotorucine A) were previously identified and formed the basis for a genome walking approach that led to the identification of additional MAT genes in complementary mating strains of R. toruloides. Two mating type-specific alleles encoding a p21-activated kinase (PAK; Ste20 homolog) were found between the RHA2 and RHA3 genes, and identification in MAT A2 strains of a gene encoding a presumptive pheromone precursor enabled prediction of the structure of rhodotorucine a. In addition, a putative pheromone receptor gene (STE3 homolog) was identified upstream of RHA1. Analyses of genomic data from two closely related species, Sporobolomyces roseus and Sporidiobolus salmonicolor, identified syntenic regions that contain homologs of all the above-mentioned genes. Notably, six novel pheromone precursor genes were uncovered, which encoded, similarly to the RHA genes, multiple tandem copies of the peptide moiety. This suggests that this structure, which is unique among fungal lipopeptide pheromones, seems to be prevalent in red yeasts. Species comparisons provided evidence for a large, multigenic MAT locus structure in the Sporidiobolales, but no putative homeodomain transcription factor genes (which are present in all basidiomycetous MAT loci characterized thus far) could be found in any of the three species in the vicinity of the MAT genes identified. PMID:18408057

  1. Comparative Genomics of the Ectomycorrhizal Sister Species Rhizopogon vinicolor and Rhizopogon vesiculosus (Basidiomycota: Boletales) Reveals a Divergence of the Mating Type B Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mujic, Alija Bajro; Kuo, Alan; Tritt, Andrew; Lipzen, Anna; Chen, Cindy; Johnson, Jenifer; Sharma, Aditi; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Spatafora, Joseph W.

    2017-01-01

    Divergence of breeding system plays an important role in fungal speciation. Ectomycorrhizal fungi, however, pose a challenge for the study of reproductive biology because most cannot be mated under laboratory conditions. To overcome this barrier, we sequenced the draft genomes of the ectomycorrhizal sister species Rhizopogon vinicolor Smith and Zeller and R. vesiculosus Smith and Zeller (Basidiomycota, Boletales)—the first genomes available for Basidiomycota truffles—and characterized gene content and organization surrounding their mating type loci. Both species possess a pair of homeodomain transcription factor homologs at the mating type A-locus as well as pheromone receptor and pheromone precursor homologs at the mating type B-locus. Comparison of Rhizopogon genomes with genomes from Boletales, Agaricales, and Polyporales revealed synteny of the A-locus region within Boletales, but several genomic rearrangements across orders. Our findings suggest correlation between gene content at the B-locus region and breeding system in Boletales with tetrapolar species possessing more diverse gene content than bipolar species. Rhizopogon vinicolor possesses a greater number of B-locus pheromone receptor and precursor genes than R. vesiculosus, as well as a pair of isoprenyl cysteine methyltransferase genes flanking the B-locus compared to a single copy in R. vesiculosus. Examination of dikaryotic single nucleotide polymorphisms within genomes revealed greater heterozygosity in R. vinicolor, consistent with increased rates of outcrossing. Both species possess the components of a heterothallic breeding system with R. vinicolor possessing a B-locus region structure consistent with tetrapolar Boletales and R. vesiculosus possessing a B-locus region structure intermediate between bipolar and tetrapolar Boletales. PMID:28450370

  2. Mating-type switching by chromosomal inversion in methylotrophic yeasts suggests an origin for the three-locus Saccharomyces cerevisiae system.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sara J; Byrne, Kevin P; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2014-11-11

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a complex system for switching the mating type of haploid cells, requiring the genome to have three mating-type (MAT)-like loci and a mechanism for silencing two of them. How this system originated is unknown, because the three-locus system is present throughout the family Saccharomycetaceae, whereas species in the sister Candida clade have only one locus and do not switch. Here we show that yeasts in a third clade, the methylotrophs, have a simpler two-locus switching system based on reversible inversion of a section of chromosome with MATa genes at one end and MATalpha genes at the other end. In Hansenula polymorpha the 19-kb invertible region lies beside a centromere so that, depending on the orientation, either MATa or MATalpha is silenced by centromeric chromatin. In Pichia pastoris, the orientation of a 138-kb invertible region puts either MATa or MATalpha beside a telomere and represses transcription of MATa2 or MATalpha2. Both species are homothallic, and inversion of their MAT regions can be induced by crossing two strains of the same mating type. The three-locus system of S. cerevisiae, which uses a nonconservative mechanism to replace DNA at MAT, likely evolved from a conservative two-locus system that swapped genes between expression and nonexpression sites by inversion. The increasing complexity of the switching apparatus, with three loci, donor bias, and cell lineage tracking, can be explained by continuous selection to increase sporulation ability in young colonies. Our results provide an evolutionary context for the diversity of switching and silencing mechanisms.

  3. Mating-type switching by chromosomal inversion in methylotrophic yeasts suggests an origin for the three-locus Saccharomyces cerevisiae system

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Sara J.; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a complex system for switching the mating type of haploid cells, requiring the genome to have three mating-type (MAT)–like loci and a mechanism for silencing two of them. How this system originated is unknown, because the three-locus system is present throughout the family Saccharomycetaceae, whereas species in the sister Candida clade have only one locus and do not switch. Here we show that yeasts in a third clade, the methylotrophs, have a simpler two-locus switching system based on reversible inversion of a section of chromosome with MATa genes at one end and MATalpha genes at the other end. In Hansenula polymorpha the 19-kb invertible region lies beside a centromere so that, depending on the orientation, either MATa or MATalpha is silenced by centromeric chromatin. In Pichia pastoris, the orientation of a 138-kb invertible region puts either MATa or MATalpha beside a telomere and represses transcription of MATa2 or MATalpha2. Both species are homothallic, and inversion of their MAT regions can be induced by crossing two strains of the same mating type. The three-locus system of S. cerevisiae, which uses a nonconservative mechanism to replace DNA at MAT, likely evolved from a conservative two-locus system that swapped genes between expression and nonexpression sites by inversion. The increasing complexity of the switching apparatus, with three loci, donor bias, and cell lineage tracking, can be explained by continuous selection to increase sporulation ability in young colonies. Our results provide an evolutionary context for the diversity of switching and silencing mechanisms. PMID:25349420

  4. White-opaque Switching in Different Mating Type-like Locus Gene Types of Clinical Candida albicans Isolates.

    PubMed

    Li, Hou-Min; Shimizu-Imanishi, Yumi; Tanaka, Reiko; Li, Ruo-Yu; Yaguchi, Takashi

    2016-11-20

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) can become a pathogen causing superficial as well as life-threatening systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Many phenotypic attributes contribute to its capacity to colonize human organs. In our study, 93 C. albicans isolates from patients of various candidiasis in a hospital of China were surveyed. We aimed to investigate the white-opaque (WO) switching competence, drug sensitivity, and virulence of mating type-like (MTL) a/α isolates. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene and the MTL configuration were detected in all the isolates by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. White/opaque phenotype and doubling time of cell growth were determined. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of antifungal agent were measured using broth microdilution method. Sixty-four isolates (69.6%) were classified to serotype A, 19 (20.6%) to serotype B, and 9 (9.8%) to serotype C. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates were divided into four different subgroups of ITS genotypes. Most of our clinical isolates were MTL a/α type, while 6.8% remained MTL a or MTLα type. The frequency of opaque phenotype was 71.0% (66 isolates). Following the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3, all isolates were susceptible to caspofungin and a few (0.6-3.2%) of them showed resistance against amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole. From these analyses, there were comparatively more C. albicans strains classified into serotype B, and the frequency of opaque phase strains was significant in the clinical isolates from China. Genetic, phenotypic, or drug susceptibility patterns were not significantly different from previous studies. MTL a/α isolates could also undergo WO switching which facilitates their survival.

  5. White-opaque Switching in Different Mating Type-like Locus Gene Types of Clinical Candida albicans Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hou-Min; Shimizu-Imanishi, Yumi; Tanaka, Reiko; Li, Ruo-Yu; Yaguchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Candida albicans (C. albicans) can become a pathogen causing superficial as well as life-threatening systemic infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Many phenotypic attributes contribute to its capacity to colonize human organs. In our study, 93 C. albicans isolates from patients of various candidiasis in a hospital of China were surveyed. We aimed to investigate the white-opaque (WO) switching competence, drug sensitivity, and virulence of mating type-like (MTL) a/α isolates. Methods: Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene and the MTL configuration were detected in all the isolates by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. White/opaque phenotype and doubling time of cell growth were determined. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of antifungal agent were measured using broth microdilution method. Results: Sixty-four isolates (69.6%) were classified to serotype A, 19 (20.6%) to serotype B, and 9 (9.8%) to serotype C. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates were divided into four different subgroups of ITS genotypes. Most of our clinical isolates were MTLa/α type, while 6.8% remained MTLa or MTLα type. The frequency of opaque phenotype was 71.0% (66 isolates). Following the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M27-A3, all isolates were susceptible to caspofungin and a few (0.6–3.2%) of them showed resistance against amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole. Conclusions: From these analyses, there were comparatively more C. albicans strains classified into serotype B, and the frequency of opaque phase strains was significant in the clinical isolates from China. Genetic, phenotypic, or drug susceptibility patterns were not significantly different from previous studies. MTLa/α isolates could also undergo WO switching which facilitates their survival. PMID:27824006

  6. Control of yeast cell type by the mating type locus: positive regulation of the alpha-specific STE3 gene by the MAT alpha 1 product.

    PubMed

    Sprague, G F; Jensen, R; Herskowitz, I

    1983-02-01

    The mating type locus (MAT) determines the three yeast cell types, a, alpha, and a/alpha. It has been proposed that alleles of this locus, MATa and MAT alpha, encode regulators that control expression of unlinked genes necessary for mating and sporulation. Specifically, the alpha 1 product of MAT alpha is proposed to be a positive regulator of alpha-specific genes. To test this view, we have assayed RNA production from the alpha-specific STE3 gene in the three cell types and in mutants defective in MAT alpha. The STE3 gene was cloned by screening a yeast genomic clone bank for plasmids that complement the mating defect of ste3 mutants. Using the cloned STE3 gene as a probe, we find that alpha cells produce STE3 RNA, whereas a and a/alpha cells do not. Furthermore, mat alpha 1 mutants do not produce STE3 RNA, whereas mat alpha 2 mutants do. These results show that the STE3 gene, required for mating only by alpha cells, is expressed only in alpha cells. They show also that production of RNA from the STE3 gene requires that alpha 1 product of MAT alpha. Thus alpha 1 positively regulates at least one alpha-specific gene by increasing the level of that gene's RNA product.

  7. Genetic map of randomly amplified DNA polymorphisms closely linked to the mating type locus of tetrahymenta thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, T.J.; Brickner, J.; Orias, E.; Nakano, K.J.

    1995-12-01

    We have used the PCR-based randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method to efficiently identify and map DNA polymorphisms in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. The polymorphisms segregate as Mendelian genetic markers. A targeted screen, using DNA from pooled meiotic segregants, yielded the polymorphisms most closely linked to the mat locus. A total of 10 polymorphisms linked to the mat-Pmr segment of the left arm of micronuclear chromosome 2 have been identified. This constitutes the largest linkage group described in T. thermophila. We also provide here the first crude estimate of the frequency of meiotic recombination in the mat region, 20 kb/cM. This frequency is much higher than that observed in most other eukaryotes. Special features of Tetrahymena genetics enhanced the power of the RAPD method: the ability to obtain in a single step meiotic segregants that are whole-genome homozygotes and the availability of nullisomic strains permitting quick deletion mapping of polymorphisms to micronuclear chromosomes or chromosomes segments. The RAPD method appears to provide a practical and relatively inexpensive approach to the construction of a high-resolution map of the Tetrahymena genome. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Mating-type genes from the homothallic fungus Sordaria macrospora are functionally expressed in a heterothallic ascomycete.

    PubMed

    Pöggeler, S; Risch, S; Kück, U; Osiewacz, H D

    1997-10-01

    Homokaryons from the homothallic ascomycte Sordaria macrospora are able to enter the sexual pathway and to form fertile fruiting bodies. To analyze the molecular basis of homothallism and to elucidate the role of mating-products during fruiting body development, we cloned and sequenced the entire S. macrospora mating-type locus. Comparison of the Sordaria mating-type locus with mating-type idiomorphs from the heterothallic ascomycetes Neurospora crassa and Podospora anserina revealed that sequences from both idiomorphs (A/a and mat-/mat+, respectively) are contiguous in S. macrospora. DNA sequencing of the S. macrospora mating-type region allowed the identification of four open reading frames (ORFs), which were termed Smt-a1, SmtA-1, SmtA-2 and SmtA-3. While Smt-a1, SmtA-1, and SmtA-2 show strong sequence similarities with the corresponding N. crassa mating-type ORFs, SmtA-3 has a chimeric character. It comprises sequences that are similar to the A and a mating-type idiomorph from N. crassa. To determine functionality of the S. macrospora mating-type genes, we show that all ORFs are transcriptionally expressed. Furthermore, we transformed the S. macrospora mating-type genes into mat- and mat+ strains of the closely related heterothallic fungus P. anserina. The transformation experiments show that mating-type genes from S. macrospora induce fruiting body formation in P. anserina.

  9. A MAT1–2 wild-type strain from Penicillium chrysogenum: functional mating-type locus characterization, genome sequencing and mating with an industrial penicillin-producing strain

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Julia; Dahlmann, Tim A; Gümüşer, Hendrik; Kück, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    In heterothallic ascomycetes, mating is controlled by two nonallelic idiomorphs that determine the ‘sex’ of the corresponding strains. We recently discovered mating-type loci and a sexual life cycle in the penicillin-producing fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum. All industrial penicillin production strains worldwide are derived from a MAT1-1 isolate. No MAT1-2 strain has been investigated in detail until now. Here, we provide the first functional analysis of a MAT1-2 locus from a wild-type strain. Similar to MAT1-1, the MAT1-2 locus has functions beyond sexual development. Unlike MAT1-1, the MAT1-2 locus affects germination and surface properties of conidiospores and controls light-dependent asexual sporulation. Mating of the MAT1-2 wild type with a MAT1-1 high penicillin producer generated sexual spores. We determined the genomic sequences of parental and progeny strains using next-generation sequencing and found evidence for genome-wide recombination. SNP calling showed that derived industrial strains had an uneven distribution of point mutations compared with the wild type. We found evidence for meiotic recombination in all chromosomes. Our results point to a strategy combining the use of mating-type genes, genetics, and next-generation sequencing to optimize conventional strain improvement methods. PMID:25521009

  10. Inversion of the Chromosomal Region between Two Mating Type Loci Switches the Mating Type in Hansenula polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Hiromi; Kaneko, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Yeast mating type is determined by the genotype at the mating type locus (MAT). In homothallic (self-fertile) Saccharomycotina such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluveromyces lactis, high-efficiency switching between a and α mating types enables mating. Two silent mating type cassettes, in addition to an active MAT locus, are essential components of the mating type switching mechanism. In this study, we investigated the structure and functions of mating type genes in H. polymorpha (also designated as Ogataea polymorpha). The H. polymorpha genome was found to harbor two MAT loci, MAT1 and MAT2, that are ∼18 kb apart on the same chromosome. MAT1-encoded α1 specifies α cell identity, whereas none of the mating type genes were required for a identity and mating. MAT1-encoded α2 and MAT2-encoded a1 were, however, essential for meiosis. When present in the location next to SLA2 and SUI1 genes, MAT1 or MAT2 was transcriptionally active, while the other was repressed. An inversion of the MAT intervening region was induced by nutrient limitation, resulting in the swapping of the chromosomal locations of two MAT loci, and hence switching of mating type identity. Inversion-deficient mutants exhibited severe defects only in mating with each other, suggesting that this inversion is the mechanism of mating type switching and homothallism. This chromosomal inversion-based mechanism represents a novel form of mating type switching that requires only two MAT loci. PMID:25412462

  11. Inversion of the chromosomal region between two mating type loci switches the mating type in Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hiromi; Kaneko, Yoshinobu

    2014-11-01

    Yeast mating type is determined by the genotype at the mating type locus (MAT). In homothallic (self-fertile) Saccharomycotina such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluveromyces lactis, high-efficiency switching between a and α mating types enables mating. Two silent mating type cassettes, in addition to an active MAT locus, are essential components of the mating type switching mechanism. In this study, we investigated the structure and functions of mating type genes in H. polymorpha (also designated as Ogataea polymorpha). The H. polymorpha genome was found to harbor two MAT loci, MAT1 and MAT2, that are ∼18 kb apart on the same chromosome. MAT1-encoded α1 specifies α cell identity, whereas none of the mating type genes were required for a identity and mating. MAT1-encoded α2 and MAT2-encoded a1 were, however, essential for meiosis. When present in the location next to SLA2 and SUI1 genes, MAT1 or MAT2 was transcriptionally active, while the other was repressed. An inversion of the MAT intervening region was induced by nutrient limitation, resulting in the swapping of the chromosomal locations of two MAT loci, and hence switching of mating type identity. Inversion-deficient mutants exhibited severe defects only in mating with each other, suggesting that this inversion is the mechanism of mating type switching and homothallism. This chromosomal inversion-based mechanism represents a novel form of mating type switching that requires only two MAT loci.

  12. The Mating Type Locus (MAT) and Sexual Reproduction of Cryptococcus heveanensis: Insights into the Evolution of Sex and Sex-Determining Chromosomal Regions in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Metin, Banu; Findley, Keisha; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Mating in basidiomycetous fungi is often controlled by two unlinked, multiallelic loci encoding homeodomain transcription factors or pheromones/pheromone receptors. In contrast to this tetrapolar organization, Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii have a bipolar mating system, and a single biallelic locus governs sexual reproduction. The C. neoformans MAT locus is unusually large (>100 kb), contains >20 genes, and enhances virulence. Previous comparative genomic studies provided insights into how this unusual MAT locus might have evolved involving gene acquisitions into two unlinked loci and fusion into one contiguous locus, converting an ancestral tetrapolar system to a bipolar one. Here we tested this model by studying Cryptococcus heveanensis, a sister species to the pathogenic Cryptococcus species complex. An extant sexual cycle was discovered; co-incubating fertile isolates results in the teleomorph (Kwoniella heveanensis) with dikaryotic hyphae, clamp connections, septate basidia, and basidiospores. To characterize the C. heveanensis MAT locus, a fosmid library was screened with C. neoformans/C. gattii MAT genes. Positive fosmids were sequenced and assembled to generate two large probably unlinked MAT gene clusters: one corresponding to the homeodomain locus and the other to the pheromone/receptor locus. Strikingly, two divergent homeodomain genes (SXI1, SXI2) are present, similar to the bE/bW Ustilago maydis paradigm, suggesting one or the other homeodomain gene was recently lost in C. neoformans/C. gattii. Sequencing MAT genes from other C. heveanensis isolates revealed a multiallelic homeodomain locus and at least a biallelic pheromone/receptor locus, similar to known tetrapolar species. Taken together, these studies reveal an extant C. heveanensis sexual cycle, define the structure of its MAT locus consistent with tetrapolar mating, and support the proposed evolutionary model for the bipolar Cryptococcus MAT locus revealing transitions in sexuality

  13. Position effect variegation at the mating-type locus of fission yeast: a cis-acting element inhibits covariegated expression of genes in the silent and expressed domains.

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, N; Goldshmidt, I; Cohen, A

    1999-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe switches its mating type by transposing a copy of unexpressed genes from the respective mat2 or mat3 cassettes to mat1. The donor cassettes are located in a silent domain that is separated from the expressed mat1 cassette by the L region. We monitored the expression of ade6 from sites in the L region and examined the relationship between the expression state at these sites and at sites within the silent domain. Results indicate that: (1) the silent domain extends into the L region, but repression is gradually alleviated with increasing distance from mat2, and overexpression of swi6 enhances PEV in the L region; (2) a transcriptionally active chromatin state, associated with reporter gene expression in the L region, spreads toward the silent domain; (3) a cis-acting element, located at the junction between the L region and mat2-P, ensures repression in the silent domain, regardless of the expression state in the L region; and (4) repression in mat1-P cells is less stringently controlled than in mat1-M cells. We discuss the functional organization of the mat region and genetic elements that ensure separation between repressed and derepressed domains. PMID:10353894

  14. Position effect variegation at the mating-type locus of fission yeast: a cis-acting element inhibits covariegated expression of genes in the silent and expressed domains.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, N; Goldshmidt, I; Cohen, A

    1999-06-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe switches its mating type by transposing a copy of unexpressed genes from the respective mat2 or mat3 cassettes to mat1. The donor cassettes are located in a silent domain that is separated from the expressed mat1 cassette by the L region. We monitored the expression of ade6 from sites in the L region and examined the relationship between the expression state at these sites and at sites within the silent domain. Results indicate that: (1) the silent domain extends into the L region, but repression is gradually alleviated with increasing distance from mat2, and overexpression of swi6 enhances PEV in the L region; (2) a transcriptionally active chromatin state, associated with reporter gene expression in the L region, spreads toward the silent domain; (3) a cis-acting element, located at the junction between the L region and mat2-P, ensures repression in the silent domain, regardless of the expression state in the L region; and (4) repression in mat1-P cells is less stringently controlled than in mat1-M cells. We discuss the functional organization of the mat region and genetic elements that ensure separation between repressed and derepressed domains.

  15. Rearrangements of the transposable mating-type cassettes of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Beach, D H; Klar, A J

    1984-03-01

    The fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, switches mating type every few cell divisions. Switching is controlled by the genes of the mating-type locus, which consists of three components, mat1, mat2-P and mat3-M, each separated by approximately 15 kb. Copy transposition of P (Plus) or M (Minus) information from mat2-P or mat3-M into the expression locus mat1 mediates cell type switching. The mating-type locus undergoes events at high frequency (10(-2)-10(-6)) which stabilize one or other mating type. These events are shown to be rearrangements which result in either deletion or insertion of DNA between cassettes.

  16. An Evolutionary Perspective on Yeast Mating-Type Switching.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sara J; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2017-05-01

    Cell differentiation in yeast species is controlled by a reversible, programmed DNA-rearrangement process called mating-type switching. Switching is achieved by two functionally similar but structurally distinct processes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe In both species, haploid cells possess one active and two silent copies of the mating-type locus (a three-cassette structure), the active locus is cleaved, and synthesis-dependent strand annealing is used to replace it with a copy of a silent locus encoding the opposite mating-type information. Each species has its own set of components responsible for regulating these processes. In this review, we summarize knowledge about the function and evolution of mating-type switching components in these species, including mechanisms of heterochromatin formation, MAT locus cleavage, donor bias, lineage tracking, and environmental regulation of switching. We compare switching in these well-studied species to others such as Kluyveromyces lactis and the methylotrophic yeasts Ogataea polymorpha and Komagataella phaffii We focus on some key questions: Which cells switch mating type? What molecular apparatus is required for switching? Where did it come from? And what is the evolutionary purpose of switching? Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. An Evolutionary Perspective on Yeast Mating-Type Switching

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Sara J.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2017-01-01

    Cell differentiation in yeast species is controlled by a reversible, programmed DNA-rearrangement process called mating-type switching. Switching is achieved by two functionally similar but structurally distinct processes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In both species, haploid cells possess one active and two silent copies of the mating-type locus (a three-cassette structure), the active locus is cleaved, and synthesis-dependent strand annealing is used to replace it with a copy of a silent locus encoding the opposite mating-type information. Each species has its own set of components responsible for regulating these processes. In this review, we summarize knowledge about the function and evolution of mating-type switching components in these species, including mechanisms of heterochromatin formation, MAT locus cleavage, donor bias, lineage tracking, and environmental regulation of switching. We compare switching in these well-studied species to others such as Kluyveromyces lactis and the methylotrophic yeasts Ogataea polymorpha and Komagataella phaffii. We focus on some key questions: Which cells switch mating type? What molecular apparatus is required for switching? Where did it come from? And what is the evolutionary purpose of switching? PMID:28476860

  18. The influence of the mating type on virulence of Mucor irregularis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqi; Liang, Guanzhao; Peng, Jingwen; Long, Zhimin; Li, Dongmei; Fu, Meihua; Wang, Qiong; Shen, Yongnian; Lv, Guixia; Mei, Huan; Tsui, Clement K M; Liu, Weida

    2017-09-06

    Mucor irregularis is an emerging fungal pathogen that cause cutaneous infection and could cause death. However, little is known about its mechanism of pathogenesis. There is evidence suggesting virulence vary with mating types in fungi, including the Mucorales. Here, we characterized the mating type locus of M. irregularis and the mating type ratio of 17 clinical isolates in China. Genomic data indicated M. irregularis is heterothallic having two mating types - bearing either SexP or SexM allele. Also, we employed a mice model to study the inflammation and pathological effects of different mating types. The comparison of the inflammatory response, cytokine profiles and Th-1, Th-2 and Th-17 cells numbers in each mating type treated mice showed that the severity and disease progress were enhanced in (+) mating type treated mice. One (+/0) mutant strain, with multiple mutations at the mating locus, had defects in sexual mating ability but appeared to be more virulent than the (-) mating type. Although (+) mating type appeared to be more virulent, most of our clinical isolates presented belonged to (-) mating type. Our findings support the involvement of MAT genes in sexual fertility, and the influence of mating type on the severity of cutaneous infection.

  19. Basidiomycete Mating Type Genes and Pheromone Signaling▿

    PubMed Central

    Raudaskoski, Marjatta; Kothe, Erika

    2010-01-01

    The genome sequences of the basidiomycete Agaricomycetes species Coprinopsis cinerea, Laccaria bicolor, Schizophyllum commune, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and Postia placenta, as well as of Cryptococcus neoformans and Ustilago maydis, are now publicly available. Out of these fungi, C. cinerea, S. commune, and U. maydis, together with the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have been investigated for years genetically and molecularly for signaling in sexual reproduction. The comparison of the structure and organization of mating type genes in fungal genomes reveals an amazing conservation of genes regulating the sexual reproduction throughout the fungal kingdom. In agaricomycetes, two mating type loci, A, coding for homeodomain type transcription factors, and B, encoding a pheromone/receptor system, regulate the four typical mating interactions of tetrapolar species. Evidence for both A and B mating type genes can also be identified in basidiomycetes with bipolar systems, where only two mating interactions are seen. In some of these fungi, the B locus has lost its self/nonself discrimination ability and thus its specificity while retaining the other regulatory functions in development. In silico analyses now also permit the identification of putative components of the pheromone-dependent signaling pathways. Induction of these signaling cascades leads to development of dikaryotic mycelia, fruiting body formation, and meiotic spore production. In pheromone-dependent signaling, the role of heterotrimeric G proteins, components of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, and cyclic AMP-dependent pathways can now be defined. Additionally, the pheromone-dependent signaling through monomeric, small GTPases potentially involved in creating the polarized cytoskeleton for reciprocal nuclear exchange and migration during mating is predicted. PMID:20190072

  20. Functional characterization of MAT1-1-specific mating-type genes in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora provides new insights into essential and nonessential sexual regulators.

    PubMed

    Klix, V; Nowrousian, M; Ringelberg, C; Loros, J J; Dunlap, J C; Pöggeler, S

    2010-06-01

    Mating-type genes in fungi encode regulators of mating and sexual development. Heterothallic ascomycete species require different sets of mating-type genes to control nonself-recognition and mating of compatible partners of different mating types. Homothallic (self-fertile) species also carry mating-type genes in their genome that are essential for sexual development. To analyze the molecular basis of homothallism and the role of mating-type genes during fruiting-body development, we deleted each of the three genes, SmtA-1 (MAT1-1-1), SmtA-2 (MAT1-1-2), and SmtA-3 (MAT1-1-3), contained in the MAT1-1 part of the mating-type locus of the homothallic ascomycete species Sordaria macrospora. Phenotypic analysis of deletion mutants revealed that the PPF domain protein-encoding gene SmtA-2 is essential for sexual reproduction, whereas the alpha domain protein-encoding genes SmtA-1 and SmtA-3 play no role in fruiting-body development. By means of cross-species microarray analysis using Neurospora crassa oligonucleotide microarrays hybridized with S. macrospora targets and quantitative real-time PCR, we identified genes expressed under the control of SmtA-1 and SmtA-2. Both genes are involved in the regulation of gene expression, including that of pheromone genes.

  1. Presence of alpha and a mating types in environmental and clinical collections of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii strains from Australia.

    PubMed

    Halliday, C L; Bui, T; Krockenberger, M; Malik, R; Ellis, D H; Carter, D A

    1999-09-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii lives in association with certain species of eucalyptus trees and is a causative agent of cryptococcosis. It exists as two mating types, MATalpha and MATa, which is determined by a single-locus, two-allele system. In the closely related C. neoformans var. neoformans, the alpha mating type has been found to outnumber its a counterpart by at least 30:1, but there have been very limited data on the proportions of each mating type in C. neoformans var. gattii. In the present study, specific PCR primers were designed to amplify two separate alpha-mating-type genes from C. neoformans var. gattii strains. These were used to survey for the presence of the two mating types in clinical and environmental collections of C. neoformans var. gattii strains from Australia. Sixty-eight of 69 clinical isolates produced both alpha mating type-specific bands and were assumed to be of the alpha mating type. The majority of environmental isolates were also of the alpha mating type, but the a mating type was located in two separate areas. In one area, the a mating type outnumbered the alpha mating type by 27:2, but in the second area, the ratio of the two mating types was close to the 50:50 ratio expected for sexual recombination.

  2. Rearrangements of the transposable mating-type cassettes of fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Beach, D H; Klar, A J

    1984-01-01

    The fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, switches mating type every few cell divisions. Switching is controlled by the genes of the mating-type locus, which consists of three components, mat1, mat2-P and mat3-M, each separated by approximately 15 kb. Copy transposition of P (Plus) or M (Minus) information from mat2-P or mat3-M into the expression locus mat1 mediates cell type switching. The mating-type locus undergoes events at high frequency (10(-2)-10(-6)) which stabilize one or other mating type. These events are shown to be rearrangements which result in either deletion or insertion of DNA between cassettes. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:6325178

  3. Cryptococcus gattii sero-mating type allelic pattern determined by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, M; D'Amicis, R; Tortorano, A M

    2015-02-01

    Molecular methods to differentiate serotypes, mating types and molecular types of Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii are important tools to understand epidemiology and pathogenesis of these pathogens. In this study, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was applied to sero-mating typing of C. gattii strains. Four pairs of primers were designed to target 4 allele-specific genes located in the mating-type locus. Twenty-three C. gattii strains, presenting different mating types and serotypes, were tested to validate the method. The method was able to identify all sero-mating allelic patterns including hybrid combinations, and therefore, it represents a simple one-step PCR for sero-mating typing of C. gattii strains.

  4. Mutations Affecting Donor Preference during Mating Type Interconversion in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, K. S.; Szeto, L.; Broach, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Homothallic strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can convert mating type from a to α or α to a as often as every generation, by replacing genetic information specifying one mating type at the expressor locus, MAT, with information specifying the opposite mating type. The cryptic mating type information that is copied and inserted at MAT is contained in either of two loci, HML or HMR. The particular locus selected as donor during mating type interconversion is regulated by the allele expressed at MAT. MATa cells usually select HML, and MATα cells usually select HMR, a process referred to as donor preference. To identify factors required for donor preference, we isolated and characterized a number of mutants that frequently selected the nonpreferred donor locus during mating type interconversion. Many of these mutants were found to harbor chromosome rearrangements or mutations at MAT or HML that interfered with the switching process. However, one mutant carried a recessive allele of CHL1, a gene previously shown to be required for efficient chromosome segregation during mitosis. Homothallic strains of yeast containing a null allele of CHL1 exhibited almost random selection of the donor locus in a MATa background but were normal in their ability to select HMR in a MATα background. Our results indicate that Chl1p participates in the process of donor selection and are consistent with a model in which Chl1p helps establish an intrinsic bias in donor preference. PMID:7789755

  5. Functional Characterization of MAT1-1-Specific Mating-Type Genes in the Homothallic Ascomycete Sordaria macrospora Provides New Insights into Essential and Nonessential Sexual Regulators▿†

    PubMed Central

    Klix, V.; Nowrousian, M.; Ringelberg, C.; Loros, J. J.; Dunlap, J. C.; Pöggeler, S.

    2010-01-01

    Mating-type genes in fungi encode regulators of mating and sexual development. Heterothallic ascomycete species require different sets of mating-type genes to control nonself-recognition and mating of compatible partners of different mating types. Homothallic (self-fertile) species also carry mating-type genes in their genome that are essential for sexual development. To analyze the molecular basis of homothallism and the role of mating-type genes during fruiting-body development, we deleted each of the three genes, SmtA-1 (MAT1-1-1), SmtA-2 (MAT1-1-2), and SmtA-3 (MAT1-1-3), contained in the MAT1-1 part of the mating-type locus of the homothallic ascomycete species Sordaria macrospora. Phenotypic analysis of deletion mutants revealed that the PPF domain protein-encoding gene SmtA-2 is essential for sexual reproduction, whereas the α domain protein-encoding genes SmtA-1 and SmtA-3 play no role in fruiting-body development. By means of cross-species microarray analysis using Neurospora crassa oligonucleotide microarrays hybridized with S. macrospora targets and quantitative real-time PCR, we identified genes expressed under the control of SmtA-1 and SmtA-2. Both genes are involved in the regulation of gene expression, including that of pheromone genes. PMID:20435701

  6. The evolution of mating type switching

    PubMed Central

    Hadjivasiliou, Zena; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Kuijper, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Predictions about the evolution of sex determination mechanisms have mainly focused on animals and plants, whereas unicellular eukaryotes such as fungi and ciliates have received little attention. Many taxa within the latter groups can stochastically switch their mating type identity during vegetative growth. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that mating type switching overcomes distortions in the distribution of mating types due to drift during asexual growth. Using a computational model, we show that smaller population size, longer vegetative periods and more mating types lead to greater distortions in the distribution of mating types. However, the impact of these parameters on optimal switching rates is not straightforward. We find that longer vegetative periods cause reductions and considerable fluctuations in the switching rate over time. Smaller population size increases the strength of selection for switching but has little impact on the switching rate itself. The number of mating types decreases switching rates when gametes can freely sample each other, but increases switching rates when there is selection for speedy mating. We discuss our results in light of empirical work and propose new experiments that could further our understanding of sexuality in isogamous eukaryotes. PMID:27271362

  7. The evolution of mating type switching.

    PubMed

    Hadjivasiliou, Zena; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Kuijper, Bram

    2016-07-01

    Predictions about the evolution of sex determination mechanisms have mainly focused on animals and plants, whereas unicellular eukaryotes such as fungi and ciliates have received little attention. Many taxa within the latter groups can stochastically switch their mating type identity during vegetative growth. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that mating type switching overcomes distortions in the distribution of mating types due to drift during asexual growth. Using a computational model, we show that smaller population size, longer vegetative periods and more mating types lead to greater distortions in the distribution of mating types. However, the impact of these parameters on optimal switching rates is not straightforward. We find that longer vegetative periods cause reductions and considerable fluctuations in the switching rate over time. Smaller population size increases the strength of selection for switching but has little impact on the switching rate itself. The number of mating types decreases switching rates when gametes can freely sample each other, but increases switching rates when there is selection for speedy mating. We discuss our results in light of empirical work and propose new experiments that could further our understanding of sexuality in isogamous eukaryotes. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Development of SCAR markers to determine the mating types of Lepista nuda protoplast monokaryons.

    PubMed

    Li, Dengjin; Liu, Yu; Wang, Peng; Ma, Yuanwei; Wang, Shouxian; Zhao, Shuang; Xu, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Lepista nuda (Bull. ex Fr.) Cooke belongs to Tricholomataceae and is an edible fungus with both economic and medical value. Mycelia were isolated from the fruiting bodies of L. nuda and were used to prepare the protoplast monokaryons. One hundred and fifteen monokaryons were obtained and their mating types were determined using somatic incompatibility tests. Protoplast monokaryons segregated into either the A1B1 or the A2B2 mating types. Inter-simple sequence repeats and sequence-related amplified polymorphism fingerprinting were used to analyse the mating types of these protoplast monokaryons and 16 sequence-characterised amplified region primers were developed to efficiently differentiate between the monokaryon mating types. Multiplex PCR analyses were also established. The data presented here outline a method for the precise and rapid identification of protoplast monokaryon mating types, which has the promise to shorten the period required for conventional crossbreeding.

  9. Fission yeast switches mating type by a replication–recombination coupled process

    PubMed Central

    Arcangioli, Benoit; de Lahondès, Raynald

    2000-01-01

    Fission yeast exhibits a homothallic life cycle, in which the mating type of the cell mitotically alternates in a highly regulated fashion. Pedigree analysis of dividing cells has shown that only one of the two sister cells switches mating type. It was shown recently that a site- and strand-specific DNA modification at the mat1 locus precedes mating-type switching. By tracking the fate of mat1 DNA throughout the cell cycle with a PCR assay, we identified a novel DNA intermediate of mating-type switching in S-phase. The time and rate of appearance and disappearance of this DNA intermediate are consistent with a model in which mating-type switching occurs through a replication–recombination coupled pathway. Such a process provides experimental evidence in support of a copy choice recombination model in Schizosaccharomyces pombe mating-type switching and is reminiscent of the sister chromatid recombination used to complete replication in the presence of certain types of DNA damage. PMID:10716938

  10. Evolution of sexes from an ancestral mating-type specification pathway.

    PubMed

    Geng, Sa; De Hoff, Peter; Umen, James G

    2014-07-01

    Male and female sexes have evolved repeatedly in eukaryotes but the origins of dimorphic sexes and their relationship to mating types in unicellular species are not understood. Volvocine algae include isogamous species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, with two equal-sized mating types, and oogamous multicellular species such as Volvox carteri with sperm-producing males and egg-producing females. Theoretical work predicts genetic linkage of a gamete cell-size regulatory gene(s) to an ancestral mating-type locus as a possible step in the evolution of dimorphic gametes, but this idea has not been tested. Here we show that, contrary to predictions, a single conserved mating locus (MT) gene in volvocine algae-MID, which encodes a RWP-RK domain transcription factor-evolved from its ancestral role in C. reinhardtii as a mating-type specifier, to become a determinant of sperm and egg development in V. carteri. Transgenic female V. carteri expressing male MID produced functional sperm packets during sexual development. Transgenic male V. carteri with RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdowns of VcMID produced functional eggs, or self-fertile hermaphrodites. Post-transcriptional controls were found to regulate cell-type-limited expression and nuclear localization of VcMid protein that restricted its activity to nuclei of developing male germ cells and sperm. Crosses with sex-reversed strains uncoupled sex determination from sex chromosome identity and revealed gender-specific roles for male and female mating locus genes in sexual development, gamete fitness and reproductive success. Our data show genetic continuity between the mating-type specification and sex determination pathways of volvocine algae, and reveal evidence for gender-specific adaptations in the male and female mating locus haplotypes of Volvox. These findings will enable a deeper understanding of how a master regulator of mating-type determination in an ancestral unicellular species was reprogrammed to

  11. Directed Replacement of Mt a by Mt a-1 Effects a Mating Type Switch in Neurospora Crassa

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S.; Staben, C.

    1994-01-01

    To test the functions of a mating type genes, we developed an efficient strategy to select transformants of Neurospora crassa in which resident A mating type DNA was replaced by cloned DNA from the mt a idiomorph. Cloned a idiomorphic DNA could specify all functions, including fertility, of a mating type, but only when it replaced A DNA at the mating type locus. Only the mt a-1 region of the a idiomorph was necessary in order to specify a mating type. Gene replacement events involved the homologous sequences flanking the unique mating type idiomorphic DNA, resulting in apparently isogenic a and A strains. These isogenic strains were fertile when crossed with one another, indicating that no determinants outside the transforming DNA are necessary for fertility as a and that no host sequences of A strains interfere with fertility as a. One a replacement strain bore a duplication of the transforming mt a-1 and hph DNA. The duplication strain had unexpected properties. Although mating type segregated 1:1 in crosses of this strain to A, the duplicated regions were efficiently altered during the sexual process to generate a single copy in the progeny. No progeny were recovered that had undergone RIP (repeat induced point mutation) sufficient to inactivate the mt a-1 gene. We infer that the mt a-1 gene is necessary and sufficient to specify a mating type identity in all vegetative and sexual activities. Mt a-1 may also play an essential role in ascosporogenesis after fertilization. PMID:8001795

  12. Genes required for initiation and resolution steps of mating-type switching in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Egel, R; Beach, D H; Klar, A J

    1984-06-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe switches mating type by transposition of a copy of DNA derived from either of the two storage cassettes, mat2 -P and mat3 -M, into the expression locus, mat1 . The recombinational event of switching is initiated by a double-stranded DNA break present in approximately 20% of the molecules at mat1 . Fifty-three mutants defective in switching of mating type have been isolated previously, and each has been assigned to 1 of 10 linkage groups. One group consists of cis-acting mutations at mat1 , which reduce the amount of the DNA double-strand cut. The remaining nine groups are mutations in genes that are unlinked to the mating-type locus and are studied here. Three ( swi1 , -3, -7) are required for formation of the double-strand cut, whereas the others are not. Mutants of three genes ( swi4 , -8, -9) undergo high-frequency rearrangement of the mating-type locus indicative of errors of resolution of recombinational intermediates. The remaining three ( swi2 , -5, -6) have normal levels of cut, do not make errors of resolution, and possibly are required either for efficient utilization of the cut or determining the directionality of switching. The data suggest that the switching process can be dissected into genetically distinguishable steps.

  13. Genes required for initiation and resolution steps of mating-type switching in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Egel, R; Beach, D H; Klar, A J

    1984-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe switches mating type by transposition of a copy of DNA derived from either of the two storage cassettes, mat2 -P and mat3 -M, into the expression locus, mat1 . The recombinational event of switching is initiated by a double-stranded DNA break present in approximately 20% of the molecules at mat1 . Fifty-three mutants defective in switching of mating type have been isolated previously, and each has been assigned to 1 of 10 linkage groups. One group consists of cis-acting mutations at mat1 , which reduce the amount of the DNA double-strand cut. The remaining nine groups are mutations in genes that are unlinked to the mating-type locus and are studied here. Three ( swi1 , -3, -7) are required for formation of the double-strand cut, whereas the others are not. Mutants of three genes ( swi4 , -8, -9) undergo high-frequency rearrangement of the mating-type locus indicative of errors of resolution of recombinational intermediates. The remaining three ( swi2 , -5, -6) have normal levels of cut, do not make errors of resolution, and possibly are required either for efficient utilization of the cut or determining the directionality of switching. The data suggest that the switching process can be dissected into genetically distinguishable steps. Images PMID:6587363

  14. Mating type gene (MAT1-1) in Japanese isolates of Trichophyton rubrum.

    PubMed

    Kano, Rui; Isizuka, Maiko; Hiruma, Masataro; Mochizuki, Takashi; Kamata, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2013-02-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is an anthropophilic species that is the most frequent etiologic agent of human dermatophytosis throughout the world. No teleomorph has been identified for T. rubrum strains. This study used PCR analysis to confirm the presence of a mating type locus in the genome of Japanese isolates of T. rubrum. To clarify the epidemiological and ecological characteristics of this fungus, mating type sequences were tested for correlation of MAT genotype to mating type. This study examined clinical isolates of T. rubrum that had been obtained from 206 human cases of tinea pedis and tinea unguium in Japan, including those from Fukuoka (29 strains), Gifu (23 strains), Kanazawa (63 strains), and Tokyo (91 strains), along with 10 isolates derived from 10 cases of canine dermatophytosis. PCR detected the presence of MAT1-1 in all of the human and animal isolates. Therefore, all isolates examined were expected to react as (-) type on the mating test and not as (+) type.

  15. Occurrence and Distribution of Mating Types of Pseudoperonospora cubensis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anna; Carbone, Ignazio; Cohen, Yigal; Ojiambo, Peter S

    2017-03-01

    During the past two decades, a resurgence of cucurbit downy mildew has occurred around the world, resulting in severe disease epidemics. In the United States, resurgence of the disease occurred in 2004 and several hypotheses, including introduction of a new genetic recombinant or pathotype of the pathogen, have been suggested as potential causes for this resurgence. Occurrence and distribution of mating types of Pseudoperonospora cubensis in the United States were investigated using 40 isolates collected from cucurbits across 11 states from 2005 to 2013. Pairing of unknown isolates with known mating-type tester strains on detached leaves of cantaloupe or cucumber resulted in oospore formation 8 to 10 days after inoculation. Isolates differed in their ability to form oospores across all coinoculation pairings, with oospore numbers ranging from 280 to 1,000 oospores/cm(2) of leaf tissue. Oospores were hyaline to golden-yellow, spherical, and approximately 36 μm in diameter. Of the 40 isolates tested, 24 were found to be of the A1 mating type, while 16 were of the A2 mating type. Mating type was significantly (P < 0.0001) associated with host type, whereby all isolates collected from cucumber were of the A1 mating type, while isolates from squash and watermelon were of the A2 mating type. Similarly, mating type was significantly (P = 0.0287) associated with geographical region, where isolates from northern-tier states of Michigan, New Jersey, New York, and Ohio were all A1, while isolates belonging to either A1 or A2 mating type were present in equal proportions in southern-tier states of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas. Viability assays showed that oospores were viable and, on average, approximately 40% of the oospores produced were viable as determined by the plasmolysis method. This study showed that A1 and A2 mating types of P. cubensis are present and the pathogen could potentially reproduce sexually in cucurbits within the

  16. Gene activation by copy transposition in mating-type switching of a homothallic fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Egel, R; Gutz, H

    1981-04-01

    Mating-type switching in homothallic clones of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, appears to follow the same route as previously found for "mutations" from homothallism to heterothallic ⊕ strains. A copy of mat2-P is transposed to and inserted at mat1, where it functionally replaces the mat1-M allele, and only the mat1 segment is expressed (!) to determine the actual mating type: mat1-M(!) mat2-P = ⊖ ⇌ ⊕ = mat1-P(!) mat2-P. This phenomenon has hitherto been concealed by the high switch-back rate from ⊕ to ⊖ observed in homothallic wild-type strains. It only becomes apparent in the presence of mutant "switching genes", which retard the rates of mating-type interconversion and temporarily freeze one or the other state of gene activation at the mat1 segment. Mutations to lowered rates of switching are found to map both inside and outside the mating-type locus. While the internal mutations of this kind exert their effect autonomously in the cis-configuration, the unlinked mutations are recessive to their wild-type alleles.

  17. Comparative analysis of the mating-type loci from Neurospora crassa and Sordaria macrospora: identification of novel transcribed ORFs.

    PubMed

    Pöggeler, S; Kück, U

    2000-03-01

    The mating-type locus controls mating and sexual development in filamentous ascomycetes. In the heterothallic ascomycete Neurospora crassa, the genes that confer mating behavior comprise dissimilar DNA sequences (idiomorphs) in the mat a and mat A mating partners. In the homothallic fungus Sordaria macrospora, sequences corresponding to both idiomorphs are located contiguously in the mating-type locus, which contains one chimeric gene, Smt A-3, that includes sequences which are similar to sequences found at the mat A and mat a mating-type idiomorphs in N. crassa. In this study, we describe the comparative transcriptional analysis of the chimeric mating-type region of S. macrospora and the corresponding region of the N. crassa mat a idiomorph. By means of RT-PCR experiments, we identified novel intervening sequences in the mating-type loci of both ascomycetes and, hence, concluded that an additional ORF, encoding a putative polypeptide of 79 amino acids, is present in the N. crassa mat a idiomorph. Furthermore, our analysis revealed co-transcription of the novel gene with the mat a-1 gene in N. crassa. The same mode of transcription was found in the corresponding mating-type region of S. macrospora, where the chimeric Smt A-3 gene is co-transcribed with the mat a-specific Smt a-1 gene. Analysis of a Smt A-3 cDNA revealed optional splicing of two introns. We believe that this is the first report of co-transcription of protein-encoding nuclear genes in filamentous fungi. Possible functions of the novel ORFs in regulating mating-type gene expression are discussed.

  18. Mating type loci of Sporisorium reilianum: novel pattern with three a and multiple b specificities.

    PubMed

    Schirawski, Jan; Heinze, Bernadette; Wagenknecht, Martin; Kahmann, Regine

    2005-08-01

    Sporisorium reilianum and Ustilago maydis are two closely related smut fungi, which both infect maize but differ fundamentally in their mode of plant invasion and site of symptom development. As a prelude to studying the molecular basis of these differences, we have characterized the mating type loci of S. reilianum. S. reilianum has two unlinked mating type loci, a and b. Genes in both loci and adjacent regions show a high degree of synteny to the corresponding genes of U. maydis. The b locus occurs in at least five alleles and encodes two subunits of a heterodimeric homeodomain transcription factor, while the a locus encodes a pheromone/receptor system. However, in contrast to that of U. maydis, the a locus of S. reilianum exists in three alleles containing two active pheromone genes each. The alleles of the a locus appear to have arisen through recent recombination events within the locus itself. This has created a situation where each pheromone is specific for recognition by only one mating partner.

  19. Mating Type Loci of Sporisorium reilianum: Novel Pattern with Three a and Multiple b Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Schirawski, Jan; Heinze, Bernadette; Wagenknecht, Martin; Kahmann, Regine

    2005-01-01

    Sporisorium reilianum and Ustilago maydis are two closely related smut fungi, which both infect maize but differ fundamentally in their mode of plant invasion and site of symptom development. As a prelude to studying the molecular basis of these differences, we have characterized the mating type loci of S. reilianum. S. reilianum has two unlinked mating type loci, a and b. Genes in both loci and adjacent regions show a high degree of synteny to the corresponding genes of U. maydis. The b locus occurs in at least five alleles and encodes two subunits of a heterodimeric homeodomain transcription factor, while the a locus encodes a pheromone/receptor system. However, in contrast to that of U. maydis, the a locus of S. reilianum exists in three alleles containing two active pheromone genes each. The alleles of the a locus appear to have arisen through recent recombination events within the locus itself. This has created a situation where each pheromone is specific for recognition by only one mating partner. PMID:16087737

  20. Mating types and sexual development in filamentous ascomycetes.

    PubMed Central

    Coppin, E; Debuchy, R; Arnaise, S; Picard, M

    1997-01-01

    The progress made in the molecular characterization of the mating types in several filamentous ascomycetes has allowed us to better understand their role in sexual development and has brought to light interesting biological problems. The mating types of Neurospora crassa, Podospora anserina, and Cochliobolus heterostrophus consist of unrelated and unique sequences containing one or several genes with multiple functions, related to sexuality or not, such as vegetative incompatibility in N. crassa. The presence of putative DNA binding domains in the proteins encoded by the mating-type (mat) genes suggests that they may be transcriptional factors. The mat genes play a role in cell-cell recognition at fertilization, probably by activating the genes responsible for the hormonal signal whose occurrence was previously demonstrated by physiological experiments. They also control recognition between nuclei at a later stage, when reproductive nuclei of each mating type which have divided in the common cytoplasm pair within the ascogenous hyphae. How self is distinguished from nonself at the nuclear level is not known. The finding that homothallic species, able to mate in the absence of a partner, contain both mating types in the same haploid genome has raised more issues than it has resolved. The instability of the mating type, in particular in Sclerotinia trifolorium and Botrytinia fuckeliana, is also unexplained. This diversity of mating systems, still more apparent if the yeasts and the basidiomycetes are taken into account, clearly shows that no single species can serve as a universal mating-type model. PMID:9409146

  1. Comparative Genomics of the Mating-Type Loci of the Mushroom Flammulina velutipes Reveals Widespread Synteny and Recent Inversions

    PubMed Central

    van Peer, Arend F.; Park, Soon-Young; Shin, Pyung-Gyun; Jang, Kab-Yeul; Yoo, Young-Bok; Park, Young-Jin; Lee, Byoung-Moo; Sung, Gi-Ho; James, Timothy Y.; Kong, Won-Sik

    2011-01-01

    Background Mating-type loci of mushroom fungi contain master regulatory genes that control recognition between compatible nuclei, maintenance of compatible nuclei as heterokaryons, and fruiting body development. Regions near mating-type loci in fungi often show adapted recombination, facilitating the generation of novel mating types and reducing the production of self-compatible mating types. Compared to other fungi, mushroom fungi have complex mating-type systems, showing both loci with redundant function (subloci) and subloci with many alleles. The genomic organization of mating-type loci has been solved in very few mushroom species, which complicates proper interpretation of mating-type evolution and use of those genes in breeding programs. Methodology/Principal Findings We report a complete genetic structure of the mating-type loci from the tetrapolar, edible mushroom Flammulina velutipes mating type A3B3. Two matB3 subloci, matB3a that contains a unique pheromone and matB3b, were mapped 177 Kb apart on scaffold 1. The matA locus of F. velutipes contains three homeodomain genes distributed over 73 Kb distant matA3a and matA3b subloci. The conserved matA region in Agaricales approaches 350 Kb and contains conserved recombination hotspots showing major rearrangements in F. velutipes and Schizophyllum commune. Important evolutionary differences were indicated; separation of the matA subloci in F. velutipes was diverged from the Coprinopsis cinerea arrangement via two large inversions whereas separation in S. commune emerged through transposition of gene clusters. Conclusions/Significance In our study we determined that the Agaricales have very large scale synteny at matA (∼350 Kb) and that this synteny is maintained even when parts of this region are separated through chromosomal rearrangements. Four conserved recombination hotspots allow reshuffling of large fragments of this region. Next to this, it was revealed that large distance subloci can exist in matB as

  2. Transient inhibition of histone deacetylase activity overcomes silencing in the mating-type region in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Olsson, T G; Silverstein, R A; Ekwall, K; Sunnerhagen, P

    1999-03-01

    We have investigated the effects of inhibition of histone de-acetylase activity on silencing at the silent mating-type loci in fission yeast. Treatment of exponentially growing cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), resulted in derepression of a marker gene inserted 150 bp distal from the silent mat3-M locus. The natural targets for the silencing mechanism in this region were only partially derepressed and the activation appeared to be asymmetric, i.e. the mat2-P cassette remained silent at concentrations that clearly partially derepressed the mat3-M cassette. We further noted that treatment of wild-type h90 cells resulted in the generation of altered sporulation phenotypes, indicating that the treatment affected the expression of mating-type genes and/or mating-type switching. The results are discussed in the light of recent accumulated data regarding the role of deacetylation for silencing in other species.

  3. Altered Mating-Type Identity in the Fungus Podospora Anserina Leads to Selfish Nuclei, Uniparental Progeny, and Haploid Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zickler, D.; Arnaise, S.; Coppin, E.; Debuchy, R.; Picard, M.

    1995-01-01

    In wild-type crosses of the filamentous ascomycete Podospora anserina, after fertilization, only nuclei of opposite mating type can form dikaryons that undergo karyogamy and meiosis, producing biparental progeny. To determine the role played by the mating type in these steps, the four mat genes were mutagenized in vitro and introduced into a strain deleted for its mat locus. Genetic and cytological analyses of these mutant strains, crossed to each other and to wild type, showed that mating-type information is required for recognition of nuclear identity during the early steps of sexual reproduction. In crosses with strains carrying a mating-type mutation, two unusual developmental patterns were observed: monokaryotic cells, resulting in haploid meiosis, and uniparental dikaryotic cells providing, after karyogamy and meiosis, a uniparental progeny. Altered mating-type identity leads to selfish behavior of the mutant nucleus: it migrates alone or paired, ignoring its wild-type partner in all mutant X wild-type crosses. This behavior is nucleus-autonomous because, in the same cytoplasm, the wild-type nuclei form only biparental dikaryons. In P. anserina, mat genes are thus required to ensure a biparental dikaryotic state but appear dispensable for later stages, such as meiosis and sporulation. PMID:7498731

  4. Chromosome-refolding model of mating-type switching in yeast.

    PubMed

    Avşaroğlu, Barış; Bronk, Gabriel; Li, Kevin; Haber, James E; Kondev, Jane

    2016-10-24

    Chromosomes are folded into cells in a nonrandom fashion, with particular genetic loci occupying distinct spatial regions. This observation raises the question of whether the spatial organization of a chromosome governs its functions, such as recombination or transcription. We consider this general question in the specific context of mating-type switching in budding yeast, which is a model system for homologous recombination. Mating-type switching is induced by a DNA double-strand break (DSB) at the MAT locus on chromosome III, followed by homologous recombination between the cut MAT locus and one of two donor loci (HMLα and HMRa), located on the same chromosome. Previous studies have suggested that in MATa cells after the DSB is induced chromosome III undergoes refolding, which directs the MAT locus to recombine with HMLα. Here, we propose a quantitative model of mating-type switching predicated on the assumption of DSB-induced chromosome refolding, which also takes into account the previously measured stochastic dynamics and polymer nature of yeast chromosomes. Using quantitative fluorescence microscopy, we measure changes in the distance between the donor (HMLα) and MAT loci after the DSB and find agreement with the theory. Predictions of the theory also agree with measurements of changes in the use of HMLα as the donor, when we perturb the refolding of chromosome III. These results establish refolding of yeast chromosome III as a key driving force in MAT switching and provide an example of a cell regulating the spatial organization of its chromosome so as to direct homology search during recombination.

  5. Schizosaccharomyces pombe switches mating type by the synthesis-dependent strand-annealing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Klar, Amar J S; Dalgaard, Jacob Z

    2007-09-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells can switch between two mating types, plus (P) and minus (M). The change in cell type occurs due to a replication-coupled recombination event that transfers genetic information from one of the silent-donor loci, mat2P or mat3M, into the expressed mating-type determining mat1 locus. The mat1 locus can as a consequence contain DNA encoding either P or M information. A molecular mechanism, known as synthesis-dependent strand annealing, has been proposed for the underlying recombination event. A key feature of this model is that only one DNA strand of the donor locus provides the information that is copied into the mat1. Here we test the model by constructing strains that switch using two different mutant P cassettes introduced at the donor loci, mat2 and mat3. We show that in such strains wild-type P-cassette DNA is efficiently generated at mat1 through heteroduplex DNA formation and repair. The present data provide an in vivo genetic test of the proposed molecular recombination mechanism.

  6. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Switches Mating Type by the Synthesis-Dependent Strand-Annealing Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Klar, Amar J. S.; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.

    2007-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells can switch between two mating types, plus (P) and minus (M). The change in cell type occurs due to a replication-coupled recombination event that transfers genetic information from one of the silent-donor loci, mat2P or mat3M, into the expressed mating-type determining mat1 locus. The mat1 locus can as a consequence contain DNA encoding either P or M information. A molecular mechanism, known as synthesis-dependent strand annealing, has been proposed for the underlying recombination event. A key feature of this model is that only one DNA strand of the donor locus provides the information that is copied into the mat1. Here we test the model by constructing strains that switch using two different mutant P cassettes introduced at the donor loci, mat2 and mat3. We show that in such strains wild-type P-cassette DNA is efficiently generated at mat1 through heteroduplex DNA formation and repair. The present data provide an in vivo genetic test of the proposed molecular recombination mechanism. PMID:17660548

  7. Conservation of the b mating-type gene complex among bipolar and tetrapolar smut fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Bakkeren, G; Kronstad, J W

    1993-01-01

    In the phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago hordei, one locus with two alternate alleles, MAT-1 and MAT-2, controls mating and the establishment of the infectious dikaryon (bipolar mating). In contrast, for U. maydis, these functions are associated with two different gene complexes, called a and b (tetrapolar mating); the a complex has two alternate specificities, and the b gene complex is multiallelic. We have found homologs for the b gene complex in U. hordei and have cloned one from each mating type using sequences from one bEast allele of U. maydis as a probe. Sequence analysis revealed two divergent open reading frames in each b complex, which we called bW (bWest) and bE (bEast) in analogy with the b gene complex of U. maydis. The predicted bW and bE gene products from the two different mating types showed approximately 75% identity when homologous polypeptides were compared. All of the characterized bW and bE gene products have variable amino-terminal regions, conserved carboxy-terminal regions, and similar homeodomain motifs. Sequence comparisons with the bW1 and bE1 genes of U. maydis showed conservation in organization and structure. Transformation of the U. hordei b gene complex into a U. hordei strain of opposite mating type showed that the b genes from the two mating types are functional alleles. The U. hordei b genes, when introduced into U. maydis, rendered the haploid transformants weakly pathogenic on maize. These results indicate that structurally and functionally conserved b genes are present in U. hordei. PMID:8439742

  8. Odd mating-type substances may work as precursor molecules of even mating-type substances in Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Kumakura, M; Kaku, E; Takahashi, M

    2001-01-01

    Mating-type substances are key molecules in the sexual recognition of the odd (O) and even (E) complementary mating-type cells in Paramecium caudatum. Indirect evidence suggested that the substances were proteins and were located on ventral surface cilia. Monoclonal antibodies inhibiting the mating reactivity of the O cells have been obtained. Using these antibodies, we tried to detect antigen molecules as dot-blot signals. Strong dot-blot signals of antigens were only detected from the mating reactive cells, but they were not detected from the well-fed and starved cells without mating reactivity. In addition to identifying the antigen on cilia and cytoplasm of the O cell, the antigen was detected from the cytoplasm of the E cells but never from their cilia. Furthermore, extracts of the E cells induced mating reaction with the living E cells but not with O cells. Thus, the O mating-type substances exist in the cytoplasm of the E mating-type cells, supporting strongly the hypothesis that O mating-type substances are precursor molecules of the E mating-type substances.

  9. Directionality of Fission Yeast Mating-Type Interconversion Is Controlled by the Location of the Donor Loci

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Klar, AJS.

    1993-01-01

    Cells of homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe efficiently switch between two mating types called P and M. The phenotypic switches are due to conversion of the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) by two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P and mat3-M, that contain unexpressed information for the P and M mating types, respectively. In this process, switching-competent cells switch to the opposite mating type in 72-90% of the cell divisions. Hence, mat2-P is a preferred donor of information to mat1 in M cells, whereas mat3-M is a preferred donor in P cells. We investigated the reason for the donor preference by constructing a strain in which the genetic contents of the donor loci were swapped. We found that switching to the opposite mating type was very inefficient in that strain. This shows that the location of the silent cassettes in the chromosome, rather than their content, is the deciding factor for recognition of the donor for each cell type. We propose a model in which switching is achieved by regulating accessibility of the donor loci, perhaps by changing the chromatin structure in the mating-type region, thus promoting an intrachromosomal folding of mat2 or mat3 onto mat1 in a cell type-specific fashion. We also present evidence for the involvement of the Swi6 and Swi6-mod trans-acting factors in the donor-choice mechanism. We suggest that these factors participate in forming the proposed folded structure. PMID:8375648

  10. Directionality of fission yeast mating-type interconversion is controlled by the location of the donor loci.

    PubMed

    Thon, G; Klar, A J

    1993-08-01

    Cells of homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe efficiently switch between two mating types called P and M. The phenotypic switches are due to conversion of the expressed mating-type locus (mat1) by two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P and mat3-M, that contain unexpressed information for the P and M mating types, respectively. In this process, switching-competent cells switch to the opposite mating type in 72-90% of the cell divisions. Hence, mat2-P is a preferred donor of information to mat1 in M cells, whereas mat3-M is a preferred donor in P cells. We investigated the reason for the donor preference by constructing a strain in which the genetic contents of the donor loci were swapped. We found that switching to the opposite mating type was very inefficient in that strain. This shows that the location of the silent cassettes in the chromosome, rather than their content, is the deciding factor for recognition of the donor for each cell type. We propose a model in which switching is achieved by regulating accessibility of the donor loci, perhaps by changing the chromatin structure in the mating-type region, thus promoting an intrachromosomal folding of mat2 or mat3 onto mat1 in a cell type-specific fashion. We also present evidence for the involvement of the Swi6 and Swi6-mod trans-acting factors in the donor-choice mechanism. We suggest that these factors participate in forming the proposed folded structure.

  11. Advances in Understanding Mating Type Gene Organization in the Mushroom-Forming Fungus Flammulina velutipes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lian, Lingdan; Xu, Ping; Chou, Tiansheng; Mukhtar, Irum; Osakina, Aron; Waqas, Muhammad; Chen, Bingzhi; Liu, Xinrui; Liu, Fang; Xie, Baogui; van Peer, Arend F.

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of sexual development in the important edible and medicinal mushroom Flammulina velutipes is controlled by special genes at two different, independent, mating type (MAT) loci: HD and PR. We expanded our understanding of the F. velutipes mating type system by analyzing the MAT loci from a series of strains. The HD locus of F. velutipes houses homeodomain genes (Hd genes) on two separated locations: sublocus HD-a and HD-b. The HD-b subloci contained strain-specific Hd1/Hd2 gene pairs, and crosses between strains with different HD-b subloci indicated a role in mating. The function of the HD-a sublocus remained undecided. Many, but not all strains contained the same conserved Hd2 gene at the HD-a sublocus. The HD locus usually segregated as a whole, though we did detect one new HD locus with a HD-a sublocus from one parental strain, and a HD-b sublocus from the other. The PR locus of F. velutipes contained pheromone receptor (STE3) and pheromone precursor (Pp) genes at two locations, sublocus PR-a and PR-b. PR-a and PR-b both contained sets of strain-specific STE3 and Pp genes, indicating a role in mating. PR-a and PR-b cosegregated in our experiments. However, the identification of additional strains with identical PR-a, yet different PR-b subloci, demonstrated that PR subloci can recombine within the PR locus. In conclusion, at least three of the four MAT subloci seem to participate in mating, and new HD and PR loci can be generated through intralocus recombination in F. velutipes. PMID:27621376

  12. Evolutionary erosion of yeast sex chromosomes by mating-type switching accidents

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jonathan L.; Armisén, David; Proux-Wéra, Estelle; ÓhÉigeartaigh, Seán S.; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate yeast sex chromosome evolution by comparing genome sequences from 16 species in the family Saccharomycetaceae, including data from genera Tetrapisispora, Kazachstania, Naumovozyma, and Torulaspora. We show that although most yeast species contain a mating-type (MAT) locus and silent HML and HMR loci structurally analogous to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, their detailed organization is highly variable and indicates that the MAT locus is a deletion hotspot. Over evolutionary time, chromosomal genes located immediately beside MAT have continually been deleted, truncated, or transposed to other places in the genome in a process that is gradually shortening the distance between MAT and HML. Each time a gene beside MAT is removed by deletion or transposition, the next gene on the chromosome is brought into proximity with MAT and is in turn put at risk for removal. This process has also continually replaced the triplicated sequence regions, called Z and X, that allow HML and HMR to be used as templates for DNA repair at MAT during mating-type switching. We propose that the deletion and transposition events are caused by evolutionary accidents during mating-type switching, combined with natural selection to keep MAT and HML on the same chromosome. The rate of deletion accelerated greatly after whole-genome duplication, probably because genes were redundant and could be deleted without requiring transposition. We suggest that, despite its mutational cost, switching confers an evolutionary benefit by providing a way for an isolated germinating spore to reform spores if the environment is too poor. PMID:22123960

  13. Structures of the Mating-Type Loci of Cordyceps takaomontana

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Eiji; Yamagishi, Kenzo; Hara, Akira

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the mating-type loci MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 of Cordyceps takaomontana were determined, which is the first such report for the clavicipitaceous fungi. MAT1-1 contains two mating-type genes, MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-2, but MAT1-1-3 could not be found. On the other hand, MAT1-2 has MAT1-2-1. A pseudogene of MAT1-1-1 is located next to MAT1-2. PMID:12902305

  14. Trans-acting factors and properly positioned DNA elements repress mating-type genes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ekwall, K; Olsson, T; Ruusala, T

    1992-04-01

    Repression of the mating-type P genes at the silent mat2-P locus in fission yeast is dependent on four cis-acting DNA elements, two on each side of the coding sequences. The mechanism by which these elements exert their influence on the mating-type promoter is studied here by insertion of a bacterial antibiotic resistance gene at several positions in the silent region. The behavior of the resistance gene itself, and the changes its insertion causes in mating-type expression, reveal that the repressive elements have a limited range of action and that the four elements have unequal effects on gene expression. Repression of the antibiotic resistance gene inside the silent region leads to an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype and facilitates the selection of resistant mutants. These mutants can de-repress the resistance gene at other positions than the one used for their selection. Strong antibiotic resistance correlates with derepression of the plasmid-borne mating-type cassette. These data argue that mat2-P repression is dependent on trans-acting factors and the positioning of the repressive DNA elements, but less dependent on the nature of the affected promoter.

  15. What uses are mating types? The "developmental switch" model.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Nicolas

    2012-04-01

    Why mating types exist at all is subject to much debate. Among hypotheses, mating types evolved to control organelle transmission during sexual reproduction, or to prevent inbreeding or same-clone mating. Here I review data from a diversity of taxa (including ciliates, algae, slime molds, ascomycetes, and basidiomycetes) to show that the structure and function of mating types run counter the above hypotheses. I argue instead for a key role in triggering developmental switches. Genomes must fulfill a diversity of alternative programs along the sexual cycle. As a haploid gametophyte, an individual may grow vegetatively (through haploid mitoses), or initiate gametogenesis and mating. As a diploid sporophyte, similarly, it may grow vegetatively (through diploid mitoses) or initiate meiosis and sporulation. Only diploid sporophytes (and not haploid gametophytes) should switch on the meiotic program. Similarly, only haploid gametophytes (not sporophytes) should switch on gametogenesis and mating. And they should only do so when other gametophytes are ready to do the same in the neighborhood. As argued here, mating types have evolved primarily to switch on the right program at the right moment.

  16. Sequence diversity of mating-type genes in Phaeosphaeria avenaria.

    PubMed

    Ueng, Peter P; Dai, Qun; Cui, Kai-rong; Czembor, Paweł C; Cunfer, Barry M; Tsang, H; Arseniuk, Edward; Bergstrom, Gary C

    2003-05-01

    Phaeosphaeria avenaria, one of the causal agents of stagonospora leaf blotch diseases in cereals, is composed of two subspecies, P. avenaria f. sp. triticea (Pat) and P. avenaria f. sp. avenaria (Paa). The Pat subspecies was grouped into Pat1-Pat3, based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences in previous studies. Mating-type genes and their potential use in phylogeny and molecular classification were studied by DNA hybridization and PCR amplification. The majority of Pat1 isolates reported to be homothallic and producing sexual reproduction structures on cultural media had only the MAT1-1 gene. Minor sequence variations were found in the conserved region of MAT1-1 gene in Pat1 isolates. However, both mating-type genes, MAT1-1 and MAT1-2, were identified in P. avenaria isolates represented by ATCC12277 from oats (Paa) and the Pat2 isolates from foxtail barley ( Hordeum jubatum L.). Cluster analyses based on mating-type gene conserved regions revealed that cereal Phaeosphaeria is not phylogenetically closely related to other ascomycetes, including Mycosphaerella graminicola (anamorph Septoria tritici). The sequence diversity of mating-type genes in Pat and Paa supports our previous phylogenetic relationship and molecular classification based on RFLP fingerprinting and rDNA ITS sequences.

  17. Mating-type genes and MAT switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2012-05-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break.

  18. Mating-Type Genes and MAT Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Haber, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break. PMID:22555442

  19. Fifty years of research on serotypes and mating types in Dileptus anser: A review.

    PubMed

    Uspenskaya, Zoya I; Yudin, Alexander L

    2016-04-01

    The ciliate Dileptus anser is increasingly used as a laboratory model not only in protozoological research sensu stricto, but also in general biology. However, genetic studies of this ciliate have never been carried out, and this species is new to the comparative genetics of ciliates. This review describes the genetic experiments conducted at the Institute of Cytology of the Russian Academy of Sciences for the last 50 years. Two characters that are classical for the genetics of ciliates, serotypes and mating types were selected for analysis. The results presented do not fit into conventional genetic schemes and may have epigenetic nature. Features of this model that were revealed earlier (the simplest possible system of multiple mating types, full serial dominance of the alleles in the mat locus, the excretion of pheromones, etc.) are promising with regard to interesting comparisons of breeding systems in ciliates. The results obtained in studies of mating pheromones in D. anser have demonstrated that this model is a perspective one for further exploration of intercellular recognition in lower eukaryotes and of other related issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Orientation of DNA replication establishes mating-type switching pattern in S. pombe.

    PubMed

    Dalgaard, J Z; Klar, A J

    1999-07-08

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe normally has haploid cells of two mating types, which differ at the chromosomal locus mat1. After two consecutive asymmetric cell divisions, only one in four 'grand-daughter' cells undergoes a 'mating-type switch', in which genetic information is transferred to mat1 from the mat2-P or mat3-M donor loci. This switching pattern probably results from an imprinting event at mat1 that marks one sister chromatid in a strand-specific manner, and is related to a site-specific, double-stranded DNA break at mat1. Here we show that the genetic imprint is a strand-specific, alkali-labile DNA modification at mat1. The DNA break is an artefact, created from the imprint during DNA purification. We also propose and test the model that mat1 is preferentially replicated by a centromere-distal origin(s), so that the strand-specific imprint occurs only during lagging-strand synthesis. Altering the origin of replication, by inverting mat1 or introducing an origin of replication, affects the imprinting and switching efficiencies in predicted ways. Two-dimensional gel analysis confirmed that mat1 is preferentially replicated by a centromere-distal origin(s). Thus, the DNA replication machinery may confer different developmental potential to sister cells.

  1. Relationship between Monokaryotic Growth Rate and Mating Type in the Edible Basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Larraya, Luis M.; Pérez, Gúmer; Iribarren, Iñaki; Blanco, Juan A.; Alfonso, Mikel; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Ramírez, Lucía

    2001-01-01

    The edible fungus Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) is an industrially produced heterothallic homobasidiomycete whose mating is controlled by a bifactorial tetrapolar genetic system. Two mating loci (matA and matB) control different steps of hyphal fusion, nuclear migration, and nuclear sorting during the onset and progress of the dikaryotic growth. Previous studies have shown that the segregation of the alleles present at the matB locus differs from that expected for a single locus because (i) new nonparental B alleles appeared in the progeny and (ii) there was a distortion in the segregation of the genomic regions close to this mating locus. In this study, we pursued these observations by using a genetic approach based on the identification of molecular markers linked to the matB locus that allowed us to dissect it into two genetically linked subunits (matBα and matBβ) and to correlate the presence of specific matBα and matA alleles with differences in monokaryotic growth rate. The availability of these molecular markers and the mating type dependence of growth rate in monokaryons can be helpful for marker-assisted selection of fast-growing monokaryons to be used in the construction of dikaryons able to colonize the substrate faster than the competitors responsible for reductions in the industrial yield of this fungus. PMID:11472908

  2. Gametogenesis in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii minus mating type is controlled by two genes, MID and MTD1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huawen; Goodenough, Ursula W

    2007-06-01

    In the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the plus and minus mating types are controlled by a complex locus, MT, where the dominant MID gene in the MT(-) locus has been shown to be necessary for expression of minus-specific gamete-specific genes in response to nitrogen depletion. We report studies on MID expression patterns during gametogenesis and on a second gene unique to the MT(-) locus, MTD1. Vegetative cells express basal levels of MID. An early activation of MID transcription after nitrogen removal, and its sequence similarity to plant RWP-RK proteins involved in nitrogen-responsive processes, suggest that Mid conformation/activity may be nitrogen sensitive. A second stage of MID upregulation correlates with the acquisition of mating ability in minus gametes. Knockdown of MTD1 by RNAi in minus strains results in a failure to differentiate into gametes of either mating type after nitrogen deprivation. We propose that intermediate Mid levels are sufficient to activate MTD1 transcription and to repress plus gamete-specific genes and that MTD1 expression in turn allows the threshold-level MID expression needed to turn on minus gamete-specific genes. We further propose that an MTD1-equivalent system, utilizing at least one gene product encoded in the MT(+) locus, is operant during plus gametogenesis.

  3. Genetic diversity of the mating type and toxin production genes in Pyrenophora tritici-repentis.

    PubMed

    Lepoint, P; Renard, M-E; Legrève, A; Duveiller, E; Maraite, H

    2010-05-01

    Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, the causal agent of tan spot on wheat, is a homothallic loculoascomycete with a complex race structure. The objectives of this study were to confirm the homothallic nature of the pathogen, characterize mating type diversity and toxin production genes in a global collection of strains, and analyze how these traits are associated between each other and with existing races. The pseudothecia production capacity, race identification, mating type locus (MAT), internal transcribed spacer, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase regions were analyzed in a selection of 88 strains originating from Europe, North and South America, North Africa, and Central and South Asia. Some (60%) strains produced pseudothecia containing ascospores, independent of their origin. Race identification obtained using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction targeting host-selective toxin (HST) genes was consistent, overall, with the results based on the inoculation of a set of differential wheat cultivars and confirmed the predominance of race 1/2 strains ( approximately 83%). However, discrepancies in race identification, differences from the reference tester strains, and atypical ToxA profiles suggest the presence of new races and HSTs. The MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 coding regions are consecutively arranged in a single individual, suggesting putative heterothallic origin of P. tritici-repentis. Upstream from the MAT is an open reading frame of unknown function (ORF1) containing a MAT-specific degenerate carboxy-terminus. The phylogenetic analysis of the MAT locus reveals two distinct groups, unlinked to geographical origin or ToxA profile. Group I, the best-represented group, is associated with typical tan spot lesions caused by races 1, 2, 3, and 5 on wheat. It is more homogenous than group II encompassing race 4 strains, as well as isolates associated primarily with small spot lesions on wheat leaves or other hosts. Group II could contain several distinct taxa.

  4. Mating types in Paramecium and a molecular approach to their determination.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Mating types are expressed in ciliates for the duration of the mature period of their clonal cycle. During cell conjugation the reciprocal fertilization of complementary mating types takes place. Models of mating type determination in the Paramecium aurelia species complex based on classical genetics are reviewed including molecular aspects of the studies.

  5. Primers for mating-type diagnosis in Diaporthe and Phomopsis: their use in teleomorph induction in vitro and biological species definition.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jorge M; Correia, Viviana G; Phillips, Alan J L

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in ascomycete fungi is governed by the mating-type (MAT) locus. The MAT loci of Diaporthe and its Phomopsis anamorphs differ in only one gene: MAT1-1-1 in mating-type MAT1-1 and MAT1-2-1 in mating-type MAT1-2. In order to diagnose mating-types in Diaporthe and Phomopsis and evaluate their usefulness in teleomorph induction in vitro and biological species delimitation, we designed primers that amplify part of the MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 genes. MAT phylogenies were generated and compared with ITS and EF1-α phylograms. Species recognised in the EF1-α phylogeny corresponded directly with those determined in the MAT phylogenies. ITS was shown to be highly variable resulting in a large number of phylogenetic species that were discordant with MAT and EF1-α species. Mating experiments were conducted to evaluate the existence of reproductive barriers between some isolates, and their anamorphic morphologies were compared. The primers proved to be useful in the mating-type diagnosis of isolates, selection of compatible mating pairs, and in the assessment of biological species boundaries. Copyright © 2010 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mating-type Gene Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Haber, James E

    2015-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two alternative mating types designated MATa and MATα. These are distinguished by about 700 bp of unique sequences, Ya or Yα, including divergent promoter sequences and part of the open reading frames of genes that regulate mating phenotype. Homothallic budding yeast, carrying an active HO endonuclease gene, HO, can switch mating type through a recombination process known as gene conversion, in which a site-specific double-strand break (DSB) created immediately adjacent to the Y region results in replacement of the Y sequences with a copy of the opposite mating type information, which is harbored in one of two heterochromatic donor loci, HMLα or HMRa. HO gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that only half of the cells in a lineage switch to the opposite MAT allele, thus promoting conjugation and diploid formation. Study of the silencing of these loci has provided a great deal of information about the role of the Sir2 histone deacetylase and its associated Sir3 and Sir4 proteins in creating heterochromatic regions. MAT switching has been examined in great detail to learn about the steps in homologous recombination. MAT switching is remarkably directional, with MATa recombining preferentially with HMLα and MATα using HMRa. Donor preference is controlled by a cis-acting recombination enhancer located near HML. RE is turned off in MATα cells but in MATa binds multiple copies of the Fkh1 transcription factor whose forkhead-associated phosphothreonine binding domain localizes at the DSB, bringing HML into conjunction with MATa.

  7. The fission yeast homologue of CENP-B, Abp1, regulates directionality of mating-type switching

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Marsellach, Francesc-Xavier; Azorín, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    In fission yeast, mating-type switching involves replacing genetic information contained at the expressed mat1 locus by that of either the mat2P or mat3M donor loci. Donor selection is nonrandom, as mat1P cells preferentially use mat3M for switching, whereas mat1M cells use mat2P. Switching directionality is determined by the cell-type-specific distribution of the Swi2–Swi5 complex that, in mat1P cells, localises to mat3M and, only in mat1M cells, spreads to mat2P in a heterochromatin-dependent manner. Mechanisms regulating spreading of Swi2–Swi5 across heterochromatin are not fully understood. Here, we show that the fission yeast homologue of CENP-B, Abp1, binds to the silent domain of the mating-type locus and regulates directionality of switching. Deletion of abp1 prevents utilisation of mat2P, as when heterochromatin is disrupted and spreading of Swi2–Swi5 is impaired. Our results show that, indeed, deletion of abp1 abolishes spreading of Swi2–Swi5 to mat2P. However, in abp1Δ cells, heterochromatin organisation at the mating-type locus is preserved, indicating that Abp1 is actually required for efficient spreading of Swi2–Swi5 through heterochromatin. Cbh1 and Cbh2, which are also homologous to CENP-B, have only a minor contribution to the regulation of directionality of switching, which is in contrast with the strong effects observed for Abp1. PMID:18354497

  8. Evolution of Mating Systems in Basidiomycetes and the Genetic Architecture Underlying Mating-Type Determination in the Yeast Leucosporidium scottii

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Teresa M.; Lopes, Susana T.; Almeida, João M. G. C. F.; Rosa, Luiz H.; Sampaio, José Paulo; Gonçalves, Paula; Coelho, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    In most fungi, sexual reproduction is bipolar; that is, two alternate sets of genes at a single mating-type (MAT) locus determine two mating types. However, in the Basidiomycota, a unique (tetrapolar) reproductive system emerged in which sexual identity is governed by two unlinked MAT loci, each of which controls independent mechanisms of self/nonself recognition. Tetrapolar-to-bipolar transitions have occurred on multiple occasions in the Basidiomycota, resulting, for example, from linkage of the two MAT loci into a single inheritable unit. Nevertheless, owing to the scarcity of molecular data regarding tetrapolar systems in the earliest-branching lineage of the Basidiomycota (subphylum Pucciniomycotina), it is presently unclear if the last common ancestor was tetrapolar or bipolar. Here, we address this question, by investigating the mating system of the Pucciniomycotina yeast Leucosporidium scottii. Using whole-genome sequencing and chromoblot analysis, we discovered that sexual reproduction is governed by two physically unlinked gene clusters: a multiallelic homeodomain (HD) locus and a pheromone/receptor (P/R) locus that is biallelic, thereby dismissing the existence of a third P/R allele as proposed earlier. Allele distribution of both MAT genes in natural populations showed that the two loci were in strong linkage disequilibrium, but independent assortment of MAT alleles was observed in the meiotic progeny of a test cross. The sexual cycle produces fertile progeny with similar proportions of the four mating types, but approximately 2/3 of the progeny was found to be nonhaploid. Our study adds to others in reinforcing tetrapolarity as the ancestral state of all basidiomycetes. PMID:26178967

  9. The fission yeast homologue of CENP-B, Abp1, regulates directionality of mating-type switching.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Marsellach, Francesc-Xavier; Azorín, Fernando

    2008-04-09

    In fission yeast, mating-type switching involves replacing genetic information contained at the expressed mat1 locus by that of either the mat2P or mat3M donor loci. Donor selection is nonrandom, as mat1P cells preferentially use mat3M for switching, whereas mat1M cells use mat2P. Switching directionality is determined by the cell-type-specific distribution of the Swi2-Swi5 complex that, in mat1P cells, localises to mat3M and, only in mat1M cells, spreads to mat2P in a heterochromatin-dependent manner. Mechanisms regulating spreading of Swi2-Swi5 across heterochromatin are not fully understood. Here, we show that the fission yeast homologue of CENP-B, Abp1, binds to the silent domain of the mating-type locus and regulates directionality of switching. Deletion of abp1 prevents utilisation of mat2P, as when heterochromatin is disrupted and spreading of Swi2-Swi5 is impaired. Our results show that, indeed, deletion of abp1 abolishes spreading of Swi2-Swi5 to mat2P. However, in abp1Delta cells, heterochromatin organisation at the mating-type locus is preserved, indicating that Abp1 is actually required for efficient spreading of Swi2-Swi5 through heterochromatin. Cbh1 and Cbh2, which are also homologous to CENP-B, have only a minor contribution to the regulation of directionality of switching, which is in contrast with the strong effects observed for Abp1.

  10. Molecular organization of the mating-type loci in the homothallic Ascomycete Eupenicillium crustaceum.

    PubMed

    Pöggeler, Stefanie; O'Gorman, Céline M; Hoff, Birgit; Kück, Ulrich

    2011-07-01

    Eupenicillium species are the teleomorphic (sexual) forms of anamorphic (asexual) members of the genus Penicillium, which contains many species of industrial importance. Here we describe the first molecular analysis of the mating-type (MAT) locus from a homothallic (self-fertile) Eupenicillium species, E. crustaceum. This ascomycete is a sexual relative of the penicillin producer Penicillium chrysogenum, which while long considered asexual, was recently shown to possess the required genetic machinery for heterothallic breeding. The E. crustaceum genome contains two MAT loci, MAT1-1 and MAT1-2, in an arrangement characteristic of other known homothallic euascomycetes, such as Neosartorya fischeri. MAT1-1 is flanked by conserved APN2 (DNA lyase) and SLA2 (cytoskeleton assembly control) genes and encodes a homologue of the α-box domain protein MAT1-1-1. Conversely, MAT1-2 carries a HMG-domain gene MAT1-2-1, and is flanked by a degenerate SLA2 gene and an intact homologue of the P. chrysogenum ORF Pc20g08960. Here we demonstrate the transcriptional expression of both mating-type genes during vegetative development. Furthermore, the MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 sequences were used to resolve the phylogenetic relationship of E. crustaceum with other ascomycetes. Phylogenetic trees confirmed a very close relationship between the homothallic E. crustaceum and the supposedly heterothallic P. chrysogenum. This close taxonomic association makes E. crustaceum an ideal candidate for future expression and evolutionary studies of sexual reproduction, with the ultimate aim of inducing sex in P. chrysogenum.

  11. DNA polymorphism in recombining and non-recombing mating-type-specific loci of the smut fungus Microbotryum

    PubMed Central

    Votintseva, A A; Filatov, D A

    2011-01-01

    The population-genetic processes leading to the genetic degeneration of non-recombining regions have mainly been studied in animal and plant sex chromosomes. Here, we report population genetic analysis of the processes in the non-recombining mating-type-specific regions of the smut fungus Microbotryum violaceum. M. violaceum has A1 and A2 mating types, determined by mating-type-specific ‘sex chromosomes' that contain 1–2 Mb long non-recombining regions. If genetic degeneration were occurring, then one would expect reduced DNA polymorphism in the non-recombining regions of this fungus. The analysis of DNA diversity among 19 M. violaceum strains, collected across Europe from Silene latifolia flowers, revealed that (i) DNA polymorphism is relatively low in all 20 studied loci (π∼0.15%), (ii) it is not significantly different between the two mating-type-specific chromosomes nor between the non-recombining and recombining regions, (iii) there is substantial population structure in M. violaceum populations, which resembles that of its host species, S. latifolia, and (iv) there is significant linkage disequilibrium, suggesting that widespread selfing in this species results in a reduction of the effective recombination rate across the genome. We hypothesise that selfing-related reduction of recombination across the M. violaceum genome negates the difference in the level of DNA polymorphism between the recombining and non-recombining regions, and may possibly lead to similar levels of genetic degeneration in the mating-type-specific regions of the non-recombining ‘sex chromosomes' and elsewhere in the genome. PMID:21081967

  12. Mating Type and Simple Sequence Repeat Markers Indicate a Clonal Population of Phyllosticta citricarpa in Florida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan-Yi; Zhang, Ke; Huguet-Tapia, Jose C; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Dewdney, Megan M

    2016-11-01

    Phyllosticta citricarpa, the citrus black spot pathogen, was first identified in Florida in March 2010. Subsequently, this pathogen has become established in Florida but can be easily confused with the endemic nonpathogenic citrus endophyte P. capitalensis. In this study, the mating-type (MAT) loci of P. citricarpa and P. capitalensis were identified via draft genome sequencing and were characterized at the structural and sequence levels. P. citricarpa was determined to have an idiomorphic, heterothallic MAT locus structure, whereas P. capitalensis was found to have a single MAT locus consistent with a homothallic mating system. A survey of P. citricarpa isolates from Florida revealed that only the MAT1-2 idiomorph existed in the Floridian population. In contrast, isolates collected from Australia exhibited a 1:1 ratio of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates. Development and analysis of simple sequence repeat markers revealed a single multilocus genotype (MLG) in the Floridian population (n = 70) and 11 MLG within the Australian population (n = 24). These results indicate that isolates of P. citricarpa from Florida are likely descendent from a single clonal lineage and are reproducing asexually. The disease management focus in Florida will need to be concentrated on the production and dispersal of pycnidiospores.

  13. Efficient production of a ring derivative of chromosome III by the mating-type switching mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Klar, A J; Strathern, J N; Hicks, J B; Prudente, D

    1983-01-01

    The mating-type switches in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae occur by unidirectional transposition of replicas of unexpressed genetic information, residing at HML or HMR, into the mating-type locus (MAT). The source loci, HML and HMR, remain unchanged. Interestingly, when the HM cassettes are expressed, as in marl strains, the HML and HMR cassettes can also efficiently switch, apparently by obtaining genetic information from either of the other two cassettes (Klar et al., Cell 25:517-524, 1981). We have isolated a novel chromosome III rearrangement in heterothallic (marl ho) strains, which is also produced efficiently in marl HO cells, presumably the consequence of a recombination event between HML and HMR. The fusion results in the loss of sequences which are located distal to HML and to HMR and produces a ring derivative of chromosome III. Cells containing such a ring chromosome are viable as haploids; apparently, no essential loci are located distal to the HM loci. The fusion cassette behaves as a standard HM locus with respect to both regulation by the MAR/SIR control and its role in switching MAT. Images PMID:6346056

  14. Evolutionary restoration of fertility in an interspecies hybrid yeast, by whole-genome duplication after a failed mating-type switch

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Merino, Raúl A.; Kuanyshev, Nurzhan; Braun-Galleani, Stephanie; Byrne, Kevin P.; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Many interspecies hybrids have been discovered in yeasts, but most of these hybrids are asexual and can replicate only mitotically. Whole-genome duplication has been proposed as a mechanism by which interspecies hybrids can regain fertility, restoring their ability to perform meiosis and sporulate. Here, we show that this process occurred naturally during the evolution of Zygosaccharomyces parabailii, an interspecies hybrid that was formed by mating between 2 parents that differed by 7% in genome sequence and by many interchromosomal rearrangements. Surprisingly, Z. parabailii has a full sexual cycle and is genetically haploid. It goes through mating-type switching and autodiploidization, followed by immediate sporulation. We identified the key evolutionary event that enabled Z. parabailii to regain fertility, which was breakage of 1 of the 2 homeologous copies of the mating-type (MAT) locus in the hybrid, resulting in a chromosomal rearrangement and irreparable damage to 1 MAT locus. This rearrangement was caused by HO endonuclease, which normally functions in mating-type switching. With 1 copy of MAT inactivated, the interspecies hybrid now behaves as a haploid. Our results provide the first demonstration that MAT locus damage is a naturally occurring evolutionary mechanism for whole-genome duplication and restoration of fertility to interspecies hybrids. The events that occurred in Z. parabailii strongly resemble those postulated to have caused ancient whole-genome duplication in an ancestor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:28510588

  15. Gamete signalling underlies the evolution of mating types and their number

    PubMed Central

    Hadjivasiliou, Zena; Pomiankowski, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The gametes of unicellular eukaryotes are morphologically identical, but are nonetheless divided into distinct mating types. The number of mating types varies enormously and can reach several thousand, yet most species have only two. Why do morphologically identical gametes need to be differentiated into self-incompatible mating types, and why is two the most common number of mating types? In this work, we explore a neglected hypothesis that there is a need for asymmetric signalling interactions between mating partners. Our review shows that isogamous gametes always interact asymmetrically throughout sex and argue that this asymmetry is favoured because it enhances the efficiency of the mating process. We further develop a simple mathematical model that allows us to study the evolution of the number of mating types based on the strength of signalling interactions between gametes. Novel mating types have an advantage as they are compatible with all others and rarely meet their own type. But if existing mating types coevolve to have strong mutual interactions, this restricts the spread of novel types. Similarly, coevolution is likely to drive out less attractive mating types. These countervailing forces specify the number of mating types that are evolutionarily stable. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Weird sex: the underappreciated diversity of sexual reproduction’. PMID:27619695

  16. Genetic Instability in the Mating Type System of Tetrahymena pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ellen M.; Orias, Eduardo

    1987-01-01

    Selfing clones of Tetrahymena pigmentosa show several interesting genetic features, and provide some insight into the mechanisms of mating type (mt) determination. They differ significantly from those of Tetrahymena thermophila. They are distributed nonrandomly in crosses. Their rates of stabilization are highly variable, but most are much lower than those reported for T. thermophila. A number of subclones derived from nearly all the selfers have maintained stable mts in culture for several years. However, some subclones manifest persistent selfing, long after the calculated completion of allelic assortment for heterozygous loci. This phenomenon along with the perpetual maintenance of dominant mts in heterozygotes shows that phenotypic assortment is not involved in mt expression.—In crosses, many selfers exhibit quantitative and qualitative aberrations in the transmission of alleles to the gametes; some of the micronuclear changes underlying these aberrations occur during vegetative growth. There are rare illegitimate appearances of dominant alleles in sexual progeny, and more common illegitimate appearances of the most recessive phenotype.—Various models to explain mt determination in this species are considered. One which might account for the troubling phenomena of the system consists of an active mat expression site, with "cassettes" at other sites specific for the different dominant alleles and capable of transposition to the expression site. PMID:3692137

  17. Characterization and distribution of mating-type genes of the turfgrass pathogen Sclerotinia homoeocarpa on a global scale.

    PubMed

    Putman, Alexander I; Tredway, Lane P; Carbone, Ignazio

    2015-08-01

    Sclerotinia homoeocarpa F.T. Bennett is a filamentous member of Ascomycota that causes dollar spot, the most economically important disease of turfgrass worldwide. We sequenced and characterized the mating-type (MAT) locus of four recently-collected contemporary strains causing dollar spot, four historical type strains used to describe the fungus, and three species of Rutstroemiaceae. Moreover, we developed a multiplex PCR assay to screen 1019 contemporary isolates for mating-type. The organization of the MAT loci of all strains examined could be classified into one of four categories: (1) putatively heterothallic, as exemplified by all contemporary strains and three of four historical type strains; (2) putatively heterothallic with a deleted putative gene in the MAT1-2 idiomorph, as detected in strains from two recently-collected populations in the United Kingdom that show more similarity to historical strains; (3) putatively homothallic with close physical linkage between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1, as found in one historical type strain of S. homoeocarpa and two strains of Rutstroemia cuniculi; and (4) an unresolved but apparently homothallic organization in which strains contained both MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 but linkage between these genes and between the two flanking genes could not be confirmed, as identified in R. paludosa and Poculum henningsianum. In contemporary S. homoeocarpa populations there was no significant difference in the frequency of the two mating types in clone-corrected samples when analyzed on regional and local scales, suggesting sex may be possible in this pathogen. However, two isolates from Italy and twenty from California were heterokaryotic for both complete heterothallic MAT idiomorphs. Results from this study contribute to knowledge about mating systems in filamentous fungi and enhance our understanding of the evolution and biology of an important plant pathogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mating Type Gene (MAT) and Itraconazole Susceptibility of Trichophyton tonsurans Strains Isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Junichiro; Okubo, Miki; Kano, Rui; Kumagawa, Mai; Hiruma, Masataro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kamata, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2016-06-01

    Infection by Trichophyton tonsurans is an emerging fungal epidemic in Japan. Itraconazole (ITZ) and terbinafine have been used for the treatment of this infection for 15 years. However, patients with T. tonsurans infections have been shown to remain uncured or to become reinfected, suggesting that subclinical infection or polyphyletic strains and/or antifungal drug-resistant strains might be occurring in Japan. In this study, PCR analysis was performed to confirm the presence of the mating type locus MAT in genomic DNA from 60 Japanese clinical isolates of T. tonsurans, and to assess the previously postulated clonal origin of clinical isolates of this species. Antifungal susceptibility testing on isolates also was performed to confirm the absence of strains resistant to ITZ. PCR analysis proved that all 60 strains contained the MAT1-1 allele, while none contained the MAT1-2 allele. As determined by E-test, the mean MIC of ITZ in the 60 strains was 0.023 mg/L (range 0.002-0.125 mg/L). All strains of T. tonsurans isolated in Japan were clonal and were not resistant to ITZ. Therefore, dermatophytosis due to T. tonsurans is expected to respond to ITZ, since clinical isolates of T. tonsurans tested to date have been susceptible to this antifungal. This infection is proliferating as a subclinical infection in Japan.

  19. Mating type gene analysis in apparently asexual Cercospora species is suggestive of cryptic sex.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Marizeth; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Harrington, Thomas C; Abeln, Edwin C A; Crous, Pedro W

    2006-12-01

    The genus Cercospora consists of numerous important, apparently asexual plant pathogens. We designed degenerate primers from homologous sequences in related species to amplify part of the C. apii, C. apiicola, C. beticola, C. zeae-maydis and C. zeina mating type genes. Chromosome walking was used to determine the full length mating type genes of these species. Primers were developed to amplify and sequence homologous portions of the mating type genes of additional species. Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences revealed little variation among members of the C. apii complex, whereas C. zeae-maydis and C. zeina were found to be dissimilar. The presence of both mating types in approximately even proportions in C. beticola, C. zeae-maydis and C. zeina populations, in contrast to single mating types in C. apii (MAT1) and C. apiicola (MAT2), suggests that a sexual cycle may be active in some of these species.

  20. Genetic organization and molecular characterization of secA2 locus in Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Krishna K; Mendonca, Marcelo; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Burkholder, Kristin M; Bhunia, Arun K

    2011-12-10

    The translocation of proteins across the bacterial cell wall is carried out by the general secretory (Sec) system. Most bacteria have a single copy of the secA gene, with the exception of a few Gram-positive bacteria, which have an additional copy of secA, designated secA2. secA2 is present in Listeria monocytogenes and is responsible for secretion and translocation of several proteins including virulence factors; however, little is known about the secA2 gene and its genetic organization in nonpathogenic members of the genus Listeria. The goal of this study was to determine the presence of secA2 locus and analyze the genetic relatedness among pathogenic and nonpathogenic Listeria species. Cloning experiments revealed that secA2 is present in all analyzed pathogenic (L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii) and nonpathogenic (L. welshimeri, L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. grayi and L. marthii) Listeria species except L. rocourtiae. Likewise, SecA2 transcripts were also detected in all species. Sequence analysis further revealed that 2331 nucleotides (776 amino acids) are conserved in L. monocytogenes, L. welshimeri, L. innocua and L. marthii. Three nucleotides are deleted in L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri and six in L. grayi, resulting in amino acid counts of 775, 775 and 774, respectively. secA2 is flanked upstream by iap (encoding p60) and downstream by a putative membrane protein (lmo0583, lmo f2365_0613) in all analyzed Listeria species, demonstrating conserved genetic organization of the secA2 locus in pathogenic and nonpathogenic species. Deletion of secA2 in L. innocua impaired accumulation of SecA2 substrate, N-acetyl muramidase (NamA) in the cell wall, providing evidence for the presence of functional SecA2 in nonpathogenic Listeria.

  1. The mating type-like loci of Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Robledo-Márquez, Karina A; Ramírez-Zavaleta, Candy Y; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a haploid and opportunistic fungal pathogen that has not known sexual cycle, has conserved the majority of the genes required for mating and cell type identity. The C. glabrata genome contains three mating-type-like loci called MTL1, MTL2 and MTL3. The three loci encode putative transcription factors, a1, α1 and α2 that regulate cell type identity and sexual reproduction in other fungi like the closely related Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MTL1 can contain either a or α information. MTL2, which contains a information and MTL3 with α information, are relatively close to two telomeres. MTL1 and MTL2 are transcriptionally active, while MTL3 is subject to an incomplete silencing nucleated at the telomere that depends on the silencing proteins Sir2, Sir3, Sir4, yKu70/80, Rif1, Rap1 and Sum1. C. glabrata does not seem to maintain cell type identity, as cell type-specific genes are expressed regardless of the type (or even absence) of mating information. These data highlight important differences in the control of mating and cell type identity between the non-pathogenic yeast S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which might explain the absence of a sexual cycle in C. glabrata. The fact that C. glabrata has conserved the vast majority of the genes involved in mating might suggest that some of these genes perhaps have been rewired to control other processes important for the survival inside the host as a commensal or as a human pathogen. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of two genes required for the position-effect control of yeast mating-type genes.

    PubMed Central

    Shore, D; Squire, M; Nasmyth, K A

    1984-01-01

    The mating type of haploid yeast (a or alpha) is determined by information present at the MAT locus. Identical copies of a and alpha information are present at distal loci (HMR and HML), but transcription of these copies is repressed by the action, in trans, of four unlinked genes called SIR (silent information regulator). Repression by SIR also requires, in cis, DNA sequences called E which are found to the left of HML and HMR (but not MAT) and are greater than 1 kb from the mating-type gene promoters. SIR control can act on other promoters when they are brought near the E sequence, and thus the SIR gene products act in some general manner to repress transcription. We have determined the DNA sequence of two fragments which complement mutations in the SIR2 and SIR3 genes and show that these contain the structural genes by mapping the cloned sequences onto the yeast chromosome. The SIR2 and SIR3 coding sequences were identified by constructing gene disruptions and using these mutations to replace the normal chromosomal copies. Such null mutants of both SIR2 and SIR3 are defective in the position-effect control of the silent loci but have no other detectable phenotype. We have mapped the 5' and 3' ends of the SIR2 and SIR3 mRNAs and show that their level is unaffected by mutations in any of the four known SIR complementation groups. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6098447

  3. A MADS box protein interacts with a mating-type protein and is required for fruiting body development in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Nolting, Nicole; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2006-07-01

    MADS box transcription factors control diverse developmental processes in plants, metazoans, and fungi. To analyze the involvement of MADS box proteins in fruiting body development of filamentous ascomycetes, we isolated the mcm1 gene from the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora, which encodes a putative homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MADS box protein Mcm1p. Deletion of the S. macrospora mcm1 gene resulted in reduced biomass, increased hyphal branching, and reduced hyphal compartment length during vegetative growth. Furthermore, the S. macrospora Deltamcm1 strain was unable to produce fruiting bodies or ascospores during sexual development. A yeast two-hybrid analysis in conjugation with in vitro analyses demonstrated that the S. macrospora MCM1 protein can interact with the putative transcription factor SMTA-1, encoded by the S. macrospora mating-type locus. These results suggest that the S. macrospora MCM1 protein is involved in the transcriptional regulation of mating-type-specific genes as well as in fruiting body development.

  4. The Transcription Factor Rbf1 Is the Master Regulator for b-Mating Type Controlled Pathogenic Development in Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Vranes, Miroslav; Wahl, Ramon; Pothiratana, Chetsada; Schuler, David; Vincon, Volker; Finkernagel, Florian; Flor-Parra, Ignacio; Kämper, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    In the phytopathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, sexual and pathogenic development are tightly connected and controlled by the heterodimeric bE/bW transcription factor complex encoded by the b-mating type locus. The formation of the active bE/bW heterodimer leads to the formation of filaments, induces a G2 cell cycle arrest, and triggers pathogenicity. Here, we identify a set of 345 bE/bW responsive genes which show altered expression during these developmental changes; several of these genes are associated with cell cycle coordination, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. 90% of the genes that show altered expression upon bE/bW-activation require the zinc finger transcription factor Rbf1, one of the few factors directly regulated by the bE/bW heterodimer. Rbf1 is a novel master regulator in a multilayered network of transcription factors that facilitates the complex regulatory traits of sexual and pathogenic development. PMID:20700446

  5. The transcription factor Rbf1 is the master regulator for b-mating type controlled pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Heimel, Kai; Scherer, Mario; Vranes, Miroslav; Wahl, Ramon; Pothiratana, Chetsada; Schuler, David; Vincon, Volker; Finkernagel, Florian; Flor-Parra, Ignacio; Kämper, Jörg

    2010-08-05

    In the phytopathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, sexual and pathogenic development are tightly connected and controlled by the heterodimeric bE/bW transcription factor complex encoded by the b-mating type locus. The formation of the active bE/bW heterodimer leads to the formation of filaments, induces a G2 cell cycle arrest, and triggers pathogenicity. Here, we identify a set of 345 bE/bW responsive genes which show altered expression during these developmental changes; several of these genes are associated with cell cycle coordination, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. 90% of the genes that show altered expression upon bE/bW-activation require the zinc finger transcription factor Rbf1, one of the few factors directly regulated by the bE/bW heterodimer. Rbf1 is a novel master regulator in a multilayered network of transcription factors that facilitates the complex regulatory traits of sexual and pathogenic development.

  6. A sex recognition glycoprotein is encoded by the plus mating-type gene fus1 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, P J; Woessner, J P; Goodenough, U W

    1996-01-01

    Sexual fusion between plus and minus gametes of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii entails adhesion between plus-specific and minus-specific "fringe" proteins displayed on the plasma membrane of gametic mating structures. We report the identification of the gene (fus1) encoding the plus fringe glycoprotein, which resides in a unique domain of the mating-type plus (mt+) locus, and which was identified by transposon insertions in three fusion-defective mutant strains. Transformation with fus1+ restores fringe and fusion competence to these mutants and to the pseudo-plus mutant imp11 mt-, defective in minus differentiation. The fus1 gene is remarkable in lacking the codon bias found in all other nuclear genes of C. reinhardtii. Images PMID:8856667

  7. Two tightly linked silent cassettes in the mating-type region of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Egel, R

    1984-04-01

    Genetic evidence is presented for the presence of two silent cassettes mat2-P and mat3- M, which both map to the right of the expressible site mat1 of the mating-type region in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. During a switch of mating type, the resident cassette at mat1 is replaced by a copy of opposite mating-type information from one of the silent loci. Usually the switch becomes effective in one of two daughter cells, thus allowing for efficient sister-cell conjugation. In swi mutants, mating-type switching can be observed as early as for the first division after spore germination, albeit at a lower frequency. Genetically the two silent cassettes are linked so tightly that no crossovers were observed between mat2 and mat3 at a resolution of 10(-3) cM.

  8. Differentiation between Atypical Isolates of Candida lusitaniae and Candida pulcherrima by Determination of Mating Type

    PubMed Central

    Noël, Thierry; Favel, Anne; Michel-Nguyen, Annie; Goumar, Abdelhak; Fallague, Karim; Chastin, Christiane; Leclerc, Florence; Villard, Jean

    2005-01-01

    We report on five clinical isolates routinely identified as Candida lusitaniae that the ID 32C system was unable to discriminate from the closely related species Candida pulcherrima. When additional tests did not allow accurate identification, the less usual mating type test identified all of them as Clavispora lusitaniae. Mating type testing appears to be a valuable tool for assessing the true incidence of this emerging non-albicans Candida species. PMID:15750124

  9. Pseudohomothallism and evolution of the mating-type chromosome in Neurospora tetrasperma

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, S.T.; Nelson, M.A.; Natvig, D.O.

    1996-06-01

    Ascospores of Neurospora tetrasperma normally contain nuclei of both mating-type idiomorphs (a and A), resulting in self-fertile heterokaryons (a type of sexual reproduction termed pseudohomothallism). Occasional homokaryotic self-sterile strains (either a or A) behave as heterothallics and, in principal, provide N. tetrasperma to assess levels of intrastrain heterokaryosis (heterozygosity). The unexpected result was the mating-type chromosome and autosomes exhibited very different patterns of evolution, apparently because of suppressed recombination between mating-type chromosomes. Analysis of sequences on the mating-type chromosomes of wild-collected self-fertile strains revealed high levels of genetic variability between sibling A and a nuclei. In contrast, sequences on autosomes of sibling A and a nuclei exhibited nearly complete homogeneity. Conservation of distinct haplotype combinations on A and a mating-type chromosomes in strains from diverse locations further suggested an absence of recombination over substantial periods of evolutionary time. The suppression of recombination of the N. tetrasperma mating-type chromosome, expected to ensure a high frequency of self fertility, presents an interesting parallel with, and possible model for studying aspects of, the evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Characterization and distribution of mating type genes in the dothistroma needle blight pathogens.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Marizeth; Barnes, Irene; Bradshaw, Rosie E; Brown, Anna V; Dale, Angie; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Lewis, Kathy J; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J; Crous, Pedro W

    2007-07-01

    ABSTRACT Dothistroma septosporum and D. pini are the two causal agents of Dothistroma needle blight of Pinus spp. in natural forests and plantations. Degenerate primers amplified portions of mating type genes (MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2) and chromosome walking was applied to obtain the full-length genes in both species. The mating-type-specific primers designed in this study could distinguish between the morphologically similar D. pini and D. septosporum and between the different mating types of these species. Screening of isolates from global collections of D. septosporum showed that only MAT2 isolates are present in Australian and New Zealand collections, where only the asexual form of the fungus has been found. In contrast, both mating types of D. septosporum were present in collections from Canada and Europe, where the sexual state is known. Intriguingly, collections from South Africa and the United Kingdom, where the sexual state of the fungus is unknown, included both mating types. In D. pini, for which no teleomorph is known, both mating types were present in collections from the United States. These results provided new insights into the biology and global distribution of two of the world's most important pine pathogens and should facilitate management of the diseases caused by these fungi.

  11. Dynamics of mitochondrial inheritance in the evolution of binary mating types and two sexes.

    PubMed

    Hadjivasiliou, Zena; Lane, Nick; Seymour, Robert M; Pomiankowski, Andrew

    2013-10-22

    The uniparental inheritance (UPI) of mitochondria is thought to explain the evolution of two mating types or even true sexes with anisogametes. However, the exact role of UPI is not clearly understood. Here, we develop a new model, which considers the spread of UPI mutants within a biparental inheritance (BPI) population. Our model explicitly considers mitochondrial mutation and selection in parallel with the spread of UPI mutants and self-incompatible mating types. In line with earlier work, we find that UPI improves fitness under mitochondrial mutation accumulation, selfish conflict and mitonuclear coadaptation. However, we find that as UPI increases in the population its relative fitness advantage diminishes in a frequency-dependent manner. The fitness benefits of UPI 'leak' into the biparentally reproducing part of the population through successive matings, limiting the spread of UPI. Critically, while this process favours some degree of UPI, it neither leads to the establishment of linked mating types nor the collapse of multiple mating types to two. Only when two mating types exist beforehand can associated UPI mutants spread to fixation under the pressure of high mitochondrial mutation rate, large mitochondrial population size and selfish mutants. Variation in these parameters could account for the range of UPI actually observed in nature, from strict UPI in some Chlamydomonas species to BPI in yeast. We conclude that UPI of mitochondria alone is unlikely to have driven the evolution of two mating types in unicellular eukaryotes.

  12. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure of the black truffle (Tuber melanosporum) investigated with neutral microsatellites and functional mating type genes.

    PubMed

    Murat, Claude; Rubini, Andrea; Riccioni, Claudia; De la Varga, Herminia; Akroume, Emila; Belfiori, Beatrice; Guaragno, Marco; Le Tacon, François; Robin, Christophe; Halkett, Fabien; Martin, Francis; Paolocci, Francesco

    2013-07-01

    The genetic structure of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal populations results from both vegetative and sexual propagation. In this study, we have analysed the spatial genetic structure of Tuber melanosporum populations, a heterothallic ascomycete that produces edible fruit bodies. Ectomycorrhizas from oaks and hazels from two orchards were mapped and genotyped using simple sequence repeat markers and the mating type locus. The distribution of the two T. melanosporum mating types was also monitored in the soil. In one orchard, the genetic profiles of the ascocarps were compared with those of the underlying mycorrhizas. A pronounced spatial genetic structure was found. The maximum genet sizes were 2.35 and 4.70 m in the two orchards, with most manifesting a size < 1 m. Few genets persisted throughout two seasons. A nonrandom distribution pattern of the T. melanosporum was observed, resulting in field patches colonized by genets that shared the same mating types. Our findings suggest that competition occurs between genets and provide basic information on T. melanosporum propagation patterns that are relevant for the management of productive truffle orchards.

  13. Direct repeat-mediated DNA deletion of the mating type locus MAT1-2 genes results in unidirectional mating type switching in Sclerotinia trifoliorum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fungus Sclerotinia trifoliorum is a pathogen of chickpea and other cool season legumes, and it produces spores of two sizes. The large spores give rise to strains that are self-fertile and produce large and small spores again, but the small spores give rise to strains that are self sterile and ...

  14. [Mating types in the ciliate Dileptus anser. Inheritance and genetic determination].

    PubMed

    Iudin, A L; Uspenskaia, Z I

    2006-01-01

    Hybridological analysis of mating types (MTs) has been first made for the lower ciliate Dileptus anser. Clones of an initially unknown genotype belonging to three MTs (MT I, MT II and MT III), characteristic of D. anser, were isolated from natural reservoirs and further used for crosses. In one group crosses, synclonal inheritance and typical Mendelian behaviour of the character were observed over sexual generations of ciliates. The results suggest that MTs in D. anser may be directly controlled by a single mat locus with three alleles showing peck-order dominance (mat1 > mat2 > mat3). In other words, cells with mat1/mat1, mat1/mat2 and mat1/mat3 genotypes belong to MT I, those with mat2/mat2 and mat2/mat3, and the mat3/mat3 belong to MT II and MT III, respectively. Sexually mature exconjugant clones stably retain their MTs corresponding to their genotypes on vegetative reproduction. The progeny of other group crosses showed various deviations from typical Mendelian behaviour of the character. In some cases, standard Mendelian ratios were more or less violated. Most typical was instability of differentiation for MT in maturing exconjugant clones. Shortly after their maturation, the majority of clones change their MT, rather frequently more than once, although the finally established MT is stably inherited afterwards, during vegetative reproduction. When unstable, exconjugant clones can successively express two or even three MTs characteristic of this species, including MTs that should not have been expected on the basis of parental genotypes available in a given cross. It looks likely that the mat locus in D. anser is complex and multipotential; it is inherited as a whole providing for expression of any MT characteristic of the species (in this respect bearing similarity with Tetrahymena thermophila). Other mechanisms, epigenetic in particular (Nanney, 1958), determine the final expression of one of the three MT potentialities by a given exconjugant clone. Stable

  15. Identification of Uhp1, a ubiquitinated histone-like protein, as a target/mediator of Rhp6 in mating-type silencing in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Naresh, Alpana; Saini, Sharanjot; Singh, Jagmohan

    2003-03-14

    Mating-type silencing in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is brought about by cooperative interactions between cis-acting DNA sequences flanking mat2P and mat3M and the trans-acting factors, namely Swi6, Clr1-Clr4, Clr6, and Rik1. In addition, DNA repair gene rhp6, which plays a role in post-replication DNA repair and ubiquitination of proteins including histones, is also involved in silencing, albeit in a unique way; its effect on silencing and chromatin structure of the donor loci is dependent on their switching competence. Earlier, we hypothesized the existence of a mediator of Rhp6 that plays a role in reestablishment of the chromatin structure coincidentally with DNA replication associated with mating-type switching. Here we report the identification of a 22-kDa protein as an in vivo target and mediator of Rhp6 in mating-type silencing. The level of this protein is greatly elevated in sng1-1/rhp6(-) mutant and rhp6Delta as compared with wild type strain. Both the deletion and overexpression of the gene encoding this protein elicit switching-dependent loss of silencing. Furthermore, the 22-kDa protein undergoes Rhp6-dependent multiubiquitination and associates with mat2 locus during S phase in wild type cells. Interestingly, it contains a histone-fold motif similar to that of histone H2A, and like histone H2A, it interacts strongly with histone H2B in vitro. These results indicate that the 22-kDa protein, renamed as the ubiquitinated histone-like protein Uhp1, is an in vivo target/mediator of Rhp6 in silencing. Thus, regulation of association of Uhp1 with chromatin and ubiquitination followed by degradation may play a role in reestablishment of inactive chromatin structure at the silent mating-type loci.

  16. Unequal Recombination and Evolution of the Mating-Type (MAT) Loci in the Pathogenic Fungus Grosmannia clavigera and Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Clement K.-M.; DiGuistini, Scott; Wang, Ye; Feau, Nicolas; Dhillon, Braham; Bohlmann, Jörg; Hamelin, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungi is regulated by the mating-type (MAT) locus where recombination is suppressed. We investigated the evolution of MAT loci in eight fungal species belonging to Grosmannia and Ophiostoma (Sordariomycetes, Ascomycota) that include conifer pathogens and beetle symbionts. The MAT1-2 idiomorph/allele was identified from the assembled and annotated Grosmannia clavigera genome, and the MAT locus is flanked by genes coding for cytoskeleton protein (SLA) and DNA lyase. The synteny of these genes is conserved and consistent with other members in Ascomycota. Using sequences from SLA and flanking regions, we characterized the MAT1-1 idiomorph from other isolates of G. clavigera and performed dotplot analysis between the two idiomorphs. Unexpectedly, the MAT1-2 idiomorph contains a truncated MAT1-1-1 gene upstream of the MAT1-2-1 gene that bears the high-mobility-group domain. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence of the truncated MAT1-1-1 gene is similar to its homologous copy in the MAT1-1 idiomorph in the opposite mating-type isolate, except that positive selection is acting on the truncated gene and the alpha(α)-box that encodes the transcription factor has been deleted. The MAT idiomorphs sharing identical gene organization were present in seven additional species in the Ophiostomatales, suggesting that the presence of truncated MAT1-1-1 gene is a general pattern in this order. We propose that an ancient unequal recombination event resulted in the ancestral MAT1-1-1 gene integrated into the MAT1-2 idiomorph and surviving as the truncated MAT1-1-1 genes. The α-box domain of MAT1-1-1 gene, located at the same MAT locus adjacent to the MAT1-2-1 gene, could have been removed by deletion after recombination due to mating signal interference. Our data confirmed a 1:1 MAT/sex ratio in two pathogen populations, and showed that all members of the Ophiostomatales studied here including those that were previously deemed asexual have the potential to

  17. Interaction between mating-type proteins from the homothallic fungus Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Sabine; Wittig, Michael; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2002-06-01

    Mating-type genes control sexual development in ascomycetes. Little is known about their function in homothallic species, which are self-fertile and do not require a mating partner for sexual reproduction. The function of mating-type genes in the homothallic fungus Sordaria macrospora was assayed using a yeast system in order to find properties typical of eukaryotic transcription factors. We were able to demonstrate that the mating-type proteins SMTA-1 and SMTa-1 have domains capable of activating transcription of yeast reporter genes. Two-hybrid analysis for heterodimerization and homodimerization revealed the ability of SMTA-1 to interact with SMTa-1 and vice versa. These two proteins are encoded by different mating types in the related heterothallic species Neurospora crassa. The interaction between SMTA-1 and SMTa-1 was defined by experiments with truncated versions of SMTA-1 and in vitro by means of protein cross-linking. Moreover, we gained evidence for homodimerization of SMTA-1. Possible functions of mating-type proteins in the homothallic ascomycete S. macrospora are discussed.

  18. Roles for receptors, pheromones, G proteins, and mating type genes during sexual reproduction in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojeong; Wright, Sara J; Park, Gyungsoon; Ouyang, Shouqiang; Krystofova, Svetlana; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2012-04-01

    Here we characterize the relationship between the PRE-2 pheromone receptor and its ligand, CCG-4, and the general requirements for receptors, pheromones, G proteins, and mating type genes during fusion of opposite mating-type cells and sexual sporulation in the multicellular fungus Neurospora crassa. PRE-2 is highly expressed in mat a cells and is localized in male and female reproductive structures. Δpre-2 mat a females do not respond chemotropically to mat A males (conidia) or form mature fruiting bodies (perithecia) or meiotic progeny (ascospores). Strains with swapped identity due to heterologous expression of pre-2 or ccg-4 behave normally in crosses with opposite mating-type strains. Coexpression of pre-2 and ccg-4 in the mat A background leads to self-attraction and development of barren perithecia without ascospores. Further perithecial development is achieved by inactivation of Sad-1, a gene required for meiotic gene silencing. Findings from studies involving forced heterokaryons of opposite mating-type strains show that presence of one receptor and its compatible pheromone is necessary and sufficient for perithecial development and ascospore production. Taken together, the results demonstrate that although receptors and pheromones control sexual identity, the mating-type genes (mat A and mat a) must be in two different nuclei to allow meiosis and sexual sporulation to occur.

  19. Genetic Diversity and Mating Type Distribution of Tuber melanosporum and Their Significance to Truffle Cultivation in Artificially Planted Truffiéres in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Selmes, H.

    2012-01-01

    Tuber melanosporum is a truffle native to Europe and is cultivated in countries such as Australia for the gastronomic market, where production yields are often lower than expected. We assessed the genetic diversity of T. melanosporum with six microsatellite loci to assess the effect of genetic drift on truffle yield in Australia. Genetic diversity as assessed on 210 ascocarps revealed a higher allelic diversity compared to previous studies from Europe, suggesting a possible genetic expansion and/or multiple and diverse source populations for inoculum. The results also suggest that the single sequence repeat diversity of locus ME2 is adaptive and that, for example, the probability of replication errors is increased for this locus. Loss of genetic diversity in Australian populations is therefore not a likely factor in limiting ascocarp production. A survey of nursery seedlings and trees inoculated with T. melanosporum revealed that <70% of seedlings and host trees were colonized with T. melanosporum and that some trees had been contaminated by Tuber brumale, presumably during the inoculation process. Mating type (MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1) analyses on seedling and four- to ten-year-old host trees found that 100% of seedlings but only approximately half of host trees had both mating types present. Furthermore, MAT1-1-1 was detected significantly more commonly than MAT1-2-1 in established trees, suggesting a competitive advantage for MAT1-1-1 strains. This study clearly shows that there are more factors involved in ascocarp production than just the presence of both mating types on host trees. PMID:22773652

  20. Genetic diversity and mating type distribution of Tuber melanosporum and their significance to truffle cultivation in artificially planted truffieres in Australia.

    PubMed

    Linde, C C; Selmes, H

    2012-09-01

    Tuber melanosporum is a truffle native to Europe and is cultivated in countries such as Australia for the gastronomic market, where production yields are often lower than expected. We assessed the genetic diversity of T. melanosporum with six microsatellite loci to assess the effect of genetic drift on truffle yield in Australia. Genetic diversity as assessed on 210 ascocarps revealed a higher allelic diversity compared to previous studies from Europe, suggesting a possible genetic expansion and/or multiple and diverse source populations for inoculum. The results also suggest that the single sequence repeat diversity of locus ME2 is adaptive and that, for example, the probability of replication errors is increased for this locus. Loss of genetic diversity in Australian populations is therefore not a likely factor in limiting ascocarp production. A survey of nursery seedlings and trees inoculated with T. melanosporum revealed that <70% of seedlings and host trees were colonized with T. melanosporum and that some trees had been contaminated by Tuber brumale, presumably during the inoculation process. Mating type (MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1) analyses on seedling and four- to ten-year-old host trees found that 100% of seedlings but only approximately half of host trees had both mating types present. Furthermore, MAT1-1-1 was detected significantly more commonly than MAT1-2-1 in established trees, suggesting a competitive advantage for MAT1-1-1 strains. This study clearly shows that there are more factors involved in ascocarp production than just the presence of both mating types on host trees.

  1. Sex in smut fungi: Structure, function and evolution of mating-type complexes.

    PubMed

    Bakkeren, Guus; Kämper, Jörg; Schirawski, Jan

    2008-08-01

    Smut fungi are basidiomycete plant pathogens that pose a threat to many important cereal crops. In order to be pathogenic on plants, smut fungal cells of compatible mating-type need to fuse. Fusion and pathogenicity are regulated by two loci, a and b, which harbor conserved genes. The functions of the encoded mating-type complexes have been well-studied in the model fungus Ustilago maydis and will be briefly reviewed here. Sequence comparison of the mating-type loci of different smut and related fungi has revealed that these loci differ substantially in structure. These structural differences point to an evolution from tetrapolar to bipolar mating behavior, which might have occurred several independent times during fungal speciation.

  2. A recombinationally repressed region between mat2 and mat3 loci shares homology to centromeric repeats and regulates directionality of mating-type switching in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Grewal, S I; Klar, A J

    1997-08-01

    Cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe switch mating type by replacing genetic information at the transcriptionally active mat1 locus with sequences copied from one of two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P or mat3-M. By a process referred to as directionality of switching, cells predominantly switch to the opposite mat1 allele; the mat1-P allele preferentially recombines with mat3, while mat1-M selects the mat2. In contrast to efficient recombination at mat1, recombination within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval is undetectable. We defined the role of sequences between mat2 and mat3, designated the K-region, in directionality as well as recombinational suppression. Cloning and sequencing analysis revealed that a part of the K-region is homologous to repeat sequences present at centromeres, which also display transcriptional and recombinational suppression. Replacement of 7.5 kb of the K-region with the ura4+ gene affected directionality in a variegated manner. Analysis of the swi6-mod locus, which was previously shown to affect directionality, in K delta::ura4+ strains suggested the existence of at least two overlapping directionality mechanisms. Our work furthers the model that directionality is regulated by cell-type-specific organization of the heterochromatin-like structure in the mating-type region and provides evidence that the K-region contributes to silencing of the mat2-mat3 interval.

  3. A Recombinationally Repressed Region between Mat2 and Mat3 Loci Shares Homology to Centromeric Repeats and Regulates Directionality of Mating-Type Switching in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, SIS.; Klar, AJS.

    1997-01-01

    Cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe switch mating type by replacing genetic information at the transcriptionally active mat1 locus with sequences copied from one of two closely linked silent loci, mat2-P or mat3-M. By a process referred to as directionality of switching, cells predominantly switch to the opposite mat1 allele; the mat1-P allele preferentially recombines with mat3, while mat1-M selects the mat2. In contrast to efficient recombination at mat1, recombination within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval is undetectable. We defined the role of sequences between mat2 and mat3, designated the K-region, in directionality as well as recombinational suppression. Cloning and sequencing analysis revealed that a part of the K-region is homologous to repeat sequences present at centromeres, which also display transcriptional and recombinational suppression. Replacement of 7.5 kb of the K-region with the ura4(+) gene affected directionality in a variegated manner. Analysis of the swi6-mod locus, which was previously shown to affect directionality, in KΔ::ura4(+) strains suggested the existence of at least two overlapping directionality mechanisms. Our work furthers the model that directionality is regulated by cell-type-specific organization of the heterochromatin-like structure in the mating-type region and provides evidence that the K-region contributes to silencing of the mat2-mat3 interval. PMID:9258669

  4. Going in the right direction: mating-type switching of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is controlled by judicious expression of two different swi2 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanhe; Bonaduce, Michael J; Klar, Amar J S

    2012-03-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the fission yeast, cells alternate between P- and M-mating type, controlled by the alternate alleles of the mating-type locus (mat1). The mat1 switching occurs by replacing mat1 with a copy derived from a silenced "donor locus," mat2P or mat3M. The mechanism of donor choice ensuring that switching occurs primarily and productively to the opposite type, called directionality, is largely unknown. Here we identified the mat1-Mc gene, a mammalian sex-determination gene (SRY) homolog, as the primary gene that dictates directionality in M cells. A previously unrecognized, shorter swi2 mRNA, a truncated form of the swi2, was identified, and its expression requires the mat1-Mc function. We also found that the abp1 gene (human CENPB homolog) controls directionality through swi2 regulation. In addition, we implicated a cis-acting DNA sequence in mat2 utilization. Overall, we showed that switching directionality is controlled by judicious expression of two swi2 transcripts through a cell-type-regulated dual promoter. In this respect, this regulation mechanism resembles that of the Drosophila sex-determination Slx gene.

  5. Going in the Right Direction: Mating-Type Switching of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Is Controlled by Judicious Expression of Two Different swi2 Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chuanhe; Bonaduce, Michael J.; Klar, Amar J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the fission yeast, cells alternate between P- and M-mating type, controlled by the alternate alleles of the mating-type locus (mat1). The mat1 switching occurs by replacing mat1 with a copy derived from a silenced “donor locus,” mat2P or mat3M. The mechanism of donor choice ensuring that switching occurs primarily and productively to the opposite type, called directionality, is largely unknown. Here we identified the mat1-Mc gene, a mammalian sex-determination gene (SRY) homolog, as the primary gene that dictates directionality in M cells. A previously unrecognized, shorter swi2 mRNA, a truncated form of the swi2, was identified, and its expression requires the mat1-Mc function. We also found that the abp1 gene (human CENPB homolog) controls directionality through swi2 regulation. In addition, we implicated a cis-acting DNA sequence in mat2 utilization. Overall, we showed that switching directionality is controlled by judicious expression of two swi2 transcripts through a cell-type-regulated dual promoter. In this respect, this regulation mechanism resembles that of the Drosophila sex-determination Slx gene. PMID:22209903

  6. Diversity of mating-type chromosome structures in the yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii caused by ectopic exchanges between MAT-like loci.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Jun; Uehara, Kenji; Mogi, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated sex chromosome diversity in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (Z. rouxii). In the current study, we show that the organization of the mating-type (MAT) locus is highly variable in the Z. rouxii population, indicating the MAT, HML, and HMR loci are translocation hotspots. Although NBRC1130 and CBS732 were originally two stocks of the type strain of the species, only NBRC1130 retains the original karyotype. A reciprocal translocation between the MAT and HMR loci appears to have occurred during the early passage culture of CBS732, which was used for genome sequencing. In NBRC1733, NBRC0686, NBRC0740 and NBRC1053, the terminal region of the chromosome containing the HMR locus was replaced with the chromosomal region to the left of the MAT or HML loci. The translocation events found in NBRC1733, NBRC0686, NBRC0740, and NBRC1053 were reconstructed under our experimental conditions using the DA2 background, and the reconstruction suggests that the frequency of this type of translocation is approximately 10(-7). These results suggest that the MAT and MAT-like loci were the susceptible regions in the genome, and the diversity of mating-type chromosome structures in Z. rouxii was caused by ectopic exchanges between MAT-like loci.

  7. Diversity of Mating-Type Chromosome Structures in the Yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii Caused by Ectopic Exchanges between MAT-Like Loci

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Jun; Uehara, Kenji; Mogi, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    We investigated sex chromosome diversity in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (Z. rouxii). In the current study, we show that the organization of the mating-type (MAT) locus is highly variable in the Z. rouxii population, indicating the MAT, HML, and HMR loci are translocation hotspots. Although NBRC1130 and CBS732 were originally two stocks of the type strain of the species, only NBRC1130 retains the original karyotype. A reciprocal translocation between the MAT and HMR loci appears to have occurred during the early passage culture of CBS732, which was used for genome sequencing. In NBRC1733, NBRC0686, NBRC0740 and NBRC1053, the terminal region of the chromosome containing the HMR locus was replaced with the chromosomal region to the left of the MAT or HML loci. The translocation events found in NBRC1733, NBRC0686, NBRC0740, and NBRC1053 were reconstructed under our experimental conditions using the DA2 background, and the reconstruction suggests that the frequency of this type of translocation is approximately 10−7. These results suggest that the MAT and MAT-like loci were the susceptible regions in the genome, and the diversity of mating-type chromosome structures in Z. rouxii was caused by ectopic exchanges between MAT-like loci. PMID:23614024

  8. Ascospore dimorphism-associated mating types of Sclerotinia trifoliorum equally capable of infecting chickpea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sclerotinia trifoliorum causes stem and crown rot of chickpea and other forage and grain legumes, and is one of the three important species of the genus Sclerotinia. S. trifoliorum is unique from the other two species in that it is heterothallic and has two opposite mating types required for comple...

  9. Cell-cell signalling in sexual chemotaxis: a basis for gametic differentiation, mating types and sexes.

    PubMed

    Hadjivasiliou, Zena; Iwasa, Yoh; Pomiankowski, Andrew

    2015-08-06

    While sex requires two parents, there is no obvious need for them to be differentiated into distinct mating types or sexes. Yet this is the predominate state of nature. Here, we argue that mating types could play a decisive role because they prevent the apparent inevitability of self-stimulation during sexual signalling. We rigorously assess this hypothesis by developing a model for signaller-detector dynamics based on chemical diffusion, chemotaxis and cell movement. Our model examines the conditions under which chemotaxis improves partner finding. Varying parameter values within ranges typical of protists and their environments, we show that simultaneous secretion and detection of a single chemoattractant can cause a multifold movement impediment and severely hinder mate finding. Mutually exclusive roles result in faster pair formation, even when cells conferring the same roles cannot pair up. This arrangement also allows the separate mating types to optimize their signalling or detecting roles, which is effectively impossible for cells that are both secretors and detectors. Our findings suggest that asymmetric roles in sexual chemotaxis (and possibly other forms of sexual signalling) are crucial, even without morphological differences, and may underlie the evolution of gametic differentiation among both mating types and sexes.

  10. Cell–cell signalling in sexual chemotaxis: a basis for gametic differentiation, mating types and sexes

    PubMed Central

    Hadjivasiliou, Zena; Iwasa, Yoh; Pomiankowski, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    While sex requires two parents, there is no obvious need for them to be differentiated into distinct mating types or sexes. Yet this is the predominate state of nature. Here, we argue that mating types could play a decisive role because they prevent the apparent inevitability of self-stimulation during sexual signalling. We rigorously assess this hypothesis by developing a model for signaller–detector dynamics based on chemical diffusion, chemotaxis and cell movement. Our model examines the conditions under which chemotaxis improves partner finding. Varying parameter values within ranges typical of protists and their environments, we show that simultaneous secretion and detection of a single chemoattractant can cause a multifold movement impediment and severely hinder mate finding. Mutually exclusive roles result in faster pair formation, even when cells conferring the same roles cannot pair up. This arrangement also allows the separate mating types to optimize their signalling or detecting roles, which is effectively impossible for cells that are both secretors and detectors. Our findings suggest that asymmetric roles in sexual chemotaxis (and possibly other forms of sexual signalling) are crucial, even without morphological differences, and may underlie the evolution of gametic differentiation among both mating types and sexes. PMID:26156301

  11. Social amoebae mating types do not invest unequally in sexual offspring.

    PubMed

    Douglas, T E; Queller, D C; Strassmann, J E

    2017-05-01

    Unequal investment by different sexes in their progeny is common and includes differential investment in the zygote and differential care of the young. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has a sexual stage in which isogamous cells of any two of the three mating types fuse to form a zygote which then attracts hundreds of other cells to the macrocyst. The latter cells are cannibalized and so make no genetic contribution to reproduction. Previous literature suggests that this sacrifice may be induced in cells of one mating type by cells of another, resulting in a higher than expected production of macrocysts when the inducing type is rare and giving a reproductive advantage to this social cheat. We tested this hypothesis in eight trios of field-collected clones of each of the three D. discoideum mating types by measuring macrocyst production at different pairwise frequencies. We found evidence that supported differential contribution in only two of the 24 clone pairs, so this pattern is rare and clone-specific. In general, we did not reject the hypothesis that the mating types contribute cells relative to their proportion in the population. We also found a significant quadratic relationship between partner frequency and macrocyst production, suggesting that when one clone is rare, macrocyst production is limited by partner availability. We were also unable to replicate previous findings that macrocyst production could be induced in the absence of a compatible mating partner. Overall, mating type-specific differential investment during sex is unlikely in microbial eukaryotes like D. discoideum. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  12. Population structure and mating type distribution of the chickpea blight pathogen Ascochyta rabiei from Pakistan and United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ascochyta blight caused by the fungus Ascochyta rabiei (AR) depresses chickpea production in Pakistan and worldwide. Thirty two AR isolates representing six geographical regions of Pakistan was compared with a US AR population for frequency of mating types and genetic variation. Mating type results ...

  13. Tracing the Origin of the Fungal α1 Domain Places Its Ancestor in the HMG-Box Superfamily: Implication for Fungal Mating-Type Evolution

    PubMed Central

    van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Ripoll, Daniel R.; Dixelius, Christina; Turgeon, B. Gillian; Debuchy, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background Fungal mating types in self-incompatible Pezizomycotina are specified by one of two alternate sequences occupying the same locus on corresponding chromosomes. One sequence is characterized by a gene encoding an HMG protein, while the hallmark of the other is a gene encoding a protein with an α1 domain showing similarity to the Matα1p protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA-binding HMG proteins are ubiquitous and well characterized. In contrast, α1 domain proteins have limited distribution and their evolutionary origin is obscure, precluding a complete understanding of mating-type evolution in Ascomycota. Although much work has focused on the role of the S. cerevisiae Matα1p protein as a transcription factor, it has not yet been placed in any of the large families of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings We present sequence comparisons, phylogenetic analyses, and in silico predictions of secondary and tertiary structures, which support our hypothesis that the α1 domain is related to the HMG domain. We have also characterized a new conserved motif in α1 proteins of Pezizomycotina. This motif is immediately adjacent to and downstream of the α1 domain and consists of a core sequence Y-[LMIF]-x(3)-G-[WL] embedded in a larger conserved motif. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that extant α1-box genes originated from an ancestral HMG gene, which confirms the current model of mating-type evolution within the fungal kingdom. We propose to incorporate α1 proteins in a new subclass of HMG proteins termed MATα_HMG. PMID:21170349

  14. Mutations in rik1, clr2, clr3 and clr4 genes asymmetrically derepress the silent mating-type loci in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ekwall, K; Ruusala, T

    1994-01-01

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the mating-type information is stored at two transcriptionally silent loci (mat2 and mat3). The region between these sites (K region) is inert for meiotic crossing over. The mating-type genes (M or P) are expressed only when present at a third, active locus (mat1). We have earlier shown that the positional regulation of P genes is based on repression at the silent site, caused by elements in the flanking DNA sequences. In this study we have mutagenized a sterile mat1 deleted strain and selected for cells that are able to conjugate. Recessive mutations of this type should define genes encoding trans-acting factors involved in repression of the silent mating-type loci. Before this work mutations in two genes, clr1 and swi6, had been shown to allow both expression of the silent loci and recombination in the K region. The sensitivity of the present selection is demonstrated by the isolation of new mutations that derepress one or both of the silent loci (M-mating or bi-mating). The frequency of M-mating mutants was almost two orders of magnitude higher than that of bi-mating mutants and in all mutants analyzed mat3-M expression was significantly higher than mat2-P expression. The mutations define three new genes, clr2, clr3 and clr4. In addition we show that the rik1 mutant previously known to allow recombination in the K region also depresses the silent loci.

  15. The mutator gene swi8 effects specific mutations in the mating-type region of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Fleck, O; Rudolph, C; Albrecht, A; Lorentz, A; Schär, P; Schmidt, H

    1994-11-01

    The swi8+ gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe appears to be involved in the termination step of copy synthesis during mating-type (MT) switching. Mutations in swi8 confer a general mutator phenotype and, in particular, generate specific mutations in the MT region. Sequencing of the MT cassettes of the h90 swi8-137 mutant revealed three altered sites. One is situated at the switching (smt) signal adjacent to the H1 homology box of the expression locus mat1:1. It reduces the rate of MT switching. The alteration at the smt signal arose frequently in other h90 swi8 strains and is probably caused by gene conversion in which the sequence adjacent to the H1 box of mat2:2 is used as template. This change might be generated during the process of MT switching when hybrid DNA formation is anomalously extended into the more heterologous region flanking the H1 homology box. In addition to the gene conversion at mat1:1, two mutations were found in the H3 homology boxes of the silent cassettes mat2:2 and mat3:3.

  16. The Mutator Gene Swi8 Effects Specific Mutations in the Mating-Type Region of Schizosaccharomyces Pombe

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, O.; Rudolph, C.; Albrecht, A.; Lorentz, A.; Schar, P.; Schmidt, H.

    1994-01-01

    The swi8(+) gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe appears to be involved in the termination step of copy synthesis during mating-type (MT) switching. Mutations in swi8 confer a general mutator phenotype and, in particular, generate specific mutations in the MT region. Sequencing of the MT cassettes of the h(90) swi8-137 mutant revealed three altered sites. One is situated at the switching (smt) signal adjacent to the H1 homology box of the expression locus mat1:1. It reduces the rate of MT switching. The alteration at the smt signal arose frequently in other h(90) swi8 strains and is probably caused by gene conversion in which the sequence adjacent to the H1 box of mat2:2 is used as template. This change might be generated during the process of MT switching when hybrid DNA formation is anomalously extended into the more heterologous region flanking the H1 homology box. In addition to the gene conversion at mat1:1, two mutations were found in the H3 homology boxes of the silent cassettes mat2:2 and mat3:3. PMID:7851760

  17. Three additional linkage groups that repress transcription and meiotic recombination in the mating-type region of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Thon, G; Cohen, A; Klar, A J

    1994-09-01

    The mating-type genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are found at three locations in the same chromosomal region. These genes are in an active configuration at the mat1 locus and in an inactive configuration at the mat2 and mat3 loci. The mechanism that represses transcription of mat2 and mat3 also inactivates other promoters introduced nearby and is accompanied by a block to meiotic recombination in the mat2-mat3 interval, suggesting that this mechanism involves a particular chromatin structure. We present evidence that the transcription and recombination blocks require three newly defined trans-acting loci, clr2, clr3 and clr4, in addition to the previously identified clr1, rik1 and swi6 loci. We also investigated the role of mat2 cis-acting sequences in silencing. Four cis-acting elements that repress mat2 in a plasmid context were previously identified. Deletion of two of these elements proved to have little effect in a chromosomal context. However, when combined with mutations in trans-acting genes, deletion of the same two elements greatly enhanced mat2 expression. The observed cumulative effects suggest a redundancy in the silencing mechanism.

  18. Three Additional Linkage Groups That Repress Transcription and Meiotic Recombination in the Mating-Type Region of Schizosaccharomyces Pombe

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Cohen, A.; Klar, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The mating-type genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are found at three locations in the same chromosomal region. These genes are in an active configuration at the mat1 locus and in an inactive configuration at the mat2 and mat3 loci. The mechanism that represses transcription of mat2 and mat3 also inactivates other promoters introduced nearby and is accompanied by a block to meiotic recombination in the mat2-mat3 interval, suggesting that this mechanism involves a particular chromatin structure. We present evidence that the transcription and recombination blocks require three newly defined trans-acting loci, clr2, clr3 and clr4, in addition to the previously identified clr1, rik1 and swi6 loci. We also investigated the role of mat2 cis-acting sequences in silencing. Four cis-acting elements that repress mat2 in a plasmid context were previously identified. Deletion of two of these elements proved to have little effect in a chromosomal context. However, when combined with mutations in trans-acting genes, deletion of the same two elements greatly enhanced mat2 expression. The observed cumulative effects suggest a redundancy in the silencing mechanism. PMID:8001791

  19. A MADS Box Protein Interacts with a Mating-Type Protein and Is Required for Fruiting Body Development in the Homothallic Ascomycete Sordaria macrospora

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Nicole; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2006-01-01

    MADS box transcription factors control diverse developmental processes in plants, metazoans, and fungi. To analyze the involvement of MADS box proteins in fruiting body development of filamentous ascomycetes, we isolated the mcm1 gene from the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora, which encodes a putative homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MADS box protein Mcm1p. Deletion of the S. macrospora mcm1 gene resulted in reduced biomass, increased hyphal branching, and reduced hyphal compartment length during vegetative growth. Furthermore, the S. macrospora Δmcm1 strain was unable to produce fruiting bodies or ascospores during sexual development. A yeast two-hybrid analysis in conjugation with in vitro analyses demonstrated that the S. macrospora MCM1 protein can interact with the putative transcription factor SMTA-1, encoded by the S. macrospora mating-type locus. These results suggest that the S. macrospora MCM1 protein is involved in the transcriptional regulation of mating-type-specific genes as well as in fruiting body development. PMID:16835449

  20. Isolation and in vitro binding of mating type plus fertilization tubules from Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nedra F

    2008-01-01

    During fertilization in Chlamydomonas, adhesion and fusion of gametes occur at the tip of specialized regions of the plasma membrane, known as mating structures. The mating type minus (mt[-]) structure is a slightly raised dome-shaped region located at the apical end of the cell body. In contrast, the activated mating type plus (mt[+]) structure is an actin-filled, microvillouslike organelle. Interestingly, a similar type of "fusion organelle" is conserved across diverse groups. Chlamydomonas provides an ideal model system for studying the process of gametic cell fusion in that it is amenable to genetic manipulations as well as cell and molecular biological approaches. Moreover, the ease of culturing Chlamydomonas combined with the ability to isolate the mt(+) fertilization tubule and the development of in vitro assays for adhesion makes it an ideal system for biochemical studies focused on dissecting the molecular mechanisms that underlie the complex process of gametic cell fusion.

  1. Four mating-type genes control sexual differentiation in the fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M; Burke, J; Smith, M; Klar, A; Beach, D

    1988-05-01

    The mating-type region of fission yeast consists of three components, mat1, mat2-P and mat3-M, each separated by 15 kb. Cell-type is determined by the alternate allele present at mat1, either P in an h+ or M in an h- cell. mat2-P and mat3-M serve as donors of information that is transposed to mat1 during a switch of mating type. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of each component of mat. The P and M specific regions are 1104 and 1128 bp, respectively, and bounded by sequences common to each mating-type cassette (H1; 59 bp and H2; 135 bp). A third sequence is present at mat2-P and mat3-M but absent at mat1 (H3; 57 bp), and may be involved in transcriptional repression of these cassettes. mat1-P and mat1-M each encode two genes (Pc; 118 amino acids, Pi; 159 amino acids, Mc; 181 amino acids and Mi; 42 amino acids). Introduction of opal or frame-shift mutations into the open-reading-frame of each gene revealed that Pc and Mc are necessary and sufficient for mating and confer an h+ or h- mating type respectively. All four genes are required for meiotic competence in an h+/h- diploid. The transcription of each mat gene is strongly influenced by nutritional conditions and full induction was observed only in nitrogen-free medium. The predicted product of the Pi gene contains a region of homology with the homeobox sequence, suggesting that this gene encodes a DNA binding protein that directly regulates the expression of other genes.

  2. Genome-defence small RNAs exapted for epigenetic mating-type inheritance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepankar Pratap; Saudemont, Baptiste; Guglielmi, Gérard; Arnaiz, Olivier; Goût, Jean-François; Prajer, Malgorzata; Potekhin, Alexey; Przybòs, Ewa; Aubusson-Fleury, Anne; Bhullar, Simran; Bouhouche, Khaled; Lhuillier-Akakpo, Maoussi; Tanty, Véronique; Blugeon, Corinne; Alberti, Adriana; Labadie, Karine; Aury, Jean-Marc; Sperling, Linda; Duharcourt, Sandra; Meyer, Eric

    2014-05-22

    In the ciliate Paramecium, transposable elements and their single-copy remnants are deleted during the development of somatic macronuclei from germline micronuclei, at each sexual generation. Deletions are targeted by scnRNAs, small RNAs produced from the germ line during meiosis that first scan the maternal macronuclear genome to identify missing sequences, and then allow the zygotic macronucleus to reproduce the same deletions. Here we show that this process accounts for the maternal inheritance of mating types in Paramecium tetraurelia, a long-standing problem in epigenetics. Mating type E depends on expression of the transmembrane protein mtA, and the default type O is determined during development by scnRNA-dependent excision of the mtA promoter. In the sibling species Paramecium septaurelia, mating type O is determined by coding-sequence deletions in a different gene, mtB, which is specifically required for mtA expression. These independently evolved mechanisms suggest frequent exaptation of the scnRNA pathway to regulate cellular genes and mediate transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of essential phenotypic polymorphisms.

  3. Transcription of two long noncoding RNAs mediates mating-type control of gametogenesis in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    van Werven, Folkert J; Neuert, Gregor; Hendrick, Natalie; Lardenois, Aurélie; Buratowski, Stephen; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Primig, Michael; Amon, Angelika

    2012-09-14

    The cell-fate decision leading to gametogenesis is essential for sexual reproduction. In S. cerevisiae, only diploid MATa/α but not haploid MATa or MATα cells undergo gametogenesis, known as sporulation. We find that transcription of two long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) mediates mating-type control of sporulation. In MATa or MATα haploids, expression of IME1, the central inducer of gametogenesis, is inhibited in cis by transcription of the lncRNA IRT1, located in the IME1 promoter. IRT1 transcription recruits the Set2 histone methyltransferase and the Set3 histone deacetylase complex to establish repressive chromatin at the IME1 promoter. Inhibiting expression of IRT1 and an antisense transcript that antagonizes the expression of the meiotic regulator IME4 allows cells expressing the haploid mating type to sporulate with kinetics that are indistinguishable from that of MATa/α diploids. Conversely, expression of the two lncRNAs abolishes sporulation in MATa/α diploids. Thus, transcription of two lncRNAs governs mating-type control of gametogenesis in yeast.

  4. Molecular Polymorphism in the MTA and MTB Mating Type Genes of Tetrahymena thermophila and Related Asexual Species.

    PubMed

    Booth, Laurie; Wolfe, Benjamin; Doerder, F Paul

    2015-01-01

    Each of the seven mating types of Tetrahymena thermophila is determined by a pair of large genes, MTA and MTB, whose expression peaks at early conjugation. Each protein consists of a mating-type specific domain and a common transmembrane domain. To assess variation in natural populations, regions of both domains from wild isolates expressing mating types V and VII were analyzed. Corresponding regions of amicronucleates incapable of mating also were examined. MTA and MTB showed high haplotype diversity, with greater sequence variation in MTB. Mating type VII was less variable than mating type V, suggesting more recent origin. No polymorphism distinguished between mat1- and mat2-like alleles encoding different arrays of mating types, nor did polymorphisms give evidence of population structure. MTA and MTB variants have different phylogenies, suggesting independent rather than concerted evolution, and are under weak purifying selection. Codon usage is less biased than for housekeeping genes, and reassigned glutamine encoding stop codons are preferentially used. Amicronucleate T. thermophila and closely related nsp15 and nsp25 have higher levels of nucleotide and amino acid substitution, consistent with cox1 distances. The results suggest that complete sequencing of mating type genes of wild isolates coupled with functional analysis will be informative. © 2015 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  5. [Macronuclear DNA and total protein contents of mating types I and II of Paramecium primaurelia, during the phase of maturity and the transition to senescence. Preliminary observations].

    PubMed

    Delmonte Corrado, M U; Crippa Franceschi, T

    1992-01-01

    Concerning the studies on mating type differentiation and life cycle development in Paramecium primaurelia stock 90, both macronuclear DNA and total protein contents have been measured cytofluorometrically in mating type I and mating type II isogenic cell lines growing in logarithmic phase, throughout their maturity period and transition to senescence. The target was to investigate whether the two mating types undergo clonal decline in different times, as the previous studies suggested. The results indicate that, throughout the maturity period, macronuclear DNA and total protein contents vary both in mating type I and mating type II cell lines; moreover, aged phenotypes as the dramatic decrease of both contents, firstly occur in mating type II which, therefore, appears to be submitted to clonal decline before mating type I.

  6. The Chlamydomonas Mating Type Plus Fertilization Tubule, a Prototypic Cell Fusion Organelle: Isolation, Characterization, and In Vitro Adhesion to Mating Type Minus Gametes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nedra F.; Foglesong, Mary J.; Snell, William J.

    1997-01-01

    In the biflagellated alga Chlamydomonas, adhesion and fusion of the plasma membranes of gametes during fertilization occurs via an actin-filled, microvillus-like cell protrusion. Formation of this ∼3-μm-long fusion organelle, the Chlamydomonas fertilization tubule, is induced in mating type plus (mt+) gametes during flagellar adhesion with mating type minus (mt−) gametes. Subsequent adhesion between the tip of the mt+ fertilization tubule and the apex of a mating structure on mt− gametes is followed rapidly by fusion of the plasma membranes and zygote formation. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of fertilization tubules from mt+ gametes activated for cell fusion. Fertilization tubules were detached by homogenization of activated mt+ gametes in an EGTA-containing buffer and purified by differential centrifugation followed by fractionation on sucrose and Percoll gradients. As determined by fluorescence microscopy of samples stained with a fluorescent probe for filamentous actin, the method yielded 2–3 × 106 fertilization tubules/μg protein, representing up to a 360-fold enrichment of these organelles. Examination by negative stain electron microscopy demonstrated that the purified fertilization tubules were morphologically indistinguishable from fertilization tubules on intact, activated mt+ gametes, retaining both the extracellular fringe and the internal array of actin filaments. Several proteins, including actin as well as two surface proteins identified by biotinylation studies, copurified with the fertilization tubules. Most importantly, the isolated mt+ fertilization tubules bound to the apical ends of activated mt− gametes between the two flagella, the site of the mt− mating structure; a single fertilization tubule bound per cell, binding was specific for gametes, and fertilization tubules isolated from trypsin-treated, activated mt+ gametes did not bind to activated mt− gametes. PMID:9199169

  7. DNA sequence characterization and molecular evolution of MAT1 and MAT2 mating-type loci of the self-compatible ascomycete mold Neosartorya fischeri.

    PubMed

    Rydholm, C; Dyer, P S; Lutzoni, F

    2007-05-01

    Degenerate PCR and chromosome-walking approaches were used to identify mating-type (MAT) genes and flanking regions from the homothallic (sexually self-fertile) euascomycete fungus Neosartorya fischeri, a close relative of the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Both putative alpha- and high-mobility-group-domain MAT genes were found within the same genome, providing a functional explanation for self-fertility. However, unlike those in many homothallic euascomycetes (Pezizomycotina), the genes were not found adjacent to each other and were termed MAT1 and MAT2 to recognize the presence of distinct loci. Complete copies of putative APN1 (DNA lyase) and SLA2 (cytoskeleton assembly control) genes were found bordering the MAT1 locus. Partial copies of APN1 and SLA2 were also found bordering the MAT2 locus, but these copies bore the genetic hallmarks of pseudogenes. Genome comparisons revealed synteny over at least 23,300 bp between the N. fischeri MAT1 region and the A. fumigatus MAT locus region, but no such long-range conservation in the N. fischeri MAT2 region was evident. The sequence upstream of MAT2 contained numerous candidate transposase genes. These results demonstrate a novel means involving the segmental translocation of a chromosomal region by which the ability to undergo self-fertilization may be acquired. The results are also discussed in relation to their significance in indicating that heterothallism may be ancestral within the Aspergillus section Fumigati.

  8. DNA Sequence Characterization and Molecular Evolution of MAT1 and MAT2 Mating-Type Loci of the Self-Compatible Ascomycete Mold Neosartorya fischeri▿

    PubMed Central

    Rydholm, C.; Dyer, P. S.; Lutzoni, F.

    2007-01-01

    Degenerate PCR and chromosome-walking approaches were used to identify mating-type (MAT) genes and flanking regions from the homothallic (sexually self-fertile) euascomycete fungus Neosartorya fischeri, a close relative of the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Both putative alpha- and high-mobility-group-domain MAT genes were found within the same genome, providing a functional explanation for self-fertility. However, unlike those in many homothallic euascomycetes (Pezizomycotina), the genes were not found adjacent to each other and were termed MAT1 and MAT2 to recognize the presence of distinct loci. Complete copies of putative APN1 (DNA lyase) and SLA2 (cytoskeleton assembly control) genes were found bordering the MAT1 locus. Partial copies of APN1 and SLA2 were also found bordering the MAT2 locus, but these copies bore the genetic hallmarks of pseudogenes. Genome comparisons revealed synteny over at least 23,300 bp between the N. fischeri MAT1 region and the A. fumigatus MAT locus region, but no such long-range conservation in the N. fischeri MAT2 region was evident. The sequence upstream of MAT2 contained numerous candidate transposase genes. These results demonstrate a novel means involving the segmental translocation of a chromosomal region by which the ability to undergo self-fertilization may be acquired. The results are also discussed in relation to their significance in indicating that heterothallism may be ancestral within the Aspergillus section Fumigati. PMID:17384199

  9. Dominant and Recessive Forms of Fibrochondrogenesis Resulting from Mutations at a Second Locus, COL11A2

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Stuart W.; Faqeih, Eissa Ali; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Miki, Rika; Funari, Tara; Funari, Vincent A.; Nevarez, Lisette; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe, recessively inherited skeletal dysplasia shown to result from mutations in the gene encoding the proα1(XI) chain of type XI collagen, COL11A1. The first of two cases reported here was the affected offspring of first cousins and sequence analysis excluded mutations in COL11A1. Consequently, whole-genome SNP genotyping was performed to identify blocks of homozygosity, identical-by-descent, wherein the disease locus would reside. COL11A1 was not within a region of homozygosity, further excluding it as the disease locus, but the gene encoding the proα2(XI) chain of type XI collagen, COL11A2, was located within a large region of homozygosity. Sequence analysis identified homozygosity for a splice donor mutation in intron 18. Exon trapping demonstrated that the mutation resulted in skipping of exon 18 and predicted deletion of 18 amino acids from the triple helical domain of the protein. In the second case, heterozygosity for a de novo 9 bp deletion in exon 40 of COL11A2 was identified, indicating that there are autosomal dominant forms of fibrochondrogenesis. These findings thus demonstrate that fibrochondrogenesis can result from either recessively- or dominantly-inherited mutations in COL11A2. PMID:22246659

  10. Large-Scale Introgression Shapes the Evolution of the Mating-Type Chromosomes of the Filamentous Ascomycete Neurospora tetrasperma

    PubMed Central

    Menkis, Audrius; Whittle, Carrie A.; Andersson, Siv G. E.; Johannesson, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    The significance of introgression as an evolutionary force shaping natural populations is well established, especially in animal and plant systems. However, the abundance and size of introgression tracts, and to what degree interspecific gene flow is the result of adaptive processes, are largely unknown. In this study, we present medium coverage genomic data from species of the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora, and we use comparative genomics to investigate the introgression landscape at the genomic level in this model genus. We revealed one large introgression tract in each of the three investigated phylogenetic lineages of Neurospora tetrasperma (sizes of 5.6 Mbp, 5.2 Mbp, and 4.1 Mbp, respectively). The tract is located on the chromosome containing the locus conferring sexual identity, the mating-type (mat) chromosome. The region of introgression is confined to the region of suppressed recombination and is found on one of the two mat chromosomes (mat a). We used Bayesian concordance analyses to exclude incomplete lineage sorting as the cause for the observed pattern, and multilocus genealogies from additional species of Neurospora show that the introgression likely originates from two closely related, freely recombining, heterothallic species (N. hispaniola and N. crassa/N. perkinsii). Finally, we investigated patterns of molecular evolution of the mat chromosome in Neurospora, and we show that introgression is correlated with reduced level of molecular degeneration, consistent with a shorter time of recombination suppression. The chromosome specific (mat) and allele specific (mat a) introgression reported herein comprise the largest introgression tracts reported to date from natural populations. Furthermore, our data contradicts theoretical predictions that introgression should be less likely on sex-determining chromosomes. Taken together, the data presented herein advance our general understanding of introgression as a force shaping eukaryotic genomes. PMID

  11. Diploids in the Cryptococcus neoformans Serotype A Population Homozygous for the α Mating Type Originate via Unisexual Mating

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaorong; Patel, Sweta; Litvintseva, Anastasia P.; Floyd, Anna; Mitchell, Thomas G.; Heitman, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitous environmental human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is traditionally considered a haploid fungus with a bipolar mating system. In nature, the α mating type is overwhelmingly predominant over a. How genetic diversity is generated and maintained by this heterothallic fungus in a largely unisexual α population is unclear. Recently it was discovered that C. neoformans can undergo same-sex mating under laboratory conditions generating both diploid intermediates and haploid recombinant progeny. Same-sex mating (α-α) also occurs in nature as evidenced by the existence of natural diploid αADα hybrids that arose by fusion between two α cells of different serotypes (A and D). How significantly this novel sexual style contributes to genetic diversity of the Cryptococcus population was unknown. In this study, ∼500 natural C. neoformans isolates were tested for ploidy and close to 8% were found to be diploid by fluorescence flow cytometry analysis. The majority of these diploids were serotype A isolates with two copies of the α MAT locus allele. Among those, several are intra-varietal allodiploid hybrids produced by fusion of two genetically distinct α cells through same-sex mating. The majority, however, are autodiploids that harbor two seemingly identical copies of the genome and arose via either endoreplication or clonal mating. The diploids identified were isolated from different geographic locations and varied genotypically and phenotypically, indicating independent non-clonal origins. The present study demonstrates that unisexual mating produces diploid isolates of C. neoformans in nature, giving rise to populations of hybrids and mixed ploidy. Our findings underscore the importance of same-sex mating in shaping the current population structure of this important human pathogenic fungus, with implications for mechanisms of selfing and inbreeding in other microbial pathogens. PMID:19180236

  12. Multiple epigenetic events regulate mating-type switching of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Klar, A J; Ivanova, A V; Dalgaard, J Z; Bonaduce, M J; Grewal, S I

    1998-01-01

    Two epigenetic events at mat1, one of which is DNA strand specific, are required to initiate recombination during mating-type switching. The third, a chromosomally borne imprinted event at the mat2/3 interval regulates silencing and directionality of switching, and prohibits interchromosomal recombination. We speculate that the unit of inheritance in the mat2/3 interval is both DNA plus its associated chromatin structure. Such a control is likely to be essential in maintaining particular states of gene expression during development.

  13. Heteroduplex formation and mismatch repair of the "stuck" mutation during mating-type switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ray, B L; White, C I; Haber, J E

    1991-01-01

    We sequenced two alleles of the MATa locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that reduce homothallic switching and confer viability to HO rad52 strains. Both the MATa-stk (J. E. Haber, W. T. Savage, S. M. Raposa, B. Weiffenbach, and L. B. Rowe, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77:2824-2828, 1980) and MATa-survivor (R. E. Malone and D. Hyman, Curr. Genet. 7:439-447, 1983) alleles result from a T----A base change at position Z11 of the MAT locus. These strains also contain identical base substitutions at HMRa, so that the mutation is reintroduced when MAT alpha switches to MATa. Mating-type switching in a MATa-stk strain relative to a MATa Z11T strain is reduced at least 50-fold but can be increased by expression of HO from a galactose-inducible promoter. We confirmed by Southern analysis that the Z11A mutation reduced the efficiency of double-strand break formation compared with the Z11T variant; the reduction was more severe in MAT alpha than in MATa. In MAT alpha, the Z11A mutation also creates a mat alpha 1 (sterile) mutation that distinguishes switches of MATa-stk to either MAT alpha or mat alpha 1-stk. Pedigree analysis of cells induced to switch in G1 showed that MATa-stk switched frequently (23% of the time) to produce one mat alpha 1-stk and one MAT alpha progeny. This postswitching segregation suggests that Z11 was often present in heteroduplex DNA that was not mismatch repaired. When mismatch repair was prevented by deletion of the PMS1 gene, there was an increase in the proportion of mat alpha 1-stk/MAT alpha sectors (59%) and in pairs of switched cells that both retained the stk mutation (27%). We conclude that at least one strand of DNA only 4 bp from the HO cut site is not degraded in most of the gene conversion events that accompany MAT switching. Images PMID:1922052

  14. Heteroduplex formation and mismatch repair of the "stuck" mutation during mating-type switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ray, B L; White, C I; Haber, J E

    1991-10-01

    We sequenced two alleles of the MATa locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that reduce homothallic switching and confer viability to HO rad52 strains. Both the MATa-stk (J. E. Haber, W. T. Savage, S. M. Raposa, B. Weiffenbach, and L. B. Rowe, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77:2824-2828, 1980) and MATa-survivor (R. E. Malone and D. Hyman, Curr. Genet. 7:439-447, 1983) alleles result from a T----A base change at position Z11 of the MAT locus. These strains also contain identical base substitutions at HMRa, so that the mutation is reintroduced when MAT alpha switches to MATa. Mating-type switching in a MATa-stk strain relative to a MATa Z11T strain is reduced at least 50-fold but can be increased by expression of HO from a galactose-inducible promoter. We confirmed by Southern analysis that the Z11A mutation reduced the efficiency of double-strand break formation compared with the Z11T variant; the reduction was more severe in MAT alpha than in MATa. In MAT alpha, the Z11A mutation also creates a mat alpha 1 (sterile) mutation that distinguishes switches of MATa-stk to either MAT alpha or mat alpha 1-stk. Pedigree analysis of cells induced to switch in G1 showed that MATa-stk switched frequently (23% of the time) to produce one mat alpha 1-stk and one MAT alpha progeny. This postswitching segregation suggests that Z11 was often present in heteroduplex DNA that was not mismatch repaired. When mismatch repair was prevented by deletion of the PMS1 gene, there was an increase in the proportion of mat alpha 1-stk/MAT alpha sectors (59%) and in pairs of switched cells that both retained the stk mutation (27%). We conclude that at least one strand of DNA only 4 bp from the HO cut site is not degraded in most of the gene conversion events that accompany MAT switching.

  15. Recovery of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type a cells from G1 arrest by alpha factor.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, R K

    1977-01-01

    Mating-type a cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that had been specifically arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle by alpha factor, an oligopeptide pheromone made by alpha cells, recovered and resumed cell division after a period of inhibition which was dependent on the concentration of alpha factor used. These treated a cells were more resistant to alpha factor than untreated a cells, but lost their resistance upon further cell division. However, cells arrested for 6 h were no more resistant to alpha factor than cells arrested for only 2.5 h. Mating-type a strains could inactivate or remove alpha factor from the culture fluid, but two a sterile (nonmating) mutants and an a/alpha diploid strain could not. These results suggest that a cells have a mechanism, which may involve uptake or inactivation of alpha factor, for recovering from alpha factor arrest. However, the results do not distinguish between a recovery mechanism which is constitutive and one which is induced by alpha factor. The loss of alpha factor activity during recovery appeared to be primarily cell contact mediated, although an extracellular, diffusible inhibitor of alpha factor that is labile or that functions stoichiometrically could not be ruled out. PMID:400792

  16. Transcription of the mating-type-regulated lncRNA IRT1 is governed by TORC1 and PKA.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Fabien; van Werven, Folkert J

    2016-08-12

    Cell fate decisions are controlled by multiple cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors. In budding yeast, the decision to enter gametogenesis or sporulation is dictated by nutrient availability and mating type. Recently, we showed that in diploid cells harbouring opposite mating types (MATa and MATα), the protein kinase A (PKA) and target of rapamycin complex I (TORC1) signalling pathways integrate at the promoter of the master regulatory transcription factor IME1 to control sporulation via nutrient availability (Weidberg, et al. 2016). In cells with a single mating type (MATa or MATα), however, IME1 is repressed by transcription through the IME1 promoter of a long non-coding RNA called IRT1, which prevents this cell type from undergoing sporulation. Here, we investigated the role of nutrient signalling in mating-type control of IME1. We find that expression of IRT1, like IME1 itself, depends on nutrient availability and the activities of PKA and TORC1. IRT1 transcription is repressed when nutrients are ample and TORC1 and PKA are active. In contrast, inhibition of PKA and TORC1 is sufficient to recruit Rme1 to the IRT1 promoter and induce IRT1-mediated repression of IME1. Finally, we provide evidence that IRT1 and IME1 are co-repressed by the Tup1-Cyc8 complex when nutrients are ample. Thus, in cells with a single mating-type nutrient availability regulates mating-type repression of IME1 and sporulation. Our results indicate that there is a hierarchy between nutrient and mating-type signals in controlling the decision to enter sporulation.

  17. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Profiling of Fertilization Competent Mycelium in Opposite Mating Types in the Heterothallic Fungus Podospora anserina

    PubMed Central

    Coppin, Evelyne; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Grognet, Pierre; Delacroix, Hervé; Debuchy, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background Mating-type loci in yeasts and ascomycotan filamentous fungi (Pezizomycotina) encode master transcriptional factors that play a critical role in sexual development. Genome-wide analyses of mating-type-specification circuits and mating-type target genes are available in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe; however, no such analyses have been performed in heterothallic (self-incompatible) Pezizomycotina. The heterothallic fungus Podospora anserina serves as a model for understanding the basic features of mating-type control. Its mat+ and mat− mating types are determined by dissimilar allelic sequences. The mat− sequence contains three genes, designated FMR1, SMR1 and SMR2, while the mat+ sequence contains one gene, FPR1. FMR1 and FPR1 are the major regulators of fertilization, and this study presents a genome-wide view of their target genes and analyzes their target gene regulation. Methodology/Principal Findings The transcriptomic profiles of the mat+ and mat− strains revealed 157 differentially transcribed genes, and transcriptomic analysis of fmr1− and fpr1− mutant strains was used to determine the regulatory actions exerted by FMR1 and FPR1 on these differentially transcribed genes. All possible combinations of transcription repression and/or activation by FMR1 and/or FPR1 were observed. Furthermore, 10 additional mating-type target genes were identified that were up- or down-regulated to the same level in mat+ and mat− strains. Of the 167 genes identified, 32 genes were selected for deletion, which resulted in the identification of two genes essential for the sexual cycle. Interspecies comparisons of mating-type target genes revealed significant numbers of orthologous pairs, although transcriptional profiles were not conserved between species. Conclusions/Significance This study represents the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of mating-type direct and indirect target genes in a heterothallic filamentous fungus

  18. The pedigree pattern of mating-type switching in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Egel, R

    1984-04-01

    The previous ovservation that in dividing sister cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe only one of two parallel divisions can be accompanied by a switch of mating type, herein termed "Miyata's rule", has been confirmed in pedigrees of diploid cells heterozygous for the mat2-Pm-B102 allele. Moreover, this rule appears to operate at the level of individual chromosomes, since in diploid cells simultaneous single-switch events were frequently observed in both sister cells, albeit on different chromosomes. Assuming two successive precursory states for the smt switching signal to the right of mat1, a deterministic 3-step model coupled to the cell cycle has been fitted to the empirical frequency distribution of conjugation in "four-lined cells" (a minipedigree of dividing sister cells). The nature of the first intermediate is still unknown, while the ultimate precursor of a switching event is probably a double-strand cut at smt, which can be revealed by molecular analyses.

  19. Population structure and mating-type genes of Colletotrichum graminicola from Agrostis palustris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fajun; Goodwin, Paul H; Khan, Adalat; Hsiang, Tom

    2002-05-01

    Eighty-seven isolates of Colletotrichum graminicola, mostly from Agrostis palustris, were collected in grass fields, most of which were in Ontario, Canada. Specific primers were designed to amplify the mating-type (MAT) genes and, among 35 isolates tested, all yielded a band of the expected size for MAT2. For six isolates, the MAT2 PCR products were sequenced and found to be similar to that reported for MAT2 of C. graminicola from maize. Based on 119 polymorphic bands from 10 random amplified polymorphic DNA primers, analyses of genetic distances were found to generally cluster isolates by host and geographic origin. Among 42 isolates from a grass field in Ontario, significant spatial autocorrelation was found to occur within a 20-m distance, implying that this is the effective propagule dispersal distance. Although clonal propagation was observed in the 87 isolates with 67 unique genotypes, the extent of genetic variation in local populations implies some occurrence of sexual or asexual recombination.

  20. Identification and In Situ Distribution of a Fungal Gene Marker: The Mating Type Genes of the Black Truffle.

    PubMed

    De la Varga, Herminia; Murat, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Truffles are ectomycorrhizal fungi harvested mainly in human managed agroforestry ecosystems. Truffle production in truffle orchards faces two important bottlenecks or challenges: the initiation of the sexual reproduction and the growth of the ascocarps during several months. The black Périgord truffle, Tuber melanosporum, is a heterothallic species and the mating type genes (MAT1-1 and M1T1-2) have been characterized. In this context, the unraveling of the T. melanosporum mating type strains distribution in truffle orchards is a critical starting point to provide new insights into its sexual reproduction. The aim of this chapter is to present the protocol used to characterize the T. melanosporum mating type present in a truffle orchard from ascocarps, hazel mycorrhizal root tips, and/or soil samples, by polymerase chain reactions using specific primers for those genes, but it can be adapted for other fungal species.

  1. Functional convergence and divergence of mating-type genes fulfilling in Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuzhen; Xia, Yongliang; Luo, Feifei; Dong, Caihong; Wang, Chengshu

    2016-03-01

    Fungal sexual lives are considerably diversified in terms of the types of mating systems and mating-control gene functions. Sexual fruiting bodies of the ascomycete fungus Cordyceps militaris have been widely consumed as edible and medicinal mushrooms, whereas the regulation of fruiting-body development and sex in this fungus remain elusive. Herein, we performed the comprehensive functional analyses of mating-type (MAT) genes in C. militaris. Interspecies functional convergence was evident that MAT1-1 and MAT1-2-1 null mutants were sterile and lost the ability to produce stromata in outcrosses with the opposite mating-type partner. In contrast to other fungal species, functional divergence of MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-2 was also observed that ΔMAT1-1-1 produced barren stromata in outcrosses, whereas ΔMAT1-1-2 generated fruiting bodies morphologically similar to that of the parental strain but with sterile perithecia. The homothallic-like transformants MAT1-2::MAT1-1-1 (haploidic MAT1-2 isolate transformed with the MAT1-1-1 gene) produced sterile stromata, whereas the MAT1-1::MAT1-2-1 (haploidic MAT1-1 isolate transformed with the MAT1-2-1 gene) mutant was determined to be completely fruitless. The findings relating to the fully fertile gene-complementation mutants suggest that the genomic location is not essential for the MAT genes to fulfill their functions in C. militaris. Comparison of the production of bioactive constituents cordycepin and adenosine provides experimental support that the fungal sexual cycle is an energy consuming process. The results of the present study enrich our knowledge of both convergent and divergent controls of fungal sex.

  2. The DNA Repair Protein yKu80 Regulates the Function of Recombination Enhancer during Yeast Mating Type Switching†

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Chun; Workman, Jerry L.; Simpson, Robert T.

    2005-01-01

    Recombination enhancer (RE) is essential for regulating donor preference during yeast mating type switching. In this study, by using minichromosome affinity purification (MAP) and mass spectrometry, we found that yeast Ku80p is associated with RE in MATa cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed its occupancy in vivo. Deletion of YKU80 results in altered chromatin structure in the RE region and more importantly causes a dramatic decrease of HML usage in MATa cells. We also detect directional movement of yKu80p from the RE towards HML during switching. These results indicate a novel function of yeast Ku80p in regulating mating type switching. PMID:16166630

  3. A multiplex PCR assay for determination of mating type in isolates of the honey bee fungal pathogen, Ascosphaera apis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we developed a multiplex PCR for identification of mating type idiomorphs in the filamentous fungus, Ascosphaera apis, the causative agent of chalkbrood disease in the honey bee (Apis melliffera). A combination of gene-specific primers was designed to amplify Mat1-1 and Mat1-2 gene fra...

  4. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes

    PubMed Central

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Ismael; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I.

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis. PMID:26317403

  5. Characterization of Ascochyta rabiei for population structure, mating type and pathogenic variability from Pakistan and United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chickpea production is greatly hampered by blight causing fungal pathogen Ascochyta rabiei (AR) in chickpea growing regions of the world. Genetic variability and mating type frequency of thirty-two AR isolates from six geographical regions of Pakistan were compared with a US-AR population. Pakistani...

  6. Mating-type distribution and genetic diversity of Cercospora sojina populations on soybean from Arkansas: evidence for potential sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun; Newell, Annakay D; Cota-Sieckmeyer, Robyn G; Rupe, John C; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Bluhm, Burton H

    2013-10-01

    Cercospora sojina causes frogeye leaf spot of soybean, which can cause serious economic losses in the United States. In this study, 132 C. sojina isolates were collected from six fields (from two counties, Cross and Crawford) in Arkansas. To determine mating type, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay was developed with primers specific for C. sojina. Of the 132 isolates, 68 isolates had the MAT1-1-1 idiomorph and 64 isolates had the MAT1-2 idiomorph; no isolates possessed both idiomorphs. Both mating types were present in a variety of spatial scales, including separate lesions on individual leaves. Clone-corrected data from eight microsatellites indicated that mating-type loci were present in approximately equal proportions in all populations analyzed, which suggests that Arkansas populations of C. sojina are undergoing cryptic sexual reproduction. All six populations evaluated had high genotypic diversity of 26 to 79%. In addition, among strains isolated from a single leaf, multiple and distinct haplotypes were associated with both mating types, supporting the hypothesis that sexual reproduction occurs within the populations. Most populations showed significant gametic disequilibrium but levels of disequilibrium were relatively low, particularly in populations from Crawford County. A low differentiation index (GST) was observed for all simple-sequence repeat markers across all populations. Furthermore, the value of G statistics between populations suggests that significant genetic exchange exists among the populations. Taken together, these results demonstrate that C. sojina populations from Arkansas are genetically diverse and most likely undergoing sexual reproduction.

  7. Mating-Type Mutations in SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE: Isolation of Mutants and Analysis of Strains with an h- or h+ Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Meade, James H.; Gutz, Herbert

    1976-01-01

    Mutants defective in various steps of the sexual cycle have been isolated from homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Bresch, Müller and Egel (1968). These mutants include heterothallic h+ and h- strains. We have isolated additional h+ and h- mutants from homothallic strains. Those mutants which are due to mutations in the mating-type region were analyzed in detail. Our results show that the mating-type gene mat2 not only has a function in copulation and meiosis, but that it also regulates the formation of the map1 gene product (map1 is a mating-type auxiliary gene). Some of the h - mutants have lost only one of the three functions while others are defective in at least two, and perhaps all three, functions. Further, we show that the mat1- allele of h90 strains can mutate to mat1+ but that mutations in mat2 appear to affect the mutational behavior of mat1. Finally, we describe a new inactive mating-type allele, mat2*, which is different from mat20 in that it can mutate to mat2+. PMID:17248713

  8. Mating-Type Mutations in SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE: Isolation of Mutants and Analysis of Strains with an h or h Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Meade, J H; Gutz, H

    1976-06-01

    Mutants defective in various steps of the sexual cycle have been isolated from homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Bresch, Müller and Egel (1968). These mutants include heterothallic h(+) and h(-) strains. We have isolated additional h(+) and h(- ) mutants from homothallic strains. Those mutants which are due to mutations in the mating-type region were analyzed in detail. Our results show that the mating-type gene mat2 not only has a function in copulation and meiosis, but that it also regulates the formation of the map1 gene product (map1 is a mating-type auxiliary gene). Some of the h( -) mutants have lost only one of the three functions while others are defective in at least two, and perhaps all three, functions. Further, we show that the mat1(-) allele of h(90) strains can mutate to mat1(+) but that mutations in mat2 appear to affect the mutational behavior of mat1. Finally, we describe a new inactive mating-type allele, mat2*, which is different from mat2(0) in that it can mutate to mat2(+).

  9. Characterization of the mycelial compatibility groups and mating type alleles in populations of Sclerotinia minor in central China

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ninety-five single-sclerotium isolates were obtained from lettuce and weeds in three counties in central China. They were identified belonging to Sclerotinia minor Jagger based on colony morphology and the S. minor-specific DNA marker. Mycelial compatibility groups (MCGs) and the mating type (MAT) a...

  10. Mating-type orthologous genes in the primarily homothallic Moniliophthora perniciosa, the causal agent of Witches' Broom Disease in cacao.

    PubMed

    Kües, Ursula; Navarro-González, Mónica

    2010-10-01

    The cacao-pathogenic Moniliophthora perniciosa C-biotype is a primarily homothallic Agaricomycete of which the genome has recently become available. Searching of the genome sequence with mating type proteins from other basidiomycetes detected one or possibly two potential genes for HD1 homeodomain transcription factors, 7 or possibly 8 genes for potential pheromone receptors and five genes for putative pheromone precursors. Apparently, the fungus possesses gene functions encoded in the tetrapolar basidiomycetes in the A and B mating loci, respectively. In the tetrapolar species, the A and B mating type genes govern formation of clamp cells at hyphal septa of the dikaryon and their fusion with sub-apical cells as well as mushroom production. The C-biotype forms fused clamp cells and also basidiocarps on mycelia germinated from basidiospores and their development might be controlled by the detected genes. It represents the first example of a primarily homothallic basidiomycete where A - and B -mating-type-like genes were found. Various strategies are discussed as how self-compatibility in presence of such genes can evolve. An A -mating-type like gene for an HD2 homeodomain transcription factor is, however, not included in the available sequence representing estimated 69% coverage of the haploid genome but there are non-mating genes for other homeodomain transcription factors of currently unknown function that are conserved in basidiomycetes and also various ascomycetes.

  11. Using mating-type gene sequences for improved phylogenetic resolution of Collectotrichum species complexes.

    PubMed

    Du, Meizhu; Schardl, Christopher L; Nuckles, Etta M; Vaillancourt, Lisa J

    2005-01-01

    Colletotrichum species are defined primarily on the basis of host preference and morphology of the organism in planta and in culture. However the genus contains several species complexes that encompass such a broad range of morphological and pathological variation that the species name is of relatively little use either to the taxonomist or plant pathologist. Phylogenetic analyses, primarily based on variable regions of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences, have indicated that these species complexes comprise a variable number of identifiable monophyletic clades. However rDNA sequences often are insufficiently diverse to fully resolve such closely related lineages. A group of isolates representing three species complexes (C. graminicola, C. gloeosporioides and C. acutatum) were analyzed by using the high mobility group (HMG)-encoding sequence of the MAT1-2 mating type sequence, which has been shown in other fungi to be especially suitable for distinguishing relationships among closely related groups. Results were compared with those obtained from analysis of variable regions of the rDNA as well as from standard morphological classification methods. Results achieved through analysis of MAT1-2 sequences correlated well with those obtained by analysis of rDNA sequences but provided significantly better resolution among the various lineages. Morphological traits, including hyphopodia size, colony appearance, spore size, appresorial shape and size and host preference, frequently were unreliable as indicators of phylogenetic association. Spore shape and hyphopodia shape more often were useful for this purpose.

  12. swi6, a gene required for mating-type switching, prohibits meiotic recombination in the mat2-mat3 "cold spot" of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Klar, A J; Bonaduce, M J

    1991-12-01

    Mitotic interconversion of the mating-type locus (mat1) of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is initiated by a double-strand break at mat1. The mat2 and mat3 loci act as nonrandom donors of genetic information for mat1 switching such that switches occur primarily (or only) to the opposite mat1 allele. Location of the mat1 "hot spot" for transposition should be contrasted with the "cold spot" of meiotic recombination located within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval. That is, meiotic interchromosomal recombination in mat2, mat3 and the intervening 15-kilobase region does not occur at all. swi2 and swi6 switching-deficient mutants possess the normal level of double-strand break at mat1, yet they fail to switch efficiently. By testing for meiotic recombination in the cold spot, we found the usual lack of recombination in a swi2 mutant but a significant level of recombination in a swi6 mutant. Therefore, the swi6 gene function is required to keep the donor loci inert for interchromosomal recombination. This finding, combined with the additional result that switching primarily occurs intrachromosomally, suggests that the donor loci are made accessible for switching by folding them onto mat1, thus causing the cold spot of recombination.

  13. Swi6, a Gene Required for Mating-Type Switching, Prohibits Meiotic Recombination in the Mat2-Mat3 ``cold Spot'' of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Klar, AJS.; Bonaduce, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    Mitotic interconversion of the mating-type locus (mat1) of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is initiated by a double-strand break at mat1. The mat2 and mat3 loci act as nonrandom donors of genetic information for mat1 switching such that switches occur primarily (or only) to the opposite mat1 allele. Location of the mat1 ``hot spot'' for transposition should be contrasted with the ``cold spot'' of meiotic recombination located within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval. That is, meiotic interchromosomal recombination in mat2, mat3 and the intervening 15-kilobase region does not occur at all. swi2 and swi6 switching-deficient mutants possess the normal level of double-strand break at mat1, yet they fail to switch efficiently. By testing for meiotic recombination in the cold spot, we found the usual lack of recombination in a swi2 mutant but a significant level of recombination in a swi6 mutant. Therefore, the swi6 gene function is required to keep the donor loci inert for interchromosomal recombination. This finding, combined with the additional result that switching primarily occurs intrachromosomally, suggests that the donor loci are made accessible for switching by folding them onto mat1, thus causing the cold spot of recombination. PMID:1783290

  14. Genome-wide identification of target genes of a mating-type α-domain transcription factor reveals functions beyond sexual development.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kordula; Beer, Christina; Freitag, Michael; Kück, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is the main industrial producer of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin, the most commonly used drug in the treatment of bacterial infections. Recently, a functional MAT1-1 locus encoding the α-box transcription factor MAT1-1-1 was discovered to control sexual development in P. chrysogenum. As only little was known from any organism about the regulatory functions mediated by MAT1-1-1, we applied chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) to gain new insights into the factors that influence MAT1-1-1 functions on a molecular level and its role in genome-wide transcriptional regulatory networks. Most importantly, our data provide evidence for mating-type transcription factor functions that reach far beyond their previously understood role in sexual development. These new roles include regulation of hyphal morphology, asexual development, as well as amino acid, iron, and secondary metabolism. Furthermore, in vitro DNA-protein binding studies and downstream analysis in yeast and P. chrysogenum enabled the identification of a MAT1-1-1 DNA-binding motif, which is highly conserved among euascomycetes. Our studies pave the way to a more general understanding of these master switches for development and metabolism in all fungi, and open up new options for optimization of fungal high production strains.

  15. Deciphering evolutionary strata on plant sex chromosomes and fungal mating-type chromosomes through compositional segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravi S; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-03-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved from a pair of homologous autosomes which differentiated into sex determination systems, such as XY or ZW system, as a consequence of successive recombination suppression between the gametologous chromosomes. Identifying the regions of recombination suppression, namely, the "evolutionary strata", is central to understanding the history and dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. Evolution of sex chromosomes as a consequence of serial recombination suppressions is well-studied for mammals and birds, but not for plants, although 48 dioecious plants have already been reported. Only two plants Silene latifolia and papaya have been studied until now for the presence of evolutionary strata on their X chromosomes, made possible by the sequencing of sex-linked genes on both the X and Y chromosomes, which is a requirement of all current methods that determine stratum structure based on the comparison of gametologous sex chromosomes. To circumvent this limitation and detect strata even if only the sequence of sex chromosome in the homogametic sex (i.e. X or Z chromosome) is available, we have developed an integrated segmentation and clustering method. In application to gene sequences on the papaya X chromosome and protein-coding sequences on the S. latifolia X chromosome, our method could decipher all known evolutionary strata, as reported by previous studies. Our method, after validating on known strata on the papaya and S. latifolia X chromosome, was applied to the chromosome 19 of Populus trichocarpa, an incipient sex chromosome, deciphering two, yet unknown, evolutionary strata. In addition, we applied this approach to the recently sequenced sex chromosome V of the brown alga Ectocarpus sp. that has a haploid sex determination system (UV system) recovering the sex determining and pseudoautosomal regions, and then to the mating-type chromosomes of an anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae predicting five strata in the non

  16. Localization and properties of a silencing element near the mat3-M mating-type cassette of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G; Bjerling, K P; Nielsen, I S

    1999-01-01

    Transcription is repressed in a segment of Schizosaccharomyces pombe chromosome II that encompasses the mat2-P and mat3-M mating-type cassettes. Chromosomal deletion analysis revealed the presence of a repressor element within 500 bp of mat3-M. This element acted in synergy with the trans-acting factors Swi6, Clr1, Clr2, Clr3, and Clr4 and had several properties characteristic of silencers: it did not display promoter specificity, being able to silence not only the M mating-type genes but also the S. pombe ura4 and ade6 genes placed on the centromere-distal side of the mat3-M cassette; it could repress a gene when placed further than 2.6 kb from the promoter and it acted in both orientations, although with different efficiencies, the natural orientation repressing more stringently than the reverse. Following deletion of this element, two semistable states of expression of the mat3-M region were observed and these two states could interconvert. The deletion did not affect gene expression in the vicinity of the mat2-P cassette, 11 kb away from mat3-M. Conversely, deleting 1.5 kb on the centromere-proximal side of the mat2-P cassette, which was previously shown to partially derepress transcription around mat2-P, had no effect on gene expression near mat3-M. A double deletion removing the mat2-P and mat3-M repressor elements had the same effect as the single deletions on their respective cassettes when assayed in cells of the M mating type. These observations allow us to refine a model proposing that redundant pathways silence the mating type region of S. pombe. PMID:10049914

  17. Localization and properties of a silencing element near the mat3-M mating-type cassette of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Thon, G; Bjerling, K P; Nielsen, I S

    1999-03-01

    Transcription is repressed in a segment of Schizosaccharomyces pombe chromosome II that encompasses the mat2-P and mat3-M mating-type cassettes. Chromosomal deletion analysis revealed the presence of a repressor element within 500 bp of mat3-M. This element acted in synergy with the trans-acting factors Swi6, Clr1, Clr2, Clr3, and Clr4 and had several properties characteristic of silencers: it did not display promoter specificity, being able to silence not only the M mating-type genes but also the S. pombe ura4 and ade6 genes placed on the centromere-distal side of the mat3-M cassette; it could repress a gene when placed further than 2.6 kb from the promoter and it acted in both orientations, although with different efficiencies, the natural orientation repressing more stringently than the reverse. Following deletion of this element, two semistable states of expression of the mat3-M region were observed and these two states could interconvert. The deletion did not affect gene expression in the vicinity of the mat2-P cassette, 11 kb away from mat3-M. Conversely, deleting 1.5 kb on the centromere-proximal side of the mat2-P cassette, which was previously shown to partially derepress transcription around mat2-P, had no effect on gene expression near mat3-M. A double deletion removing the mat2-P and mat3-M repressor elements had the same effect as the single deletions on their respective cassettes when assayed in cells of the M mating type. These observations allow us to refine a model proposing that redundant pathways silence the mating type region of S. pombe.

  18. Inheritance and molecular mapping of Rf6 locus with pollen fertility restoration ability on A1 and A2 cytoplasms in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Praveen, M; Anurag Uttam, G; Suneetha, N; Umakanth, Av; Patil, J V; Madhusudhana, R

    2015-09-01

    Of the several male sterility cytoplasms available as an alternative to the widely exploited A1 (milo) cytoplasm in sorghum, A2 is more suitable for commercial exploitation. Diversification of genetic and cytoplasmic base of hybrids involving A2 cytoplasm necessitates mapping of fertility restorer (Rf) genes for use in marker-assisted restorer development. We mapped a major male fertility restoration locus on sorghum chromosome 4 tightly linked with SSR markers, SB2387 and SB2388. This new fertility locus, Rf6, was able to restore male fertility on both A1 and A2 cytoplasms. Analysis of the genomic region around the Rf6 locus identified six genes including a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene, Sobic.004G004100. With its similar restoration ability to Rf1, Rf2 and Rf5 loci in sorghum, it is most likely that the Rf6 is a member of the PPR gene family, and the PPR gene Sobic.004G004100 could be a candidate for fertility restoration on A1 and A2 cytoplasms.

  19. Genetic variation, occurrence of mating types and different forms of Pyrenophora teres causing net blotch of barley in Finland.

    PubMed

    Serenius, Marjo; Mironenko, Nina; Manninen, Outi

    2005-07-01

    The amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to study genetic variation in Pyrenophora teres causing net blotch of barley in Finland. The mean similarity was 93% between all isolates and a bit higher within two distinct populations based on 175 AFLP markers. Despite the high genetic similarity, 70 unique AFLP genotypes were identified among 72 isolates. Most of the genetic variation (68.5%) was observed within a field population and a smaller portion (30.3%) between them. Significant genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.308, P < 0.001) was identified between field populations. However only 1.2% of the variation was observed between mating types within a field and a lack of genetic differentiation (Fsc = 0.017, P = 0.087) was observed. The occurrence of the form of blotch (spot type, f. sp. maculata, or net type, P. teres f. sp. teres) was identified with specific PCR. All isolates were found to be of the net type. The existence of both mating types (MAT1 and MAT2) was identified for the first time in Finland and the ratio of the two mating types was almost 1:1 in both locations. The evolutionary potential and the possibility of sexual reproduction of P. teres occurring in Finland are discussed.

  20. Alpha mating type-specific expression of mutations leading to constitutive agglutinability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Doi, S; Yoshimura, M

    1985-01-01

    Two mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been isolated and characterized. The mutants were constitutively agglutinable at 36 degrees C, the temperature at which wild-type cells agglutinate only after induction by mating pheromone. The mutant cells had other properties specific for the normal alpha cell type, i.e., conjugation with a cells, response to a mating pheromone, and production of alpha mating pheromone. The two mutations, cag1 and cag2, were recessive and expressed only in alpha cells. cag1 is linked very closely to the MAT locus, but cag2 is unlinked to the MAT locus. These cag mutations complemented ste3-1. These results indicate that CAG genes are novel alpha-specific genes involved in the regulation of sex agglutinin synthesis. PMID:3881403

  1. BOTH MAT1-1 AND MAT1-2 MATING TYPES OF MYCOSPHAERELLA GRAMINICOLA OCCUR AT EQUAL FREQUENCIES IN ALGERIA.

    PubMed

    Allioui, N; Siah, A; Brinis, L; Reignault, Ph; Halama, P

    2014-01-01

    Septoria tritici blotch caused by Mycosphaerella graminicola is currently the most devastating disease on wheat crops worldwide. Mycosphaerella graminicola sexual reproduction involves two mating type idiomorphs that were previously studied in several areas around the world, but not in Algeria so far. The objective of this study was thus to determine the frequencies and distribution of M. graminicola mating types in this country. One hundred and twenty monoconidial isolates of this fungus (60 from bread wheat and 60 from durum wheat) were collected during the 2012 growing season from five distinct geographical locations in Algeria. The mating type of each isolate was identified using a multiplex PCR that amplifies either MAT1-1 or MAT1-2 fragment from mating type loci. Both idiomorphs were found at equal frequencies according to the chi-square test at the whole country level (46% MAT1-1 and 54% MAT1-2) and in each of the sampled locations. The two mating types were also detected at equal frequencies on both host species (47% MAT1-1 vs 53% MAT1-2 on bread wheat and 45% MAT1-1 vs 55% MAT1-2 on durum wheat). Our study showed that the two mating types of M. graminicola occur at equal proportions in Algeria and suggests a strong potential for sexual reproduction of the pathogen in this country that may eventually lead to either adaptation to local conditions, plant resistance overcoming or the emergence of resistance to fungicides.

  2. A 2-Mb YAC/BAC-based physical map of the ovum mutant (Om) locus region on mouse chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Tannoudji, M; Vandormael-Pournin, S; Le Bras, S; Coumailleau, F; Babinet, C; Baldacci, P

    2000-09-15

    The embryonic lethal phenotype observed when DDK females are crossed with males from other strains results from a deleterious interaction between the egg cytoplasm and the paternal pronucleus soon after fertilization. We have previously mapped the Om locus responsible for this phenotype, called the DDK syndrome, to an approximately 2-cM region of chromosome 11. Here, we report the generation of a physical map of 28 yeast and bacterial artificial chromosome clones encompassing the entire genetic interval containing the Om locus. This contig, spanning approximately 2 Mb, was used to map precisely genes and genetic markers of the region. We determined the maximum physical interval for Om to be 1400 kb. In addition, 11 members of the Scya gene family were found to be organized into two clusters at the borders of the Om region. Two other genes (Rad51l3 and Schlafen 2) and one EST (D11Wsu78e) were also mapped in the Om region. This integrated map provides support for the identification of additional candidate genes for the DDK syndrome. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. The novel fusion transcript NR5A2-KLHL29FT is generated by an insertion at the KLHL29 locus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenguo; Ke, Xiquan; Salzberg, Steven L; Kim, Daehwan; Antonescu, Valentin; Cheng, Yulan; Huang, Binbin; Song, Jee Hoon; Abraham, John M; Ibrahim, Sariat; Tian, Hui; Meltzer, Stephen J

    2017-05-01

    Novel fusion transcripts (FTs) caused by chromosomal rearrangement are common factors in the development of cancers. In the current study, the authors used massively parallel RNA sequencing to identify new FTs in colon cancers. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and TopHat-Fusion were used to identify new FTs in colon cancers. The authors then investigated whether the novel FT nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 2 (NR5A2)-Kelch-like family member 29 FT (KLHL29FT) was transcribed from a genomic chromosomal rearrangement. Next, the expression of NR5A2-KLHL29FT was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in colon cancers and matched corresponding normal epithelia. The authors identified the FT NR5A2-KLHL29FT in normal and cancerous epithelia. While investigating this transcript, it was unexpectedly found that it was due to an uncharacterized polymorphic germline insertion of the NR5A2 sequence from chromosome 1 into the KLHL29 locus at chromosome 2, rather than a chromosomal rearrangement. This germline insertion, which occurred at a population frequency of 0.40, appeared to bear no relationship to cancer development. Moreover, expression of NR5A2-KLHL29FT was validated in RNA specimens from samples with insertions of NR5A2 at the KLHL29 gene locus, but not from samples without this insertion. It is interesting to note that NR5A2-KLH29FT expression levels were significantly lower in colon cancers than in matched normal colonic epithelia (P =.029), suggesting the potential participation of NR5A2-KLHL29FT in the origin or progression of this tumor type. NR5A2-KLHL29FT was generated from a polymorphism insertion of the NR5A2 sequence into the KLHL29 locus. NR5A2-KLHL29FT may influence the origin or progression of colon cancer. Moreover, researchers should be aware that similar FTs may occur due to transchromosomal insertions that are not correctly annotated in genome databases, especially with current assembly algorithms. Cancer 2017;123:1507-1515.

  4. Introgression maintains the genetic integrity of the mating-type determining chromosome of the fungus Neurospora tetrasperma

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Pádraic; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, David J.; Sun, Yu; Ni, Peixiang; Lascoux, Martin; Johannesson, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Genome evolution is driven by a complex interplay of factors, including selection, recombination, and introgression. The regions determining sexual identity are particularly dynamic parts of eukaryotic genomes that are prone to molecular degeneration associated with suppressed recombination. In the fungus Neurospora tetrasperma, it has been proposed that this molecular degeneration is counteracted by the introgression of nondegenerated DNA from closely related species. In this study, we used comparative and population genomic analyses of 92 genomes from eight phylogenetically and reproductively isolated lineages of N. tetrasperma, and its three closest relatives, to investigate the factors shaping the evolutionary history of the genomes. We found that suppressed recombination extends across at least 6 Mbp (∼63%) of the mating-type (mat) chromosome in N. tetrasperma and is associated with decreased genetic diversity, which is likely the result primarily of selection at linked sites. Furthermore, analyses of molecular evolution revealed an increased mutational load in this region, relative to recombining regions. However, comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses indicate that the mat chromosomes are temporarily regenerated via introgression from sister species; six of eight lineages show introgression into one of their mat chromosomes, with multiple Neurospora species acting as donors. The introgressed tracts have been fixed within lineages, suggesting that they confer an adaptive advantage in natural populations, and our analyses support the presence of selective sweeps in at least one lineage. Thus, these data strongly support the previously hypothesized role of introgression as a mechanism for the maintenance of mating-type determining chromosomal regions. PMID:26893460

  5. Genetic Variation and Its Reflection on Posttranslational Modifications in Frequency Clock and Mating Type a-1 Proteins in Sordaria fimicola

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Rabia; Akram, Faiza; Jamil, Tazeen; Lee, Siu Fai

    2017-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) occur in all essential proteins taking command of their functions. There are many domains inside proteins where modifications take place on side-chains of amino acids through various enzymes to generate different species of proteins. In this manuscript we have, for the first time, predicted posttranslational modifications of frequency clock and mating type a-1 proteins in Sordaria fimicola collected from different sites to see the effect of environment on proteins or various amino acids pickings and their ultimate impact on consensus sequences present in mating type proteins using bioinformatics tools. Furthermore, we have also measured and walked through genomic DNA of various Sordaria strains to determine genetic diversity by genotyping the short sequence repeats (SSRs) of wild strains of S. fimicola collected from contrasting environments of two opposing slopes (harsh and xeric south facing slope and mild north facing slope) of Evolution Canyon (EC), Israel. Based on the whole genome sequence of S. macrospora, we targeted 20 genomic regions in S. fimicola which contain short sequence repeats (SSRs). Our data revealed genetic variations in strains from south facing slope and these findings assist in the hypothesis that genetic variations caused by stressful environments lead to evolution. PMID:28717646

  6. Genetic Variation and Its Reflection on Posttranslational Modifications in Frequency Clock and Mating Type a-1 Proteins in Sordaria fimicola.

    PubMed

    Arif, Rabia; Akram, Faiza; Jamil, Tazeen; Mukhtar, Hamid; Lee, Siu Fai; Saleem, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) occur in all essential proteins taking command of their functions. There are many domains inside proteins where modifications take place on side-chains of amino acids through various enzymes to generate different species of proteins. In this manuscript we have, for the first time, predicted posttranslational modifications of frequency clock and mating type a-1 proteins in Sordaria fimicola collected from different sites to see the effect of environment on proteins or various amino acids pickings and their ultimate impact on consensus sequences present in mating type proteins using bioinformatics tools. Furthermore, we have also measured and walked through genomic DNA of various Sordaria strains to determine genetic diversity by genotyping the short sequence repeats (SSRs) of wild strains of S. fimicola collected from contrasting environments of two opposing slopes (harsh and xeric south facing slope and mild north facing slope) of Evolution Canyon (EC), Israel. Based on the whole genome sequence of S. macrospora, we targeted 20 genomic regions in S. fimicola which contain short sequence repeats (SSRs). Our data revealed genetic variations in strains from south facing slope and these findings assist in the hypothesis that genetic variations caused by stressful environments lead to evolution.

  7. Stringent mating-type-regulated auxotrophy increases the accuracy of systematic genetic interaction screens with Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant arrays.

    PubMed

    Singh, Indira; Pass, Rebecca; Togay, Sine Ozmen; Rodgers, John W; Hartman, John L

    2009-01-01

    A genomic collection of haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion strains provides a unique resource for systematic analysis of gene interactions. Double-mutant haploid strains can be constructed by the synthetic genetic array (SGA) method, wherein a query mutation is introduced by mating to mutant arrays, selection of diploid double mutants, induction of meiosis, and selection of recombinant haploid double-mutant progeny. The mechanism of haploid selection is mating-type-regulated auxotrophy (MRA), by which prototrophy is restricted to a particular haploid genotype generated only as a result of meiosis. MRA escape leads to false-negative genetic interaction results because postmeiotic haploids that are supposed to be under negative selection instead proliferate and mate, forming diploids that are heterozygous at interacting loci, masking phenotypes that would be observed in a pure haploid double-mutant culture. This work identified factors that reduce MRA escape, including insertion of terminator and repressor sequences upstream of the MRA cassette, deletion of silent mating-type loci, and utilization of alpha-type instead of a-type MRA. Modifications engineered to reduce haploid MRA escape reduced false negative results in SGA-type analysis, resulting in >95% sensitivity for detecting gene-gene interactions.

  8. The MAT1-2-1 mating-type gene upregulates photo-inducible carotenoid biosynthesis in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Adám, Attila L; García-Martínez, Jorge; Szucs, Endre P; Avalos, Javier; Hornok, László

    2011-05-01

    Filamentous ascomycetes, including mitotic holomorphs, have constitutively transcribed MAT (mating type) genes. These genes encode transcription factors considered to be the major regulators of sexual communication. The proven targets of the MAT transcription factors are pheromone precursor and pheromone receptor genes. However, recent studies demonstrated that MAT proteins may also affect other genes not involved directly in the mating process. When grown in the light, Fusarium verticillioides produces the acidic xanthophyll neurosporoxanthin and lower amounts of nonpolar precursor carotenes, such as phytoene, torulene, β-carotene, and γ-carotene. Depending on the illumination conditions, a drastic decrease or the absence of light-inducible carotenoid accumulation was detected in three independent ΔFvMAT1-2-1 knockout mutants of F. verticillioides as compared with the parental wild-type strain. Transcript levels of the carB, carRA, and carT genes, encoding key enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, were also significantly reduced in the mutants. The downregulation of these genes in the ΔFvMAT1-2-1 mutant indicates that MAT genes play a role in the control of carotenogenesis in Fusarium. The finding that mating-type genes regulate important processes unrelated to sex helps to understand the presence of functional MAT genes in asexually reproducing fungus populations. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sexual reproduction and mating-type-mediated strain development in the penicillin-producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Julia; Hoff, Birgit; O'Gorman, Céline M; Wolfers, Simon; Klix, Volker; Binger, Danielle; Zadra, Ivo; Kürnsteiner, Hubert; Pöggeler, Stefanie; Dyer, Paul S; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-22

    Penicillium chrysogenum is a filamentous fungus of major medical and historical importance, being the original and present-day industrial source of the antibiotic penicillin. The species has been considered asexual for more than 100 y, and despite concerted efforts, it has not been possible to induce sexual reproduction, which has prevented sexual crosses being used for strain improvement. However, using knowledge of mating-type (MAT) gene organization, we now describe conditions under which a sexual cycle can be induced leading to production of meiotic ascospores. Evidence of recombination was obtained using both molecular and phenotypic markers. The identified heterothallic sexual cycle was used for strain development purposes, generating offspring with novel combinations of traits relevant to penicillin production. Furthermore, the MAT1-1-1 mating-type gene, known primarily for a role in governing sexual identity, was also found to control transcription of a wide range of genes with biotechnological relevance including those regulating penicillin production, hyphal morphology, and conidial formation. These discoveries of a sexual cycle and MAT gene function are likely to be of broad relevance for manipulation of other asexual fungi of economic importance.

  10. Mating-Type Effect on CIS Mutations Leading to Constitutivity of Ornithine Transaminase in Diploid Cells of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Jacqueline; Wiame, Jean-Marie

    1979-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory mutations have been isolated that affect L-ornithine transaminase (OTAse), an enzyme catalyzing the second step of arginine breakdown in yeast. These mutations lead to constitutive synthesis of OTAse at various levels. Two different types of mutations have been recovered, both of which are tightly linked to the structural gene (cargB) for this enzyme. One type behaves as a classical operator-constitutive mutation similar to the cargB+O-—1 mutation previously described (Dubois et al. 1978).—The second type is peculiar in two respects: the higher level of constitutive OTAse synthesis and the expression of constitutivity in diploid cells. These mutations are designated cargB+Oh. They behave as usual operator-constitutive mutations in diploid strains homozygous for mating type (a/a or α/α), but the constitutivity is strongly reduced in a/α diploid cells. PMID:395019

  11. DNA Loss at the Ceratocystis fimbriata Mating Locus Results in Self-Sterility

    PubMed Central

    Wilken, P. Markus; Steenkamp, Emma T.; Wingfield, Michael J.; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; Wingfield, Brenda D.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi have evolved a remarkable diversity of reproductive strategies. Some of these, most notably those of the model fungi, have been well studied but others are poorly understood. The latter is also true for uni-directional mating type switching, which has been reported in only five fungal genera, including Ceratocystis. Mating type switching allows a self-fertile fungal isolate to produce both self-fertile and self-sterile offspring. This study considered the molecular nature of uni-directional mating type switching in the type species of Ceratocystis, C. fimbriata. To do this, the genome of C. fimbriata was first examined for the presence of mating type genes. Three mating genes (MAT1-1-1, MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-1-2) were found in an atypical organisation of the mating type locus. To study the effect that uni-directional switching has on this locus, several self-sterile offspring were analysed. Using a combination of next generation and conventional Sanger sequencing, it was shown that a 3581 base pair (bp) region had been completely deleted from the MAT locus. This deletion, which includes the entire MAT1-2-1 gene, results in the permanent loss of self-fertility, rendering these isolates exclusively self-sterile. Our data also suggest that the deletion mechanism is tightly controlled and that it always occurs at the same genomic position. Two 260 bp direct repeats flanking the deleted region are strongly implicated in the process, although the exact mechanism behind the switching remains unclear. PMID:24651494

  12. Maintenance of Sex-Related Genes and the Co-Occurrence of Both Mating Types in Verticillium dahliae

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoping; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Subbarao, Krishna V.

    2014-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae is a cosmopolitan, soilborne fungus that causes a significant wilt disease on a wide variety of plant hosts including economically important crops, ornamentals, and timber species. Clonal expansion through asexual reproduction plays a vital role in recurring plant epidemics caused by this pathogen. The recent discovery of recombination between clonal lineages and preliminary investigations of the meiotic gene inventory of V. dahliae suggest that cryptic sex appears to be rare in this species. Here we expanded on previous findings on the sexual nature of V. dahliae. Only 1% of isolates in a global collection of 1120 phytopathogenic V. dahliae isolates contained the MAT1-1 idiomorph, whereas 99% contained MAT1-2. Nine unique multilocus microsatellite types comprised isolates of both mating types, eight of which were collected from the same substrate at the same time. Orthologs of 88 previously characterized sex-related genes from fungal model systems in the Ascoymycota were identified in the genome of V. dahliae, out of 93 genes investigated. Results of RT-PCR experiments using both mating types revealed that 10 arbitrarily chosen sex-related genes, including MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1, were constitutively expressed in V. dahliae cultures grown under laboratory conditions. Ratios of non-synonymous (amino-acid altering) to synonymous (silent) substitutions in V. dahliae MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 sequences were indistinguishable from the ratios observed in the MAT genes of sexual fungi in the Pezizomycotina. Patterns consistent with strong purifying selection were also observed in 18 other arbitrarily chosen V. dahliae sex-related genes, relative to the patterns in orthologs from fungi with known sexual stages. This study builds upon recent findings from other laboratories and mounts further evidence for an ancestral or cryptic sexual stage in V. dahliae. PMID:25383550

  13. B cell response during infection with the MAT a and MAT alpha mating types of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Adila Regina T Santos; Heise, Norton; Previato, José Osvaldo; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Peçanha, Ligia M T

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, we compared the B cell response of BALB/c and C57Bl/6 mice during Cryptococcus neoformans infection. This response was investigated using virulent serotype D forms of mating types alpha and a (MAT alpha and MAT a). C57Bl/6 mice showed massive (mainly cerebral) infection by both types, while BALB/c were resistant to infection. Some resistance of C57Bl/6 mice was induced by previous immunization with the capsular polysaccharide from MAT alpha. Passive immunization of C57Bl/6 mice with purified antibody (Ab) obtained from capsular polysaccharide-immunized mice also increased resistance to infection. Both mouse strains showed comparable low IgM response to the capsular polysaccharide from MAT alpha, and only C57Bl/6 mice produced IgM to the polysaccharide of MAT a. Comparable levels of different immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes against capsular components of MAT alpha and MAT a were detected, and the response of C57Bl/6 mice was higher when compared to that of BALB/c mice. FACS analysis indicated an increase in the percentage of a high-granulosity (side-scatter) splenic subpopulation and in the percentage of splenic Gr-1+ cells in infected C57Bl/6 mice. In addition, the percentage of follicular splenic B cells was decreased after C. neoformans infection of C57Bl/6 mice. This response was more pronounced when we investigated infection induced by the MAT a mating type. Taken together, our results indicate that capsular polysaccharide derived from MAT alpha and MAT a types of C. neoformans have a stimulatory effect upon B cells but that there is no correlation between resistance of BALB/c mice and Ab production. However, the increase in resistance of C57Bl/6 mice parallels the production of Abs and a major change in splenic cell populations.

  14. Cloning of mating-type gene MAT1-1 from the caterpillar medicinal mushroom, Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes) using TAIL-PCR technology.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wei-Ran; Gong, Zhen-Hua; Shi, Dan-Dan; Guo, Hui; Zhou, Xuanwei

    2014-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris and Ophiocordyceps sinensis (syn. Cordyceps sinensis), 2 well-known traditional Chinese medicines, contain the same bioactive components and share a similar developmental process. In this study, one C. militaris strain preserved in our laboratory was proven to be a MAT1 mating-type strain using a polymerase chain reaction-based mating-type assay. A 5000-bp nucleotide sequence of the mating-type MAT1-1 from C. militaris was amplified by thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction, but genes within the mating-type MAT1-2 remain undetectable. Sequence analysis shows that the mating-type gene MAT1-1 idiomorph contains 2 genes, MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-2. The MAT1-1-1 gene consists of 1480-bp nucleotides that encode 456 amino acids and contain the conserved a-box domain interrupted by 2 introns; the MAT1-1-2 gene consists of 1066 nucleotides that encode 377 amino acids interrupted by one intron. The intervening distance between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-1-2 is 778 bp. The C. militaris MAT1-1 idiomorph organization is the same as that of Cordyceps takaomontana. The MAT1-1 mating-type idiomorph of both Cordyceps species lacks the MAT1-1-3 gene, which is typically present in Pyrenomycetes. These studies provide some insights for further study of the morphological development of C. militaris and will eventually benefit the domestication of O. sinensis.

  15. Genetic control of a central pattern generator: rhythmic oromotor movement in mice is controlled by a major locus near Atp1a2.

    PubMed

    Boughter, John D; Mulligan, Megan K; St John, Steven J; Tokita, Kenichi; Lu, Lu; Heck, Detlef H; Williams, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Fluid licking in mice is a rhythmic behavior that is controlled by a central pattern generator (CPG) located in a complex of brainstem nuclei. C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) strains differ significantly in water-restricted licking, with a highly heritable difference in rates (h(2)≥0.62) and a corresponding 20% difference in interlick interval (mean ± SEM = 116.3±1 vs 95.4±1.1 ms). We systematically quantified motor output in these strains, their F(1) hybrids, and a set of 64 BXD progeny strains. The mean primary interlick interval (MPI) varied continuously among progeny strains. We detected a significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) for a CPG controlling lick rate on Chr 1 (Lick1), and a suggestive locus on Chr 10 (Lick10). Linkage was verified by testing of B6.D2-1D congenic stock in which a segment of Chr 1 of the D2 strain was introgressed onto the B6 parent. The Lick1 interval on distal Chr 1 contains several strong candidate genes. One of these is a sodium/potassium pump subunit (Atp1a2) with widespread expression in astrocytes, as well as in a restricted population of neurons. Both this subunit and the entire Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase molecule have been implicated in rhythmogenesis for respiration and locomotion. Sequence variants in or near Apt1a2 strongly modulate expression of the cognate mRNA in multiple brain regions. This gene region has recently been sequenced exhaustively and we have cataloged over 300 non-coding and synonymous mutations segregating among BXD strains, one or more of which is likely to contribute to differences in central pattern generator tempo.

  16. The mating type-specific homeodomain genes SXI1 alpha and SXI2a coordinately control uniparental mitochondrial inheritance in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhun; Hull, Christina M; Sun, Sheng; Heitman, Joseph; Xu, Jianping

    2007-03-01

    In the great majority of sexual eukaryotes, mitochondrial genomes are inherited almost exclusively from a single parent. While many hypotheses have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, very little is known about the genetic elements controlling uniparental mitochondria inheritance. In the bipolar, isogamous basidiomycete yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, progeny from crosses between strains of mating type a (MATa) and mating type alpha (MATalpha) typically inherit mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from the MATa parent. We recently demonstrated that a mating type alpha (MATalpha)-specific gene SXI1a, controls mitochondrial inheritance in C. neoformans. Here, we show that another homeodomain gene SXI2a in the alternative mating type MATa is also required for uniparental mtDNA inheritance in this fungus. Disruption of SXI2a resulted in biparental mtDNA inheritance in the zygote population with significant numbers of progeny inheriting mtDNA from the MATa parent, the MATalpha parent, and both the MATa and the MATalpha parents. In addition, progeny from same-sex mating between MATalpha strains showed a biparental mitochondrial inheritance pattern. Our results suggest that SXI1alpha and SXI2a coordinately control uniparental mitochondrial inheritance in C. neoformans.

  17. Replication and segregation of plasmids containing cis-acting regulatory sites of silent mating-type genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are controlled by the SIR genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerly, W J; Rine, J

    1987-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two cis-acting regulatory sites called E and I flank the silent mating-type gene, HMRa, and mediate SIR-dependent transcriptional repression of the a1-a2 promoters. It has been shown previously that the E and I sites have plasmid replicator (ARS) activity. We show in this report that the ARS activity of the E and I sites is governed by the SIR genotype of the cell. In wild-type cells, a plasmid carrying the E site from HMRa (HMR E) in the vector YIp5 exhibited very high mitotic stability at a copy number of approximately 25 per cell. However, in sir2, sir3, or sir4 mutants, plasmids with HMR E had the low mitotic stability characteristic of plasmids containing ARS1, a SIR-independent replicator. Elevated mitotic stability of plasmids that carry HMR E is due to a segregation mechanism provided by SIR and HMR E. In sir2 and sir4 mutants, the plasmid copy number was significantly lowered, suggesting that these gene products also participate in the replication of plasmids carrying HMR E. The phenotype of point mutations introduced at an 11-base-pair ARS consensus sequence present at HMR E indicated that this sequence is functional but not absolutely required for autonomous replication of the plasmid and that it is not required for SIR-dependent mitotic stabilization. A plasmid carrying both a centromere and HMR E exhibited reduced mitotic stability in wild-type cells. This destabilization appeared to be due to antagonism between the segregation functions provided by the centromere and by HMR E. Images PMID:3325822

  18. Markers linked to vegetative incompatibility (vic) genes and a region of high heterogeneity and reduced recombination near the mating type locus (MAT) in Cryphonectria parasitica

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Kubisiak; Michael g. Milgroom

    2006-01-01

    To find markers linked to vegetative incompatibility (vic) genes in the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, we constructed a preliminary linkage map. In general, this map is characterized by low levels of polymorphism, as evident from the more than 24 linkage groups observed, compared to seven expected from electrophoretic karyotyping....

  19. Mutations in XRS2 and RAD50 delay but do not prevent mating-type switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, E L; Sugawara, N; White, C I; Fabre, F; Haber, J E

    1994-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a large number of genes in the RAD52 epistasis group has been implicated in the repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks and in both mitotic and meiotic homologous recombination. While most of these genes are essential for yeast mating-type (MAT) gene switching, neither RAD50 nor XRS2 is required to complete this specialized mitotic gene conversion process. Using a galactose-inducible HO endonuclease gene to initiate MAT switching, we have examined the effect of null mutations of RAD50 and of XRS2 on intermediate steps of this recombination event. Both rad50 and xrs2 mutants exhibit a marked delay in the completion of switching. Both mutations reduce the extent of 5'-to-3' degradation from the end of the HO-created double-strand break. The steps of initial strand invasion and new DNA synthesis are delayed by approximately 30 min in mutant cells. However, later events are still further delayed, suggesting that XRS2 and RAD50 affect more than one step in the process. In the rad50 xrs2 double mutant, the completion of MAT switching is delayed more than in either single mutant, without reducing the overall efficiency of the process. The XRS2 gene encodes an 854-amino-acid protein with no obvious similarity to the Rad50 protein or to any other protein in the database. Overexpression of RAD50 does not complement the defects in xrs2 or vice versa. Images PMID:8164689

  20. The switching gene swi6 affects recombination and gene expression in the mating-type region of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, A; Heim, L; Schmidt, H

    1992-06-01

    The products of 11 switching (swi) genes are required for efficient mating-type (MT) switching in homothallic (h90) strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The MT region of h90 comprises three cassette genes: the expression site mat1:1 and two silent loci, mat2:2 and mat3:3. Besides reducing MT switching, the swi6 mutation leads to deletions in the MT region caused by intrachromosomal cross-overs between two paired cassettes. These deletions only arise if DNA double-strand breaks are present at mat1:1, which initiate MT switching. Furthermore, swi6 allows meiotic recombination in the K region, a region of 16 kb between mat2:2 and mat3:3; in wild-type strains no recombination occurs in K. swi6 also allows the simultaneous expression of two different cassettes in the same haploid cell. Thus swi6 may have an influence on the general chromatin structure in the MT region.

  1. Co-expression of the mating-type genes involved in internuclear recognition is lethal in Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Coppin, E; Debuchy, R

    2000-01-01

    In the heterothallic filamentous fungus Podospora anserina, four mating-type genes encoding transcriptional factors have been characterized: FPR1 in the mat+ sequence and FMR1, SMR1, and SMR2 in the alternative mat- sequence. Fertilization is controlled by FPR1 and FMR1. After fertilization, male and female nuclei, which have divided in the same cell, form mat+/mat- pairs during migration into the ascogenous hyphae. Previous data indicate that the formation of mat+/mat- pairs is controlled by FPR1, FMR1, and SMR2. SMR1 was postulated to be necessary for initial development of ascogenous hyphae. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional control of the mat genes by seeking mat transcripts during the vegetative and sexual phase and fusing their promoter to a reporter gene. The data indicate that FMR1 and FPR1 are expressed in both mycelia and perithecia, whereas SMR1 and SMR2 are transcribed in perithecia. Increased or induced vegetative expression of the four mat genes has no effect when the recombined gene is solely in the wild-type strain. However, the combination of resident FPR1 with deregulated SMR2 and overexpressed FMR1 in the same nucleus is lethal. This lethality is suppressed by the expression of SMR1, confirming that SMR1 operates downstream of the other mat genes. PMID:10835389

  2. Partial isodisomy for maternal chromosome 7 and short stature in an individual with a mutation at the COL1A2 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Spotila, L D; Sereda, L; Prockop, D J

    1992-01-01

    Uniparental disomy for chromosome 7 has been described previously in two individuals with cystic fibrosis. Here, we describe a third case that was discovered because the proband was homozygous for a mutation in the COL1A2 gene for type I procollagen, although his mother was heterozygous and his father did not have the mutation. Phenotypically, the proband was similar to the two previously reported cases with uniparental disomy for chromosome 7, in that he was short in stature and growth retarded. Paternity was assessed with five polymorphic markers. Chromosome 7 inheritance in the proband was analyzed using 12 polymorphic markers distributed along the entire chromosome. Similar analysis of the proband's two brothers established the phase of the alleles at the various loci, assuming minimal recombination. The proband inherited only maternal alleles at five loci and was homozygous at all loci examined, except one. He was heterozygous for an RFLP at the IGBP-1 locus at 7p13-p12. The results suggest that the isodisomy was not complete because of a recombination event involving the proximal short arms of two maternal chromosomes. In addition, the phenotype of proportional dwarfism in the proband suggests imprinting of one or more growth-related genes on chromosome 7. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1463018

  3. Partial isodisomy for maternal chromosome 7 and short stature in an individual with a mutation at the COL1A2 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Spotila, L.D.; Sereda, L.; Prockop, D.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Uniparental disomy for chromosome 7 has been described previously in two individuals with cystic fibrosis. Here, the authors describe a third case that was discovered because the proband was homozygous for a mutation in the COL1A2 gene for type I procollagen, although his mother was heterozygous and his father did not have the mutation. Phenotypically, the proband was similar to the two previously reported cases with uniparental disomy for chromosome 7, in that he was short in stature and growth retarded. Paternity was assessed with five polymorphic markers. Chromosome 7 inheritance in the proband was analyzed using 12 polymorphic markers distributed along the entire chromosome. Similar analysis of the proband's two brothers established the phase of the alleles at the various loci, assuming minimal recombination. The proband inherited only maternal alleles at five loci and was homozygous at all loci examined, except one. He was heterozygous for an RFLP at the IGBP-1 locus at 7p13-p12. The results suggest that the isodisomy was not complete because of a recombination event involving the proximal short arms of two maternal chromosomes. In addition, the phenotype of proportional dwarfism in the proband suggests imprinting of one or more growth-related genes on chromosome 7. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex in southern Italy: an overview on the environmental diffusion of serotypes, genotypes and mating-types.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Scordino, Fabio; Chillemi, Valeria; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    Given the lack of comprehensive molecular epidemiology studies in Reggio Calabria and Messina, Italy, we decided to perform an extensive environmental sampling to describe the current molecular epidemiology of C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex in southern Italy. In this study, we report the occurrence of serotypes, genotypes and mating-types of isolates of the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex recovered from environmental sources. In addition, a number of environmental C. neoformans var. grubii strains, isolated in 1997 by our laboratory, were also retrospectively examined in order to compare their genotypes with those recently found and to infer the possible epidemiological changes in our country. One hundred and twenty-two isolates were identified as being C. neoformans, whereas only one was found to belong to C. gattii serotype B, genotype VGI and mating-type alpha. Our data revealed that all environmental isolates of C. neoformans recovered here as well as those previously isolated in 1997 belong to serotype A and genotype VNI and posses a mating-type alpha allele.

  5. Organization and evolution of mating-type genes in three Stagonosporopsis species causing gummy stem blight of cucurbits and leaf spot and dry rot of papaya.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao-Xi; Gottilla, Thomas M; Brewer, Marin Talbot

    2017-10-01

    Population divergence and speciation of closely related lineages can result from reproductive differences leading to genetic isolation. An increasing number of fungal diseases of plants and animals have been determined to be caused by morphologically indistinguishable species that are genetically distinct, thereby representing cryptic species. We were interested in identifying if mating systems among three Stagonosporopsis species (S. citrulli, S. cucurbitacearum, and S. caricae) causing gummy stem blight (GSB) of cucurbits or leaf spot and dry rot of papaya differed, possibly underlying species divergence. Additionally, we were interested in identifying evolutionary pressures acting on the genes controlling mating in these fungi. The mating-type loci (MAT1) of three isolates from each of the three species were identified in draft genome sequences. For the three species, MAT1 was structurally identical and contained both mating-type genes necessary for sexual reproduction, which suggests that all three species are homothallic. However, both MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 were divergent among species showing rapid evolution with a much greater number of amino acid-changing substitutions detected for the reproductive genes compared with genes flanking MAT1. Positive selection was detected in MAT1-2-1, especially in the highly conserved high mobility group (MATA_HMG-box) domain. Thus, the mating-type genes are rapidly evolving in GSB fungi, but a difference in mating systems among the three species does not underlie their divergence. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genotype and mating type distribution within clinical Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates from patients with cryptococcal meningitis in Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mora, Delio José; Pedrosa, André Luiz; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Leite Maffei, Claudia Maria; Trilles, Luciana; Dos Santos Lazéra, Márcia; Silva-Vergara, Mario León

    2010-06-01

    We molecularly characterized 81 cryptococcal isolates recovered from cerebrospinal fluid samples of 77 patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2007 as having cryptococcal meningitis in Uberaba Minas Gerais, Brazil. Fifty-seven (74%) were male with a mean age 35.6 years. Seventy-two (88.9%) of the isolates were from 68 AIDS patients and cryp-tococcosis was the first AIDS-defining condition in 38 (55.9%) patients. Cryptococcosis and AIDS were simultaneously diagnosed in 25 (65.8%) of these 38 patients. Genotypes were characterized through the use of URA5 restriction fragment length polymorphisms analysis, the genetic variability was determined using PCR-fingerprinting with the minisatellite-specific primer M13, and the mating type and serotypes were established by PCR. Seventy-six of the 81 isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans (93.8%), while the remaining five were C. gattii (6.1%), but all were mating type alpha. C. neoformans isolates were genotype VNI (serotype A), while C. gattii isolates were VGII. Four of the latter isolates were identical, but only two were from AIDS patients. Six of the nine isolates from non-AIDS patients were VNI. PCR fingerprints of the isolates from two of the three AIDS patients with clinical relapse were 100% identical. The predominance of VNI and mating type alpha is in accordance with data from other parts of the world. The occurrence of VGII in Minas Gerais indicates a geographical expansion within Brazil.

  7. Impact of the competition between mating types on the cultivation of Tuber melanosporum: Romeo and Juliet and the matter of space and time.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Andrea; Riccioni, Claudia; Belfiori, Beatrice; Paolocci, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Major breakthroughs in our understanding of the life cycles of the symbiotic ascomycetes belonging to the genus Tuber have occurred over the last several years. A number of Tuber species produce edible fruiting bodies, known as truffles, that are marketed worldwide. A better understanding of the basic biological characteristics of Tuber spp. is likely to have tremendous practical relevance for their cultivation. Tuber melanosporum produces the most valuable black truffles and its genome has been recently sequenced. This species is now serving as a model for studying the biology of truffles. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of sexual reproduction modalities in T. melanosporum. The practical relevance of these findings is outlined. In particular, the discoveries that T. melanosporum is heterothallic and that strains of different mating types compete to persist on the roots of host plants suggest that the spatial and temporal distributional patterns of strains of different mating types are key determinants of truffle fructification. The spatial segregation of the two mating types in areas where T. melanosporum occurs likely limits truffle production. Thus, host plant inoculation techniques and agronomic practices that might be pursued to manage T. melanosporum orchards with a balanced presence of the two mating partners are described.

  8. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xiangyuan; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ye, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  9. Regulation of budding yeast mating-type switching donor preference by the FHA domain of Fkh1.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Coïc, Eric; Lee, Kihoon; Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Kim, Jung-Ae; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E

    2012-01-01

    During Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching, an HO endonuclease-induced double-strand break (DSB) at MAT is repaired by recombining with one of two donors, HMLα or HMRa, located at opposite ends of chromosome III. MATa cells preferentially recombine with HMLα; this decision depends on the Recombination Enhancer (RE), located about 17 kb to the right of HML. In MATα cells, HML is rarely used and RE is bound by the MATα2-Mcm1 corepressor, which prevents the binding of other proteins to RE. In contrast, in MATa cells, RE is bound by multiple copies of Fkh1 and a single copy of Swi4/Swi6. We report here that, when RE is replaced with four LexA operators in MATa cells, 95% of cells use HMR for repair, but expression of a LexA-Fkh1 fusion protein strongly increases HML usage. A LexA-Fkh1 truncation, containing only Fkh1's phosphothreonine-binding FHA domain, restores HML usage to 90%. A LexA-FHA-R80A mutant lacking phosphothreonine binding fails to increase HML usage. The LexA-FHA fusion protein associates with chromatin in a 10-kb interval surrounding the HO cleavage site at MAT, but only after DSB induction. This association occurs even in a donorless strain lacking HML. We propose that the FHA domain of Fkh1 regulates donor preference by physically interacting with phosphorylated threonine residues created on proteins bound near the DSB, thus positioning HML close to the DSB at MAT. Donor preference is independent of Mec1/ATR and Tel1/ATM checkpoint protein kinases but partially depends on casein kinase II. RE stimulates the strand invasion step of interchromosomal recombination even for non-MAT sequences. We also find that when RE binds to the region near the DSB at MATa then Mec1 and Tel1 checkpoint kinases are not only able to phosphorylate histone H2A (γ-H2AX) around the DSB but can also promote γ-H2AX spreading around the RE region.

  10. Regulation of Budding Yeast Mating-Type Switching Donor Preference by the FHA Domain of Fkh1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kihoon; Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Kim, Jung-Ae; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E.

    2012-01-01

    During Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching, an HO endonuclease-induced double-strand break (DSB) at MAT is repaired by recombining with one of two donors, HMLα or HMR a, located at opposite ends of chromosome III. MAT a cells preferentially recombine with HMLα; this decision depends on the Recombination Enhancer (RE), located about 17 kb to the right of HML. In MATα cells, HML is rarely used and RE is bound by the MATα2-Mcm1 corepressor, which prevents the binding of other proteins to RE. In contrast, in MAT a cells, RE is bound by multiple copies of Fkh1 and a single copy of Swi4/Swi6. We report here that, when RE is replaced with four LexA operators in MAT a cells, 95% of cells use HMR for repair, but expression of a LexA-Fkh1 fusion protein strongly increases HML usage. A LexA-Fkh1 truncation, containing only Fkh1's phosphothreonine-binding FHA domain, restores HML usage to 90%. A LexA-FHA-R80A mutant lacking phosphothreonine binding fails to increase HML usage. The LexA-FHA fusion protein associates with chromatin in a 10-kb interval surrounding the HO cleavage site at MAT, but only after DSB induction. This association occurs even in a donorless strain lacking HML. We propose that the FHA domain of Fkh1 regulates donor preference by physically interacting with phosphorylated threonine residues created on proteins bound near the DSB, thus positioning HML close to the DSB at MAT. Donor preference is independent of Mec1/ATR and Tel1/ATM checkpoint protein kinases but partially depends on casein kinase II. RE stimulates the strand invasion step of interchromosomal recombination even for non-MAT sequences. We also find that when RE binds to the region near the DSB at MAT a then Mec1 and Tel1 checkpoint kinases are not only able to phosphorylate histone H2A (γ-H2AX) around the DSB but can also promote γ-H2AX spreading around the RE region. PMID:22496671

  11. The Fission Yeast Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzymes UbcP3, Ubc15, and Rhp6 Affect Transcriptional Silencing of the Mating-Type Region

    PubMed Central

    Sig Nielsen, Inga; Nielsen, Olaf; Murray, Johanne M.; Thon, Geneviève

    2002-01-01

    Genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II are silenced when introduced near the mat2 or mat3 mating-type loci of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Silencing is mediated by a number of gene products and cis-acting elements. We report here the finding of novel trans-acting factors identified in a screen for high-copy-number disruptors of silencing. Expression of cDNAs encoding the putative E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes UbcP3, Ubc15 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme), or Rhp6 (Rad homolog pombe) from the strong nmt1 promoter derepressed the silent mating-type loci mat2 and mat3 and reporter genes inserted nearby. Deletion of rhp6 slightly derepressed an ade6 reporter gene placed in the mating-type region, whereas disruption of ubcP3 or ubc15 had no obvious effect on silencing. Rhp18 is the S. pombe homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad18p, a DNA-binding protein that physically interacts with Rad6p. Rhp18 was not required for the derepression observed when UbcP3, Ubc15, or Rhp6 was overproduced. Overexpressing Rhp6 active-site mutants showed that the ubiquitin-conjugating activity of Rhp6 is essential for disruption of silencing. However, high dosage of UbcP3, Ubc15, or Rhp6 was not suppressed by a mutation in the 26S proteasome, suggesting that loss of silencing is not due to an increased degradation of silencing factors but rather to the posttranslational modification of proteins by ubiquitination. We discuss the implications of these results for the possible modes of action of UbcP3, Ubc15, and Rhp6. PMID:12456009

  12. The fission yeast ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes UbcP3, Ubc15, and Rhp6 affect transcriptional silencing of the mating-type region.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Inga Sig; Nielsen, Olaf; Murray, Johanne M; Thon, Geneviève

    2002-08-01

    Genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II are silenced when introduced near the mat2 or mat3 mating-type loci of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Silencing is mediated by a number of gene products and cis-acting elements. We report here the finding of novel trans-acting factors identified in a screen for high-copy-number disruptors of silencing. Expression of cDNAs encoding the putative E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes UbcP3, Ubc15 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme), or Rhp6 (Rad homolog pombe) from the strong nmt1 promoter derepressed the silent mating-type loci mat2 and mat3 and reporter genes inserted nearby. Deletion of rhp6 slightly derepressed an ade6 reporter gene placed in the mating-type region, whereas disruption of ubcP3 or ubc15 had no obvious effect on silencing. Rhp18 is the S. pombe homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad18p, a DNA-binding protein that physically interacts with Rad6p. Rhp18 was not required for the derepression observed when UbcP3, Ubc15, or Rhp6 was overproduced. Overexpressing Rhp6 active-site mutants showed that the ubiquitin-conjugating activity of Rhp6 is essential for disruption of silencing. However, high dosage of UbcP3, Ubc15, or Rhp6 was not suppressed by a mutation in the 26S proteasome, suggesting that loss of silencing is not due to an increased degradation of silencing factors but rather to the posttranslational modification of proteins by ubiquitination. We discuss the implications of these results for the possible modes of action of UbcP3, Ubc15, and Rhp6.

  13. Binding of the Fkh1 Forkhead Associated Domain to a Phosphopeptide within the Mph1 DNA Helicase Regulates Mating-Type Switching in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhangli; Cherney, Rachel; Choi, Koyi; Denu, John; Zhao, Xiaolan; Fox, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fkh1 protein has roles in cell-cycle regulated transcription as well as a transcription-independent role in recombination donor preference during mating-type switching. The conserved FHA domain of Fkh1 regulates donor preference by juxtaposing two distant regions on chromosome III to promote their recombination. A model posits that this Fkh1-mediated long-range chromosomal juxtaposition requires an interaction between the FHA domain and a partner protein(s), but to date no relevant partner has been described. In this study, we used structural modeling, 2-hybrid assays, and mutational analyses to show that the predicted phosphothreonine-binding FHA domain of Fkh1 interacted with multiple partner proteins. The Fkh1 FHA domain was important for its role in cell-cycle regulation, but no single interaction partner could account for this role. In contrast, Fkh1’s interaction with the Mph1 DNA repair helicase regulated donor preference during mating-type switching. Using 2-hybrid assays, co-immunoprecipitation, and fluorescence anisotropy, we mapped a discrete peptide within the regulatory Mph1 C-terminus required for this interaction and identified two threonines that were particularly important. In vitro binding experiments indicated that at least one of these threonines had to be phosphorylated for efficient Fkh1 binding. Substitution of these two threonines with alanines (mph1-2TA) specifically abolished the Fkh1-Mph1 interaction in vivo and altered donor preference during mating-type switching to the same degree as mph1Δ. Notably, the mph1-2TA allele maintained other functions of Mph1 in genome stability. Deletion of a second Fkh1-interacting protein encoded by YMR144W also resulted in a change in Fkh1-FHA-dependent donor preference. We have named this gene FDO1 for Forkhead one interacting protein involved in donor preference. We conclude that a phosphothreonine-mediated protein-protein interface between Fkh1-FHA and Mph1 contributes

  14. Distribution of mating-type alleles and M13 PCR markers in the black leaf spot fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis of bananas in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, C B; Miranda, E C; Hanada, R E; Sousa, N R; Gasparotto, L; Soares, M A; Silva, G F

    2013-02-08

    The fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis is the causative agent of black sigatoka, which is one of the most destructive diseases of banana plants. Infection with this pathogen results in underdeveloped fruit, with no commercial value. We analyzed the distribution of the M. fijiensis mating-type system and its genetic variability using M13 phage DNA markers. We found a 1:1 distribution of mating-type alleles, indicating MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 idiomorphs. A polymorphism analysis using three different primers for M13 markers showed that only the M13 minisatellite primers generated polymorphic products. We then utilized this polymorphism to characterize 40 isolates from various Brazilian states. The largest genetic distances were found between isolates from the same location and between isolates from different parts of the country. Therefore, there was no correlation between the genetic similarity and the geographic origin of the isolates. The M13 marker was used to generate genetic fingerprints for five isolates; these fingerprints were compared with the band profiles obtained from inter-simple sequence repeat (UBC861) and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism analyses. We found that the M13 marker was more effective than the other two markers for differentiating these isolates.

  15. Mating type and ploidy effect on the β-glucosidase activity and ethanol-producing performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with multiple δ-integrated bgl1 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Huajun; Liu, Cheng; Zou, Shaolan; Hong, Jiefang; Zhang, Minhua

    2016-08-10

    In order to investigate the effect of mating type and ploidy on enzymatic activity and fermentation performance in yeast with multiple δ-integrated foreign genes, eight ploidy series strains were constructed. The initial haploid strain BGL-a was shown to contain about 19 copies of the bgl1 gene. In rich media containing 2% (w/v) sugar the specific activities of BGL-aα were lower than those of BGL-aa or BGL-αα, which indicates the existence of mating type effects. While the maximum OD660 decreased with rising ploidy, the biomass yield showed no significant difference between the eight strains and the specific activities (expressed as U/mL or U/mg DCW) showed little to no variation. When cellobiose was used as the carbon source and β-glucosidase substrate, β-glucosidase was expressed more quickly and at higher levels than in glucose-containing media. The maximum specific activitiy values obtained were 19.07U/mL and 19.39U/mL for BGL-αα and BGL-aa, repsectively. The anaerobic biomass and ethanol-producing performance in rich media containing 10% cellobiose showed no significant difference among the eight strains. Their maximal ethanol concentrations and corresponding yields ranged from 40.27 to 43.46g/L and 77.56 to 83.71%, respectively. When the acid- and alkali-pretreated corncob (10% solids content) was used, the diploid BGL-aα fermented the best. When urea was used as the only supplemented nutrient, the ethanol titer and yield were 35.65g/L and 83.69%, respectively, while a control experiment using industrial Angel yeast with exogenous β-glucosidase addition gave values of 37.93g/L and 89.04%. The combined effects of δ-integration of bgl1, ploidy and mating type result in BGL-aa or BGL-αα being the optimal choice for enzyme production and BGL-aα being more suitable for cellulosic ethanol fermentation. These results provide valuable information for future yeast breeding and utilization efforts.

  16. Mating type-specific cell-cell recognition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: cell wall attachment and active sites of a- and alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Cappellaro, C; Baldermann, C; Rachel, R; Tanner, W

    1994-01-01

    Mating type-specific agglutination of Saccharomyces cerevisiae a and alpha cells depends on the heterophilic interaction of two cell surface glycoproteins, the gene products of AG alpha 1 and AGA2. Evidence is presented with immunogold labelling that the alpha-agglutinin is part of the outer fimbrial cell wall coat. The a-agglutinin is bound via two S-S bridges (Cys7 and Cys50) to a cell wall component, most probably the gene product of AGA1. His273 of alpha-agglutinin has previously been shown to be essential for a- and alpha-agglutinin interaction and a model based on two opposing ion-pairs had been proposed. By site-directed mutagenesis this possibility has now been excluded. With the help of various peptides, either chemically synthesized, obtained by proteolysis of intact glycosylated a-agglutinin or prepared from a fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, the biologically active region of a-agglutinin was located at the C-terminus of the molecule. A peptide consisting of the C-terminal 10 amino acids (GSPIN-TQYVF) was active in nanomolar concentrations. Saccharide moieties, therefore, are not essential for the mating type-specific cell-cell interaction; glycosylated peptides are, however, four to five times more active than non-glycosylated ones. Comparisons of the recognition sequences of the S. cerevisiae agglutinins with that of the Dictyostelium contact site A glycoprotein (gp80), as well as with those of the various families of cell adhesion molecules of higher eucaryotes, have been made and are discussed. Images PMID:7957044

  17. RAS/Cyclic AMP and Transcription Factor Msn2 Regulate Mating and Mating-Type Switching in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Barsoum, E.; Rajaei, N.; Åström, S. U.

    2011-01-01

    In response to harsh environmental conditions, ascomycetes produce stress-resistant spores to promote survival. As sporulation requires a diploid DNA content, species with a haploid lifestyle, such as Kluyveromyces lactis, first induce mating in response to stress. In K. lactis, mating and mating-type switching are induced by the DNA-binding protein Mts1. Mts1 expression is known to be upregulated by nutrient limitation, but the mechanism is unknown. We show that a ras2 mutation results in a hyperswitching phenotype. In contrast, strains lacking the phosphodiesterase Pde2 had lower switching rates compared to that of the wild type (WT). As Ras2 promotes cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and Pde2 degrades cAMP, these data suggest that low cAMP levels induce switching. Because the MTS1 regulatory region contains several Msn2 binding sites and Msn2 is a transcription factor that is activated by low cAMP levels, we investigated if Msn2 regulates MTS1 transcription. Consistently with this idea, an msn2 mutant strain displayed lower switching rates than the WT strain. The transcription of MTS1 is highly induced in the ras2 mutant strain. In contrast, an msn2 ras2 double mutant strain displays WT levels of the MTS1 transcript, showing that Msn2 is a critical inducer of MTS1 transcription. Strains lacking Msn2 and Pde2 also exhibit mating defects that can be complemented by the ectopic expression of Mts1. Finally, we show that MTS1 is subjected to negative autoregulation, presumably adding robustness to the mating and switching responses. We suggest a model in which Ras2/cAMP/Msn2 mediates the stress-induced mating and mating-type switching responses in K. lactis. PMID:21890818

  18. Recurrent polymorphic mating type variation in Madagascan Bulbophyllum species (Orchidaceae) exemplifies a high incidence of auto-pollination in tropical orchids

    PubMed Central

    Gamisch, Alexander; Fischer, Gunter A; Comes, Hans Peter

    2014-01-01

    The transition from outcrossing to self-fertilization is one of the most common evolutionary changes in angiosperms. The orchid family exemplifies this evolutionary trend but, because of a general lack of large-scale surveys on auto-pollination in orchid taxa, the incidence and modes of auto-pollination among (sub)tropical orchids remain poorly known. In the present study, we assessed the frequency and mode of auto-pollination within and among species of a largely monophyletic group of Madagascan Bulbophyllum. The capacity for autonomous fruit set was investigated by bagging experiments in the greenhouse and the field, complemented with detailed floral micromorphological studies of the gynostemium. Our survey comprises 393 accessions, representing at least 78 species, and thus approximately 37% of the species diversity of the genus in the Madagascan region. Our studies revealed that mating type is directly related to gynostemium structure, most often involving the presence or absence of a physical barrier termed ‘rostellum’. As a novel and unexpected finding, we identified eight species of a single lineage of Madagascan Bulbophyllum (termed ‘clade C’), in which auto-pollinating morphs (selfers), either lacking a rostellum or (rarely) possessing a stigmatic rostellum, co-exist with their pollinator-dependent conspecifics (outcrossers). We hypothesize that auto-pollination via rostellum abortion has a simple genetic basis, and probably evolved rapidly and recurrently by subtle changes in the timing of rostellum development (heterochrony). Thus, species of clade C may have an intrinsic genetic and developmental lability toward auto-pollination, allowing rapid evolutionary response under environmental, perhaps human-disturbed conditions favouring reproductive assurance. Overall, these findings should stimulate further research on the incidence, evolution, and maintenance of mating type variation in tropical orchids, as well as how they adapt(ed) to changing

  19. Species and Mating-Type Distribution of Tapesia yallundae and T. acuformis and Occurrence of Apothecia in the U.S. Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Douhan, G W; Murray, T D; Dyer, P S

    2002-07-01

    ABSTRACT Eyespot of wheat is caused by the discomycete fungi Tapesia yallundae and T. acuformis. T. yallundae is considered the most important causal agent of the disease in this region but no apothecia of either species have been found in the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW). Two compatible isolates of T. yallundae from the PNW were used to inoculate a field plot in the fall of 1998 and apothecia developed in the spring and fall of 2000 on standing wheat stubble. In the spring of 2000, wheat stubble from eight naturally infected fields was examined for the presence of apothecia of T. yallundae and T. acuformis. Apothecia of T. acuformis were found in two fields but no apothecia of T. yallundae were found. This is the first report of apothecia of the eyespot pathogens occurring in the PNW. Species and mating-type distribution of T. yallundae and T. acuformis in the PNW were determined from 817 isolates collected from diseased wheat over 3 years at spatial scales ranging from within fields to across states. In all, 460 isolates were identified as T. yallundae and 357 isolates were identified as T. acuformis with MAT1-1/MAT1-2 ratios not significantly different from 1:1 based on chi(2) tests at most scales tested. The apparent increase in frequency of T. acuformis from previous surveys may indicate a shift in the predominant species causing eyespot. The occurrence of apothecia under field conditions, along with the widespread distribution of mating types of both species, suggests that sexual reproduction may be occurring in both species.

  20. Recurrent polymorphic mating type variation in Madagascan Bulbophyllum species (Orchidaceae) exemplifies a high incidence of auto-pollination in tropical orchids.

    PubMed

    Gamisch, Alexander; Fischer, Gunter A; Comes, Hans Peter

    2014-06-01

    The transition from outcrossing to self-fertilization is one of the most common evolutionary changes in angiosperms. The orchid family exemplifies this evolutionary trend but, because of a general lack of large-scale surveys on auto-pollination in orchid taxa, the incidence and modes of auto-pollination among (sub)tropical orchids remain poorly known. In the present study, we assessed the frequency and mode of auto-pollination within and among species of a largely monophyletic group of Madagascan Bulbophyllum. The capacity for autonomous fruit set was investigated by bagging experiments in the greenhouse and the field, complemented with detailed floral micromorphological studies of the gynostemium. Our survey comprises 393 accessions, representing at least 78 species, and thus approximately 37% of the species diversity of the genus in the Madagascan region. Our studies revealed that mating type is directly related to gynostemium structure, most often involving the presence or absence of a physical barrier termed 'rostellum'. As a novel and unexpected finding, we identified eight species of a single lineage of Madagascan Bulbophyllum (termed 'clade C'), in which auto-pollinating morphs (selfers), either lacking a rostellum or (rarely) possessing a stigmatic rostellum, co-exist with their pollinator-dependent conspecifics (outcrossers). We hypothesize that auto-pollination via rostellum abortion has a simple genetic basis, and probably evolved rapidly and recurrently by subtle changes in the timing of rostellum development (heterochrony). Thus, species of clade C may have an intrinsic genetic and developmental lability toward auto-pollination, allowing rapid evolutionary response under environmental, perhaps human-disturbed conditions favouring reproductive assurance. Overall, these findings should stimulate further research on the incidence, evolution, and maintenance of mating type variation in tropical orchids, as well as how they adapt(ed) to changing

  1. Different mating-type-regulated genes affect the DNA repair defects of Saccharomyces RAD51, RAD52 and RAD55 mutants.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Burton, Maria; Oki, Masaya; Johnson, Jean; Seier, Tracey A; Kamakaka, Rohinton; Haber, James E

    2006-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing both a- and alpha-mating-type (MAT) genes (termed mating-type heterozygosity) exhibit higher rates of spontaneous recombination and greater radiation resistance than cells expressing only MATa or MATalpha. MAT heterozygosity suppresses recombination defects of four mutations involved in homologous recombination: complete deletions of RAD55 or RAD57, an ATPase-defective Rad51 mutation (rad51-K191R), and a C-terminal truncation of Rad52, rad52-Delta327. We investigated the genetic basis of MAT-dependent suppression of these mutants by deleting genes whose expression is controlled by the Mata1-Matalpha2 repressor and scoring resistance to both campothecin (CPT) and phleomycin. Haploid rad55Delta strains became more damage resistant after deleting genes required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), a process that is repressed in MATa/MATalpha cells. Surprisingly, NHEJ mutations do not suppress CPT sensitivity of rad51-K191R or rad52-Delta327. However, rad51-K191R is uniquely suppressed by deleting the RME1 gene encoding a repressor of meiosis or its coregulator SIN4; this effect is independent of the meiosis-specific homolog, Dmc1. Sensitivity of rad52-Delta327 to CPT was unexpectedly increased by the MATa/MATalpha-repressed gene YGL193C, emphasizing the complex ways in which MAT regulates homologous recombination. The rad52-Delta327 mutation is suppressed by deleting the prolyl isomerase Fpr3, which is not MAT regulated. rad55Delta is also suppressed by deletion of PST2 and/or YBR052C (RFS1, rad55 suppressor), two members of a three-gene family of flavodoxin-fold proteins that associate in a nonrandom fashion with chromatin. All three recombination-defective mutations are made more sensitive by deletions of Rad6 and of the histone deacetylases Rpd3 and Ume6, although these mutations are not themselves CPT or phleomycin sensitive.

  2. A Large-Scale Functional Analysis of Putative Target Genes of Mating-Type Loci Provides Insight into the Regulation of Sexual Development of the Cereal Pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Jo, Seong-Mi; Kim, Gi-Yong; Kim, Da-Woon; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Yun, Sung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in cereal crops, produces sexual progeny (ascospore) as an important overwintering and dissemination strategy for completing the disease cycle. This homothallic ascomycetous species does not require a partner for sexual mating; instead, it carries two opposite mating-type (MAT) loci in a single nucleus to control sexual development. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation of sexual development in F. graminearum, we used in-depth and high-throughput analyses to examine the target genes controlled transcriptionally by two-linked MAT loci (MAT1-1, MAT1-2). We hybridized a genome-wide microarray with total RNAs from F. graminearum mutants that lacked each MAT locus individually or together, and overexpressed MAT1-2-1, as well as their wild-type progenitor, at an early stage of sexual development. A comparison of the gene expression levels revealed a total of 1,245 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among all of the mutants examined. Among these, genes involved in metabolism, cell wall organization, cellular response to stimuli, cell adhesion, fertilization, development, chromatin silencing, and signal transduction, were significantly enriched. Protein binding microarray analysis revealed the presence of putative core DNA binding sequences (ATTAAT or ATTGTT) for the HMG (high mobility group)-box motif in the MAT1-2-1 protein. Targeted deletion of 106 DEGs revealed 25 genes that were specifically required for sexual development, most of which were regulated transcriptionally by both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 loci. Taken together with the expression patterns of key target genes, we propose a regulatory pathway for MAT-mediated sexual development, in which both MAT loci may be activated by several environmental cues via chromatin remodeling and/or signaling pathways, and then control the expression of at least 1,245 target genes during sexual development via regulatory cascades and/or networks

  3. A Large-Scale Functional Analysis of Putative Target Genes of Mating-Type Loci Provides Insight into the Regulation of Sexual Development of the Cereal Pathogen Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Jo, Seong-Mi; Kim, Gi-Yong; Kim, Da-Woon; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Yun, Sung-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in cereal crops, produces sexual progeny (ascospore) as an important overwintering and dissemination strategy for completing the disease cycle. This homothallic ascomycetous species does not require a partner for sexual mating; instead, it carries two opposite mating-type (MAT) loci in a single nucleus to control sexual development. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation of sexual development in F. graminearum, we used in-depth and high-throughput analyses to examine the target genes controlled transcriptionally by two-linked MAT loci (MAT1-1, MAT1-2). We hybridized a genome-wide microarray with total RNAs from F. graminearum mutants that lacked each MAT locus individually or together, and overexpressed MAT1-2-1, as well as their wild-type progenitor, at an early stage of sexual development. A comparison of the gene expression levels revealed a total of 1,245 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among all of the mutants examined. Among these, genes involved in metabolism, cell wall organization, cellular response to stimuli, cell adhesion, fertilization, development, chromatin silencing, and signal transduction, were significantly enriched. Protein binding microarray analysis revealed the presence of putative core DNA binding sequences (ATTAAT or ATTGTT) for the HMG (high mobility group)-box motif in the MAT1-2-1 protein. Targeted deletion of 106 DEGs revealed 25 genes that were specifically required for sexual development, most of which were regulated transcriptionally by both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 loci. Taken together with the expression patterns of key target genes, we propose a regulatory pathway for MAT-mediated sexual development, in which both MAT loci may be activated by several environmental cues via chromatin remodeling and/or signaling pathways, and then control the expression of at least 1,245 target genes during sexual development via regulatory cascades and/or networks

  4. The Ruminococcus albus pilA1-pilA2 locus: expression and putative role of two adjacent pil genes in pilus formation and bacterial adhesion to cellulose.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarivonina, Harivony; Larson, Marilynn A; Morrison, Mark; Girardeau, Jean-Pierre; Gaillard-Martinie, Brigitte; Forano, Evelyne; Mosoni, Pascale

    2005-04-01

    Ruminococcus albus produces fimbria-like structures that are involved with the bacterium's adhesion to cellulose. The subunit protein has been identified in strain 8 (CbpC) and strain 20 (GP25) and both are type IV fimbrial (Pil) proteins. The presence of a pil locus that is organized similarly in both strains is reported here together with the results of an initial examination of a second Pil protein. Downstream of the cbpC/gp25 gene (hereafter referred to as pilA1) is a second pilin gene (pilA2). Northern blot analysis of pilA1 and pilA2 transcripts showed that the pilA1 transcript is much more abundant in R. albus 8, and real-time PCR was used to measure pilA1 and pilA2 transcript abundance in R. albus 20 and its adhesion-defective mutant D5. Similar to the findings with R. albus 8, the relative expression of pilA1 in the wild-type strain was 73-fold higher than that of pilA2 following growth with cellobiose, and there were only slight differences between the wild-type and mutant strain in pilA1 and pilA2 transcript abundances, indicating that neither pilA1 nor pilA2 transcription is adversely affected in the mutant strain. Western immunoblots showed that the PilA2 protein is localized primarily to the membrane fraction, and the anti-PilA2 antiserum does not inhibit bacterial adhesion to cellulose. These results suggest that the PilA2 protein plays a role in the synthesis and assembly of type IV fimbriae-like structures by R. albus, but its role is restricted to cell-associated functions, rather than as part of the externalized fimbrial structure.

  5. Mutations in deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis pathway cause spreading of silencing across heterochromatic barriers at the mating-type region of the fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurjeet; Klar, Amar J S

    2008-02-01

    The mat2,3-region of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is flanked by two inverted repeat elements, IRL and IRR, which define the boundaries of the silent domain resulting from heterochromatin assembly in the region. We employed a genetic screen to isolate factors whose mutations allowed spreading of heterochromatin across boundary elements. Surprisingly, this screen revealed that mutations in the genes required for deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, cdc22 (encoding the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase) and tds1 (putative thymidylate synthase), cause silencing of marker genes inserted outside of the silent domain. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that histone H3 lysine 9 methylation modification, an epigenetic mark associated with gene silencing, is enriched by two- to three-fold in the cdc22 mutant as compared to the level found in the wild-type strain in regions outside the silent domain. The spreading of heterochromatin across barriers required functional Atf1/Pcr1, ATF-CREB family proteins, but not the RNA-interference Dcr1, Ago1, or Rdp1 factors, previously implicated in silencing. These results implicate the deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis pathway in limiting epigenetic controls at barrier elements at the mating-type region, but the mechanism remains unknown.

  6. Switching gene swi6, involved in repression of silent mating-type loci in fission yeast, encodes a homologue of chromatin-associated proteins from Drosophila and mammals.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, A; Ostermann, K; Fleck, O; Schmidt, H

    1994-05-27

    The switching gene swi6 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is involved in the repression of the silent mating-type loci mat2 and mat3. We have cloned the gene by functional complementation of the switching defect of the swi6-115 mutation. DNA sequence analyses revealed an open reading frame of 984 bp coding for a putative protein of 328 amino acids (aa). The isolation of a swi6 cDNA confirmed this result. Gene replacement showed that swi6 is not essential for viability. The Swi6 protein is very hydrophilic; it contains 41% charged aa. A region of 48 aa is homologous to a sequence motif found in the chromatin-associated proteins, HP1 and Polycomb (Drosophila melanogaster), M31, M32 and M33 (mouse), and the human HSM1 protein. This motif is called chromo domain (chromatin organization modifier). Our results indicate that Swi6 is a structural component of chromatin. Swi6 may have the function to compact mat2 and mat3 into a heterochromatin-like conformation which represses the transcription of these silent cassettes.

  7. Rapid, selective digestion of mitochondrial DNA in accordance with the matA hierarchy of multiallelic mating types in the mitochondrial inheritance of Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Y; Kawano, S

    2003-07-01

    Although mitochondria are inherited uniparentally in nearly all eukaryotes, the mechanism for this is unclear. When zygotes of the isogamous protist Physarum polycephalum were stained with DAPI, the fluorescence of mtDNA in half of the mitochondria decreased simultaneously to give small spots and then disappeared completely approximately 1.5 hr after nuclear fusion, while the other mitochondrial nucleoids and all of the mitochondrial sheaths remained unchanged. PCR analysis of single zygote cells confirmed that the loss was limited to mtDNA from one parent. The vacant mitochondrial sheaths were gradually eliminated by 60 hr after mating. Using six mating types, the transmission patterns of mtDNA were examined in all possible crosses. In 39 of 60 crosses, strict uniparental inheritance was confirmed in accordance with a hierarchy of relative sexuality. In the other crosses, however, mtDNA from both parents was transmitted to plasmodia. The ratio of parental mtDNA was estimated to be from 1:1 to 1:10(-4). Nevertheless, the matA hierarchy was followed. In these crosses, the mtDNA was incompletely digested, and mtDNA replicated during subsequent plasmodial development. We conclude that the rapid, selective digestion of mtDNA promotes the uniparental inheritance of mitochondria; when this fails, biparental inheritance occurs.

  8. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, genetic homogeneity, and mapping of the locus within a 2-cM interval

    SciTech Connect

    Ducros, A.; Alamowitch, S.; Nagy, T.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a recently identified autosomal dominant cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of subcortical infarcts leading to dementia. A genetic linkage analysis conducted in two large families recently allowed us to map the affected gene on chromosome 19 in a 12-cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215. In the present study, these first 2 families and 13 additional ones, including a total of 199 potentially informative meiosis, have been genotyped with eight polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families were linked to chromosome 19. The highest combined lod score (Z{sub max} = 37.24 at {theta} = .01) was obtained with marker D19S841, a new CA{sub n} microsatellite marker that we isolated from chromosome 19 cosmids. The recombinant events observed within these families were used to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL within a 2-cM interval that is now bracketed by D19S226 and D19S199 on 19p13.1. These data strongly suggest the genetic homogeneity of this recently identified condition and establish the value of its clinical and neuroimaging diagnostic criteria. Besides their importance for the ongoing positional cloning of the CADASIL gene, these data help to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL relative to familial hemiplegic migraine and hereditary paroxysmal cerebellar ataxia, conditions that we both mapped within the same chromosome 19 region. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Genotype × Adiposity Interaction Linkage Analyses Reveal a Locus on Chromosome 1 for Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2, a Marker of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Vincent P.; Rainwater, David L.; Wang, Xing-Li; Cole, Shelley A.; Curran, Joanne E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Jowett, Jeremy B. M.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Williams, Jeff T.; Moses, Eric K.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Mahaney, Michael C.; Blangero, John

    2007-01-01

    Because obesity leads to a state of chronic, low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress, we hypothesized that the contribution of genes to variation in a biomarker of these two processes may be influenced by the degree of adiposity. We tested this hypothesis using samples from the San Antonio Family Heart Study that were assayed for activity of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), a marker of inflammation and oxidative stress. Using an approach to model discrete genotype×environment (G×E) interaction, we assigned individuals to one of two discrete diagnostic states (or “adiposity environments”): nonobese or obese, according to criteria suggested by the World Health Organization. We found a genomewide maximum LOD of 3.39 at 153 cM on chromosome 1 for Lp-PLA2. Significant G×E interaction for Lp-PLA2 at the genomewide maximum (P=1.16×10-4) was also found. Microarray gene-expression data were analyzed within the 1-LOD interval of the linkage signal on chromosome 1. We found two transcripts—namely, for Fc gamma receptor IIA and heat-shock protein (70 kDa)—that were significantly associated with Lp-PLA2 (P<.001 for both) and showed evidence of cis-regulation with nominal LOD scores of 2.75 and 13.82, respectively. It would seem that there is a significant genetic response to the adiposity environment in this marker of inflammation and oxidative stress. Additionally, we conclude that G×E interaction analyses can improve our ability to identify and localize quantitative-trait loci. PMID:17160904

  10. Genomes of Ashbya Fungi Isolated from Insects Reveal Four Mating-Type Loci, Numerous Translocations, Lack of Transposons, and Distinct Gene Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Fred S.; Voegeli, Sylvia; Kuo, Sidney; Philippsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii is a cotton pathogen transmitted by insects. It is readily grown and manipulated in the laboratory and is commercially exploited as a natural overproducer of vitamin B2. Our previous genome analysis of A. gossypii isolate ATCC10895, collected in Trinidad nearly 100 years ago, revealed extensive synteny with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, leading us to use it as a model organism to understand the evolution of filamentous growth. To further develop Ashbya as a model system, we have investigated the ecological niche of A. gossypii and isolated additional strains and a sibling species, both useful in comparative analysis. We isolated fungi morphologically similar to A. gossypii from different plant-feeding insects of the suborder Heteroptera, generated a phylogenetic tree based on rDNA-ITS sequences, and performed high coverage short read sequencing with one A. gossypii isolate from Florida, a new species, Ashbya aceri, isolated in North Carolina, and a genetically marked derivative of ATCC10895 intensively used for functional studies. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, all strains carry four not three mating type loci, adding a new puzzle in the evolution of Ashbya species. Another surprise was the genome identity of 99.9% between the Florida strain and ATCC10895, isolated in Trinidad. The A. aceri and A. gossypii genomes show conserved gene orders rearranged by eight translocations, 90% overall sequence identity, and fewer tandem duplications in the A. aceri genome. Both species lack transposable elements. Finally, our work identifies plant-feeding insects of the suborder Heteroptera as the most likely natural reservoir of Ashbya, and that infection of cotton and other plants may be incidental to the growth of the fungus in its insect host. PMID:23749448

  11. Evidence of the accumulation of allele-specific non-synonymous substitutions in the young region of recombination suppression within the mating-type chromosomes of Neurospora tetrasperma

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, C A; Johannesson, H

    2011-01-01

    Currently, little is known about the origin and early evolution of sex chromosomes. This is largely due to the fact that ancient non-recombining sex chromosomes are highly degenerated, and thus provide little information about the early genomic events in their evolution. The Neurospora tetrasperma mating-type (mat) chromosomes contain a young (<6 Mya) and large region (>6.6 Mb) of suppressed recombination, thereby providing a model system to study early stages of sex chromosome evolution. Here, we examined alleles of 207 genes located on the N. tetrasperma mat a and mat A chromosomes to test for signs of genomic alterations at the protein level in the young region of recombination suppression. We report that the N. tetrasperma mat a and mat A chromosomes have each independently accumulated allele-specific non-synonymous codon substitutions in a time-dependent, and gene-specific manner in the recombinationally suppressed region. In addition, examination of the ratio (ω) of non-synonymous substitutions (dN) to synonymous substitutions (dS) using maximum likelihood analyses, indicates that such changes are associated with relaxed purifying selection, a finding consistent with genomic degeneration. We also reveal that sex specific biases in mutation rates or selection pressures are not necessary for genomic alterations in sex chromosomes, and that recombination suppression in itself is sufficient to explain these results. The present findings extend our current understanding of genomic events associated within the young region of recombination suppression in these fungal sex-regulating chromosomes. PMID:21386869

  12. Gene genealogies indicates abundant gene conversions and independent evolutionary histories of the mating-type chromosomes in the evolutionary history of Neurospora tetrasperma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The self-fertile filamentous ascomycete Neurospora tetrasperma contains a large (~7 Mbp) and young (< 6 MYA) region of suppressed recombination within its mating-type (mat) chromosomes. The objective of the present study is to reveal the evolutionary history, including key genomic events, associated with the various regions of the mat chromosomes among ten strains representing all the nine known species (lineages) contained within the N. tetrasperma species complex. Results Comparative analysis of sequence divergence among alleles of 24 mat-linked genes (mat A and mat a) indicates that a large region of suppressed recombination exists within the mat chromosome for each of nine lineages of N. tetrasperma sensu latu. The recombinationally suppressed region varies in size and gene composition among lineages, and is flanked on both ends by normally recombining regions. Genealogical analyses among lineages reveals that eight gene conversion events have occurred between homologous mat A and mat a-linked alleles of genes located within the region of restricted recombination during the evolutionary history of N. tetrasperma. Conclusions We conclude that the region of suppressed recombination in the mat chromosomes has likely been subjected to independent contraction and/or expansion during the evolutionary history of the N. tetrasperma species complex. Furthermore, we infer that gene conversion events are likely a common phenomenon within this recombinationally suppressed genomic region. We argue that gene conversions might provide an efficient mechanism of adaptive editing of functional genes, including the removal of deleterious mutations, within the young recombinationally suppressed region of the mat chromosomes. PMID:20673371

  13. Cloning of a novel constitutively expressed pectate lyase gene pelB from Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi (Nectria haematococca, mating type VI) and characterization of the gene product expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W; González-Candelas, L; Kolattukudy, P E

    1995-01-01

    Since plant-pathogenic fungi must penetrate through pectinaceous layers of the host cell wall, pectin-degrading enzymes are thought to be important for pathogenesis. Antibodies prepared against a pectin-inducible pectate lyase (pectate lyase A [PLA]) produced by a phytopathogenic fungus, Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi (Nectria haematococca, mating type VI), was previously found to protect the host from infection. The gene (pelA) and its cDNA were cloned and sequenced. Here we report the isolation of a new pectate lyase gene, pelB, from a genomic library of F. solani f. sp. pisi with the pelA cDNA as the probe. A 2.6-kb DNA fragment containing pelB and its flanking regions was sequenced. The coding region of pelB was amplified by reverse transcription-mediated PCR, using total RNA isolated from F. solani pisi culture grown in the presence of glucose as the sole carbon source. The predicted open reading frame of pelB would encode a 25.6-kDa protein of 244 amino acids which has 65% amino acid sequence identity with PLA from F. solani f. sp. pisi but no significant homology with other pectinolytic enzymes. The first 16 amino acid residues at the N terminus appeared to be a signal peptide. The pelB cDNA was expressed in Pichia pastoris, yielding a pectate lyase B (PLB) which was found to be a glycoprotein of 29 kDa. PLB was purified to homogeneity by using a two-step procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by Superdex G75 gel filtration chromatography. Purified PLB showed optimal lyase activity at pH 10.0. A rapid drop in the viscosity of the substrate and Mono Q anion-exchange chromatography of the products generated by the lyase showed that PLB cleaved polygalacturonate chains in an endo fashion. Western blotting (immunoblotting) with antibodies raised against PLA showed that PLB and PLA are immunologically related to each other. The 5' flanking regions of both pelA and pelB were translationally fused to the beta-glucuronidase gene and introduced into

  14. Two-locus mitochondrial and nuclear gene models for mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Bu, X; Yang, H Y; Shohat, M; Rotter, J I

    1992-01-01

    Stimulated by a large pedigree with a cochlear form of deafness, for which we considered a two-locus mitochondrial and nuclear gene model, we have extended the classic methods of segregation analysis to these classes of two-locus disorders. Based on the unique maternal transmission pattern of the mitochondria, we demonstrate that utilization of the maternal line pedigree allows us to simplify the various two-locus mitochondrial models to "one nuclear locus" models. Classifying the nuclear families into different independent groups by the mother's phenotypes allows us to estimate the nuclear gene frequency in one group and to use this estimate as the expected value to test the fitness of the model on the other group. In addition, if we restrict the analysis to specific subsets of the mating type(s), we can also test the model on specific groups of nuclear families without estimating the gene frequency. Goodness-of-fit tests can be performed on pooled sibship data as well as individual sibship data. These methods of analysis should assume increasing importance as more disorders with features of mitochondrial inheritance are identified.

  15. Image simulation using LOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Roberts, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The LOCUS data base program has been used to simulate images and to solve simple equations. This has been accomplished by making each record (which normally would represent a data entry)represent sequenced or random number pairs.

  16. Identification and Functional Analysis of Pheromone and Receptor Genes in the B3 Mating Locus of Pleurotus eryngii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Young Min; Im, Chak Han; Ali, Asjad; Kim, Sun Young; Je, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Min-Keun; Rho, Hyun Su; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kong, Won-Sik; Ryu, Jae-San

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii has recently become a major cultivated mushroom; it uses tetrapolar heterothallism as a part of its reproductive process. Sexual development progresses only when the A and B mating types are compatible. Such mating incompatibility occasionally limits the efficiency of breeding programs in which crossing within loci-shared strains or backcrossing strategies are employed. Therefore, understanding the mating system in edible mushroom fungi will help provide a short cut in the development of new strains. We isolated and identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and performed a functional analysis of the genes in the mating process by transformation. A genomic DNA library was constructed to map the entire mating-type locus. The B3 locus was found to contain four pheromone precursor genes and four receptor genes. Remarkably, receptor PESTE3.3.1 has just 34 amino acid residues in its C-terminal cytoplasmic region; therefore, it seems likely to be a receptor-like gene. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) revealed that most pheromone and receptor genes showed significantly higher expression in monokaryotic cells than dikaryotic cells. The pheromone genes PEphb3.1 and PEphb3.3 and the receptor gene PESTE3.3.1 were transformed into P5 (A3B4). The transformants were mated with a tester strain (A4B4), and the progeny showed clamp connections and a normal fruiting body, which indicates the proposed role of these genes in mating and fruiting processes. This result also confirms that PESTE3.3.1 is a receptor gene. In this study, we identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and found that some of those genes appear to play a role in the mating and fruiting processes. These results might help elucidate the mechanism of fruiting differentiation and improve breeding efficiency. PMID:25133513

  17. Identification and functional analysis of pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 mating locus of Pleurotus eryngii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Young Min; Im, Chak Han; Ali, Asjad; Kim, Sun Young; Je, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Min-Keun; Rho, Hyun Su; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kong, Won-Sik; Ryu, Jae-San

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii has recently become a major cultivated mushroom; it uses tetrapolar heterothallism as a part of its reproductive process. Sexual development progresses only when the A and B mating types are compatible. Such mating incompatibility occasionally limits the efficiency of breeding programs in which crossing within loci-shared strains or backcrossing strategies are employed. Therefore, understanding the mating system in edible mushroom fungi will help provide a short cut in the development of new strains. We isolated and identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and performed a functional analysis of the genes in the mating process by transformation. A genomic DNA library was constructed to map the entire mating-type locus. The B3 locus was found to contain four pheromone precursor genes and four receptor genes. Remarkably, receptor PESTE3.3.1 has just 34 amino acid residues in its C-terminal cytoplasmic region; therefore, it seems likely to be a receptor-like gene. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) revealed that most pheromone and receptor genes showed significantly higher expression in monokaryotic cells than dikaryotic cells. The pheromone genes PEphb3.1 and PEphb3.3 and the receptor gene PESTE3.3.1 were transformed into P5 (A3B4). The transformants were mated with a tester strain (A4B4), and the progeny showed clamp connections and a normal fruiting body, which indicates the proposed role of these genes in mating and fruiting processes. This result also confirms that PESTE3.3.1 is a receptor gene. In this study, we identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and found that some of those genes appear to play a role in the mating and fruiting processes. These results might help elucidate the mechanism of fruiting differentiation and improve breeding efficiency.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of clinical and environmental isolates of the Cryptococcus neoformans species complex reveals a high genetic diversity and the presence of the molecular type VGII mating type a in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Escandón, Patricia; Sánchez, Adriana; Martínez, Marcela; Meyer, Wieland; Castañeda, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological relationships of clinical and environmental isolates of the Cryptococcus neoformans species complex in Colombia. The current study reflects data from 1987 to 2004. In Colombia serotypes A and B are most frequently recovered from patients and the environment. Of the 178 clinical isolates studied, 91.1% were of serotype A, 8.4% serotype B and 0.5% serotype C. Of the 247 environmental isolates, 44.2% were of serotype A, 42.6% serotype B and 13.2% serotype C. No serotype D isolates were isolated. Serotype AD has not been recovered in Colombia. PCR fingerprinting with the primers M13, (GACA)4 and (GTG)5 and URA5 gene restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis grouped the majority of clinical serotype A and environmental serotype B isolates into the molecular types VNI (98.1%) and VGII (100%), respectively. Mating type alpha was determined in 99.3% of serotype A isolates, but 96.6% of serotype B isolates were of mating type a. Similar profiles between clinical and environmental isolates suggest that the patients may have acquired the infection from the environment. The data presented form part of the Colombian contribution to the ongoing global survey of the C. neoformans species complex.

  19. The IGF2 Locus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 is vital to embryo development. The IGF2 locus covers approximately 150-kb genomic region on human chromosome 11, containing two imprinted genes, IGF2 and H19, sha...

  20. A 2.5-Kilobase Deletion Containing a Cluster of Nine MicroRNAs in the Latency-Associated-Transcript Locus of the Pseudorabies Virus Affects the Host Response of Porcine Trigeminal Ganglia during Established Latency

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, Nada; Dhorne-Pollet, Sophie; Fuchs, Walter; Endale Ahanda, Marie-Laure; Lange, Elke; Klupp, Barbara; Arya, Anoop; Loveland, Jane E.; Lefevre, François; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PrV) establishes latency primarily in neurons of trigeminal ganglia when only the transcription of the latency-associated transcript (LAT) locus is detected. Eleven microRNAs (miRNAs) cluster within the LAT, suggesting a role in establishment and/or maintenance of latency. We generated a mutant (M) PrV deleted of nine miRNA genes which displayed properties that were almost identical to those of the parental PrV wild type (WT) during propagation in vitro. Fifteen pigs were experimentally infected with either WT or M virus or were mock infected. Similar levels of virus excretion and host antibody response were observed in all infected animals. At 62 days postinfection, trigeminal ganglia were excised and profiled by deep sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR. Latency was established in all infected animals without evidence of viral reactivation, demonstrating that miRNAs are not essential for this process. Lower levels of the large latency transcript (LLT) were found in ganglia infected by M PrV than in those infected by WT PrV. All PrV miRNAs were expressed, with highest expression observed for prv-miR-LLT1, prv-miR-LLT2 (in WT ganglia), and prv-miR-LLT10 (in both WT and M ganglia). No evidence of differentially expressed porcine miRNAs was found. Fifty-four porcine genes were differentially expressed between WT, M, and control ganglia. Both viruses triggered a strong host immune response, but in M ganglia gene upregulation was prevalent. Pathway analyses indicated that several biofunctions, including those related to cell-mediated immune response and the migration of dendritic cells, were impaired in M ganglia. These findings are consistent with a function of the LAT locus in the modulation of host response for maintaining a latent state. IMPORTANCE This study provides a thorough reference on the establishment of latency by PrV in its natural host, the pig. Our results corroborate the evidence obtained from the study

  1. Two HAP2-GCS1 homologs responsible for gamete interactions in the cellular slime mold with multiple mating types: Implication for common mechanisms of sexual reproduction shared by plants and protozoa and for male-female differentiation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Marina; Yamada, Lixy; Fujisaki, Yukie; Bloomfield, Gareth; Yoshida, Kentaro; Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Sawada, Hitoshi; Mori, Toshiyuki; Urushihara, Hideko

    2016-07-01

    Fertilization is a central event in sexual reproduction, and understanding its molecular mechanisms has both basic and applicative biological importance. Recent studies have uncovered the molecules that mediate this process in a variety of organisms, making it intriguing to consider conservation and evolution of the mechanisms of sexual reproduction across phyla. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum undergoes sexual maturation and forms gametes under dark and humid conditions. It exhibits three mating types, type-I, -II, and -III, for the heterothallic mating system. Based on proteome analyses of the gamete membranes, we detected expression of two homologs of the plant fertilization protein HAP2-GCS1. When their coding genes were disrupted in type-I and type-II strains, sexual potency was completely lost, whereas disruption in the type-III strain did not affect mating behavior, suggesting that the latter acts as female in complex organisms. Our results demonstrate the highly conserved function of HAP2-GCS1 in gamete interactions and suggest the presence of additional allo-recognition mechanisms in D. discoideum gametes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fisetin up-regulates the expression of adiponectin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes via the activation of silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1)-deacetylase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs).

    PubMed

    Jin, Taewon; Kim, Oh Yoen; Shin, Min-Jeong; Choi, Eun Young; Lee, Sung Sook; Han, Ye Sun; Chung, Ji Hyung

    2014-10-29

    Adiponectin, an adipokine, has been described as showing physiological benefits against obesity-related malfunctions and vascular dysfunction. Several natural compounds that promote the expression and secretion of adipokines in adipocytes could be useful for treating metabolic disorders. This study investigated the effect of fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, on the regulation of adiponectin in adipocytes using 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The expression and secretion of adiponectin increased in 3T3-L1 cells upon treatment with fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. Fisetin-induced adiponectin secretion was inhibited by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) antagonists. It was also revealed that fisetin increased the activities of PPARs and silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the up-regulation of adiponectin and the activation of PPARs induced by fisetin were prevented by a SIRT1 inhibitor. Fisetin also promoted deacetylation of PPAR γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1) and its interaction with PPARs. SIRT knockdown by siRNA significantly decreased both adiponectin production and PPARs-PGC-1 interaction. These results provide evidence that fisetin promotes the gene expression of adiponectin through the activation of SIRT1 and PPARs in adipocytes.

  3. Bifurcations of the conjugate locus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The conjugate locus of a point p in a surface S will have a certain number of cusps. As the point p is moved in the surface the conjugate locus may spontaneously gain or lose cusps. In this paper we explain this 'bifurcation' in terms of the vanishing of higher derivatives of the exponential map; we derive simple equations for these higher derivatives in terms of scalar invariants; we classify the bifurcations of cusps in terms of the local structure of the conjugate locus; and we describe an intuitive picture of the bifurcation as the intersection between certain contours in the tangent plane.

  4. The RAD7 and RAD16 genes, which are essential for pyrimidine dimer removal from the silent mating type loci, are also required for repair of the nontranscribed strand of an active gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; de Groot, N; Gleig, F; Bang, D D; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1994-01-01

    The rad16 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was previously shown to be impaired in removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the silent mating-type loci (D. D. Bang, R. A. Verhage, N. Goosen, J. Brouwer, and P. van de Putte, Nucleic Acids Res. 20:3925-3931, 1992). Here we show that rad7 as well as rad7 rad16 double mutants have the same repair phenotype, indicating that the RAD7 and RAD16 gene products might operate in the same nucleotide excision repair subpathway. Dimer removal from the genome overall is essentially incomplete in these mutants, leaving about 20 to 30% of the DNA unrepaired. Repair analysis of the transcribed RPB2 gene shows that the nontranscribed strand is not repaired at all in rad7 and rad16 mutants, whereas the transcribed strand is repaired in these mutants at a fast rate similar to that in RAD+ cells. When the results obtained with the RPB2 gene can be generalized, the RAD7 and RAD16 proteins not only are essential for repair of silenced regions but also function in repair of nontranscribed strands of active genes in S. cerevisiae. The phenotype of rad7 and rad16 mutants closely resembles that of human xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells, suggesting that RAD7 and RAD16 in S. cerevisiae function in the same pathway as the XPC gene in human cells. RAD4, which on the basis of sequence homology has been proposed to be the yeast XPC counterpart, seems to be involved in repair of both inactive and active yeast DNA, challenging the hypothesis that RAD4 and XPC are functional homologs. Images PMID:8065346

  5. [Study on preferred retinal locus].

    PubMed

    Dai, Bing-Fa; Hu, Jian-Min; Xu, Duan-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Preferred retinal locus (PRL) is always found in the age-related macular degeneration and other macular damages in patients with low vision, and it is a very important anatomic position in patients with central vision impairment to achieve the rehabilitation. In recent years, the training of preferred retinal locus (PRL) has become a research hotspot of low vision rehabilitation, it can clearly improve functional vision and quality of life. The authors reviewed relevant literatures, and summarized the definition, position, characteristics, training and clinical implications of the PRL.

  6. Locus of Control and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, C. A.; Strongman, K. T.

    1984-01-01

    Assessed delinquent and nondelinquent male adolescents (N=43) on locus of control and intellectual achievement responsibilty. Results supported a multidimensional model. There was no difference in expectancy of control for negative academic events between delinquents and nondelinquents. Birth order and delinquency were the most important…

  7. Locus of Control and Socialization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raine, Adrian; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Predicted that an external locus of control would characterize undersocialization. Tested this hypothesis on a random sample of secondary school children (N=97). Scores from the Child Nowicki-Strickland Internal-External Scale were found to predict undersocialization in the expected direction. Suggested several possible interpretations of this…

  8. Locus of Control and Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, M. Michael

    1980-01-01

    The role of locus of control in interpersonal attraction was examined by administering 1) the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale and 2) a sociometric test of friendship to 200 eighth graders. (CM)

  9. Locus of Control and Status Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensman, Miriam Roza; Haller, Archibald O.

    Utilizing data derived from 277 rural, male respondents initially enrolled in Lenawee County, Michigan high schools, the Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale was employed to test the hypothesis that locus of control will have interactive rather than additive effects on the process of status attainment. Locus of control was defined as…

  10. Which Sry locus is the hypertensive Y chromosome locus?

    PubMed

    Turner, Monte E; Farkas, Joel; Dunmire, Jeff; Ely, Daniel; Milsted, Amy

    2009-02-01

    The Y chromosome of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) contains a genetic component that raises blood pressure compared with the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) Y chromosome. This research tests the Sry gene complex as the hypertensive component of the SHR Y chromosome. The Sry loci were sequenced in 1 strain with a hypertensive Y chromosome (SHR/Akr) and 2 strains with a normotensive Y chromosome (SHR/Crl and WKY/Akr). Both SHR strains have 7 Sry loci, whereas the WKY strain has 6. The 6 loci in common between SHR and WKY strains were identical in the sequence compared (coding region, 392-bp 5' prime flanking, 1200-bp 3' flanking). Both SHR strains have a locus (Sry3) not found in WKY rats, but this locus is different between SHR/Akr and SHR/Crl rats. Six mutations have accumulated in Sry3 between the SHR strains, whereas the other 6 Sry loci are identical. This pattern of an SHR-specific locus and mutation in this locus in SHR/Crl coinciding with the loss of Y chromosome hypertension is an expected pattern if Sry3 is the Y chromosome-hypertensive component. The SHR/y strain showed a significant increase in total Sry expression in the kidney between 4 and 15 weeks of age. There are significant differences in Sry expression between adrenal glands and the kidney (15 to 30 times higher in kidneys) but no significant differences between strains. These results, along with previous studies demonstrating an interaction of Sry with the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter and increased blood pressure with exogenous Sry expression, suggest the Sry loci as the hypertensive component of the SHR Y chromosome.

  11. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-01-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant–vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change. PMID:24535890

  12. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-11-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant-vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change.

  13. The evolution of male-female sexual dimorphism predates the gender-based divergence of the mating locus gene MAT3/RB.

    PubMed

    Hiraide, Rintaro; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Hamaji, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Ryo; Kawafune, Kaoru; Abe, Jun; Sekimoto, Hiroyuki; Umen, James; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2013-05-01

    The molecular bases for the evolution of male-female sexual dimorphism are possible to study in volvocine algae because they encompass the entire range of reproductive morphologies from isogamy to oogamy. In 1978, Charlesworth suggested the model of a gamete size gene becoming linked to the sex-determining or mating type locus (MT) as a mechanism for the evolution of anisogamy. Here, we carried out the first comprehensive study of a candidate MT-linked oogamy gene, MAT3/RB, across the volvocine lineage. We found that evolution of anisogamy/oogamy predates the extremely high male-female divergence of MAT3 that characterizes the Volvox carteri lineage. These data demonstrate very little sex-linked sequence divergence of MAT3 between the two sexes in other volvocine groups, though linkage between MAT3 and the mating locus appears to be conserved. These data implicate genetic determinants other than or in addition to MAT3 in the evolution of anisogamy in volvocine algae.

  14. Mechanisms Underlying the Breast Cancer Susceptibility Locus Mcs5a

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Mcs5a2) down regulates the expression of the Fbxo10 gene in the T cells and that this reduced expression is associated with reduced mammary tumor...in primary T cells is conserved between rat and human. We demonstrate that the function of the non-coding Mcs5a locus likely is repressive gene ...regulation. We present a model that begins to explain how the Fbxo10 gene could be regulated in T cells. 15. SUBJECT TERMS mammary carcinogenesis

  15. Contrasting Codon Usage Patterns and Purifying Selection at the Mating Locus in Putatively Asexual Alternaria Fungal Species

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Jane E.; Kawabe, Masato; Abdo, Zaid; Arie, Tsutomu; Peever, Tobin L.

    2011-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in heterothallic ascomycete fungi is controlled by a single mating-type locus called MAT1 with two alternate alleles or idiomorphs, MAT1-1 and MAT1-2. These alleles lack sequence similarity and encode different transcriptional regulators. A large number of phytopathogenic fungi including Alternaria spp. are considered asexual, yet still carry expressed MAT1 genes. The molecular evolution of Alternaria MAT1 was explored using nucleotide diversity, nonsynonymous vs. synonymous substitution (dn/ds) ratios and codon usage statistics. Likelihood ratio tests of site-branch models failed to detect positive selection on MAT1-1-1 or MAT1-2-1. Codon-site models demonstrated that both MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 are under purifying selection and significant differences in codon usage were observed between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1. Mean GC content at the third position (GC3) and effective codon usage (ENC) were significantly different between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 with values of 0.57 and 48 for MAT1-1-1 and 0.62 and 46 for MAT1-2-1, respectively. In contrast, codon usage of Pleospora spp. (anamorph Stemphylium), a closely related Dothideomycete genus, was not significantly different between MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1. The purifying selection and biased codon usage detected at the MAT1 locus in Alternaria spp. suggest a recent sexual past, cryptic sexual present and/or that MAT1 plays important cellular role(s) in addition to mating. PMID:21625561

  16. Factors Determining Adolescent Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopera-Frye, Karen F.; And Others

    Previous research has demonstrated an association between locus of control in adolescence and a successful transition to adulthood. Having an external locus of control has been implicated as an important factor in adolescent behaviors such as teenage pregnancy and delinquency, and has been found to be negatively related to school achievement. This…

  17. Interactions between Superintendent Leader Behavior and Locus of Control on Job Satisfaction as Perceived by Vocational Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohan, Alan R.

    A study investigated the interactions between leadership style and the personality variable locus of control on vocational teacher job satisfaction. It used a 2x2x2 factorial design to explore three independent variables: (1) the consideration dimension of leader behavior; (2) the initiating structure dimension of leader behavior; and (3) locus of…

  18. Internal locus of control and vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Selander, John; Marnetoft, Sven-Uno; Asell, Malin; Selander, Ulrika; Millet, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In previous studies, internal locus of control (ILC) has been pointed out as a key factor for return to work after vocational rehabilitation. The aim of the current study was to gain a deeper understanding of the concept of ILC in a Swedish vocational rehabilitation context. The study was based on data from 347 long-term sick-listed clients collected at the onset of vocational rehabilitation. A first bi-variate analysis showed that ILC was positively associated with physical functioning and general health, and negatively associated with bodily pain. The analysis also showed that women, more than men, reported high internal locus of control. After a second multivariate analysis, only bodily pain remained associated. It is concluded that there exist a strong and negative association between bodily pain and internal locus of control. Clients with severe pain often also suffer from low internal locus of control. This should be kept in mind when providing vocational rehabilitation.

  19. Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0445 TITLE: Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mia M. MacCollin, M.D...NUMBER Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0445 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...can be found on next page. 15. SUBJECT TERMS schwannomatosis, tumor suppressor gene, NF2, molecular genetics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  20. Molecular characterization of the mouse agouti locus.

    PubMed

    Bultman, S J; Michaud, E J; Woychik, R P

    1992-12-24

    The agouti (a) locus acts within the microenvironment of the hair follicle to regulate coat color pigmentation in the mouse. We have characterized a gene encoding a novel 131 amino acid protein that we propose is the one gene associated with the agouti locus. This gene is normally expressed in a manner consistent with a locus function, and, more importantly, its structure and expression are affected by a number of representative alleles in the agouti dominance hierarchy. In addition, we found that the pleiotropic effects associated with the lethal yellow (Ay) mutation, which include pronounced obesity, diabetes, and the development of neoplasms, are accompanied by deregulated overexpression of the agouti gene in numerous tissues of the adult animal.

  1. Intrahaplotype polymorphism at the Brassica S locus.

    PubMed Central

    Miege, C; Ruffio-Châble, V; Schierup, M H; Cabrillac, D; Dumas, C; Gaude, T; Cock, J M

    2001-01-01

    The S locus receptor kinase and the S locus glycoproteins are encoded by genes located at the S locus, which controls the self-incompatibility response in Brassica. In class II self-incompatibility haplotypes, S locus glycoproteins can be encoded by two different genes, SLGA and SLGB. In this study, we analyzed the sequences of these genes in several independently isolated plants, all of which carry the same S haplotype (S(2)). Two groups of S(2) haplotypes could be distinguished depending on whether SRK was associated with SLGA or SLGB. Surprisingly, SRK alleles from the two groups could be distinguished at the sequence level, suggesting that recombination rarely occurs between haplotypes of the two groups. An analysis of the distribution of polymorphisms along the S domain of SRK showed that hypervariable domains I and II tend to be conserved within haplotypes but to be highly variable between haplotypes. This is consistent with these domains playing a role in the determination of haplotype specificity. PMID:11606555

  2. The Preconscious: Locus for Significant Written Compositions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, Alvin D.

    1979-01-01

    The author suggests that the preconscious is the true locus of significant prose because of its greater amount of freedom to gather, compare, and rearrange ideas, and that the ultimate challenge to teachers of composition is to give freedom to their students' preconscious processes. (KC)

  3. Exercise Adherence and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geshuri, Yosef; Glahn, Ronald

    In 1990, a study was conducted to investigate the relationship between students' locus of control and the extent to which they participated in a voluntary exercise program. First-time participants in the "Shape Up" program offered at the Porterville College Fitness Center during the summer and fall semesters of 1990 were identified through the…

  4. A suppressor locus for MODY3-diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Carette, Claire; Bagattin, Alessia; Chiral, Magali; Makinistoglu, Munevver Parla; Garbay, Serge; Prévost, Géraldine; Madaras, Cécile; Hérault, Yann; Leibovici, Michel; Pontoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 3 (MODY3), linked to mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A, is the most prevalent form of monogenic diabetes mellitus. HNF1alpha-deficiency leads to defective insulin secretion via a molecular mechanism that is still not completely understood. Moreover, in MODY3 patients the severity of insulin secretion can be extremely variable even in the same kindred, indicating that modifier genes may control the onset of the disease. With the use of a mouse model for HNF1alpha-deficiency, we show here that specific genetic backgrounds (C3H and CBA) carry a powerful genetic suppressor of diabetes. A genome scan analysis led to the identification of a major suppressor locus on chromosome 3 (Moda1). Moda1 locus contains 11 genes with non-synonymous SNPs that significantly interacts with other loci on chromosomes 4, 11 and 18. Mechanistically, the absence of HNF1alpha in diabetic-prone (sensitive) strains leads to postnatal defective islets growth that is remarkably restored in resistant strains. Our findings are relevant to human genetics since Moda1 is syntenic with a human locus identified by genome wide association studies of fasting glycemia in patients. Most importantly, our results show that a single genetic locus can completely suppress diabetes in Hnf1a-deficiency. PMID:27667715

  5. Dental Outpatients: Health Locus of Control Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludenia, Krista; Donham, Greg W.

    1983-01-01

    Examined relationships among specific personality variables, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales, and criterion-based ratings by staff dentists with dental outpatients (N=101). Found a consistent relationship between the perception that health is maintained by engaging in health-related behaviors and individual difference measures…

  6. Dental Outpatients: Health Locus of Control Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludenia, Krista; Donham, Greg W.

    1983-01-01

    Examined relationships among specific personality variables, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales, and criterion-based ratings by staff dentists with dental outpatients (N=101). Found a consistent relationship between the perception that health is maintained by engaging in health-related behaviors and individual difference measures…

  7. Multidimensionality of Locus of Control in Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Maureen J.; Kearney, James F.

    The Internal-External (I-E) Locus of Control scale (Rotter, 1966) was administered to 185 male and 185 female university students. The resulting scores were factored, producing two factors for males and four for females. The male factors were the generally-accepted "luck" and "powerful others"; for women, however, the "powerful others" dimension…

  8. Locus of Control, Social Class, and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez, James A.

    The relationship between locus of control, social class, and learning processes were reviewed by analyzing: (1) externality as a function of socioeconomic status, i.e., the lower the status, the greater the degree of externality; (2) the impact of the early home environment on the child's learning and development; (3) classroom and teacher…

  9. Relationships among Reading Performance, Locus of Control and Achievement for Marginal Admission Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Roger S.; Drexler, John A., Jr.

    The first phase of the study was a 2 x 2 factorial design, with locus of control and instructional method (lecture and demonstration) as independent variables and honor point average (HPA) as the dependent variable. The second phase used correlational techniques to test the extent to which reading performance and traditional predictors of…

  10. The Impact of Locus of Control on Language Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani

    2012-01-01

    This study hypothesized that students' loci of control affected their language achievement. 198 (N = 198) EFL students took the Rotter's (1966) locus of control test and were classified as locus-internal (ni = 78), and locus-external (ne = 120). They then took their ordinary courses and at the end of the semester, they were given their exams.…

  11. Cognitive Evaluation Theory, Locus of Control and Positive Verbal Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonky, Edward; Reihman, Jacqueline

    This study tests the hypothesis that individual differences in locus of control orientation may mediate elementary school students' responses to positive verbal feedback. A total of 30 kindergarten through fourth grade subjects were assessed for locus of control orientation using the Bialer Children's Locus of Control Questionnaire. To establish a…

  12. Self-Esteem, Locus of Control, and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterbin, Allan; Rakow, Ernest

    The direct effects of locus of control and self-esteem on standardized test scores were studied. The relationships among the standardized test scores and measures of locus of control and self-esteem for 12,260 students from the National Education Longitudinal Study 1994 database were examined, using the same definition of locus of control and…

  13. Locus of control and the fundamental dimensions of moods.

    PubMed

    Henson, H N; Chang, E C

    1998-06-01

    The present study examined the association between locus of control and positive and negative moods in 253 college students. Using the PANAS-X, designed by Watson and Clark, individuals scoring high on internal locus of control also scored higher across different dimensions of positive mood. Conversely, individuals scoring high on external locus of control had higher scores across different dimensions of negative mood.

  14. Mating-type heterokaryosis and population shifts in Aspergillus flavus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of many agronomically important crops worldwide. We sampled A. flavus strains from a cornfield in Rocky Mount, NC. This field was planted in 2010 and plots were inoculated at tasselling with either AF36 or NRRL 21882 (=Afla-Guard) biocontrol strains, both of...

  15. Population shifts and mating-type heterokaryosis in Aspergillus flavus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal pathogen of many agronomically important crops worldwide. We sampled A. flavus strains from a cornfield in Rocky Mount, NC. This field was planted in 2010 and plots were inoculated at tasselling with either AF36 or NRRL 21882 (=Afla-Guard) biocontrol strains, both of...

  16. Effect of individualized goal-setting on college biology students' locus of control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, John E.

    This study investigated the effect of Individualized Goal-Setting A-T, relative to Classic A-T, on a student's locus of control (generalized and academic). This study also examined the effect of pretesting, relative to no pretesting, on a student's locus of control. Sixty students in an introductory, Audio-Tutorial, college zoology course were randomly assigned to treatment and control groups. Control groups (Classic A-T) completed the course in the usual manner. Treatment groups (IGS A-T) completed the course in the usual manner with one exception. That is, they used a different format for Optional Minicourse mastery. This new format released greater control to students over means as well as ends of minicourse mastery. Data were collected through use of the Solomon Four-Group design, with two levels of treatment (Classic A-T, IGS A-T) and two levels of pretesting (pretest, no pretest). Instruments included the Rotter I-E and Schafer Academic I-E Locus of Control Scales. Posttest scores were analyzed by a 2 × 2 multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA).The following conclusions were made (p < 0.10).1IGS A-T, relative to Classic A-T, has no significant effect on a student's locus of control.2Pretesting, relative to no pretesting, has no significant effect on posttest locus of control.

  17. Increased cerebral blood flow during hypercapnia is not affected by lesion of the nucleus locus ceruleus

    SciTech Connect

    Harik, S.I.; Prado, R.; Busto, R.; Ginsberg, M.D.

    1986-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the putative noradrenergic innervation of intraparenchymal cerebral blood vessels from the nucleus locus ceruleus mediates the vasodilatory response to hypercapnia, regional cerebral blood flow was measured by iodo-(/sup 14/C)antipyrine autoradiography in awake and restrained rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nucleus locus ceruleus and in unlesioned control rats. Hypercapnia, induced by the inhalation of 5% or 8% CO/sub 2/ in air for 8 minutes caused a 2 to 5-fold increase in regional cerebral blood flow. However, despite a marked reduction of about 90% in cortical norepinephrine levels ipsilateral to the lesion, blood flow to the frontal and parietal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum increased to the same extent in ipsilateral and contralateral regions. Thus, lesion of the locus ceruleus and the resultant depletion of endogenous cortical and hippocampal norepinephrine, does not influence the cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia.

  18. Geographic distribution of haplotype diversity at the bovine casein locus

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Oliver C; Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M; Özbeyaz, Ceyhan; Zaragoza, Pilar; Williams, John L; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Lenstra, Johannes A; Moazami-Goudarzi, Katy; Erhardt, Georg

    2004-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the casein locus in cattle was studied on the basis of haplotype analysis. Consideration of recently described genetic variants of the casein genes which to date have not been the subject of diversity studies, allowed the identification of new haplotypes. Genotyping of 30 cattle breeds from four continents revealed a geographically associated distribution of haplotypes, mainly defined by frequencies of alleles at CSN1S1 and CSN3. The genetic diversity within taurine breeds in Europe was found to decrease significantly from the south to the north and from the east to the west. Such geographic patterns of cattle genetic variation at the casein locus may be a result of the domestication process of modern cattle as well as geographically differentiated natural or artificial selection. The comparison of African Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds allowed the identification of several Bos indicus specific haplotypes (CSN1S1*C-CSN2*A2-CSN3*AI/CSN3*H) that are not found in pure taurine breeds. The occurrence of such haplotypes in southern European breeds also suggests that an introgression of indicine genes into taurine breeds could have contributed to the distribution of the genetic variation observed. PMID:15040901

  19. Grape seed procyanidin B2 ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibits apoptosis via the AMP-activated protein kinase-silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1-PPARγ co-activator-1α axis in rat mesangial cells under high-dose glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Cai, Xiaxia; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Li, Yong

    2015-01-14

    Grape seed procyanidin B2 (GSPB2), an antioxidative and anti-inflammatory polyphenol in grape seed, has been found to have protective effects on diabetic nephropathy. Based on its favourable biological activities, in the present study, we aimed to investigate whether GSPB2 could inhibit apoptosis in rat mesangial cells treated with glucosamine (GlcN) under high-dose conditions. The results showed that the administration of GSPB2 (10 μg/ml) significantly increased the viability of mesangial cells treated with GlcN at a dose of 15 mM. We found that GSPB2 inhibited apoptosis in mesangial cells using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphates (dUTP) nick-end labelling staining and flow cytometry technique (P< 0·05 for both). GSPB2 treatment also suppressed oxidative stress by elevating the activity of glutathione peroxidase (P< 0·05) and superoxide dismutase (P< 0·01), as well as prevented cellular damage. GSPB2 enhanced the mRNA expression of nuclear respiratory factor 1, mitochondrial transcription factor A and mitochondrial DNA copy number in mesangial cells as determined by real-time PCR (P< 0·05 for each). Finally, GSPB2 treatment activated the protein expression of PPARγ co-activator-1α (PGC-1α), silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mesangial cells. These findings suggest that GSPB2 markedly ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibits apoptosis in rat mesangial cells treated with high-dose GlcN. This protective effect could be, at least in part, due to the activation of the AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α axis.

  20. Genetic variability at the PARK16 locus

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Arianna; Nalls, Mike A; Houlden, Henry; Revesz, Tamas; Singleton, Andrew B; Wood, Nicholas W; Hardy, John; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease which is clinically heterogeneous and pathologically consists of loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and intracytoplasmic neuronal inclusions containing alpha-synuclein aggregations known as Lewy bodies. Although the majority of PD is idiopathic, pathogenic mutations in several mendelian genes have been successfully identified through linkage analyses. To identify susceptibility loci for idiopathic PD, several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) within different populations have recently been conducted in both idiopathic and familial forms of PD. These analyses have confirmed SNCA and MAPT as loci harboring PD susceptibility. In addition, the GWAS identified several other genetic loci suggestively associated with the risk of PD; among these, only one was replicated by two different studies of European and Asian ancestries. Hence, we investigated this novel locus known as PARK16 for coding mutations in a large series of idiopathic pathologically proven PD cases, and also conducted an association study in a case–control cohort from the United Kingdom. An association between a novel RAB7L1 mutation, c.379-12insT, and disease (P-value=0.0325) was identified. Two novel coding variants present only in the PD cohort were also identified within the RAB7L1 (p.K157R) and SLC41A1 (p.A350V) genes. No copy number variation analyses have yet been performed within this recently identified locus. We concluded that, although both coding variants and risk alleles within the PARK16 locus seem to be rare, further molecular analyses within the PARK16 locus and within different populations are required in order to examine its biochemical role in the disease process. PMID:20683486

  1. Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0445 TITLE: Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis Locus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mia M. MacCollin, M.D...COVERED (Leave blank) July 2004 Annual (1 Jul 2003 - 30 Jun 2004) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Molecular Identification of the Schwannomatosis...linkage and loss of heterozygosity analyses. 3. To determine the molecular mechanism of tumor formation in these patients using complementary molecular

  2. Bipolar disorder: evidence for a major locus.

    PubMed

    Spence, M A; Flodman, P L; Sadovnick, A D; Bailey-Wilson, J E; Ameli, H; Remick, R A

    1995-10-09

    Complex segregation analyses were conducted on families of bipolar I and bipolar II probands to delineate the mode of inheritance. The probands were ascertained from consecutive referrals to the Mood Disorder Service, University Hospital, University of British Columbia and diagnosed by DSM-III-R and Research Diagnostic Criteria. Data were available on over 1,500 first-degree relatives of the 186 Caucasian probands. The purpose of the analyses was to determine if, after correcting for age and birth cohort, there was evidence for a single major locus. Five models were fit to the data using the statistical package SAGE: i) dominant, ii) recessive, iii) arbitrary mendelian inheritance, iv) environmental, and v) no major effects. A single dominant, mendelian major locus was the best fitting of these models for the sample of bipolar I and II probands when only bipolar relatives were defined as affected (polygenic inheritance could not be tested). Adding recurrent major depression to the diagnosis "affected" for relatives reduced the evidence for a major locus effect. Our findings support the undertaking of linkage studies and are consistent with the analyses of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative Study data by Rice et al. (Arch Gen Psychiatry 44: 441-447, 1987) and Blangero and Elston (Genet Epidemiol 6:221-227, 1989).

  3. Bipolar disorder: Evidence for a major locus

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, M.A.; Flodman, P.L.; Sadovnick, A.D.; Ameli, H.

    1995-10-09

    Complex segregation analyses were conducted on families of bipolar I and bipolar II probands to delineate the mode of inheritance. The probands were ascertained from consecutive referrals to the Mood Disorder Service, University Hospital, University of British Columbia and diagnosed by DSM-III-R and Research Diagnostic Criteria. Data were available on over 1,500 first-degree relatives of the 186 Caucasian probands. The purpose of the analyses was to determine if, after correcting for age and birth cohort, there was evidence for a single major locus. Five models were fit to the data using the statistical package SAGE: (1) dominant, (2) recessive, (3) arbitrary mendelian inheritance, (4) environmental, and (5) no major effects. A single dominant, mendelian major locus was the best fitting of these models for the sample of bipolar I and II probands when only bipolar relatives were defined as affected (polygenic inheritance could not be tested). Adding recurrent major depression to the diagnosis {open_quotes}affected{close_quotes} for relatives reduced the evidence for a major locus effect. Our findings support the undertaking of linkage studies and are consistent with the analyses of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative Study data by Rice et al. and Blangero and Elston. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Quantitative trait locus for reading disability on chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Cardon, L.R. |; Smith, S.D.; Kimberling, W.J.; Fulker, D.W.; DeFries, J.C.; Pennington, B.F.

    1994-10-14

    Interval mapping of data from two independent samples of sib pairs, at least one member of whom was reading disabled, revealed evidence for a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 6. Results obtained from analyses of reading performance from 114 sib pairs genotyped for DNA markers localized the QTL to 6p21.3. Analyses of corresponding data from an independent sample of 50 dizygotic twin pairs provided evidence for linkage to the same region. In combination, the replicate samples yielded a x{sup 2} value of 16.73 (P = 0.0002). Examination of twin and kindred siblings with more extreme deficits in reading performance yielded even stronger evidence for a QTL (x{sup 2} = 27.35, P < 0.00001). The position of the QTL was narrowly defined with a 100:1 confidence interval to a 2-centimorgan region within the human leukocyte antigen complex. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Regulatory organization of the staphylococcal sae locus.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Rajan P; Novick, Richard P

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the complex internal regulatory circuitry of the staphylococcal sae locus and the impact of modifying this circuitry on the expression of external genes in the sae regulon. The sae locus contains four genes, the saeR and S two-component signalling module (TCS), and saeP and Q, two upstream genes of hitherto unknown function. It is expressed from two promoters, P(A)sae, which transcribes only the TCS, and P(C)sae, which transcribes the entire locus. A bursa aurealis (bursa) transposon insertion in saeP in a derivative of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325 has a profound effect on sae function. It modifies the activity of the TCS, changing the expression of many genes in the sae regulon, even though transcription of the TCS (from P(A)sae) is not interrupted. Moreover, these effects are not due to disruption of saeP since an in-frame deletion in saeP has essentially no phenotype. The phenotype of S. aureus strain Newman is remarkably similar to that of the saeP : : bursa and this similarity is explained by an amino acid substitution in the Newman saeS gene that is predicted to modify profoundly the signalling function of the protein. This concurrence suggests that the saeP : : bursa insertion affects the signalling function of saeS, a suggestion that is supported by the ability of an saeQR clone, but not an saeR clone, to complement the effects of the saeP : : bursa insertion.

  6. A root locus based flutter synthesis procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.

    1983-01-01

    An efficient generalized constraint is proposed in the context of a nonlinear mathematical programming approach for the minimum weight design of wing structures for flutter considerations. The approach is based on a root locus analysis procedure that is better suited for flutter redesign than the conventionally used V-g method. The proposed flutter constraint does not require an actual computation of the flutter speed, allows prescription of meaningful margins of safety in the optimized design and lends itself to elegant computation of sensitivity information. The approach is implemented and results presented for representative structural models.

  7. Root Locus Algorithms for Programmable Pocket Calculators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wechsler, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Two algorithms are described which allow the plotting of individual points on a root locus diagram with or without time delay. The development was performed during the design of a continuous phase shifter used in the Baseband Antenna Combiner for the Deep Space Network (DSN). The algorithms, which are expected to be useful in similar DSN efforts, are simple enough to be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator. The coordinates of the open-loop zeros and poles, the gain constant K, and the time delay T are the data inputs.

  8. Relationships between locus of control and paranormal beliefs.

    PubMed

    Newby, Robert W; Davis, Jessica Boyette

    2004-06-01

    The present study investigated the associations between scores on paranormal beliefs, locus of control, and certain psychological processes such as affect and cognitions as measured by the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count. Analysis yielded significant correlations between scores on Locus of Control and two subscales of Tobacyk's (1988) Revised Paranormal Beliefs Scale, New Age Philosophy and Traditional Paranormal Beliefs. A step-wise multiple regression analysis indicated that Locus of Control was significantly related to New Age Philosophy. Other correlations were found between Tobacyk's subscales, Locus of Control, and three processes measured by the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count.

  9. Impact of locus of control on health message effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Shen, Fuyuan

    2011-10-01

    This article examined how individuals' locus of control might moderate the effect of health message frames. An experiment was conducted whereby participants read either individual- or social-responsibility message frames after their locus of control was primed. Results indicated that messages presented in individual-responsibility frames were more persuasive when people were primed with internal locus of control, whereas social-responsibility framed appeals were more persuasive when people were primed with external locus of control. These results were found for individuals in both high and low cognitive load conditions. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  10. Inside the CBF locus in Poaceae.

    PubMed

    Tondelli, Alessandro; Francia, Enrico; Barabaschi, Delfina; Pasquariello, Marianna; Pecchioni, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Several molecular evidences have been gathered in Poaceae that point out a central role of the CBF/DREB1 transcription factors in the signal transduction pathways leading to low-temperature tolerance, although to a quite different extent between crops originating from either temperate or tropical climates. A common feature of the CBF/DREB1 genes in Poaceae is their structural organization at the genome level in clusters of tandemly duplicated genes. In temperate cereals such as barley and wheat, expansion of specific multigene phylogenetic clades of CBFs that map at the Frost Resistance-2 locus has been exclusively observed. In addition, copy number variants of CBF genes between frost resistant and frost sensitive genotypes raise the question if multiple copies of the CBF/DREB1s are required to ensure freezing tolerance. On the other hand, in crops of tropical origin such as rice and maize, a smaller or less-responsive CBF regulon may have evolved, and different mechanisms might determine chilling tolerance. In this review, recent advances on the organization and diversity at the CBF cluster locus in the grasses are provided and discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural Organization of Cerebral Basolateral Nucleus of the Amygdaloid Complex in WAG-Rij Rats with Different Genotypes by the TAQ 1A Locus of Dopamine 2 Receptor Gene (DRD2).

    PubMed

    Akhmadeev, A V; Leushkina, N F; Kalimullina, L B

    2016-11-01

    Anxiety levels and structural organization of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdaloid complex were analyzed in WAG/Rij rats with genotypes A1/A1 and A2/A2 by DRD2 locus Taq 1A. Association of anxious behavior with A2/A2 genotype and the relationship between the structural organization of the nucleus and polymorphic variants of this locus are detected.

  12. Locus of Control and Death Anxiety: A Reexamination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadowski, Cyril J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examined the relationship between locus of control and death anxiety. The Reid-Ware Three Factor Locus of Control Scale and Templer Death Anxiety Scale were administered to college students aged 17 to 49. Death anxiety loaded significantly on the Fatalism dimension for males and on the Social System Control dimension for females. (Author/BWF)

  13. Metacognition: As a Predictor of One's Academic Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Serhat; Akin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of metacognition on one's academic locus of control. The study's sample group consists of 451 university students enrolled in various programs at Sakarya University, Turkey. In this study, the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory and the Academic Locus of Control Scale were used. The correlations and…

  14. Anxiety, locus of control and appraisal of air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, P.L.; Simpson-Housley, P.; de Man, A.F.

    1987-06-01

    100 residents of Santiago de Chile took part in a study of the relationship among locus of control, trait-anxiety, and perception of air pollution. Concern over the problem of atmospheric pollution and number of antipollution measures taken was related to trait-anxiety. Locus of control was associated with variation in awareness of pollution hazard.

  15. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  16. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  17. The Locus of Control Construct in EEG Alpha Rhythm Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Richard K.; Meyer, Robert G.

    1974-01-01

    The present study investigated locus of control, and performance in a biofeedback situation where the goal was to increase EEG alpha rhythm. Subjects with an internal locus of control were better able to use feedback to increase their alpha activity than external subjects. (Author)

  18. Acculturation and Health Locus of Control among Mexican American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Bobby

    1998-01-01

    Health locus of control was investigated across culture of origin (Mexicanism), mainstream culture (Americanism), and bicultural linguistic-acculturation domains among 424 Mexican-American adolescents. Belief in powerful others' external control was the strongest explanation of locus of control in the culture-of-origin domain; internal control was…

  19. Physical Attractiveness, Locus of Control, Sex Role, and Conversational Assertiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Keith F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the relationship among physical attractiveness, locus of control, sex role orientation, and assertiveness in undergraduate students. Reviews videotapes of mixed-sex student groups engaged in discussion. Finds an internal locus of control positively correlated with assertiveness. Uses a behavioral measure of assertiveness rather than…

  20. Locus of Control in Underachieving and Achieving Gifted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Robert; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study, with 87 underachieving and 77 achieving gifted students in grades 6-9, found that general locus of control measures did not differentiate between the 2 groups, that both scored significantly higher on positive internal than on negative internal locus of control, and that there were no gender or grade effects. (Author/DB)

  1. Externality and Locus of Control in Obese Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbitsky, Joyce Renee; White, Donna Romano

    1981-01-01

    Significant sex differences indicated that boys generally ate more than girls and held more internal locus of control expectancies. However, obese and normal-weighted children were not differentiated by their performance on either food-related measures nor by their locus of control expectancies. (Author/MP)

  2. The Cajal Body and Histone Locus Body

    PubMed Central

    Nizami, Zehra; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear organelle present in all eukaryotes that have been carefully studied. It is identified by the signature protein coilin and by CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). CBs contain high concentrations of splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and other RNA processing factors, suggesting that they are sites for assembly and/or posttranscriptional modification of the splicing machinery of the nucleus. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors required for processing histone pre-mRNAs. As its name implies, the HLB is associated with the genes that code for histones, suggesting that it may function to concentrate processing factors at their site of action. CBs and HLBs are present throughout the interphase of the cell cycle, but disappear during mitosis. The biogenesis of CBs shows the features of a self-organizing structure. PMID:20504965

  3. Identifying a novel locus for psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Bowes, John

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have identified genetic risk loci for PsA, the majority of which also confer risk for psoriasis. The stronger heritability of PsA in comparison with psoriasis suggests that there should be risk loci that are specific for PsA. Identifying such loci could potentially inform therapy development to provide more effective treatments for PsA patients, especially with a considerable proportion being non-responsive to current therapies. Evidence of a PsA-specific locus has been previously found at HLA-B27 within the MHC region. A recent study has provided evidence of non-HLA risk loci that are specific for PsA at IL23R, PTPN22 and on chromosome 5q31. Functional characterization of these loci will provide further understanding of the pathways underlying PsA, and enable us to apply genetic findings for patient benefit. PMID:26255310

  4. Fine mapping of E(kp)-1, a locus associated with silkworm (Bombyx mori) proleg development.

    PubMed

    Xiang, H; Li, M; Yang, F; Guo, Q; Zhan, S; Lin, H; Miao, X; Huang, Y

    2008-05-01

    The silkworm homeotic mutant E(kp) has a pair of rudimentary abdominal legs, called prolegs, in its A2 segment. This phenotype is caused by a single dominant mutation at the E(kp)-1 locus, which was previously mapped to chromosome 6. To explore the possible association of Hox genes with proleg development in the silkworm, a map-based cloning strategy was used to isolate the E(kp)-1 locus. Five E(kp)-1-linked simple sequence repeat markers on chromosome 6 were used to generate a low-resolution map with a total genetic distance of 39.5 cM. Four additional cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers were developed based on the initial map. The closest marker to E(kp)-1 was at a genetic distance of 2.7 cM. A high-resolution genetic map was constructed using nine BC1 segregating populations consisting of 2396 individuals. Recombination suppression was observed in the vicinity of E(kp)-1. Four molecular markers were tightly linked to E(kp)-1, and three were clustered with it. These markers were used to screen a BAC library. A single bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone spanning the E(kp)-1 locus was identified, and E(kp)-1 was delimited to a region less than 220 kb long that included the Hox gene abdominal-A and a non-coding locus, iab-4. These results provide essential information for the isolation of this locus, which may shed light on the mechanism of proleg development in the silkworm and possibly in Lepidoptera.

  5. Effects of preferred retinal locus placement on text navigation and development of advantageous trained retinal locus.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gale R; Schuchard, Ronald A; De l'Aune, William R; Watkins, Erica

    2006-01-01

    Sixty readers were evaluated for visual function and text-navigation ability. The visual field and preferred retinal locus (PRL) were measured with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). We found significant differences in text-navigation ability based on scotoma and PRL placement. Readers with a PRL to the left of or above a scotoma had significantly less text-navigation abilities. Readers with a PRL to the left of a scotoma tended to misread words with similar beginnings and omit the last word on a line. Readers with a PRL above a scotoma tended to skip a line or reread the same line twice. In a follow-up study, seven subjects with a nonadvantageous PRL quickly developed a trained retinal locus (TRL) during instruction with an SLO. Although the readers developed the TRL in about 15 minutes, they read slower with the TRL than the PRL. This TRL research provides promising pilot data.

  6. Identifying regulatory mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis using locus expression signature analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjee; de Ridder, Jeroen; Kool, Jaap; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2014-04-15

    Retroviral insertional mutagenesis is a powerful tool for identifying putative cancer genes in mice. To uncover the regulatory mechanisms by which common insertion loci affect downstream processes, we supplemented genotyping data with genome-wide mRNA expression profiling data for 97 tumors induced by retroviral insertional mutagenesis. We developed locus expression signature analysis, an algorithm to construct and interpret the differential gene expression signature associated with each common insertion locus. Comparing locus expression signatures to promoter affinity profiles allowed us to build a detailed map of transcription factors whose protein-level regulatory activity is modulated by a particular locus. We also predicted a large set of drugs that might mitigate the effect of the insertion on tumorigenesis. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential of a locus-specific signature approach for identifying mammalian regulatory mechanisms in a cancer context.

  7. Locus of Control Orientation: Parents, Peers, and Place.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Eileen M; Lobo Antunes, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    An internal locus of control contributes to positive youth outcomes such as a general well-being and academic success, while also serving as a protective factor against exposure to community violence and reducing negative behaviors like violence. Despite these benefits, very little is known about antecedents of an internal locus of control orientation. Without an understanding of what factors contribute to the development of an internal locus of control, it is not clear how to best encourage its formation. This study uses data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine whether various mesosystem variables (family management strategies, peer interactions, neighborhood context, and individual-level characteristics) are associated with an internal locus of control orientation among 1,076 youth ages 9-19 living in 78 Chicago neighborhoods. Study participants were Hispanic (46 %), African American (34 %), and White (15 %), and 50 % were female. The findings suggest that, while most levels of the mesosystem influence locus of control orientation, family management strategies are more prominent determinants of an internal locus of control than peers, neighborhood context, or individual characteristics. Parental supervision over the time a youth spends at home and family socioeconomic status are consistent predictors of an internal locus of control, while harsh discipline is associated with an external locus of control. The discussion examines the import of various parenting techniques in shaping an internal locus of control and considers future avenues for research to further unpack how antecedents of locus of control can vary across youth.

  8. Allelic Variation within the Emv-15 Locus Defines Genomic Sequences Closely Linked to the agouti Locus on Mouse Chromosome 2

    PubMed Central

    Siracusa, Linda D.; Russell, Liane B.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    1987-01-01

    Gene(s) at the agouti locus act within the microenvironment of the hair follicle to switch pigment synthesis in the melanocyte between eumelanin (black or brown pigment) and phaeomelanin (yellow pigment). Many phenotypic variants of this locus have been described. The mechanism(s) of gene action causing such variation in coat-color phenotype is not known. The close linkage of an endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia provirus, Emv-15 , to the lethal yellow mutation of the agouti locus provides a means to molecularly access genes at or near the agouti locus. We have identified and used a unique mouse sequence flanking the Emv-15 provirus to define three alleles of the Emv-15 locus. We found a correlation between the presence of specific Emv-15 alleles and the origins of specific agouti locus mutations, confirming close linkage. However, we found some exceptions which suggest that the Emv-15 locus is closely linked to, but genetically separable from, the agouti locus. PMID:2822532

  9. Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Daniel; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Aylward, Alan D.; Aruliah, Anasuya; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Saunders, Christopher; Friend, Jonathan; Bird, Rachel; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Parkes, Steve

    2014-05-01

    near future. We describe the current instrument configuration of LOCUS, and give a first preview of the expected science return such a mission would yield. The LOCUS instrument concept calls for four spectral bands, a first band at 4.7 THz to target atomic oxygen (O), a second band at 3.5 THz to target hydroxyl (OH), a third band at 1.1 THz to cover several diatomic species (NO, CO, O3, H2O) and finally a fourth band at 0.8 THz to retrieve pointing information from molecular oxygen (O2). LOCUS would be the first satellite instrument to measure atomic oxygen on a global scale with a precision that will allow the retrieval of the global O distribution. It would also be the first time that annual and diurnal changes in O are measured. This will be a significant step forward in understanding the chemistry and dynamics of the MLT. Current indications (derived from CRISTA measurement) lead us to believe that current models only give a poor representation of upper atmospheric O. The secondary target species can help us to address additional scientific questions related to both Climate (distribution of climate relevant gases, highly geared cooling of the MLT in response to Climate change, increased occurrence of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC), etc) and Space Weather (precipitation of electrically charged particles and impact on NOx chemistry, fluctuations of solar Lyman-alpha flux through shown in the the distribution of photochemically active species, etc).

  10. AKT as locus of fragility in robust cancer system.

    PubMed

    Radisavljevic, Ziv

    2008-08-15

    Metastatic cancer is a complex positive feedback loop system. Such as system has a tendency to acquire extreme robustness. Signaling pathways controlling that robustness can fail completely if an essential element from the signaling is removed. That element is a locus of fragility. Targeting that locus represents the best way to target the cancer robustness. This prospect presents another locus of fragility in signaling complex system network, controlling the cell cycle progression through the PI3K/AKT/mTOR/RAN pathway and cell migration and angiogenesis through the VEGF/PI3K/AKT/NO/ICAM-1 pathway. The locus of fragility of these pathways is AKT, which is regulated by a balance of catalase/H2O2 or by AKT inhibitor. Tiny and trivial perturbations such as change in redox state in the cells by antioxidant enzyme catalase, scavenging H2O2 signaling molecule, regulates robust signaling molecule AKT, abolishing its phosporilation and inducing cascading failure of robust signaling pathways for cell growth, proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. An anticancer effect of the antioxidant is achieved through the AKT locus, by abolishing signals from growth factors VEGF, HGF, HIF-1alpha and H2O2. Previously reported locus of fragility nitric oxide (NO) and locus AKT are close in the complex signaling interactome network, but they regulate distinct signaling modules. Simultaneously targeted loci represents new principles in cancer robustness chemotherapy by blocking cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and inducing rather slow then fast apoptosis leading to slow eradication of cancer.

  11. Detecting purely epistatic multi-locus interactions by an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wongseree, Waranyu; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Piroonratana, Theera; Sinsomros, Saravudh; Limwongse, Chanin; Chaiyaratana, Nachol

    2009-01-01

    Background Purely epistatic multi-locus interactions cannot generally be detected via single-locus analysis in case-control studies of complex diseases. Recently, many two-locus and multi-locus analysis techniques have been shown to be promising for the epistasis detection. However, exhaustive multi-locus analysis requires prohibitively large computational efforts when problems involve large-scale or genome-wide data. Furthermore, there is no explicit proof that a combination of multiple two-locus analyses can lead to the correct identification of multi-locus interactions. Results The proposed 2LOmb algorithm performs an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses. The algorithm consists of four main steps: two-locus analysis, a permutation test, global p-value determination and a progressive search for the best ensemble. 2LOmb is benchmarked against an exhaustive two-locus analysis technique, a set association approach, a correlation-based feature selection (CFS) technique and a tuned ReliefF (TuRF) technique. The simulation results indicate that 2LOmb produces a low false-positive error. Moreover, 2LOmb has the best performance in terms of an ability to identify all causative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a low number of output SNPs in purely epistatic two-, three- and four-locus interaction problems. The interaction models constructed from the 2LOmb outputs via a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method are also included for the confirmation of epistasis detection. 2LOmb is subsequently applied to a type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) data set, which is obtained as a part of the UK genome-wide genetic epidemiology study by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). After primarily screening for SNPs that locate within or near 372 candidate genes and exhibit no marginal single-locus effects, the T2D data set is reduced to 7,065 SNPs from 370 genes. The 2LOmb search in the reduced T2D data reveals that four intronic SNPs

  12. AKT as locus of cancer multidrug resistance and fragility.

    PubMed

    Radisavljevic, Ziv

    2013-04-01

    Complexity and robustness of cancer hypoxic microenvironment are supported by the robust signaling networks of autocrine and paracrine elements creating powerful interactome for multidrug resistance. These elements generate a positive feedback loops responsible for the extreme robustness and multidrug resistance in solid cancer, leukemia, myeloma, and lymphoma. Phosphorylated AKT is a cancer multidrug resistance locus. Targeting that locus by oxidant/antioxidant balance modulation, positive feedback loops are converted into negative feedback loops, leading to disappearance of multidrug resistance. This is a new principle for targeting cancer multidrug resistance by the locus chemotherapy inducing a phenomenon of loops conversion. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Turnipseed, David L; Bacon, Calvin M

    2009-12-01

    The relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control was assessed in a sample of 286 college students (52% men; M age = 24 yr.) who worked an average of 26 hr. per week. Measures were Spector's Work Locus of Control Scale and Podsakoff, et al.'s Organization Citizenship Behavior scale. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated positive association of scores on work locus of control with scores on each of the four tested dimensions of organizational citizenship, as well as total organizational citizenship behavior.

  14. Locus of control and cerebral asymmetry.

    PubMed

    De Brabander, B; Boone, C; Gerits, P

    1992-08-01

    Data about the lack of synchronism of flexor carpi ulnaris peak EMG values of bimanual reactions during a semantic and during a visuospatial discrimination reaction time task are reported. The effects of type of task as well as the presence or absence of an unexpected stimulus preceding the reaction stimulus on lack of synchronism clearly depend upon the locus of control of the subjects, as measured on Rotter's I-E scale. On the basis of several arguments it is proposed that the measure of lack of synchronism reflects in an opposite sense the amount of dopaminergic activation or motor readiness in the sense in which Pribram and McGuinness in 1975 and Tucker and Williamson in 1984 have defined these concepts. The results for 15 women and 18 men show that more internally oriented subjects are more activated by a semantic task and by an unexpected preparatory stimulus in this type of task than more externally oriented subjects. The opposite appears to hold on the visuospatial task and unexpected preparatory stimuli therein. Together with earlier findings about reaction times and a number of relevant findings in the literature, the results are interpreted as indicative of basic differences in asymmetric tonic activation of the cerebral hemispheres between more internally and more externally oriented subjects. A model is proposed to explain phasic activating effects which ensue when tonically more left- or right-activated subjects perform left- or right-hemisphere tasks and when supplementary irrelevant stimuli are received.

  15. Autism, fever, epigenetics and the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Mehler, Mark F; Purpura, Dominick P

    2009-03-01

    Some children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibit improved behaviors and enhanced communication during febrile episodes. We hypothesize that febrigenesis and the behavioral-state changes associated with fever in autism depend upon selective normalization of key components of a functionally impaired locus coeruleus-noradrenergic (LC-NA) system. We posit that autistic behaviors result from developmental dysregulation of LC-NA system specification and neural network deployment and modulation linked to the core behavioral features of autism. Fever transiently restores the modulatory functions of the LC-NA system and ameliorates autistic behaviors. Fever-induced reversibility of autism suggests preserved functional integrity of widespread neural networks subserving the LC-NA system and specifically the subsystems involved in mediating the cognitive and behavioral repertoires compromised in ASD. Alterations of complex gene-environmental interactions and associated epigenetic mechanisms during seminal developmental critical periods are viewed as instrumental in LC-NA dysregulation as emphasized by the timing and severity of prenatal maternal stressors on autism prevalence. Our hypothesis has implications for a rational approach to further interrogate the interdisciplinary etiology of ASD and for designing novel biological detection systems and therapeutic agents that target the LC-NA system's diverse network of pre- and postsynaptic receptors, intracellular signaling pathways and dynamic epigenetic remodeling processes involved in their regulation and functional plasticity.

  16. THE LOCUS COERULEUS AND CENTRAL CHEMOSENSITIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Gargaglioni, Luciane H.; Hartzler, Lynn K.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) lies in the dorsal pons and supplies noradrenergic (NA) input to many regions of the brain, including respiratory control areas. The LC may provide tonic input for basal respiratory drive and is involved in central chemosensitivity since focal acidosis of the region stimulates ventilation and ablation reduces CO2-induced increased ventilation. The output of LC is modulated by both serotonergic and glutamatergic inputs. A large percentage of LC neurons are intrinsically activated by hypercapnia. This percentage and the magnitude of their response are highest in young neonates and decrease dramatically after postnatal day P10. The cellular bases for intrinsic chemosensitivity of LC neurons are comprised of multiple factors, primary among them being reduced extracellular and intracellular pH, which inhibit inwardly rectifying and voltage-gated K+ channels, and activate L-type Ca2+ channels. Activation of KCa channels in LC neurons may limit their ultimate response to hypercapnia. Finally, the LC mediates central chemosensitivity and contains pH-sensitive neurons in amphibians, suggesting that the LC has a long-standing phylogenetic role in respiratory control. PMID:20435170

  17. Sequence variation within the fragile X locus.

    PubMed

    Mathews, D J; Kashuk, C; Brightwell, G; Eichler, E E; Chakravarti, A

    2001-08-01

    The human genome provides a reference sequence, which is a template for resequencing studies that aim to discover and interpret the record of common ancestry that exists in extant genomes. To understand the nature and pattern of variation and linkage disequilibrium comprising this history, we present a study of approximately 31 kb spanning an approximately 70 kb region of FMR1, sequenced in a sample of 20 humans (worldwide sample) and four great apes (chimp, bonobo, and gorilla). Twenty-five polymorphic sites and two insertion/deletions, distributed in 11 unique haplotypes, were identified among humans. Africans are the only geographic group that do not share any haplotypes with other groups. Parsimony analysis reveals two main clades and suggests that the four major human geographic groups are distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree and within each major clade. An African sample appears to be most closely related to the common ancestor shared with the three other geographic groups. Nucleotide diversity, pi, for this sample is 2.63 +/- 6.28 x 10(-4). The mutation rate, mu is 6.48 x 10(-10) per base pair per year, giving an ancestral population size of approximately 6200 and a time to the most recent common ancestor of approximately 320,000 +/- 72,000 per base pair per year. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) at the FMR1 locus, evaluated by conventional LD analysis and by the length of segment shared between any two chromosomes, is extensive across the region.

  18. Analysis of Recombination Sites within the Maize Waxy Locus

    PubMed Central

    Okagaki, R. J.; Weil, C. F.

    1997-01-01

    Genetic fine structure analysis of the maize wx locus has determined that the ratio of genetic to physical distance within wx was one to two orders of magnitude higher than the average for the maize genome. Similar results have been found at other maize loci. In this study, we examined several mechanisms that could account for this pattern. First, crossovers in two other maize genes resolve preferentially at specific sites. By mapping exchanges between wx-B1 and wx-I relative to a polymorphic SstI site, we found no evidence for such a hotspot at wx. Second, deletion of promoter sequences from wx alleles had little effect on recombination frequencies, in contrast to results in yeast where promoter sequences are important for initiating recombination in some genes. Third, high levels of insertion polymorphism may suppress intergenic recombination. However, the presence of a 2-kb Ds element 470 bp upstream of the wx transcription start site did not further suppress recombination between Ds insertions in nearby wx sequences. Thus, none of these mechanisms is sufficient to explain the difference between intergenic and intragenic recombination rates at wx. PMID:9335616

  19. The internet and locus of control in older adults.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Robert J.; Harris, Kimberly D.; Wabby, James

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how training older adults to find medical information using the Internet affects their locus of control. METHODS: Quantitative methods were utilized. Specifically, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control survey was distributed at the onset of each seminar and again at the conclusion. RESULTS: Paired t-tests revealed that the subjects did not change their locus of control regarding their health beliefs over the period of the seminar. However, there was statistical significance with regard to eight specific questions. CONCLUSION: Subjects scored high on their level of internal locus of control coming into the study. The majority of subjects had already learned to use the computer, owned a home computer, and had access to the Internet, but had not used the Internet to search for healthcare information. The challenge continues to be reaching those older adults who have not encountered the computer and the Internet. PMID:12463794

  20. Multidimensional profiles of health locus of control in Hispanic Americans

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Brian R; Fox, Rina S; Mills, Sarah D; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2016-01-01

    Latent profile analysis identified health locus of control profiles among 436 Hispanic Americans who completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales. Results revealed four profiles: Internally Oriented-Weak, -Moderate, -Strong, and Externally Oriented. The profile groups were compared on sociocultural and demographic characteristics, health beliefs and behaviors, and physical and mental health outcomes. The Internally Oriented-Strong group had less cancer fatalism, religiosity, and equity health attributions, and more alcohol consumption than the other three groups; the Externally Oriented group had stronger equity health attributions and less alcohol consumption. Deriving multidimensional health locus of control profiles through latent profile analysis allows examination of the relationships of health locus of control subtypes to health variables. PMID:25855212

  1. Multidimensional profiles of health locus of control in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Brian R; Fox, Rina S; Mills, Sarah D; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2016-10-01

    Latent profile analysis identified health locus of control profiles among 436 Hispanic Americans who completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales. Results revealed four profiles: Internally Oriented-Weak, -Moderate, -Strong, and Externally Oriented. The profile groups were compared on sociocultural and demographic characteristics, health beliefs and behaviors, and physical and mental health outcomes. The Internally Oriented-Strong group had less cancer fatalism, religiosity, and equity health attributions, and more alcohol consumption than the other three groups; the Externally Oriented group had stronger equity health attributions and less alcohol consumption. Deriving multidimensional health locus of control profiles through latent profile analysis allows examination of the relationships of health locus of control subtypes to health variables. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Healthy elderly: social bonds and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P D; Hooper, E M

    1983-03-01

    An investigation into social relationships and their connection to health was integrated into a 5-year prospective study of nutrition and immunobiology in 300 healthy elderly persons. The data were collected from a subsample of 40 individuals by interview, using the Interview Schedule for Social Interaction (ISSI), the Rotter I-E Locus of Control Scale, and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC). This group did not differ from the general population in terms of their social relationships. The mean locus of control expectancy score was 6.5 +/- 3.3, indicating an internal group. There was a statistically significant relationship between internality and availability of social integration, but no differences based upon sex or age for the ISSI or Rotter's I-E Locus of Control Scale.

  3. Independence of Foveal Retinal Locus and Visual Detection Paradigm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-09

    F O-AO.. 17 ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN HUMAN ATTENTION RES -ETC F/A 5/10 INDEPENDENCE OF FOVEAL RETINAL LOCUS AND VISUAL DETECTION PARAD -ETC...variably mapped, and frame time of 100 or 200 msec for the consistent or variably mapped conditions, respectively. The main effects of experimental paradigm...Foveal Retinal Locus and Visual Detection Paradigm Walter Schneider and Arthur D. Fisk Report 8001 Human Attention Research Laboratory University of

  4. Fine structure of the FMR-1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.L.; Eichler, E.E.; Richards, S.; Gibbs, R.A.

    1994-07-15

    The fragile X syndrome is due to a CGG triplet expansion in the first exon of FMR-1, resulting in hypermethylation and extinction of gene expression. To further understanding of the gene`s involvement in the syndrome, we have determined the physical structure of this locus. A high resolution restriction map of cosmids from the region has been prepared encompassing approximately 50 kb. Using exon-exon PCR and restriction analysis, the FMR-1 gene has been determined to consist of 17 exons spanning 38 kb of Xq27.3. Each intron-exon boundary has been sequenced. In general, the splice donors and acceptors located in the 5{prime} portion of the gene demonstrate greater adherence to consensus than those in the 3{prime} end, providing a possible explanation for the finding of alternative splicing in FMR-1. Sequence analysis of the region immediately flanking the CGG triplet repeat demonstrated both tetranucleotide and dinucleotide repeats. Additional sequence is being obtained from the overlapping cosmids spanning the gene, and extending 20 kb proximal and approximately 30 kb distal as part of a larger project to determine sequence on the megabase scale in the Xq27.3-q28 region. These sequences are being characterized from normal and affected individuals to assess polymorphisms and the role (if any) of peculiar sequences in the generation of fragile X CGG instability. The elucidation of the structure and composition of the FMR-1 gene as well as its flanking region will enhance detection of other mutations possible in fragile X phenocopy individuals.

  5. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Strategies for conditional two-locus nonparametric linkage analysis.

    PubMed

    Angquist, Lars; Hössjer, Ola; Groop, Leif

    2008-01-01

    In this article we deal with two-locus nonparametric linkage (NPL) analysis, mainly in the context of conditional analysis. This means that one incorporates single-locus analysis information through conditioning when performing a two-locus analysis. Here we describe different strategies for using this approach. Cox et al. [Nat Genet 1999;21:213-215] implemented this as follows: (i) Calculate the one-locus NPL process over the included genome region(s). (ii) Weight the individual pedigree NPL scores using a weighting function depending on the NPL scores for the corresponding pedigrees at speci fi c conditioning loci. We generalize this by conditioning with respect to the inheritance vector rather than the NPL score and by separating between the case of known (prede fi ned) and unknown (estimated) conditioning loci. In the latter case we choose conditioning locus, or loci, according to prede fi ned criteria. The most general approach results in a random number of selected loci, depending on the results from the previous one-locus analysis. Major topics in this article include discussions on optimal score functions with respect to the noncentrality parameter (NCP), and how to calculate adequate p values and perform power calculations. We also discuss issues related to multiple tests which arise from the two-step procedure with several conditioning loci as well as from the genome-wide tests.

  7. Fixation probability in a two-locus intersexual selection model.

    PubMed

    Durand, Guillermo; Lessard, Sabin

    2016-06-01

    We study a two-locus model of intersexual selection in a finite haploid population reproducing according to a discrete-time Moran model with a trait locus expressed in males and a preference locus expressed in females. We show that the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele for a male ornament introduced at random at the trait locus given any initial frequency state at the preference locus is increased by weak intersexual selection and recombination, weak or strong. Moreover, this probability exceeds the initial frequency of the mutant allele even in the case of a costly male ornament if intersexual selection is not too weak. On the other hand, the probability of ultimate fixation of a single mutant allele for a female preference towards a male ornament introduced at random at the preference locus is increased by weak intersexual selection and weak recombination if the female preference is not costly, and is strong enough in the case of a costly male ornament. The analysis relies on an extension of the ancestral recombination-selection graph for samples of haplotypes to take into account events of intersexual selection, while the symbolic calculation of the fixation probabilities is made possible in a reasonable time by an optimizing algorithm.

  8. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tienari, P.J. Univ. of Helsinki ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. ); Palo, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. DNA Modification Study of Major Depressive Disorder: Beyond Locus-by-Locus Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gabriel; Wang, Sun-Chong; Pal, Mrinal; Chen, Zheng Fei; Khare, Tarang; Tochigi, Mamoru; Ng, Catherine; Yang, Yeqing A.; Kwan, Andrew; Kaminsky, Zachary A.; Mill, Jonathan; Gunasinghe, Cerisse; Tackett, Jennifer L.; Gottesman, Irving I.; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Wray, Naomi R.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Turecki, Gustavo; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; McGuffin, Peter; Kustra, Rafal; Petronis, Art

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) exhibits numerous clinical and molecular features that are consistent with putative epigenetic misregulation. Despite growing interest in epigenetic studies of psychiatric diseases, the methodologies guiding such studies have not been well defined. Methods We performed DNA modification analysis in white blood cells from monozygotic twins discordant for MDD, in brain prefrontal cortex, and germline (sperm) samples from affected individuals and control subjects (total N = 304) using 8.1K CpG island microarrays and fine mapping. In addition to the traditional locus-by-locus comparisons, we explored the potential of new analytical approaches in epigenomic studies. Results In the microarray experiment, we detected a number of nominally significant DNA modification differences in MDD and validated selected targets using bisulfite pyrosequencing. Some MDD epigenetic changes, however, overlapped across brain, blood, and sperm more often than expected by chance. We also demonstrated that stratification for disease severity and age may increase the statistical power of epimutation detection. Finally, a series of new analytical approaches, such as DNA modification networks and machine-learning algorithms using binary and quantitative depression phenotypes, provided additional insights on the epigenetic contributions to MDD. Conclusions Mapping epigenetic differences in MDD (and other psychiatric diseases) is a complex task. However, combining traditional and innovative analytical strategies may lead to identification of disease-specific etiopathogenic epimutations. PMID:25108803

  10. Murine Lupus Susceptibility Locus Sle1a Requires the Expression of two Subloci to Induce Inflammatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuda, Carla M.; Zeumer, Leilani; Sobel, Eric S.; Croker, Byron P.; Morel, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    The NZM2410-derived Sle1a lupus susceptibility locus induces activated autoreactive CD4+ T cells and reduces the number and function of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. In this study, we first showed that Sle1a contributes to autoimmunity by increasing anti-nuclear antibody production when expressed on either NZB or NZW heterozygous genomes, and by enhancing the chronic graft vs. host disease response indicating an expansion of the autoreactive B cell pool. Screening two non-overlapping recombinants, the Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 intervals that cover the entire Sle1a locus, revealed that both Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 were necessary for the full Sle1a phenotype. Sle1a.1, and to a lesser extent Sle1a.2, significantly affected CD4+ T cell activation as well as Treg differentiation and function. Sle1a.2 also increased the production of autoreactive B cells. Since the Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 intervals contain only one and 15 known genes, respectively, this study considerably reduces the number of candidate genes responsible for the production of autoreactive T cells. These results also demonstrate that the Sle1 locus is an excellent model for the genetic architecture of lupus, in which a major obligate phenotype results from the co-expression of multiple genetic variants with individual weak effects. PMID:20445563

  11. Murine lupus susceptibility locus Sle1a requires the expression of two sub-loci to induce inflammatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Cuda, C M; Zeumer, L; Sobel, E S; Croker, B P; Morel, L

    2010-10-01

    The NZM2410-derived Sle1a lupus susceptibility locus induces activated autoreactive CD4(+) T cells and reduces the number and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this study, we first showed that Sle1a contributes to autoimmunity by increasing antinuclear antibody production when expressed on either NZB or NZW heterozygous genomes, and by enhancing the chronic graft versus host disease response indicating an expansion of the autoreactive B-cell pool. Screening two non-overlapping recombinants, the Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 intervals that cover the entire Sle1a locus, revealed that both Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 were necessary for the full Sle1a phenotype. Sle1a.1, and to a lesser extent Sle1a.2, significantly affected CD4(+) T-cell activation as well as Treg differentiation and function. Sle1a.2 also increased the production of autoreactive B cells. As the Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 intervals contain only 1 and 15 known genes, respectively, this study considerably reduces the number of candidate genes responsible for the production of autoreactive T cells. These results also show that the Sle1 locus is an excellent model for the genetic architecture of lupus, in which a major obligate phenotype results from the coexpression of multiple genetic variants with individual weak effects.

  12. Organization of the murine Cd22 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Che-Leung; Torres, R.M.; Sundeberg, H.A.; Clark, E.A ); Parkhouse, R.M.E. ); Brannan, C.I.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1993-07-01

    Murine CD22 (mCD22) is a B cell-associated adhesion protein with seven extracellular Ig-like domains that has 62% amino acid identify to its human homologue. Southern analysis on genomic DNA isolated from tissues and cell lines from several mouse strains using mCD22 cDNA demonstrated that the Cd22 locus encoding mCD22 is a single copy gene of [le]30 kb. Digestion of genomic DNA preparations with four restriction endonucleases revealed the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in BALB/c, C57BL/6, and C3H strains vs DBA/2j, NZB, and NZC strains, suggesting the presence of two or more Cd22 alleles. Using a mCD22 cDNA clone derived from the BALB/c strain, the authors isolated genomic clones from a DBA/2 genomic library that contained all the exons necessary to encode the full length mCD22 cDNA. Fifteen exons, including exon 3 that encodes the translation start codon, were identified. Each extracellular Ig-like domain of mCD22 is encoded by a single exon. A comparison between the nucleotide sequences of the BALB/c CD22 cDNA and the exons of the DBA/2j CD22 genomic clones revealed an 18-nucleotide deletion in exon 4 (encoding the most distal Ig-like domain 1 of mCD22) of the DBA/2j genomic sequence in addition to a number of substitutions, insertions, and deletions in other exons. These nucleotide differences were also present in a cDNA clone isolated from total RNA of LPS-activated DBA/2j splenocytes mosome 7, a region sytenic to human chromosome 19q, close to the previously reported loci, Lyb-8 and Mag (a homologue of Cd22). An antibody (CY34) against the Lyb-8.2 B cell marker reacted with a BHK transfectant expressing the full length mCd22 cDNA, thus demonstrating that Lyb-8 and Cd22 loci are identical. Furthermore, a rat anti-mCD22 mAb, NIM-R6, bound to slgM[sup +] DBA/2j B cells, confirming the expression of a CD22 protein by the Cd22[sup a]/lyb-8[sup a] allele. 63 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Subcultural Determinants of Locus of Control (IE) Development. A Locus of Control (IE) Measure for Preschool-Age Children: Model, Method, and Validity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Mark; Delys, Pamela

    Both papers are concerned with locus of control (of reinforcement) expectancies among young children, especially preschoolers. The first reviews a number of studies which examined the relationship between locus of control, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity. The results indicate that (1) economic status is consistently related to locus of…

  14. [Influence of B locus on avian viral induced tumours].

    PubMed

    Cauchy, L; Dambrine, G; Coudert, F

    1982-01-01

    Since early in the century Avian Cancers were described as induced by viruses which later were known of DNA and RNA types. The susceptibility of birds was found different according to the genetic lines of the chickens and specially to the B locus blood group. Since the B locus of birds was strongly associated with the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) it was of interest to review the last reports on the influence of the B locus on viral induced tumours. In Marek's Disease due to a DNA virus (Herpes type) the B21 allele expresses the greater resistance compared with other B alleles although non-B factors could be involved as demonstrated with the lymphocyte factor Ly-4. The possible mechanisms of the influence of B locus on the resistance against Marek's Disease are discussed. The tumours induced by RNA viruses (Avian Leucosis Sarcomas) develop or regress following genetic characters closely related to MHC. Differences of resistance exist between B alleles. Complementary genes should be present to fully express the resistance. The relationship between MHC-B locus and resistance to tumors stimulates the actual assays. Since a number of parameters remain still unknown further researches should be done in order to evidence the involved mechanisms of the resistance.

  15. Impulsiveness, locus of control, motivation and problem gambling.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Dave

    2004-01-01

    A questionnaire consisting of demographic items, questions about gambling behavior, the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS), a depression inventory, the Eysenck Impulsiveness Questionnaire, Levenson's Internality, Powerful Others and Chance Scales of locus of control and the Gambling Motivation Scale, was completed by a non-random sample of 147 New Zealand university students who gambled for money, median age 24 years. Approximately 17 of the sample was classified as problem gamblers, the rest as non-problem gamblers. Multivariate analysis of variance showed that there were significant differences between problem and non-problem gamblers on gambling frequency, number of activities, parents' gambling, depression, impulsiveness and motivation, but not on locus of control. Amotivation (apathy) and motivation towards stimulation correlated with powerful others and chance locus of control, and motivation to impress others with powerful others locus of control. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that: (1) beyond gambling frequency, number of activities and parents' gambling, motivation explained a substantial proportion of variance in SOGS scores, with impulsiveness accounting for a lesser amount, and (2) predictors of problem gambling included impulsiveness, amotivation and the motivations for accomplishment and tension release. It was concluded that gambling motivation is a more useful construct than locus of control in explaining problem gambling. Suggestions were made for future research, and aspects of gambling motivation were discussed in terms of a treatment program with groups of problem gamblers.

  16. Inferring Demographic History Using Two-Locus Statistics.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Aaron P; Gutenkunst, Ryan N

    2017-06-01

    Population demographic history may be learned from contemporary genetic variation data. Methods based on aggregating the statistics of many single loci into an allele frequency spectrum (AFS) have proven powerful, but such methods ignore potentially informative patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between neighboring loci. To leverage such patterns, we developed a composite-likelihood framework for inferring demographic history from aggregated statistics of pairs of loci. Using this framework, we show that two-locus statistics are more sensitive to demographic history than single-locus statistics such as the AFS. In particular, two-locus statistics escape the notorious confounding of depth and duration of a bottleneck, and they provide a means to estimate effective population size based on the recombination rather than mutation rate. We applied our approach to a Zambian population of Drosophila melanogaster Notably, using both single- and two-locus statistics, we inferred a substantially lower ancestral effective population size than previous works and did not infer a bottleneck history. Together, our results demonstrate the broad potential for two-locus statistics to enable powerful population genetic inference. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Characterization of the spv locus in Salmonella enterica serovar Arizona.

    PubMed

    Libby, Stephen J; Lesnick, Marc; Hasegawa, Patricia; Kurth, Michael; Belcher, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua; Guiney, Donald G

    2002-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Arizona (S. enterica subspecies IIIa) is a common Salmonella isolate from reptiles and can cause serious systemic disease in humans. The spv virulence locus, found on large plasmids in Salmonella subspecies I serovars associated with severe infections, was confirmed to be located on the chromosome of serovar Arizona. Sequence analysis revealed that the serovar Arizona spv locus contains homologues of spvRABC but lacks the spvD gene and contains a frameshift in spvA, resulting in a different C terminus. The SpvR protein functions as a transcriptional activator for the spvA promoter, and SpvB and SpvC are highly conserved. The analysis supports the proposal that the chromosomal spv sequence more closely corresponds to the ancestral locus acquired during evolution of S. enterica, with plasmid acquisition of spv genes in the subspecies I strains involving addition of spvD and polymorphisms in spvA.

  18. Lupus vulgaris occurring in a locus minoris resistentiae.

    PubMed

    Long, Richard; Beatch, Anita; Lee, Mao-Cheng; Cheung-Lee, Melody; Wasel, Norman

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of lupus vulgaris, a form of cutaneous tuberculosis, is not always clear, especially in patients who do not have coexistent extracutaneous tuberculosis and in patients with single lesions. To report a case of lupus vulgaris in a locus minoris resistentiae (a site of reduced resistance) and to use a unique set of clinical circumstances and laboratory tests to reconstruct the pathogenesis of the lesion and the response to treatment. Lupus vulgaris can occur in a locus minoris resistentiae; local trauma and possibly other factors, such as increased temperature, topical corticosteroids, and the virulence of the infecting strain, may facilitate the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis present at a locus minoris resistentiae as a result of a silent bacillemia.

  19. Tension versus ecological zones in a two-locus system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-Sheng

    2005-08-01

    Previous theories show that tension and ecological zones are indistinguishable in terms of gene frequency clines. Here I analytically show that these two types of zones can be distinguished in terms of genetic statistics other than gene frequency. A two-locus cline model is examined with the assumptions of random mating, weak selection, no drift, no mutation, and multiplicative viabilities. The genetic statistics for distinguishing the two types of zones are the deviations of one- or two-locus genotypic frequencies from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) or from random association of gametes (RAG), and the deviations of additive and dominance variances from the values at HWE. These deviations have a discontinuous distribution in space and different extents of interruptions in the ecological zone with a sharp boundary, but exhibit a continuous distribution in the tension zone. Linkage disequilibrium enhances the difference between the deviations from HWE and from RAG for any two-locus genotypic frequency.

  20. Organization of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Lindsay A; Luo, Liqun

    2015-11-02

    The release of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine throughout the mammalian brain is important for modulating attention, arousal, and cognition during many behaviors. Furthermore, disruption of norepinephrine-mediated signaling is strongly associated with several psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders in humans, emphasizing the clinical importance of this system. Most of the norepinephrine released in the brain is supplied by a very small, bilateral nucleus in the brainstem called the locus coeruleus. The goal of this minireview is to emphasize the complexity of the locus coeruleus beyond its primary definition as a norepinephrine-producing nucleus. Several recent studies utilizing innovative technologies highlight how the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system can now be targeted with increased accuracy and resolution, in order to better understand its role in modulating diverse behaviors.

  1. Locus-specific view of flax domestication history

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Diederichsen, Axel; Allaby, Robin G

    2012-01-01

    Crop domestication has been inferred genetically from neutral markers and increasingly from specific domestication-associated loci. However, some crops are utilized for multiple purposes that may or may not be reflected in a single domestication-associated locus. One such example is cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), the earliest oil and fiber crop, for which domestication history remains poorly understood. Oil composition of cultivated flax and pale flax (L. bienne Mill.) indicates that the sad2 locus is a candidate domestication locus associated with increased unsaturated fatty acid production in cultivated flax. A phylogenetic analysis of the sad2 locus in 43 pale and 70 cultivated flax accessions established a complex domestication history for flax that has not been observed previously. The analysis supports an early, independent domestication of a primitive flax lineage, in which the loss of seed dispersal through capsular indehiscence was not established, but increased oil content was likely occurred. A subsequent flax domestication process occurred that probably involved multiple domestications and includes lineages that contain oil, fiber, and winter varieties. In agreement with previous studies, oil rather than fiber varieties occupy basal phylogenetic positions. The data support multiple paths of flax domestication for oil-associated traits before selection of the other domestication-associated traits of seed dispersal loss and fiber production. The sad2 locus is less revealing about the origin of winter tolerance. In this case, a single domestication-associated locus is informative about the history of domesticated forms with the associated trait while partially informative on forms less associated with the trait. PMID:22408732

  2. Neighborhood Vigilance, Health Locus of Control, and Smoking Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Reitzel, Lorraine R.; Lahoti, Sejal; Li, Yisheng; Cao, Yumei; Wetter, David W.; Waters, Andrew J.; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether health locus of control mediated relations of self-reported neighborhood vigilance and biochemically verified, continuous short-term smoking abstinence among 200 smokers enrolled in a cohort study. Methods A nonparametric bootstrapping procedure was used to assess mediation. Results Health locus of control-chance mediated relations between neighborhood vigilance and smoking abstinence in analyses adjusted for sociodemographics and tobacco dependence (p < .05). Greater vigilance was associated with greater attributions that health was affected by chance, which was associated with a lower likelihood of smoking abstinence. Conclusions Results suggest that neighborhood perceptions influence residents’ attributions for health outcomes, which can affect smoking abstinence. PMID:23985180

  3. Controlling-Element Events at the Shrunken Locus in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Burr, B.; Burr, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    We have examined insertions of the controlling element Ds at the Shrunken locus of maize. A cDNA probe complementary to a portion of the Shrunken locus mRNA was prepared. This probe recognizes a unique sequence in maize DNA. Using lines carrying derivatives of the same short arm of chromosome 9, we have detected modifications at the nucleic acid level caused by Ds. The changes appear to be large insertions, one of which may be more than 20 kilobase pairs in length. These observations provide a basis for the isolation and molecular characterization of one of the maize controlling elements. PMID:17249083

  4. Locus of control and attitudes toward large carnivores.

    PubMed

    Bjerke, T; Vittersø, J; Kaltenborn, B P

    2000-02-01

    It has been hypothesized tha the negative attitudes toward carnivores found among rural groups is only one element embedded in a larger sociopolitical complex of disputes over resource use and rural development. Negative attitudes may reflect a protest against increased control of land use by central political authorities. In a survey among sheep farmers, wildlife managers, and research biologists in Norway we found that the sheep farmers expressed an external locus of control, indicating a belief that external forces control events, relative to the two other groups. Among sheep farmers and research biologists a positive association was found between an external locus of control and negative attitudes toward large carnivores.

  5. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coline, Goriaux; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  6. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Goriaux, Coline; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets.

  7. Heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping identifies intra-locus interactions that underlie reproductive hybrid vigor in Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Ben-Israel, Imri; Kilian, Benjamin; Nida, Habte; Fridman, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Identifying intra-locus interactions underlying heterotic variation among whole-genome hybrids is a key to understanding mechanisms of heterosis and exploiting it for crop and livestock improvement. In this study, we present the development and first use of the heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping approach to associate specific intra-locus interactions with an overdominant heterotic mode of inheritance in a diallel population using Sorghum bicolor as the model. This method combines the advantages of ample genetic diversity and the possibility of studying non-additive inheritance. Furthermore, this design enables dissecting the latter to identify specific intra-locus interactions. We identified three HTLs (3.5% of loci tested) with synergistic intra-locus effects on overdominant grain yield heterosis in 2 years of field trials. These loci account for 19.0% of the heterotic variation, including a significant interaction found between two of them. Moreover, analysis of one of these loci (hDPW4.1) in a consecutive F2 population confirmed a significant 21% increase in grain yield of heterozygous vs. homozygous plants in this locus. Notably, two of the three HTLs for grain yield are in synteny with previously reported overdominant quantitative trait loci for grain yield in maize. A mechanism for the reproductive heterosis found in this study is suggested, in which grain yield increase is achieved by releasing the compensatory tradeoffs between biomass and reproductive output, and between seed number and weight. These results highlight the power of analyzing a diverse set of inbreds and their hybrids for unraveling hitherto unknown allelic interactions mediating heterosis.

  8. Mapping of the nadB Locus Adjacent to a Previously Undescribed Purine Locus in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Tritz, Gerald J.; Matney, Thomas S.; Gholson, Robert K.

    1970-01-01

    It is proposed that all mutants blocked in the de novo pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis be designated nad rather than nic. It is further suggested that mutants blocked in the pyridine nucleotide cycle be designated pnc. The nadB locus and a previously unidentified pur locus are cotransducible. These two loci have been mapped near minute 49 on the standard genetic map of Escherichia coli. The order of genes in that region is purC-guaB-purG-glyA-pur-nadB-tyrA-pheA. PMID:4315893

  9. Mapping of the nadB locus adjacent to a previously undescribed purine locus in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Tritz, G J; Matney, T S; Gholson, R K

    1970-05-01

    It is proposed that all mutants blocked in the de novo pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis be designated nad rather than nic. It is further suggested that mutants blocked in the pyridine nucleotide cycle be designated pnc. The nadB locus and a previously unidentified pur locus are cotransducible. These two loci have been mapped near minute 49 on the standard genetic map of Escherichia coli. The order of genes in that region is purC-guaB-purG-glyA-pur-nadB-tyrA-pheA.

  10. COM, a heterochromatic locus governing the control of independent endogenous retroviruses from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Desset, Sophie; Meignin, Carine; Dastugue, Bernard; Vaury, Chantal

    2003-01-01

    ZAM and Idefix are two endogenous retroviruses whose expression is tightly controlled in Drosophila melanogaster. However, a line exists in which this control has been perturbed, resulting in a high mobilization rate for both retroviruses. This line is called the U (unstable) line as opposed to the other S (stable) lines. In the process of analyzing this control and tracing the genetic determinant involved, we found that ZAM and Idefix expression responded to two types of controls: one restricting their expression to specific somatic cells in the ovaries and the other silencing their expression in S lines but permitting it in U lines. While studying this second control in the U or S backgrounds, we found that the heterochromatic locus 20A2-3 on the X chromosome, previously implicated in the regulation of a third retroelement, gypsy, also controlled both ZAM and Idefix. We report here that genetic determinants necessary for endogenous retrovirus silencing occur at the 20A2-3 locus, which we call COM, for centre organisateur de mobilisation. We propose that if this point of control becomes mutated during the life of the fly, it may trigger processes reactivating dormant endogenous retroviruses and thus bring about sudden bursts of mobilization. PMID:12807771

  11. COM, a heterochromatic locus governing the control of independent endogenous retroviruses from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Desset, Sophie; Meignin, Carine; Dastugue, Bernard; Vaury, Chantal

    2003-06-01

    ZAM and Idefix are two endogenous retroviruses whose expression is tightly controlled in Drosophila melanogaster. However, a line exists in which this control has been perturbed, resulting in a high mobilization rate for both retroviruses. This line is called the U (unstable) line as opposed to the other S (stable) lines. In the process of analyzing this control and tracing the genetic determinant involved, we found that ZAM and Idefix expression responded to two types of controls: one restricting their expression to specific somatic cells in the ovaries and the other silencing their expression in S lines but permitting it in U lines. While studying this second control in the U or S backgrounds, we found that the heterochromatic locus 20A2-3 on the X chromosome, previously implicated in the regulation of a third retroelement, gypsy, also controlled both ZAM and Idefix. We report here that genetic determinants necessary for endogenous retrovirus silencing occur at the 20A2-3 locus, which we call COM, for centre organisateur de mobilisation. We propose that if this point of control becomes mutated during the life of the fly, it may trigger processes reactivating dormant endogenous retroviruses and thus bring about sudden bursts of mobilization.

  12. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Molecular genetic analysis of the Phaseolus vulgaris P locus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Common bean market classes are distinguished by their many seed colors, patterns, and size. At least 23 genes, acting independently or in an epistatic manner, affect the seed coat color and pattern. The P locus which is described as the “ground factor” by Emerson, has multiple alleles and controls a...

  14. Parenting style, locus of control, and oral hygiene in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aleksejūnienė, Jolanta; Brukienė, Vilma

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test if variations in oral hygiene levels in adolescents were associated with locus of control and parenting styles after controlling for demographic factors. The study sample comprised 237 adolescents aged 12-13 years. The structured questionnaire included demographic characteristics and items about parenting style and locus of control. The Individual Quantitative Plaque % Index (IQPI) and toothbrushing frequency were used as clinical outcome measures. In the bivariate analyses, socioeconomic status (P=0.012), number of children in the family (P=0.003), and frequency of toothbrushing (P=0.001) were related to dental plaque levels. Gender (P<0.001), socioeconomic status (P=0.022), and external locus of control (Spearman rho, -0.144, P=0.027) were statistically significantly associated with toothbrushing frequency. In the multivariate analyses, only socioeconomic status and toothbrushing frequency were statistically significantly related to the IQPI. When toothbrushing frequency as the second outcome variable was used, the IQPI and gender were statistically significant. The association with socioeconomic status did not reach statistical significance (P=0.07). Only socioeconomic status and toothbrushing frequency explained variation in dental plaque levels among adolescents. The expected relationship among parenting styles, locus of control, and oral hygiene levels was not confirmed.

  15. Fetal Health Locus of Control Scale: Development and Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labs, Sharon M.; Wurtele, Sandy K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes development of the Fetal Health Locus of Control scale, the scale's utility in predicting maternal health-related behavior during pregnancy, normative data, and information on factor structure and internal consistency. Reports that cigarette and caffeine consumption during pregnancy, and women's intentions to participate in prepared…

  16. Attitudes toward Nutrition, Locus of Control and Smoking Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, V. Kilian; And Others

    Research has shown that many behaviors previously thought to be purely psychological in origin do, in fact, have a physiological basis. To examine the relationship of smoking behavior to locus of control, and to attitudes toward, knowledge about, and behavior with respect to nutrition, 116 Canadian undergraduate students completed the Nutrition…

  17. Locus of Control Correlates in an Alcoholic Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowicki, Stephen, Jr.; Hopper, Allen E.

    1974-01-01

    Assesses the locus of control orientation within an alcoholic population and relates this orientation to the degree of cognitive dysfunction. Results suggest that female alcoholics, specifically those who need inpatient treatment, may be a relatively more disturbed group compared to alcoholic male inpatients. (Author/PC)

  18. Comparison of Locus of Control with Levels of Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneipp, Karen B.; Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    This study was undertaken to determine whether external locus of control orientation was significantly negatively correlated with levels of creativity. Subjects were 13 male and 13 female undergraduate students enrolled in psychology classes at a southwestern university. Mean age of the subjects was 28.6. Instruments used were Levenson's (1972) I…

  19. Motive to Avoid Success, Locus of Control, and Reinforcement Avoidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katovsky, Walter

    Subjects were four groups of 12 college women, high or low in motive to avoid success (MAS) and locus of control (LC), were reinforced for response A on a fixed partial reinforcement schedule on three concept learning tasks, one task consisting of combined reward and punishment, another of reward only, and one of punishment only. Response B was…

  20. The Influence of Locus of Control on Student Financial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Sonya; Cumbie, Julie A.; Bell, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Data on psychological influences of financial behaviors has not been well addressed in student populations, which is concerning given the high levels of general and financial stress experienced by college students. The findings of this study indicate that college students with an external locus of control exhibit the worst financial behaviors.…

  1. Fetal Health Locus of Control Scale: Development and Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labs, Sharon M.; Wurtele, Sandy K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes development of the Fetal Health Locus of Control scale, the scale's utility in predicting maternal health-related behavior during pregnancy, normative data, and information on factor structure and internal consistency. Reports that cigarette and caffeine consumption during pregnancy, and women's intentions to participate in prepared…

  2. Attitudes toward Nutrition, Locus of Control and Smoking Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, V. Kilian; And Others

    Research has shown that many behaviors previously thought to be purely psychological in origin do, in fact, have a physiological basis. To examine the relationship of smoking behavior to locus of control, and to attitudes toward, knowledge about, and behavior with respect to nutrition, 116 Canadian undergraduate students completed the Nutrition…

  3. Job Satisfaction and Locus of Control in an Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stachowiak, Bonni J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored any relationships that existed between faculty members' locus of control and job satisfaction at a small, private, faith-based university. Two demographic variables were also analyzed in the findings: number of years teaching in higher education and tenure status. The job satisfaction instrument used was the Job in General…

  4. Dealing with Malfunction: Locus of Control in Web-Conferencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klebl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers how students deal with malfunctions that occur during the use of web conferencing systems in learning arrangements. In a survey among participants in online courses that make use of a web-conferencing system (N = 129), the relationship between a preference for internal or external locus of control and the perception of…

  5. Locus of Responsibility as an Aid to Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattran, Kenneth J.

    1984-01-01

    Human resource development specialists have employed analytical devices to assist them in identifying the trainees' personal, occupational, and professional characteristics. A new instrument called the Locus of Responsibility Inventory assumes that leadership is an unconscious choice that the individuals make as a result of their perception of how…

  6. The Locus of the Focus of a Rolling Parabola

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Anurag; Marengo, James

    2010-01-01

    The catenary is usually introduced as the shape assumed by a hanging flexible cable. This is a "physical" description of a catenary. In this article we give a "geometrical" description of a catenary. Specifically we show that the catenary is the locus of the focus of a certain parabola as it rolls on the x-axis.

  7. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  8. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  9. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  10. Marathon Group: Changes in Perceived Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foulds, Melvin L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen college students participated in a 24-hour marathon group and responded to the Internal-External Scale immediately before and after the experience. The results disclosed significant positive change at the .001 level in perceived locus of internal-external control of reinforcement expectancies in the direction of increased internality.…

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Cancer Locus of Control Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jessica W.; Donatelle, Rebecca J.; Acock, Alan C.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a confirmatory factor analysis of the Cancer Locus of Control scale (M. Watson and others, 1990), administered to 543 women with a history of breast cancer. Results support a three-factor model of the scale and support use of the scale to assess control dimensions. (SLD)

  12. Relationship between Locus of Control and Health-Related Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graffeo, Lisa Cotlar; Silvestri, Lynette

    2006-01-01

    Locus of Control (LOC) deals with an individual's personal attribution of successful or failure. Those with internal LOC believe that events in their lives are under their personal control while individuals with external LOC feel that their lives are dominated by the environment. The theory has been applied to achievement and health-related issues…

  13. Job Satisfaction and Locus of Control in an Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stachowiak, Bonni J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored any relationships that existed between faculty members' locus of control and job satisfaction at a small, private, faith-based university. Two demographic variables were also analyzed in the findings: number of years teaching in higher education and tenure status. The job satisfaction instrument used was the Job in General…

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of sil Locus in Clinical Streptococcus pyogenes Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plainvert, Céline; Dinis, Márcia; Ravins, Miriam; Hanski, Emanuel; Touak, Gérald; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Fouet, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) causes a wide variety of diseases, ranging from mild noninvasive to severe invasive infections. Mutations in regulatory components have been implicated in the switch from colonization to invasive phenotypes. The inactivation of the sil locus, composed of six genes encoding a quorum-sensing complex, gives rise to a highly invasive strain. However, studies conducted on limited collections of GAS strains suggested that sil prevalence is around 15%; furthermore, whereas a correlation between the presence of sil and the genetic background was suggested, no link between the presence of a functional sil locus and the invasive status was assessed. We established a collection of 637 nonredundant strains covering all emm genotypes present in France and of known clinical history; 68%, 22%, and 10% were from invasive infections, noninvasive infections, and asymptomatic carriage, respectively. Among the 637 strains, 206 were sil positive. The prevalence of the sil locus varied according to the emm genotype, being present in >85% of the emm4, emm18, emm32, emm60, emm87, and emm90 strains and absent from all emm1, emm28, and emm89 strains. A random selection based on 2009 French epidemiological data indicated that 16% of GAS strains are sil positive. Moreover, due to mutations leading to truncated proteins, only 9% of GAS strains harbor a predicted functional sil system. No correlation was observed between the presence or absence of a functional sil locus and the strain invasiveness status. PMID:24671796

  15. The Influence of Locus of Control on Student Financial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Sonya; Cumbie, Julie A.; Bell, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Data on psychological influences of financial behaviors has not been well addressed in student populations, which is concerning given the high levels of general and financial stress experienced by college students. The findings of this study indicate that college students with an external locus of control exhibit the worst financial behaviors.…

  16. Relationships Among Locus of Control, Grades, and Student Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Steven V.; Froman, Robin D.

    This research examines the interaction between college students' control orientation and a discrepancy score of GPA minus expected grade in course, on the dependent measure of 13 student rating items. It was hypothesized that students with an external locus of control who also showed a discrepancy between expected and actual grades would distort…

  17. Marathon Group: Changes in Perceived Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foulds, Melvin L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen college students participated in a 24-hour marathon group and responded to the Internal-External Scale immediately before and after the experience. The results disclosed significant positive change at the .001 level in perceived locus of internal-external control of reinforcement expectancies in the direction of increased internality.…

  18. Locus of Control and Completion in an Adult Retraining Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C.

    Since attrition is often a problem in adult training programs, a study was conducted to investigate the relationship between locus of control and course completion of adults enrolled in a retraining program. Rotter's Social Learning Theory of Personality was used as a starting point for the study. The study population was a sample of 108…

  19. Exploring Learner Autonomy: Language Learning Locus of Control in Multilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Ron

    2016-01-01

    By using data from an online language learning beliefs survey (n?=?841), defining language learning experience in terms of participants' multilingualism, and using a domain-specific language learning locus of control (LLLOC) instrument, this article examines whether more experienced language learners can also be seen as more autonomous language…

  20. Reminiscences of a mouse specific-locus test addict.

    PubMed

    Russell, W L

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes some of the historical events surrounding the development of and achievements with the mouse specific-locus test in radiation and chemical mutagenesis. Some ongoing and future contributions of the test to research in molecular genetics are also mentioned.

  1. Locus of Control and Likelihood of Nuclear War: Two Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdahl, Paul; Rounds, James B.

    The Nuclear Locus of Control (NLOC) scales were constructed to assess beliefs as to whether nuclear war and nuclear policy decisions are, or can be, influenced by oneself, powerful others, or chance. Three scales measuring internal, powerful others, and chance nuclear LOC show internal consistency estimates (Cronbach's Alpha) of .87, .76, and .85,…

  2. Relationships among Impulsiveness, Locus of Control, Sex, and Music Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study is an investigation of relationships among impulsiveness, locus of control, sex, observed practice behaviors, practice effectiveness, and self-reported practice habits in a sample of 40 college brass players. Practice effectiveness was defined by the amount of change in pretest and posttest performance achievement scores over one…

  3. Biallelic Germline Transcription at the κ Immunoglobulin Locus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nandita; Bergman, Yehudit; Cedar, Howard; Chess, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Rearrangement of antigen receptor genes generates a vast array of antigen receptors on lymphocytes. The establishment of allelic exclusion in immunoglobulin genes requires differential treatment of the two sequence identical alleles. In the case of the κ immunoglobulin locus, changes in chromatin structure, methylation, and replication timing of the two alleles are all potentially involved in regulating rearrangement. Additionally, germline transcription of the κ locus which precedes rearrangement has been proposed to reflect an opening of the chromatin structure rendering it available for rearrangement. As the initial restriction of rearrangement to one allele is critical to the establishment of allelic exclusion, a key question is whether or not germline transcription at the κ locus is monoallelic or biallelic. We have used a sensitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and an RNA–fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to show that germline transcription of the κ locus is biallelic in wild-type immature B cells and in recombination activating gene (RAG)−/−, μ+ B cells. Therefore, germline transcription is unlikely to dictate which allele will be rearranged first and rather reflects a general opening on both alleles that must be accompanied by a mechanism allowing one of the two alleles to be rearranged first. PMID:12629064

  4. The Locus of the Focus of a Rolling Parabola

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Anurag; Marengo, James

    2010-01-01

    The catenary is usually introduced as the shape assumed by a hanging flexible cable. This is a "physical" description of a catenary. In this article we give a "geometrical" description of a catenary. Specifically we show that the catenary is the locus of the focus of a certain parabola as it rolls on the x-axis.

  5. Validation of a Five-Level Locus of Control Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Genevieve; Jeanrie, Chantale

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with 1,011 students and employed adults explored seven work-related themes: decision making, self-knowledge, meaning of work, career planning, social/work environment, educational institutions, and job market. Results supported the validity of the Vocational Locus of Control Scale. (SK)

  6. Locus of control as predictive of goal-directed behavior.

    PubMed

    Collins, H A; Taylor, G A; Burger, G K

    1976-04-01

    EEO Upward Mobility Program participants were compared with three different control groups along I-E locus of control dimensions. With this instrument and these Ss, no significant differences were found when participation in the program was used as an indicator of goal-directed behavior.

  7. Should Farmers' Locus of Control Be Used in Extension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuthall, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    To explore whether Farmers' Locus of Control (LOC) could be useful in agricultural extension programmes to improve managerial ability. This test records a farmer's belief in her/his control over production outcomes. A mail survey of 2300 New Zealand farmers was used to obtain a range of variables, and to measure their LOC using a question set…

  8. Modification of Locus of Control among Rehabilitation Counseling Graduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkard, Calvin M.; Gross, Pincus

    1984-01-01

    Investigated changes in locus of control orientation during graduate education in rehabilitation counseling by comparing students (N=20) who received experiential training with controls who received didactic training. Results indicated movement toward internality was determined by the types of instruction and the level of the initial external…

  9. Exploring Learner Autonomy: Language Learning Locus of Control in Multilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Ron

    2016-01-01

    By using data from an online language learning beliefs survey (n?=?841), defining language learning experience in terms of participants' multilingualism, and using a domain-specific language learning locus of control (LLLOC) instrument, this article examines whether more experienced language learners can also be seen as more autonomous language…

  10. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

    PubMed Central

    Presciuttini, Silvano; Toni, Chiara; Tempestini, Elena; Verdiani, Simonetta; Casarino, Lucia; Spinetti, Isabella; Stefano, Francesco De; Domenici, Ranieri; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2002-01-01

    Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi) depend on locus heterozygosity (H), and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals. PMID:12441003

  11. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The biochemical.... Offspring are examined in the next generation for evidence that a new mutation has arisen. (3) Animal...

  12. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The biochemical.... Offspring are examined in the next generation for evidence that a new mutation has arisen. (3) Animal...

  13. [Drug compliance and health locus of control in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Combes, C; Feral, F

    2011-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a frequent disorder since it affects about 1% of the general population. Drug compliance, that is to say patients' adherence to their treatment, remains rather poor concerning this disease with, on an average, one patient out of two not complying with his/her medication. Among the factors influencing drug compliance, we focused on patients' beliefs in terms of health control, a concept known as health locus of control. This is a concept that originated from social psychology and derived from the Rotters' original concept of locus of control: it corresponds to the type of connexion established by an individual between subsequent events in the history of his/her disease and internal (personal abilities) or external factors (chance, powerful others). Nowadays, the tridimensional structure of this concept is commonly admitted as being in three dimensions: internality, chance externality and powerful others externality, the latter group being divided between doctors and others. We have assumed that there is a correlation between the degree of drug compliance and the internal and/or doctors' external health locus of control. For this purpose, we have determined the quality of drug compliance by using the Medical Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) and the type of health locus of control by using the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) scale among 65 schizophrenic patients. We have also considered it was important to evaluate patients' insight by using the Amador's scale (Scale of Unawareness of Mental Disorder) because many researchers have established a strong correlation between insight and drug compliance in schizophrenia. Associations between the four dimensions of health locus of control ("internal", "chance external", "others external" and "doctors' external") and drug compliance were assessed by estimating Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r) and its degree of significance (p). These associations were judged significant at an alpha

  14. The Role of Locus of Control of Reinforcement in Interpersonal Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowicki, Stephen, Jr.; Blumberg, Neil

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to relate subjects' locus of control orientation to the degree of initial interpersonal attraction expressed toward a stranger who differed from the subjects only in degree of expressed locus of control orientation. (Author)

  15. Coordinated forms of noradrenergic plasticity in the locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana Raquel O.; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is plastic and represents the world according to the significance of sensory stimuli. However, cortical networks are embodied within complex circuits including neuromodulatory systems such as the noradrenergic locus coeruleus, providing information about internal state and behavioral relevance. While norepinephrine is important for cortical plasticity, it is unknown how modulatory neurons themselves respond to changes of sensory input. Here we examine how locus coeruleus neurons are modified by experience, and the consequences of locus coeruleus plasticity on cortical representations and sensory perception. We made whole-cell recordings from rat locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex (AI), pairing sounds with locus coeruleus activation. Although initially unresponsive, locus coeruleus neurons developed and maintained auditory responses afterwards. Locus coeruleus plasticity induced changes in AI responses lasting at least hours and improved auditory perception for days to weeks. Our results demonstrate that locus coeruleus is highly plastic, leading to substantial changes in regulation of brain state by norepinephrine. PMID:26301326

  16. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  17. Age-Related Differences in Locus of Control Orientation in Three Behavior Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Robert H.; Webb, Roger

    1976-01-01

    Age correlated differences in locus of control orientation were examined for 306 persons aged 13 to 90 in three areas of activity: intellectual, social and physical. The Locus of Control Inventory for Three Achievement Domains was administered. (MS)

  18. Homozygosity mapping of the Werner syndrome locus (WRN)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakura, J.; Miki, T.; Kamino, K.

    1994-10-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the early onset of several age-related diseases. The locus for this disease was recently mapped to 8p12. We studied 27 WS kindreds of mixed ethnic origins, 26 of which were consanguineous. In 24 of these families, the affected subject was given the diagnosis of {open_quotes}definite{close_quotes} WS and affected subjects in the remaining 3 pedigrees were given the diagnosis of {open_quotes}probable{close_quotes} WS. Affected subjects from each kindred were genotyped for 13 short tandem repeat polymorphic sites. Two-point linkage analysis yielded significant evidence for linkage to D8S137, D8S339, D8S87, PLAT, D8S165, and D8S166. The locus yielding a maximum lod score at the smallest recombination fraction was D8S339, suggesting that this marker is the closest to the WS gene (WRN locus) of those tested. D8S339 gave significant lod scores (Z{sub max}{>=}3.0) for both Japanese and non-Japanese (mostly Caucasian) families, demonstrating that a single locus is responsible for WS in both groups. Multipoint analysis of these markers yielded a maximum lod score of 17.05 at a distance of approximately 0.6 cM from D8S339. The combined evidence from 2-point analysis, multipoint analysis, and analysis of regions of homozygosity in subjects from inbred pedigrees indicates that the WRN locus is between D8S131 and D8S87, in an 8.3-cM interval containing D8S339. 32 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  19. Increased expression of LD1 genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I in Leishmania donovani as a result of duplication into the rRNA gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Lodes, M.J.; Merlin, G.; DeVos, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates the duplication of two LD1 genes into the rRNA locus and the resultant transcription by RNA polymerase I, which has a faster transcription rate than that of RNA polymerase II. This was conducted using a 2.2-Mb chromosome in Leishmania donovani. 55 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  1. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-07-28

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes.

  2. Rasch Analysis of the Locus-of-Hope Scale. Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadiana, Leny G.; David, Adonis P.

    2015-01-01

    The Locus-of-Hope Scale (LHS) was developed as a measure of the locus-of-hope dimensions (Bernardo, 2010). The present study adds to the emerging literature on locus-of-hope by assessing the psychometric properties of the LHS using Rasch analysis. The results from the Rasch analyses of the four subscales of LHS provided evidence on the…

  3. On the Relation of Locus of Control and L2 Reading and Writing Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghonsooly, Behzad; Shirvan, Majid Elahi

    2011-01-01

    Locus of control, a psychological construct, has been the focus of attention in recent decades. Psychologists have discussed the effect of locus of control on achieving life goals in social/psychological interactions. While learning a foreign language involves both social interactions and psychological processes, the role and relation of locus of…

  4. Adolescent Values Clarification: A Positive Influence on Perceived Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    Used locus of control assessments to monitor specific aspect of adolescent chemical dependency treatment program. Used song lyric analysis activities to note short-term modifications in experimental group's (N=10) perceived locus of control. No improvements were noted in matched control group's locus of control. Findings suggest that addictions…

  5. On the Locus Formed by the Maximum Heights of Projectile Motion with Air Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Saldana, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the locus formed by the set of maxima of the trajectories of a projectile launched in a medium with linear drag. Such a place, the locus of apexes, is written in terms of the Lambert "W" function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. To characterize the locus, a study of…

  6. Locus of Control in Offenders and Alleged Offenders with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Wendy; Leggett, Janice; Garrett, Tanya

    2007-01-01

    Locus of control can be a useful measure of treatment outcome in offenders from the general population. However, there is little information regarding locus of control and offenders with learning disabilities. Existing measures of locus of control use complex language and abstract ideas that may not be accessible to individuals in this group. A…

  7. Reframing Student Affairs Leadership: An Analysis of Organizational Frames of Reference and Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tull, Ashley; Freeman, Jerrid P.

    2011-01-01

    Examined in this study were the identified frames of reference and locus of control used by 478 student affairs administrators. Administrator responses were examined to identify frames of reference most commonly used and their preference order. Locus of control most commonly used and the relationship between frames of reference and locus of…

  8. On the Locus Formed by the Maximum Heights of Projectile Motion with Air Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Saldana, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the locus formed by the set of maxima of the trajectories of a projectile launched in a medium with linear drag. Such a place, the locus of apexes, is written in terms of the Lambert "W" function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. To characterize the locus, a study of…

  9. Haplotype frequencies at the DRD2 locus in populations of the East European Plain

    PubMed Central

    Flegontova, Olga V; Khrunin, Andrey V; Lylova, Olga I; Tarskaia, Larisa A; Spitsyn, Victor A; Mikulich, Alexey I; Limborska, Svetlana A

    2009-01-01

    Background It was demonstrated previously that the three-locus RFLP haplotype, TaqI B-TaqI D-TaqI A (B-D-A), at the DRD2 locus constitutes a powerful genetic marker and probably reflects the most ancient dispersal of anatomically modern humans. Results We investigated TaqI B, BclI, MboI, TaqI D, and TaqI A RFLPs in 17 contemporary populations of the East European Plain and Siberia. Most of these populations belong to the Indo-European or Uralic language families. We identified three common haplotypes, which occurred in more than 90% of chromosomes investigated. The frequencies of the haplotypes differed according to linguistic and geographical affiliation. Conclusion Populations in the northwestern (Byelorussians from Mjadel'), northern (Russians from Mezen' and Oshevensk), and eastern (Russians from Puchezh) parts of the East European Plain had relatively high frequencies of haplotype B2-D2-A2, which may reflect admixture with Uralic-speaking populations that inhabited all of these regions in the Early Middle Ages. PMID:19793394

  10. Haplotype frequencies at the DRD2 locus in populations of the East European Plain.

    PubMed

    Flegontova, Olga V; Khrunin, Andrey V; Lylova, Olga I; Tarskaia, Larisa A; Spitsyn, Victor A; Mikulich, Alexey I; Limborska, Svetlana A

    2009-09-30

    It was demonstrated previously that the three-locus RFLP haplotype, TaqI B-TaqI D-TaqI A (B-D-A), at the DRD2 locus constitutes a powerful genetic marker and probably reflects the most ancient dispersal of anatomically modern humans. We investigated TaqI B, BclI, MboI, TaqI D, and TaqI A RFLPs in 17 contemporary populations of the East European Plain and Siberia. Most of these populations belong to the Indo-European or Uralic language families. We identified three common haplotypes, which occurred in more than 90% of chromosomes investigated. The frequencies of the haplotypes differed according to linguistic and geographical affiliation. Populations in the northwestern (Byelorussians from Mjadel'), northern (Russians from Mezen' and Oshevensk), and eastern (Russians from Puchezh) parts of the East European Plain had relatively high frequencies of haplotype B2-D2-A2, which may reflect admixture with Uralic-speaking populations that inhabited all of these regions in the Early Middle Ages.

  11. An investigation on the mediating role of coping strategies on locus of control-- wellbeing relationship.

    PubMed

    Thiruchelvi, Arunachalam; Supriya, Mangatvadakkeveetil V

    2012-03-01

    The relationship among coping strategies, locus of control, and workplace wellbeing is examined. The model hypothesizes that coping strategies mediate the relationship between locus of control and work place well being. To test the model, data was collected from 154 software professionals using separate tools to assess coping strategies, locus of control and work place wellbeing. Model fit for the collected data was examined using structural equation modeling technique with the help of AMOS. Results support the view that coping strategies mediate the relationship between locus of control and work place wellbeing. While the path between locus of control and wellbeing is significant, the path between coping distraction and wellbeing is not significant.

  12. A locus affecting nucleoid segregation in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, M B

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen temperature-sensitive lethal mutations of Salmonella typhimurium map near metC at 65 min and form the clmF (conditional lethal mutation) locus. The mutations in this region were ordered by three-point transduction crosses. After a shift to the nonpermissive temperature, many of these clmF mutants failed to complete the segregation of nucleoids into daughter cells; daughter nucleoids appeared incompletely separated and asymmetrically positioned within cells. Some clmF mutants showed instability of F' episomes at permissive growth temperatures yet showed no detectable defect with smaller multicopy plasmids such as pSC101 or pBR322. In addition, many of the clmF mutants rapidly lost viability yet continued DNA replication at the nonpermissive temperature. These results suggest that the clmF locus encodes at least one indispensable gene product that is required for faithful partitioning of the bacterial nucleoid and F-plasmid replicons. Images PMID:2203751

  13. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the reptile Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Gambón Deza, Francisco; Sánchez Espinel, Christian; Magadán Mompó, Susana

    2009-05-01

    We describe the entire immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus from the reptile Anolis carolinensis. The heavy chain constant (C(H)) region includes C mu, C delta and C upsilon genes. This is the first description of a C upsilon gene in the reptilian class. Variable (V(H)), diversity (D(H)) and joining (J(H)) genes are located 5' from the constant (C(H)) chain complex locus. The C mu and C upsilon genes encode antibodies with four immunoglobulin domains. The C delta gene encoded an 11 domain delta heavy chain as in Eublepharis macularius. Seventy V(H) genes, belonging to 28 families, were identified, and they can be sorted into five broader groups. The similarity of the organization of the reptilian genes with those of amphibians and mammals suggests the existence of a process of heavy chain genomic reorganization before the radiation of tetrapod vertebrates.

  14. Teacher psychological needs, locus of control and engagement.

    PubMed

    Betoret, Fernando Doménech

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationships among psychological needs, locus of control and engagement in a sample of 282 Spanish secondary school teachers. Nine teacher needs were identified based on the study of Bess (1977) and on the Self-Determination Theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985, 2000, 2002). Self-report questionnaires were used to measure the construct selected for this study and their interrelationships were examined by conducting hierarchical regression analyses. An analysis of teacher responses using hierarchical regression reveals that psychological needs have significant positive effects on the three engagement dimensions (vigor, dedication and absorption). Furthermore, the results show the moderator role played by locus of control in the relationship between teacher psychological needs and the so-called core of engagement (vigor and dedication). Finally, practical implications are discussed.

  15. The locus of microRNA-10b

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary microRNA research has led to significant advances in our understanding of the process of tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs participate in different events of a cancer cell’s life, through their ability to target hundreds of putative transcripts involved in almost every cellular function, including cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. The relevance of these small molecules is even more evident in light of the emerging linkage between their expression and both prognosis and clinical outcome of many types of human cancers. This identifies microRNAs as potential therapeutic modifiers of cancer phenotypes. From this perspective, we overview here the miR-10b locus and its involvement in cancer, focusing on its role in the establishment (miR-10b*) and spreading (miR-10b) of breast cancer. We conclude that targeting the locus of microRNA 10b holds great potential for cancer treatment. PMID:23839045

  16. The Molecular Revolution in Cutaneous Biology: EDC and Locus Control.

    PubMed

    Oh, Inez Y; de Guzman Strong, Cristina

    2017-05-01

    The epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) locus consists of a cluster of genes important for the terminal differentiation of the epidermis. While early studies identified the functional importance of individual EDC genes, the recognition of the EDC genes as a cluster with its shared biology, homology, and physical linkage was pivotal to later studies that investigated the transcriptional regulation of the locus. Evolutionary conservation of the EDC and the transcriptional activation during epidermal differentiation suggested a cis-regulatory mechanism via conserved noncoding elements or enhancers. This line of pursuit led to the identification of CNE 923, an epidermal-specific enhancer that was found to mediate chromatin remodeling of the EDC in an AP-1 dependent manner. These genomic studies, as well as the advent of high-throughput sequencing and genome engineering techniques, have paved the way for future investigation into enhancer-mediated regulatory networks in cutaneous biology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The permuted locus trial--Well suited for emerging pathogens?

    PubMed

    Porco, Travis C; Keenan, Jeremy D; Enanoria, Wayne T A; Lietman, Thomas M

    2016-03-01

    The recent Ebola virus epidemic was waning by the time stakeholders were ready to field vaccines for testing but an evidence-based response to a novel pathogen will surely be required again. Here, we present a design for such a randomized controlled trial. The permuted locus trial was originally intended for studying the influence of water wells on trachoma. While outcomes can be measured in individuals, neither individuals nor groups are themselves randomized to arms, just potential well-sites, or in the case of an epidemic, index cases. The permuted locus trial may be used when classic individual and cluster-randomized trial design and analyses may not be optimal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Locus-specific gene repositioning in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leshner, Marc; Devine, Michelle; Roloff, Gregory W.; True, Lawrence D.; Misteli, Tom; Meaburn, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Genes occupy preferred spatial positions within interphase cell nuclei. However, positioning patterns are not an innate feature of a locus, and genes can alter their localization in response to physiological and pathological changes. Here we screen the radial positioning patterns of 40 genes in normal, hyperplasic, and malignant human prostate tissues. We find that the overall spatial organization of the genome in prostate tissue is largely conserved among individuals. We identify three genes whose nuclear positions are robustly altered in neoplastic prostate tissues. FLI1 and MMP9 position differently in prostate cancer than in normal tissue and prostate hyperplasia, whereas MMP2 is repositioned in both prostate cancer and hyperplasia. Our data point to locus-specific reorganization of the genome during prostate disease. PMID:26564800

  19. Refined localization of the Prieto-syndrome locus

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, F.; Prieto, F.; Gal, A.

    1996-07-12

    PRS designates the locus for a syndromal form of X-linked mental retardation (Prieto syndrome) characterized by minor facial anomalies, ear malformation, abnormal growth of teeth, clinodactyly, sacral dimple, patellar luxation, malformation of lower limbs, abnormalities of the fundus of the eye, and subcortical cerebral atrophy. Linkage analysis localized the disease locus between DXS84 (Xp21.1) and DXS255. Here we present additional linkage data that provide further support and refinement of this localization. Individual III-18 gave birth to a male, currently aged 2 7/12 years, who clearly shows delayed psychomotor development. He began to walk at 23 months and his speech is delayed. In addition, he shows the characteristic facial anomalies, {open_quotes}dysplastic{close_quotes} ears, sacral dimple, and clinodactyly, as do all other affected males in this family. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Contactin 4 as a Possible Autism Susceptibility Locus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-27

    using a carefully phenotyped local registry of autism families (CORA*) with DNA samples collected at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and WPAFB...Central Ohio Registry for Autism 3 2011 MHS Conference BACKGROUND: CORA – Recruit 250-300 carefully phenotyped probands with ASD + family members...Sharing Knowledge: Achieving Breakthrough Performance 2010 Military Health System Conference CONTACTIN 4 AS A POSSIBLE AUTISM SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCUS

  1. Rapid Multi-Locus Sequence Typing Using Microfluidic Biochips

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-12

    Rapid Multi-Locus Sequence Typing Using Microfluidic Biochips Timothy D. Read1,2*, Rosemary S. Turingan3, Christopher Cook1, Heidi Giese3, Ulrich...sequencing of 6–8 housekeeping loci to assign unique sequence types. In this work we adapted MLST to a rapid microfluidics platform in order to...enhance speed and reduce laboratory labor time. Methodology/Principal Findings: Using two integrated microfluidic devices, DNA was purified from 100

  2. Pressure sore survey. Part 3: Locus of control.

    PubMed

    Maylor, M; Torrance, C

    1999-03-01

    This is the third in a three-part article which investigates the prevalence, knowledge and attitudes to pressure sores in one NHS trust. This study describes the methodology used in choosing and developing attitude scales to explore whether there are any relationships between the locus of control and pressure sore prevention. Factors to do with attitude and the value associated with pressure sore prevention have a central role. Attitudes and beliefs affect what we do and may contribute to pressure sore development.

  3. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Gambón-Deza, F; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Magadán-Mompó, S

    2009-08-01

    Immunoglobulins loci in mammals are well known to be organized within a translocon, however their origin remains unresolved. Four of the five classes of immunoglobulins described in humans and rodents (immunoglobulins M, G, E and A-IgM, IgG, IgE and IgA) were found in marsupials and monotremes (immunoglobulin D-IgD was not found) thus showing that the genomic structure of antibodies in mammals has remained constant since its origin. We have recently described the genomic organization of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in reptiles (IGHM, IGHD and IGHY). These data and the characterization of the IGH locus in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), allow us to elucidate the changes that took place in this genomic region during evolution from reptile to mammal. Thus, by using available genome data, we were able to detect that platypus IGH locus contains reptilian and mammalian genes. Besides having an IGHD that is very similar to the one in reptiles and an IGHY, they also present the mammal specific antibody genes IGHG and IGHE, in addition to IGHA. We also detected a pseudogene that originated by recombination between the IGHD and the IGHM (similar to the IGHD2 found in Eublepharis macularius). The analysis of the IGH locus in platypus shows that IGHY was duplicated, firstly by evolving into IGHE and then into IGHG. The IGHA of the platypus has a complex origin, and probably arose by a process of recombination between the IGHM and the IGHY. We detected about 44 VH genes (25 were already described), most of which comprise a single group. When we compared these VH genes with those described in Anolis carolinensis, we find that there is an evolutionary relationship between the VH genes of platypus and the reptilian Group III genes. These results suggest that a fast VH turnover took place in platypus and this gave rise to a family with a high VH gene number and the disappearance of the earlier VH families.

  4. Relationship between nursing students' epistemological beliefs and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Aylin; Kaya, Hülya

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing students' epistemologic beliefs and locus of control, and the research was conducted at Istanbul University Florence Nightingale School of Nursing with 350 nursing students. Data were collected using the Turkish version of the Epistemological beliefs questionnaire and Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale. In the data analysis number, percentage, mean, correlation analysis, one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD test were used. The findings as whole indicated that nursing students' epistemological beliefs that "The Belief of Learning Depends on Effort (Effort)" showed a greater degree of development than their beliefs about the two other dimensions as named "The Belief of Learning Depends on Ability (Ability)" and "The Belief That There is Only One Unchanging Truth (Unchanging Truth)" in this study, while their belief that there is Unchanging Truth was not developed when compared to the other two. There was a positive correlation between nursing students locus of control and Effort and Ability dimensions, but a significant correlation was not found with Unchanging Truth dimension. This researcher suggests that research should be carried out to determine nursing students' epistemological beliefs and the factors influencing them in an environment to promote the development of these beliefs, and thus the research can be used to learn about the development of the epistemological beliefs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement methodology in children's health locus of control.

    PubMed

    Bases, Hugh; Schonfeld, David J

    2002-06-01

    Health locus of control scales for children are often constructed in an agree/disagree format. It was hypothesized that the structure of the instrument may be in part responsible for the finding that young children (7-8 yr) have an external health locus of control relevant to children several years older. The original version and a revised version, using a choice of attribution format, were both administered to 444 students (98% of eligible students) attending 10 second-grade classes. Although the mean scores for the two formats were the same, 32.0 (SD = 3.3), item level analyses showed poor agreement (kappa, -.005-.41) and significant bias in disagreements on 15 of the 20 items. Changes in the wording of the questions led to different results, indicating possible limitations in either format. The observation that young children likely have a mixed health locus of control indicates that health educators may benefit from employing both internal and external sources of reinforcement to promote healthy behaviors in young children.

  6. Interarticulator phasing, locus equations, and degree of coarticulation

    PubMed Central

    Löfqvist, Anders

    2010-01-01

    A locus equation plots the frequency of the second formant at vowel onset against the target frequency of the same formant for the vowel in a consonant–vowel sequence, across different vowel contexts. It has generally been assumed that the slope of the locus equation reflects the degree of coarticulation between the consonant and the vowel, with a steeper slope showing more coarticulation. This study examined the articulatory basis for this assumption. Four subjects participated and produced VCV sequences of the consonants /b, d, g/ and the vowels /i, a, u/. The movements of the tongue and the lips were recorded using a magnetometer system. One articulatory measure was the temporal phasing between the onset of the lip closing movement for the bilabial consonant and the onset of the tongue movement from the first to the second vowel in a VCV sequence. A second measure was the magnitude of the tongue movement during the oral stop closure, averaged across four receivers on the tongue. A third measure was the magnitude of the tongue movement from the onset of the second vowel to the tongue position for that vowel. When compared with the corresponding locus equations, no measure showed any support for the assumption that the slope serves as an index of the degree of coarticulation between the consonant and the vowel. PMID:10530025

  7. Genetic analysis of the claret locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, W.; Nelson, C.R.; Szauter, P. )

    1989-11-01

    The claret (ca) locus of Drosophila melanogaster comprises two separately mutable domains, one responsible for eye color and one responsible for proper disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis and early cleavage divisions. Previously isolated alleles are of three types: (1) alleles of the claret (ca) type that affect eye color only, (2) alleles of the claret-nondisjunctional (ca{sup nd}) type that affect eye color and chromosome behavior, and (3) a meiotic mutation, non-claret disjunctional (ncd), that affects chromosome behavior only. In order to investigate the genetic structure of the claret locus, the authors have isolated 19 radiation-induced alleles of claret on the basis of the eye color phenotype. Two of these 19 new alleles are of the ca{sup nd} type, while 17 are of the ca type, demonstrating that the two domains do not often act as a single target for mutagenesis. This suggests that the two separately mutable functions are likely to be encoded by separate or overlapping genes rather than by a single gene. One of the new alleles of the ca{sup nd} type is a chromosome rearrangement with a breakpoint at the position of the claret locus. If this breakpoint is the cause of the mutant phenotype and there are no other mutations associated with the rearrangement, the two functions must be encoded by overlapping genes.

  8. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus

    PubMed Central

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  9. Population genetics of the HRAS1 minisatellite locus

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, B.; Risch, N. ); Krontiris, T. New England Medical Center Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1993-12-01

    Several years ago it was reported that rare HRAS1 VNTR alleles occurred more frequently in US Caucasian cancer patients than in unaffected controls. Such an association, in theory, could be caused by undetected population heterogeneity. Also, in a study clearly relevant to this issue, it was recently reported that significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium exist at this locus in a sample of US Caucasians. These considerations motivate population genetic analysis of the HRAS1 locus. From published studies of the HRAS1 VNTR locus, which classified alleles into types, the authors found only small differences in the allele frequency distributions of samples from various European nations, although there were larger differences among ethnic groups (African American, Caucasian, and Oriental). In an analysis of variation of rare-allele frequencies among samples from four European nations, most of the variance was attributable to molecular methodology, and very little of the variance was accounted for by nationality. In addition, the authors showed that mixture of European subpopulations should result in only minor deviations from expected genotype proportions in a Caucasian database and demonstrated that there was no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the HRAS1 data. 35 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Characterization of frequently deleted 6q locus in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Srikantan, Vasantha; Ma, Lanfeng; Li, Jia; Zhang, Wei; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Makarem, Mazen; Strovel, Jeffrey W; Horrigan, Stephen G; Augustus, Meena; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Moul, Judd W; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Zou, Zhiqiang; Srivastava, Shiv

    2006-11-01

    The long arm of chromosome 6 is frequently deleted in diverse human neoplasms. Our previous study showed a minimum deletion region between markers D6S1056 and D6S300 on chromosome 6q in primary prostate cancer (CaP). In this study, we further refined a 200-kb minimal region of deletion (6qTSG1) centered around D6S1013 marker. The 6qTSG1 transcripts contained complex multiple splicing variants with low or absent expression in CaP cells. None of the transcripts identified contained open reading frames that code for a protein in the NCBI database. The expression of 6qTSG transcripts revealed interesting hormonal regulation relevant to CaP biology. Expression of 6q TSG transcript was induced in LNCaP cells that were cultured in charcoal-stripped serum medium suggesting an upregulation of 6qTSG transcript by androgen ablation and cell growth inhibition/apoptosis. Induction of 6qTSG1 expression in response to androgen ablation was abrogated in androgen-independent derivatives of LNCaP cells. In summary, we have defined a candidate CaP suppressor locus on chromosome 6q16.1, and deletions of this locus are frequently associated with prostate tumorigenesis. In the light of emerging role of noncoding RNAs in cancer biology including CaP, future investigations of 6qTSG11 locus is warranted.

  11. Transvection at the vestigial locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, Alistair B; Nolan, Nadia; Bell, John B; Hilliker, Arthur J

    2005-08-01

    Transvection is a phenomenon wherein gene expression is effected by the interaction of alleles in trans and often results in partial complementation between mutant alleles. Transvection is dependent upon somatic pairing between homologous chromosome regions and is a form of interallelic complementation that does not occur at the polypeptide level. In this study we demonstrated that transvection could occur at the vestigial (vg) locus by revealing that partial complementation between two vg mutant alleles could be disrupted by changing the genomic location of the alleles through chromosome rearrangement. If chromosome rearrangements affect transvection by disrupting somatic pairing, then combining chromosome rearrangements that restore somatic pairing should restore transvection. We were able to restore partial complementation in numerous rearrangement trans-heterozygotes, thus providing substantial evidence that the observed complementation at vg results from a transvection effect. Cytological analyses revealed this transvection effect to have a large proximal critical region, a feature common to other transvection effects. In the Drosophila interphase nucleus, paired chromosome arms are separated into distinct, nonoverlapping domains. We propose that if the relative position of each arm in the nucleus is determined by the centromere as a relic of chromosome positions after the last mitotic division, then a locus will be displaced to a different territory of the interphase nucleus relative to its nonrearranged homolog by any rearrangement that links that locus to a different centromere. This physical displacement in the nucleus hinders transvection by disrupting the somatic pairing of homologous chromosomes and gives rise to proximal critical regions.

  12. Congenic mapping and sequence analysis of the Renin locus

    PubMed Central

    Flister, Michael J.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Reddy, Prajwal; Jacob, Howard J.; Moreno, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Renin was the first blood pressure (BP) quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapped by linkage analysis in the rat. Subsequent BP linkage and congenic studies capturing different portions of the renin region have returned conflicting results, suggesting that multiple interdependent BP loci may be residing in the chromosome 13 BP QTL that includes Renin. We used SS-13BN congenic strains to map 2 BP loci in the Renin region (chr13:45.2–49.0 Mb). We identified a 1.1 Mb protective Brown Norway (BN) region around Renin (chr13:46.1–47.2 Mb) that significantly decreased BP by 32 mmHg. The Renin protective BP locus was offset by an adjacent hypertensive locus (chr13:47.2–49.0 Mb) that significantly increased BP by 29 mmHg. Sequence analysis of the protective and hypertensive BP loci revealed 1,433 and 2,063 variants between Dahl salt-sensitive/Mcwi (SS) and BN rats, respectively. To further reduce the list of candidate variants, we re-genotyped an overlapping SS-13SR congenic strain (S/renrr) with a previously reported BP phenotype. Sequence comparison between SS, Dahl R (SR), and BN reduced the number of candidate variants in the 2 BP loci by 42% for further study. Combined with previous studies, these data suggest that at least 4 BP loci reside within the 30 cM chromosome 13 BP QTL that includes Renin. PMID:23460292

  13. The SCL gene is formed from a transcriptionally complex locus.

    PubMed Central

    Aplan, P D; Begley, C G; Bertness, V; Nussmeier, M; Ezquerra, A; Coligan, J; Kirsch, I R

    1990-01-01

    We describe the structural organization of the human SCL gene, a helix-loop-helix family member which we believe plays a fundamental role in hematopoietic differentiation. The SCL locus is composed of eight exons distributed over 16 kb. SCL shows a pattern of expression quite restricted to early hematopoietic tissues, although in malignant states expression of the gene may be somewhat extended into later developmental stages. A detailed analysis of the transcript(s) arising from the SCL locus revealed that (i) the 5' noncoding portion of the SCL transcript, which resides within a CpG island, has a complex pattern of alternative exon utilization as well as two distinct transcription initiation sites; (ii) the 5' portions of the SCL transcript contain features that suggest a possible regulatory role for these segments; (iii) the pattern of utilization of the 5' exons is cell lineage dependent; and (iv) all of the currently studied chromosomal aberrations that affect the SCL locus either structurally or functionally eliminate the normal 5' transcription initiation sites. These data suggest that the SCL gene, and specifically its 5' region, may be a target for regulatory interactions during early hematopoietic development. Images PMID:2247063

  14. Interarticulator phasing, locus equations, and degree of coarticulation.

    PubMed

    Löfqvist, A

    1999-10-01

    A locus equation plots the frequency of the second formant at vowel onset against the target frequency of the same formant for the vowel in a consonant-vowel sequence, across different vowel contexts. It has generally been assumed that the slope of the locus equation reflects the degree of coarticulation between the consonant and the vowel, with a steeper slope showing more coarticulation. This study examined the articulatory basis for this assumption. Four subjects participated and produced VCV sequences of the consonants /b, d, g/ and the vowels /i, a, u/. The movements of the tongue and the lips were recorded using a magnetometer system. One articulatory measure was the temporal phasing between the onset of the lip closing movement for the bilabial consonant and the onset of the tongue movement from the first to the second vowel in a VCV sequence. A second measure was the magnitude of the tongue movement during the oral stop closure, averaged across four receivers on the tongue. A third measure was the magnitude of the tongue movement from the onset of the second vowel to the tongue position for that vowel. When compared with the corresponding locus equations, no measure showed any support for the assumption that the slope serves as an index of the degree of coarticulation between the consonant and the vowel.

  15. The Effects of Locus of Control and Task Difficulty on Procrastination.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Tracy; Carton, John S

    1999-12-01

    The authors investigated the effects of locus of control expectancies and task difficulty on procrastination. Forty-two college students were administered an academic locus of control scale and a task that was similar to a typical college homework assignment. The students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 task difficulty levels. Although none of the results involving task difficulty was significant, several results involving locus of control were significant. Specifically, analyses revealed that students with internal locus of control expectancies tended to begin working on the assignment sooner than students with external locus of control expectancies. In addition, students with internal locus of control completed and returned the assignment sooner than students with external locus of control. The results are discussed within the context of J. B. Rotter's (1966, 1975, 1982) social learning theory.

  16. 'Locus of control', health-related quality of life, emotional distress and disability in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rizza, Federica; Gison, Annalisa; Bonassi, Stefano; Dall'Armi, Valentina; Tonto, Francesca; Giaquinto, Salvatore

    2017-06-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated locus of control and its subscales in Parkinson's disease. A total of 50 consecutive Parkinson's disease participants and 50 healthy volunteers (control group) were enrolled. External locus of control was significantly higher in Parkinson's disease participants, whereas internal locus of control had no significant differences. External locus of control and internal locus of control were correlated in control group, but not in Parkinson's disease. In Parkinson's disease participants, external locus of control was negatively associated with health-related quality of life as well as positively associated with emotional distress and disease severity (but not with disability). After adjusting to confound variables, the associations remained. On the other hand, internal locus of control was negatively associated with depression.

  17. High-resolution mapping of the X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    PubMed Central

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Browne, D.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Becker, H. W.; Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S.; Davies, K. P.; Clarke, A.; Thomas, N. S. T.

    1992-01-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. We have extended our previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009–.075. Multipoint analyses gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human/rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosities of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that cosegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXS732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. PMID:1357963

  18. High-resolution mapping of the x-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Browne, D.; Becker, H.W. ); Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S. ); Davies, K.P.; Clarke, A. )

    1992-11-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. The authors have extended previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009-.075. Multipoint analysis gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human-rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosites of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that consegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXSA732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. 36 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  19. Evidence for genetic heterogeneity in tuberous sclerosis: One locus on chromosome 9 and at least one locus elsewhere

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, H.; Rodriguez, E. Jr. ); Herman, G.E.; Lewis, R.A. ); Kwiatkowski, D.J. ); Roach, E.S. ); Dobyns, W.B. ); Daiger, S.P.; Blanton, S.H. )

    1992-10-01

    Linkage of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder, to markers on chromosome 9 was reported first in 1987. This assignment was confirmed by an international collaborative study that suggested more than one locus may be responsible for the phenotype. The authors studied 14 multigenerational TSC families (13 previously unreported) with markers for nine loci in the linked region of chromosome 9q32-q34. Results confirm the previous reports that the genetic locus in one-third to one-half of families maps to chromosome 9. Comparison of clinical findings in the chromosome 9-linked families with those in the chromosome 9-unlinked families reveals only a higher incidence of ungual fibromata in the chromosome 9-linked families. 38 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Rat Mcs5a is a compound quantitative trait locus with orthologous human loci that associate with breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, David J.; Hesselson, Stephanie E.; Aperavich, Beth A.; Zan, Yunhong; Haag, Jill D.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Hampton, John M.; Mau, Bob; Chen, Kai-Shun; Baynes, Caroline; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert; Perkins, Barbara; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Doug F.; Ponder, Bruce A.; Gould, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer risk is a polygenic trait. To identify breast cancer modifier alleles that have a high population frequency and low penetrance we used a comparative genomics approach. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) were initially identified by linkage analysis in a rat mammary carcinogenesis model followed by verification in congenic rats carrying the specific QTL allele under study. The Mcs5a locus was identified by fine-mapping Mcs5 in a congenic model. Here we characterize the Mcs5a locus, which when homozygous for the Wky allele, reduces mammary cancer risk by 50%. The Mcs5a locus is a compound QTL with at least two noncoding interacting elements: Mcs5a1 and Mcs5a2. The resistance phenotype is only observed in rats carrying at least one copy of the Wky allele of each element on the same chromosome. Mcs5a1 is located within the ubiquitin ligase Fbxo10, whereas Mcs5a2 includes the 5′ portion of Frmpd1. Resistant congenic rats show a down-regulation of Fbxo10 in the thymus and an up-regulation of Frmpd1 in the spleen. The association of the Mcs5a1 and Mcs5a2 human orthologs with breast cancer was tested in two population-based breast cancer case-control studies (≈12,000 women). The minor alleles of rs6476643 (MCS5A1) and rs2182317 (MCS5A2) were independently associated with breast cancer risk. The minor allele of rs6476643 increases risk, whereas the rs2182317 minor allele decreases risk. Both alleles have a high population frequency and a low penetrance toward breast cancer risk. PMID:17404222

  1. Cognitive functioning correlates of self-esteem and health locus of control in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chien-Shu; Wu, Jo Yung-Wei; Chang, Wei-Chung; Chuang, Shu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Aim The study aimed to investigate the relationship among sociodemographic factors, neurocognitive factors, self-esteem, and health locus of control in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. We examined the self-esteem, internal health locus of control, and external health locus of control through sociodemographic and neurocognitive factors. Methods Forty-six schizophrenic patients and 31 healthy residents from the community or hospital were recruited as the control group. All subjects participated in the self-esteem questionnaire, health locus of control questionnaire, and a series of neuropychological measures. Results Multiple regression analysis revealed that inhibition of attention and external health locus of control were predictors for self-esteem (r=−0.30, P<0.05; r=0.41, P<0.01); inhibition of attention and external health locus of control were contributors for internal health locus of control (r=−0.43, P<0.01; r=0.61, P<0.001); and education was related to external health locus of control (r=−0.31, P<0.05). Conclusion The current study integrated background characteristics and cognitive function to better understand the impact of self-esteem and health locus of control in schizophrenia. The findings indicated that inhibition of attention, external health locus of control, and education contributed to self-esteem, internal health locus of control and external health locus of control. However, the overall predicted variance accounted for by these predictors was small; thus, further research is necessary to examine imperative variables related with self-esteem and health locus of control in schizophrenia. PMID:24194641

  2. Genetic locus for streptolysin S production by group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Nizet, V; Beall, B; Bast, D J; Datta, V; Kilburn, L; Low, D E; De Azavedo, J C

    2000-07-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Streptolysin S (SLS) is the cytolytic factor that creates the zone of beta-hemolysis surrounding GAS colonies grown on blood agar. We recently reported the discovery of a potential genetic determinant involved in SLS production, sagA, encoding a small peptide of 53 amino acids (S. D. Betschel, S. M. Borgia, N. L. Barg, D. E. Low, and J. C. De Azavedo, Infect. Immun. 66:1671-1679, 1998). Using transposon mutagenesis, chromosomal walking steps, and data from the GAS genome sequencing project (www.genome.ou.edu/strep. html), we have now identified a contiguous nine-gene locus (sagA to sagI) involved in SLS production. The sag locus is conserved among GAS strains regardless of M protein type. Targeted plasmid integrational mutagenesis of each gene in the sag operon resulted in an SLS-negative phenotype. Targeted integrations (i) upstream of the sagA promoter and (ii) downstream of a terminator sequence after sagI did not affect SLS production, establishing the functional boundaries of the operon. A rho-independent terminator sequence between sagA and sagB appears to regulate the amount of sagA transcript produced versus transcript for the entire operon. Reintroduction of the nine-gene sag locus on a plasmid vector restored SLS activity to the nonhemolytic sagA knockout mutant. Finally, heterologous expression of the intact sag operon conferred the SLS beta-hemolytic phenotype to the nonhemolytic Lactococcus lactis. We conclude that gene products of the GAS sag operon are both necessary and sufficient for SLS production. Sequence homologies of sag operon gene products suggest that SLS is related to the bacteriocin family of microbial toxins.

  3. Role of a Putative Polysaccharide Locus in Bordetella Biofilm Development▿

    PubMed Central

    Parise, Gina; Mishra, Meenu; Itoh, Yoshikane; Romeo, Tony; Deora, Rajendar

    2007-01-01

    Bordetellae are gram-negative bacteria that colonize the respiratory tracts of animals and humans. We and others have recently shown that these bacteria are capable of living as sessile communities known as biofilms on a number of abiotic surfaces. During the biofilm mode of existence, bacteria produce one or more extracellular polymeric substances that function, in part, to hold the cells together and to a surface. There is little information on either the constituents of the biofilm matrix or the genetic basis of biofilm development by Bordetella spp. By utilizing immunoblot assays and by enzymatic hydrolysis using dispersin B (DspB), a glycosyl hydrolase that specifically cleaves the polysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (poly-β-1,6-GlcNAc), we provide evidence for the production of poly-β-1,6-GlcNAc by various Bordetella species (Bordetella bronchiseptica, B. pertussis, and B. parapertussis) and its role in their biofilm development. We have investigated the role of a Bordetella locus, here designated bpsABCD, in biofilm formation. The bps (Bordetella polysaccharide) locus is homologous to several bacterial loci that are required for the production of poly-β-1,6-GlcNAc and have been implicated in bacterial biofilm formation. By utilizing multiple microscopic techniques to analyze biofilm formation under both static and hydrodynamic conditions, we demonstrate that the bps locus, although not essential at the initial stages of biofilm formation, contributes to the stability and the maintenance of the complex architecture of Bordetella biofilms. PMID:17114249

  4. Genetic Locus for Streptolysin S Production by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Nizet, Victor; Beall, Bernard; Bast, Darrin J.; Datta, Vivekananda; Kilburn, Laurie; Low, Donald E.; De Azavedo, Joyce C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Streptolysin S (SLS) is the cytolytic factor that creates the zone of beta-hemolysis surrounding GAS colonies grown on blood agar. We recently reported the discovery of a potential genetic determinant involved in SLS production, sagA, encoding a small peptide of 53 amino acids (S. D. Betschel, S. M. Borgia, N. L. Barg, D. E. Low, and J. C. De Azavedo, Infect. Immun. 66:1671–1679, 1998). Using transposon mutagenesis, chromosomal walking steps, and data from the GAS genome sequencing project (www.genome.ou.edu/strep.html), we have now identified a contiguous nine-gene locus (sagA to sagI) involved in SLS production. The sag locus is conserved among GAS strains regardless of M protein type. Targeted plasmid integrational mutagenesis of each gene in the sag operon resulted in an SLS-negative phenotype. Targeted integrations (i) upstream of the sagA promoter and (ii) downstream of a terminator sequence after sagI did not affect SLS production, establishing the functional boundaries of the operon. A rho-independent terminator sequence between sagA and sagB appears to regulate the amount of sagA transcript produced versus transcript for the entire operon. Reintroduction of the nine-gene sag locus on a plasmid vector restored SLS activity to the nonhemolytic sagA knockout mutant. Finally, heterologous expression of the intact sag operon conferred the SLS beta-hemolytic phenotype to the nonhemolytic Lactococcus lactis. We conclude that gene products of the GAS sag operon are both necessary and sufficient for SLS production. Sequence homologies of sag operon gene products suggest that SLS is related to the bacteriocin family of microbial toxins. PMID:10858242

  5. Locus minimization in breed prediction using artificial neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Iquebal, M A; Ansari, M S; Sarika; Dixit, S P; Verma, N K; Aggarwal, R A K; Jayakumar, S; Rai, A; Kumar, D

    2014-12-01

    Molecular markers, viz. microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms, have revolutionized breed identification through the use of small samples of biological tissue or germplasm, such as blood, carcass samples, embryos, ova and semen, that show no evident phenotype. Classical tools of molecular data analysis for breed identification have limitations, such as the unavailability of referral breed data, causing increased cost of collection each time, compromised computational accuracy and complexity of the methodology used. We report here the successful use of an artificial neural network (ANN) in background to decrease the cost of genotyping by locus minimization. The webserver is freely accessible (http://nabg.iasri.res.in/bisgoat) to the research community. We demonstrate that the machine learning (ANN) approach for breed identification is capable of multifold advantages such as locus minimization, leading to a drastic reduction in cost, and web availability of reference breed data, alleviating the need for repeated genotyping each time one investigates the identity of an unknown breed. To develop this model web implementation based on ANN, we used 51,850 samples of allelic data of microsatellite-marker-based DNA fingerprinting on 25 loci covering 22 registered goat breeds of India for training. Minimizing loci to up to nine loci through the use of a multilayer perceptron model, we achieved 96.63% training accuracy. This server can be an indispensable tool for identification of existing breeds and new synthetic commercial breeds, leading to protection of intellectual property in case of sovereignty and bio-piracy disputes. This server can be widely used as a model for cost reduction by locus minimization for various other flora and fauna in terms of variety, breed and/or line identification, especially in conservation and improvement programs.

  6. Locus of control and home mortgage loan behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingji; Chen, Hong; Wang, Lei

    2008-04-01

    The present study investigated the impact of locus of control on home mortgage loan behaviours. The results showed that participants with stronger external control were more likely to purchase a lower priced home, have a lower ratio of mortgage loan amount to the total home value, and have a shorter term of mortgage loan. Moreover, among participants who have owned a home, those not using mortgage loans showed more external control than those using mortgage loans; among participants who have not owned a home but want to buy a home, those not planning to use mortgage loans showed more external control than those planning to use mortgage loans.

  7. Measurement of supernatural belief: sex differences and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Randall, T M; Desrosiers, M

    1980-10-01

    Although we live in an age dominated by science and technology, there exists an increasingly popular anti-science sentiment. This study describes the development of a scale to assess the degree of personal acceptance of supernatural causality versus acceptance of scientific explanation. In addition to the psychometric data concerning validity and reliability of the scale, data are presented which showed the personality factor of supernaturalism to be independent of orthodox religious attitudes. Results indicated a significantly greater supernatural acceptance for women, and a positive relation of supernaturalism with external locus of control.

  8. Platinum coat color locus in the deer mouse.

    PubMed

    Dodson, K M; Dawson, W D; Van Ooteghem, S O; Cushing, B S; Haigh, G R

    1987-01-01

    Platinum coat color in the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, is an autosomal recessive trait marking a locus, pt, distinct from silver (si), albino (c), blonde (bl), brown (b), and agouti (a). Platinum deer mice are conspicuously pale, with light ears and tail stripe. The pewter trait is allelic with and phenotypically identical to platinum, and represents an independent recurrence of this mutant. The rate of recoveries of coat color mutations from wild deer mice is consistent with available data for recurring mutation rates balanced by strong selection against the recessive phenotype.

  9. [Polymorphism of the DXS1062 locus in a Polish population].

    PubMed

    Cybulska, Lidia; Szczerkowska, Zofia

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a population study of a dinucleotide STR marker DXS1062. Blood samples were obtained from unrelated adult individuals (males and females) living in the northern part of Poland. In the analyzed population, 21 different phenotypes and 9 alleles of the DXS1062 locus were found. The alleles were sequenced and used for the construction of an allelic ladder. The nomenclature in accordance with ISFG guidelines was proposed. The most frequent alleles were 20 and 21. Statistical parameters (PR, PM, PD, PIC) showed that the examined system is useful in forensic medicine.

  10. Recent advances of flowering locus T gene in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Rong, Xiaofeng; Huang, Xiaohua; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2012-01-01

    Flowering Locus T (FT) can promote flowering in the plant photoperiod pathway and also facilitates vernalization flowering pathways and other ways to promote flowering. The expression of products of the FT gene is recognized as important parts of the flowering hormone and can induce flowering by long-distance transportation. In the present study, many FT-like genes were isolated, and the transgenic results show that FT gene can promote flowering in plants. This paper reviews the progress of the FT gene and its expression products to provide meaningful information for further studies of the functions of FT genes.

  11. Semiparametric approach to match probability calculations using single locus probes.

    PubMed

    Cao, R; Alemany, J; Cabrero, C; Carracedo, A; Díez, A; Valverde, E

    1996-01-01

    A semiparametric approach to match probability calculations using single locus probes has been developed and compared graphically with other standard methods by a one-sample simulation. The density functions obtained using this method are closer to the real distributions than those obtained by conventional approaches. Our method does not need to establish an arbitrary match threshold, which has been a source of problems in practical applications of standard methods. Moreover, it can be adjusted to any particular conditions by setting the experimental error and correlation of each laboratory. To assess the practical performance of this method we carried out a comparison experiment using a sample of 229 individuals analysed in duplicate.

  12. Role of health locus of control between uncertainty and uncertainty appraisal among patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Younhee

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of health locus of control in the model of uncertainty in illness among patients with atrial fibrillation. This study employed a descriptive, correlational survey. A total of 81 patients with atrial fibrillation were recruited from two large medical centers in the United States. Only the interaction term of uncertainty and internal health locus of control had a significant moderating effect on appraisal of danger. Greater internal health locus of control was associated with greater appraisal of danger at the given degree of uncertainty. Therefore, the internal health locus of control played a significant role in magnifying the relationship of uncertainty on appraisal of danger. However, health locus of control did not moderate the relationship between uncertainty and appraisal of opportunity. Finally, this study concluded that internal health locus of control had a moderating effect on the relationship between uncertainty and appraisal of danger.

  13. Factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale in Iranian infertile people.

    PubMed

    Maroufizadeh, Saman; Omani Samani, Reza; Amini, Payam; Navid, Behnaz

    2016-09-01

    This study examined psychometric properties of the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale among Iranian infertile patients. In all, 312 infertile patients completed the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the original three-factor model of Levenson's Locus of Control Scale was adequate ( χ(2)/ df = 2.139; goodness-of-fit index = 0.88; root mean square error of approximation = 0.061; and standardized root mean square residual = 0.076). The Cronbach's alpha of the subscales ranged from 0.56 to 0.67. The Levenson's Locus of Control Scale subscales significantly correlated with anxiety and depression, showing an acceptable convergent validity. In conclusion, the Levenson's Locus of Control Scale has adequate reliability and validity and can be used to measure locus of control orientation in Iranian infertile patients.

  14. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE.

    PubMed

    Zahodne, Laura B; Meyer, Oanh L; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L; Willis, Sherry L; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L; Rebok, George W; Parisi, Jeanine M

    2015-09-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training.

  15. A new and simple method to construct root locus of general fractional-order systems.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mukesh D; Vyawahare, Vishwesh A; Bhole, Manisha K

    2014-03-01

    Recently fractional-order (FO) differential equations are widely used in the areas of modeling and control. They are multivalued in nature hence their stability is defined using Riemann surfaces. The stability analysis of FO linear systems using the technique of Root Locus is the main focus of this paper. Procedure to plot root locus of FO systems in s-plane has been proposed by many authors, which are complicated, and analysis using these methods is also difficult and incomplete. In this paper, we have proposed a simple method of plotting root locus of FO systems. In the proposed method, the FO system is transformed into its integer-order counterpart and then root locus of this transformed system is plotted. It is shown with the help of examples that the root locus of this transformed system (which is obviously very easy to plot) has exactly the same shape and structure as the root locus of the original FO system. So stability of the FO system can be directly deduced and analyzed from the root locus of the transformed IO system. This proposed procedure of developing and analyzing the root locus of FO systems is much easier and straightforward than the existing methods suggested in the literature. This root locus plot is used to comment about the stability of FO system. It also gives the range for the amplifier gain k required to maintain this stability. The reliability of the method is verified with analytical calculations.

  16. Relationship of field dependence/independence with learning styles and locus of control among registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Murphy, P H

    1993-06-01

    This study investigated the relations among scores on field dependence/independence, learning styles, and locus of control for 199 Registered Nurses. Hypotheses were that nurses with higher scores on field independence would score higher on internal locus of control and nurses with scores on concrete learning styles would score higher on field independence and internal locus of control. The Group Embedded Figures Test, Learning Style Inventory, and the Internal-External Scale, and a demographic questionnaire were administered. Analysis showed that nurses were field dependent, used the Reflective Observation mode of learning, displayed abstract and active learning styles, and scored as internal on the measure of locus of control.

  17. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Meyer, Oanh L.; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L.; Willis, Sherry L.; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L.; Rebok, George W.; Parisi, Jeanine M.

    2015-01-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  18. Mox: a novel modifier of the tomato Xa locus.

    PubMed

    Peterson, P W; Yoder, J I

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated a novel mutation that caused variegated leaf color in a tomato plant which had multiple maize Ac transposable elements and the tomato Xa allele. Xa is a previously characterized semi-dominant mutation that causes tomato leaves to be bright yellow when heterozygous (Xa/xa+). The mutation responsible for the new phenotype was named Mox (Modifier of Xa). The Mox mutation modified the Xa/xa+ yellow leaf phenotype in two ways: it compensated for the Xa allele resulting in a plant with a wildtype green color, and it caused somatic variegation which appeared as white and yellow sectors on the green background. Somatic variegation was visible only if the plant contained both the Mox and Xa loci. Genetic studies indicated that the Mox locus was linked in repulsion to Xa and that the Mox locus was genetically transmitted at a reduced frequency through the male gamete. Molecular characterization of the Ac elements in lines segregating for Mox identified an Ac insertion that appeared to cosegregate with Mox variegation. We propose a model in which the Mox mutation consists of a duplication of the xa+ allele and subsequent Ac-induced breakage of the duplicated region causes variegation.

  19. A familial venous malformation locus is on chromosome 9p

    SciTech Connect

    Boon, L.M.; Mulliken, J.B.; Vikkula, M.

    1994-09-01

    Venous malformation is the most common vascular malformation affecting 0.2% of the population. Depending upon size and location, these slow-flow lesions may cause pain, anatomic distortion and threaten life. Most venous malformations occur sporadically and present as solitary lesions. For this reason, determining their pathogenic bases has proven elusive. However, venous malformations also occur in several rare syndromes, some of which demonstrate Mendelian inheritance. As a first step towards identifying the pathogenic bases for these lesions, we have mapped a locus for an autosomal dominant disorder in a three generation family that manifests as multiple cutaneous and mucosal venous malformations. This locus lies within a 24.5 cM interval on chromosome 9p, defined by the markers D9S157 and D9S163. A maximum LOD score of 4.11 at {theta} = 0.05 is obtained with several markers within the interval. The interferon gene cluster, which has previously been implicated in angiogenesis, and the multiple tumor suppressor gene, responsible for several types of malignant tumors, also lie within this interval and are potential candidates.

  20. Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) immunoglobulin heavy chain locus description.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo-Yun; Mate, Suzanne; Garcia, Karla; Ward, Michael D; Brueggemann, Ernst; Hall, Matthew; Kenny, Tara; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have become an important animal model for biomedical research. In particular, it is the animal model of choice for the development of vaccine candidates associated with emerging dangerous pathogens. Despite their increasing importance as animal models, the cynomolgus macaque genome is not fully characterized, hindering molecular studies for this model. More importantly, the lack of knowledge about the immunoglobulin (IG) locus organization directly impacts the analysis of the humoral response in cynomolgus macaques. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to analyze IG repertoires open the opportunity to deeply characterize the humoral immune response. However, the IG locus organization for the animal is required to completely dissect IG repertoires. Here, we describe the localization and organization of the rearranging IG heavy (IGH) genes on chromosome 7 of the cynomolgus macaque draft genome. Our annotation comprises 108 functional genes which include 63 variable (IGHV), 38 diversity (IGHD), and 7 joining (IGHJ) genes. For validation, we provide RNA transcript data for most of the IGHV genes and all of the annotated IGHJ genes, as well as proteomic data to validate IGH constant genes. The description and annotation of the rearranging IGH genes for the cynomolgus macaques will significantly facilitate scientific research. This is particularly relevant to dissect the immune response during vaccination or infection with dangerous pathogens such as Ebola, Marburg and other emerging pathogens where non-human primate models play a significant role for countermeasure development.

  1. Drosophila histone locus bodies form by hierarchical recruitment of components

    PubMed Central

    White, Anne E.; Burch, Brandon D.; Yang, Xiao-cui; Gasdaska, Pamela Y.; Dominski, Zbigniew; Marzluff, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are protein- and RNA-containing structures that participate in a wide range of processes critical to genome function. Molecular self-organization is thought to drive nuclear body formation, but whether this occurs stochastically or via an ordered, hierarchical process is not fully understood. We addressed this question using RNAi and proteomic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify and characterize novel components of the histone locus body (HLB), a nuclear body involved in the expression of replication-dependent histone genes. We identified the transcription elongation factor suppressor of Ty 6 (Spt6) and a homologue of mammalian nuclear protein of the ataxia telangiectasia–mutated locus that is encoded by the homeotic gene multisex combs (mxc) as novel HLB components. By combining genetic manipulation in both cell culture and embryos with cytological observations of Mxc, Spt6, and the known HLB components, FLICE-associated huge protein, Mute, U7 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, and MPM-2 phosphoepitope, we demonstrated sequential recruitment and hierarchical dependency for localization of factors to HLBs during development, suggesting that ordered assembly can play a role in nuclear body formation. PMID:21576393

  2. The locus for bovine dilated cardiomyopathy maps to chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Guziewicz, K E; Owczarek-Lipska, M; Küffer, J; Schelling, C; Tontis, A; Denis, C; Eggen, A; Leeb, T; Dolf, G; Braunschweig, M H

    2007-06-01

    Bovine dilated cardiomyopathy (BDCMP) is a severe and terminal disease of the heart muscle observed in Holstein-Friesian cattle over the last 30 years. There is strong evidence for an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for BDCMP. The objective of this study was to genetically map BDCMP, with the ultimate goal of identifying the causative mutation. A whole-genome scan using 199 microsatellite markers and one SNP revealed an assignment of BDCMP to BTA18. Fine-mapping on BTA18 refined the candidate region to the MSBDCMP06-BMS2785 interval. The interval containing the BDCMP locus was confirmed by multipoint linkage analysis using the software loki. The interval is about 6.7 Mb on the bovine genome sequence (Btau 3.1). The corresponding region of HSA19 is very gene-rich and contains roughly 200 genes. Although telomeric of the marker interval, TNNI3 is a possible positional and a functional candidate for BDCMP given its involvement in a human form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Sequence analysis of TNNI3 in cattle revealed no mutation in the coding sequence, but there was a G-to-A transition in intron 6 (AJ842179:c.378+315G>A). The analysis of this SNP using the study's BDCMP pedigree did not conclusively exclude TNNI3 as a candidate gene for BDCMP. Considering the high density of genes on the homologous region of HSA19, further refinement of the interval on BTA18 containing the BDCMP locus is needed.

  3. Locus equations and coarticulation in three Australian languages.

    PubMed

    Graetzer, Simone; Fletcher, Janet; Hajek, John

    2015-02-01

    Locus equations were applied to F2 data for bilabial, alveolar, retroflex, palatal, and velar plosives in three Australian languages. In addition, F2 variance at the vowel-consonant boundary, and, by extension, consonantal coarticulatory sensitivity, was measured. The locus equation slopes revealed that there were place-dependent differences in the magnitude of vowel-to-consonant coarticulation. As in previous studies, the non-coronal (bilabial and velar) consonants tended to be associated with the highest slopes, palatal consonants tended to be associated with the lowest slopes, and alveolar and retroflex slopes tended to be low to intermediate. Similarly, F2 variance measurements indicated that non-coronals displayed greater coarticulatory sensitivity to adjacent vowels than did coronals. Thus, both the magnitude of vowel-to-consonant coarticulation and the magnitude of consonantal coarticulatory sensitivity were seen to vary inversely with the magnitude of consonantal articulatory constraint. The findings indicated that, unlike results reported previously for European languages such as English, anticipatory vowel-to-consonant coarticulation tends to exceed carryover coarticulation in these Australian languages. Accordingly, on the F2 variance measure, consonants tended to be more sensitive to the coarticulatory effects of the following vowel. Prosodic prominence of vowels was a less significant factor in general, although certain language-specific patterns were observed.

  4. The Locus analytical framework for indoor localization and tracking applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segou, Olga E.; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2015-05-01

    Obtaining location information can be of paramount importance in the context of pervasive and context-aware computing applications. Many systems have been proposed to date, e.g. GPS that has been proven to offer satisfying results in outdoor areas. The increased effect of large and small scale fading in indoor environments, however, makes localization a challenge. This is particularly reflected in the multitude of different systems that have been proposed in the context of indoor localization (e.g. RADAR, Cricket etc). The performance of such systems is often validated on vastly different test beds and conditions, making performance comparisons difficult and often irrelevant. The Locus analytical framework incorporates algorithms from multiple disciplines such as channel modeling, non-uniform random number generation, computational geometry, localization, tracking and probabilistic modeling etc. in order to provide: (a) fast and accurate signal propagation simulation, (b) fast experimentation with localization and tracking algorithms and (c) an in-depth analysis methodology for estimating the performance limits of any Received Signal Strength localization system. Simulation results for the well-known Fingerprinting and Trilateration algorithms are herein presented and validated with experimental data collected in real conditions using IEEE 802.15.4 ZigBee modules. The analysis shows that the Locus framework accurately predicts the underlying distribution of the localization error and produces further estimates of the system's performance limitations (in a best-case/worst-case scenario basis).

  5. Thought recognition, locus of control, and adolescent well-being.

    PubMed

    Kelley, T M; Stack, S A

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the underlying assumptions and principles of a new psychological paradigm, Psychology of Mind/Health Realization (POM/HR). A core concept of POM/HR, thought recognition, is then compared with locus of control (LOC), a well-known psychological construct. Next, the relationship of LOC to self-reported happiness and satisfaction is examined from the perspective of POM/HR, using a sample of 1,872 at-risk adolescents from 17 nations. The findings support POM/HR predictions that (1) locus of control would account for a slight portion of the variance in adolescent happiness and satisfaction, (2) circumstances that are external in nature would account for additional variance in happiness and satisfaction, and (3) there would be little difference in self-reported happiness and satisfaction between adolescents self-reporting high and low internal LOC. Further, it was conjectured that the adolescents mistook superficial emotions, such as excitement and security, for genuine feelings of well-being. Finally, the implications for prevention and intervention efforts with at-risk adolescents are discussed.

  6. Single locus complementary sex determination in Hymenoptera: an "unintelligent" design?

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Ellen; Driessen, Gerard; Beukeboom, Leo W

    2006-01-01

    The haplodiploid sex determining mechanism in Hymenoptera (males are haploid, females are diploid) has played an important role in the evolution of this insect order. In Hymenoptera sex is usually determined by a single locus, heterozygotes are female and hemizygotes are male. Under inbreeding, homozygous diploid and sterile males occur which form a genetic burden for a population. We review life history and genetical traits that may overcome the disadvantages of single locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD). Behavioural adaptations to avoid matings between relatives include active dispersal from natal patches and mating preferences for non-relatives. In non-social species, temporal and spatial segregation of male and female offspring reduces the burden of sl-CSD. In social species, diploid males are produced at the expense of workers and female reproductives. In some social species, diploid males and diploid male producing queens are killed by workers. Diploid male production may have played a role in the evolution or maintenance of polygyny (multiple queens) and polyandry (multiple mating). Some forms of thelytoky (parthenogenetic female production) increase homozygosity and are therefore incompatible with sl-CSD. We discuss a number of hypothetical adaptations to sl-CSD which should be considered in future studies of this insect order. PMID:16393347

  7. A novel locus for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongzhong; Yang, Zhenglin; Meyer, J Jay; McInnes, Allen W; Xue, Lai; Azimi, Asif M; Baird, Jenn; Zhao, Yu; Pearson, Erik; Wang, Changguan; Chen, Yali; Zhang, Kang

    2006-07-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most prevalent group of inherited retinopathies and demonstrates considerable clinical and genetic heterogeneity, with wide variations in disease severity, progression, and gene involvement. We studied a large family with RP to determine the pattern of inheritance and to identify the disease-causing gene/locus. Ophthalmic examination was performed on 35 family members to identify affected individuals and carriers and to characterise the disease phenotype. Genetic linkage analysis was performed using short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphic markers encompassing the known loci for Xlinked RP (xlRP) including RP2, RP3, RP6, RP23, and RP24. Mutation screening was performed by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA of the RP2 and RPGR genes of the affected individuals. A highly penetrant, X-linked form of RP was observed in this family. Age of onset was from 5 to 8 years and visual acuity ranged from 20/25 in children to light perception in older adults. Linkage analysis and direct sequencing showed that no known loci/genes were associated with the phenotype in this kindred. A novel disease gene locus/loci is responsible for the xlRP phenotype in this family.

  8. Histamine excites noradrenergic neurons in locus coeruleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Korotkova, Tatiana M; Sergeeva, Olga A; Ponomarenko, Alexei A; Haas, Helmut L

    2005-07-01

    Histamine is implicated in the control of many brain functions, in particular the control of arousal. Histaminergic neurons send dense projections through the entire brain, including the locus coeruleus (LC)--the main noradrenergic (NAergic) nucleus. In this study, we have examined the effect of bath-applied histamine on cells in the LC by single-unit recordings in slices and the expression of histamine receptors in this area by single-cell RT-PCR. Histamine (10 microM) increased the firing of NAergic cells to 130+/-9% of control, 100 microM to 256+/-58% of control. This excitation was unaffected by blocking synaptic transmission. Histamine-mediated excitation was blocked by an H1 receptor antagonist, mepyramine, in 78% of cells and by cimetidine, an H2 receptor antagonist, in 42% of cells, but not by the H3 receptor antagonist, thioperamide. RT-PCR revealed that mRNA for the H1 receptor was expressed in 77% of isolated LC neurons, mRNA for the H2 receptor in 41% of LC neurons and H3 receptors in 29%. These findings underline the coordination between aminergic systems and suggest that the arousal induced by the histamine system could involve excitation of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus.

  9. [Locus of control in girls with anorexia readiness syndrome].

    PubMed

    Jaros, Katarzyna; Oszwa, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research was to indicate whether there are differences between locus of control (LOC) in girls with anorexia readiness syndrome (ARS) and without this syndrome. There was also a question about the relationship between LOC and the tendency to respond in incorrect attitudes towards food, eating and their bodies under stress. The sample consisted of girls aged 13-18 years randomly selected from five public Polish middle and high schools. Tools: 1) Eating Attitudes Questionnaire (EAQ) by B. Ziółkowska; 2) Locus of Control Questionnaire (LOCQ) by G. Krasowicz, A. Kurzyp-Wojnarska, to assess LOC of the subjects. The criterion group (N=23) was formed by girls who received high score in EAQ (signs of ARS) in the first stage of research (N=189). The control group (N = 23) were girls who received a low score in EAQ (no signs of ARS). Subjects with ARS were characterized by more external LOC than girls without any signs of this syndrome (t = -2.898; p < 0.01). The results did not confirm the hypothesis about the relationship between LOC and the tendency to respond by abnormal attitude to eating and own body in difficult situations in both groups. In pathogenesis of ARS where anorexic behaviors can become a way to a regain lost control, LOC may play a role as a mediating variable rather than a direct determinant of this syndrome.

  10. Role of Oculoproprioception in Coding the Locus of Attention.

    PubMed

    Odoj, Bartholomaeus; Balslev, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    The most common neural representations for spatial attention encode locations retinotopically, relative to center of gaze. To keep track of visual objects across saccades or to orient toward sounds, retinotopic representations must be combined with information about the rotation of one's own eyes in the orbits. Although gaze input is critical for a correct allocation of attention, the source of this input has so far remained unidentified. Two main signals are available: corollary discharge (copy of oculomotor command) and oculoproprioception (feedback from extraocular muscles). Here we asked whether the oculoproprioceptive signal relayed from the somatosensory cortex contributes to coding the locus of attention. We used continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) over a human oculoproprioceptive area in the postcentral gyrus (S1EYE). S1EYE-cTBS reduces proprioceptive processing, causing ∼1° underestimation of gaze angle. Participants discriminated visual targets whose location was cued in a nonvisual modality. Throughout the visual space, S1EYE-cTBS shifted the locus of attention away from the cue by ∼1°, in the same direction and by the same magnitude as the oculoproprioceptive bias. This systematic shift cannot be attributed to visual mislocalization. Accuracy of open-loop pointing to the same visual targets, a function thought to rely mainly on the corollary discharge, was unchanged. We argue that oculoproprioception is selective for attention maps. By identifying a potential substrate for the coupling between eye and attention, this study contributes to the theoretical models for spatial attention.

  11. Novel Locus FER Is Associated With Serum HMW Adiponectin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lu; Menzaghi, Claudia; Salvemini, Lucia; De Bonis, Concetta; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Hu, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE High molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin is a predominant isoform of circulating adiponectin and has been related to type 2 diabetes. Previous linkage studies suggest that different genetic components might be involved in determining HMW and total adiponectin levels. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of serum HMW adiponectin levels in individuals of European ancestry drawn from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) (N = 1,591). The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the GWAS analysis were replicated in an independent cohort of Europeans (N = 626). We examined the associations of the identified variations with diabetes risk and metabolic syndrome. RESULTS We identified a novel locus near the FER gene (5q21) at a genome-wide significance level, best represented by SNP rs10447248 (P = 4.69 × 10−8). We also confirmed that variations near the adiponectin-encoding ADIPOQ locus (3q27) were related to serum HMW adiponectin levels. In addition, we found that FER SNP rs10447248 was related to HDL cholesterol levels (P = 0.009); ADIPOQ variation was associated with fasting glucose (P = 0.04), HDL cholesterol (P = 0.04), and a metabolic syndrome score (P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that different loci may be involved in regulation of circulating HMW adiponectin levels and provide novel insight into the mechanisms that affect HMW adiponectin homeostasis. PMID:21700879

  12. Synaptic potentials in locus coeruleus neurons in brain slices.

    PubMed

    Williams, J T; Bobker, D H; Harris, G C

    1991-01-01

    Neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC) fire action potentials spontaneously in vitro in the absence of any stimulation. This spontaneous activity is thought to arise from intrinsic membrane properties that include a balance between at least two ion conductances. One is a persistent inward sodium current that is active near the threshold for action potential generation. The second is a calcium-dependent potassium current that is activated following the entry of calcium during the action potential, is responsible for the after-hyperpolarization following the action potential, and decays over a period of 1-2 sec following the action potential. The spontaneous activity of LC neurons can be altered by both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. One excitatory input has been described that is mediated by glutamate receptors of both the non-NMDA and NMDA subtypes. Inhibitory synaptic potentials include those mediated by GABA (acting on GABAA-receptors), glycine (acting on a strychnine-sensitive receptor) and noradrenaline (acting on alpha 2-adrenoceptors). The presence of synaptic potentials mediated by these transmitters, studied in vitro, correlate with studies made in vivo and with histochemical identification of synaptic inputs to the locus coeruleus.

  13. Evidence for locus heterogeneity in human autosomal dominant split hand/split foot malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.P.; Palmer, S.E.; Wijsman, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    Split hand/split foot (SHSF, also known as ectrodactyly) is a human developmental disorder characterized by absent central rays and other distal limb malformations. Physical mapping of SHSF-associated chromosomal rearrangements has provided compelling evidence for the location of a causative gene locus (designated SHFD1) on chromosome 7 within q21.3-q22.1. In the present study, marker loci were localized to the SHFD1 critical region through the analysis of somatic cell hybrids derived from individuals with SHSF and cytogenetic abnormalities involving the 7q21.3q22.1 region. Combined genetic and physical data suggest that the order of markers in the SHFD1 critical region is cen - D7S492 - COL1A2 - D7S527 - D7S479 - D7S491 - SHFD1 - D7S554 - ASNS - D7S518 -qter. Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at several of these loci were used to test for linkage of SHSF to this region in a large pedigree that demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance of this disorder. Strong evidence against linkage of SHSF to the SHFD1 critical region was obtained, and the gene responsible for the SHSF phenotype in this pedigree was excluded from a 10 cM interval spanning the entire SHFD1 critical region. Evidence of exclusion to the SHFD1 critical region was also observed in five additional families. Thus, combined molecular and genetic data provide evidence for locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant SHSF, implying that mutations in at least two separate autosomal genes can result in this distinctive human developmental disorder.

  14. Discordant Haplotype Sequencing Identifies Functional Variants at the 2q33 Breast Cancer Risk Locus.

    PubMed

    Camp, Nicola J; Lin, Wei-Yu; Bigelow, Alex; Burghel, George J; Mosbruger, Timothy L; Parry, Marina A; Waller, Rosalie G; Rigas, Sushilaben H; Tai, Pei-Yi; Berrett, Kristofer; Rajamanickam, Venkatesh; Cosby, Rachel; Brock, Ian W; Jones, Brandt; Connley, Dan; Sargent, Robert; Wang, Guoying; Factor, Rachel E; Bernard, Philip S; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Knight, Stacey; Abo, Ryan; Werner, Theresa L; Reed, Malcolm W R; Gertz, Jason; Cox, Angela

    2016-04-01

    The findings from genome-wide association studies hold enormous potential for novel insight into disease mechanisms. A major challenge in the field is to map these low-risk association signals to their underlying functional sequence variants (FSV). Simple sequence study designs are insufficient, as the vast numbers of statistically comparable variants and a limited knowledge of noncoding regulatory elements complicate prioritization. Furthermore, large sample sizes are typically required for adequate power to identify the initial association signals. One important question is whether similar sample sizes need to be sequenced to identify the FSVs. Here, we present a proof-of-principle example of an extreme discordant design to map FSVs within the 2q33 low-risk breast cancer locus. Our approach employed DNA sequencing of a small number of discordant haplotypes to efficiently identify candidate FSVs. Our results were consistent with those from a 2,000-fold larger, traditional imputation-based fine-mapping study. To prioritize further, we used expression-quantitative trait locus analysis of RNA sequencing from breast tissues, gene regulation annotations from the ENCODE consortium, and functional assays for differential enhancer activities. Notably, we implicate three regulatory variants at 2q33 that target CASP8 (rs3769823, rs3769821 in CASP8, and rs10197246 in ALS2CR12) as functionally relevant. We conclude that nested discordant haplotype sequencing is a promising approach to aid mapping of low-risk association loci. The ability to include more efficient sequencing designs into mapping efforts presents an opportunity for the field to capitalize on the potential of association loci and accelerate translation of association signals to their underlying FSVs. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1916-25. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Role of the Eikenella corrodens pilA Locus in Pilus Function and Phase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Maria T.; Hirschberg, Rona L.; Schaefer, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    The human pathogen Eikenella corrodens expresses type IV pili and exhibits a phase variation involving the irreversible transition from piliated to nonpiliated variants. On solid medium, piliated variants form small (S-phase), corroding colonies whereas nonpiliated variants form large (L-phase), noncorroding colonies. We are studying pilus structure and function in the clinical isolate E. corrodens VA1. Earlier work defined the pilA locus which includes pilA1, pilA2, pilB, and hagA. Both pilA1 and pilA2 predict a type IV pilin, whereas pilB predicts a putative pilus assembly protein. The role of hagA has not been clearly established. That work also confirmed that pilA1 encodes the major pilus protein in this strain and showed that the phase variation involves a posttranslational event in pilus formation. In this study, the function of the individual genes comprising the pilA locus was examined using a recently developed protocol for targeted interposon mutagenesis of S-phase variant VA1-S1. Different pilA mutants were compared to S-phase and L-phase variants for several distinct aspects of phase variation and type IV pilus biosynthesis and function. S-phase cells were characterized by surface pili, competence for natural transformation, and twitching motility, whereas L-phase cells lacked these features. Inactivation of pilA1 yielded a mutant that was phenotypically indistinguishable from L-phase variants, showing that native biosynthesis of the type IV pilus in strain VA1 is dependent on expression of pilA1 and proper export and assembly of PilA1. Inactivation of pilA2 yielded a mutant that was phenotypically indistinguishable from S-phase variants, indicating that pilA2 is not essential for biosynthesis of functionally normal pili. A mutant inactivated for pilB was deficient for twitching motility, suggesting a role for PilB in this pilus-related phenomenon. Inactivation of hagA, which may encode a tellurite resistance protein, had no effect on pilus structure or

  16. Are there gender differences in locus of control specific to alcohol dependence?

    PubMed

    McPherson, Andrew; Martin, Colin R

    2017-01-01

    To investigate gender differences in locus of control in an alcohol-dependent population. Locus of control helps to explain behaviour in terms of internal (the individual is responsible) or external (outside forces, such as significant other people or chance, are responsible) elements. Past research on gender differences in locus of control in relation to alcohol dependence has shown mixed results. There is a need then to examine gender and locus of control in relation to alcohol dependence to ascertain the veracity of any locus of control differences as a function of gender. The Multidimensional Health Locus of Control form-C was administered to clients from alcohol dependence treatment centres in the West of Scotland. Independent t-tests were carried out to assess gender differences in alcohol dependence severity and internal/external aspects of locus of control. One hundred and eighty-eight (53% females) participants were recruited from a variety of alcohol dependence treatment centres. The majority of participants (72%) came from Alcoholics Anonymous groups. Women revealed a greater internal locus of control compared with men. Women also had a greater 'significant others' locus of control score than men. Men were more reliant on 'chance' and 'doctors' than women. All these trends were not, however, statistically significant. Gender differences in relation to locus of control and alcohol dependence from past studies are ambiguous. This study also found no clear statistically significant differences in locus of control orientation as a function of gender. This article helps nurses to contextualise health behaviours as a result of internal or external forces. It also helps nursing staff to better understand alcohol dependence treatment in relation to self-efficacy and control. Moreover, it highlights an important concept in health education theory. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Locus of control and pain: Validity of the Form C of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales when used with adolescents.

    PubMed

    Castarlenas, Elena; Solé, Ester; Racine, Mélanie; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Elisabet; Jensen, Mark P; Miró, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Form C of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales in adolescents. A confirmatory factor analysis indicated that adequate fit of a four-factor model and the internal consistency of the scales were adequate. Criterion validity of the four scales of the Form C of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control was also supported by significant correlations with measures of pain-related self-efficacy, anxiety, and coping strategies. The results indicate that the four Form C of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scale scores are reliable and valid and therefore support their use to assess pain-related locus of control beliefs in adolescents.

  18. Hitch-hiking to a locus under balancing selection: high sequence diversity and low population subdivision at the S-locus genomic region in Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Maria Valeria; Jacquemin, Bertrand; Castric, Vincent; Vekemans, Xavier

    2008-02-01

    Hitch-hiking to a site under balancing selection is expected to produce a local increase in nucleotide polymorphism and a decrease in population differentiation compared with the background genomic level, but empirical evidence supporting these predictions is scarce. We surveyed molecular diversity at four genes flanking the region controlling self-incompatibility (the S-locus) in samples from six populations of the herbaceous plant Arabidopsis halleri, and compared their polymorphism with sequences from five control genes unlinked to the S-locus. As a preliminary verification, the S-locus flanking genes were shown to co-segregate with SRK, the gene involved in the self-incompatibility reaction at the pistil level. In agreement with theory, our results demonstrated a significant peak of nucleotide diversity around the S-locus as well as a significant decrease in population genetic structure in the S-locus region compared with both control genes and a set of seven unlinked microsatellite markers. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that balancing selection is increasing the effective migration rate in subdivided populations. Although only four S-locus flanking genes were investigated, our results suggest that these two signatures of the hitch-hiking effect are localized in a very narrow genomic region.

  19. Relationship of Personality and Locus of Control With Employment Outcomes among Participants with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.; Broderick, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    We investigated relationships among personality, locus of control, and current post-injury employment status for 1,391 participants with spinal cord injury. Participants with higher internality locus-of-control scores and activity scores (personality) reported more favorable employment outcomes. Higher scores on chance and powerful others (locus…

  20. A Study to Investigate the Relationship between Locus of Control and Academic Achievement of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed; Aijaz, Rukhma

    2014-01-01

    Motivation is regarded as the alpha and omega of learning. It is the heart of teaching learning process. Motivation is defined as an internal state that arouses, directs, and maintains the behavior over time. Thus motivation is the pivotal component of learning and locus of control which is one of the important factors it stems from. Locus of…

  1. Social Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control, and Internet Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iskender, Murat; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of internet addiction, social self-efficacy, and academic locus of control. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Social Self-efficacy Scale. The…

  2. Birth order and locus of control revisited: sex of siblings as a moderating factor.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Brian M

    2005-10-01

    Rotter's Locus of Control scale was administered to 64 first-born and 157 other undergraduate students, and data on the sex of participants' siblings were also obtained. The sex of participants' siblings was significantly correlated with locus of control among first-borns but not among other participants.

  3. Self Esteem, Locus of Control and Multidimensional Perfectionism as the Predictors of Subjective Well Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karatas, Zeynep; Tagay, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a relationship between self-esteem, locus of control and multidimensional perfectionism, and the extent to which the variables of self-esteem, locus of control and multidimensional perfectionism contribute to the prediction of subjective well-being. The study was carried out with 318 final…

  4. Recurrence risks for Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Implications of locus heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Julie C.; Nishimura, Darryl; Johnston, Jennifer J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Héon, Elise; Sheffield, Val C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a pleiotropic multiple anomaly syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. It is now known that this disorder has locus heterogeneity, with causative mutations identified in as many as 14 genes. The aim of this study was to derive locus-specific recurrence risk estimates for family members of a proband affected with BBS. Methods Mutation data from 187 probands affected with BBS were used. The authors counted the relative proportion of families with mutations at each of ten loci and estimated locus-specific carrier rates for mutations using Hardy-Weinberg principles and an aggregate population frequency of 1/100,000 for the phenotype. Locus-specific recurrence risks were calculated for relatives of an affected proband. Results Locus-specific carrier frequencies range from 1/250 to 1/2200, and the risks for an offspring of the sibling of an affected individual range from 1/1,500 to 1/13,000. The estimate of this risk derived under a locus homogeneity model is 1/960. Conclusion Variation of recurrence risks of this magnitude may have implications for genetic counseling of families with affected individuals, in particular about prenatal testing and other reproductive options. Similar analyses to determine locus-specific carrier frequencies for other phenotypes with significant locus heterogeneity may yield similarly relevant results. PMID:20949666

  5. Recurrence risks for Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Implications of locus heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Sapp, Julie C; Nishimura, Darryl; Johnston, Jennifer J; Stone, Edwin M; Héon, Elise; Sheffield, Val C; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2010-10-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a pleiotropic multiple anomaly syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. It is now known that this disorder has locus heterogeneity, with causative mutations identified in as many as 14 genes. The aim of this study was to derive locus-specific recurrence risk estimates for family members of a proband affected with Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Mutation data from 187 probands affected with Bardet-Biedl syndrome were used. The authors counted the relative proportion of families with mutations at each of 10 loci and estimated locus-specific carrier rates for mutations using Hardy-Weinberg principles and an aggregate population frequency of 1/100,000 for the phenotype. Locus-specific recurrence risks were calculated for relatives of an affected proband. Locus-specific carrier frequencies range from 1/250 to 1/2200, and the risks for an offspring of the sibling of an affected individual range from 1/1,500 to 1/13,000. The estimate of this risk derived under a locus homogeneity model is 1/960. Variation of recurrence risks of this magnitude may have implications for genetic counseling of families with affected individuals, in particular about prenatal testing and other reproductive options. Similar analyses to determine locus-specific carrier frequencies for other phenotypes with significant locus heterogeneity may yield similarly relevant results.

  6. The Effect of Locus of Control on Message Acceptance and Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Catherine A.; Singh, Surendra

    Locus of control is a personality trait that influences human behavior in many situations. Internal-external control reactions to a persuasive message and the recall of the message were examined in two studies. In the first study, 35 undergraduate students' locus of control was measured using Duttweiler's Internal Control Measure. On the basis of…

  7. Criterion-Related Validity of the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale with Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, Gary D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated the relationships between student locus of control and academic achievement in grades five through eight. The Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale (NSLOCS) was used to measure motivation, and the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) to assess academic achievement. Results indicated moderate inverse relationships between level of…

  8. Locus of Semantic Interference in Picture Naming: Evidence from Dual-Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piai, Vitória; Roelofs, Ardi; Schriefers, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Disagreement exists regarding the functional locus of semantic interference of distractor words in picture naming. This effect is a cornerstone of modern psycholinguistic models of word production, which assume that it arises in lexical response-selection. However, recent evidence from studies of dual-task performance suggests a locus in…

  9. Relationships between Psychological Androgyny, Social Conformity, and Perceived Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehony, Kathleen A.; Geller, E. Scott

    1981-01-01

    Compared the decisions and attitudes of sex-stereotyped and androgynous individuals in a social conformity paradigm and on two measures of locus of control. Stereotypic females conformed significantly more often than androgynous females and stereotypic males. Androgynous females were more internal in locus of control than stereotypic females.…

  10. Predictors of Parental Locus of Control in Mothers of Pre- and Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, Rachel D.; Tompson, Martha C.

    2011-01-01

    Parental locus of control refers to parents' perceived power and efficacy in child-rearing situations. This study explored parental locus of control and its correlates in 160 mothers of children ages 8 to 14 cross-sectionally and 1 year later. Maternal depression, maternal expressed emotion, and child internalizing and externalizing behavior were…

  11. Identification of heat resistant Escherichia coli by qPCR for the locus of heat resistance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Angela; Chui, Linda

    2017-02-01

    Three qPCR assays targeting the locus of heat resistance to identify heat resistant clinical Escherichia coli isolates are described. Of 613 isolates, 3 (0.5%) possessed the locus. The assays are a rapid, highly sensitive and specific alternative to screening by heat shock and can be used in food safety surveillance.

  12. A locus necessary for the transport and catabolism of erythritol in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Barney A; Pickering, Brad S; Poysti, Nathan J; Collins, Heather; Yudistira, Harry; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2010-10-01

    In this work we have genetically defined an erythritol utilization locus in Sinorhizobium meliloti. A cosmid containing the locus was isolated by complementation of a transposon mutant and was subsequently mutagenized using Tn5 : : B20. The locus was found to consist of five transcriptional units, each of which was necessary for the utilization of erythritol. Genetic complementation experiments using genes putatively annotated as erythritol catabolic genes clearly showed that, of the 17 genes at this locus, six genes are not necessary for the utilization of erythritol as a sole carbon source. The remaining genes encode EryA, EryB, EryC and TpiB as well as an uncharacterized ABC-type transporter. Transport experiments using labelled erythritol showed that components of the ABC transporter are necessary for the uptake of erythritol. The locus also contains two regulators: EryD, a SorC class regulator, and SMc01615, a DeoR class regulator. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that each of these regulators negatively regulates its own transcription. In addition, induction of the erythritol locus was dependent upon EryD and a product of erythritol catabolism. Further characterization of polar mutations revealed that in addition to erythritol, the locus contains determinants for adonitol and l-arabitol utilization. The context of the mutations suggests that the locus is important for both the transport and catabolism of adonitol and l-arabitol.

  13. Health Locus of Control and Preventive Behaviour among Students of Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spahn, Claudia; Burger, Thorsten; Hildebrandt, Horst; Seidenglanz, Karin

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated health locus of control, preventive behaviour and previous playing-related health problems of music students; 326 students of music (58% female, mean age 22 years) filled in the Locus of Control Inventory for Illness and Health (Lohaus and Schmitt, 1989) and the Epidemiological Questionnaire for Musicians (Spahn,…

  14. An Examination of Locus of Control, Epistemological Beliefs and Metacognitive Awareness in Preservice Early Childhood Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedel, Emine Ferda

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to explore the locus of control, epistemological beliefs and metacognitive awareness levels of preservice early childhood education teachers and to determine the interrelations among these variables. 206 teacher candidates have been asked to fill out Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale, Central Epistemological Beliefs…

  15. On the relevance of locus equations for production and perception of stop consonants.

    PubMed

    Brancazio, L; Fowler, C A

    1998-01-01

    We examined the possible relevance of locus equations to human production and perception of stop consonants. The orderly output constraint (OOC) of Sussman, Fruchter, and Cable (1995) claims that humans have evolved to produce speech such that F2 at consonant release and F2 at vowel midpoint are linearly related for consonants so that developing perceptual systems can form representations in an F2ons-by-F2vowel space. The theory claims that this relationship described by locus equations can distinguish consonants, and that the linearity of locus equations is captured in neural representations and is thus perceptually relevant. We investigated these claims by testing how closely locus equations reflect the production and perception of stop consonants. In Experiment 1, we induced speakers to change their locus equation slope and intercept parameters systematically, but found that consonants remained distinctive in slope-by-intercept space. In Experiment 2, we presented stop-consonant syllables with their bursts removed to listeners, and compared their classification error matrices with the predictions of a model using locus equation prototypes and with those of an exemplar-based model that uses F2ons and F2vowel, but not locus equations. Both models failed to account for a large proportion of the variance in listeners' responses; the locus equation model was no better in its predictions than the exemplar model. These findings are discussed in the context of the OOC.

  16. Student Locus of Control and Response to Expectations About Self and Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Robert S.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Undergraduate subjects with either an internal or external locus of control were used to investigate the relationship between locus of control and responsiveness to expectations regarding their own and their teacher's competence. As predicted, internal subjects were more receptive to the expectation regarding self than external subjects.…

  17. Locus of Control, Attributional Style and Discipline Problems in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tony, Tam Shui Kee

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a study hypothesizing that school discipline problems are a maladaptive response to the demand of the school environment as a result of deficits in the area of locus of control and attributional style. The findings indicate that an external orientation of locus of control and a passive pattern of attribution…

  18. Perception of Environmental Risk Related to Gender, Community Socioeconomic Setting, Age, and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riechard, Donald E.; Peterson, Sandra J.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how students' perception of risk for 20 environmental hazards are related to gender, community socioeconomic setting, age, and locus of control. The sample was drawn from a large metropolitan area in the southeast. Females had significantly higher risk-perception scores than males. Participants with an internal locus of control posted the…

  19. Evolution and homoplasy at the bem6 microsatellite locus in three Bemisia tabaci cryptic species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The evolution of individual microsatellite loci is often complex and homoplasy is common but often goes undetected. Sequencing alleles at a microsatellite locus can provide a more complete picture of the common evolutionary mechanisms occurring at that locus and can reveal cases of homoplasy. Within...

  20. Locus ceruleus neurons in people with autism contain no histochemically-detectable mercury.

    PubMed

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to environmental mercury has been proposed to play a part in autism. Mercury is selectively taken up by the human locus ceruleus, a region of the brain that has been implicated in autism. We therefore looked for the presence of mercury in the locus ceruleus of people who had autism, using the histochemical technique of autometallography which can detect nanogram amounts of mercury in tissues. In addition, we sought evidence of damage to locus ceruleus neurons in autism by immunostaining for hyperphosphorylated tau. No mercury was found in any neurons of the locus ceruleus of 6 individuals with autism (5 male, 1 female, age range 16-48 years). Mercury was present in locus ceruleus neurons in 7 of 11 (64%) age-matched control individuals who did not have autism, which is significantly more than in individuals with autism. No increase in numbers of locus ceruleus neurons containing hyperphosphorylated tau was detected in people with autism. In conclusion, most people with autism have not been exposed early in life to quantities of mercury large enough to be found later in adult locus ceruleus neurons. Human locus ceruleus neurons are sensitive indicators of mercury exposure, and mercury appears to remain in these neurons indefinitely, so these findings do not support the hypothesis that mercury neurotoxicity plays a role in autism.