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Sample records for a2 mediates progression

  1. Transactivation of the Receptor-tyrosine Kinase Ephrin Receptor A2 Is Required for the Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronan-mediated Angiogenesis That Is implicated in Tumor Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Frances E; Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Salgia, Ravi; Singleton, Patrick A.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis or the formation of new blood vessels is important in the growth and metastatic potential of various cancers. Therefore, understanding the mechanism(s) by which angiogenesis occurs can have important therapeutic implications in numerous malignancies. We and others have demonstrated that low molecular weight hyaluronan (LMW-HA, ∼2500 Da) promotes endothelial cell (EC) barrier disruption and angiogenesis. However, the mechanism(s) by which this occurs is poorly defined. Our data indicate that treatment of human EC with LMW-HA induced CD44v10 association with the receptor-tyrosine kinase, EphA2, transactivation (tyrosine phosphorylation) of EphA2, and recruitment of the PDZ domain scaffolding protein, PATJ, to the cell periphery. Silencing (siRNA) CD44, EphA2, PATJ, or Dbs (RhoGEF) expression blocked LMW-HA-mediated angiogenesis (EC proliferation, migration, and tubule formation). In addition, silencing EphA2, PATJ, Src, or Dbs expression blocked LMW-HA-mediated RhoA activation. To translate our in vitro findings, we utilized a novel anginex/liposomal targeting of murine angiogenic endothelium with either CD44 or EphA2 siRNA and observed inhibition of LMW-HA-induced angiogenesis in implanted Matrigel plugs. Taken together, these results indicate LMW-HA-mediated transactivation of EphA2 is required for PATJ and Dbs membrane recruitment and subsequent RhoA activation required for angiogenesis. These results suggest that targeting downstream effectors of LMW-HA could be a useful therapeutic intervention for angiogenesis-associated diseases including tumor progression. PMID:25023279

  2. Thromboxane A2 Receptor Inhibition Suppresses Multiple Myeloma Cell Proliferation by Inducing p38/c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-mediated G2/M Progression Delay and Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Tao, Bo; Liu, Guizhu; Chen, Guilin; Zhu, Qian; Yu, Ying; Yu, Yu; Xiong, Hong

    2016-02-26

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy without effective therapeutics. Thromboxane A2 (TxA2)/TxA2 receptor (T prostanoid receptor (TP)) modulates the progression of some carcinomas; however, its effects on MM cell proliferation remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and downstream prostaglandin profiles in human myeloma cell lines RPMI-8226 and U-266 and analyzed the effects of COX-1/-2 inhibitors SC-560 and NS-398 on MM cell proliferation. Our observations implicate COX-2 as being involved in modulating cell proliferation. We further incubated MM cells with prostaglandin receptor antagonists or agonists and found that only the TP antagonist, SQ29548, suppressed MM cell proliferation. TP silencing and the TP agonist, U46619, further confirmed this finding. Moreover, SQ29548 and TP silencing promoted MM cell G2/M phase delay accompanied by reducing cyclin B1/cyclin-dependent kinase-1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression. Notably, cyclin B1 overexpression rescued MM cells from G2/M arrest. We also found that the TP agonist activated JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and inhibitors of JNK and p38 MAPK depressed U46619-induced proliferation and cyclin B1/CDK1 protein expression. In addition, SQ29548 and TP silencing led to the MM cell apoptotic rate increasing with improving caspase 3 activity. The knockdown of caspase 3 reversed the apoptotic rate. Taken together, our results suggest that TxA2/TP promotes MM cell proliferation by reducing cell delay at G2/M phase via elevating p38 MAPK/JNK-mediated cyclin B1/CDK1 expression and hindering cell apoptosis. The TP inhibitor has potential as a novel agent to target kinase cascades for MM therapy.

  3. Thromboxane A2 Receptor Inhibition Suppresses Multiple Myeloma Cell Proliferation by Inducing p38/c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-mediated G2/M Progression Delay and Cell Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Tao, Bo; Liu, Guizhu; Chen, Guilin; Zhu, Qian; Yu, Ying; Yu, Yu; Xiong, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy without effective therapeutics. Thromboxane A2 (TxA2)/TxA2 receptor (T prostanoid receptor (TP)) modulates the progression of some carcinomas; however, its effects on MM cell proliferation remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and downstream prostaglandin profiles in human myeloma cell lines RPMI-8226 and U-266 and analyzed the effects of COX-1/-2 inhibitors SC-560 and NS-398 on MM cell proliferation. Our observations implicate COX-2 as being involved in modulating cell proliferation. We further incubated MM cells with prostaglandin receptor antagonists or agonists and found that only the TP antagonist, SQ29548, suppressed MM cell proliferation. TP silencing and the TP agonist, U46619, further confirmed this finding. Moreover, SQ29548 and TP silencing promoted MM cell G2/M phase delay accompanied by reducing cyclin B1/cyclin-dependent kinase-1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression. Notably, cyclin B1 overexpression rescued MM cells from G2/M arrest. We also found that the TP agonist activated JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and inhibitors of JNK and p38 MAPK depressed U46619-induced proliferation and cyclin B1/CDK1 protein expression. In addition, SQ29548 and TP silencing led to the MM cell apoptotic rate increasing with improving caspase 3 activity. The knockdown of caspase 3 reversed the apoptotic rate. Taken together, our results suggest that TxA2/TP promotes MM cell proliferation by reducing cell delay at G2/M phase via elevating p38 MAPK/JNK-mediated cyclin B1/CDK1 expression and hindering cell apoptosis. The TP inhibitor has potential as a novel agent to target kinase cascades for MM therapy. PMID:26724804

  4. Regulated lysosomal exocytosis mediates cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Eda; White-Gilbertson, Shai; van de Vlekkert, Diantha; Janke, Laura; Moshiach, Simon; Campos, Yvan; Finkelstein, David; Gomero, Elida; Mosca, Rosario; Qiu, Xiaohui; Morton, Christopher L.; Annunziata, Ida; d’Azzo, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how tumor cells transition to an invasive and drug-resistant phenotype is central to cancer biology, but the mechanisms underlying this transition remain unclear. We show that sarcomas gain these malignant traits by inducing lysosomal exocytosis, a ubiquitous physiological process. During lysosomal exocytosis, the movement of exocytic lysosomes along the cytoskeleton and their docking at the plasma membrane involve LAMP1, a sialylated membrane glycoprotein and target of the sialidase NEU1. Cleavage of LAMP1 sialic acids by NEU1 limits the extent of lysosomal exocytosis. We found that by down-regulation of NEU1 and accumulation of oversialylated LAMP1, tumor cells exacerbate lysosomal exocytosis of soluble hydrolases and exosomes. This facilitates matrix invasion and propagation of invasive signals, and purging of lysosomotropic chemotherapeutics. In Arf−⁄− mice, Neu1 haploinsufficiency fostered the development of invasive, pleomorphic sarcomas, expressing epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and lysosomal exocytosis effectors, LAMP1 and Myosin-11. These features are analogous to those of metastatic, pleomorphic human sarcomas, where low NEU1 levels correlate with high expression of lysosomal exocytosis markers. In a therapeutic proof of principle, we demonstrate that inhibiting lysosomal exocytosis reversed invasiveness and chemoresistance in aggressive sarcoma cells. Thus, we reveal that this unconventional, lysosome-regulated pathway plays a primary role in tumor progression and chemoresistance. PMID:26824057

  5. KSHV-Mediated Angiogenesis in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Uppal, Timsy; Sarkar, Roni; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is a malignant human oncovirus belonging to the gamma herpesvirus family. HHV-8 is closely linked to the pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and two other B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases: primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and a plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD). KS is an invasive tumor of endothelial cells most commonly found in untreated HIV-AIDS or immuno-compromised individuals. KS tumors are highly vascularized and have abnormal, excessive neo-angiogenesis, inflammation, and proliferation of infected endothelial cells. KSHV directly induces angiogenesis in an autocrine and paracrine fashion through a complex interplay of various viral and cellular pro-angiogenic and inflammatory factors. KS is believed to originate due to a combination of KSHV’s efficient strategies for evading host immune systems and several pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory stimuli. In addition, KSHV infection of endothelial cells produces a wide array of viral oncoproteins with transforming capabilities that regulate multiple host-signaling pathways involved in the activation of angiogenesis. It is likely that the cellular-signaling pathways of angiogenesis and lymph-angiogenesis modulate the rate of tumorigenesis induction by KSHV. This review summarizes the current knowledge on regulating KSHV-mediated angiogenesis by integrating the findings reported thus far on the roles of host and viral genes in oncogenesis, recent developments in cell-culture/animal-model systems, and various anti-angiogenic therapies for treating KSHV-related lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:27447661

  6. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α regulates G1 progression through modulating FOXO1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Naini, Said Movahedi; Choukroun, Gabriel J.; Ryan, James R.; Hentschel, Dirk M.; Shah, Jagesh V.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Group IVA phospholipase A2 [cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α)] is a key mediator of inflammation and tumorigenesis. In this study, by using a combination of chemical inhibition and genetic approaches in zebrafish and murine cells, we identify a mechanism by which cPLA2α promotes cell proliferation. We identified 2 cpla2α genes in zebrafish, cpla2αa and cpla2αb, with conserved phospholipase activity. In zebrafish, loss of cpla2α expression or inhibition of cpla2α activity diminished G1 progression through the cell cycle. This phenotype was also seen in both mouse embryonic fibroblasts and mesangial cells. G1 progression was rescued by the addition of arachidonic acid or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), indicating a phospholipase-dependent mechanism. We further show that PGE2, through PI3K/AKT activation, promoted Forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) phosphorylation and FOXO1 nuclear export. This led to up-regulation of cyclin D1 and down-regulation of p27Kip1, thus promoting G1 progression. Finally, using pharmacologic inhibitors, we show that cPLA2α, rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF)/MEK/ERK, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways cooperatively regulate G1 progression in response to platelet-derived growth factor stimulation. In summary, these data indicate that cPLA2α, through its phospholipase activity, is a critical effector of G1 phase progression through the cell cycle and suggest that pharmacological targeting of this enzyme may have important therapeutic benefits in disease mechanisms that involve excessive cell proliferation, in particular, cancer and proliferative glomerulopathies.—Naini, S. M., Choukroun, G. J., Ryan, J. R., Hentschel, D. M., Shah, J. V., Bonventre, J. V. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α regulates G1 progression through modulating FOXO1 activity. PMID:26644349

  7. SUMOylation-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation plays critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancers were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could potentially be exploited in anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26601932

  8. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-08-01

    Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression. Systemic IgE-mediated mast cell activation in apoE(-/-)μMT mice resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size as compared to control mice, and interestingly, the number of neutrophils was highly increased in these lesions. In addition, peritoneal mast cell activation led to a massive neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity in C57Bl6 mice, whereas neutrophil numbers in mast cell deficient Kit(W(-sh)/W(-sh)) mice were not affected. Within the newly recruited neutrophil population, increased levels of CXCR2(+) and CXCR4(+) neutrophils were observed after mast cell activation. Indeed, mast cells were seen to contain and release CXCL1 and CXCL12, the ligands for CXCR2 and CXCR4. Intriguingly, peritoneal mast cell activation in combination with anti-CXCR2 receptor antagonist resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment, thus establishing a prominent role for the CXCL1/CXCR2 axis in mast cell-mediated neutrophil recruitment. Our data suggest that chemokines, and in particular CXCL1, released from activated mast cells induce neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, thereby aggravating the ongoing inflammatory response and thus affecting plaque progression and destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. SUMOylation-Mediated Regulation of Cell Cycle Progression and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2015-12-01

    Protein conjugation with Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMOylation) has critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancer were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could be exploited in anticancer therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Flow Mediated Dilatation and Progression of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Regent; Bellamkonda, Kirthi; Jones, Amy; Killough, Nicholas; Woodgate, Felicity; Williams, Matthew; Cassimjee, Ismail; Handa, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Objective/Background Biomarker(s) for prediction of the future progression rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) may be useful to stratify the management of individual patients. AAAs are associated with features of systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Flow mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery is a recognised non-invasive measurement for endothelial function. We hypothesised that FMD is a potential biomarker of AAA progression and reflects the temporal changes of endothelial function during AAA progression. Methods In a prospectively recruited cohort of patients with AAAs (Oxford Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Study), AAA size was recorded by antero-posterior diameter (APD) (outer to outer) on ultrasound. Annual AAA progression was calculated by (ΔAPD/APD at baseline)/(number of days lapsed/365 days). FMD was assessed at the same time as AAA size measurement. Analyses of data were performed in the overall cohort, and further in subgroups of AAA by size (small: 30–39 mm; moderate: 40–55 mm; large: > 55 mm). Results FMD is inversely correlated with the diameter of AAAs in all patients (n = 162, Spearman’s r = −.28, p < .001). FMD is inversely correlated with AAA diameter progression in the future 12 months (Spearman’s r = −.35, p = .001), particularly in the moderate size group. Furthermore, FMD deteriorates during the course of AAA surveillance (from a median of 2.0% at baseline to 1.2% at follow-up; p = .004), while surgical repair of AAAs (n = 50 [open repair n = 22, endovascular repair n = 28)] leads to an improvement in FMD (from 1.1% pre-operatively to 3.8% post-operatively; p < .001), irrespective of the type of surgery. Conclusion FMD is inversely correlated with future AAA progression in humans. FMD deteriorates during the natural history of AAA, and is improved by surgery. The utility of FMD as a potential biomarker in the context of AAA warrants further investigation. PMID:28416190

  11. Adenosine A(2A) receptor activation prevents progressive kidney fibrosis in a model of immune-associated chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gabriela E; Truong, Luan D; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Johnson, Richard J; Feng, Lili

    2011-08-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) in Wistar-Kyoto rats progresses to lethal kidney failure by macrophage (Mφ)-mediated mechanisms. Mφs in nephritic glomeruli express adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs), the activation of which suppresses inflammation. Here, we pharmacologically activated the A(2A)Rs with a selective agonist, CGS 21680, and inactivated them with a selective antagonist, ZM241385, to test the effects on established GN. When activation was delayed until antiglomerular basement membrane GN and extracellular matrix deposition were established, glomerular Mφ infiltration was reduced by 83%. There was also a marked improvement in glomerular lesion histology, as well as decreased proteinuria. A(2A)R activation significantly reduced type I, III, and IV collagen deposition, and E-cadherin expression was restored in association with a reduction of α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts in the interstitium and glomeruli. In contrast, pharmacological inactivation of A(2A)Rs increased glomerular crescent formation, type I, III, and IV collagen expression, and enhanced E-cadherin loss. Activation of A(2A)Rs suppressed the expression of the Mφ-linked glomerular damage mediators, transforming growth factor-β, osteopontin-1, thrombospondin-1, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. Thus, A(2A)R activation can arrest GN and prevent progressive fibrosis in established pathological lesions.

  12. A2: Mathematical relativity and other progress in classical gravity theory—a session report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chruściel, Piotr T.; Paetz, Tim-T.

    2014-05-01

    We report on selected oral contributions to the A2 session "Mathematical relativity and other progress in classical gravity theory" of "The 20th International Conference on General Relativity and Gravitation (GR20)" in Warsaw.

  13. Genes Encoding Phospholipases A2 Mediate Insect Nodulation Reactions to Bacterial Challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We propose that expression of four genes encoding secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) mediates insect nodulation responses to bacterial infection. Nodulation is the quantitatively predominant cellular defense reaction to bacterial infection. This reaction is mediated by eicosanoids, the biosynthesis...

  14. Role of adenosine A2b receptor overexpression in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Cesar; Palomo, Iván; Fuentes, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    The adenosine A2b receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor. Its activation occurs with high extracellular adenosine concentration, for example in inflammation or hypoxia. These conditions are generated in the tumor environment. Studies show that A2b receptor is overexpressed in various tumor lines and biopsies from patients with different cancers. This suggests that A2b receptor can be used by tumor cells to promote progression. Thus A2b participates in different events, such as angiogenesis and metastasis, besides exerting immunomodulatory effects that protect tumor cells. Therefore, adenosine A2b receptor appears as an interesting therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  15. Cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha mediates electrophysiologic responses of hippocampal pyramidal neurons to neurotoxic NMDA treatment.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Kishimoto, Koji; Linden, David J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2007-04-03

    The arachidonic acid-generating enzyme cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) has been implicated in the progression of excitotoxic neuronal injury. However, the mechanisms of cPLA(2)alpha toxicity have yet to be determined. Here, we used a model system exposing mouse hippocampal slices to NMDA as an excitotoxic injury, in combination with simultaneous patch-clamp recording and confocal Ca(2+) imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons. NMDA treatment caused significantly greater injury in wild-type (WT) than in cPLA(2)alpha null CA1 neurons. Bath application of NMDA evoked a slow inward current in voltage-clamped neurons (composed of both NMDA receptor-mediated and other conductances) that was smaller in cPLA(2)alpha null than in WT slices. This was not due to down-regulation of NMDA receptor function because NMDA receptor-mediated currents were equivalent in each genotype following brief photolysis of caged glutamate. Current-clamp recordings were made during and following NMDA exposure by eliciting a single action potential with a brief current injection. After NMDA exposure, WT CA1 neurons developed a spike-evoked plateau potential and an increased spike-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) transient. These effects were absent in CA1 neurons from cPLA(2)alpha null mice and WT neurons treated with a cPLA(2)alpha inhibitor. The Ca-sensitive K-channel toxins, apamin and paxilline, caused spike broadening and Ca(2+) enhancement in WT and cPLA(2)alpha null slices. NMDA application in WT and arachidonate applied to cPLA(2)alpha null cells occluded the effects of apamin/paxilline. These results indicate that cPLA(2)alpha activity is required for development of aberrant electrophysiologic events triggered by NMDA receptor activation, in part through attenuation of K-channel function.

  16. Magnetic-mediated hyperthermia for cancer treatment: Research progress and clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ling-Yun; Liu, Jia-Yi; Ouyang, Wei-Wei; Li, Dan-Ye; Li, Li; Li, Li-Ya; Tang, Jin-Tian

    2013-10-01

    Research progress and frontiers of magnetic-mediated hyperthermia (MMH) are presented, along with clinical trials in Germany, the US, Japan, and China. Special attention is focused on MMH mediated by magnetic nanoparticles, and multifunctional magnetic devices for cancer multimodality treatment are also introduced.

  17. Implementation Planning and Progress on Physical Activity Goals: The Mediating Role of Life-Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugas, Michelle; Gaudreau, Patrick; Carraro, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    This 4-week prospective study examined whether the use of life-management strategies mediates the relationship between implementation planning and short-term progress on physical activity goals. In particular, the strategies of elective selection, compensation, and loss-based selection were disentangled to assess their specific mediating effects.…

  18. Implementation Planning and Progress on Physical Activity Goals: The Mediating Role of Life-Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugas, Michelle; Gaudreau, Patrick; Carraro, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    This 4-week prospective study examined whether the use of life-management strategies mediates the relationship between implementation planning and short-term progress on physical activity goals. In particular, the strategies of elective selection, compensation, and loss-based selection were disentangled to assess their specific mediating effects.…

  19. Implementation planning and progress on physical activity goals: the mediating role of life-management strategies.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Michelle; Gaudreau, Patrick; Carraro, Natasha

    2012-03-01

    This 4-week prospective study examined whether the use of life-management strategies mediates the relationship between implementation planning and short-term progress on physical activity goals. In particular the strategies of elective selection, compensation, and loss-based selection were disentangled to assess their specific mediating effects. Results from a sample of 131undergraduate students showed that, as a composite, life-management strategies fully mediated the relationship between planning and goal progress. More specifically, decomposing the effects demonstrated that only elective selection and compensation mediated the association between planning and greater progress on a personal physical activity goal. Results are discussed in light of their practical implications and contributions to the personal goal literature.

  20. 2,3,7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD)-MEDIATED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN FEMALE CYP1A-2 KNOCKOUT (CYP1A2-/-) MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-Mediated Oxidative Stress in Female CYP1A2 Knockout (CYP1A2-/-) Mice

    Deborah Burgin1, Janet Diliberto2, Linda Birnbaum2
    1UNC Toxicology; 2USEPA/ORD/NHEERL, RTP, NC

    Most of the effects due to TCDD exposure are mediated via...

  1. 2,3,7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD)-MEDIATED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN FEMALE CYP1A-2 KNOCKOUT (CYP1A2-/-) MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-Mediated Oxidative Stress in Female CYP1A2 Knockout (CYP1A2-/-) Mice

    Deborah Burgin1, Janet Diliberto2, Linda Birnbaum2
    1UNC Toxicology; 2USEPA/ORD/NHEERL, RTP, NC

    Most of the effects due to TCDD exposure are mediated via...

  2. Microvesicles: mediators of extracellular communication during cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Clancy, James W.; Sedgwick, Alanna; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2010-01-01

    Microvesicles are generated by the outward budding and fission of membrane vesicles from the cell surface. Recent studies suggest that microvesicle shedding is a highly regulated process that occurs in a spectrum of cell types and, more frequently, in tumor cells. Microvesicles have been widely detected in various biological fluids including peripheral blood, urine and ascitic fluids, and their function and composition depend on the cells from which they originate. By facilitating the horizontal transfer of bioactive molecules such as proteins, RNAs and microRNAs, they are now thought to have vital roles in tumor invasion and metastases, inflammation, coagulation, and stem-cell renewal and expansion. This Commentary summarizes recent literature on the properties and biogenesis of microvesicles and their potential role in cancer progression. PMID:20445011

  3. SOX-mediated molecular crosstalk during the progression of tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya-Ru; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2017-03-01

    SOX family transcription factor has emerged as a double-edged sword relating to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Multiple studies have revealed different expression patterns and contradictory roles of SOX factors in the tumor initiation and progression. The aberrant expression of SOX factors is regulated by copy number alteration, methylation modulation, microRNAs, transcription factors and post-translational modification. This review summarizes the role of SOX factors in molecular interactions and signaling pathways during different steps of carcinogenesis, such as CSCs stemness maintenance, EMT occurrence, cell invasion, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The Wnt signaling pathway is also shown to provide vital intermediate signaling transduction. We believe that SOX family proteins may be used as prognostic markers for human clinical therapy, and novel therapy strategies targeting SOX factors should be explored in future clinical applications.

  4. Role of Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors in Dietary Soy Isoflavone-Mediated Effects on Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Dietary Soy Isoflavone-Mediated Effects on Breast Cancer Progression. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Columba de la Parra Simental CONTRACTING...00935 Role of Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors in Dietary Soy Isoflavone-Mediated Effects on Breast Cancer Progression Columba de la Parra Simental...Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors in Dietary Soy Isoflavone- Mediated Effects on Breast Cancer Progression. 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  5. Epigenetic modulators, modifiers and mediators in cancer aetiology and progression

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Andrew P.; Koldobskiy, Michael A.; Göndör, Anita

    2016-01-01

    This year is the tenth anniversary of the publication in this journal of a model suggesting the existence of ‘tumour progenitor genes’. These genes are epigenetically disrupted at the earliest stages of malignancies, even before mutations, and thus cause altered differentiation throughout tumour evolution. The past decade of discovery in cancer epigenetics has revealed a number of similarities between cancer genes and stem cell reprogramming genes, widespread mutations in epigenetic regulators, and the part played by chromatin structure in cellular plasticity in both development and cancer. In the light of these discoveries, we suggest here a framework for cancer epigenetics involving three types of genes: ‘epigenetic mediators’, corresponding to the tumour progenitor genes suggested earlier; ‘epigenetic modifiers’ of the mediators, which are frequently mutated in cancer; and ‘epigenetic modulators’ upstream of the modifiers, which are responsive to changes in the cellular environment and often linked to the nuclear architecture. We suggest that this classification is helpful in framing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to cancer. PMID:26972587

  6. ELF5-Mediated AR Activation Regulates Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Guo, Yongmin; Yang, Xiong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhang, Changwen; Xu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor E74-like factor 5 (ELF5) is a potent antioncogene that can prevent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis in prostate cancer (PCa). However, little is known how it suppress the tumor growth and if it can interact with androgen receptor (AR). In this study, we find that the ELF5 is frequently expressed in AR activated PCa cells, where it binds to AR acting as a physiological partner and negatively regulates its transcriptional activity. In addition, the interaction between ELF5 and AR is androgen-dependent. Downregulation of ELF5 by shRNA increases the expression of AR-response genes and the progression of PCa. Moreover, ELF5 is a AR-dependent gene that its expression can be induced by androgen and suppressed by antiandrogen treatment. Notably, forced reduction of ELF5 in LNCaP cells facilitates the binding of AR to ARE in ELF5 gene and enabling its transcription, so that low level ELF5 can turn up its own expression by the negative feedback loop. PMID:28287091

  7. ELF5-Mediated AR Activation Regulates Prostate Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Guo, Yongmin; Yang, Xiong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhang, Changwen; Xu, Yong

    2017-03-13

    The transcription factor E74-like factor 5 (ELF5) is a potent antioncogene that can prevent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis in prostate cancer (PCa). However, little is known how it suppress the tumor growth and if it can interact with androgen receptor (AR). In this study, we find that the ELF5 is frequently expressed in AR activated PCa cells, where it binds to AR acting as a physiological partner and negatively regulates its transcriptional activity. In addition, the interaction between ELF5 and AR is androgen-dependent. Downregulation of ELF5 by shRNA increases the expression of AR-response genes and the progression of PCa. Moreover, ELF5 is a AR-dependent gene that its expression can be induced by androgen and suppressed by antiandrogen treatment. Notably, forced reduction of ELF5 in LNCaP cells facilitates the binding of AR to ARE in ELF5 gene and enabling its transcription, so that low level ELF5 can turn up its own expression by the negative feedback loop.

  8. Progress of cereal transformation technology mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Hiei, Yukoh; Ishida, Yuji; Komari, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Monocotyledonous plants were believed to be not transformable by the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens until two decades ago, although convenient protocols for infection of leaf disks and subsequent regeneration of transgenic plants had been well established in a number of dicotyledonous species by then. This belief was reinforced by the fact that monocotyledons are mostly outside the host range of crown gall disease caused by the bacterium and by the failures in trials in monocotyledons to mimic the transformation protocols for dicotyledons. However, a key reason for the failure could have been the lack of active cell divisions at the wound sites in monocotyledons. The complexity and narrow optimal windows of critical factors, such as genotypes of plants, conditions of the plants from which explants are prepared, tissue culture methods and culture media, pre-treatments of explants, strains of A. tumefaciens, inducers of virulence genes, transformation vectors, selection marker genes and selective agents, kept technical hurdles high. Eventually it was demonstrated that rice and maize could be transformed by co-cultivating cells of callus cultures or immature embryos, which are actively dividing or about to divide, with A. tumefaciens. Subsequently, these initial difficulties were resolved one by one by many research groups, and the major cereals are now transformed quite efficiently. As many as 15 independent transgenic events may be regenerated from a single piece of immature embryo of rice. Maize transformation protocols are well established, and almost all transgenic events deregulated for commercialization after 2003 were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Wheat, barley, and sorghum are also among those plants that can be efficiently transformed by A. tumefaciens. PMID:25426132

  9. Progress of cereal transformation technology mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Hiei, Yukoh; Ishida, Yuji; Komari, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Monocotyledonous plants were believed to be not transformable by the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens until two decades ago, although convenient protocols for infection of leaf disks and subsequent regeneration of transgenic plants had been well established in a number of dicotyledonous species by then. This belief was reinforced by the fact that monocotyledons are mostly outside the host range of crown gall disease caused by the bacterium and by the failures in trials in monocotyledons to mimic the transformation protocols for dicotyledons. However, a key reason for the failure could have been the lack of active cell divisions at the wound sites in monocotyledons. The complexity and narrow optimal windows of critical factors, such as genotypes of plants, conditions of the plants from which explants are prepared, tissue culture methods and culture media, pre-treatments of explants, strains of A. tumefaciens, inducers of virulence genes, transformation vectors, selection marker genes and selective agents, kept technical hurdles high. Eventually it was demonstrated that rice and maize could be transformed by co-cultivating cells of callus cultures or immature embryos, which are actively dividing or about to divide, with A. tumefaciens. Subsequently, these initial difficulties were resolved one by one by many research groups, and the major cereals are now transformed quite efficiently. As many as 15 independent transgenic events may be regenerated from a single piece of immature embryo of rice. Maize transformation protocols are well established, and almost all transgenic events deregulated for commercialization after 2003 were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Wheat, barley, and sorghum are also among those plants that can be efficiently transformed by A. tumefaciens.

  10. Mechanisms of Copper Ion Mediated Huntington's Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jonathan H.; Kama, Jibrin A.; Lieberman, Gregory; Chopra, Raman; Dorsey, Kate; Chopra, Vanita; Volitakis, Irene; Cherny, Robert A.; Bush, Ashley I.; Hersch, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a dominant polyglutamine expansion within the N-terminus of huntingtin protein and results in oxidative stress, energetic insufficiency and striatal degeneration. Copper and iron are increased in the striata of HD patients, but the role of these metals in HD pathogenesis is unknown. We found, using inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectroscopy, that elevations of copper and iron found in human HD brain are reiterated in the brains of affected HD transgenic mice. Increased brain copper correlated with decreased levels of the copper export protein, amyloid precursor protein. We hypothesized that increased amounts of copper bound to low affinity sites could contribute to pro-oxidant activities and neurodegeneration. We focused on two proteins: huntingtin, because of its centrality to HD, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), because of its documented sensitivity to copper, necessity for normoxic brain energy metabolism and evidence for altered lactate metabolism in HD brain. The first 171 amino acids of wild-type huntingtin, and its glutamine expanded mutant form, interacted with copper, but not iron. N171 reduced Cu2+ in vitro in a 1∶1 copper∶protein stoichiometry indicating that this fragment is very redox active. Further, copper promoted and metal chelation inhibited aggregation of cell-free huntingtin. We found decreased LDH activity, but not protein, and increased lactate levels in HD transgenic mouse brain. The LDH inhibitor oxamate resulted in neurodegeneration when delivered intra-striatially to healthy mice, indicating that LDH inhibition is relevant to neurodegeneration in HD. Our findings support a role of pro-oxidant copper-protein interactions in HD progression and offer a novel target for pharmacotherapeutics. PMID:17396163

  11. Kindlin-3 enhances breast cancer progression and metastasis by activating Twist-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sossey-Alaoui, Khalid; Pluskota, Elzbieta; Davuluri, Gangarao; Bialkowska, Katarzyna; Das, Mitali; Szpak, Dorota; Lindner, Daniel J.; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Thompson, Cheryl L.; Plow, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    The FERM domain containing protein Kindlin-3 has been recognized as a major regulator of integrin function in hematopoietic cells, but its role in neoplasia is totally unknown. We have examined the relationship between Kindlin-3 and breast cancer in mouse models and human tissues. Human breast tumors showed a ∼7-fold elevation in Kindlin-3 mRNA compared with nonneoplastic tissue by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Kindlin-3 overexpression in a breast cancer cell line increased primary tumor growth and lung metastasis by 2.5- and 3-fold, respectively, when implanted into mice compared with cells expressing vector alone. Mechanistically, the Kindlin-3-overexpressing cells displayed a 2.2-fold increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion and enhanced β1 integrin activation. Increased VEGF secretion resulted from enhanced production of Twist, a transcription factor that promotes tumor angiogenesis. Knockdown of Twist diminished VEGF production, and knockdown of β1 integrins diminished Twist and VEGF production by Kindlin-3-overexpressing cells, while nontargeting small interfering RNA had no effect on expression of these gene products. Thus, Kindlin-3 influences breast cancer progression by influencing the crosstalk between β1 integrins and Twist to increase VEGF production. This signaling cascade enhances breast cancer cell invasion and tumor angiogenesis and metastasis.—Sossey-Alaoui, K., Pluskota, E., Davuluri, G., Bialkowska, K., Das, M., Szpak, D., Lindner, D. J., Downs-Kelly, E., Thompson, C. L., Plow, E. F. Kindlin-3 enhances breast cancer progression and metastasis by activating Twist-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:24469992

  12. Interactions between responses mediated by activation of adenosine A2 receptors and alpha 1-adrenoceptors in the rabbit isolated aorta.

    PubMed

    Wiener, H L; Thalody, G P; Maayani, S

    1993-06-01

    1. This paper describes aspects of the functional antagonism between the responses mediated by activated alpha 1-adrenoceptors and adenosine A2 receptors in the adventitia- and endothelium-denuded aorta of the rabbit. 2. Adenosine A2 receptor agonists relaxed aortic rings pre-contracted with phenylephrine. The relaxation response was agonist concentration-dependent and saturable. The respective contractile and relaxation responses were stable, reproducible, and reversible. 3. Increasing the phenylephrine concentration caused a progressive attenuation of the action of adenosine A2 receptor agonists, consisting of a decreased maximal response and a dextral shift of the adenosine agonist concentration-response curve. This functional antagonism could be completely reversed upon removal of adenosine by either the addition of adenosine deaminase or by wash-out of the adenosine agonist from the tissue. The relaxation response to the adenosine A2 receptor partial agonists, N6-cyclohexyladenosine and R-(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine, was abolished at higher phenylephrine concentrations (e.g. 30 EC50). 4. A 1000 fold increase in the adenosine concentration was required to shift the value of the EC50 of phenylephrine six fold, while a similar increase in the value of the EC50 of adenosine could be elicited by only a 32 fold increase in the phenylephrine concentration. A 30 fold increase in the phenylephrine concentration shifted the value of the EC50 of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine four fold. 5. Analysis of the functional antagonism between the responses mediated by these receptors using the Black & Leff (1983) operational model of agonism allowed for the estimation of the agonist dissociation constant, KA, and the apparent efficacy, tau, for both phenylephrine and adenosine A2 receptor agonists. Increasing the concentration of phenylephrine reduced the value of tau for adenosine agonists in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner. Similarly, increasing the

  13. Interactions between responses mediated by activation of adenosine A2 receptors and alpha 1-adrenoceptors in the rabbit isolated aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, H. L.; Thalody, G. P.; Maayani, S.

    1993-01-01

    1. This paper describes aspects of the functional antagonism between the responses mediated by activated alpha 1-adrenoceptors and adenosine A2 receptors in the adventitia- and endothelium-denuded aorta of the rabbit. 2. Adenosine A2 receptor agonists relaxed aortic rings pre-contracted with phenylephrine. The relaxation response was agonist concentration-dependent and saturable. The respective contractile and relaxation responses were stable, reproducible, and reversible. 3. Increasing the phenylephrine concentration caused a progressive attenuation of the action of adenosine A2 receptor agonists, consisting of a decreased maximal response and a dextral shift of the adenosine agonist concentration-response curve. This functional antagonism could be completely reversed upon removal of adenosine by either the addition of adenosine deaminase or by wash-out of the adenosine agonist from the tissue. The relaxation response to the adenosine A2 receptor partial agonists, N6-cyclohexyladenosine and R-(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine, was abolished at higher phenylephrine concentrations (e.g. 30 EC50). 4. A 1000 fold increase in the adenosine concentration was required to shift the value of the EC50 of phenylephrine six fold, while a similar increase in the value of the EC50 of adenosine could be elicited by only a 32 fold increase in the phenylephrine concentration. A 30 fold increase in the phenylephrine concentration shifted the value of the EC50 of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine four fold. 5. Analysis of the functional antagonism between the responses mediated by these receptors using the Black & Leff (1983) operational model of agonism allowed for the estimation of the agonist dissociation constant, KA, and the apparent efficacy, tau, for both phenylephrine and adenosine A2 receptor agonists. Increasing the concentration of phenylephrine reduced the value of tau for adenosine agonists in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner. Similarly, increasing the

  14. Lymphoid tissue phospholipase A2 group IID resolves contact hypersensitivity by driving antiinflammatory lipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Kei; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Hiroyasu; Shimo, Kanako; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Kabashima, Kenji; Arita, Makoto; Arai, Hiroyuki; Lambeau, Gérard; Bollinger, James M.; Hara, Shuntaro; Gelb, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is an active process that is mediated in part by antiinflammatory lipid mediators. Although phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes have been implicated in the promotion of inflammation through mobilizing lipid mediators, the molecular entity of PLA2 subtypes acting upstream of antiinflammatory lipid mediators remains unknown. Herein, we show that secreted PLA2 group IID (PLA2G2D) is preferentially expressed in CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and displays a pro-resolving function. In hapten-induced contact dermatitis, resolution, not propagation, of inflammation was compromised in skin and LNs of PLA2G2D-deficient mice (Pla2g2d−/−), in which the immune balance was shifted toward a proinflammatory state over an antiinflammatory state. Bone marrow-derived DCs from Pla2g2d−/− mice were hyperactivated and elicited skin inflammation after intravenous transfer into mice. Lipidomics analysis revealed that PLA2G2D in the LNs contributed to mobilization of a pool of polyunsaturated fatty acids that could serve as precursors for antiinflammatory/pro-resolving lipid mediators such as resolvin D1 and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, which reduced Th1 cytokine production and surface MHC class II expression in LN cells or DCs. Altogether, our results highlight PLA2G2D as a “resolving sPLA2” that ameliorates inflammation through mobilizing pro-resolving lipid mediators and points to a potential use of this enzyme for treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:23690440

  15. Achievement goals and emotions: The mediational roles of perceived progress, control, and value.

    PubMed

    Hall, Nathan C; Sampasivam, Lavanya; Muis, Krista R; Ranellucci, John

    2016-06-01

    The link between achievement goals and achievement emotions is well established; however, research exploring potential mediators of this relationship is lacking. The control-value theory of achievement emotions (Pekrun, 2006, Educational Psychology Review, 18, 315) posits that perceptions of control and value mediate the relationship between achievement goals and achievement emotions, whereas the bidirectional theory of affect (Linnenbrink & Pintrich, 2002, Educational Psychologist, 37, 69) proposes that perceived progress mediates this relationship. The present study empirically evaluated three hypothesized mediators of the effects of achievement goals on learning-related emotions as proposed in the control-value theory and the bidirectional theory of affect. Undergraduate students (N = 273) from humanities, social science, and STEM disciplines participated. Participants completed web-based questionnaires evaluating academic achievement goals, perceptions of control, perceived task value, and achievement emotions. Results provided empirical support primarily for perceived progress as a mediator of mastery-approach goal effects on positive emotions (enjoyment, hope), showing indirect effects of mastery- and performance-approach goals on outcome-related emotions (hope, anxiety) via perceived control. Indirect effects of mastery- and performance-approach goals were further observed on anxiety via perceived value, with higher value levels predicting greater anxiety. Study findings partially support Linnenbrink and Pintrich's (2002, Educational Psychologist, 37, 69) bidirectional theory of affect while underscoring the potential for indirect effects of goals on emotions through perceived control as proposed by Pekrun (2006, Educational Psychology Review, 18, 315). © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  16. RIPK3-Mediated Necroptosis and Apoptosis Contributes to Renal Tubular Cell Progressive Loss and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongjun; Cui, Hongwang; Xia, Yunfeng; Gan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is caused by the progressive loss of renal tubular cells and the consequent replacement of the extracellular matrix. The progressive depletion of renal tubular cells results from apoptosis and necroptosis; however, the relative significance of each of these cell death mechanisms at different stages during the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. We sought to explore the mechanisms of renal tubular cell death during the early and intermediate stages of chronic renal damage of subtotal nephrectomied (SNx) rats. The results of tissue histological assays indicated that the numbers of necrotic dying cells and apoptotic cells were significantly higher in kidney tissues derived from a rat model of CKD. In addition, there was a significant increase in necroptosis observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and an increase in the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells in kidney tissues from SNx rats compared with control rats, and necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) could inhibit necroptosis and reduce the proportion of TUNEL-positive cells. More importantly, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of necroptosis compared with apoptosis by TEM in vivo and in vitro and a significant increase in the proportion of TUNEL-positive tubular epithelial cells that did not express caspase-3 compared with those expressing cleaved caspase-3 in vitro. Furthermore, treatment with Nec-1 and zVAD strongly reduced necroptosis- and apoptosis-mediated renal tubular cell death and decreased the levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine and tubular damage scores of SNx rats. These results suggest that necroptotic cell death plays a more significant role than apoptosis in mediating the loss of renal tubular cells in SNx rats and that effectively blocking both necroptosis and apoptosis improves renal function and tubular damage at early and intermediate stages of CKD. PMID:27281190

  17. Smad3 promotes cancer progression by inhibiting E4BP4-mediated NK cell development.

    PubMed

    Tang, Patrick Ming-Kuen; Zhou, Shuang; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Qing-Ming; Li, Chun-Jie; Lian, Guang-Yu; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Tang, Yong-Jiang; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Yan, Bryan Ping-Yen; To, Ka-Fai; Lan, Hui-Yao

    2017-03-06

    TGF-β is known to influence tumour progression. Here we report an additional role of Smad3 in the tumour microenvironment regulating cancer progression. Deletion or inhibition of Smad3 in the tumour microenvironment suppresses tumour growth, invasion and metastasis in two syngeneic mouse tumour models. Smad3(-/-) bone marrow gives rise to an expanded NK cell population with enhanced tumour-suppressive activities in vivo, and promotes differentiation of NK cells ex vivo. We identify E4BP4/NFIL3 as a direct Smad3 target gene critical for NK cell differentiation. Smad3 suppresses transcription of IFN-γ via E4BP4 in a T-bet independent manner. Therefore disruption of Smad3 enhances both the E4BP4-mediated NK cell differentiation and anti-cancer effector functions in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, systemic treatment with a Smad3 inhibitor SIS3 effectively suppresses cancer progression. In summary, suppression of NK cell-mediated immunosurveillance via the Smad3-E4BP4 axis contributes to cancer progression. We propose targeting Smad3-dependent tumour microenvironment may represent an effective anti-cancer strategy.

  18. Smad3 promotes cancer progression by inhibiting E4BP4-mediated NK cell development

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Patrick Ming-Kuen; Zhou, Shuang; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Qing-Ming; Li, Chun-Jie; Lian, Guang-Yu; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Tang, Yong-Jiang; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Yan, Bryan Ping-Yen; To, Ka-Fai; Lan, Hui-Yao

    2017-01-01

    TGF-β is known to influence tumour progression. Here we report an additional role of Smad3 in the tumour microenvironment regulating cancer progression. Deletion or inhibition of Smad3 in the tumour microenvironment suppresses tumour growth, invasion and metastasis in two syngeneic mouse tumour models. Smad3−/− bone marrow gives rise to an expanded NK cell population with enhanced tumour-suppressive activities in vivo, and promotes differentiation of NK cells ex vivo. We identify E4BP4/NFIL3 as a direct Smad3 target gene critical for NK cell differentiation. Smad3 suppresses transcription of IFN-γ via E4BP4 in a T-bet independent manner. Therefore disruption of Smad3 enhances both the E4BP4-mediated NK cell differentiation and anti-cancer effector functions in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, systemic treatment with a Smad3 inhibitor SIS3 effectively suppresses cancer progression. In summary, suppression of NK cell-mediated immunosurveillance via the Smad3-E4BP4 axis contributes to cancer progression. We propose targeting Smad3-dependent tumour microenvironment may represent an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:28262747

  19. Genes encoding phospholipases A2 mediate insect nodulation reactions to bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sony; Park, Yoonseong; Stanley, David; Kim, Yonggyun

    2010-03-01

    We propose that expression of four genes encoding secretory phospholipases A(2) (sPLA(2)) mediates insect nodulation responses to bacterial infection. Nodulation is the quantitatively predominant cellular defense reaction to bacterial infection. This reaction is mediated by eicosanoids, the biosynthesis of which depends on PLA(2)-catalyzed hydrolysis of arachidonic acid (AA) from cellular phospholipids. Injecting late instar larvae of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, with the bacterium, Escherichia coli, stimulated nodulation reactions and sPLA(2) activity in time- and dose-related manners. Nodulation was inhibited by pharmaceutical inhibitors of enzymes involved in eicosanoid biosynthesis, and the inhibition was rescued by AA. We cloned five genes encoding sPLA(2) and expressed them in E. coli cells to demonstrate these genes encode catalytically active sPLA(2)s. The recombinant sPLA(2)s were inhibited by sPLA(2) inhibitors. Injecting larvae with double-stranded RNAs specific to each of the five genes led to reduced expression of the corresponding sPLA(2) genes and to reduced nodulation reactions to bacterial infections for four of the five genes. The reduced nodulation was rescued by AA, indicating that expression of four genes encoding sPLA(2)s mediates nodulation reactions. A polyclonal antibody that reacted with all five sPLA(2)s showed the presence of the sPLA(2) enzymes in hemocytes and revealed that the enzymes were more closely associated with hemocyte plasma membranes following infection. Identifying specific sPLA(2) genes that mediate nodulation reactions strongly supports our hypothesis that sPLA(2)s are central enzymes in insect cellular immune reactions. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of enhanced glomerular synthesis of thromboxane A2 in progressive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Salvati, P; Ferti, C; Ferrario, R G; Lamberti, E; Duzzi, L; Bianchi, G; Remuzzi, G; Perico, N; Benigni, A; Braidotti, P

    1990-09-01

    Normotensive rats of the Milan strain (MNS) spontaneously develop focal glomerulosclerosis. In order to explore the contribution of glomerular thromboxane (TX) A2 synthesis to the development of the disease, we have characterized the time course of renal functional and biochemical changes, and their modification by long-term treatment with a TX-synthase inhibitor. Oral administration (150 mg.kg-1 from 1 to 14 months of age) of FCE 22178 suppressed enhanced glomerular TXB2 production at all experimental times (mean inhibition 80%) and proteinuria (varying between 27.1 and 73.0%) while preserving renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. These effects of TX-synthase inhibition were seen in the absence of any statistically significant changes in systemic blood pressure. Moreover, FCE 22178 had no antihypertensive effects in hypertensive rats of the Milan strain (MHS) nor in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Treatment also prevented the age-related hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia observed in control MNS and significantly (P less than 0.01) reduced glomerular histologic damage, as demonstrated by light microscopy studies and measurement of sclerotic area. We conclude that: 1) MNS rats provide an animal model of long-lasting proteinuria characterized by an age-related increase in glomerular TXB2 production paralleled by progressive loss of renal structural integrity and function and by a secondary dyslipidemia; 2) pharmacological inhibition of glomerular TX-synthase attenuates the structural as well as the functional expression of kidney disease, without a primary effect on systemic blood pressure. These data are suggestive of an important modulating role of TXA2 in the progression of MNS renal disease.

  1. Aberrant Splicing in Cancer: Mediators of Malignant Progression through an Imperfect Splice Program Shift.

    PubMed

    Luz, Felipe Andrés Cordero; Brígido, Paula Cristina; Moraes, Alberto Silva; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Although the efforts to understand the genetic basis of cancer allowed advances in diagnosis and therapy, little is known about other molecular bases. Splicing is a key event in gene expression, controlling the excision of introns decoded inside genes and being responsible for 80% of the proteome amplification through events of alternative splicing. Growing data from the last decade point to deregulation of splicing events as crucial in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Several alterations in splicing events were observed in cancer, caused by either missexpression of or detrimental mutations in some splicing factors, and appear to be critical in carcinogenesis and key events during tumor progression. Notwithstanding, it is difficult to determine whether it is a cause or consequence of cancer and/or tumorigenesis. Most reviews focus on the generated isoforms of deregulated splicing pattern, while others mainly summarize deregulated splicing factors observed in cancer. In this review, events associated with carcinogenesis and tumor progression mainly, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, which is also implicated in alternative splicing regulation, will be progressively discussed in the light of a new perspective, suggesting that splicing deregulation mediates cell reprogramming in tumor progression by an imperfect shift of the splice program. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Causing a 2-Years Slowly Progressive Isolated Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Álvaro; Ribeiro, Manuel; Rodrigues, Margarida; Ferreira, Carla; Baldeiras, Inês; Ribeiro, M. Helena; Santana, Isabel; Almeida, Rui; Castro, Lígia; Carpenter, Stirling

    2009-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman was seen for progressive behavioural and cognitive disturbances slowly evolving over a 1-year period. Neuropsychological evaluation disclosed moderate to severe impairment of all cortical functions. Besides this no other clinical abnormality was found. MRI diffusion weighted imaging disclosed hyperintense cortical lesions in a ribbon-like fashion, with restricted diffusivity. EEG showed no periodic sharp waves and CSF examination was normal, including protein 14.3.3. She was heterozygote on codon 129. Her cognitive function continued to decline and she was readmitted for further investigation at the 24th month of disease. Again no ataxia or involuntary movements were observed. MRI disclosed widespread hyperintense lesions over the entire cortex and, for the first time, also caudato-putaminal hyperintensity in T2-weighted images. EEG again failed to show periodic activity. Stereotactic biopsy disclosed moderate spongiform changes, astrocytosis and perivacuolar staining with prion-directed antibodies. Western blot analysis revealed prion type 2 mobility pattern. We discuss the clinical significance of this case: as dementia was the sole finding, and this was slowly-evolving over a 2-year period, MRI findings were the key factor suggesting a prion disease in a woman that otherwise would probably be diagnosed with a primary degenerative dementia. PMID:19996514

  3. Suppression of adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR)-mediated adenosine signaling improves disease phenotypes in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Seng kah; Higashimori, Haruki; Tolman, Michaela; Yang, Yongjie

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease in which the majority of upper and lower motor neurons are degenerated. Despite intensive efforts to identify drug targets and develop neuroprotective strategies, effective therapeutics for ALS remains unavailable. The identification and characterization of novel targets and pathways remain crucial in the development of ALS therapeutics. Adenosine is a major neuromodulator that actively regulates synaptic transmission. Interestingly, adenosine levels are significantly elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of progressing human ALS patients. In the current study, we showed that adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR), but not adenosine 1 receptor (A1R), is highly enriched in spinal (motor) neurons. A2aR expression is also selectively increased at the symptomatic onset in the spinal cords of SOD1G93A mice and end-stage human ALS spinal cords. Interestingly, we found that direct adenosine treatment is sufficient to induce embryonic stem cell-derived motor neuron (ESMN) cell death in cultures. Subsequent pharmacological inhibition and partial genetic ablation of A2aR (A2aR+/−) significantly protect ESMN from SOD1G93A+ astrocyte-induced cell death and delay disease progression of SOD1G93A mice. Taken together, our results provide compelling novel evidence that A2aR-mediated adenosine signaling contributes to the selective spinal motor neuron degeneration observed in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. PMID:25779930

  4. Suppression of adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR)-mediated adenosine signaling improves disease phenotypes in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Seng Kah; Higashimori, Haruki; Tolman, Michaela; Yang, Yongjie

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disease in which the majority of upper and lower motor neurons are degenerated. Despite intensive efforts to identify drug targets and develop neuroprotective strategies, effective therapeutics for ALS remains unavailable. The identification and characterization of novel targets and pathways remain crucial in the development of ALS therapeutics. Adenosine is a major neuromodulator that actively regulates synaptic transmission. Interestingly, adenosine levels are significantly elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of progressing human ALS patients. In the current study, we showed that adenosine 2a receptor (A2aR), but not adenosine 1 receptor (A1R), is highly enriched in spinal (motor) neurons. A2aR expression is also selectively increased at the symptomatic onset in the spinal cords of SOD1G93A mice and end-stage human ALS spinal cords. Interestingly, we found that direct adenosine treatment is sufficient to induce embryonic stem cell-derived motor neuron (ESMN) cell death in cultures. Subsequent pharmacological inhibition and partial genetic ablation of A2aR (A2aR(+/-)) significantly protect ESMN from SOD1G93A(+) astrocyte-induced cell death and delay disease progression of SOD1G93A mice. Taken together, our results provide compelling novel evidence that A2aR-mediated adenosine signaling contributes to the selective spinal motor neuron degeneration observed in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS.

  5. Adenosine A2B-receptor-mediated cyclic AMP accumulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on the accumulation of cyclic AMP have been investigated in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. 2. Adenosine A2-receptor stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP in cells prelabelled with [3H]-adenine. The rank order of agonist potencies was 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; EC50 = 1 microM) > adenosine (EC50 = 5 microM) > 2-chloroadenosine (EC50 = 20 microM) >> CGS 21680 (EC50 > 10 microM). The presence of 0.5 microM dipyridamole, an adenosine uptake blocker, had no effect on the potency of adenosine. 3. The response to 10 microM NECA was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonists, xanthine amine congener (apparent KD = 12 nM), PD 115,199 (apparent KD = 134 nM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (apparent KD = 126 nM). However, the A1-receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, had no significant effect on the responses to NECA or 2-chloroadenosine at concentrations up to 1 microM. 4. Stimulation of A1-receptors with the selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine, did not alter the basal accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP but inhibited a forskolin-mediated elevation of [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation by a maximal value of 42%. This inhibition was fully reversed in the presence of 0.1 microM, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. 5. The time course for NECA-mediated [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation was investigated. The results suggest that there is a substantial efflux of cyclic AMP from the cells in addition to the rapid and sustained elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (5 fold over basal) which was also observed. 6. These data indicate that rat astrocytes in primary culture express an A2B-adenosine receptor coupled positively to adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, the presence of A1-receptors negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase appears to have no significant effect on the A2B-receptor-mediated

  6. BdorOBP83a-2 Mediates Responses of the Oriental Fruit Fly to Semiochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Lin, Jintian; Zhang, He; Zeng, Xinnian

    2016-01-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae), is one of the most destructive pests throughout tropical and subtropical regions in Asia. This insect displays remarkable changes during different developmental phases in olfactory behavior between sexually immature and mated adults. The olfactory behavioral changes provide clues to examine physiological and molecular bases of olfactory perception in this insect. We comparatively analyzed behavioral and neuronal responses of B. dorsalis adults to attractant semiochemicals, and the expression profiles of antenna chemosensory genes. We found that some odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) were upregulated in mated adults in association with their behavioral and neuronal responses. Ligand-binding assays further showed that one of OBP83a orthologs, BdorOBP83a-2, binds with high affinity to attractant semiochemicals. Functional analyses confirmed that the reduction in BdorOBP83a-2 transcript abundance led to a decrease in neuronal and behavioral responses to selected attractants. This study suggests that BdorOBP83a-2 mediates behavioral responses to attractant semiochemicals and could be a potential efficient target for pest control. PMID:27761116

  7. Group X Phospholipase A2 Stimulates the Proliferation of Colon Cancer Cells by Producing Various Lipid Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Surrel, Fanny; Jemel, Ikram; Boilard, Eric; Bollinger, James G.; Payré, Christine; Mounier, Carine M.; Talvinen, Kati A.; Laine, Veli J. O.; Nevalainen, Timo J.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Among mammalian secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s), the group X enzyme has the most potent hydrolyzing capacity toward phosphatidylcholine, the major phospholipid of cell membrane and lipoproteins. This enzyme has recently been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and asthma and may also play a role in colon tumorigenesis. We show here that group X sPLA2 [mouse (m)GX] is one of the most highly expressed PLA2 in the mouse colon and that recombinant mouse and human enzymes stimulate proliferation and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation of various colon cell lines, including Colon-26 cancer cells. Among various recombinant sPLA2s, mGX is the most potent enzyme to stimulate cell proliferation. Based on the use of sPLA2 inhibitors, catalytic site mutants, and small interfering RNA silencing of cytosolic PLA2α and M-type sPLA2 receptor, we demonstrate that mGX promotes cell proliferation independently of the receptor and via its intrinsic catalytic activity and production of free arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids, which are mitogenic by themselves. mGX can also elicit the production of large amounts of prostaglandin E2 and other eicosanoids from Colon-26 cells, but these lipid mediators do not play a role in mGX-induced cell proliferation because inhibitors of cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases do not prevent sPLA2 mitogenic effects. Together, our results indicate that group X sPLA2 may play an important role in colon tumorigenesis by promoting cancer cell proliferation and releasing various lipid mediators involved in other key events in cancer progression. PMID:19602573

  8. Group X phospholipase A2 stimulates the proliferation of colon cancer cells by producing various lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Surrel, Fanny; Jemel, Ikram; Boilard, Eric; Bollinger, James G; Payré, Christine; Mounier, Carine M; Talvinen, Kati A; Laine, Veli J O; Nevalainen, Timo J; Gelb, Michael H; Lambeau, Gérard

    2009-10-01

    Among mammalian secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA(2)s), the group X enzyme has the most potent hydrolyzing capacity toward phosphatidylcholine, the major phospholipid of cell membrane and lipoproteins. This enzyme has recently been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and asthma and may also play a role in colon tumorigenesis. We show here that group X sPLA(2) [mouse (m)GX] is one of the most highly expressed PLA(2) in the mouse colon and that recombinant mouse and human enzymes stimulate proliferation and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation of various colon cell lines, including Colon-26 cancer cells. Among various recombinant sPLA(2)s, mGX is the most potent enzyme to stimulate cell proliferation. Based on the use of sPLA(2) inhibitors, catalytic site mutants, and small interfering RNA silencing of cytosolic PLA(2)alpha and M-type sPLA(2) receptor, we demonstrate that mGX promotes cell proliferation independently of the receptor and via its intrinsic catalytic activity and production of free arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids, which are mitogenic by themselves. mGX can also elicit the production of large amounts of prostaglandin E2 and other eicosanoids from Colon-26 cells, but these lipid mediators do not play a role in mGX-induced cell proliferation because inhibitors of cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases do not prevent sPLA(2) mitogenic effects. Together, our results indicate that group X sPLA(2) may play an important role in colon tumorigenesis by promoting cancer cell proliferation and releasing various lipid mediators involved in other key events in cancer progression.

  9. Impairment of replication fork progression mediates RNA polII transcription-associated recombination.

    PubMed

    Prado, Félix; Aguilera, Andrés

    2005-03-23

    Homologous recombination safeguards genome integrity, but it can also cause genome instability of important consequences for cell proliferation and organism development. Transcription induces recombination, as shown in prokaryotes and eukaryotes for both spontaneous and developmentally regulated events such as those responsible for immunoglobulin class switching. Deciphering the molecular basis of transcription-associated recombination (TAR) is important in understanding genome instability. Using novel plasmid-borne recombination constructs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription induces recombination by impairing replication fork progression. RNAPII transcription concomitant to head-on oncoming replication causes a replication fork pause (RFP) that is linked to a significant increase in recombination. However, transcription that is codirectional with replication has little effect on replication fork progression and recombination. Transcription occurring in the absence of replication does not affect either recombination or replication fork progression. The Rrm3 helicase, which is required for replication fork progression through nucleoprotein complexes, facilitates replication through the transcription-dependent RFP site and reduces recombination. Therefore, our work provides evidence that one mechanism responsible for TAR is RNAP-mediated replication impairment.

  10. Endothelial adenosine A2a receptor-mediated glycolysis is essential for pathological retinal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiping; Yan, Siyuan; Wang, Jiaojiao; Xu, Yiming; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Shuya; Xu, Xizhen; Yang, Qiuhua; Zeng, Xianqiu; Zhou, Yaqi; Gu, Xuejiao; Lu, Sarah; Fu, Zhongjie; Fulton, David J; Weintraub, Neal L; Caldwell, Ruth B; Zhang, Wenbo; Wu, Chaodong; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Ahmad, Aftab; Kaddour-Djebbar, Ismail; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Li, Qinkai; Jiang, Xuejun; Sun, Ye; Sodhi, Akrit; Smith, Lois; Hong, Mei; Huo, Yuqing

    2017-09-19

    Adenosine/adenosine receptor-mediated signaling has been implicated in the development of various ischemic diseases, including ischemic retinopathies. Here, we show that the adenosine A2a receptor (ADORA2A) promotes hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1)-dependent endothelial cell glycolysis, which is crucial for pathological angiogenesis in proliferative retinopathies. Adora2a expression is markedly increased in the retina of mice with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Endothelial cell-specific, but not macrophage-specific Adora2a deletion decreases key glycolytic enzymes and reduces pathological neovascularization in the OIR mice. In human primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells, hypoxia induces the expression of ADORA2A by activating HIF-2α. ADORA2A knockdown decreases hypoxia-induced glycolytic enzyme expression, glycolytic flux, and endothelial cell proliferation, sprouting and tubule formation. Mechanistically, ADORA2A activation promotes the transcriptional induction of glycolytic enzymes via ERK- and Akt-dependent translational activation of HIF-1α protein. Taken together, these findings advance translation of ADORA2A as a therapeutic target in the treatment of proliferative retinopathies and other diseases dependent on pathological angiogenesis.Pathological angiogenesis in the retina is a major cause of blindness. Here the authors show that adenosine receptor A2A drives pathological angiogenesis in the oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model by promoting glycolysis in endothelial cells via the ERK/Akt/HIF-1α pathway, thereby suggesting new therapeutic targets for disease treatment.

  11. Nitric oxide mediates insect cellular immunity via phospholipase A2 activation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    After infection or invasion is recognized, biochemical mediators act in signaling insect immune functions. These include biogenic amines, insect cytokines, eicosanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Treating insects or isolated hemocyte populations with different mediators often leads to similar results. Se...

  12. Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement-Mediated Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Glioma with Different Progression at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiangyong; Dai, Zhuozhi; Xiao, Gang; Yan, Gen; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Guishan; Zhuang, Zerui; Shen, Yuanyu; Zhang, Zhiyan; Hu, Wei; Wu, Renhua

    2017-01-18

    Glioma is a malignant neoplasm affecting the central nervous system. The conventional approaches to diagnosis, such as T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and contrast-enhanced T1WI, give an oversimplified representation of anatomic structures. Nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) imaging is a special form of magnetization transfer (MT) that provides a new way to detect small solute pools through indirect measurement of attenuated water signals, and makes it possible to probe semisolid macromolecular protons. In this study, we investigated the correlation between the effect of NOE-mediated imaging and progression of glioma in a rat tumor model. We found that the NOE signal decreased in tumor region, and signal of tumor center and peritumoral normal tissue markedly decreased with growth of the glioma. At the same time, NOE signal in contralateral normal tissue dropped relatively late (at about day 16-20 after implanting the glioma cells). NOE imaging is a new contrast method that may provide helpful insights into the pathophysiology of glioma with regard to mobile proteins, lipids, and other metabolites. Further, NOE images differentiate normal brain tissue from glioma tissue at a molecular level. Our study indicates that NOE-mediated imaging is a new and promising approach for estimation of tumor progression.

  13. Differences in kinase-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression in normal and transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Crissman, H.A.; Gadbois, D.M.; Tobey, R.A.; Stevenson, A.P.; Kraemer, P.M.; Bustos, L.D.; Dickson, J.A.; Bradbury, E.M. )

    1993-01-01

    Staurosporine (Stsp), a general protein kinase inhibitor, was used to investigate the role of kinase-mediated mechanisms in regulating mammalian cell proliferation. Low levels of Stsp (1-2nM) prevented nontransformed cells from entering S phase, indicating that protein phosphorylation processes are essential for commitment of DNA replication in normal cells. Cells resumed cycling when Stsp was removed. The period of sensitivity of nontransformed human diploid fibroblasts to low levels of the drug commenced 3 h later than the G0/G1 boundary and extended through the G1/S boundary. The initial block point at 3 h corresponds neither to the serum nor the amino acid restriction point. In contrast, neither low nor high concentrations (100nm) of Stsp affected G1 progression of transformed cells. High drug concentrations blocked normal cells in G1 and G2 but affected only G2-progression in transformed cells. These results indicate that kinase-mediated regulation of DNA replication is lost as a result of neoplastic transformation, but the G2-arrest mechanism remains intact.

  14. MVP-mediated exosomal sorting of miR-193a promotes colon cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yun; Ren, Yi; Hu, Xin; Mu, Jingyao; Samykutty, Abhilash; Zhuang, Xiaoying; Deng, Zhongbin; Kumar, Anil; Zhang, Lifeng; Merchant, Michael L.; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald M.; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are emerging mediators of intercellular communication; whether the release of exosomes has an effect on the exosome donor cells in addition to the recipient cells has not been investigated to any extent. Here, we examine different exosomal miRNA expression profiles in primary mouse colon tumour, liver metastasis of colon cancer and naive colon tissues. In more advanced disease, higher levels of tumour suppressor miRNAs are encapsulated in the exosomes. miR-193a interacts with major vault protein (MVP). Knockout of MVP leads to miR-193a accumulation in the exosomal donor cells instead of exosomes, inhibiting tumour progression. Furthermore, miR-193a causes cell cycle G1 arrest and cell proliferation repression through targeting of Caprin1, which upregulates Ccnd2 and c-Myc. Human colon cancer patients with more advanced disease show higher levels of circulating exosomal miR-193a. In summary, our data demonstrate that MVP-mediated selective sorting of tumour suppressor miRNA into exosomes promotes tumour progression. PMID:28211508

  15. Efficient soluble expression of active recombinant human cyclin A2 mediated by E. coli molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Grigoroudis, Asterios I; McInnes, Campbell; Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Kontopidis, George

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial expression of human proteins continues to present a critical challenge in protein crystallography and drug design. While human cyclin A constructs have been extensively characterized in complex with cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), efforts to express the monomeric human cyclin A2 in Escherichia coli in a stable form, without the kinase subunit, have been laden with technical difficulties, including solubility, yield and purity. Here, optimized conditions are described with the aim of generating for first time, sufficient quantities of human recombinant cyclin A2 in a soluble and active form for crystallization and ligand characterization purposes. The studies involve implementation of a His-tagged heterologous expression system under conditions of auto-induction and mediated by molecular chaperone-expressing plasmids. A high yield of human cyclin A2 was obtained in natively folded and soluble form, through co-expression with groups of molecular chaperones from E. coli in various combinations. A one-step affinity chromatography method was utilized to purify the fusion protein products to homogeneity, and the biological activity confirmed through ligand-binding affinity to inhibitory peptides, representing alternatives for the key determinants of the CDK2 substrate recruitment site on the cyclin regulatory subunit. As a whole, obtaining the active cyclin A without the CDK partner (referred to as monomeric in this work) in a straightforward and facile manner will obviate protein--production issues with the CDK2/cyclin A complex and enable drug discovery efforts for non-ATP competitive CDK inhibition through the cyclin groove. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficient Soluble Expression of Active Recombinant Human Cyclin A2 Mediated by E. coli Molecular Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Grigoroudis, Asterios I.; McInnes, Campbell; Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Kontopidis, George

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial expression of human proteins continues to present a critical challenge in protein crystallography and drug design. While human cyclin A constructs have been extensively characterized in complex with cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), efforts to express the monomeric human cyclin A2 in Escherichia coli in a stable form, without the kinase subunit, have been laden with technical difficulties, including solubility, yield and purity. Here, optimized conditions are described with the aim of generating for first time, sufficient quantities of human recombinant cyclin A2 in a soluble and active form for crystallization and ligand characterization purposes. The studies involve implementation of a His-tagged heterologous expression system under conditions of auto-induction and mediated by molecular chaperone-expressing plasmids. A high yield of human cyclin A2 was obtained in natively folded and soluble form, through co-expression with groups of molecular chaperones from E. coli in various combinations. A one-step affinity chromatography method was utilized to purify the fusion protein products to homogeneity, and the biological activity confirmed through ligand-binding affinity to inhibitory peptides, representing alternatives for the key determinants of the CDK2 substrate recruitment site on the cyclin regulatory subunit. As a whole, obtaining the active cyclin A without the CDK partner (referred as monomeric in this work) in a straightforward and facile manner will obviate protein –production issues with the CDK2/cyclin A complex and enable drug discovery efforts for non-ATP competitive CDK inhibition through the cyclin groove. PMID:25956535

  17. Eosinophil Cysteinyl Leukotriene Synthesis Mediated by Exogenous Secreted Phospholipase A2 Group X*

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ying; Oslund, Rob C.; Bollinger, James G.; Henderson, William R.; Santana, Luis F.; Altemeier, William A.; Gelb, Michael H.; Hallstrand, Teal S.

    2010-01-01

    Secreted phospholipase A2 group X (sPLA2-X) has recently been identified in the airways of patients with asthma and may participate in cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT; C4, D4, and E4) synthesis. We examined CysLT synthesis and arachidonic acid (AA) and lysophospholipid release by eosinophils mediated by recombinant human sPLA2-X. We found that recombinant sPLA2-X caused marked AA release and a rapid onset of CysLT synthesis in human eosinophils that was blocked by a selective sPLA2-X inhibitor. Exogenous sPLA2-X released lysophospholipid species that arise from phospholipids enriched in AA in eosinophils, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine as well as plasmenyl phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. CysLT synthesis mediated by sPLA2-X but not AA release could be suppressed by inhibition of cPLA2α. Exogenous sPLA2-X initiated Ser505 phosphorylation of cPLA2α, an intracellular Ca2+ flux, and translocation of cPLA2α and 5-lipoxygenase in eosinophils. Synthesis of CysLTs in response to sPLA2-X or lysophosphatidylcholine was inhibited by p38 or JNK inhibitors but not by a MEK 1/2 inhibitor. A further increase in CysLT synthesis was induced by the addition of sPLA2-X to eosinophils under conditions of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-mediated cPLA2α activation. These results indicate that sPLA2-X participates in AA and lysophospholipid release, resulting in CysLT synthesis in eosinophils through a mechanism involving p38 and JNK MAPK, cPLA2α, and 5-lipoxygenase activation and resulting in the amplification of CysLT synthesis during cPLA2α activation. Transactivation of eosinophils by sPLA2-X may be an important mechanism leading to CysLT formation in the airways of patients with asthma. PMID:20974857

  18. Ran GTPase promotes cancer progression via Met receptor-mediated downstream signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Hiu-Fung; Chan, Ka-Kui; Platt-Higgins, Angela; Dakir, El-Habib; Matchett, Kyle B.; Haggag, Yusuf Ahmed; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Habib, Tanwir; Faheem, Ahmed; Dean, Fennell A.; Morgan, Richard; Rudland, Philip S.; El-Tanani, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown previously that cancer cells with an activated oncogenic pathway, including Met activation, require Ran for growth and survival. Here, we show that knockdown of Ran leads to a reduction of Met receptor expression in several breast and lung cancer cell lines. This, in turn suppressed HGF expression and the Met-mediated activation of the Akt pathway, as well as cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. In a cell line model where Met amplification has previously been shown to contribute to gefitinib resistance, Ran knockdown sensitized cells to gefitinib-mediated inhibition of Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and consequently reduced cell proliferation. We further demonstrate that Met reduction-mediated by knockdown of Ran, occurs at the post-transcriptional level, probably via a matrix metalloproteinase. Moreover, the level of immunoreactive Ran and Met are positively associated in human breast cancer specimens, suggesting that a high level of Ran may be a pre-requisite for Met overexpression. Interestingly, a high level of immunoreactive Ran dictates the prognostic significance of Met, indicating that the co-overexpression of Met and Ran may be associated with cancer progression and could be used in combination as a prognostic indicator. PMID:27716616

  19. NALP3-mediated inflammation is a principal cause of progressive renal failure in oxalate nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Felix; Asplin, John R.; Granja, Ignacio; Schmidt, Insa M.; Moeckel, Gilbert; David, Rachel; Flavell, Richard A.; Aronson, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Oxalate nephropathy with renal failure is caused by multiple disorders causing hyperoxaluria due to either overproduction of oxalate (primary hyperoxaluria) or excessive absorption of dietary oxalate (enteric hyperoxaluria). To study the etiology of renal failure in crystal-induced kidney disease, we created a model of progressive oxalate nephropathy by feeding mice a diet high in soluble oxalate (high oxalate in the absence of dietary calcium). Renal histology was characterized by intratubular calcium-oxalate crystal deposition with an inflammatory response in the surrounding interstitium. Oxalate nephropathy was not found in mice fed a high oxalate diet that also contained calcium. NALP3, also known as cryopyrin, has been implicated in crystal-associated diseases such as gout and silicosis. Mice fed the diet high in soluble oxalate demonstrated increased NALP3 expression in the kidney. Nalp3-null mice were completely protected from the progressive renal failure and death that occurred in wild-type mice fed the diet high in soluble oxalate. NALP3-deficiency did not affect oxalate homeostasis, thereby excluding differences in intestinal oxalate handling to explain the observed phenotype. Thus, progressive renal failure in oxalate nephropathy results primarily from NALP3-mediated inflammation. PMID:23739234

  20. Omi/HtrA2 protease mediates cisplatin-induced cell death in renal cells.

    PubMed

    Cilenti, Lucia; Kyriazis, George A; Soundarapandian, Mangala M; Stratico, Valerie; Yerkes, Adam; Park, Kwon Moo; Sheridan, Alice M; Alnemri, Emad S; Bonventre, Joseph V; Zervos, Antonis S

    2005-02-01

    Omi/HtrA2 is a mitochondrial proapoptotic serine protease that is able to induce both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death. After apoptotic stimuli, Omi is released to the cytoplasm where it binds and cleaves inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. In this report, we investigated the role of Omi in renal cell death following cisplatin treatment. Using primary mouse proximal tubule cells, as well as established renal cell lines, we show that the level of Omi protein is upregulated after treatment with cisplatin. This upregulation is followed by the release of Omi from mitochondria to the cytoplasm and degradation of XIAP. Reducing the endogenous level of Omi protein using RNA interference renders renal cells resistant to cisplatin-induced cell death. Furthermore, we show that the proteolytic activity of Omi is necessary and essential for cisplatin-induced cell death in this system. When renal cells are treated with Omi's specific inhibitor, ucf-101, they become significantly resistant to cisplatin-induced cell death. Ucf-101 was also able to minimize cisplatin-induced nephrotoxic injury in animals. Our results demonstrate that Omi is a major mediator of cisplatin-induced cell death in renal cells and suggest a way to limit renal injury by specifically inhibiting its proteolytic activity.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 mediates reactive oxygen species signaling for hepatocellular carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Ru; Hu, Chi-Tan; You, Ren-In; Pan, Siou-Mei; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Wu, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chang-Shan; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    One of the signaling components involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression is the focal adhesion adaptor paxillin. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), one of the paralogs of paxillin, exhibits many biological functions distinct from paxillin, but may cooperate with paxillin to trigger tumor progression. Screening of Hic-5 in 145 surgical HCCs demonstrated overexpression of Hic-5 correlated well with intra- and extra-hepatic metastasis. Hic-5 highly expressed in the patient derived HCCs with high motility such as HCC329 and HCC353 but not in the HCCs with low motility such as HCC340. Blockade of Hic-5 expression prevented constitutive migration of HCC329 and HCC353 and HGF-induced cell migration of HCC340. HCC329Hic-5(−), HCC353Hic-5(−), HCC372Hic-5(−), the HCCs stably depleted of Hic-5, exhibited reduced motility compared with each HCC expressing Scramble shRNA. Moreover, intra/extrahepatic metastasis of HCC329Hic-5(−) in SCID mice greatly decreased compared with HCC329Scramble. On the other hand, ectopic Hic-5 expression in HCC340 promoted its progression. Constitutive and HGF-induced Hic-5 expression in HCCs were suppressed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers catalase and dithiotheritol and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. On the contrary, depletion of Hic-5 blocked constitutive and HGF-induced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation in HCCs. Also, ectopic expression of Hic-5 enhanced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. These highlighted that Hic-5 plays a central role in the positive feedback ROS-JNK signal cascade. Finally, the Chinese herbal derived anti-HCC peptide LZ-8 suppressed constitutive Hic-5 expression and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Hic-5 mediates ROS-JNK signaling and may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention of HCC progression. PMID:26416447

  2. Probiotic-derived ferrichrome inhibits colon cancer progression via JNK-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Hiroaki; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Moriichi, Kentaro; Sasajima, Junpei; Ikuta, Katsuya; Akutsu, Hiroaki; Tanabe, Hiroki; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested that some probiotics inhibit tumorigenesis and cancer progression. However, the molecules involved have not yet been identified. Here, we show that the culture supernatant of Lactobacillus casei ATCC334 has a strong tumour-suppressive effect on colon cancer cells. Using mass spectrometry, we identify ferrichrome as a tumour-suppressive molecule produced by L. casei ATCC334. The tumour-suppressive effect of ferrichrome is greater than that of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, and ferrichrome has less of an effect on non-cancerous intestinal cells than either of those agents. A transcriptome analysis reveals that ferrichrome treatment induces apoptosis, which is mediated by the activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Western blotting indicates that the induction of apoptosis by ferrichrome is reduced by the inhibition of the JNK signalling pathway. This we demonstrate that probiotic-derived ferrichrome exerts a tumour-suppressive effect via the JNK signalling pathway. PMID:27507542

  3. Cross talk between cell death and cell cycle progression: BCL-2 regulates NFAT-mediated activation.

    PubMed Central

    Linette, G P; Li, Y; Roth, K; Korsmeyer, S J

    1996-01-01

    BCL-2-deficient T cells demonstrate accelerated cell cycle progression and increased apoptosis following activation. Increasing the levels of BCL-2 retarded the G0-->S transition, sustained the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1, and repressed postactivation death. Proximal signal transduction events and immediate early gene transcription were unaffected. However, the transcription and synthesis of interleukin 2 and other delayed early cytokines were markedly attenuated by BCL-2. In contrast, a cysteine protease inhibitor that also blocks apoptosis had no substantial affect upon cytokine production. InterleUkin 2 expression requires several transcription factors of which nuclear translocation of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) and NFAT-mediated transactivation were impaired by BCL-2. Thus, select genetic aberrations in the apoptotic pathway reveal a cell autonomous coregulation of activation. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 PMID:8790367

  4. Hypoxia-Inducible Factors: Mediators of Cancer Progression; Prognostic and Therapeutic Targets in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Sadri, Navid; Zhang, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Soft-tissue sarcomas remain aggressive tumors that result in death in greater than a third of patients due to either loco-regional recurrence or distant metastasis. Surgical resection remains the main choice of treatment for soft tissue sarcomas with pre- and/or post-operational radiation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy employed in more advanced stage disease. However, in recent decades, there has been little progress in the average five-year survival for the majority of patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas, highlighting the need for improved targeted therapeutic agents. Clinical and preclinical studies demonstrate that tumor hypoxia and up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) is associated with decreased survival, increased metastasis, and resistance to therapy in soft tissue sarcomas. HIF-mediated gene expression regulates many critical aspects of tumor biology, including cell survival, metabolic programming, angiogenesis, metastasis, and therapy resistance. In this review, we discuss HIFs and HIF-mediated genes as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in sarcomas. Many pharmacological agents targeting hypoxia-related pathways are in development that may hold therapeutic potential for treating both primary and metastatic sarcomas that demonstrate increased HIF expression. PMID:24216979

  5. Appoptosin-Mediated Caspase Cleavage of Tau Contributes to Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjun; Tseng, I-Chu; Heyser, Charles J; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Zheng, Qiuyang; Huang, Timothy; Wang, Xin; Arslan, Pharhad E; Chakrabarty, Paramita; Wu, Chengbiao; Bu, Guojun; Mobley, William C; Zhang, Yun-Wu; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Masliah, Eliezer; Fraser, Paul; Xu, Huaxi

    2015-09-02

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a movement disorder characterized by tau neuropathology where the underlying mechanism is unknown. An SNP (rs1768208 C/T) has been identified as a strong risk factor for PSP. Here, we identified a much higher T-allele occurrence and increased levels of the pro-apoptotic protein appoptosin in PSP patients. Elevations in appoptosin correlate with activated caspase-3 and caspase-cleaved tau levels. Appoptosin overexpression increased caspase-mediated tau cleavage, tau aggregation, and synaptic dysfunction, whereas appoptosin deficiency reduced tau cleavage and aggregation. Appoptosin transduction impaired multiple motor functions and exacerbated neuropathology in tau-transgenic mice in a manner dependent on caspase-3 and tau. Increased appoptosin and caspase-3-cleaved tau were also observed in brain samples of patients with Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia with tau inclusions. Our findings reveal a novel role for appoptosin in neurological disorders with tau neuropathology, linking caspase-3-mediated tau cleavage to synaptic dysfunction and behavioral/motor defects.

  6. The eukaryotic translation elongation factor eEF1A2 induces neoplastic properties and mediates tumorigenic effects of ZNF217 in precursor cells of human ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yu; Wong, Nicholas; Guan, Yinghui; Salamanca, Clara M.; Cheng, Jung Chien; Lee, Jonathan M.; Gray, Joe W.; Auersperg, Nelly

    2008-04-25

    Ovarian epithelial carcinomas (OEC) frequently exhibit amplifications at the 20q13 locus which is the site of several oncogenes, including the eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A2 and the transcription factor ZNF217. We reported previously that overexpressed ZNF217 induces neoplastic characteristics in precursor cells of OEC. Unexpectedly, ZNF217, which is a transcriptional repressor, enhanced expression of eEF1A2. In this study, array comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism and Affymetrix analysis of ZNF217-overexpressing cell lines confirmed consistently increased expression of eEF1A2 but not of other oncogenes, and revealed early changes in EEF1A2 gene copy numbers and increased expression at crisis during immortalization. We defined the influence of eEF1A2 overexpression on immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells, and investigated interrelationships between effects of ZNF217 and eEF1A2 on cellular phenotypes. Lentivirally induced eEF1A2 overexpression caused delayed crisis, apoptosis resistance and increases in serum-independence, saturation densities, and anchorage independence. siRNA to eEF1A2 reversed apoptosis resistance and reduced anchorage independence in eEF1A2-overexpressing lines. Remarkably, siRNA to eEF1A2 was equally efficient in inhibiting both anchorage independence and resistance to apoptosis conferred by ZNF217 overexpression. Our data define neoplastic properties that are caused by eEF1A2 in nontumorigenic ovarian cancer precursor cells, and suggest that eEF1A2 plays a role in mediating ZNF217-induced neoplastic progression.

  7. From goal motivation to goal progress: the mediating role of coping in the Self-Concordance Model.

    PubMed

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Carraro, Natasha; Miranda, Dave

    2012-01-01

    The present studies examined the mediating role of self-regulatory mechanisms in the relationship between goal motivation and goal progress in the Self-Concordance Model. First, a systematic review, using meta-analytical path analysis, supported the mediating role of effort and action planning in the positive association between autonomous goal motivation and goal progress. Second, results from two additional empirical studies, using structural equation modeling, lent credence to the mediating role of coping in the relationship between goal motivation and goal progress of university students. Autonomous goal motivation was positively associated with task-oriented coping, which predicted greater goal progress during midterm exams (Study 1, N=702) and at the end of the semester in a different sample (Study 2, N=167). Controlled goal motivation was associated with greater disengagement-oriented coping (Study 1 and Study 2) and lesser use of task-oriented coping (Study 2), which reduced goal progress. These results held up after controlling for perceived stress (Study 2). Our findings highlight the importance of coping in the "inception-to-attainment" goal process because autonomous goal motivation indirectly rather than directly predicts goal progress of university students through their usage of task-oriented coping.

  8. Involvement of NADPH oxidase in A2A adenosine receptor-mediated increase in coronary flow in isolated mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhichao; Rajamani, Uthra; Labazi, Hicham; Tilley, Stephen L; Ledent, Catherine; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S Jamal

    2015-06-01

    Adenosine increases coronary flow mainly through the activation of A2A and A2B adenosine receptors (ARs). However, the mechanisms for the regulation of coronary flow are not fully understood. We previously demonstrated that adenosine-induced increase in coronary flow is in part through NADPH oxidase (Nox) activation, which is independent of activation of either A1 or A3ARs. In this study, we hypothesize that adenosine-mediated increase in coronary flow through Nox activation depends on A2A but not A2BARs. Functional studies were conducted using isolated Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was measured in isolated coronary arteries from WT, A2AAR knockout (KO), and A2BAR KO mice using dichlorofluorescein immunofluorescence. Adenosine-induced concentration-dependent increase in coronary flow was attenuated by the specific Nox2 inhibitor gp91 ds-tat or reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger EUK134 in both WT and A2B but not A2AAR KO isolated hearts. Similarly, the A2AAR selective agonist CGS-21680-induced increase in coronary flow was significantly blunted by Nox2 inhibition in both WT and A2BAR KO, while the A2BAR selective agonist BAY 60-6583-induced increase in coronary flow was not affected by Nox2 inhibition in WT. In intact isolated coronary arteries, adenosine-induced (10 μM) increase in H2O2 formation in both WT and A2BAR KO mice was attenuated by Nox2 inhibition, whereas adenosine failed to increase H2O2 production in A2AAR KO mice. In conclusion, adenosine-induced increase in coronary flow is partially mediated by Nox2-derived H2O2, which critically depends upon the presence of A2AAR.

  9. Annexin A2 is involved in antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pathogenic effects in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Romay-Penabad, Zurina; Montiel-Manzano, Maria Guadalupe; Shilagard, Tuya; Papalardo, Elizabeth; Vargas, Gracie; Deora, Arun B; Wang, Michael; Jacovina, Andrew T; Garcia-Latorre, Ethel; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba; Hajjar, Katherine A; Pierangeli, Silvia S

    2009-10-01

    Antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies recognize receptor-bound beta(2) glycoprotein I (beta(2)GPI) on target cells, and induce an intracellular signaling and a procoagulant/proinflammatory phenotype that leads to thrombosis. Evidence indicates that annexin A2 (A2), a receptor for tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen, binds beta(2)GPI on target cells. However, whether A2 mediates pathogenic effects of aPL antibodies in vivo is unknown. In this work, we studied the effects of human aPL antibodies in A2-deficient (A2(-/-)) mice. A2(-/-) and A2(+/+) mice were injected with immunoglobulin G (IgG) isolated from either a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome (IgG-APS), a healthy control subject (IgG-normal human serum), a monoclonal anti-beta(2)GPI antibody (4C5), an anti-A2 monoclonal antibody, or monoclonal antibody of irrelevant specificity as control. We found that, after IgG-APS or 4C5 injections and vascular injury, mean thrombus size was significantly smaller and tissue factor activity was significantly less in A2(-/-) mice compared with A2(+/+) mice. The expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 induced by IgG-APS or 4C5 in explanted A2(-/-) aorta was also significantly reduced compared with A2(+/+) mice. Interestingly, anti-A2 monoclonal antibody significantly decreased aPL-induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and tissue factor activity on cultured endothelial cells. Together, these data indicate for the first time that A2 mediates the pathogenic effects of aPL antibodies in vivo and in vitro APS.

  10. Vitamin D-mediated regulation of CYP21A2 transcription - a novel mechanism for vitamin D action.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Johan; Wikvall, Kjell; Norlin, Maria

    2012-10-01

    1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) has recently been reported to decrease expression and activity of CYP21A2. In this paper, we have studied the mechanisms for the 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)-mediated effect on CYP21A2 transcriptional rate. We have studied the effects of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) using luciferase reporter constructs containing different lengths of the CYP21A2 promoter. These constructs were transfected into cell lines derived from human and mouse adrenal cortex. The mechanism for the effects of vitamin D on the CYP21A2 promoter was studied using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, mutagenesis and gene silencing by siRNA. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) was found to alter the promoter activity via a VDR-mediated mechanism, including the comodulators VDR interacting repressor (VDIR) and Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF). The involvement of comodulator VDIR was confirmed by gene silencing. We identified a vitamin D response element in the CYP21A2 promoter. Interaction between this novel response element and VDR, WSTF and VDIR was shown by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. When this sequence was deleted, the effect of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) was abolished, indicating that this sequence in the CYP21A2 promoter functions as a vitamin D response element. Interestingly, an altered balance between nuclear receptors and comodulators reversed the suppressing effect of vitamin D to a stimulatory effect. This paper reports data important for the understanding of the mechanisms for vitamin D-mediated suppression of gene expression as well as for the vitamin D-mediated effects on CYP21A2. We report a novel mechanism for effects of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Overexpressed Ly-6A.2 mediates cell-cell adhesion by binding a ligand expressed on lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bamezai, A; Rock, K L

    1995-01-01

    The Ly-6 locus encodes several cell surface proteins whose functions are unknown. Although it is hypothesized that these proteins may be receptors, there is no direct evidence that they bind a ligand. Herein we present evidence that Ly-6A.2, a Ly-6 protein expressed on T lymphocytes, binds a ligand expressed on normal thymocytes and splenic B and T cells. We find that transgenic thymocytes that overexpress Ly-6A.2 spontaneously aggregate in culture. This homotypic adhesion requires the overexpression of Ly-6A.2 because it is not observed in cultures of nontransgenic thymocytes. The aggregation of Ly-6A.2 transgenic thymocytes is inhibited by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (which removes Ly-6A.2 and other glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins from the membrane). Some anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies, including nonactivating ones and Fab' fragments, inhibit this aggregation. In contrast, other anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies increase the aggregation of transgenic but not nontransgenic thymocytes. To further examine whether Ly-6A.2 mediates adhesion (versus inducing another adhesion pathway) reaggregation assays were performed with paraformaldehyde-fixed Tg+ thymocytes. Paraformaldehyde-fixed Tg+ thymocytes reaggregate in culture and this aggregation is also blocked by phosphatidyl-inositol-specific phospholipase C and anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies. These results indicate that the homotypic adhesion of cultured Ly-6A.2 transgenic thymocytes is directly mediated by Ly-6A.2 and, more importantly, strongly suggests that Ly-6A.2 binds a ligand that is expressed on thymocytes. Tg+ thymocytes also bind to nontransgenic thymocytes, B cells, and T cells, indicating that normal cells naturally express the Ly-6A.2 ligand. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753800

  12. Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression associates with progression of anal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wan-Hsiang; Miyai, Katsumi; Sporn, Judith C; Luo, Linda; Wang, Jean Y J; Cosman, Bard; Ramamoorthy, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aims The macroH2A histone variants are epigenetic marks for inactivated chromatin. In this study, we examined the expression of macroH2A2 in anal neoplasm from anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) to anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods AIN and anal SCC samples were analysed for macroH2A2 expression, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). The association of macroH2A2 expression with clinical grade, disease recurrence, overall survival and viral involvement was determined. Results macroH2A2 was expressed in normal squamous tissue and lower grade AIN (I and II). Expression was lost in 38% of high-grade AIN (III) and 71% of anal SCC (p=0.002). Patients with AIN with macroH2A2-negative lesions showed earlier recurrence than those with macroH2A2-positive neoplasm (p=0.017). With anal SCC, macroH2A2 loss was more prevalent in the HPV-negative tumours. Conclusions Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression is associated with the progression of anal neoplasm and can be used as a prognostic biomarker for high-grade AIN and SCC. PMID:26658220

  13. Pre-synaptic adenosine A2A receptors control cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Martire, Alberto; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferreira, Samira G; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Köfalvi, Attila; Popoli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    An interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs) and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1) Rs) has been consistently reported to occur in the striatum, although the precise mechanisms are not completely understood. As both receptors control striatal glutamatergic transmission, we now probed the putative interaction between pre-synaptic CB(1) R and A(2A) R in the striatum. In extracellular field potentials recordings in corticostriatal slices from Wistar rats, A(2A) R activation by CGS21680 inhibited CB(1) R-mediated effects (depression of synaptic response and increase in paired-pulse facilitation). Moreover, in superfused rat striatal nerve terminals, A(2A) R activation prevented, while A(2A) R inhibition facilitated, the CB(1) R-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release. In summary, the present study provides converging neurochemical and electrophysiological support for the occurrence of a tight control of CB(1) R function by A(2A) Rs in glutamatergic terminals of the striatum. In view of the key role of glutamate to trigger the recruitment of striatal circuits, this pre-synaptic interaction between CB(1) R and A(2A) R may be of relevance for the pathogenesis and the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia.

  14. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  15. Unloader braces for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis: implications on mediating progression.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Dan K; Russell, Mary E

    2009-09-01

    For persons with unicompartment knee osteoarthritis (OA), off-unloader braces are a mechanical intervention designed to reduce pain, improve physical function, and possibly slow disease progression. Pain relief is thought to be mediated by distracting the involved compartment via external varus or valgus forces applied to the knee. In so doing, tibiofemoral alignment is improved, and load is shifted off the degenerative compartment, where exposure to potentially damaging and provocative mechanical stresses are reduced. To provide a synopsis of the evidence documented in the scientific literature concerning the efficacy of off-loader knee braces for improving symptomatology associated with painful disabling medial compartment knee OA. Relevant peer-reviewed publications were retrieved from a MEDLINE search using the terms with the reference terms osteoarthritis, knee, and braces (per Medical Subject Headings), plus a manual search of bibliographies from original and review articles and appropriate Internet resources. For persons with combined unicompartment knee OA and mild to moderate instability, the strength of recommendation reported by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International in the ability of off-loader knee braces to reduce pain, improve stability, and diminish the risk of falling was 76% (95% confidence interval, 69%-83%). The more evidence the treatment is effective, the higher the percentage. Given the encouraging evidence that off-loader braces are effective in mediating pain relief in conjunction with knee OA and malalignment, bracing should be fully used before joint realignment or replacement surgery is considered. With the number of patients with varus deformities and knee pain predicted to increase as the population ages, a reduction of patient morbidity for this widespread chronic condition in combination with this treatment modality could have a positive impact on health care costs and the economic productivity and quality of life of the

  16. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated oxidative stress in CYP1A2 knockout (CYP1A2-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Slezak, B P; Diliberto, J J; Birnbaum, L S

    1999-10-22

    The objective of the study was to compare alterations in indicators of oxidative stress following 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure in cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2) knockout mice and their parental lineage strains (C57BL/6N and 129/Sv). This study will aid in determining the role, if any, of CYP1A2 in TCDD-mediated oxidative stress. Formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) as a measurement of lipid peroxidation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via the in vitro reduction of cytochrome c in tissue homogenate, and changes in the biochemical antioxidant glutathione were monitored to determine oxidative stress 7 days following a single oral dose of 25 microg TCDD/kg. TBARS, reduction of cytochrome c, and changes in glutathione demonstrated a similar response in CYP1A2 knockout and parental strains. These data suggest that CYP1A2 does not play a critical role in the acute oxidative stress response following TCDD exposure.

  17. Nicotine-mediated cell proliferation and tumor progression in smoking-related cancers

    PubMed Central

    Schaal, Courtney; Chellappan, Srikumar P.

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains multiple classes of established carcinogens including benzo(a)pyrenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and tobacco specific nitrosamines. Most of these compounds exert their genotoxic effects by forming DNA adducts and generation of reactive oxygen species, causing mutations in vital genes like K-Ras and p53. In addition, tobacco specific nitrosamines can activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and to a certain extent β-Adrenergic receptors (β-ARs), promoting cell proliferation. Further, it has been demonstrated that nicotine, the major addictive component of tobacco smoke, can induce cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, and metastasis of lung and pancreatic cancers. These effects occur mainly through the α7-nAChRs, with possible contribution from the β-ARs and/or epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). This review article will discuss the molecular mechanisms by which nicotine and its oncogenic derivatives such as NNK (4-methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone) and NNN (N-nitrosonornicotine) induce cell cycle progression and promote tumor growth. A variety of signaling cascades are induced by nicotine through nAChRs, including the MAPK/ERK pathway, PI3K/AKT pathway and JAK/STAT signaling. In addition, studies have shown that nAChR activation induces Src kinase in a β-arrestin-1 dependent manner, leading to the inactivation of Rb protein and resulting in the expression of E2F1-regulated proliferative genes. Such nAChR-mediated signaling events enhance the proliferation of cells and render them resistant to apoptosis induced by various agents. These observations highlight the role of nAChRs in promoting the growth and metastasis of tumors and raise the possibility of targeting them for cancer therapy. PMID:24398389

  18. Progress on the development of a 2-D PIC/Monte Carlo model of glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, A. E.; Faehl, R. J.; Keinigs, R. K.; Oliphant, T. A., Jr.; Shanahan, W. R.

    There are several computational approaches that have been and are being implemented for the investigation of plasma processing discharges. One-dimensional electrostatic PIC calculations have proven useful in modeling the bulk properties of discharges far from the edges and have yielded good agreement with experiment for ion distributions in the sheath region. The value of PIC methods is that they follow the evolution of an N-body system unconstrained by equilibrium requirements. Gaseous discharges are in general far from equilibrium. Electrons in the bulk region and ions in the sheath can have energies greatly exceeding the neutral gas temperature and can be distributed in a highly non-Maxwellian fashion. One dimensional models are incapable of treating flow and transport of reactants in reactors properly. Geometrical features are also neglected. Modeling the more recently developed high density reactors, such as the Hitachi ECRH source, requires at least two-dimensional and possibly three-dimensional electromagnetic models. Therefore, at Los Alamos we have chosen to address these problems with the MERLIN code. In this paper we will discuss our progress toward developing this code. We will describe, briefly the physics that we are including in this model. We will discuss a test problem that is being used to exercise most of the new features that have recently been added to MERLIN. Finally, we will discuss our future efforts.

  19. NF-κB-Mediated CCL20 Reigns Dominantly in CXCR2-Driven Ovarian Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica C.; Kabir, Syeda M.; Lee, Eun-Sook; Adunyah, Samuel E.; Son, Deok-Soo

    2016-01-01

    progression of ovarian cancer in the peritoneal cavity involves NF-κB-mediated CCL20 as a main chemokine network, which is potentiated by CXCR2 expression. PMID:27723802

  20. SCFFbxw5 mediates transient degradation of actin remodeler Eps8 to allow proper mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Achim; Disanza, Andrea; Reifenberger, Nina; Habeck, Gregor; Becker, Janina; Calabrese, Matthew; Urlaub, Henning; Lorenz, Holger; Schulman, Brenda; Scita, Giorgio; Melchior, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Eps8, a bi-functional actin cytoskeleton remodeler, is a positive regulator of cell proliferation and motility. Here, we describe an unrecognized mechanism regulating Eps8 that is required for proper mitotic progression: While Eps8 is stable in G1 and S phase, its half-life drops sharply in G2. This requires G2-specific proteasomal degradation mediated by the Ubiquitin E3 ligase SCFFbxw5. Consistent with a short window of degradation, Eps8 disappears from the cell cortex early in mitosis, but reappears at the midzone of dividing cells. Failure to reduce Eps8 levels in G2 prolongs its localization at the cell cortex and markedly delays cell rounding and prometaphase duration. However, during late stages of mitosis and cytokinesis, Eps8 capping activity is required to prevent membrane blebbing and cell shape deformations. Our findings identify SCFFbxw5-driven fluctuation of Eps8 levels as an important mechanism that contributes to cell-shape changes during entry into – and exit from - mitosis. PMID:23314863

  1. Ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel PKA phosphorylation: a critical mediator of heart failure progression.

    PubMed

    Wehrens, Xander H T; Lehnart, Stephan E; Reiken, Steven; Vest, John A; Wronska, Anetta; Marks, Andrew R

    2006-01-17

    Defective regulation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2)/calcium release channel, required for excitation-contraction coupling in the heart, has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. For example, diastolic calcium "leak" via RyR2 channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum has been identified as an important factor contributing to impaired contractility in heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death. In patients with heart failure, chronic activation of the "fight or flight" stress response leads to protein kinase A (PKA) hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 at Ser-2808. PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 Ser-2808 reduces the binding affinity of the channel-stabilizing subunit calstabin2, resulting in leaky RyR2 channels. We developed RyR2-S2808A mice to determine whether Ser-2808 is the functional PKA phosphorylation site on RyR2. Furthermore, mice in which the RyR2 channel cannot be PKA phosphorylated were relatively protected against the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction. Taken together, these data show that PKA phosphorylation of Ser-2808 on the RyR2 channel appears to be a critical mediator of progressive cardiac dysfunction after myocardial infarction.

  2. Tuberatolide B Suppresses Cancer Progression by Promoting ROS-Mediated Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youn Kyung; Kim, Junseong; Lee, Kang Min; Choi, Yu-Jeong; Ye, Bo-Ram; Kim, Min-Sun; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Lee, Seung-Hong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Heo, Soo-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Tuberatolide B (TTB, C27H34O4) is a diastereomeric meroterpenoid isolated from the Korean marine algae Sargassum macrocarpum. However, the anticancer effects of TTB remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that TTB inhibits tumor growth in breast, lung, colon, prostate, and cervical cancer cells. To examine the mechanism by which TTB suppresses cell growth, we determined the effect of TTB on apoptosis, ROS generation, DNA damage, and signal transduction. TTB induced ROS production in MDA-MB-231, A549, and HCT116 cells. Moreover, TTB enhanced DNA damage by inducing γH2AX foci formation and the phosphorylation of DNA damage-related proteins such as Chk2 and H2AX. Furthermore, TTB selectively inhibited STAT3 activation, which resulted in a reduction in cyclin D1, MMP-9, survivin, VEGF, and IL-6. In addition, TTB-induced ROS generation caused STAT3 inhibition, DNA damage, and apoptotic cell death. Therefore, TTB suppresses cancer progression by promoting ROS-mediated inhibition of STAT3 signaling, suggesting that TTB is useful for the treatment of cancer. PMID:28245605

  3. Tuberatolide B Suppresses Cancer Progression by Promoting ROS-Mediated Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Kyung; Kim, Junseong; Lee, Kang Min; Choi, Yu-Jeong; Ye, Bo-Ram; Kim, Min-Sun; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Lee, Seung-Hong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Heo, Soo-Jin

    2017-02-25

    Tuberatolide B (TTB, C27H34O₄) is a diastereomeric meroterpenoid isolated from the Korean marine algae Sargassum macrocarpum. However, the anticancer effects of TTB remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that TTB inhibits tumor growth in breast, lung, colon, prostate, and cervical cancer cells. To examine the mechanism by which TTB suppresses cell growth, we determined the effect of TTB on apoptosis, ROS generation, DNA damage, and signal transduction. TTB induced ROS production in MDA-MB-231, A549, and HCT116 cells. Moreover, TTB enhanced DNA damage by inducing γH2AX foci formation and the phosphorylation of DNA damage-related proteins such as Chk2 and H2AX. Furthermore, TTB selectively inhibited STAT3 activation, which resulted in a reduction in cyclin D1, MMP-9, survivin, VEGF, and IL-6. In addition, TTB-induced ROS generation caused STAT3 inhibition, DNA damage, and apoptotic cell death. Therefore, TTB suppresses cancer progression by promoting ROS-mediated inhibition of STAT3 signaling, suggesting that TTB is useful for the treatment of cancer.

  4. Aptamer-mediated blockade of IL4Rα triggers apoptosis of MDSCs and limits tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Roth, Felix; De La Fuente, Adriana C; Vella, Jennifer L; Zoso, Alessia; Inverardi, Luca; Serafini, Paolo

    2012-03-15

    In addition to promoting tumor progression and metastasis by enhancing angiogenesis and invasion, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) also inhibit antitumor T-cell functions and limit the efficacy of immunotherapeutic interventions. Despite the importance of these leukocyte populations, a simple method for their specific depletion has not been developed. In this study, we generated an RNA aptamer that blocks the murine or human IL-4 receptor-α (IL4Rα or CD124) that is critical for MDSC suppression function. In tumor-bearing mice, this anti-IL4Rα aptamer preferentially targeted MDSCs and TAM and unexpectedly promoted their elimination, an effect that was associated with an increased number of tumor-infiltrating T cells and a reduction in tumor growth. Mechanistic investigations of aptamer-triggered apoptosis in MDSCs confirmed the importance of IL4Ra-STAT6 pathway activation in MDSC survival. Our findings define a straightforward strategy to deplete MDSCs and TAMs in vivo, and they strengthen the concept that IL4Rα signaling is pivotal for MDSC survival. More broadly, these findings suggest therapeutic strategies based on IL4Rα signaling blockades to arrest an important cellular mechanism of tumoral immune escape mediated by MDSCs and TAM in cancer.

  5. Stem cell-mediated gene delivering for the treatment of cerebral ischemia: progress and prospectives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. There is no effective treatment for ischemic stroke apart from thrombolytic therapy, which has a narrow therapeutic time window. Gene therapy has proven to be effective in experimental stroke, but it suffers from disadvantages that limit its clinical application, such as difficulty in intracranial delivering of therapeutic genes, low efficacy in transfecting host cells and long-term expression of exogenous genes. Delivering therapeutic genes to the ischemic brain via stem cells is an alternative strategy of combined gene and stem cell therapy. There are advantages for stem cell-mediated gene delivery as opposed to direct gene transfer. In recent years, studies used stem cells that over-express different neurotrophic factors, such as BDNF, GDNT, or NT3, and found that the delivery of these genetically-modified stem cells to animal models of ischemic stroke is safe and effective, thus suggesting that stem cell-based gene therapy may be a promising treatment for stroke. This review summarizes the advantages and recent progress of stem cell-based gene therapy for ischemic stroke. We also discuss the relevant strategy for optimizing stem cell-based gene therapy and discuss the potential strategies for its future application.

  6. Progress report on LLTR Series II Test A-2 (Part 1). [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Freede, W.J.; Neely, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    This document contains a complete set of valid and final digital and analog data plots for LLTR Series II, Test A-2. Included is an Accuracy Statement regarding this data as required by Revision 0 of the GE Test Request, Specification No. 23A2062. The Series II, Sodium-Water Reaction Test A-2 was performed in the Large Leak Test Rig (LLTR) at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). This was the third of three planned double-edged guillotine (DEG) rupture tests of a single tube which will be followed by a number of small leak tests. The test article is the LLTI which is a full-size diameter internals, shortened in length and prototypic of the CRBR steam generator. It is installed in the Large Leak Test Vessel (LLTV). The overall test program was formulated by General Electric (GE) as Test Requester to establish steam generator design and to verify analytical models/codes to estimate the effect of large leak accidents in an LMFBR demonstration plant steam generator and system.

  7. Up-regulation of ribosome biogenesis by MIR196A2 genetic variation promotes endometriosis development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Wen; Chang, Hui-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chan, Carmen; Chung, Ching; Tseng, Chun-Cheng; Hwang, Tritium; Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression has been reported in endometriosis and miRNA gene polymorphisms have been linked to cancer. Because certain ovarian cancers arise from endometriosis, we genotyped seven cancer-related miRNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (MiRSNPs) to investigate their possible roles in endometriosis. Genetic variants in MIR196A2 (rs11614913) and MIR100 (rs1834306) were found to be associated with endometriosis development and related clinical phenotypes, such as infertility and pain. Downstream analysis of the MIR196A2 risk allele revealed upregulation of rRNA editing and protein synthesis genes, suggesting hyper-activation of ribosome biogenesis as a driving force for endometriosis progression. Clinical studies confirmed higher levels of small nucleolar RNAs and ribosomal proteins in atypical endometriosis lesions, and this was more pronounced in the associated ovarian clear cell carcinomas. Treating ovarian clear cells with CX5461, an RNA polymerase I inhibitor, suppressed cell growth and mobility followed by cell cycle arrest at G2/M stage and apoptosis. Our study thus uncovered a novel tumorigenesis pathway triggered by the cancer-related MIR196A2 risk allele during endometriosis development and progression. We suggest that anti-RNA polymerase I therapy may be efficacious for treating endometriosis and associated malignancies. PMID:27741504

  8. EphA2 in the early pathogenesis and progression of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Jennifer M; Sen, Banibrata; Saigal, Babita; Prudkin, Ludmila; Behrens, Carmen; Solis, Luisa; Dong, Wenli; Bekele, B Nebiyou; Wistuba, Ignacio; Johnson, Faye M

    2009-12-01

    Overexpression of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 occurs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a number of other human cancers. This overexpression correlates with a poor prognosis, smoking, and the presence of Kirsten rat sarcoma (K-Ras) mutations in NSCLC. In other cancers, EphA2 has been implicated in migration and metastasis. To determine if EphA2 can promote NSCLC progression, we examined the relationship of EphA2 with proliferation and migration in cell lines and with metastases in patient tumors. We also examined potential mechanisms involving AKT, Src, focal adhesion kinase, Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPase), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2. Knockdown of EphA2 in NSCLC cell lines decreased proliferation (colony size) by 20% to 70% in four of five cell lines (P < 0. 04) and cell migration by 7% to 75% in five of six cell lines (P < 0. 03). ERK1/2 activation correlated with effects on proliferation, and inhibition of ERK1/2 activation also suppressed proliferation. In accordance with the in vitro data, high tumor expression of EphA2 was an independent prognostic factor in time to recurrence (P = 0.057) and time to metastases (P = 0.046) of NSCLC patients. We also examined EphA2 expression in the putative premalignant lung lesion, atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, and the noninvasive bronchioloalveolar component of adenocarcinoma because K-Ras mutations occur in atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and are common in lung adenocarcinomas. Both preinvasive lesion types expressed EphA2, showing its expression in the early pathogenesis of lung adenocarcinoma. Our data suggest that EphA2 may be a promising target for treating and preventing NSCLC.

  9. Annexin A2 Mediates Mycoplasma pneumoniae Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome Toxin Binding to Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Somarajan, Sudha R.; Al-Asadi, Fadi; Ramasamy, Kumaraguruparan; Pandranki, Lavanya

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasma pneumoniae synthesizes a novel human surfactant protein A (SP-A)-binding cytotoxin, designated community-acquired respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS) toxin, that exhibits ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating activities in mammalian cells and is directly linked to a range of acute and chronic airway diseases, including asthma. In our attempt to detect additional CARDS toxin-binding proteins, we subjected the membrane fraction of human A549 airway cells to affinity chromatography using recombinant CARDS toxin as bait. A 36-kDa A549 cell membrane protein bound to CARDS toxin and was identified by time of flight (TOF) mass spectroscopy as annexin A2 (AnxA2) and verified by immunoblotting with anti-AnxA2 monoclonal antibody. Dose-dependent binding of CARDS toxin to recombinant AnxA2 reinforced the specificity of the interaction, and further studies revealed that the carboxy terminus of CARDS toxin mediated binding to AnxA2. In addition, pretreatment of viable A549 cells with anti-AnxA2 monoclonal antibody or AnxA2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced toxin binding and internalization. Immunofluorescence analysis of CARDS toxin-treated A549 cells demonstrated the colocalization of CARDS toxin with cell surface-associated AnxA2 upon initial binding and with intracellular AnxA2 following toxin internalization. HepG2 cells, which express low levels of AnxA2, were transfected with a plasmid expressing AnxA2 protein, resulting in enhanced binding of CARDS toxin and increased vacuolization. In addition, NCI-H441 cells, which express both AnxA2 and SP-A, upon AnxA2 siRNA transfection, showed decreased binding and subsequent vacuolization. These results indicate that CARDS toxin recognizes AnxA2 as a functional receptor, leading to CARDS toxin-induced changes in mammalian cells. PMID:25139904

  10. Group IVA phospholipase A2 participates in the progression of hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Akira; Nabe, Takeshi; Fushimi, Hideaki; Iriyama, Nao; Kanai, Shiho; Sato, Takashi; Uozumi, Naonori; Shimizu, Takao; Akiba, Satoshi

    2012-10-01

    Group IVA phospholipase A2 (IVA-PLA2) is an enzyme that intiates the arachidonic acid pathway and plays an important role in inflammation. We demonstrate that IVA-PLA2 deficiency suppresses lipid deposition in the liver, which was induced by administration of a high-fat and -cholesterol diet (HFCD) for 16 wk in mice. Herein, we performed 2-dimensional gel-based comparative proteomics to further define the suppressive effect of IVA-PLA2 deficiency on fatty liver formation. In comparisons among 4 groups, wild-type (WT)/normal diet (ND), IVA-PLA2-deficient knockout (KO)/ND, WT/HFCD, and KO/HFCD, 4 proteins, 3 of which are associated with hepatic fibrosis, were identified as molecules, of which altered expression by HFCD was suppressed in KO mice compared to WT mice. Therefore, we assessed the effect of IVA-PLA2 deficiency on hepatic fibrosis induced by HFCD or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in mouse models. Biochemical and histological analyses revealed that IVA-PLA2 deficiency markedly reduced overall collagen accumulation in the liver of HFCD- and CCl4-derived mouse models. We found that IVA-PLA2 deficiency prevented activation of hepatic stellate cells and infiltration of F4/80-positive macrophages without affecting other immunocytes such as CD8+ lymphocytes and natural killer cells. In summary, IVA-PLA2 deficiency attenuates not only lipid deposition in the liver but also hepatic fibrosis formation.

  11. AAV-mediated pancreatic overexpression of Igf1 counteracts progression to autoimmune diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Mallol, Cristina; Casana, Estefania; Jimenez, Veronica; Casellas, Alba; Haurigot, Virginia; Jambrina, Claudia; Sacristan, Victor; Morró, Meritxell; Agudo, Judith; Vilà, Laia; Bosch, Fatima

    2017-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by autoimmune destruction of β-cells leading to severe insulin deficiency. Although many improvements have been made in recent years, exogenous insulin therapy is still imperfect; new therapeutic approaches, focusing on preserving/expanding β-cell mass and/or blocking the autoimmune process that destroys islets, should be developed. The main objective of this work was to test in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, which spontaneously develop autoimmune diabetes, the effects of local expression of Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), a potent mitogenic and pro-survival factor for β-cells with immunomodulatory properties. Transgenic NOD mice overexpressing IGF1 specifically in β-cells (NOD-IGF1) were generated and phenotyped. In addition, miRT-containing, IGF1-encoding adeno-associated viruses (AAV) of serotype 8 (AAV8-IGF1-dmiRT) were produced and administered to 4- or 11-week-old non-transgenic NOD females through intraductal delivery. Several histological, immunological, and metabolic parameters were measured to monitor disease over a period of 28-30 weeks. In transgenic mice, local IGF1 expression led to long-term suppression of diabetes onset and robust protection of β-cell mass from the autoimmune insult. AAV-mediated pancreatic-specific overexpression of IGF1 in adult animals also dramatically reduced diabetes incidence, both when vectors were delivered before pathology onset or once insulitis was established. Transgenic NOD-IGF1 and AAV8-IGF1-dmiRT-treated NOD animals had much less islet infiltration than controls, preserved β-cell mass, and normal insulinemia. Transgenic and AAV-treated islets showed less expression of antigen-presenting molecules, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines important for tissue-specific homing of effector T cells, suggesting IGF1 modulated islet autoimmunity in NOD mice. Local expression of Igf1 by AAV-mediated gene transfer counteracts progression to diabetes in NOD mice. This study suggests a

  12. A 2D suspension of active agents: the role of fluid mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Behmadi, Hojjat; Fazli, Zahra; Najafi, Ali

    2017-03-22

    Taking into account both the Vicsek short-range ordering and the far-field hydrodynamic interactions mediated by the ambient fluid, we investigate the role of long-range interactions in the ordering phenomena in a quasi 2-dimensional active suspension. By studying the number fluctuations, the velocity correlation functions and cluster size distribution function, we show that depending on the number density of swimmers and the strength of noise, the hydrodynamic interactions can have significant effects in a suspension. For a fixed value of noise, at larger density of particles, long-range interactions enhance the particle pairing and cluster formation in the system.

  13. A 2D suspension of active agents: the role of fluid mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmadi, Hojjat; Fazli, Zahra; Najafi, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Taking into account both the Vicsek short-range ordering and the far-field hydrodynamic interactions mediated by the ambient fluid, we investigate the role of long-range interactions in the ordering phenomena in a quasi 2-dimensional active suspension. By studying the number fluctuations, the velocity correlation functions and cluster size distribution function, we show that depending on the number density of swimmers and the strength of noise, the hydrodynamic interactions can have significant effects in a suspension. For a fixed value of noise, at larger density of particles, long-range interactions enhance the particle pairing and cluster formation in the system.

  14. Aspirin delays mesothelioma growth by inhibiting HMGB1-mediated tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Pellegrini, L; Napolitano, A; Giorgi, C; Jube, S; Preti, A; Jennings, C J; De Marchis, F; Flores, E G; Larson, D; Pagano, I; Tanji, M; Powers, A; Kanodia, S; Gaudino, G; Pastorino, S; Pass, H I; Pinton, P; Bianchi, M E; Carbone, M

    2015-06-11

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory molecule that has a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that reduces the incidence, metastatic potential and mortality of many inflammation-induced cancers. We hypothesized that ASA may exert anticancer properties in MM by abrogating the carcinogenic effects of HMGB1. Using HMGB1-secreting and -non-secreting human MM cell lines, we determined whether aspirin inhibited the hallmarks of HMGB1-induced MM cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrated that ASA and its metabolite, salicylic acid (SA), inhibit motility, migration, invasion and anchorage-independent colony formation of MM cells via a novel HMGB1-mediated mechanism. ASA/SA, at serum concentrations comparable to those achieved in humans taking therapeutic doses of aspirin, and BoxA, a specific inhibitor of HMGB1, markedly reduced MM growth in xenograft mice and significantly improved survival of treated animals. The effects of ASA and BoxA were cyclooxygenase-2 independent and were not additive, consistent with both acting via inhibition of HMGB1 activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the well documented, yet poorly understood antitumorigenic activity of aspirin, which we show proceeds via HMGB1 inhibition. Moreover, the use of BoxA appears to allow a more efficient HMGB1 targeting while eluding the known gastrointestinal side effects of ASA. Our findings are directly relevant to MM. Given the emerging importance of HMGB1 and its tumor-promoting functions in many cancer types, and of aspirin in cancer prevention and therapy, our investigation is poised to provide broadly applicable information.

  15. Complement-Mediated Dysfunction of Glomerular Filtration Barrier Accelerates Progressive Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carla; Corna, Daniela; Rottoli, Daniela; Zanchi, Cristina; Azzollini, Nadia; Tomasoni, Susanna; Berlingeri, Silvia; Noris, Marina; Morigi, Marina; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Intrarenal complement activation leads to chronic tubulointerstitial injury in animal models of proteinuric nephropathies, making this process a potential target for therapy. This study investigated whether a C3-mediated pathway promotes renal injury in the protein overload model and whether the abnormal exposure of proximal tubular cells to filtered complement could trigger the resulting inflammatory response. Mice with C3 deficiency were protected to a significant degree against the protein overload–induced interstitial inflammatory response and tissue damage, and they had less severe podocyte injury and less proteinuria. When the same injury was induced in wild-type (WT) mice, antiproteinuric treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor lisinopril reduced the amount of plasma protein filtered, decreased the accumulation of C3 by proximal tubular cells, and protected against interstitial inflammation and damage. For determination of the injurious role of plasma-derived C3, as opposed to tubular cell–derived C3, C3-deficient kidneys were transplanted into WT mice. Protein overload led to the development of glomerular injury, accumulation of C3 in podocytes and proximal tubules, and tubulointerstitial changes. Conversely, when WT kidneys were transplanted into C3-deficient mice, protein overload led to a more mild disease and abnormal C3 deposition was not observed. These data suggest that the presence of C3 increases the glomerular filtration barrier's susceptibility to injury, ultrafiltered C3 contributes more to tubulointerstitial damage induced by protein overload than locally synthesized C3, and local C3 synthesis is irrelevant to the development of proteinuria. It is speculated that therapies targeting complement combined with interventions to minimize proteinuria would more effectively prevent the progression of renal disease. PMID:18354030

  16. Hyaluronan-mediated CD44 activation of RhoGTPase signaling and cytoskeleton function promotes tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Lilly Y W

    2008-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), is enriched in many types of tumors. In cancer patients HA concentrations are usually higher in malignant tumors than in corresponding benign or normal tissues, and in some tumor types the level of HA is predictive of malignancy. HA is often bound to CD44 isoforms which are ubiquitous, abundant, and functionally important cell surface receptors. This article reviews the current evidence for HA/CD44-mediated activation of the ankyrin-based cytoskeleton and RhoGTPase signaling during tumor progression. A special focus is placed on the role of HA-mediated CD44 interaction with unique downstream effectors (e.g., the cytoskeletal protein, ankyrin and/or various GTPases (e.g., RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42)) in coordinating intracellular signaling pathways (e.g., Ca(2+) mobilization, Rho signaling, PI3 kinase-AKT activation, NHE1-mediated cellular acidification, transcriptional upregulation and cytoskeletal function) and generating the concomitant onset of tumor cell activities (e.g., tumor cell adhesion, growth, survival, migration and invasion) and tumor progression. I believe this information will provide valuable new insights into poorly understood aspects of solid tumor malignancy. Furthermore, the new knowledge concerning HA/CD44-mediated oncogenic signaling events will have potentially important clinical utility, and could establish CD44 and its associated signaling molecules as important tumor markers for the early detection and evaluation of oncogenic potential. It could also serve as ground work for the future development of new drug targets to inhibit HA/CD44-mediated tumor metastasis and cancer progression.

  17. Defocus Incorporated Soft Contact (DISC) lens slows myopia progression in Hong Kong Chinese schoolchildren: a 2-year randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Carly Siu Yin; Tang, Wing Chun; Tse, Dennis Yan-Yin; Tang, Ying Yung; To, Chi Ho

    2014-01-01

    Aims To determine if ‘Defocus Incorporated Soft Contact’ (DISC) lens wear slows childhood myopia progression. Methods A 2-year double-blind randomised controlled trial was carried out in 221 children aged 8–13 years, with myopia between −1.00 and −5.00 Dioptres (D) and astigmatism ≤1.00 D. Subjects were randomly assigned to the DISC (n=111) or single vision (SV; n=110) contact lens group. DISC lenses incorporated concentric rings, which provided an addition of +2.50 D, alternating with the normal distance correction. Refractive error (cycloplegic autorefraction) and axial length were measured at 6-month intervals. Differences between groups were analysed using unpaired t test. Results In total, 128 children completed the study, n=65 in the DISC group and n=63 in the SV group. Myopia progressed 25% more slowly for children in the DISC group compared with those in the control group (0.30 D/year; 95% CI −0.71 to −0.47 vs 0.4 D/year; 95% CI −0.93 to −0.65, p=0.031). Likewise, there was less axial elongation for children in the DISC versus SV groups (0.13 mm/year; 95% CI 0.20 to 0.31 vs 0.18 mm/year; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.43, p=0.009). Treatment effect correlated positively with DISC lens wearing time (r=0.342; p=0.005). Indeed, myopia in children who wore the DISC lenses for five or more hours/day progressed 46% (mean difference=−0.382 D, p=0.001; 95% CI −0.59 to −0.17) less than those in the SV group. Conclusions The daily wearing of DISC lens significantly slowed myopia progression and axial elongation in Hong Kong schoolchildren. The findings demonstrated that simultaneous clear vision with constant myopic defocus can retard myopia progression. PMID:24169657

  18. Adenosine A2 receptor-mediated regulation of renal hemodynamics and glomerular filtration rate is abolished in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Persson, Patrik; Hansell, Peter; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are one of the earliest indications of altered kidney function in diabetes. Adenosine regulates GFR through tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism acting on adenosine A1 receptor. In addition, adenosine can directly regulate vascular tone by acting on A1 and A2 receptors expressed in afferent and efferent arterioles. Opposite to A1 receptors, A2 receptors mediate vasorelaxation. This study investigates the involvement of adenosine A2 receptors in regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) and GFR in control and diabetic kidneys. GFR was measured by inulin clearance and RBF by a transonic flow probe placed around the renal artery. Measurements were performed in isoflurane-anesthetized normoglycemic and alloxan-diabetic C57BL/6 mice during baseline and after acute administration of 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX), a selective A2 receptor antagonist. GFR and RBF were lower in diabetic mice compared to control (258 ± 61 vs. 443 ± 33 μl min(-1) and 1,083 ± 51 vs. 1,405 ± 78 μl min(-1)). In control animals, DMPX decreased RBF by -6%, whereas GFR increased +44%. DMPX had no effects on GFR and RBF in diabetic mice. Sodium excretion increased in diabetic mice after A2 receptor blockade (+78%). In conclusion, adenosine acting on A2 receptors mediates an efferent arteriolar dilatation which reduces filtration fraction (FF) and maintains GFR within normal range in normoglycemic mice. However, this regulation is absent in diabetic mice, which may contribute to reduced oxygen availability in the diabetic kidney.

  19. CD36-Dependent 7-Ketocholesterol Accumulation in Macrophages Mediates Progression of Atherosclerosis in Response to Chronic Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Maiseyeu, Andrei; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Villamena, Frederick A.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Harkema, Jack R; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Air pollution exposure has been shown to potentiate plaque progression in humans and animals. Our previous studies have suggested a role for oxidized lipids in mediating adverse vascular effect of air pollution. However, the types of oxidized lipids formed in response to air pollutants and how this occurs and their relevance to atherosclerosis is not fully understood. Objective To investigate the mechanisms by which particulate matter< 2.5μm (PM2.5) induces progression of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Atherosclerosis-prone ApoE−/− or LDLR−/− mice were exposed to filtered air or concentrated ambient PM2.5 using a versatile aerosol concentrator enrichment system for 6 months. PM2.5 increased 7-ketocholesterol (7-KCh), an oxidatively modified form of cholesterol, in plasma IDL/LDL fraction and in aortic plaque concomitant with progression of atherosclerosis and increased CD36 expression in plaque-macrophages from PM2.5-exposed mice. Macrophages isolated from PM2.5-exposed mice displayed increased uptake of oxidized lipids without alterations in their efflux capacity. Consistent with these finding, CD36-positive macrophages displayed a heightened capacity for oxidized lipid uptake. Deficiency of CD36 on hematopoietic cells diminished the effect of air pollution on 7-KCh accumulation, foam cell formation, and atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our results suggest a potential role for CD36-mediated abnormal accumulations of oxidized lipids such as 7-KCh in air pollution induced atherosclerosis progression. PMID:25186795

  20. Ultraslow Water-Mediated Transmembrane Interactions Regulate the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yoonji; Kim, Songmi; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-09-01

    Water molecules inside G-protein coupled receptor have recently been spotlighted in a series of crystal structures. To decipher the dynamics and functional roles of internal waters in GPCR activity, we studied A$_{\\text{2A}}$ adenosine receptor using $\\mu$sec-molecular dynamics simulations. Our study finds that the amount of water flux across the transmembrane (TM) domain varies depending on the receptor state, and that the water molecules of the TM channel in the active state flow three times slower than those in the inactive state. Depending on the location in solvent-protein interface as well as the receptor state, the average residence time of water in each residue varies from $\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10^2)$ psec to $\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10^2)$ nsec. Especially, water molecules, exhibiting ultraslow relaxation ($\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10^2)$ nsec) in the active state, are found around the microswitch residues that are considered activity hotspots for GPCR function. A continuous allosteric network spanning the TM domain, arising from water-mediated contacts, is unique in the active state, underscoring the importance of slow waters in the GPCR activation.

  1. Novel action of FOXL2 as mediator of Col1a2 gene autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Mara; Deiana, Manila; Marcia, Loredana; Sbardellati, Andrea; Asunis, Isadora; Meloni, Alessandra; Angius, Andrea; Cusano, Roberto; Loi, Angela; Crobu, Francesca; Fotia, Giorgio; Cucca, Francesco; Schlessinger, David; Crisponi, Laura

    2016-08-01

    FOXL2 belongs to the evolutionarily conserved forkhead box (FOX) superfamily and is a master transcription factor in a spectrum of developmental pathways, including ovarian and eyelid development and bone, cartilage and uterine maturation. To analyse its action, we searched for proteins that interact with FOXL2. We found that FOXL2 interacts with specific C-terminal propeptides of several fibrillary collagens. Because these propeptides can participate in feedback regulation of collagen biosynthesis, we inferred that FOXL2 could thereby affect the transcription of the cognate collagen genes. Focusing on COL1A2, we found that FOXL2 indeed affects collagen synthesis, by binding to a DNA response element located about 65Kb upstream of this gene. According to our hypothesis we found that in Foxl2(-/-) mouse ovaries, Col1a2 was elevated from birth to adulthood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) compartmentalizes the ovary during folliculogenesis, (with type I, type III and type IV collagens as primary components), and ECM composition changes during the reproductive lifespan. In Foxl2(-/-) mouse ovaries, in addition to up-regulation of Col1a2, Col3a1, Col4a1 and fibronectin were also upregulated, while laminin expression was reduced. Thus, by regulating levels of extracellular matrix components, FOXL2 may contribute to both ovarian histogenesis and the fibrosis attendant on depletion of the follicle reserve during reproductive aging and menopause. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Activation of thromboxane A2 receptors mediates endothelial dysfunction in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaona; Sun, Wanchun; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiaoou; Liu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is one of high-risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Improvement of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes reduces vascular complications. However, the underlying mechanism needs to be uncovered. This study was conducted to elucidate whether and how thromboxane A2 receptor (TPr) activation contributes to endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. Exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to either TPr agonists, two structurally related thromboxane A2 (TxA2) mimetics, significantly reduced phosphorylations of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser(1177) and Akt at Ser(473). These effects were abolished by pharmacological or genetic inhibitors of TPr. TPr-induced suppression of eNOS and Akt phosphorylation was accompanied by upregulation of PTEN (phosphatase and tension homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and Ser(380)/Thr(382/383) PTEN phosphorylation. PTEN-specific siRNA restored Akt-eNOS signaling in the face of TPr activation. The small GTPase, Rho, was also activated by TPr stimulation, and pretreatment of HUVECs with Y27632, a Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, rescued TPr-impaired Akt-eNOS signaling. In mice, streptozotocin-induced diabetes was associated with aortic PTEN upregulation, PTEN-Ser(380)/Thr(382/383) phosphorylation, and dephosphorylation of Akt (at Ser(473)) and eNOS (at Ser(1177)). Importantly, administration of TPr antagonist blocked these changes. We conclude that TPr activation impairs endothelial function by selectively inactivating the ROCK-PTEN-Akt-eNOS pathway in diabetic mice.

  3. Progression characteristics of the European Friedreich's Ataxia Consortium for Translational Studies (EFACTS): a 2 year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Reetz, Kathrin; Dogan, Imis; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Giunti, Paola; Mariotti, Caterina; Durr, Alexandra; Boesch, Sylvia; Klopstock, Thomas; de Rivera, Francisco Javier Rodriguez; Schöls, Ludger; Klockgether, Thomas; Bürk, Katrin; Rai, Myriam; Pandolfo, Massimo; Schulz, Jörg B

    2016-12-01

    EQ-5D-3L. PVF performance improved by 0·99 words per year (0·14). To detect a 50% reduction in SARA progression at 80% power, 548 patients would be needed in a 1 year clinical trial and 184 would be needed for a 2 year trial. Our results show that SARA is a suitable clinical rating scale to detect deterioration of ataxia symptoms over time; ADL is an appropriate measure to monitor changes in daily self-care activities; and younger age at disease onset is a major predictor for faster disease progression. The results of the EFACTS longitudinal analysis provide suitable outcome measures and sample size calculations for the design of upcoming clinical trials of Friedreich's ataxia. European Commission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors protect against prion and Aβ mediated synapse degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An early event in the neuropathology of prion and Alzheimer's diseases is the loss of synapses and a corresponding reduction in the level of synaptophysin, a pre-synaptic membrane protein essential for neurotransmission. The molecular mechanisms involved in synapse degeneration in these diseases are poorly understood. In this study the process of synapse degeneration was investigated by measuring the synaptophysin content of cultured neurones incubated with the prion derived peptide (PrP82-146) or with Aβ1-42, a peptide thought to trigger pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease. A pharmacological approach was used to screen cell signalling pathways involved in synapse degeneration. Results Pre-treatment with phospholipase A2 inhibitors (AACOCF3, MAFP and aristolochic acids) protected against synapse degeneration in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurones incubated with PrP82-146 or Aβ1-42. Synapse degeneration was also observed following the addition of a specific phospholipase A2 activating peptide (PLAP) and the addition of PrP82-146 or Aβ1-42 activated cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 within synapses. Activation of phospholipase A2 is the first step in the generation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and PAF receptor antagonists (ginkgolide B, Hexa-PAF and CV6029) protected against synapse degeneration induced by PrP82-146, Aβ1-42 and PLAP. PAF facilitated the production of prostaglandin E2, which also caused synapse degeneration and pre-treatment with the prostanoid E receptor antagonist AH13205 protected against PrP82-146, Aβ1-42 and PAF induced synapse degeneration. Conclusions Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that PrP82-146 and Aβ1-42trigger abnormal activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 resident within synapses, resulting in elevated levels of PAF and prostaglandin E2that cause synapse degeneration. Inhibitors of this pathway that can cross the blood brain barrier may protect against the synapse degeneration seen during

  5. Inhibitory effects of benzodiazepines on the adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated secretion of interleukin-8 in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kristina; Xifró, Rosa Altarcheh; Hartweg, Julia Lisa; Spitzlei, Petra; Meis, Kirsten; Molderings, Gerhard J; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2013-01-30

    The activation of adenosine A(2B) receptors in human mast cells causes pro-inflammatory responses such as the secretion of interleukin-8. There is evidence for an inhibitory effect of benzodiazepines on mast cell mediated symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease. Therefore, we investigated the effects of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast cell leukaemia (HMC1) cells by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The adenosine analogue N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 0.3-3 μM) increased interleukin-8 production about 5-fold above baseline. This effect was attenuated by the adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonist MRS1754 (N-(4-cyanophenyl)-2-{4-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl)phenoxy}-acetamide) 1 μM. In addition, diazepam, 4'-chlorodiazepam and flunitrazepam (1-30 μM) markedly reduced NECA-induced interleukin-8 production in that order of potency, whereas clonazepam showed only a modest inhibition. The inhibitory effect of diazepam was not altered by flumazenil 10 μM or PK11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide) 10 μM. Diazepam attenuated the NECA-induced expression of mRNA encoding for interleukin-8. Moreover, diazepam and flunitrazepam reduced the increasing effects of NECA on cAMP-response element- and nuclear factor of activated t-cells-driven luciferase reporter gene activities in HMC1 cells. Neither diazepam nor flunitrazepam affected NECA-induced increases in cellular cAMP levels in CHO Flp-In cells stably expressing recombinant human adenosine A(2B) receptors, excluding a direct action of benzodiazepines on human adenosine A(2B) receptors. In conclusion, this is the first study showing an inhibitory action of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast (HMC1) cells. The rank order of potency indicates the involvement of an atypical benzodiazepine binding site.

  6. Achievement Goals and Emotions: The Mediational Roles of Perceived Progress, Control, and Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Nathan C.; Sampasivam, Lavanya; Muis, Krista R.; Ranellucci, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: The link between achievement goals and achievement emotions is well established; however, research exploring potential mediators of this relationship is lacking. The control-value theory of achievement emotions (Pekrun, 2006, "Educational Psychology Review," 18, 315) posits that perceptions of control and value mediate the…

  7. Achievement Goals and Emotions: The Mediational Roles of Perceived Progress, Control, and Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Nathan C.; Sampasivam, Lavanya; Muis, Krista R.; Ranellucci, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: The link between achievement goals and achievement emotions is well established; however, research exploring potential mediators of this relationship is lacking. The control-value theory of achievement emotions (Pekrun, 2006, "Educational Psychology Review," 18, 315) posits that perceptions of control and value mediate the…

  8. EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction-mediated apoptosis and Flt3L-induced immunotherapy inhibits tumor growth in a breast cancer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Manish; Vemula, Sai V.; Sharma, Anurag; Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Mittal, Shalini; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 is overexpressed in several types of cancers and is currently being pursued as a target for breast cancer therapeutics. The EphA2 ligand EphrinA1 induces EphA2 phosphorylation and intracellular internalization and degradation, thus inhibiting tumor progression. The hematopoietic growth factor, FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor ligand (Flt3L), promotes expansion and mobilization of functional dendritic cells. Methods We tested the EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells focusing on the receptor-ligand-mediated apoptosis of breast cancer cells. In order to determine whether the EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction-associated apoptosis and Flt3L-mediated immunotherapy would have an additive effect in inhibiting tumor growth, we used an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer to evaluate intratumoral (i.t.) inoculation strategies with human adenovirus (HAd) vectors expressing either EphrinA1 (HAd-EphrinA1-Fc), Flt3L (HAd-Flt3L) or a combination of EphrinA1-Fc + Flt3L (HAd-EphrinA1-Fc + HAd-Flt3L). Results In vitro analysis demonstrated that an EphrinA1-EphA2 interaction led to apoptosis-related changes in breast cancer cells. In vivo, three i.t. inoculations of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc showed potent inhibition of tumor growth. Furthermore, increased inhibition in tumor growth was observed with the combination of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc and HAd-Flt3L accompanied by the generation of an anti-tumor adaptive immune response. Conclusions The results indicating induction of apoptosis and inhibition of mammary tumor growth show the potential therapeutic benefits of HAd-EphrinA1-Fc. In combination with HAd-Flt3L, this represents a promising strategy to effectively induce mammary tumor regression by HAd vector-based therapy. PMID:22228563

  9. Inhibition of plasmin-mediated TAFI activation may affect development but not progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Katherine; Revill, Charlotte; Macrae, Fraser; Bailey, Marc; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Wheatcroft, Stephen; Butlin, Roger; Foster, Richard; Scott, D Julian; Gils, Ann; Ariens, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) reduces the breakdown of fibrin clots through its action as an indirect inhibitor of plasmin. Studies in TAFI-deficient mice have implicated a potential role for TAFI in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) disease. The role of TAFI inhibition on AAA formation in adult ApoE-/- mice is unknown. The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of TAFI inhibition on AAA development and progression. Using the Angiotensin II model of AAA, male ApoE-/- mice were infused with Angiotensin II 750ng/kg/min with or without a monoclonal antibody inhibitor of plasmin-mediated activation of TAFI, MA-TCK26D6, or a competitive small molecule inhibitor of TAFI, UK-396082. Inhibition of TAFI in the Angiotensin II model resulted in a decrease in the mortality associated with AAA rupture (from 40.0% to 16.6% with MA-TCK26D6 (log-rank Mantel Cox test p = 0.16), and 8.3% with UK-396082 (log-rank Mantel Cox test p = 0.05)). Inhibition of plasmin-mediated TAFI activation reduced the incidence of AAA from 52.4% to 30.0%. However, late treatment with MA-TCK26D6 once AAA were already established had no effect on the progression of AAA in this model. The formation of intra-mural thrombus is responsible for the dissection and early rupture in the angiotensin II model of AAA, and this process can be prevented through inhibition of TAFI. Late treatment with a TAFI inhibitor does not prevent AAA progression. These data may indicate a role for inhibition of plasmin-mediated TAFI activation in the early stages of AAA development, but not in its progression.

  10. Inhibition of plasmin-mediated TAFI activation may affect development but not progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Katherine; Revill, Charlotte; Macrae, Fraser; Bailey, Marc; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Wheatcroft, Stephen; Butlin, Roger; Foster, Richard; Scott, D. Julian; Gils, Ann; Ariёns, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Objective Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) reduces the breakdown of fibrin clots through its action as an indirect inhibitor of plasmin. Studies in TAFI-deficient mice have implicated a potential role for TAFI in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) disease. The role of TAFI inhibition on AAA formation in adult ApoE-/- mice is unknown. The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of TAFI inhibition on AAA development and progression. Methods Using the Angiotensin II model of AAA, male ApoE-/- mice were infused with Angiotensin II 750ng/kg/min with or without a monoclonal antibody inhibitor of plasmin-mediated activation of TAFI, MA-TCK26D6, or a competitive small molecule inhibitor of TAFI, UK-396082. Results Inhibition of TAFI in the Angiotensin II model resulted in a decrease in the mortality associated with AAA rupture (from 40.0% to 16.6% with MA-TCK26D6 (log-rank Mantel Cox test p = 0.16), and 8.3% with UK-396082 (log-rank Mantel Cox test p = 0.05)). Inhibition of plasmin-mediated TAFI activation reduced the incidence of AAA from 52.4% to 30.0%. However, late treatment with MA-TCK26D6 once AAA were already established had no effect on the progression of AAA in this model. Conclusions The formation of intra-mural thrombus is responsible for the dissection and early rupture in the angiotensin II model of AAA, and this process can be prevented through inhibition of TAFI. Late treatment with a TAFI inhibitor does not prevent AAA progression. These data may indicate a role for inhibition of plasmin-mediated TAFI activation in the early stages of AAA development, but not in its progression. PMID:28472123

  11. A novel anti-inflammatory role for secretory phospholipase A2 in immune complex-mediated arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Boilard, Eric; Lai, Ying; Larabee, Katherine; Balestrieri, Barbara; Ghomashchi, Farideh; Fujioka, Daisuke; Gobezie, Reuben; Coblyn, Jonathan S; Weinblatt, Michael E; Massarotti, Elena M; Thornhill, Thomas S; Divangahi, Maziar; Remold, Heinz; Lambeau, Gérard; Gelb, Michael H; Arm, Jonathan P; Lee, David M

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) catalyses the release of arachidonic acid for generation of lipid mediators of inflammation and is crucial in diverse inflammatory processes. The functions of the secretory PLA2 enzymes (sPLA2), numbering nine members in humans, are poorly understood, though they have been shown to participate in lipid mediator generation and the associated inflammation. To further understand the roles of sPLA2 in disease, we quantified the expression of these enzymes in the synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis and used gene-deleted mice to examine their contribution in a mouse model of autoimmune erosive inflammatory arthritis. Contrary to expectation, we find that the group V sPLA2 isoform plays a novel anti-inflammatory role that opposes the pro-inflammatory activity of group IIA sPLA2. Mechanistically, group V sPLA2 counter-regulation includes promotion of immune complex clearance by regulating cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis. These observations identify a novel anti-inflammatory function for a PLA2 and identify group V sPLA2 as a potential biotherapeutic for treatment of immune-complex-mediated inflammation. PMID:20432503

  12. A novel anti-inflammatory role for secretory phospholipase A2 in immune complex-mediated arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Lai, Ying; Larabee, Katherine; Balestrieri, Barbara; Ghomashchi, Farideh; Fujioka, Daisuke; Gobezie, Reuben; Coblyn, Jonathan S; Weinblatt, Michael E; Massarotti, Elena M; Thornhill, Thomas S; Divangahi, Maziar; Remold, Heinz; Lambeau, Gérard; Gelb, Michael H; Arm, Jonathan P; Lee, David M

    2010-05-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) catalyses the release of arachidonic acid for generation of lipid mediators of inflammation and is crucial in diverse inflammatory processes. The functions of the secretory PLA2 enzymes (sPLA2), numbering nine members in humans, are poorly understood, though they have been shown to participate in lipid mediator generation and the associated inflammation. To further understand the roles of sPLA2 in disease, we quantified the expression of these enzymes in the synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis and used gene-deleted mice to examine their contribution in a mouse model of autoimmune erosive inflammatory arthritis. Contrary to expectation, we find that the group V sPLA2 isoform plays a novel anti-inflammatory role that opposes the pro-inflammatory activity of group IIA sPLA2. Mechanistically, group V sPLA2 counter-regulation includes promotion of immune complex clearance by regulating cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis. These observations identify a novel anti-inflammatory function for a PLA2 and identify group V sPLA2 as a potential biotherapeutic for treatment of immune-complex-mediated inflammation.

  13. Role of MicroRNA-26b in Glioma Development and Its Mediated Regulation on EphA2

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Zhao, Xiangzhong; Liu, Ming; Liu, Haizhou; Yao, Weicheng; Zhang, Yuyan; Cao, Shousong; Lin, Xiukun

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of multiple target genes. Deregulation of miRNAs is common in human tumorigenesis. Low level expression of miR-26b has been found in glioma cells. However, its underlying mechanism of action has not been determined. Methodology/Principal Findings Real-time PCR was employed to measure the expression level of miR-26b in glioma patients and cells. The level of miR-26b was inversely correlated with the grade of glioma. Ectopic expression of miR-26b inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioma cells. A binding site for miR-26b was identified in the 3′UTR of EphA2. Over-expression of miR-26b in glioma cells repressed the endogenous level of EphA2 protein. Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) experiments were performed to further confirm the effects of miR-26b on the regulation of EphA2, and the results showed that miR-26b inhibited the VM processes which regulated by EphA2. Significance This study demonstrated that miR-26b may act as a tumor suppressor in glioma and it directly regulates EphA2 expression. EphA2 is a direct target of miR-26b, and the down-regulation of EphA2 mediated by miR-26b is dependent on the binding of miR-26b to a specific response element of microRNA in the 3′UTR region of EphA2 mRNA. PMID:21264258

  14. Ligand independent EphA2 signaling drives the adoption of a targeted therapy-mediated metastatic melanoma phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Paraiso, Kim H. T.; Thakur, Meghna Das; Fang, Bin; Koomen, John M.; Fedorenko, Inna V.; John, Jobin K.; Tsao, Hensin; Flaherty, Keith T.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Messina, Jane L.; Pasquale, Elena B.; Villagra, Alejandro; Rao, Uma N.; Kirkwood, John M.; Meier, Friedegund; Sloot, Sarah; Gibney, Geoffrey T.; Stuart, Darrin; Tawbi, Hussein; Smalley, Keiran S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with BRAF inhibitor resistance can develop disease at new sites, suggesting that drug-induced selection pressure drives metastasis. Here we used mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic screening to uncover ligand-independent EphA2 signaling as an adaptation to BRAF inhibitor therapy that led to the adoption of a metastatic phenotype. The EphA2-mediated invasion was AKT-dependent and readily reversible upon removal of drug as well as through PI3K and AKT inhibition. In xenograft models, BRAF inhibition led to the development of EphA2 positive metastases. A retrospective analysis of melanoma patients on BRAF inhibitor therapy showed that 68% of those failing therapy develop metastases at new disease sites, compared to 35% in patients on dacarbazine. Further IHC staining of melanoma specimens taken from patients on BRAF inhibitor therapy as well as metastatic samples taken from patients failing therapy showed increased EphA2 staining. We suggest that inhibition of ligand-independent EphA2 signaling may limit metastases associated with BRAF inhibitor therapy. PMID:25542447

  15. HLA-A2 Alleles Mediate Alzheimer's Disease by Altering Hippocampal Volume.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Xuan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Tan, Lin; Sun, Fu-Rong; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2017-05-01

    HLA-A is a locus of the major histocompatibility complex situated on chromosome 6p21.3. HLA-A has been shown to be associated with susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we firstly investigated the association of gene variants in HLA-A and brain structures on MRI in a large sample from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to explore the effects of HLA-A on AD pathogenesis. We selected the hippocampus, parahippocampus, posterior cingulate, precuneus, middle temporal, entorhinal cortex, and amygdala as regions of interest (ROIs). In hybrid population analysis, our results showed a marginally significant association between rs9260168 and the atrophy of the left parahippocampus (P = 0.007, Pc = 0.054), rs3823342 and the atrophy of the left parahippocampus (P = 0.014, Pc = 0.054), rs76475517, which only exists in Caucasians with HLA-A23 or HLA-A24 alleles, and the atrophy of the right amygdala (P = 0.010, Pc = 0.085) at baseline. In particular, the haplotype (TGACAAGG), as a surrogate marker of HLA-A2, was founded to be positively associated with the atrophy of the right hippocampus (P = 0.047) at baseline. Furthermore, we detected the above four associations in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subpopulation analysis. Our study provided preliminary evidences supporting HLA-A2 in Caucasians contribute to the risk of AD by modulating the alteration of hippocampal volume and HLA-A gene variants appear to play a role in altering AD-related brain structures on MRI.

  16. Denervation Induces Cytosolic Phospholipase A2-mediated Fatty Acid Hydroperoxide Generation by Muscle Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Muller, Florian L.; Liu, Yuhong; Sabia, Marian; Liang, Hanyu; Song, Wook; Jang, Youngmok C.; Ran, Qitao; Van Remmen, Holly

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that mitochondria from denervated muscle exhibited dramatically higher Amplex Red dependent fluorescence (thought to be highly specific for hydrogen peroxide) compared with control muscle mitochondria. We now demonstrate that catalase only partially inhibits the Amplex Red signal in mitochondria from denervated muscle. In contrast, ebselen (a glutathione peroxidase mimetic and inhibitor of fatty acid hydroperoxides) significantly inhibits the Amplex Red signal. This suggests that the majority of the Amplex Red signal in mitochondria from denervated muscle is not derived from hydrogen peroxide. Because Amplex Red cannot react with substrates in the lipid environment, we hypothesize that lipid hydroperoxides formed within the mitochondrial lipid bilayer are released as fatty acid hydroperoxides and react with the Amplex Red probe. We also suggest that the release of fatty acid hydroperoxides from denervated muscle mitochondria may be an important determinant of muscle atrophy. In support of this, muscle atrophy and the Amplex Red signal are inhibited in caloric restricted mice and in transgenic mice that overexpress the lipid hydroperoxide-detoxifying enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4. Finally, we propose that cytosolic phospholipase A2 may be a potential source of these hydroperoxides. PMID:19001413

  17. Integrative Modeling Reveals Annexin A2-mediated Epigenetic Control of Mesenchymal Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kling, Teresia; Ferrarese, Roberto; Ó hAilín, Darren; Johansson, Patrik; Heiland, Dieter Henrik; Dai, Fangping; Vasilikos, Ioannis; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Jörnsten, Rebecka; Carro, Maria Stella; Nelander, Sven

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastomas are characterized by transcriptionally distinct subtypes, but despite possible clinical relevance, their regulation remains poorly understood. The commonly used molecular classification systems for GBM all identify a subtype with high expression of mesenchymal marker transcripts, strongly associated with invasive growth. We used a comprehensive data-driven network modeling technique (augmented sparse inverse covariance selection, aSICS) to define separate genomic, epigenetic, and transcriptional regulators of glioblastoma subtypes. Our model identified Annexin A2 (ANXA2) as a novel methylation-controlled positive regulator of the mesenchymal subtype. Subsequent evaluation in two independent cohorts established ANXA2 expression as a prognostic factor that is dependent on ANXA2 promoter methylation. ANXA2 knockdown in primary glioblastoma stem cell-like cultures suppressed known mesenchymal master regulators, and abrogated cell proliferation and invasion. Our results place ANXA2 at the apex of a regulatory cascade that determines glioblastoma mesenchymal transformation and validate aSICS as a general methodology to uncover regulators of cancer subtypes.

  18. Geldanamycin mediates the apoptosis of gastric carcinoma cells through inhibition of EphA2 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Hu; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Zhang, San-Bing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Liang; Liu, Feng-Ling; Zuo, Jing

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of EphA2 in the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric carcinoma. Moreover, we aimed to determine the effect of geldanamycin (GA), an inhibitor of Hsp90, on the proliferation and apoptosis of human gastric carcinoma cells. Gastric carcinoma tissues, paired adjacent mucosa and paired normal mucosa were obtained from resected surgical specimens of gastric carcinoma, and EphA2 mRNA and protein levels were assessed by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. FCM was used to detect cell cycle distribution and apoptosis. MGC803 cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed by MTT and FCM, respectively. We found that EphA2 protein was increased in the carcinogenesis of gastric epithelial cells. Proliferation index (PI) was significantly upregulated following an increase in EphA2 expression in gastric carcinoma compared with dysplasia and normal samples, and was notably correlated with grade and lymph node metastasis. Knockdown of EphA2 increased the apoptosis rate and decreased the PI of MGC803 cells, which overexpressed the EphA2 protein. GA inhibited the cell proliferation of MGC803 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, GA decreased the EphA2 protein expression in MGC803 cells. Overexpression of EphA2 inhibited cell growth, blocked cells in the G0/G1 stage and increased cell apoptosis induced by GA in MGC803 cells. However, knockdown of EphA2 in MGC803 cells increased the apoptosis ratio induced by GA. In conclusion, EphA2 overexpression is an important characteristic in the carcinogenesis of gastric epithelial cells, followed by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Knockdown of EphA2 blocked MGC803 cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis. In conclusion GA inhibits MGC803 cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis by upregulating expression of EphA2.

  19. AP-1 Is a Key Regulator of Proinflammatory Cytokine TNFα-mediated Triple-negative Breast Cancer Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yichun; He, Huan; Jonsson, Philip; Sinha, Indranil; Zhao, Chunyan; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents a highly aggressive form of breast cancer with limited treatment options. Proinflammatory cytokines such as TNFα can facilitate tumor progression and metastasis. However, the mechanistic aspects of inflammation mediated TNBC progression remain unclear. Using ChIP-seq, we demonstrate that the cistrome for the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun is comprised of 13,800 binding regions in TNFα-stimulated TNBC cells. In addition, we show that c-Jun regulates nearly a third of the TNFα-regulated transcriptome. Interestingly, high expression level of the c-Jun-regulated pro-invasion gene program is associated with poor clinical outcome in TNBCs. We further demonstrate that c-Jun drives TNFα-mediated increase of malignant characteristics of TNBC cells by transcriptional regulation of Ninj1. As exemplified by the CXC chemokine genes clustered on chromosome 4, we demonstrate that NF-κB might be a pioneer factor required for the regulation of TNFα-inducible inflammatory genes, whereas c-Jun has little effect. Together, our results uncover AP-1 as an important determinant for inflammation-induced cancer progression, rather than inflammatory response. PMID:26792858

  20. Ethylene-Mediated Regulation of A2-Type CYCLINs Modulates Hyponastic Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Polko, Joanna K; van Rooij, Jop A; Vanneste, Steffen; Pierik, Ronald; Ammerlaan, Ankie M H; Vergeer-van Eijk, Marleen H; McLoughlin, Fionn; Gühl, Kerstin; Van Isterdael, Gert; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Millenaar, Frank F; Beeckman, Tom; Peeters, Anton J M; Marée, Athanasius F M; van Zanten, Martijn

    2015-09-01

    Upward leaf movement (hyponastic growth) is frequently observed in response to changing environmental conditions and can be induced by the phytohormone ethylene. Hyponasty results from differential growth (i.e. enhanced cell elongation at the proximal abaxial side of the petiole relative to the adaxial side). Here, we characterize Enhanced Hyponasty-d, an activation-tagged Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) line with exaggerated hyponasty. This phenotype is associated with overexpression of the mitotic cyclin CYCLINA2;1 (CYCA2;1), which hints at a role for cell divisions in regulating hyponasty. Indeed, mathematical analysis suggested that the observed changes in abaxial cell elongation rates during ethylene treatment should result in a larger hyponastic amplitude than observed, unless a decrease in cell proliferation rate at the proximal abaxial side of the petiole relative to the adaxial side was implemented. Our model predicts that when this differential proliferation mechanism is disrupted by either ectopic overexpression or mutation of CYCA2;1, the hyponastic growth response becomes exaggerated. This is in accordance with experimental observations on CYCA2;1 overexpression lines and cyca2;1 knockouts. We therefore propose a bipartite mechanism controlling leaf movement: ethylene induces longitudinal cell expansion in the abaxial petiole epidermis to induce hyponasty and simultaneously affects its amplitude by controlling cell proliferation through CYCA2;1. Further corroborating the model, we found that ethylene treatment results in transcriptional down-regulation of A2-type CYCLINs and propose that this, and possibly other regulatory mechanisms affecting CYCA2;1, may contribute to this attenuation of hyponastic growth. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Ethylene-Mediated Regulation of A2-Type CYCLINs Modulates Hyponastic Growth in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Polko, Joanna K.; van Rooij, Jop A.; Vanneste, Steffen; Pierik, Ronald; Ammerlaan, Ankie M.H.; Vergeer-van Eijk, Marleen H.; McLoughlin, Fionn; Gühl, Kerstin; Van Isterdael, Gert; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.; Millenaar, Frank F.; Beeckman, Tom; Peeters, Anton J.M.; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; van Zanten, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Upward leaf movement (hyponastic growth) is frequently observed in response to changing environmental conditions and can be induced by the phytohormone ethylene. Hyponasty results from differential growth (i.e. enhanced cell elongation at the proximal abaxial side of the petiole relative to the adaxial side). Here, we characterize Enhanced Hyponasty-d, an activation-tagged Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) line with exaggerated hyponasty. This phenotype is associated with overexpression of the mitotic cyclin CYCLINA2;1 (CYCA2;1), which hints at a role for cell divisions in regulating hyponasty. Indeed, mathematical analysis suggested that the observed changes in abaxial cell elongation rates during ethylene treatment should result in a larger hyponastic amplitude than observed, unless a decrease in cell proliferation rate at the proximal abaxial side of the petiole relative to the adaxial side was implemented. Our model predicts that when this differential proliferation mechanism is disrupted by either ectopic overexpression or mutation of CYCA2;1, the hyponastic growth response becomes exaggerated. This is in accordance with experimental observations on CYCA2;1 overexpression lines and cyca2;1 knockouts. We therefore propose a bipartite mechanism controlling leaf movement: ethylene induces longitudinal cell expansion in the abaxial petiole epidermis to induce hyponasty and simultaneously affects its amplitude by controlling cell proliferation through CYCA2;1. Further corroborating the model, we found that ethylene treatment results in transcriptional down-regulation of A2-type CYCLINs and propose that this, and possibly other regulatory mechanisms affecting CYCA2;1, may contribute to this attenuation of hyponastic growth. PMID:26041787

  2. A 2-Oxoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase Mediates the Biosynthesis of Glucoraphasatin in Radish1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Li, Feng; Fukino, Nobuko; Ohara, Takayoshi; Nishio, Takeshi; Ishida, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs) are secondary metabolites whose degradation products confer intrinsic flavors and aromas to Brassicaceae vegetables. Several structures of GSLs are known in the Brassicaceae, and the biosynthetic pathway and regulatory networks have been elucidated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). GSLs are precursors of chemical defense substances against herbivorous pests. Specific GSLs can act as feeding blockers or stimulants, depending on the pest species. Natural selection has led to diversity in the GSL composition even within individual species. However, in radish (Raphanus sativus), glucoraphasatin (4-methylthio-3-butenyl glucosinolate) accounts for more than 90% of the total GSLs, and little compositional variation is observed. Because glucoraphasatin is not contained in other members of the Brassicaceae, like Arabidopsis and cabbage (Brassica oleracea), the biosynthetic pathways for glucoraphasatin remain unclear. In this report, we identified and characterized a gene encoding GLUCORAPHASATIN SYNTHASE 1 (GRS1) by genetic mapping using a mutant that genetically lacks glucoraphasatin. Transgenic Arabidopsis, which overexpressed GRS1 cDNA, accumulated glucoraphasatin in the leaves. GRS1 encodes a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, and it is abundantly expressed in the leaf. To further investigate the biosynthesis and transportation of GSLs in radish, we grafted a grs1 plant onto a wild-type plant. The grafting experiment revealed a leaf-to-root long-distance glucoraphasatin transport system in radish and showed that the composition of GSLs differed among the organs. Based on these observations, we propose a characteristic biosynthesis pathway for glucoraphasatin in radish. Our results should be useful in metabolite engineering for breeding of high-value vegetables. PMID:28100450

  3. Therapeutic AAV9-mediated Suppression of Mutant SOD1 Slows Disease Progression and Extends Survival in Models of Inherited ALS

    PubMed Central

    Foust, Kevin D; Salazar, Desirée L; Likhite, Shibi; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Ditsworth, Dara; Ilieva, Hristelina; Meyer, Kathrin; Schmelzer, Leah; Braun, Lyndsey; Cleveland, Don W; Kaspar, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) resulting in progressive motor neuron death through one or more acquired toxicities. Involvement of wild-type SOD1 has been linked to sporadic ALS, as misfolded SOD1 has been reported in affected tissues of sporadic patients and toxicity of astrocytes derived from sporadic ALS patients to motor neurons has been reported to be reduced by lowering the synthesis of SOD1. We now report slowed disease onset and progression in two mouse models following therapeutic delivery using a single peripheral injection of an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) encoding an shRNA to reduce the synthesis of ALS-causing human SOD1 mutants. Delivery to young mice that develop aggressive, fatal paralysis extended survival by delaying both disease onset and slowing progression. In a later-onset model, AAV9 delivery after onset markedly slowed disease progression and significantly extended survival. Moreover, AAV9 delivered intrathecally to nonhuman primates is demonstrated to yield robust SOD1 suppression in motor neurons and glia throughout the spinal cord and therefore, setting the stage for AAV9-mediated therapy in human clinical trials. PMID:24008656

  4. Therapeutic AAV9-mediated suppression of mutant SOD1 slows disease progression and extends survival in models of inherited ALS.

    PubMed

    Foust, Kevin D; Salazar, Desirée L; Likhite, Shibi; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Ditsworth, Dara; Ilieva, Hristelina; Meyer, Kathrin; Schmelzer, Leah; Braun, Lyndsey; Cleveland, Don W; Kaspar, Brian K

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) resulting in progressive motor neuron death through one or more acquired toxicities. Involvement of wild-type SOD1 has been linked to sporadic ALS, as misfolded SOD1 has been reported in affected tissues of sporadic patients and toxicity of astrocytes derived from sporadic ALS patients to motor neurons has been reported to be reduced by lowering the synthesis of SOD1. We now report slowed disease onset and progression in two mouse models following therapeutic delivery using a single peripheral injection of an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) encoding an shRNA to reduce the synthesis of ALS-causing human SOD1 mutants. Delivery to young mice that develop aggressive, fatal paralysis extended survival by delaying both disease onset and slowing progression. In a later-onset model, AAV9 delivery after onset markedly slowed disease progression and significantly extended survival. Moreover, AAV9 delivered intrathecally to nonhuman primates is demonstrated to yield robust SOD1 suppression in motor neurons and glia throughout the spinal cord and therefore, setting the stage for AAV9-mediated therapy in human clinical trials.

  5. N-linked glycans within the A2 domain of von Willebrand factor modulate macrophage-mediated clearance.

    PubMed

    Chion, Alain; O'Sullivan, Jamie M; Drakeford, Clive; Bergsson, Gudmundur; Dalton, Niall; Aguila, Sonia; Ward, Soracha; Fallon, Padraic G; Brophy, Teresa M; Preston, Roger J S; Brady, Lauren; Sheils, Orla; Laffan, Michael; McKinnon, Thomas A J; O'Donnell, James S

    2016-10-13

    Enhanced von Willebrand factor (VWF) clearance is important in the etiology of von Willebrand disease. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying VWF clearance remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of VWF domains and specific glycan moieties in regulating in vivo clearance. Our findings demonstrate that the A1 domain of VWF contains a receptor-recognition site that plays a key role in regulating the interaction of VWF with macrophages. In A1-A2-A3 and full-length VWF, this macrophage-binding site is cryptic but becomes exposed following exposure to shear or ristocetin. Previous studies have demonstrated that the N-linked glycans within the A2 domain play an important role in modulating susceptibility to ADAMTS13 proteolysis. We further demonstrate that these glycans presented at N1515 and N1574 also play a critical role in protecting VWF against macrophage binding and clearance. Indeed, loss of the N-glycan at N1515 resulted in markedly enhanced VWF clearance that was significantly faster than that observed with any previously described VWF mutations. In addition, A1-A2-A3 fragments containing the N1515Q or N1574Q substitutions also demonstrated significantly enhanced clearance. Importantly, clodronate-induced macrophage depletion significantly attenuated the increased clearance observed with N1515Q and N1574Q in both full-length VWF and A1-A2-A3. Finally, we further demonstrate that loss of these N-linked glycans does not enhance clearance in VWF in the presence of a structurally constrained A2 domain. Collectively, these novel findings support the hypothesis that conformation of the VWF A domains plays a critical role in modulating macrophage-mediated clearance of VWF in vivo.

  6. A1 and A2a receptors mediate inhibitory effects of adenosine on the motor activity of human colon.

    PubMed

    Fornai, M; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Ghisu, N; Buccianti, P; Marioni, A; Chiarugi, M; Tuccori, M; Blandizzi, C; Del Tacca, M

    2009-04-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that adenosine is involved in the regulation of digestive functions. This study examines the influence of adenosine on the contractile activity of human colon. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed A(1) and A(2a) receptor expression in colonic neuromuscular layers. Circular muscle preparations were connected to isotonic transducers to determine the effects of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A(1) receptor antagonist), ZM 241385 (A(2a) receptor antagonist), CCPA (A(1) receptor agonist) and 2-[(p-2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamide-adenosine (CGS 21680; A(2a) receptor agonist) on motor responses evoked by electrical stimulation or carbachol. Electrically evoked contractions were enhanced by DPCPX and ZM 241385, and reduced by CCPA and CGS 21680. Similar effects were observed when colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine (noradrenergic blocker), L-732,138, GR-159897 and SB-218795 (NK receptor antagonists). However, in the presence of guanethidine, NK receptor antagonists and N(omega)-propyl-L-arginine (NPA; neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), the effects of DPCPX and CCPA were still evident, while those of ZM 241385 and CGS 21680 no longer occurred. Carbachol-induced contractions were unaffected by A(2a) receptor ligands, but they were enhanced or reduced by DPCPX and CCPA, respectively. When colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine, NK antagonists and atropine, electrically induced relaxations were partly reduced by ZM 241385 or NPA, but unaffected by DPCPX. Dipyridamole or application of exogenous adenosine reduced electrically and carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas adenosine deaminase enhanced such motor responses. In conclusion, adenosine exerts an inhibitory control on human colonic motility. A(1) receptors mediate direct modulating actions on smooth muscle, whereas A(2a) receptors operate through inhibitory nitrergic nerve pathways.

  7. EphA2 is a Mediator of Vemurafenib Resistance and a Novel Therapeutic Target in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Benchun; Ji, Zhenyu; Tan, Li; Taylor, Michael; Zhang, Jianming; Choi, Hwan Geun; Frederick, Dennie T.; Kumar, Raj; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Tsao, Hensin

    2015-01-01

    BRAF(V600E) is the most common oncogenic lesion in melanoma and results in constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and uncontrolled cell growth. Selective BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib have been shown to neutralize oncogenic signaling, restrain cellular growth and improve patient outcome. Although several mechanisms of vemurafenib resistance have been described, directed solutions to overcome these resistance lesions are still lacking. Herein, we found that vemurafenib resistance can be (i) mediated by EphA2- a member of the largest receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) subfamily erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular (Eph) receptors and (ii) associated with a greater phenotypic dependence on EphA2. Furthermore, we developed a series of first-in-class EphA2 inhibitors and show that these new compounds potently induce apoptosis, suppress viability and abrogate tumorigenic growth of melanoma cells, including those that are resistant to vemurafenib. These results provide proof-of-concept that RTK-guided growth, and therapeutic resistance, can be prospectively defined and selectively targeted. PMID:25542448

  8. CD98hc (SLC3A2) Loss Protects Against Ras-Driven Tumorigenesis by Modulating Integrin-Mediated Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Estrach, Soline; Lee, Sin-Ae; Boulter, Etienne; Pisano, Sabrina; Errante, Aurélia; Tissot, Floriane S.; Cailleteau, Laurence; Pons, Catherine; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Féral, Chloé C.

    2016-01-01

    CD98hc (SLC3A2) is the heavy chain component of the dimeric transmembrane glycoprotein CD98, which comprises the large neutral amino acid transporter LAT1 (SLC7A5) in cells. Overexpression of CD98hc occurs widely in cancer cells, and is associated with poor prognosis clinically, but its exact contributions to tumorigenesis are uncertain. In this study, we showed that that genetic deficiency of CD98hc protects against Ras-driven skin carcinogenesis. Deleting CD98hc after tumor induction was also sufficient to cause regression of existing tumors. Investigations into the basis for these effects defined two new functions of CD98hc that contribute to epithelial cancer beyond an intrinsic effect on CD98hc on tumor cell proliferation. First, CD98hc increased the stiffness of the tumor microenvironment. Second, CD98hc amplified the capacity of cells to respond to matrix rigidity, an essential factor in tumor development. Mechanistically, CD98hc mediated this stiffness-sensing by increasing Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, resulting in increased transcription mediated by YAP/TAZ, a nuclear relay for mechanical signals. Our results suggest that CD98hc contributes to carcinogenesis by amplifying a positive feedback loop which increases both extracellular matrix stiffness and resulting cellular responses. This work supports a rationale to explore the use of CD98hc inhibitors as cancer therapeutics, PMID:25267066

  9. Multimodal imaging of central retinal disease progression in a 2 year mean follow up of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sujirakul, Tharikarn; Lin, Michael K.; Duong, Jimmy; Wei, Ying; Lopez-Pintado, Sara; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the rate of progression and optimal follow up time in patients with advanced stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP) comparing the use of fundus autofluorescence imaging and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Design Retrospective analysis of progression rate. Methods Longitudinal imaging follow up in 71 patients with retinitis pigmentosa was studied using the main outcome measurements of hyperautofluoresent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter along with ellipsoid zone line width from spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Test-retest reliability and the rate of progression were calculated. The interaction between the progression rates was tested for sex, age, mode of inheritance, and baseline measurement size. Symmetry of left and right eye progression rate was also tested. Results Significant progression was observed in >75% of patients during the 2 year mean follow up. The mean annual progression rates of ellipsoid zone line, and hyperautofluorescent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter were 0.45° (4.9%), 0.51° (4.1%), and 0.42° (4.0%), respectively. The e llipsoid zone line width, and hyperautofluorescent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter had low test-retest variabilities of 8.9%, 9.5% and 9.6%, respectively. This study is the first to demonstrate asymmetrical structural progression rate between right and left eye, which was found in 19% of patients. The rate of progression was significantly slower as the disease approached the fovea, supporting the theory that RP progresses in an exponential fashion. No significant interaction between progression rate and patient age, sex, or mode of inheritance was observed. Conclusions Fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography detect progression in patients with RP reliably and with strong correlation. These parameters may be useful alongside functional assessments as the outcome measurements for future therapeutic trials. Follow-up at 1 year

  10. Multimodal Imaging of Central Retinal Disease Progression in a 2-Year Mean Follow-up of Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sujirakul, Tharikarn; Lin, Michael K; Duong, Jimmy; Wei, Ying; Lopez-Pintado, Sara; Tsang, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    To determine the rate of progression and optimal follow-up time in patients with advanced-stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP) comparing the use of fundus autofluorescence imaging and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Retrospective analysis of progression rate. Longitudinal imaging follow-up in 71 patients with retinitis pigmentosa was studied using the main outcome measurements of hyperautofluoresent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter along with ellipsoid zone line width from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Test-retest reliability and the rate of progression were calculated. The interaction between the progression rates was tested for sex, age, mode of inheritance, and baseline measurement size. Symmetry of left and right eye progression rate was also tested. Significant progression was observed in >75% of patients during the 2-year mean follow-up. The mean annual progression rates of ellipsoid zone line and hyperautofluorescent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter were 0.45 degree (4.9%), 0.51 degree (4.1%), and 0.42 degree (4.0%), respectively. The ellipsoid zone line width and hyperautofluorescent ring horizontal diameter and vertical diameter had low test-retest variabilities of 8.9%, 9.5%, and 9.6%, respectively. This study is the first to demonstrate asymmetrical structural progression rate between right and left eye, which was found in 19% of patients. The rate of progression was significantly slower as the disease approached the fovea, supporting the theory that RP progresses in an exponential fashion. No significant interaction between progression rate and patient age, sex, or mode of inheritance was observed. Fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography detect progression in patients with RP reliably and with strong correlation. These parameters may be useful alongside functional assessments as the outcome measurements for future therapeutic trials. Follow-up at 1-year intervals should be adequate to

  11. LPA1 receptor-mediated thromboxane A2 release is responsible for lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Dancs, Péter Tibor; Ruisanchez, Éva; Balogh, Andrea; Panta, Cecília Rita; Miklós, Zsuzsanna; Nüsing, Rolf M; Aoki, Junken; Chun, Jerold; Offermanns, Stefan; Tigyi, Gábor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been recognized recently as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, but several lines of evidence indicate that it may also stimulate vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), thereby contributing to vasoregulation and remodeling. In the present study, mRNA expression of all 6 LPA receptor genes was detected in murine aortic VSMCs, with the highest levels of LPA1, LPA2, LPA4, and LPA6 In endothelium-denuded thoracic aorta (TA) and abdominal aorta (AA) segments, 1-oleoyl-LPA and the LPA1-3 agonist VPC31143 induced dose-dependent vasoconstriction. VPC31143-induced AA contraction was sensitive to pertussis toxin (PTX), the LPA1&3 antagonist Ki16425, and genetic deletion of LPA1 but not that of LPA2 or inhibition of LPA3, by diacylglycerol pyrophosphate. Surprisingly, vasoconstriction was also diminished in vessels lacking cyclooxygenase-1 [COX1 knockout (KO)] or the thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptor (TP KO). VPC31143 increased thromboxane A2 (TXA2) release from TA of wild-type, TP-KO, and LPA2-KO mice but not from LPA1-KO or COX1-KO mice, and PTX blocked this effect. Our findings indicate that LPA causes vasoconstriction in VSMCs, mediated by LPA1-, Gi-, and COX1-dependent autocrine/paracrine TXA2 release and consequent TP activation. We propose that this new-found interaction between the LPA/LPA1 and TXA2/TP pathways plays significant roles in vasoregulation, hemostasis, thrombosis, and vascular remodeling.-Dancs, P. T., Ruisanchez, E., Balogh, A., Panta, C. R., Miklós, Z., Nüsing, R. M., Aoki, J., Chun, J., Offermanns, S., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. LPA1 receptor-mediated thromboxane A2 release is responsible for lysophosphatidic acid-induced vascular smooth muscle contraction. © FASEB.

  12. Ceramide induces serotonin release from RBL-2H3 mast cells through calcium mediated activation of phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jung Eun; Kim, Seok Kyun; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Choi, Jong Min; Jung, Sung Yun; Jung, Kwang Mook; Jeon, Hyung Jun; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2011-04-01

    Ceramide has been suggested to function as a mediator of exocytosis in response to the addition of a calcium ionophore from PC12 cells. Here, we show that although cell-permeable C(6)-ceramide or a calcium ionophore alone did not increase either the degranulation of serotonin or the release of arachidonic acid (AA) from RBL-2H3 cells, their combined effect significantly stimulated these processes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This effect was inhibited by the presence of an exogenous calcium chelator and significantly suppressed by the CERK inhibitor (K1) and phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) inhibitors. Moreover, cytosolic PLA(2) GIVA (cPLA(2) GIVA) siRNA-transfected RBL-2H3 cells showed a lower level of serotonin release than scramble siRNA-transfected cells. Little is known about the regulation of degranulation proximal to the activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) GIVA, the initial rate-limiting step in RBL-2H3 cells. In this study, we suggest that CERK, ceramide-1-phosphate, and PLA(2) are involved in degranulation in a calcium-dependent manner. Inhibition of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase partially decreased the AA release, but did not affect degranulation. Furthermore, treatment of the cells with AA (ω-6, C20:4), not linoleic acid (ω-6, C18:2) or α-linolenic acid (ω-6, C18:3), induced degranulation. Taken together, these results suggest that ceramide is involved in mast cell degranulation via the calcium-mediated activation of PLA(2). Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor-mediated induction of WISP-2 contributes to attenuated progression of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fuady, Jerry H; Bordoli, Mattia R; Abreu-Rodríguez, Irene; Kristiansen, Glen; Hoogewijs, David; Stiehl, Daniel P; Wenger, Roland H

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia and the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signaling pathway trigger the expression of several genes involved in cancer progression and resistance to therapy. Transcriptionally active HIF-1 and HIF-2 regulate overlapping sets of target genes, and only few HIF-2 specific target genes are known so far. Here we investigated oxygen-regulated expression of Wnt-1 induced signaling protein 2 (WISP-2), which has been reported to attenuate the progression of breast cancer. WISP-2 was hypoxically induced in low-invasive luminal-like breast cancer cell lines at both the messenger RNA and protein levels, mainly in a HIF-2α-dependent manner. HIF-2-driven regulation of the WISP2 promoter in breast cancer cells is almost entirely mediated by two phylogenetically and only partially conserved functional hypoxia response elements located in a microsatellite region upstream of the transcriptional start site. High WISP-2 tumor levels were associated with increased HIF-2α, decreased tumor macrophage density, and a better prognosis. Silencing WISP-2 increased anchorage-independent colony formation and recovery from scratches in confluent cell layers of normally low-invasive MCF-7 cancer cells. Interestingly, these changes in cancer cell aggressiveness could be phenocopied by HIF-2α silencing, suggesting that direct HIF-2-mediated transcriptional induction of WISP-2 gene expression might at least partially explain the association of high HIF-2α tumor levels with prolonged overall survival of patients with breast cancer.

  14. Leptin-STAT3-G9a Signaling Promotes Obesity-Mediated Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chao-Ching; Wu, Meng-Ju; Yang, Jer-Yen; Camarillo, Ignacio G; Chang, Chun-Ju

    2015-06-01

    Obesity has been linked to breast cancer progression but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here we report how leptin, an obesity-associated adipokine, regulates a transcriptional pathway to silence a genetic program of epithelial homeostasis in breast cancer stem-like cells (CSC) that promotes malignant progression. Using genome-wide ChIP-seq and RNA expression profiling, we defined a role for activated STAT3 and G9a histone methyltransferase in epigenetic silencing of miR-200c, which promotes the formation of breast CSCs defined by elevated cell surface levels of the leptin receptor (OBR(hi)). Inhibiting the STAT3/G9a pathway restored expression of miR-200c, which in turn reversed the CSC phenotype to a more differentiated epithelial phenotype. In a rat model of breast cancer driven by diet-induced obesity, STAT3 blockade suppressed the CSC-like OBR(hi) population and abrogated tumor progression. Together, our results show how targeting STAT3-G9a signaling regulates CSC plasticity during obesity-related breast cancer progression, suggesting a novel therapeutic paradigm to suppress CSC pools and limit breast malignancy. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Presymptomatic and symptomatic ALS SOD1(G93A) mice differ in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor-mediated tonic modulation of neuromuscular transmission.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Filipe; Sebastião, Ana M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease leading to neuromuscular transmission impairment. A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) function changes with disease stage, but the role of the A(1) receptors (A1Rs) is unknown and may have a functional cross-talk with A2AR. The role of A1R in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of ALS in presymptomatic (4-6 weeks old) and symptomatic (12-14 weeks old) phases was investigated by recording endplate potentials (EPPs), miniature endplate potentials (MEPPs), and quantal content (q.c.) of EPPs, from Mg(2+) paralyzed hemidiaphragm preparations. In presymptomatic mice, the A1R agonist, N (6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) (50 nM), decreased mean EPP amplitude, MEPP frequency, and q.c. of EPPs, an effect quantitatively similar to that in age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. However, coactivation of A2AR with CGS 21680 (5 nM) prevented the effects of CPA in WT mice but not in presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice, suggestive of A1R/A2AR cross-talk disruption in this phase of ALS. DPCPX (50 nM) impaired CGS 21680 facilitatory action on neuromuscular transmission in WT but not in presymptomatic mice. In symptomatic animals, CPA only inhibited transmission if added in the presence of adenosine deaminase (ADA, 1 U/mL). ADA and DPCPX enhanced more transmission in symptomatic mice than in age-matched WT mice, suggestive of increase in extracellular adenosine during the symptomatic phase of ALS. The data documents that at the neuromuscular junction of presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice, there is a loss of A1R-A2AR functional cross-talk, while in symptomatic mice there is increased A1R tonic activation, and that with disease progression, changes in A1R-mediated adenosine modulation may act as aggravating factors during the symptomatic phase of ALS.

  16. Interplay among cytokines and T cell subsets in the progression and control of immune-mediated diseases.

    PubMed

    Moudgil, Kamal D

    2015-07-01

    Cytokines serve as key mediators of inflammation and tissue damage in a variety of immune-mediated disorders. The induction, progression, and resolution of inflammation in such disorders are characterized by a dynamic balance between both the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as the pathogenic and protective T cell subsets. Over the past two decades, the roles of the interleukin-17 (IL-17) /IL-23 axis and the T helper 17 (Th17)/ T regulatory (Treg) cell balance in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and other inflammatory diseases have extensively been analyzed, and their significance validated. However, these studies, coupled with others devoted to well-established Th1/Th2 cytokines, have unraveled some challenging issues including the dual action of cytokines and the plasticity of T cell subsets. Nevertheless, major positive advances have also been made regarding cytokines and T cell subsets as therapeutic targets/agents. In this special issue, "Cytokines in Immune Pathology and Therapy," leading experts have shared their research work and perspectives on the roles of cytokines in the development and control of immune-mediated diseases. An outline of 14 articles in the first volume is presented here. The second volume will follow soon. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Timosaponin AIII induces antiplatelet and antithrombotic activity via Gq-mediated signaling by the thromboxane A2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yue; Wang, Limei; Peng, Renjun; Zhao, Yang; Bai, Fan; Yang, Chao; Liu, Xiaolan; Wang, Daqian; Ma, Baiping; Cong, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    The thromboxane (Tx) A2 pathway is a major contributor to the amplification of initial platelet activation and is therefore a key drug target. To identify potent small-molecule inhibitors of the thromboxane prostaglandin (TP) receptor, we screened a small steroidal saponin library using U46619-induced rat platelet aggregation assays. Timosaponin AIII (TAIII) was identified as a potent inhibitor of U46619-induced rat platelet aggregation and exhibited superior selectivity for the TP receptor versus other G protein-coupled receptors and a PKC activator. TAIII inhibited U46619-induced rat platelet aggregation independent of increases in cAMP and cGMP and the inhibition of TxA2 production. Both PKC and PLC activators restored TAIII-inhibited platelet aggregation, whereas TAIII did not inhibit platelet aggregation induced by co-activation of the G12/13 and Gz pathways. Furthermore, TAIII did not affect the platelet shape change or ROCK2 phosphorylation evoked by low-dose U46619. In vivo, TAIII prolonged tail bleeding time, reduced the mortality of animals with acute pulmonary thromboembolism and significantly reduced venous thrombus weight. Our study suggests that TAIII, by preferentially targeting Gq-mediated PLC/PKC signaling from the TP receptor, induces stronger in vitro antiplatelet activity and in vivo antithrombotic effects and may be an excellent candidate for the treatment of thrombotic disorders. PMID:27934923

  18. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 aggravates secretory phospholipase A{sub 2}-mediated progression of acute liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Bhave, Vishakha S.; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-04-15

    Our previous study [Bhave, V. S., Donthamsetty, S., Latendresse, J. R., Muskhelishvili, L., and Mehendale, H. M. 2008-this issue. Secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} mediates progression of acute liver injury in the absence of sufficient COX-2. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol] showed that in the absence of sufficient induction and co-presence of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} (sPLA{sub 2}) appearing in the intercellular spaces for cleanup of post-necrotic debris seems to contribute to the progression of toxicant-initiated liver injury, possibly by hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids of hepatocytes in the perinecrotic areas. To further test our hypothesis on the protective role of COX-2, male Fisher-344 rats were administered a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, and then challenged with a moderately toxic dose of CCl{sub 4}. This led to a 5-fold increase in the susceptibility of the COX-2 inhibited rats to CCl{sub 4} hepatotoxicity and mortality. The CCl{sub 4} bioactivating enzyme CYP2E1 protein, CYP2E1 enzyme activity, and the {sup 14}CCl{sub 4}-derived radiolabel covalently bound to the liver proteins were unaffected by the COX-2 inhibitor suggesting that the increased hepatotoxic sensitivity of the COX-2 inhibited rats was not due to higher bioactivation of CCl{sub 4}. Further investigation showed that this increased mortality was due to higher plasma and hepatic sPLA{sub 2} activities, inhibited PGE{sub 2} production, and progression of liver injury as compared to the non-intervened rats{sub .} In conclusion, inhibition of COX-2 mitigates the tissue protective mechanisms associated with COX-2 induction, which promotes sPLA{sub 2}-mediated progression of liver injury in an acute liver toxicity model. Because increased sPLA{sub 2} activity in the intercellular space is associated with increased progression of injury, and induced COX-2 is associated with hepatoprotection, ratios of hepatic COX-2 and sPLA{sub 2} activities may turn out to be a

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells promote colorectal cancer progression through AMPK/mTOR-mediated NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Bing; Liu, Yang; Wang, Gui-Hua; Xu, Xiao; Cai, Yang; Wang, Hong-Yi; Li, Yan-Qi; Meng, Hong-Fang; Dai, Fu; Jin, Ji-De

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exert a tumor-promoting effect in a variety of human cancers. This study was designed to identify the molecular mechanisms related to the tumor-promoting effect of MSCs in colorectal cancer. In vitro analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines cultured in MSC conditioned media (MSC-CM) showed that MSC-CM significantly promoted the progression of the cancer cells by enhancing cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. The tumorigenic effect of MSC-CM was attributed to altered expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and inhibition of apoptosis. Furthermore, MSC-CM induced high level expression of a number of pluripotency factors in the cancer cells. ELISAs revealed MSC-CM contained higher levels of IL-6 and IL-8, which are associated with the progression of cancer. Moreover, MSC-CM downregulated AMPK mRNA and protein phosphorylation, but upregulated mTOR mRNA and protein phosphorylation. The NF-κB pathway was activated after addition of MSC-CM. An in vivo model in Balb/C mice confirmed the ability of MSC-CM to promote the invasion and proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. This study indicates that MSCs promote the progression of colorectal cancer via AMPK/mTOR-mediated NF-κB activation. PMID:26892992

  20. Cleavage of DFNA5 by caspase-3 during apoptosis mediates progression to secondary necrotic/pyroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Corey; Fernandes-Alnemri, Teresa; Mayes, Lindsey; Alnemri, Diana; Cingolani, Gino; Alnemri, Emad S.

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis is a genetically regulated cell suicide programme mediated by activation of the effector caspases 3, 6 and 7. If apoptotic cells are not scavenged, they progress to a lytic and inflammatory phase called secondary necrosis. The mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we show that caspase-3 cleaves the GSDMD-related protein DFNA5 after Asp270 to generate a necrotic DFNA5-N fragment that targets the plasma membrane to induce secondary necrosis/pyroptosis. Cells that express DFNA5 progress to secondary necrosis, when stimulated with apoptotic triggers such as etoposide or vesicular stomatitis virus infection, but disassemble into small apoptotic bodies when DFNA5 is deleted. Our findings identify DFNA5 as a central molecule that regulates apoptotic cell disassembly and progression to secondary necrosis, and provide a molecular mechanism for secondary necrosis. Because DFNA5-induced secondary necrosis and GSDMD-induced pyroptosis are dependent on caspase activation, we propose that they are forms of programmed necrosis. PMID:28045099

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated islet hypervascularization and inflammation contribute to progressive reduction of β-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Judith; Ayuso, Eduard; Jimenez, Veronica; Casellas, Alba; Mallol, Cristina; Salavert, Ariana; Tafuro, Sabrina; Obach, Mercè; Ruzo, Albert; Moya, Marta; Pujol, Anna; Bosch, Fatima

    2012-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) results from insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion. Insulin resistance initially causes compensatory islet hyperplasia that progresses to islet disorganization and altered vascularization, inflammation, and, finally, decreased functional β-cell mass and hyperglycemia. The precise mechanism(s) underlying β-cell failure remain to be elucidated. In this study, we show that in insulin-resistant high-fat diet-fed mice, the enhanced islet vascularization and inflammation was parallel to an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF). To elucidate the role of VEGF in these processes, we have genetically engineered β-cells to overexpress VEGF (in transgenic mice or after adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer). We found that sustained increases in β-cell VEGF levels led to disorganized, hypervascularized, and fibrotic islets, progressive macrophage infiltration, and proinflammatory cytokine production, including tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. This resulted in impaired insulin secretion, decreased β-cell mass, and hyperglycemia with age. These results indicate that sustained VEGF upregulation may participate in the initiation of a process leading to β-cell failure and further suggest that compensatory islet hyperplasia and hypervascularization may contribute to progressive inflammation and β-cell mass loss during T2D.

  2. Fulvestrant-mediated inhibition of estrogen receptor signaling slows lung cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hexiao; Liao, Yongde; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Guang; Xu, Liqiang; Liu, Zhaoguo; Fu, Shengling; Yu, Li; Zhou, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are key signaling molecules that regulate various physiological processes such as cell growth, development, and differentiation. They also play a major role in many pathological conditions, such as hormone-dependent cancer. The importance of inhibiting estrogen receptor signaling in diseases of estrogen target tissues, such as breast cancer, is well documented. However, the role of estrogen signaling in diseases of nontarget tissues, such as lung cancer, is not well characterized. The aim of the current study is to examine the expression of estrogen receptor β (ERβ) and the roles of estradiol (E2) and fulvestrant on the progression of lung cancer. Tissue microarray (TMA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analyses were used to detect the expression of aromatase, ERα, and ERβ in 198 patients. We performed analyses to determine if there was any correlation among these three proteins. A mouse model of urethane-induced lung adenocarcinoma was used in the study. Mice were divided into three treatment groups: blank control, E2 alone, and E2 + fulvestrant (ERβ antagonist). Western blot analysis and fluorescence quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR) were used to measure expression of ERβ protein and mRNA levels, respectively. ERβ, but not ERα, was overexpressed in NSCLC samples. Lung cancer progression in mice treated with E2 was significantly increased compared to either the control group or the E2 + fulvestrant group. Mice in the E2 treatment group had significantly increased expression of ERβ at both the mRNA and protein levels compared to mice treated with E2 + fulvestrant or control. Our data suggest that ERβ promotes lung cancer progression in mice and that this progression can be inhibited with fulvestrant. These findings may help elucidate the role of ERβ in lung cancer and suggest that estrogen receptor antagonists, such as fulvestrant, may be therapeutically beneficial for the treatment of the disease.

  3. Progressive heart disease in mucopolysaccharidosis type I mice may be mediated by increased cathepsin B activity.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Guilherme; Tavares, Angela Maria Vicente; Gonzalez, Esteban; Poletto, Edina; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Matte, Ursula da Silveira; Giugliani, Roberto

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal disorder characterized by a deficiency of alpha-L-iduronidase and storage of undegraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Clinical findings of the disease include heart failure, and patients often need valve replacement. It has been shown that, later in life, MPS I mice develop those abnormalities, but to date, there have not been studies on the progression and pathogenesis of the disease. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated heart function in normal and MPS I male mice from 2 to 8 months of age. Echocardiographic analysis showed left ventricular enlargement with progressive reduction in ejection fraction, fractional area change, and left ventricular fractional shortening in the MPS I hearts at 6 and 8 months of age and a reduction in acceleration time/ejection time ratio of the pulmonary artery starting at 6 months of age, which suggests pulmonary vascular resistance. Histological and biochemical analysis confirmed progressive GAG storage from 2 months of age and onwards in the myocardium and heart valves, which had also increased in thickness. Additionally, macrophages were present in the MPS I heart tissue. Collagen content was reduced in the MPS I mouse valves. Cathepsin B, an enzyme that is known to be able to degrade collagen and is involved in heart dilatation, displayed a marked elevation in activity in the MPS I mice and could be responsible for the heart dilatation and valves alterations observed. Our results suggest that the MPS I mice have progressive heart failure and valve disease, which may be caused by cathepsin B overexpression.

  4. Can unilateral, progressive or sudden hearing loss be immune-mediated in origin?

    PubMed

    Atturo, Francesca; Colangeli, Roberta; Bandiera, Giorgio; Barbara, Maurizio; Monini, Simonetta

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to demonstrate that the positivity of nonspecific immunological tests could be found not only in bilateral hearing loss but also in unilateral cases, either sudden or progressive. An observational case series study included subjects suffering from unilateral or bilateral, sudden or progressive, symmetric or asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). All the patients underwent pure tone audiometry and the following battery of blood exams: anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibody screening, anti-thyroperoxidase (anti-TPO), anti-thyroglobulin and anti-smooth muscle antibody (ASMA). The positivity to nonspecific immunological test was found in nearly 70% of the study groups. ASMA and ANA were found to be present in both bilateral and unilateral cases, without statistical difference. Considering the correlation between positivity/negativity and systemic autoimmune pathologies, in the bilateral forms of hearing loss, a high incidence of thyroid pathologies has been identified, with a higher percentage of systemic autoimmune diseases in respect to the normal population. The nonspecific autoimmune tests are worth to be performed also when SNHL is not bilateral and progressive, since an immunological mechanism could also underlie unilateral and sudden SNHL cases.

  5. The phzA2-G2 Transcript Exhibits Direct RsmA-Mediated Activation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa M18

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Bin; Shen, Huifeng; Lu, Zhi John; Liu, Haiming; Xu, Yuquan

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria, RNA-binding proteins of the RsmA/CsrA family act as post-transcriptional regulators that modulate translation initiation at target transcripts. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome contains two phenazine biosynthetic (phz) gene clusters, phzA1-G1 (phz1) and phzA2-G2 (phz2), each of which is responsible for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) biosynthesis. In the present study, we show that RsmA exhibits differential gene regulation on two phz clusters in P. aeruginosa M18 at the post-transcriptional level. Based on the sequence analysis, four GGA motifs, the potential RsmA binding sites, are found on the 5′-untranslated region (UTR) of the phz2 transcript. Studies with a series of lacZ reporter fusions, and gel mobility shift assays suggest that the third GGA motif (S3), located 21 nucleotides upstream of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence, is involved in direct RsmA-mediated activation of phz2 expression. We therefore propose a novel model in which the binding of RsmA to the target S3 results in the destabilization of the stem-loop structure and the enhancement of ribosome access. This model could be fully supported by RNA structure prediction, free energy calculations, and nucleotide replacement studies. In contrast, various RsmA-mediated translation repression mechanisms have been identified in which RsmA binds near the SD sequence of target transcripts, thereby blocking ribosome access. Similarly, RsmA is shown to negatively regulate phz1 expression. Our new findings suggest that the differential regulation exerted by RsmA on the two phz clusters may confer an advantage to P. aeruginosa over other pseudomonads containing only a single phz cluster in their genomes. PMID:24586939

  6. Protective role of p21(Waf1/Cip1) against prostaglandin A2-mediated apoptosis of human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gorospe, M; Wang, X; Guyton, K Z; Holbrook, N J

    1996-01-01

    Prostaglandin A2 (PGA2) suppresses tumor growth in vivo, is potently antiproliferative in vitro, and is a model drug for the study of the mammalian stress response. Our previous studies using breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells suggested that p21(Waf1/Cip1) induction enabled cells to survive PGA2 exposure. Indeed, the marked sensitivity of human colorectal carcinoma RKO cells to the cytotoxicity of PGA2 is known to be associated with a lack of a PGA2-mediated increase in p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression, inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase activity, and growth arrest. To determine if cell death following exposure to PGA2 could be prevented by forcing the expression of p21(Waf1/Cip1) in RKO cells, we utilized an adenoviral vector-based expression system. We demonstrate that ectopic expression of p21(Waf1/Cip1) largely rescued RKO cells from PGA2-induced apoptotic cell death, directly implicating p21(Waf1/Cip1) as a determinant of the cellular outcome (survival versus death) following exposure to PGA2. To discern whether p21(Waf1/Cip1)-mediated protection operates through the implementation of cellular growth arrest, other growth-inhibitory treatments were studied for the ability to attenuate PGA2-induced cell death. Neither serum depletion nor suramin (a growth factor receptor antagonist) protected RKO cells against PGA2 cytotoxicity, and neither induced p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression. Mimosine, however, enhanced p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression, completely inhibited RKO cell proliferation, and exerted marked protection against a subsequent PGA2 challenge. Taken together, our results directly demonstrate a protective role for p21(Waf1/Cip1) during PGA2 cellular stress and provide strong evidence that the implementation of cellular growth arrest contributes to this protective influence. PMID:8943319

  7. Triiodothyronine Attenuates Prostate Cancer Progression Mediated by β-Adrenergic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-González, Evangelina; Sánchez-Tusie, Ana Alicia; Morales, Giapsy; Aceves, Carmen; Anguiano, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells are responsive to adrenergic and thyroid stimuli. It is well established that β-adrenergic activation (protein kinase A [PKA]/cAMP response element binding protein [CREB]) promotes cancer progression, but the role of thyroid hormones is poorly understood. We analyzed the effects of β-adrenergic stimulation (isoproterenol [ISO]) and/or thyroid hormone on neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation and cell invasion, using in vivo (LNCaP tumor) and in vitro models (LNCaP and DU145 human cells). Nude mice were inoculated with LNCaP cells and were treated for 6 wks with ISO (200 μg/d), triiodothyronine (T3, 2.5 μg/d) or both. ISO alone reduced tumor growth but increased tumor expression of cAMP response element (CRE)-dependent genes (real-time polymerase chain reaction, chromogranin A, neuron-specific enolase, survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], urokinase plasmin activator [uPA] and metalloproteinase-9 [MMP-9]) and some proteins related to NE differentiation and/or invasiveness (synaptophysin, VEGF, pCREB). T3 reduced tumor growth and prevented the overexpression of ISO-stimulated factors through a pCREB-independent mechanism. In low invasive LNCaP cells, 50 μmol/L ISO or 100 nmol/L thyroxine (T4) induced the acquisition of NE-like morphology (phase-contrast microscopy), increased VEGF secretion (ELISA) and invasive capacity (Transwell assay), but no synergistic effects were observed after the coadministration of ISO + T4. In contrast, 10 nmol/L T3 alone had no effect, but it prevented the NE-like morphology and invasiveness stimulated by ISO. None of these treatments had any effect on highly invasive DU145 cells. In summary, this study showed that ISO and T4 increase cancer progression, and T3 attenuates ISO-stimulated progression. Further studies are required to determine if changes in the ratio of T4/T3 could be relevant for prostate cancer progression. PMID:26928389

  8. Ras Oncogene-Mediated Progressive Silencing of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cammarota, Francesca; de Vita, Gabriella; Salvatore, Marco; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) is a secreted enzyme that uses superoxide anion as a substrate in a dismutase reaction that results in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Both of these reactive oxygen species affect growth signaling in cells. Although SOD3 has growth-supporting characteristics, the expression of SOD3 is downregulated in epithelial cancer cells. In the current work, we studied the mechanisms regulating SOD3 expression in vitro using thyroid cell models representing different stages of thyroid cancer. We demonstrate that a low level of RAS activation increases SOD3 mRNA synthesis that then gradually decreases with increasing levels of RAS activation and the decreasing degree of differentiation of the cancer cells. Our data indicate that SOD3 regulation can be divided into two classes. The first class involves RAS–driven reversible regulation of SOD3 expression that can be mediated by the following mechanisms: RAS GTPase regulatory genes that are responsible for SOD3 self-regulation; RAS-stimulated p38 MAPK activation; and RAS-activated increased expression of the mir21 microRNA, which inversely correlates with sod3 mRNA expression. The second class involves permanent silencing of SOD3 mediated by epigenetic DNA methylation in cells that represent more advanced cancers. Therefore, the work suggests that SOD3 belongs to the group of ras oncogene-silenced genes. PMID:26550576

  9. Erythropoiesis suppression is associated with anthrax lethal toxin-mediated pathogenic progression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Hou; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Chen, Po-Kong; Lin, Yo-Yin; Liao, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Ting-Kai; Chiang, Ya-Wen; Lin, Wen-Bin; Chiang, Chih-Yu; Kau, Jyh-Hwa; Huang, Hsin-Hsien; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Liao, Chi-Yuan; Sun, Der-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Anthrax is a disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, which results in high mortality in animals and humans. Although some of the mechanisms are already known such as asphyxia, extensive knowledge of molecular pathogenesis of this disease is deficient and remains to be further investigated. Lethal toxin (LT) is a major virulence factor of B. anthracis and a specific inhibitor/protease of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKKs). Anthrax LT causes lethality and induces certain anthrax-like symptoms, such as anemia and hypoxia, in experimental mice. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are the downstream pathways of MAPKKs, and are important for erythropoiesis. This prompted us to hypothesize that anemia and hypoxia may in part be exacerbated by erythropoietic dysfunction. As revealed by colony-forming cell assays in this study, LT challenges significantly reduced mouse erythroid progenitor cells. In addition, in a proteolytic activity-dependent manner, LT suppressed cell survival and differentiation of cord blood CD34(+)-derived erythroblasts in vitro. Suppression of cell numbers and the percentage of erythroblasts in the bone marrow were detected in LT-challenged C57BL/6J mice. In contrast, erythropoiesis was provoked through treatments of erythropoietin, significantly ameliorating the anemia and reducing the mortality of LT-treated mice. These data suggested that suppressed erythropoiesis is part of the pathophysiology of LT-mediated intoxication. Because specific treatments to overcome LT-mediated pathogenesis are still lacking, these efforts may help the development of effective treatments against anthrax.

  10. HIF-1α mediates tumor hypoxia to confer a perpetual mesenchymal phenotype for malignant progression.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Young-Gun; Christensen, Jared; Gu, Jie; Huang, L Eric

    2011-06-21

    Although tumor progression involves genetic and epigenetic alterations to normal cellular biology, the underlying mechanisms of these changes remain obscure. Numerous studies have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is overexpressed in many human cancers and up-regulates a host of hypoxia-responsive genes for cancer growth and survival. We recently identified an alternative mechanism of HIF-1α function that induces genetic alterations by suppressing DNA repair. Here, we show that long-term hypoxia, which mimics the tumor microenvironment, drives a perpetual epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through up-regulation of the zinc finger E-box binding homeobox protein ZEB2, whereas short-term hypoxia induces a reversible EMT that requires the transcription factor Twist1. Moreover, we show that the perpetual EMT driven by chronic hypoxia depends on HIF-1α induction of genetic alterations rather than its canonical transcriptional activator function. These mesenchymal tumor cells not only acquire tumorigenicity but also display characteristics of advanced cancers, including necrosis, aggressive invasion, and metastasis. Hence, these results reveal a mechanism by which HIF-1α promotes a perpetual mesenchymal phenotype, thereby advancing tumor progression.

  11. Progressive inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration after traumatic brain or spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Faden, Alan I; Wu, Junfang; Stoica, Bogdan A; Loane, David J

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been linked to dementia and chronic neurodegeneration. Described initially in boxers and currently recognized across high contact sports, the association between repeated concussion (mild TBI) and progressive neuropsychiatric abnormalities has recently received widespread attention, and has been termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Less well appreciated are cognitive changes associated with neurodegeneration in the brain after isolated spinal cord injury. Also under-recognized is the role of sustained neuroinflammation after brain or spinal cord trauma, even though this relationship has been known since the 1950s and is supported by more recent preclinical and clinical studies. These pathological mechanisms, manifested by extensive microglial and astroglial activation and appropriately termed chronic traumatic brain inflammation or chronic traumatic inflammatory encephalopathy, may be among the most important causes of post-traumatic neurodegeneration in terms of prevalence. Importantly, emerging experimental work demonstrates that persistent neuroinflammation can cause progressive neurodegeneration that may be treatable even weeks after traumatic injury. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Clustering of sialylated glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors mediates PrP-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A 2 and synapse damage.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun

    2012-01-01

    Precisely how the accumulation of PrP (Sc) causes the neuronal degeneration that leads to the clinical symptoms of prion diseases is poorly understood. Our recent paper showed that the clustering of specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors attached to PrP proteins triggered synapse damage in cultured neurons. First, we demonstrated that small, soluble PrP (Sc) oligomers caused synapse damage via a GPI-dependent process. Our hypothesis, that the clustering of specific GPIs caused synapse damage, was supported by observations that cross-linkage of PrP (C), either chemically or by monoclonal antibodies, also triggered synapse damage. Synapse damage was preceded by an increase in the cholesterol content of synapses and activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A 2 (cPLA 2). The presence of a terminal sialic acid moiety, a rare modification of mammalian GPI anchors, was essential in the activation of cPLA 2 and synapse damage induced by cross-linked PrP (C). We conclude that the sialic acid modifies local membrane microenvironments (rafts) surrounding clustered PrP molecules resulting in aberrant activation of cPLA 2 and synapse damage. A recent observation, that toxic amyloid-β assemblies cross-link PrP (C), suggests that synapse damage in prion and Alzheimer diseases is mediated via a common molecular mechanism, and raises the possibility that the pharmacological modification of GPI anchors might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to these diseases.

  13. Recent Progress in Photocatalysis Mediated by Colloidal II-VI Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Wilker, Molly B; Schnitzenbaumer, Kyle J; Dukovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    The use of photoexcited electrons and holes in semiconductor nanocrystals as reduction and oxidation reagents is an intriguing way of harvesting photon energy to drive chemical reactions. This review focuses on recent research efforts to understand and control the photocatalytic processes mediated by colloidal II-VI nanocrystalline materials, such as cadmium and zinc chalcogenides. First, we highlight how nanocrystal properties govern the rates and efficiencies of charge-transfer processes relevant to photocatalysis. We then describe the use of nanocrystal catalyst heterostructures for fuel-forming reactions, most commonly H2 generation. Finally, we review the use of nanocrystal photocatalysis as a synthetic tool for metal–semiconductor nano-heterostructures. PMID:24115781

  14. Overcoming Hypoxia-Mediated Tumor Progression: Combinatorial Approaches Targeting pH Regulation, Angiogenesis and Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Paul C.; Chafe, Shawn C.; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important contributor to the heterogeneity of the microenvironment of solid tumors and is a significant environmental stressor that drives adaptations which are essential for the survival and metastatic capabilities of tumor cells. Critical adaptive mechanisms include altered metabolism, pH regulation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, migration/invasion, diminished response to immune cells and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In particular, pH regulation by hypoxic tumor cells, through the modulation of cell surface molecules such as extracellular carbonic anhydrases (CAIX and CAXII) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCT-1 and MCT-4) functions to increase cancer cell survival and enhance cell invasion while also contributing to immune evasion. Indeed, CAIX is a vital regulator of hypoxia mediated tumor progression, and targeted inhibition of its function results in reduced tumor growth, metastasis, and cancer stem cell function. However, the integrated contributions of the repertoire of hypoxia-induced effectors of pH regulation for tumor survival and invasion remain to be fully explored and exploited as therapeutic avenues. For example, the clinical use of anti-angiogenic agents has identified a conundrum whereby this treatment increases hypoxia and cancer stem cell components of tumors, and accelerates metastasis. Furthermore, hypoxia results in the infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), regulatory T cells (Treg) and Tumor Associated Macrophages (TAMs), and also stimulates the expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells, which collectively suppress T-cell mediated tumor cell killing. Therefore, combinatorial targeting of angiogenesis, the immune system and pH regulation in the context of hypoxia may lead to more effective strategies for curbing tumor progression and therapeutic resistance, thereby increasing therapeutic efficacy and leading to more effective strategies for the treatment of patients with

  15. Antibody-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Remyelination Promotes Axon Health in Progressive Demyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Watzlawik, Jens O; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-10-01

    Demyelination underlies early neurological symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, axonal damage is considered critical for permanent chronic deficits. The precise mechanisms by which axonal injury occurs in MS are unclear; one hypothesis is the absence or failure of remyelination, suggesting that promoting remyelination may protect axons from death. This report provides direct evidence that promoting oligodendrocyte remyelination protects axons and maintains transport function. Persistent Theiler's virus infection of Swiss Jim Lambert (SJL)/J mice was used as a model of MS to assess the effects of remyelination on axonal injury following demyelination in the spinal cord. Remyelination was induced using an oligodendrocyte/myelin-specific recombinant human monoclonal IgM, rHIgM22. The antibody is endowed with strong anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative effects on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. We used (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at the brainstem to measure N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) as a surrogate of neuronal health and spinal cord integrity. We found increased brainstem NAA concentrations at 5 weeks post-treatment with rHIgM22, which remained stable out to 10 weeks. Detailed spinal cord morphology studies revealed enhanced remyelination in the rHIgM22-treated group but not in the isotype control antibody- or saline-treated groups. Importantly, we found rHIgM22-mediated remyelination protected small- and medium-caliber mid-thoracic spinal cord axons from damage despite similar demyelination and inflammation across all experimental groups. The most direct confirmation of remyelination-mediated protection of descending neurons was an improvement in retrograde transport. Treatment with rHIgM22 significantly increased the number of retrograde-labeled neurons in the brainstem, indicating that preserved axons are functionally competent. This is direct validation that remyelination preserves spinal cord axons and protects functional axon integrity.

  16. DNA-PKcs mediated transcriptional regulation drives prostate cancer progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Kothari, Vishal; Drake, Justin M.; Zhao, Shuang; Dylgjeri, Emanuela; Dean, Jeffry L.; Schiewer, Matthew J.; McNair, Christopher; Jones, Jennifer K.; Aytes, Alvaro; Magee, Michael S.; Snook, Adam E.; Zhu, Ziqi; Den, Robert B.; Birbe, Ruth C.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Graham, Nicholas A.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Graeber, Thomas G.; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Takhar, Mandeep; Davicioni, Elai; Tomlins, Scott A.; Abate-Shen, Cory; Sharifi, Nima; Witte, Owen N.; Feng, Felix Y.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Emerging evidence demonstrates that the DNA repair kinase DNA-PKcs exerts divergent roles in transcriptional regulation of unsolved consequence. Here, in vitro and in vivo interrogation demonstrate that DNA-PKcs functions as a selective modulator of transcriptional networks that induce cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Accordingly, suppression of DNA-PKcs inhibits tumor metastases. Clinical assessment revealed that DNA-PKcs is significantly elevated in advanced disease, and independently predicts for metastases, recurrence, and reduced overall survival. Further investigation demonstrated that DNA-PKcs in advanced tumors is highly activated, independent of DNA damage indicators. Combined, these findings reveal unexpected DNA-PKcs functions, identify DNA-PKcs as a potent driver of tumor progression and metastases, and nominate DNA-PKcs as a therapeutic target for advanced malignancies. PMID:26175416

  17. Complex roles of filamin-A mediated cytoskeleton network in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Filamin-A (FLNA), also called actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280), was originally identified as a non-muscle actin binding protein, which organizes filamentous actin into orthogonal networks and stress fibers. Filamin-A also anchors various transmembrane proteins to the actin cytoskeleton and provides a scaffold for a wide range of cytoplasmic and nuclear signaling proteins. Intriguingly, several studies have revealed that filamin-A associates with multiple non-cytoskeletal proteins of diverse function and is involved in several unrelated pathways. Mutations and aberrant expression of filamin-A have been reported in human genetic diseases and several types of cancer. In this review, we discuss the implications of filamin-A in cancer progression, including metastasis and DNA damage response. PMID:23388158

  18. Altered miRNA expression in aniline-mediated cell cycle progression in rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Khan, M Firoze

    2017-09-01

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen, however, early molecular events in aniline-induced cell cycle progression in the spleen remain unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in tumor development by modulating key cell cycle regulators and controlling cell proliferation. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the expression of miRNAs, regulation of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in an experimental condition that precedes a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (1 mmol/kg/day by gavage) for 7 days, and expression of miRNAs, cyclins and CDKs in rat spleens were analyzed. Microarray and/or qPCR analyses showed that aniline exposure led to significantly decreased miRNA expression of let-7a, miR-24, miR-34c, miR-100, miR-125b, and greatly increased miR-181a. The aberrant expression of miRNAs was associated with significantly increased protein expression of cyclins A, B1, D3 and E. Furthermore, remarkably enhanced expression of CDKs like CDK1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, especially p-CDK1 and p-CDK2 as well as alternations in the expression of pRB, p27, and CDC25A in the spleens of aniline-treated rats was also observed. The data suggest that aniline exposure leads to aberrant expression of miRNAs in the spleen which could be important in the regulation of cell cycle proteins. Our findings, thus, provide new insight into the role of miRNAs in cell cycle progression, which may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  19. Pyrimidinoceptor-mediated activation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2 in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, W. W.; Lee, Y. T.

    1996-01-01

    1. As well as the presence of P2Z purinoceptors previously found in macrophages, we identified pyrimidinoceptors in RAW 264.7 cells, which activate phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2). 2. The relative potency of agonists to stimulate inositol phosphate (IP) formation and arachidonic acid (AA) release was UTP = UDP > > ATP, ATP gamma S, 2MeSATP. For both signalling pathways, the EC50 values for UTP and UDP (3 microM) were significantly lower than that for ATP and all other analogues tested (> 100 microM). 3. UTP and UDP displayed no additivity in terms of IP formation and AA release at maximally effective concentrations. 4. UTP-, but not ATP-, evoked AA release was 60% inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), while stimulation of IP formation by both agonists was unaffected. Short-term treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) led to a dose-dependent inhibition of IP responses to UTP and UDP, but failed to affect the AA responses. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ inhibited the PI response to UTP, but abolished its AA response. 5. ATP-induction of these two transmembrane signal pathways was decreased in high Mg(2+)-containing medium but potentiated by the removal of extracellular Mg2+. 6. Suramin and reactive blue displayed equal potency to inhibit the IP responses of UTP and ATP. 7. Both UTP and UDP (0.1-100 microM) induced a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i which lasted for more than 10 min. 8. Taken together, these results indicate that in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages, pyrimidinoceptors with specificity for UTP and UDP mediate the activation of PLC and cytosolic (c) PLA2. The activation of PLC is via a PTX-insensitive G protein, whereas that of cPLA2 is via a PTX-sensitive G protein-dependent pathway. The sustained Ca2+ influx caused by UTP contributes to the activation of cPLA2. RAW 264.7 cells also possess P2z purinoceptors which mediate ATP(4-)-induced PLC and PLA2 activation. Images Figure 3 PMID:8886407

  20. Suppression of Type I Interferon Signaling Overcomes Oncogene-Induced Senescence and Mediates Melanoma Development and Progression.

    PubMed

    Katlinskaya, Yuliya V; Katlinski, Kanstantsin V; Yu, Qiujing; Ortiz, Angelica; Beiting, Daniel P; Brice, Angela; Davar, Diwakar; Sanders, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M; Rui, Hallgeir; Xu, Xiaowei; Koumenis, Constantinos; Diehl, J Alan; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2016-04-05

    Oncogene activation induces DNA damage responses and cell senescence. We report a key role of type I interferons (IFNs) in oncogene-induced senescence. IFN signaling-deficient melanocytes expressing activated Braf do not exhibit senescence and develop aggressive melanomas. Restoration of IFN signaling in IFN-deficient melanoma cells induces senescence and suppresses melanoma progression. Additional data from human melanoma patients and mouse transplanted tumor models suggest the importance of non-cell-autonomous IFN signaling. Inactivation of the IFN pathway is mediated by the IFN receptor IFNAR1 downregulation that invariably occurs during melanoma development. Mice harboring an IFNAR1 mutant, which is partially resistant to downregulation, delay melanoma development, suppress metastatic disease, and better respond to BRAF or PD-1 inhibitors. These results suggest that IFN signaling is an important tumor-suppressive pathway that inhibits melanoma development and progression and argue for targeting IFNAR1 downregulation to prevent metastatic disease and improve the efficacy of molecularly target and immune-targeted melanoma therapies.

  1. CCND1-CDK4-mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico; Waskow, Claudia

    2015-07-27

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1-CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1-CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1-CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis.

  2. L-Boronophenylalanine-Mediated Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Glioma Progressing After External Beam Radiation Therapy: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Beule, Annette; Collan, Juhani; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Seren, Tom; Paetau, Anders; Saarilahti, Kauko; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety of boronophenylalanine-mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of malignant gliomas that progress after surgery and conventional external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Adult patients who had histologically confirmed malignant glioma that had progressed after surgery and external beam radiotherapy were eligible for this Phase I study, provided that >6 months had elapsed from the last date of radiation therapy. The first 10 patients received a fixed dose, 290 mg/kg, of L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (L-BPA-F) as a 2-hour infusion before neutron irradiation, and the remaining patients were treated with escalating doses of L-BPA-F, either 350 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg, or 450 mg/kg, using 3 patients on each dose level. Adverse effects were assessed using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version 2.0. Results: Twenty-two patients entered the study. Twenty subjects had glioblastoma, and 2 patients had anaplastic astrocytoma, and the median cumulative dose of prior external beam radiotherapy was 59.4 Gy. The maximally tolerated L-BPA-F dose was reached at the 450 mg/kg level, where 4 of 6 patients treated had a grade 3 adverse event. Patients who were given >290 mg/kg of L-BPA-F received a higher estimated average planning target volume dose than those who received 290 mg/kg (median, 36 vs. 31 Gy [W, i.e., a weighted dose]; p = 0.018). The median survival time following BNCT was 7 months. Conclusions: BNCT administered with an L-BPA-F dose of up to 400 mg/kg as a 2-hour infusion is feasible in the treatment of malignant gliomas that recur after conventional radiation therapy.

  3. Protein kinase A can block EphA2 receptor–mediated cell repulsion by increasing EphA2 S897 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Barquilla, Antonio; Lamberto, Ilaria; Noberini, Roberta; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Brill, Laurence M.; Pasquale, Elena B.

    2016-01-01

    The EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase plays key roles in tissue homeostasis and disease processes such as cancer, pathological angiogenesis, and inflammation through two distinct signaling mechanisms. EphA2 “canonical” signaling involves ephrin-A ligand binding, tyrosine autophosphorylation, and kinase activity; EphA2 “noncanonical” signaling involves phosphorylation of serine 897 (S897) by AKT and RSK kinases. To identify small molecules counteracting EphA2 canonical signaling, we developed a high-content screening platform measuring inhibition of ephrin-A1–induced PC3 prostate cancer cell retraction. Surprisingly, most hits from a screened collection of pharmacologically active compounds are agents that elevate intracellular cAMP by activating G protein–coupled receptors such as the β2-adrenoceptor. We found that cAMP promotes phosphorylation of S897 by protein kinase A (PKA) as well as increases the phosphorylation of several nearby serine/threonine residues, which constitute a phosphorylation hotspot. Whereas EphA2 canonical and noncanonical signaling have been viewed as mutually exclusive, we show that S897 phosphorylation by PKA can coexist with EphA2 tyrosine phosphorylation and block cell retraction induced by EphA2 kinase activity. Our findings reveal a novel paradigm in EphA2 function involving the interplay of canonical and noncanonical signaling and highlight the ability of the β2-adrenoceptor/cAMP/PKA axis to rewire EphA2 signaling in a subset of cancer cells. PMID:27385333

  4. Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1A2 (OATP1A2) mediates cellular uptake of all-trans-retinol in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ting; Zhu, Ling; Madigan, Michele C; Wang, Ke; Shen, Weiyong; Gillies, Mark C; Zhou, Fanfan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Vision depends on retinoid exchange between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptors. Defects in any step of the canonical visual cycle can lead to retinal degenerations. All-trans-retinol (atROL) plays an important role in visual signal transduction. However, how atROL enters human RPE from the apical membrane remains unclear. This study investigated the role of human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1A2 (OATP1A2) in atROL uptake in human RPE. Experimental Approach Immunoblotting and immunostaining elucidated the expression and localization of OATP1A2 in human RPE. Transporter functional studies were conducted to assess the interaction of OATP1A2 with atROL. Key Results Our study revealed OATP1A2 is expressed in human RPE, mainly at the apical membrane. Our data also indicated atROL inhibited the uptake of the typical OATP1A2 substrate, oestrone-3-sulfate (E3S), in over-expressing cells. Studies on the uptake of 3H-atROL in these over-expressing cells revealed atROL is a substrate of OATP1A2. We confirmed these findings in human primary RPE cells. The transport of E3S and atROL was significantly reduced in human primary RPE cells with OATP1A2 siRNA silencing. Conclusion and Implications Our data provides the first evidence of OATP1A2 expression in human RPE and more importantly, its novel role in the cellular uptake of atROL, which might be essential to the proper functioning of the canonical visual cycle. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in retinoid transport between the RPE and photoreceptors and provide novel insights into potential pharmaceutical interventions for visual cycle disruption associated with retinal degenerations. PMID:25560245

  5. Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1A2 (OATP1A2) mediates cellular uptake of all-trans-retinol in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ting; Zhu, Ling; Madigan, Michele C; Wang, Ke; Shen, Weiyong; Gillies, Mark C; Zhou, Fanfan

    2015-05-01

    Vision depends on retinoid exchange between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptors. Defects in any step of the canonical visual cycle can lead to retinal degenerations. All-trans-retinol (atROL) plays an important role in visual signal transduction. However, how atROL enters human RPE from the apical membrane remains unclear. This study investigated the role of human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1A2 (OATP1A2) in atROL uptake in human RPE. Immunoblotting and immunostaining elucidated the expression and localization of OATP1A2 in human RPE. Transporter functional studies were conducted to assess the interaction of OATP1A2 with atROL. Our study revealed OATP1A2 is expressed in human RPE, mainly at the apical membrane. Our data also indicated atROL inhibited the uptake of the typical OATP1A2 substrate, oestrone-3-sulfate (E3S), in over-expressing cells. Studies on the uptake of (3) H-atROL in these over-expressing cells revealed atROL is a substrate of OATP1A2. We confirmed these findings in human primary RPE cells. The transport of E3S and atROL was significantly reduced in human primary RPE cells with OATP1A2 siRNA silencing. Our data provides the first evidence of OATP1A2 expression in human RPE and more importantly, its novel role in the cellular uptake of atROL, which might be essential to the proper functioning of the canonical visual cycle. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in retinoid transport between the RPE and photoreceptors and provide novel insights into potential pharmaceutical interventions for visual cycle disruption associated with retinal degenerations. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. The impact of cow's milk-mediated mTORC1-signaling in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is dependent on androgen receptor signaling and aberrations of the PI3K-Akt-mTORC1 pathway mediating excessive and sustained growth signaling. The nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1 is upregulated in nearly 100% of advanced human PCas. Oncogenic mTORC1 signaling activates key subsets of mRNAs that cooperate in distinct steps of PCa initiation and progression. Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy protein consumption as a major dietary risk factor for the development of PCa. mTORC1 is a master regulator of protein synthesis, lipid synthesis and autophagy pathways that couple nutrient sensing to cell growth and cancer. This review provides evidence that PCa initiation and progression are promoted by cow´s milk, but not human milk, stimulation of mTORC1 signaling. Mammalian milk is presented as an endocrine signaling system, which activates mTORC1, promotes cell growth and proliferation and suppresses autophagy. Naturally, milk-mediated mTORC1 signaling is restricted only to the postnatal growth phase of mammals. However, persistent consumption of cow´s milk proteins in humans provide highly insulinotropic branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) provided by milk´s fast hydrolysable whey proteins, which elevate postprandial plasma insulin levels, and increase hepatic IGF-1 plasma concentrations by casein-derived amino acids. BCAAs, insulin and IGF-1 are pivotal activating signals of mTORC1. Increased cow´s milk protein-mediated mTORC1 signaling along with constant exposure to commercial cow´s milk estrogens derived from pregnant cows may explain the observed association between high dairy consumption and increased risk of PCa in Westernized societies. As well-balanced mTORC1-signaling plays an important role in appropriate prostate morphogenesis and differentiation, exaggerated mTORC1-signaling by high cow´s milk consumption predominantly during critical growth phases of prostate development and differentiation may exert long

  7. GRP78 as a regulator of liver steatosis and cancer progression mediated by loss of the tumor suppressor PTEN.

    PubMed

    Chen, W-T; Zhu, G; Pfaffenbach, K; Kanel, G; Stiles, B; Lee, A S

    2014-10-16

    Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a molecular chaperone widely elevated in human cancers, is critical for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein folding, stress signaling and PI3K/AKT activation. Genetic knockout models of GRP78 revealed that GRP78 maintains homeostasis of metabolic organs, including liver, pancreas and adipose tissues. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CC) are the most common liver cancers. There is a lack of effective therapeutics for HCC and CC, highlighting the need to further understand liver tumorigenic mechanisms. PTEN (phosphatase and tenson homolog deleted on chromosome 10), a tumor suppressor that antagonizes the PI3K/AKT pathway, is inactivated in a wide range of tumors, including 40-50% of human liver cancers. To elucidate the role of GRP78 in liver cancer, we created a mouse model with biallelic liver-specific deletion of Pten and Grp78 mediated by Albumin-Cre-recombinase (cP(f/f)78(f/f)). Interestingly, in contrast to PTEN, deletion of GRP78 was progressive but incomplete. At 3 months, cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers showed hepatomegaly, activation of lipogenic genes, exacerbated steatosis and liver injury, implying that GRP78 protects the liver against PTEN-null-mediated pathogenesis. Furthermore, in response to liver injury, we observed increased proliferation and expansion of bile duct and liver progenitor cells in cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers. Strikingly, bile duct cells in cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers maintained wild-type (WT) GRP78 level, whereas adjacent areas showed GRP78 reduction. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed selective JNK activation, β-catenin downregulation, along with PDGFRα upregulation, which was unique to cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers at 6 months. Development of both HCC and CC was accelerated and was evident in cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers at 8-9 months, coinciding with intense GRP78 expression in the cancer lesions, and GRP78 expression in adjacent normal areas reverted back to the WT level. In contrast, c78(f/f) livers

  8. The type III TGF-beta receptor suppresses breast cancer progression through GIPC-mediated inhibition of TGF-beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason D; Hempel, Nadine; Lee, Nam Y; Blobe, Gerard C

    2010-02-01

    Loss of expression of the type III transforming growth factor-beta receptor (TbetaRIII or betaglycan), a transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily co-receptor, is common in human breast cancers. TbetaRIII suppresses cancer progression in vivo by reducing cancer cell migration and invasion by largely unknown mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic domain of TbetaRIII is essential for TbetaRIII-mediated downregulation of migration and invasion in vitro and TbetaRIII-mediated inhibition of breast cancer progression in vivo. Functionally, the cytoplasmic domain of TbetaRIII is required to attenuate TGF-beta signaling, whereas TbetaRIII-mediated attenuation of TGF-beta signaling is required for TbetaRIII-mediated inhibition of migration and invasion. Mechanistically, both TbetaRIII-mediated inhibition of TGF-beta signaling and TbetaRIII-mediated inhibition of invasion occur through the interaction of the cytoplasmic domain of TbetaRIII with the scaffolding protein GAIP-interacting protein C-terminus (GIPC). Taken together, these studies support a functional role for the TbetaRIII cytoplasmic domain interacting with GIPC to suppress breast cancer progression.

  9. The type III TGF-β receptor suppresses breast cancer progression through GIPC-mediated inhibition of TGF-β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason D.; Hempel, Nadine; Lee, Nam Y.; Blobe, Gerard C.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of expression of the type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII or betaglycan), a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily co-receptor, is common in human breast cancers. TβRIII suppresses cancer progression in vivo by reducing cancer cell migration and invasion by largely unknown mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic domain of TβRIII is essential for TβRIII-mediated downregulation of migration and invasion in vitro and TβRIII-mediated inhibition of breast cancer progression in vivo. Functionally, the cytoplasmic domain of TβRIII is required to attenuate TGF-β signaling, whereas TβRIII-mediated attenuation of TGF-β signaling is required for TβRIII-mediated inhibition of migration and invasion. Mechanistically, both TβRIII-mediated inhibition of TGF-β signaling and TβRIII-mediated inhibition of invasion occur through the interaction of the cytoplasmic domain of TβRIII with the scaffolding protein GAIP-interacting protein C-terminus (GIPC). Taken together, these studies support a functional role for the TβRIII cytoplasmic domain interacting with GIPC to suppress breast cancer progression. PMID:19955393

  10. Augmented gp130-mediated cytokine signalling accompanies human gastric cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C B; Judd, L M; Menheniott, T R; Kronborg, I; Dow, C; Yeomans, N D; Boussioutas, A; Robb, L; Giraud, A S

    2007-10-01

    H. pylori infection accounts for most cases of gastric cancer, but the initiating events remain unclear. The principal H. pylori pathogenicity-associated CagA protein disrupts intracellular SHP-2 signalling pathways including those used by the IL-6 family cytokines, IL-6 and IL-11. Imbalanced IL-6 family cytokine signalling in the gp130(757FF) mouse model of gastric cancer arising from hyperactivation of oncogenic STAT3 after altered SHP-2 : ERK1/2 signalling produces dysplastic antral tumours preceded by gastritis and metaplasia. In a cohort of patient gastric biopsies with known H. pylori and CagA status, we investigated whether (i) STAT3 and ERK1/2 activation is altered in H. pylori-dependent gastritis; (ii) these profiles are more pronounced in CagA+ H. pylori infection; and (iii) the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines that activate STAT3 and ERK 1/2 pathways is associated with progression to gastric cancer. IL-6, IL-11, and activated STAT3 and ERK1/2 were quantified in antral biopsies from gastritic stomach, metaplastic tissue, and resected gastric cancer tissues. We observed significantly increased STAT3 and ERK1/2 activation (p = 0.001) in H. pylori-dependent gastritis, which was further enhanced in the presence of CagA+ H. pylori strains. Of known gastric ligands that drive STAT3 activation, IL-6 expression was increased after H. pylori infection and both IL-6 and IL-11 were strongly up-regulated in the gastric cancer biopsies. This suggests a mechanism by which IL-11 drives STAT3 activation and proliferation during gastric cancer progression. We addressed this using an in vitro approach, demonstrating that recombinant human IL-11 activates STAT3 and concomitantly increases proliferation of MKN28 gastric epithelial cells. In summary, we show increased STAT3 and ERK1/2 activation in H. pylori-dependent gastritis that is likely driven in an IL-6-dependent fashion. IL-11 expression is associated with adenocarcinoma development, but not gastritic lesions

  11. Artificial microRNA mediated gene silencing in plants: progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Manish; Sharma, Deepika; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Homology based gene silencing has emerged as a convenient approach for repressing expression of genes in order to study their functions. For this purpose, several antisense or small interfering RNA based gene silencing techniques have been frequently employed in plant research. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) mediated gene silencing represents one of such techniques which can utilize as a potential tool in functional genomics. Similar to microRNAs, amiRNAs are single-stranded, approximately 21 nt long, and designed by replacing the mature miRNA sequences of duplex within pre-miRNAs. These amiRNAs are processed via small RNA biogenesis and silencing machinery and deregulate target expression. Holding to various refinements, amiRNA technology offers several advantages over other gene silencing methods. This is a powerful and robust tool, and could be applied to unravel new insight of metabolic pathways and gene functions across the various disciplines as well as in translating observations for improving favourable traits in plants. This review highlights general background of small RNAs, improvements made in RNAi based gene silencing, implications of amiRNA in gene silencing, and describes future themes for improving value of this technology in plant science.

  12. Nonpathogenic Strains of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum Trigger Progressive Bean Defense Responses during Appressorium-Mediated Penetration

    PubMed Central

    Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Laugé, Richard; Langin, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    The fungal bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum differentiates appressoria in order to penetrate bean tissues. We showed that appressorium development in C. lindemuthianum can be divided into three stages, and we obtained three nonpathogenic strains, including one strain blocked at each developmental stage. H18 was blocked at the appressorium differentiation stage; i.e., no genuine appressoria were formed. H191 was blocked at the appressorium maturation stage; i.e., appressoria exhibited a pigmentation defect and developed only partial internal turgor pressure. H290 was impaired in appressorium function; i.e., appressoria failed to penetrate into bean tissues. Furthermore, these strains could be further discriminated according to the bean defense responses that they induced. Surprisingly, appressorium maturation, but not appressorium function, was sufficient to induce most plant defense responses tested (superoxide ion production and strong induction of pathogenesis-related proteins). However, appressorium function (i.e., entry into the first host cell) was necessary for avirulence-mediated recognition of the fungus. PMID:16085873

  13. Nonpathogenic strains of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum trigger progressive bean defense responses during appressorium-mediated penetration.

    PubMed

    Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Laugé, Richard; Langin, Thierry

    2005-08-01

    The fungal bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum differentiates appressoria in order to penetrate bean tissues. We showed that appressorium development in C. lindemuthianum can be divided into three stages, and we obtained three nonpathogenic strains, including one strain blocked at each developmental stage. H18 was blocked at the appressorium differentiation stage; i.e., no genuine appressoria were formed. H191 was blocked at the appressorium maturation stage; i.e., appressoria exhibited a pigmentation defect and developed only partial internal turgor pressure. H290 was impaired in appressorium function; i.e., appressoria failed to penetrate into bean tissues. Furthermore, these strains could be further discriminated according to the bean defense responses that they induced. Surprisingly, appressorium maturation, but not appressorium function, was sufficient to induce most plant defense responses tested (superoxide ion production and strong induction of pathogenesis-related proteins). However, appressorium function (i.e., entry into the first host cell) was necessary for avirulence-mediated recognition of the fungus.

  14. Desmoplasia suppression by metformin-mediated AMPK activation inhibits pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wanxing; Chen, Ke; Jiang, Zhengdong; Chen, Xin; Sun, Liankang; Li, Jiahui; Lei, Jianjun; Xu, Qinhong; Ma, Jiguang; Li, Xuqi; Han, Liang; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Zheng; Wang, Fengfei; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong; Ma, Zhenhua

    2017-01-28

    Emerging evidence suggests that metformin, an activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), may be useful in preventing and treating pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, whether metformin has an effect on the stromal reaction of PDAC remains unknown. In this study, we first evaluated the expression of AMPK and phosphorylated-AMPK (P-AMPK) in normal and PDAC tissues, our data indicate that reduced P-AMPK expression is a frequent event in PDAC and correlated with poor prognosis and the dense stromal reaction. We then determined the efficacy of metformin on PDAC growth in vitro and in vivo. We reveal that metformin reduces the production of fibrogenic cytokines from pancreatic cancer cells (PCs) and inhibits paracrine-mediated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) activation under PCsPSCs co-culture conditions. By using a xenograft PDAC mouse model, we show that metformin intervention prevents tumor growth and enhances the antitumor effect of gemcitabine via suppression of desmoplastic reaction. Taken together, these results suggest that induction of AMPK activation by metformin represents a novel therapeutic approach for treating advanced PDAC through reducing the desmoplastic reaction in PDAC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Actinomycetes mediated biogenic synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles: Progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Manimaran, Manickavelu; Kannabiran, Krishnan

    2017-03-07

    Actinomycetes mediated biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles and their antimicrobial activities are well documented. Actinomycetes facilitate both intracellular and extracellular metal nanoparticles synthesis and are efficient candidates for the production of polydispersed, stable and ultra-small size metal nanoparticles. Secondary metabolites and new chemical entities derived from actinomycetes have not been extensively studied for the synthesis of metal/ metal oxide nanoparticles. The present review focuses on biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles from actinomycetes and the scope for exploring actinomycetes derived compounds (enzymes, organics acids and bioactive compounds) as metal and metal oxide reducing agents for the synthesis of desired nanoparticles. This review also focuses on challenges faced in the applications nanoparticles and the methods to synthesise biogenic metal nanoparticles with desired physiochemical properties such as ultra-small size, large surface to mass ratio, high reactivity etc. Methods to evade their toxicity and unique interactions with biological systems to improve their chance as an alternative therapeutic agent in medical and pharmaceutical industry are also discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. A positive role for PEA3 in HER2-mediated breast tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Myers, E; Hill, A D K; Kelly, G; McDermott, E W; O'Higgins, N J; Young, L S

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of HER2 is associated with an adverse prognosis in breast cancer. Despite this, the mechanism of its transcriptional regulation remains poorly understood. PEA3, a MAP kinase (MAPK)-activated member of the Ets transcription factor family has been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of HER2. The direction of its modulation remains controversial. We assessed relative levels of PEA3 expression and DNA binding in primary breast cultures derived from patient tumours (n=18) in the presence of an activated MAPK pathway using Western blotting and shift analysis. Expression of PEA3 in breast tumours from patients of known HER2 status (n=107) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In primary breast cancer cell cultures, growth factors induced interaction between PEA3 and its DNA response element. Upregulation of PEA3 expression in the presence of growth factors associated with HER2 positivity and axillary lymph node metastasis (P=0.034 and 0.049, respectively). PEA3 expression in breast cancer tissue associated with reduced disease-free survival (P<0.001), Grade III tumours (P<0.0001) and axillary lymph node metastasis (P=0.026). Co-expression of PEA3 and HER2 significantly associated with rate of recurrence compared to patients who expressed HER2 alone (P=0.0039). These data support a positive role for PEA3 in HER2-mediated oncogenesis in breast cancer. PMID:17060941

  17. HESI admission assessment (A(2)) examination scores, program progression, and NCLEX-RN success in baccalaureate nursing: an exploratory study of dependable academic indicators of success.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Katherine A; DiBartolo, Mary C; Walsh, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to meet the demand for well-educated, high-quality nurses, schools of nursing seek to admit those candidates most likely to have both timely progression and first-time success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Finding the right combination of academic indicators, which are most predictive of success, continues to be an ongoing challenge for entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs across the United States. This pilot study explored the relationship of a standardized admission examination, the Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI) Admission Assessment (A(2)) Examination to preadmission grade point average (GPA), science GPA, and nursing GPA using a retrospective descriptive design. In addition, the predictive ability of the A(2) Examination, preadmission GPA, and science GPA related to timely progression and NCLEX-RN success were explored. In a sample of 89 students, no relationship was found between the A(2) Examination and preadmission GPA or science GPA. The A(2) Examination was correlated with nursing GPA and NCLEX-RN success but not with timely progression. Further studies are needed to explore the utility and predictive ability of standardized examinations such as the A(2) Examination and the contribution of such examinations to evidence-based admission decision making.

  18. miR-1297 mediates PTEN expression and contributes to cell progression in LSCC

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Wang, Hong-liang; Peng, Xin; Zhou, Hui-fang; Wang, Xin

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-1297 was found to be overexpressed in LSCC and contribute to the cell progression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was confirmed to be a target gene of miR-1297. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of PTEN can rescue the proliferation and invasion ability of miR-1297 downregulated Hep-2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of miR-1297 inhibits tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression after transcription, and are involved in cancer development. Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is one of the most common malignant neoplasms with increasing incidence in recent years. In this paper, we report the overexpression of miR-1297 in LSCC and Hep-2 cells. In addition, PTEN was identified to be directly regulated by miR-1297 through western blot and luciferase activity assay. Furthermore, downregulation of miR-1297 in Hep-2 cells was shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, migration, and tumor genesis. Our results document a new epigenetic mechanism for PTEN regulation in LSCC, which is crucial for the development of these tumors.

  19. CpG Island Hypermethylation Mediated by DNMT3A Is a Consequence of AML Progression.

    PubMed

    Spencer, David H; Russler-Germain, David A; Ketkar, Shamika; Helton, Nichole M; Lamprecht, Tamara L; Fulton, Robert S; Fronick, Catrina C; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Heath, Sharon E; Shinawi, Marwan; Westervelt, Peter; Payton, Jacqueline E; Wartman, Lukas D; Welch, John S; Wilson, Richard K; Walter, Matthew J; Link, Daniel C; DiPersio, John F; Ley, Timothy J

    2017-02-23

    DNMT3A mutations occur in ∼25% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The most common mutation, DNMT3A(R882H), has dominant negative activity that reduces DNA methylation activity by ∼80% in vitro. To understand the contribution of DNMT3A-dependent methylation to leukemogenesis, we performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of primary leukemic and non-leukemic cells in patients with or without DNMT3A(R882) mutations. Non-leukemic hematopoietic cells with DNMT3A(R882H) displayed focal methylation loss, suggesting that hypomethylation antedates AML. Although virtually all AMLs with wild-type DNMT3A displayed CpG island hypermethylation, this change was not associated with gene silencing and was essentially absent in AMLs with DNMT3A(R882) mutations. Primary hematopoietic stem cells expanded with cytokines were hypermethylated in a DNMT3A-dependent manner, suggesting that hypermethylation may be a response to, rather than a cause of, cellular proliferation. Our findings suggest that hypomethylation is an initiating phenotype in AMLs with DNMT3A(R882), while DNMT3A-dependent CpG island hypermethylation is a consequence of AML progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression Profiling of MAP Kinase–Mediated Meiotic Progression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Leacock, Stefanie W; Reinke, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    The LET-60 (Ras)/LIN-45 (Raf)/MPK-1 (MAP kinase) signaling pathway plays a key role in the development of multiple tissues in Caenorhabditis elegans. For the most part, the identities of the downstream genes that act as the ultimate effectors of MPK-1 signaling have remained elusive. A unique allele of mpk-1, ga111, displays a reversible, temperature-sensitive, tissue-specific defect in progression through meiotic prophase I. We performed gene expression profiling on mpk-1(ga111) animals to identify candidate downstream effectors of MPK-1 signaling in the germ line. This analysis delineated a cohort of genes whose expression requires MPK-1 signaling in germ cells in the pachytene stage of meiosis I. RNA in situ hybridization analysis shows that these genes are expressed in the germ line in an MPK-1-dependent manner and have a spatial expression pattern consistent with the location of activated MPK-1. We found that one MPK-1 signaling-responsive gene encoding a C2H2 zinc finger protein plays a role in meiotic chromosome segregation downstream of MPK-1. Additionally, discovery of genes responsive to MPK-1 signaling permitted us to order MPK-1 signaling relative to several events occurring in pachytene, including EFL-1/DPL-1 gene regulation and X chromosome reactivation. This study highlights the utility of applying global gene expression methods to investigate genes downstream of commonly used signaling pathways in vivo. PMID:17096596

  1. Expression profiling of MAP kinase-mediated meiotic progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Leacock, Stefanie W; Reinke, Valerie

    2006-11-10

    The LET-60 (Ras)/LIN-45 (Raf)/MPK-1 (MAP kinase) signaling pathway plays a key role in the development of multiple tissues in Caenorhabditis elegans. For the most part, the identities of the downstream genes that act as the ultimate effectors of MPK-1 signaling have remained elusive. A unique allele of mpk-1, ga111, displays a reversible, temperature-sensitive, tissue-specific defect in progression through meiotic prophase I. We performed gene expression profiling on mpk-1(ga111) animals to identify candidate downstream effectors of MPK-1 signaling in the germ line. This analysis delineated a cohort of genes whose expression requires MPK-1 signaling in germ cells in the pachytene stage of meiosis I. RNA in situ hybridization analysis shows that these genes are expressed in the germ line in an MPK-1-dependent manner and have a spatial expression pattern consistent with the location of activated MPK-1. We found that one MPK-1 signaling-responsive gene encoding a C2H2 zinc finger protein plays a role in meiotic chromosome segregation downstream of MPK-1. Additionally, discovery of genes responsive to MPK-1 signaling permitted us to order MPK-1 signaling relative to several events occurring in pachytene, including EFL-1/DPL-1 gene regulation and X chromosome reactivation. This study highlights the utility of applying global gene expression methods to investigate genes downstream of commonly used signaling pathways in vivo.

  2. Lymphoma endothelium preferentially expresses Tim-3 and facilitates the progression of lymphoma by mediating immune evasion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Bai, Xiangyang; Cao, Yang; Wu, Jingyi; Huang, Mei; Tang, Duozhuang; Tao, Si; Zhu, Tao; Liu, Yanling; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Xiaoxi; Zhao, Yanxia; Wu, Mingfu; Wei, Juncheng; Wang, Daowen; Xu, Gang; Wang, Shixuan

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is increasingly recognized as an important prognosticator associated with the progression of lymphoma and as an attractive target for novel modalities. We report a previously unrecognized mechanism by which lymphoma endothelium facilitates the growth and dissemination of lymphoma by interacting with circulated T cells and suppresses the activation of CD4+ T cells. Global gene expression profiles of microdissected endothelium from lymphoma and reactive lymph nodes revealed that T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain–containing molecule 3 (Tim-3) was preferentially expressed in lymphoma-derived endothelial cells (ECs). Clinically, the level of Tim-3 in B cell lymphoma endothelium was closely correlated to both dissemination and poor prognosis. In vitro, Tim-3+ ECs modulated T cell response to lymphoma surrogate antigens by suppressing activation of CD4+ T lymphocytes through the activation of the interleukin-6–STAT3 pathway, inhibiting Th1 polarization, and providing protective immunity. In a lymphoma mouse model, Tim-3–expressing ECs promoted the onset, growth, and dissemination of lymphoma by inhibiting activation of CD4+ T cells and Th1 polarization. Our findings strongly argue that the lymphoma endothelium is not only a vessel system but also a functional barrier facilitating the establishment of lymphoma immune tolerance. These findings highlight a novel molecular mechanism that is a potential target for enhancing the efficacy of tumor immunotherapy and controlling metastatic diseases. PMID:20176801

  3. Periodontitis, pathogenesis and progression: miRNA-mediated cellular responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Singhrao, Sim K.; Osmundsen, Harald

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered a keystone pathogen in periodontitis, a disease typically driven by dysbiosis of oral inflammophilic polymicrobial pathobionts. To combat infectious agents, the natural defense response of the host is to switch on inflammatory signaling cascades, whereby microRNA (miRNA) species serve as alternative genetic inhibitory transcriptional endpoints. miRNA profiles from diseased sites differ from those detected in disease-free tissues. miRNA profiles could therefore be harnessed as potential diagnostic/prognostic tools. The regulatory role of some miRNA species (miRNA-128, miRNA-146, miRNA-203, and miRNA-584) in the innate immune system suggests these molecular signatures also have potential in therapy. P. gingivalis–associated miRNAs are likely to influence the innate immune response, whereas its lipopolysaccharide may affect the nature of host miRNAs and their mRNA targets. This mini review discusses miRNA-dependent transcriptional and regulatory phenomena ensuing immune signaling cascade switch-on with development and progression of periodontitis initiated by P. gingivalis exposure. PMID:28748037

  4. Insulin growth factor binding protein 2 mediates the progression of lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linda; Li, Chenggang; Zhang, Erik; Ma, Wang; Fan, Qingxia; Yu, Jane J.

    2017-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a progressive pulmonary disease that almost exclusively affects women. LAM cells migrate to the lungs, where they cause cystic destruction of lung parenchyma. Mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 lead to the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1, a kinase that regulates growth factor-dependent protein translation, cell growth, and metabolism. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) binds insulin, IGF1 and IGF2 in circulation, thereby modulating cell survival, migration, and invasion in neoplasms. In this study, we identified that IGFBP2 primarily localized in the nucleus of TSC2-null LAM patient-derived cells in vitro and in vivo. We also showed that nuclear accumulation of IGFBP2 is closely associated with estrogen receptor alpha (ERa) expression. Furthermore, estrogen treatment induced IGFBP2 nuclear translocation in TSC2-null LAM patient-derived cells. Importantly, depletion of IGFBP2 by siRNA reduced cell proliferation, enhanced apoptosis, and decreased migration and invasion of TSC2-null LAM patient-derived cells. More interestingly, depletion of IGFBP2 markedly decreased the phosphorylation of MAPK in LAM patient-derived TSC2-null cells. Collectively, these results suggest that IGFBP2 plays an important role in promoting tumorigenesis, through estrogen and ERalpha signaling pathway. Thus, targeting IGFBP2 may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for women with LAM and other female gender specific neoplasms. PMID:28410230

  5. Baseline Performance Predicts tDCS-Mediated Improvements in Language Symptoms in Primary Progressive Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    McConathey, Eric M.; White, Nicole C.; Gervits, Felix; Ash, Sherry; Coslett, H. Branch; Grossman, Murray; Hamilton, Roy H.

    2017-01-01

    Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by insidious irreversible loss of language abilities. Prior studies suggest that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) directed toward language areas of the brain may help to ameliorate symptoms of PPA. In the present sham-controlled study, we examined whether tDCS could be used to enhance language abilities (e.g., picture naming) in individuals with PPA variants primarily characterized by difficulties with speech production (non-fluent and logopenic). Participants were recruited from the Penn Frontotemporal Dementia Center to receive 10 days of both real and sham tDCS (counter-balanced, full-crossover design; participants were naïve to stimulation condition). A battery of language tests was administered at baseline, immediately post-tDCS (real and sham), and 6 weeks and 12 weeks following stimulation. When we accounted for individuals’ baseline performance, our analyses demonstrated a stratification of tDCS effects. Individuals who performed worse at baseline showed tDCS-related improvements in global language performance, grammatical comprehension and semantic processing. Individuals who performed better at baseline showed a slight tDCS-related benefit on our speech repetition metric. Real tDCS may improve language performance in some individuals with PPA. Severity of deficits at baseline may be an important factor in predicting which patients will respond positively to language-targeted tDCS therapies. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT02928848 PMID:28713256

  6. Akt as a mediator of secretory phospholipase A2 receptor-involved inducible nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae-Won; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Kim, Seong-Yong; Sonn, Jong-Kyung; Bang, Ok-Sun; Kang, Shin-Sung; Kim, Jung-Hye; Baek, Suk-Hwan

    2003-02-15

    The induction of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) by group IIA phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) involves the stimulation of a novel signaling cascade. In this study, we demonstrate that group IIA PLA(2) up-regulates the expression of iNOS through a novel pathway that includes M-type secretory PLA(2) receptor (sPLA(2)R), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Akt. Group IIA PLA(2) stimulated iNOS expression and promoted nitrite production in a dose- and time-dependent manner in Raw264.7 cells. Upon treating with group IIA PLA(2), Akt is phosphorylated in a PI3K-dependent manner. Pretreatment with LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, strongly suppressed group IIA PLA(2)-induced iNOS expression and PI3K/Akt activation. The promoter activity of iNOS was stimulated by group IIA PLA(2), and this was suppressed by LY294002. Transfection with Akt cDNA resulted in Akt protein overexpression in Raw264.7 cells and effectively enhanced the group IIA PLA(2)-induced reporter activity of the iNOS promoter. M-type sPLA(2)R was highly expressed in Raw264.7 cells. Overexpression of M-type sPLA(2)R enhanced group IIA PLA(2)-induced promoter activity and iNOS protein expression, and these effects were abolished by LY294002. However, site-directed mutation in residue responsible for PLA(2) catalytic activity markedly reduced their ability to production of nitrites and expression of iNOS. These results suggest that group IIA PLA(2) induces nitrite production by involving of M-type sPLA(2)R, which then mediates signal transduction events that lead to PI3K/Akt activation.

  7. Astrocytes promote progression of breast cancer metastases to the brain via a KISS1-mediated autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kaverina, Natalya; Borovjagin, Anton V; Kadagidze, Zaira; Baryshnikov, Anatoly; Baryshnikova, Maria; Malin, Dmitry; Ghosh, Dhimankrishhna; Shah, Nameeta; Welch, Danny R; Gabikian, Patrik; Karseladze, Apollon; Cobbs, Charles; Ulasov, Ilya V

    2017-10-05

    Formation of metastases, also known as cancer dissemination, is an important stage of breast cancer (BrCa) development. KISS1 expression is associated with inhibition of metastases development. Recently we have demonstrated that BrCa metastases to the brain exhibit low levels of KISS1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. By using multicolor immunofluorescence and coculture techniques here we show that normal adult astrocytes in the brain are capable of promoting metastatic transformation of circulating breast cancer cells localized to the brain through secretion of chemokine CXCL12. The latter was found in this study to downregulate KISS1 expression at the post-transcriptional level via induction of microRNA-345 (MIR345). Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of KISS1 downregulates ATG5 and ATG7, 2 key modulators of autophagy, and works concurrently with autophagy inhibitors, thereby implicating autophagy in the mechanism of KISS1-mediated BrCa metastatic transformation. We also found that expression of KISS1 in human breast tumor specimens inversely correlates with that of MMP9 and IL8, implicated in the mechanism of metastatic invasion, thereby supporting the role of KISS1 as a potential regulator of BrCa metastatic invasion in the brain. This conclusion is further supported by the ability of KISS1, ectopically overexpressed from an adenoviral vector in MDA-MB-231Br cells with silenced expression of the endogenous gene, to revert invasive phenotype of those cells. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that human adult astrocytes can promote brain invasion of the brain-localized circulating breast cancer cells by upregulating autophagy signaling pathways via the CXCL12-MIR345- KISS1 axis.

  8. Effect of the efflux pump QepA2 combined with chromosomally mediated mechanisms on quinolone resistance and bacterial fitness in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Jesús; Briales, Alejandra; Díaz-de-Alba, Paula; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Pascual, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the interplay between the plasmid-mediated qepA2 gene and multiple chromosomally mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli and its influence on bacterial fitness. E. coli ATCC 25922 and derived isogenic strains harbouring different chromosomally mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants were electroporated with pBK-CMV vector encoding QepA2. The MICs of fluoroquinolones were determined by standardized microdilution. The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) was evaluated. Bacterial fitness was analysed using ΔlacZ system competition assays. The ciprofloxacin MIC for strains harbouring the qepA2 gene was 4- to 8-fold higher compared with strains without the qepA2 gene. The qepA2 gene also increased the MPC of ciprofloxacin 4- to 16-fold. Combination of the qepA2 gene plus two to three additional mechanisms conferred a clinically relevant resistance level. The presence of the qepA2 gene was associated with fitness costs in strains with mutations in the gyrA and/or parC genes, although the presence of an additional deletion of the marR gene compensated for this fitness cost by increasing bacterial fitness by 5%-23%. The additive effect of chromosomally mediated fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms and the qepA2 gene led to clinical levels of fluoroquinolone resistance. Under competitive conditions, the qepA2 gene had a biological cost in E. coli that was compensated for by the presence of an additional deletion in the marR gene. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Hormone mediation of immune responses in the progression of diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Soory, M

    2002-04-01

    The crucial role of the immune response is common to diabetes mellitus (DM), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease. This review identifies advances in this field and exciting paradigms in their management. Uncontrolled hyperglycaemia in diabetic patients results in the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are detrimental to cell structure and function. Altered host resistance such as defective migration of PMN, impaired phagocytosis and an exaggerated inflammatory response to microbial products also compromises healing in uncontrolled diabetic patients, further compromised in smokers. Nicotine has well documented effects on the immune response, cell adhesion proteins and apoptosis which affect the severity of disease presentation and response to treatment. Rheumatoid arthritis is a multifactorial disease that results in severe destruction of synovial cartilage and bone. Local secretion of large amounts of TNF-alpha and IL-1 due to activation of immunocompetent cells characterises the pathophysiology of RA. This has lead to the emergence of TNF-alpha inhibitors such as etanercept and infliximab in its management. Periodontal disease has a microbial aetiology. But it is similar to RA, in its cyclical pattern of destruction associated with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which can persist after removal of the antigenic stimulus. Non steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) have been used as an adjunct to mechanical removal of bacterial antigen, in the management of periodontal disease. The non-reproductive functions of steroid hormones include effects on immunocompetent cells, fibroblasts and osteoblasts, which affect the initiation and progression of inflammatory diseases. Hormone replacement therapy could be another facet in a multifaceted treatment approach in these patients, where indicated.

  10. A missense variant of the ATP1A2 gene is associated with a novel phenotype of progressive sensorineural hearing loss associated with migraine.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Kyung; Baek, Jeong-In; Weigand, Karl M; Venselaar, Hanka; Swarts, Herman G P; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hashim Raza, Muhammad; Jung, Da Jung; Choi, Soo-Young; Lee, Sang-Heun; Friedrich, Thomas; Vriend, Gert; Koenderink, Jan B; Kim, Un-Kyung; Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary sensorineural hearing loss is an extremely clinical and genetic heterogeneous disorder in humans. Especially, syndromic hearing loss is subdivided by combinations of various phenotypes, and each subtype is related to different genes. We present a new form of progressive hearing loss with migraine found to be associated with a variant in the ATP1A2 gene. The ATP1A2 gene has been reported as the major genetic cause of familial migraine by several previous studies. A Korean family presenting progressive hearing loss with migraine was ascertained. The affected members did not show any aura or other neurologic symptoms during migraine attacks, indicating on a novel phenotype of syndromic hearing loss. To identify the causative gene, linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing were performed. A novel missense variant, c.571G>A (p.(Val191Met)), was identified in the ATP1A2 gene that showed co-segregation with the phenotype in the family. In silico studies suggest that this variant causes a change in hydrophobic interactions and thereby slightly destabilize the A-domain of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. However, functional studies failed to show any effect of the p.(Val191Met) substitution on the catalytic rate of this enzyme. We describe a new phenotype of progressive hearing loss with migraine associated with a variant in the ATP1A2 gene. This study suggests that a variant in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase can be involved in both migraine and hearing loss.

  11. Do Deviant Peer Associations Mediate the Contributions of Self-Esteem to Problem Behavior During Early Adolescence? A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, David L.; Silverthorn, Naida

    2004-01-01

    We investigated deviant peer associations as a mediator of the influences of general and peer-oriented self-esteem on problem behavior using data from a 2-year longitudinal study of 350 young adolescents. Measures of problem behavior included substance use (alcohol use, smoking) and antisocial behavior (fighting, stealing). Using latent growth…

  12. Do Deviant Peer Associations Mediate the Contributions of Self-Esteem to Problem Behavior During Early Adolescence? A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, David L.; Silverthorn, Naida

    2004-01-01

    We investigated deviant peer associations as a mediator of the influences of general and peer-oriented self-esteem on problem behavior using data from a 2-year longitudinal study of 350 young adolescents. Measures of problem behavior included substance use (alcohol use, smoking) and antisocial behavior (fighting, stealing). Using latent growth…

  13. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 regulates alcohol-mediated astrocyte inflammatory responses in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, R; Ghorpade, A

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol (EtOH) abuse and HIV-1 infection remain leading public health problems not only in the United States but also across the world. Alcohol abusers have a significantly greater risk of HIV-1 infection than non-drinkers globally. In the United States, prevalence of EtOH abuse is over two-fold higher in HIV-1-positive individuals than that of the general population. Although alcohol abusers show neurodegeneration, exacerbated neuroinflammation and oxidative damage, the mechanism(s) by which EtOH regulates astrocyte inflammatory responses in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders is unknown. Thus, we explored signaling pathway(s) involved in EtOH-mediated activation of human astrocytes with HIV-1 and subsequent alterations in their inflammatory functions. Alcohol exposure altered the morphology of astrocytes, proinflammatory responses and induced cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Time-dependent changes were also evaluated. EtOH and HIV-1 cotreatment decreased cell viability and proliferation, while increasing apoptosis and mitochondrial depolarization. EtOH and HIV-1 together increased the levels of proinflammatory molecules, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, CXCL8, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 and more importantly, arachidonic acid, a known downstream target of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). Consistent with this observation, phospho-cPLA2 levels were augmented in HIV-1 and EtOH cotreatment as compared with HIV-1 or EtOH alone. Cyclooxygenase 2 was upregulated as measured by real-time PCR and western blot, whereas cotreatment of HIV-1 and EtOH decreased cytochrome P450-2E1 levels as compared with EtOH alone. Furthermore, we confirmed that blocking cPLA2 with arachidonyl tri floro methyl ketone, a cPLA2-specific inhibitor, effectively prevented cPLA2 phosphorylation and downstream outcomes. Thus, the present findings suggest that cPLA2 has a critical role in alcohol and HIV-induced astrocyte inflammation. In the future, cPLA2

  14. A mouse model of clonal CD8+ T lymphocyte-mediated alopecia areata progressing to alopecia universalis

    PubMed Central

    Alli, Rajshekhar; Nguyen, Phuong; Boyd, Kelli; Sundberg, John P.; Geiger, Terrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia areata is among the most prevalent autoimmune diseases, yet compared with other autoimmune conditions is not well studied. This in part results from limitations in the C3H/HeJ mouse and DEBR rat model systems most commonly used to study the disease, which display a low frequency and late onset. We describe a novel high incidence model for spontaneous alopecia areata. The 1MOG244 T cell expresses dual TCRA chains, one of which, when combined with the single TCRB present, promotes the development of CD8+ T cells with specificity for hair follicles. Retroviral transgenic mice expressing this TCR develop spontaneous alopecia areata at nearly 100% incidence. Disease initially follows a reticular pattern, with regionally cyclic episodes of hair loss and regrowth, and ultimately progresses to alopecia universalis. Alopecia development is associated with CD8+ T cell activation, migration into the intrafollicular region, and hair follicle destruction. The disease may be adoptively transferred with T lymphocytes, and is class I and not class II MHC-dependent. Pathologic T cells primarily express IFNG and IL17 early in disease, with dramatic increases in cytokine production and recruitment of IL4 and IL10 production with disease progression. Inhibition of individual cytokines did not significantly alter disease incidence, potentially indicating redundancy in cytokine responses. These results therefore characterize a new high incidence model for alopecia areata in C57BL/6J mice, the first to apply a monoclonal TCR, and indicate that class I MHC-restricted CD8+ T lymphocytes can independently mediate the pathologic response. PMID:22116824

  15. Secretory phospholipase A{sub 2}-mediated progression of hepatotoxicity initiated by acetaminophen is exacerbated in the absence of hepatic COX-2

    SciTech Connect

    Bhave, Vishakha S.; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Latendresse, John R.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2011-03-15

    We have previously reported that among the other death proteins, hepatic secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} (sPLA{sub 2}) is a leading mediator of progression of liver injury initiated by CCl{sub 4} in rats. The aim of our present study was to test the hypothesis that increased hepatic sPLA{sub 2} released after acetaminophen (APAP) challenge mediates progression of liver injury in wild type (WT) and COX-2 knockout (KO) mice. COX-2 WT and KO mice were administered a normally non lethal dose (400 mg/kg) of acetaminophen. The COX-2 KO mice suffered 60% mortality compared to 100% survival of the WT mice, suggesting higher susceptibility of COX-2 KO mice to sPLA{sub 2}-mediated progression of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Liver injury was significantly higher at later time points in the KO mice compared to the WT mice indicating that the abatement of progression of injury requires the presence of COX-2. This difference in hepatotoxicity was not due to increased bioactivation of acetaminophen as indicated by unchanged cyp2E1 protein and covalently bound {sup 14}C-APAP in the livers of KO mice. Hepatic sPLA{sub 2} activity and plasma TNF-{alpha} were significantly higher after APAP administration in the KO mice. This was accompanied by a corresponding fall in hepatic PGE{sub 2} and lower compensatory liver regeneration and repair ({sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation) in the KO mice. These results suggest that hindered compensatory tissue repair and poor resolution of inflammation for want of beneficial prostaglandins render the liver very vulnerable to sPLA{sub 2}-mediated progression of liver injury. These findings are consistent with the destructive role of sPLA{sub 2} in the progression and expansion of tissue injury as a result of continued hydrolytic breakdown of plasma membrane phospholipids of perinecrotic hepatocytes unless mitigated by sufficient co-induction of COX-2.

  16. Cytokine profile during latent and slowly progressive primary tuberculosis: a possible role for interleukin-15 in mediating clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Abebe, F; Mustafa, T; Nerland, A H; Bjune, G A

    2006-01-01

    Recently, mouse models for latent (LTB) and slowly progressive primary tuberculosis (SPTB) have been established. However, cytokine profiles during the two models are not well established. Using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) we studied the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha during the course of LTB and SPTB in the lungs and spleens of B6D2F1Bom mice infected with the H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The results show that, except for IL-4, cytokine expression levels were significantly higher during SPTB than LTB in both the lungs and spleens. During LTB, all the cytokines (except IL-2 in the lungs) had higher expression levels during the initial period of infection both in the lungs and spleens. During SPTB, the expression levels of IL-15 increased significantly from phases 1 to 3 in the lungs. The expression levels of IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-gamma increased significantly from 2 to 3 in the lungs. IL-10 and IL-15 increased significantly from phases 2 to 3, whereas that of TNF-alpha decreased significantly and progressively from phases 1 to 3 in the spleens. Over-expression of proinflammatory cytokines during active disease has been well documented, but factor(s) underlying such over-expression is not known. In the present study, there was a progressive and significant increase in the expression levels of IL-15, together with Th1 cytokines (IL-12 and IFN-gamma) during SPTB but a significant decrease during LTB. IL-15 is known to up-regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta, IL-8, IL-12, IL-17, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha and has an inhibitory effect on activation-induced cell death. IL-15 is known to be involved in many proinflammatory disease states such as rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune diabetes, etc. Our results, together with the above observations

  17. Mapping methyl jasmonate-mediated transcriptional reprogramming of metabolism and cell cycle progression in cultured Arabidopsis cells

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Laurens; Morreel, Kris; De Witte, Emilie; Lammertyn, Freya; Van Montagu, Marc; Boerjan, Wout; Inzé, Dirk; Goossens, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are plant-specific signaling molecules that steer a diverse set of physiological and developmental processes. Pathogen attack and wounding inflicted by herbivores induce the biosynthesis of these hormones, triggering defense responses both locally and systemically. We report on alterations in the transcriptome of a fast-dividing cell culture of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana after exogenous application of methyl JA (MeJA). Early MeJA response genes encoded the JA biosynthesis pathway proteins and key regulators of MeJA responses, including most JA ZIM domain proteins and MYC2, together with transcriptional regulators with potential, but yet unknown, functions in MeJA signaling. In a second transcriptional wave, MeJA reprogrammed cellular metabolism and cell cycle progression. Up-regulation of the monolignol biosynthesis gene set resulted in an increased production of monolignols and oligolignols, the building blocks of lignin. Simultaneously, MeJA repressed activation of M-phase genes, arresting the cell cycle in G2. MeJA-responsive transcription factors were screened for their involvement in early signaling events, in particular the regulation of JA biosynthesis. Parallel screens based on yeast one-hybrid and transient transactivation assays identified both positive (MYC2 and the AP2/ERF factor ORA47) and negative (the C2H2 Zn finger proteins STZ/ZAT10 and AZF2) regulators, revealing a complex control of the JA autoregulatory loop and possibly other MeJA-mediated downstream processes. PMID:18216250

  18. Hair Cell Loss, Spiral Ganglion Degeneration, and Progressive Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Mice with Targeted Deletion of Slc44a2/Ctl2.

    PubMed

    Kommareddi, Pavan; Nair, Thankam; Kakaraparthi, Bala Naveen; Galano, Maria M; Miller, Danielle; Laczkovich, Irina; Thomas, Trey; Lu, Lillian; Rule, Kelli; Kabara, Lisa; Kanicki, Ariane; Hughes, Elizabeth D; Jones, Julie M; Hoenerhoff, Mark; Fisher, Susan G; Altschuler, Richard A; Dolan, David; Kohrman, David C; Saunders, Thomas L; Carey, Thomas E

    2015-12-01

    SLC44A2 (solute carrier 44a2), also known as CTL2 (choline transporter-like protein 2), is expressed in many supporting cell types in the cochlea and is implicated in hair cell survival and antibody-induced hearing loss. In mice with the mixed C57BL/6-129 background, homozygous deletion of Slc44a2 exons 3–10 (Slc44a2(Δ/Δ)resulted in high-frequency hearing loss and hair cell death. To reduce effects associated with age-related hearing loss (ARHL) in these strains, mice carrying the Slc44a2Δ allele were backcrossed to the ARHL-resistant FVB/NJ strain and evaluated after backcross seven(N7) (99 % FVB). Slc44a2(Δ/Δ) mice produced abnormally spliced Slc44a2 transcripts that contain a frame shift and premature stop codons. Neither full-length SLC44A2 nor a putative truncated protein could be detected in Slc44a2(Δ/Δ) mice, suggesting a likely null allele. Auditory brain stem responses (ABRs) of mice carrying the Slc44a2Δ allele on an FVB/NJ genetic background were tested longitudinally between the ages of 2 and 10 months. By 6 months of age,Slc44a2(Δ/Δ) mice exhibited hearing loss at 32 kHz,but at 12 and 24 kHz had sound thresholds similar to those of wild-type Slc44a2(+/+) and heterozygous +/Slc44a2Δ mice. After 6 months of age, Slc44a2(Δ/Δ) mutants exhibited progressive hearing loss at all frequencies and +/Slc44a2(Δ) mice exhibited moderate threshold elevations at high frequency. Histologic evaluation of Slc44a2(Δ/Δ) mice revealed extensive hair cell and spiral ganglion cell loss, especially in the basal turn of the cochlea. We conclude that Slc44a2 function is required for long-term hair cell survival and maintenance of hearing.

  19. Calcium-mediated modulation of the quaternary structure and function of adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor heteromers

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, Sergi; Woods, Amina S.; Navarro, Gemma; Aymerich, Marisol; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor heteromer is one of the most studied receptor heteromers. It has important implications for basal ganglia function and pathology. Recent studies using Bioluminescence and Sequential Resonance Energy Transfer techniques shed light on the role of Ca2+ in the modulation of the quaternary structure of the A2A-D2 receptor heteromer, which was found to depend on the binding of calmodulin (CaM) to the carboxy terminus of the A2A receptor in the A2A-D2 receptor heteromer. Importantly, the changes in quaternary structure correlate with changes in function. A Ca2+/CaM-dependent modulation of MAPK signaling upon agonist treatment could only be observed in cells expressing A2A-D2 receptor heteromers. These studies provide a first example of a Ca2+-mediated modulation of the quaternary structure and function of a receptor heteromer. PMID:19896897

  20. WE-AB-BRB-08: Progress Towards a 2D OSL Dosimetry System Using Al2O3:C Films

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M F; Yukihara, E; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; Akselrod, M; Brons, S; Greilich, S; Jakel, O; Osinga, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a 2D dosimetry system based on the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C films for medical applications. Methods: A 2D laser scanning OSL reader was built for readout of newly developed Al2O3:C films (Landauer Inc.). An image reconstruction algorithm was developed to correct for inherent effects introduced by reader design and detector properties. The system was tested using irradiations with photon and carbon ion beams. A calibration was obtained using a 6 MV photon beam from clinical accelerator and the dose measurement precision was tested using a range of doses and different dose distributions (flat field and wedge field). The dynamic range and performance of the system in the presence of large dose gradients was also tested using 430 MeV/u {sup 12}C single and multiple pencil beams. All irradiations were performed with Gafchromic EBT3 film for comparison. Results: Preliminary results demonstrate a near-linear OSL dose response to photon fields and the ability to measure dose in dose distributions such as flat field and wedge field. Tests using {sup 12}C pencil beam demonstrate ability to measure doses over four orders of magnitude. The dose profiles measured by the OSL film generally agreed well with that measured by the EBT3 film. The OSL image signal-to-noise ratio obtained in the current conditions require further improvement. On the other hand, EBT3 films had large uncertainties in the low dose region due to film-to-film or intra-film variation in the background. Conclusion: A 2D OSL dosimetry system was developed and initial tests have demonstrated a wide dynamic range as well as good agreement between the delivered and measured doses. The low background, wide dynamic range and wide range of linearity in dose response observed for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C OSL film can be beneficial for dosimetry in radiation therapy applications, especially for small field dosimetry. This work has been funded by Landauer Inc. Dr

  1. FOXQ1 mediates the crosstalk between TGF-β and Wnt signaling pathways in the progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xudong; Luo, Zan; Kang, Qingjie; Deng, Dawei; Wang, Qiang; Peng, Hongxia; Wang, Shan; Wei, Zhengqiang

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of signaling transduction pathways contribute to tumorigenesis. Forkhead box Q1 (FOXQ1) is a member of the forkhead transcription factor family and its upregulation is closely correlated with tumor progression and prognosis of multiple cancer types, including colorectal cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms by which FOXQ1 promotes tumorigenesis, especially cancer cell invasion and metastasis in colorectal cancer, have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrate that FOXQ1 is overexpressed in colorectal tumor tissues and its expression level is closely correlated with the stage and lymph node metastasis of colorectal cancer. In in vitro cultured SW480 colorectal cancer cells, knockdown of FOXQ1 expression by small interfering RNA greatly diminished the aggressive tumor behaviors of SW480 cells, including angiogenesis, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and resistance to chemotherapy drug-induced apoptosis. Further mechanistic investigation showed that FOXQ1 silencing prevents the nuclear translocation of β-catenin, thus reducing the activity of Wnt signaling. Moreover, TGF-β1 induced the expression of FOXQ1 as well as the migration and invasion of SW480 cells, which was partially prevented following knockdown of FOXQ1. Our results demonstrate that FOXQ1 plays a critical role during the tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer and is a mediator of the crosstalk between Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways. Our findings provide further insight into the cancer biology of colorectal cancer and suggest that FOXQ1 is a potential therapeutic target for the development of therapies for colorectal cancer. PMID:25955104

  2. PTEN mediates the cross talk between breast and glial cells in brain metastases leading to rapid disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Hohensee, Ina; Chuang, Han-Ning; Grottke, Astrid; Werner, Stefan; Schulte, Alexander; Horn, Stefan; Lamszus, Katrin; Bartkowiak, Kai; Witzel, Isabell; Westphal, Manfred; Matschke, Jakob; Glatzel, Markus; Jücker, Manfred; Pukrop, Tobias; Pantel, Klaus; Wikman, Harriet

    2017-01-01

    Despite improvement of therapeutic treatments for breast cancer, the development of brain metastases has become a major limitation to life expectancy for many patients. Brain metastases show very commonly alterations in EGFR and HER2 driven pathways, of which PTEN is an important regulator. Here, we analyzed PTEN expression in 111 tissue samples of breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM). Loss of PTEN was found in a substantial proportion of BCBM samples (48.6%) and was significantly associated with triple-negative breast cancer (67.5%, p = 0.001) and a shorter survival time after surgical resection of brain metastases (p = 0.048). Overexpression of PTEN in brain-seeking MDA-MB-231 BR cells in vitro reduced activation of the AKT pathway, notably by suppression of Akt1 kinase activity. Furthermore, the migration of MDA-MB-231 BR cells in vitro was promoted by co-culturing with both astrocytes and microglial cells. Interestingly, when PTEN was overexpressed the migration was significantly inhibited. Moreover, in an ex vivo organotypic brain slice model, PTEN overexpression reduced invasion of tumor cells. This was accompanied by reduced astrocyte activation that was mediated by autocrine and paracrine activation of GM-CSF/ CSF2RA and AKT/ PTEN pathways. In conclusion, loss of PTEN is frequently detected in triple-negative BCBM patients and associated with poor prognosis. The findings of our functional studies suggest that PTEN loss promotes a feedback loop between tumor cells and glial cells, which might contribute to disease progression. PMID:28008153

  3. Elevated Snail Expression Mediates Tumor Progression in Areca Quid Chewing-Associated Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma via Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Tsai, Chung-Hung; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Background Snail is an important transcription factor implicated in several tumor progression and can be induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Areca quid chewing is a major risk factor of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Therefore, we hypothesize that the major areca nut alkaloid arecoline may induce Snail via ROS and involve in the pathogenesis of areca quid chewing-associated OSCC. Methodology/Principal Finding Thirty-six OSCC and ten normal oral epithelium specimens were examined by immunohistochemistry and analyzed by the clinico-pathological profiles. Cytotoxicity, 2′, 7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay, and western blot were used to investigate the effects of arecoline in human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) and oral epithelial cell line OECM-1 cells. In addition, antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), curcumin, and epigallocatechin-3 gallate (EGCG) were added to find the possible regulatory mechanisms. Initially, Snail expression was significantly higher in OSCC specimens (p<0.05). Elevated Snail expression was associated with lymph node metastasis (p = 0.031) and poor differentiation (p = 0.017). Arecoline enhanced the generation of intracellular ROS at the concentration higher than 40 µg/ml (p<0.05). Arecoline was also found to induced Snail expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p<0.05). Treatment with NAC, curcumin, and EGCG markedly inhibited arecoline induced Snail expression (p<0.05). Conclusion/Significance: Our results suggest that Snail overexpression in areca quid chewing-associated OSCC is associated with tumors differentiation and lymph node metastasis. Arecoline-upregulated Snail expression may be mediated by ROS generation. In addition, arecoline induced Snail expression was downregulated by NAC, curcumin, and EGCG. PMID:23874481

  4. A2B adenosine receptor blockade enhances macrophage-mediated bacterial phagocytosis and improves polymicrobial sepsis survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Belikoff, Bryan G; Hatfield, Stephen; Georgiev, Peter; Ohta, Akio; Lukashev, Dmitriy; Buras, Jon A; Remick, Daniel G; Sitkovsky, Michail

    2011-02-15

    Antimicrobial treatment strategies must improve to reduce the high mortality rates in septic patients. In noninfectious models of acute inflammation, activation of A2B adenosine receptors (A2BR) in extracellular adenosine-rich microenvironments causes immunosuppression. We examined A2BR in antibacterial responses in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. Antagonism of A2BR significantly increased survival, enhanced bacterial phagocytosis, and decreased IL-6 and MIP-2 (a CXC chemokine) levels after CLP in outbred (ICR/CD-1) mice. During the CLP-induced septic response in A2BR knockout mice, hemodynamic parameters were improved compared with wild-type mice in addition to better survival and decreased plasma IL-6 levels. A2BR deficiency resulted in a dramatic 4-log reduction in peritoneal bacteria. The mechanism of these improvements was due to enhanced macrophage phagocytic activity without augmenting neutrophil phagocytosis of bacteria. Following ex vivo LPS stimulation, septic macrophages from A2BR knockout mice had increased IL-6 and TNF-α secretion compared with wild-type mice. A therapeutic intervention with A2BR blockade was studied by using a plasma biomarker to direct therapy to those mice predicted to die. Pharmacological blockade of A2BR even 32 h after the onset of sepsis increased survival by 65% in those mice predicted to die. Thus, even the late treatment with an A2BR antagonist significantly improved survival of mice (ICR/CD-1) that were otherwise determined to die according to plasma IL-6 levels. Our findings of enhanced bacterial clearance and host survival suggest that antagonism of A2BRs offers a therapeutic target to improve macrophage function in a late treatment protocol that improves sepsis survival.

  5. Activation of the A2B adenosine receptor in B16 melanomas induces CXCL12 expression in FAP-positive tumor stromal cells, enhancing tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Claudia; Miele, Lucio; Porta, Amalia; Pinto, Aldo; Morello, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The A2B receptor (A2BR) can mediate adenosine-induced tumor proliferation, immunosuppression and angiogenesis. Targeting the A2BR has proved to be therapeutically effective in some murine tumor models, but the mechanisms of these effects are still incompletely understood. Here, we report that pharmacologic inhibition of A2BR with PSB1115, which inhibits tumor growth, decreased the number of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-expressing cells in tumors in a mouse model of melanoma. This effect was associated with reduced expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2. Treatment of melanoma-associated fibroblasts with the A2BR agonist Bay60-6583 enhanced CXCL12 and FGF2 expression. This effect was abrogated by PSB1115. The A2AR agonist CGS21680 did not induce CXCL12 or FGF2 expression in tumor associated fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained under hypoxic conditions in skin-derived fibroblasts, which responded to Bay60-6583 in an A2BR-dependent manner, by stimulating pERK1/2. FGF2 produced by Bay60-6583-treated fibroblasts directly enhanced the proliferation of melanoma cells. This effect could be reversed by PSB1115 or an anti-FGF2 antibody. Interestingly, melanoma growth in mice receiving Bay60-6583 was attenuated by inhibition of the CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway with AMD3100. CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 are involved in angiogenesis and immune-suppression. Treatment of mice with AMD3100 reduced the number of CD31+ cells induced by Bay60-6583. Conversely, CXCR4 blockade did not affect the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs or Tregs. Together, our data reveal an important role for A2BR in stimulating FGF2 and CXCL12 expression in melanoma-associated fibroblasts. These factors contribute to create a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Our findings support the therapeutic potential of PSB1115 for melanoma. PMID:27590504

  6. Mycophenolate versus cyclophosphamide for progressive interstitial lung disease associated with systemic sclerosis: a 2-year case control study.

    PubMed

    Panopoulos, Stylianos T; Bournia, Vassiliki-Kalliopi; Trakada, Georgia; Giavri, Irene; Kostopoulos, Charalambos; Sfikakis, Petros P

    2013-10-01

    Cyclophosphamide is considered the treatment of choice for interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to systemic sclerosis (SSc), albeit having a minimal effect. Although controlled evidence does not exist, mycophenolate is used increasingly in clinical practice as an alternative. We aimed to compare the long-term efficacy of these drugs. Patients from our SSc cohort who received mycophenolate for over 1 year for progressive ILD were 1:1 matched for age, gender, and baseline forced vital capacity (FVC ±3 %) with cyclophosphamide-treated patients. Changes in FVC, total lung capacity (TLC), diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans were compared between groups. Changes in pulmonary function tests (PFTs) over at least 1 year in six unmatched control patients, who had denied mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide, also were examined. FVC, TLC, and DLCO did not change significantly in either mycophenolate (from 79.0 ± 12.5 to 80.2 ± 8.1 to 81.2 ± 11.4, from 71.5 ± 16.1 to 74.3 ± 10.8 to 71.8 ± 13.0, from 56.8 ± 12.0 to 55.2 ± 9.9 to 50.6 ± 8.5, respectively) or cyclophosphamide group (from 77.3 ± 12.5 to 79.7 ± 10.3 to 82.5 ± 12.9, from 64.7 ± 14.9 to 68.6 ± 16.0 to 66.1 ± 15.5, from 53.1 ± 14.3 to 56.4 ± 13.5 to 56.3 ± 6.7, respectively), after 1 or 2 years of treatment. PFTs also remained stable in the control group. In either the mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide groups, six patients remained stable, three improved, and one deteriorated according to the definitions of the American Thoracic Society. However, and despite the fact that patients in the cyclophosphamide group had more extended ILD at baseline, a deterioration of lung HRCT findings at 2 years was noticed after mycophenolate (from 10.0 ± 8.9 to 12.7 ± 8.2, p = 0.039) but not after cyclophosphamide. Although these results derive from patients selected for receiving at least 1 year of

  7. Annual progress report on the development of a 2 MW/10 second battery energy storage system for power disturbance protection

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-29

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), acting for the US Department of Energy (DOE), contracts for and administers programs for the purpose of promoting the development and commercialization of large scale, transportable battery energy storage systems. Under DOE Co-Op Agreement No. DE-FC04-94AL99852, SNL has contracted for the development and delivery of an initial prototype 250 kW bridge that becomes an integral subsystem of a 2 MW/10 Second System that can be used by utility customers to protect power sensitive equipment from power disturbances. Development work includes field installation and testing of the prototype unit at a participating utility site for extended product testing with subsequent relocation to an industrial or commercial participating utility customer site for additional evaluation. The program described by the referenced document calls for cost sharing with the successful bidder and eventual title transfer to the participating utility. Prototype delivery is scheduled for January of 1996, with a period of two years allowed for field testing. A final report summarizing the test data with conclusions and recommendations is part of the contract.

  8. The S100A10 Subunit of the Annexin A2 Heterotetramer Facilitates L2-Mediated Human Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Woodham, Andrew W.; Da Silva, Diane M.; Skeate, Joseph G.; Raff, Adam B.; Ambroso, Mark R.; Brand, Heike E.; Isas, J. Mario; Langen, Ralf; Kast, W. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Mucosotropic, high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are sexually transmitted viruses that are causally associated with the development of cervical cancer. The most common high-risk genotype, HPV16, is an obligatory intracellular virus that must gain entry into host epithelial cells and deliver its double stranded DNA to the nucleus. HPV capsid proteins play a vital role in these steps. Despite the critical nature of these capsid protein-host cell interactions, the precise cellular components necessary for HPV16 infection of epithelial cells remains unknown. Several neutralizing epitopes have been identified for the HPV16 L2 minor capsid protein that can inhibit infection after initial attachment of the virus to the cell surface, which suggests an L2-specific secondary receptor or cofactor is required for infection, but so far no specific L2-receptor has been identified. Here, we demonstrate that the annexin A2 heterotetramer (A2t) contributes to HPV16 infection and co-immunoprecipitates with HPV16 particles on the surface of epithelial cells in an L2-dependent manner. Inhibiting A2t with an endogenous annexin A2 ligand, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), or with an annexin A2 antibody significantly reduces HPV16 infection. With electron paramagnetic resonance, we demonstrate that a previously identified neutralizing epitope of L2 (aa 108–120) specifically interacts with the S100A10 subunit of A2t. Additionally, mutation of this L2 region significantly reduces binding to A2t and HPV16 pseudovirus infection. Furthermore, downregulation of A2t with shRNA significantly decreases capsid internalization and infection by HPV16. Taken together, these findings indicate that A2t contributes to HPV16 internalization and infection of epithelial cells and this interaction is dependent on the presence of the L2 minor capsid protein. PMID:22927980

  9. Adenovirus-mediated expression of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 targeting hepatic stellate cell attenuates liver fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Yang, Quanjun; Huang, Jinlu; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response characterized with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). And hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the principal cell source of ECM. NR4A2 (Nurr1) is a member of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A family and acts as transcription factor. It participates in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver reduced significantly compared with normal liver and NR4A2 knockout in HSCs promoted ECM production. In the present study we explored the role of NR4A2 on liver fibrosis. Studies in cultured HSCs demonstrated that NR4A2 over-expression suppressed the activation of HSCs, such as ECM production and invasion ability. Moreover cell cycle was arrested, cell apoptosis was promoted and cell signaling pathway was influenced. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of NR4A2 in rats ameliorated significantly dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) induced liver fibrosis. The In vivo experiments produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. Taken together these results demonstrate NR4A2 enhancement attenuates liver fibrosis via suppressing the activation of HSCs and NR4A2 may be an ideal target for anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:27646469

  10. The effects of adenosine A2B receptor inhibition on VEGF and nitric oxide axis-mediated renal function in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Leena; Thaker, Aswin

    2014-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The pathophysiologic mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy are incompletely understood but include overproduction of various growth factors and cytokines. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a pathogenic event occurring in most forms of podocytopathy; however, the mechanisms that regulate this growth factor induction are not clearly identified. A2B receptors have been found to regulate VEGF expression under hypoxic environment in different tissues. One proposed hypothesis in mediating diabetic nephropathy is the modulation of VEGF-NO balance in renal tissue. We determined the role of adenosine A2B receptor in mediating VEGF overproduction and nitrite in diabetic nephropathy. The renal content of A2B receptors and VEGF was increased after 8 weeks of diabetes induction. The renal and plasma nitrite levels were also reduced in these animals. In vivo administration of A2B adenosine receptor antagonist (MRS1754) inhibited the renal over expression of VEGF and adverse renal function parameters. The antagonist administration also improved the kidney tissue nitrite levels. In conclusion, we demonstrated that VEGF induction via adenosine signaling might be the critical event in regulating VEGF-NO axis in diabetic nephropathy.

  11. Protein kinase A mediates adenosine A2a receptor modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation in cultured cells from medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Joao Paulo Pontes; Almeida, Marina Gomes; Castilho-Martins, Emerson Augusto; Costa, Maisa Aparecida; Fior-Chadi, Debora Rejane

    2014-08-01

    Synaptic transmission is an essential process for neuron physiology. Such process is enabled in part due to modulation of neurotransmitter release. Adenosine is a synaptic modulator of neurotransmitter release in the Central Nervous System, including neurons of medulla oblongata, where several nuclei are involved with neurovegetative reflexes. Adenosine modulates different neurotransmitter systems in medulla oblongata, specially glutamate and noradrenaline in the nucleus tractussolitarii, which are involved in hypotensive responses. However, the intracellular mechanisms involved in this modulation remain unknown. The adenosine A2a receptor modulates neurotransmitter release by activating two cAMP protein effectors, the protein kinase A and the exchange protein activated by cAMP. Therefore, an in vitro approach (cultured cells) was carried out to evaluate modulation of neurotransmission by adenosine A2a receptor and the signaling intracellular pathway involved. Results show that the adenosine A2a receptor agonist, CGS 21680, increases neurotransmitter release, in particular, glutamate and noradrenaline and such response is mediated by protein kinase A activation, which in turn increased synapsin I phosphorylation. This suggests a mechanism of A2aR modulation of neurotransmitter release in cultured cells from medulla oblongata of Wistar rats and suggest that protein kinase A mediates this modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation.

  12. Mx1-Based Resistance to Thogoto Virus in A2G Mice Is Bypassed in Tick-Mediated Virus Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dessens, Johannes T.; Nuttall, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The interferon-induced mouse Mx1 protein has intrinsic antiviral activity against orthomyxoviruses, including Thogoto virus. Thus, Mx1+ A2G mice are apparently resistant to infection following needle- or tick-borne virus challenge. However, tick-borne challenge and, to a lesser degree, injection of virus mixed with tick salivary gland extract resulted in virus transmission to uninfected ticks feeding on the A2G mice. The data indicate that immunomodulatory components in tick saliva can overcome a natural antiviral mechanism. PMID:9733885

  13. Functional impact of Aurora A-mediated phosphorylation of HP1γ at serine 83 during cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous elegant studies performed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have identified a requirement for heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) for spindle pole formation and appropriate cell division. In mammalian cells, HP1γ has been implicated in both somatic and germ cell proliferation. High levels of HP1γ protein associate with enhanced cell proliferation and oncogenesis, while its genetic inactivation results in meiotic and mitotic failure. However, the regulation of HP1γ by kinases, critical for supporting mitotic progression, remains to be fully characterized. Results We report for the first time that during mitotic cell division, HP1γ colocalizes and is phosphorylated at serine 83 (Ser83) in G2/M phase by Aurora A. Since Aurora A regulates both cell proliferation and mitotic aberrations, we evaluated the role of HP1γ in the regulation of these phenomena using siRNA-mediated knockdown, as well as phosphomimetic and nonphosphorylatable site-directed mutants. We found that genetic downregulation of HP1γ, which decreases the levels of phosphorylation of HP1γ at Ser83 (P-Ser83-HP1γ), results in mitotic aberrations that can be rescued by reintroducing wild type HP1γ, but not the nonphosphorylatable S83A-HP1γ mutant. In addition, proliferation assays showed that the phosphomimetic S83D-HP1γ increases 5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation, whereas the nonphosphorylatable S83A-HP1γ mutant abrogates this effect. Genome-wide expression profiling revealed that the effects of these mutants on mitotic functions are congruently reflected in G2/M gene expression networks in a manner that mimics the on and off states for P-Ser83-HP1γ. Conclusions This is the first description of a mitotic Aurora A-HP1γ pathway, whose integrity is necessary for the execution of proper somatic cell division, providing insight into specific types of posttranslational modifications that associate to distinct functional outcomes of this important chromatin

  14. Norbixin Protects Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Cells and Photoreceptors against A2E-Mediated Phototoxicity In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Elodie; Brazhnikova, Elena; Lesage, Laëtitia; Balducci, Christine; Guibout, Louis; Feraille, Laurence; Elena, Pierre-Paul; Sahel, José-Alain; Veillet, Stanislas; Lafont, René

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E, a toxic by-product of the visual pigment cycle) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major cause of visual impairment in the elderly. Photooxidation of A2E results in retinal pigment epithelium degeneration followed by that of associated photoreceptors. Present treatments rely on nutrient supplementation with antioxidants. 9’-cis-Norbixin (a natural diapocarotenoid, 97% purity) was prepared from Bixa orellana seeds. It was first evaluated in primary cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells challenged with A2E and illuminated with blue light, and it provided an improved photo-protection as compared with lutein or zeaxanthin. In Abca4-/- Rdh8-/- mice (a model of dry AMD), intravitreally-injected norbixin maintained the electroretinogram and protected photoreceptors against light damage. In a standard rat blue-light model of photodamage, norbixin was at least equally as active as phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone, a free radical spin-trap. Chronic experiments performed with Abca4-/- Rdh8-/- mice treated orally for 3 months with norbixin showed a reduced A2E accumulation in the retina. Norbixin appears promising for developing an oral treatment of macular degeneration. A drug candidate (BIO201) with 9’-cis-norbixin as the active principle ingredient is under development, and its potential will be assessed in a forthcoming clinical trial. PMID:27992460

  15. The Tick Protein Sialostatin L2 Binds to Annexin A2 and Inhibits NLRC4-Mediated Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowei; Shaw, Dana K.; Sakhon, Olivia S.; Snyder, Greg A.; Sundberg, Eric J.; Santambrogio, Laura; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Shirey, Kari Ann; Perkins, Darren J.; Richard, Katharina; Chagas, Andrezza C.; Calvo, Eric; Kopecký, Jan; Kotsyfakis, Michail

    2016-01-01

    Tick saliva contains a number of effector molecules that inhibit host immunity and facilitate pathogen transmission. How tick proteins regulate immune signaling, however, is incompletely understood. Here, we describe that loop 2 of sialostatin L2, an anti-inflammatory tick protein, binds to annexin A2 and impairs the formation of the NLRC4 inflammasome during infection with the rickettsial agent Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Macrophages deficient in annexin A2 secreted significantly smaller amounts of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 and had a defect in NLRC4 inflammasome oligomerization and caspase-1 activation. Accordingly, Annexin a2-deficient mice were more susceptible to A. phagocytophilum infection and showed splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, and monocytopenia. Providing translational support to our findings, better binding of annexin A2 to sialostatin L2 in sera from 21 out of 23 infected patients than in sera from control individuals was also demonstrated. Overall, we establish a unique mode of inflammasome evasion by a pathogen, centered on a blood-feeding arthropod. PMID:27045038

  16. Norbixin Protects Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Cells and Photoreceptors against A2E-Mediated Phototoxicity In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Valérie; Monteiro, Elodie; Brazhnikova, Elena; Lesage, Laëtitia; Balducci, Christine; Guibout, Louis; Feraille, Laurence; Elena, Pierre-Paul; Sahel, José-Alain; Veillet, Stanislas; Lafont, René

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E, a toxic by-product of the visual pigment cycle) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major cause of visual impairment in the elderly. Photooxidation of A2E results in retinal pigment epithelium degeneration followed by that of associated photoreceptors. Present treatments rely on nutrient supplementation with antioxidants. 9'-cis-Norbixin (a natural diapocarotenoid, 97% purity) was prepared from Bixa orellana seeds. It was first evaluated in primary cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells challenged with A2E and illuminated with blue light, and it provided an improved photo-protection as compared with lutein or zeaxanthin. In Abca4-/- Rdh8-/- mice (a model of dry AMD), intravitreally-injected norbixin maintained the electroretinogram and protected photoreceptors against light damage. In a standard rat blue-light model of photodamage, norbixin was at least equally as active as phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone, a free radical spin-trap. Chronic experiments performed with Abca4-/- Rdh8-/- mice treated orally for 3 months with norbixin showed a reduced A2E accumulation in the retina. Norbixin appears promising for developing an oral treatment of macular degeneration. A drug candidate (BIO201) with 9'-cis-norbixin as the active principle ingredient is under development, and its potential will be assessed in a forthcoming clinical trial.

  17. Do deviant peer associations mediate the contributions of self-esteem to problem behavior during early adolescence? A 2-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    DuBois, David L; Silverthorn, Naida

    2004-06-01

    We investigated deviant peer associations as a mediator of the influences of general and peer-oriented self-esteem on problem behavior using data from a 2-year longitudinal study of 350 young adolescents. Measures of problem behavior included substance use (alcohol use, smoking) and antisocial behavior (fighting, stealing). Using latent growth curve modeling and covariance structure analysis, an extension of a model proposed by DuBois et al. (2002) was evaluated for each type of problem behavior. Findings revealed that lower general self-esteem and greater peer orientation in self-esteem each predicted deviant associations with peers and that deviant peer associations, in turn, were associated with higher levels and rates of change in problem behavior. Deviant peer associations mediated the associations of general and peer-oriented self-esteem with levels and rates of change in problem behavior such that direct paths from self-esteem to problem behavior generally were nonsignificant.

  18. Immune cells and mediators involved in the inflammatory responses induced by a P-I metalloprotease and a phospholipase A2 from Bothrops atrox venom.

    PubMed

    Menaldo, Danilo L; Bernardes, Carolina P; Zoccal, Karina F; Jacob-Ferreira, Anna L; Costa, Tássia R; Del Lama, Maria P F M; Naal, Rose M Z G; Frantz, Fabiani G; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Sampaio, Suely V

    2017-05-01

    Bothrops envenomations can promote severe inflammatory responses by inducing edema, pain, leukocyte recruitment and release of chemical mediators by local cells. In the present study, two toxins from Bothrops atrox venom (the P-I metalloprotease Batroxase and the acidic phospholipase A2 BatroxPLA2) were evaluated in relation to their inflammatory effects induced in vivo and in vitro, mainly focusing on the participation of different immune cells and inflammatory mediators. Both toxins mainly promoted acute inflammatory responses with significant recruitment of neutrophils in the early hours (1-4h) after administration into the peritoneal cavity of C57BL/6 mice, and increased infiltration of mononuclear cells especially after 24h. Among the mediators induced by both toxins are IL-6, IL-10 and PGE2, with Batroxase also inducing the release of L-1β, and BatroxPLA2 of LTB4 and CysLTs. These responses pointed to possible involvement of immune cells such as macrophages and mast cells, which were then evaluated in vitro. Mice peritoneal macrophages stimulated with Batroxase produced significant levels of IL-6, IL-1β, PGE2 and LTB4, whereas stimulus with BatroxPLA2 induced increases of IL-6, PGE2 and LTB4. Furthermore, both toxins were able to stimulate degranulation of RBL-2H3 mast cells, but with distinct concentration-dependent effects. Altogether, these results indicated that Batroxase and BatroxPLA2 promoted local and acute inflammatory responses related to macrophages and mast cells and to the production of several mediators. Our findings should contribute for better understanding the different mechanisms of toxicity induced by P-I metalloproteases and phospholipases A2 after snakebite envenomations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and characterization of reactive metabolites in myristicin-mediated mechanism-based inhibition of CYP1A2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai-Hong; He, Xin; Chen, Jun-Xiu; He, Li-Na; Jin, Chun-Huan; Wang, Li-Li; Zhang, Fang-Liang; An, Li-Jun

    2015-07-25

    Myristicin belongs to the methylenedioxyphenyl or allyl-benzene family of compounds, which are found widely in plants of the Umbelliferae family, such as parsley and carrot. Myristicin is also the major active component in the essential oils of mace and nutmeg. However, this compound can cause adverse reactions, particularly when taken inappropriately or in overdoses. One important source of toxicity of natural products arises from their metabolic biotransformations into reactive metabolites. Myristicin contains a methylenedioxyphenyl substructure, and this specific structural feature may allow compounds to cause a mechanism-based inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes and produce reactive metabolites. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify whether the role of myristicin in CYP enzyme inhibition is mechanism-based inhibition and to gain further information regarding the structure of the resulting reactive metabolites. CYP cocktail assays showed that myristicin most significantly inhibits CYP1A2 among five CYP enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4 and CYP2C19) from human liver microsomes. The 3.21-fold IC50 shift value of CYP1A2 indicates that myristicin may be a mechanism-based inhibitor of CYP1A2. Next, reduced glutathione was shown to block the inhibition of CYP1A2, indicating that myristicin utilized a mechanism-based inhibition. Phase I metabolism assays identified two metabolites, 5-allyl-1-methoxy-2,3-dihydroxybenzene (M1) and 1'-hydroxymyristicin or 2',3'-epoxy-myristicin (M2). Reduced glutathione capturing assays captured the glutathione-M1 adduct, and the reactive metabolites were identified using UPLC-MS(2) as a quinone and its tautomer. Thus, it was concluded that myristicin is a mechanism-based inhibitor of CYP1A2, and the reactive metabolites are quinone tautomers. Additionally, the cleavage process of the glutathione-M1 adduct was analyzed in further detail. This study provides additional information on the metabolic mechanism of myristicin

  20. Involvement of cAMP-PKA pathway in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor-mediated regulation of acetaldehyde-induced activation of HSCs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaru; Wang, He; Lv, Xiongwen; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Yang, Yan; Li, Jun

    2015-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which adenosine receptors (ARs)-mediated the cAMP/PKA/CREB signal pathway regulates the activation of acetaldehyde-induced hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Primary HSCs were isolated from SD rats, cultured in vitro, and activated with different concentrations of acetaldehyde at different time points. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to quantify both protein and mRNA levels of the four AR (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R) in rat HSCs. Selective inhibitors of PDEs and the Gi/o protein pathway, general AR agonists, and AR subtype specific agents were used to study the AR signaling. The level of cAMP was measured by radio-immunoassay, and the expression of α-SMA, collagen type I and III, PKA and p-CREB were also detected by Western blotting. Acetaldehyde could significantly promote HSC proliferation, with a maximum stimulatory effect observed at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. All four AR subtypes could be present in rat HSCs, and the mRNA and protein expression levels for A2AR and A1R in much greater abundance than those for A2BR and A3R. The expression of A2AR and A1R was significantly increased in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs as compared with that of control group, whereas the expression of A2BR and A3R remained unaffected by the addition of acetaldehyde. Curiously, there is coupling of A2AR to the Gs-AC signaling, as well as coupling of A1R to the Gi/o-AC signaling pathway in acetaldehyde-induced HSCs. Both the A2AR and A1R antagonists could suppress the activation of HSC, although they have opposing effects on cAMP signal transduction. These results suggested that a combination of cAMP/PKA/CREB signals via A2AR and A1R likely mediate the activation of acetaldehyde-induced HSCs, and A1R coupled to the Gi/o-AC signaling pathway may be masked by the more predominant A2AR that coupled to the Gs-AC signaling pathway.

  1. Lentiviral MGMT(P140K)-mediated in vivo selection employing a ubiquitous chromatin opening element (A2UCOE) linked to a cellular promoter.

    PubMed

    Phaltane, Ruhi; Lachmann, Nico; Brennig, Sebastian; Ackermann, Mania; Modlich, Ute; Moritz, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Notwithstanding recent successes, insertional mutagenesis as well as silencing and variegation of transgene expression still represent considerable obstacles to hematopoietic gene therapy. This also applies to O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT)-mediated myeloprotection, a concept recently proven clinically effective in the context of glioblastoma therapy. To improve on this situation we here evaluate a SIN-lentiviral vector expressing the MGMT(P140K)-cDNA from a combined A2UCOE/PGK-promoter. In a murine in vivo chemoselection model the A2UCOE.PGK.MGMT construct allowed for significant myeloprotection as well as robust and stable selection of transgenic hematopoietic cells. In contrast, only transient enrichment and severe myelotoxicity was observed for a PGK.MGMT control vector. Selection of A2UCOE.PGK.MGMT-transduced myeloid and lymphoid mature and progenitor cells was demonstrated in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, spleen, and thymus. Unlike the PGK and SFFV promoters used as controls, the A2UCOE.PGK promoter allowed for sustained vector copy number-related transgene expression throughout the experiment indicating an increased resistance to silencing, which was further confirmed by CpG methylation studies of the PGK promoter. Thus, our data support a potential role of the A2UCOE.PGK.MGMT-vector in future MGMT-based myeloprotection and chemoselection strategies, and underlines the suitability of the A2UCOE element to stabilize lentiviral transgene expression in hematopoietic gene therapy.

  2. Structure-activity relationship studies of 1-substituted 3-dodecanoylindole-2-carboxylic acids as inhibitors of cytosolic phospholipase A2-mediated arachidonic acid release in intact platelets.

    PubMed

    Griessbach, Klaus; Klimt, Monika; Schulze Elfringhoff, Alwine; Lehr, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    A series of 3-dodecanoylindole-2-carboxylic acid derivatives with varied carboxylic acid substituents at the indole 1-position were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit arachidonic acid release in human platelets mediated by the cytosolic phospholipase A(2). Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that increasing the polarity of these substituents by the introduction of additional polar groups in the proximity of the carboxylic acid moiety reduced activity. Conformational restriction of the indole-1-carboxylic acid substituents in distinct positions as well as extending the length of these residues led to compounds which did not substantially differ in their potencies.

  3. The characterization of an intestine-like genomic signature maintained during Barrett’s-associated adenocarcinogenesis reveals an NR5A2-mediated promotion of cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Shane P.; Behan, Fiona M.; Kirca, Murat; Zaheer, Abdul; McGarrigle, Sarah A.; Reynolds, John V.; Vaz, Gisela M. F.; Senge, Mathias O.; Kelleher, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s oesophagus (BO), an intestinal-type metaplasia (IM), typically arising in conjunction with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, is a prominent risk factor for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The molecular similarities between IM and normal intestinal tissues are ill-defined. Consequently, the contribution of intestine-enriched factors expressed within BO to oncogenesis is unclear. Herein, using transcriptomics we define the intestine-enriched genes expressed in meta-profiles of BO and OAC. Interestingly, 77% of the genes differentially expressed in a meta-profile of BO were similarly expressed in intestinal tissues. Furthermore, 85% of this intestine-like signature was maintained upon transition to OAC. Gene networking analysis of transcription factors within this signature revealed a network centred upon NR5A2, GATA6 and FOXA2, whose over-expression was determined in a cohort of BO and OAC patients. Simulated acid reflux was observed to induce the expression of both NR5A2 and GATA6. Using siRNA-mediated silencing and an NR5A2 antagonist we demonstrate that NR5A2-mediated cancer cell survival is facilitated through augmentation of GATA6 and anti-apoptotic factor BCL-XL levels. Abrogation of NR5A2-GATA6 expression in conjunction with BCL-XL co-silencing resulted in synergistically increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and photo-dynamic therapeutics. These findings characterize the intestine-like signature associated with IM which may have important consequences to adenocarcinogenesis. PMID:27586588

  4. Adenosine A2A receptors and uric acid mediate protective effects of inosine against TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Daneshmand, Ali; Mohammadi, Hamed; Bahremand, Arash; Rasouli, Mohammad Reza; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2010-12-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease comprises chronic recurrent inflammation of gastrointestinal tract. This study was conducted to investigate inosine, a potent immunomodulator, in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced chronic model of experimental colitis, and contribution of adenosine A(2A) receptors and the metabolite uric acid as possible underlying mechanisms. Experimental colitis was rendered in rats by a single colonic administration of 10 mg of TNBS. Inosine, potassium oxonate (a hepatic uricase inhibitor), SCH-442416 (a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist), inosine+potassium oxonate, or inosine+SCH-442416 were given twice daily for 7 successive days. At the end of experiment, macroscopic and histopathologic scores, colonic malondialdehyde (MDA), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) levels, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assessed. Plasma uric acid level was measured throughout the experiment. Both macroscopic and histological features of colonic injury were markedly ameliorated by either inosine, oxonate or inosine+oxonate. Likewise, the elevated amounts of MPO and MDA abated as well as those of TNF-α and IL-1β (P<0.05). SCH-442416 partially reversed the effect of inosine on theses markers, while inosine+oxonate showed a higher degree of protection than each treatment alone (P<.0.05). No significant difference was observed between TNBS and SCH-442416 groups. Uric acid levels were significantly higher in inosine or oxonate groups compared to control. Inosine+oxonate resulted in an even more elvelated uric acid level than each treatment alone (P<0.05). Inosine elicits notable anti-inflammatory effects on TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Uric acid and adenosine A(2A) receptors contribute to these salutary properties.

  5. Pathophysiology of isoprostanes in the cardiovascular system: implications of isoprostane-mediated thromboxane A2 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Jochen; Ripperger, Anne; Frantz, Stefan; Ergün, Süleyman; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Benndorf, Ralf A

    2014-01-01

    Isoprostanes are free radical-catalysed PG-like products of unsaturated fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, which are widely recognized as reliable markers of systemic lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in vivo. Moreover, activation of enzymes, such as COX-2, may contribute to isoprostane formation. Indeed, formation of isoprostanes is considerably increased in various diseases which have been linked to oxidative stress, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), and may predict the atherosclerotic burden and the risk of cardiovascular complications in the latter patients. In addition, several isoprostanes may directly contribute to the functional consequences of oxidant stress via activation of the TxA2 prostanoid receptor (TP), for example, by affecting endothelial cell function and regeneration, vascular tone, haemostasis and ischaemia/reperfusion injury. In this context, experimental and clinical data suggest that selected isoprostanes may represent important alternative activators of the TP receptor when endogenous TxA2 levels are low, for example, in aspirin-treated individuals with CVD. In this review, we will summarize the current understanding of isoprostane formation, biochemistry and (patho) physiology in the cardiovascular context. PMID:24646155

  6. Pathophysiology of isoprostanes in the cardiovascular system: implications of isoprostane-mediated thromboxane A2 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jochen; Ripperger, Anne; Frantz, Stefan; Ergün, Süleyman; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Benndorf, Ralf A

    2014-07-01

    Isoprostanes are free radical-catalysed PG-like products of unsaturated fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, which are widely recognized as reliable markers of systemic lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in vivo. Moreover, activation of enzymes, such as COX-2, may contribute to isoprostane formation. Indeed, formation of isoprostanes is considerably increased in various diseases which have been linked to oxidative stress, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), and may predict the atherosclerotic burden and the risk of cardiovascular complications in the latter patients. In addition, several isoprostanes may directly contribute to the functional consequences of oxidant stress via activation of the TxA2 prostanoid receptor (TP), for example, by affecting endothelial cell function and regeneration, vascular tone, haemostasis and ischaemia/reperfusion injury. In this context, experimental and clinical data suggest that selected isoprostanes may represent important alternative activators of the TP receptor when endogenous TxA2 levels are low, for example, in aspirin-treated individuals with CVD. In this review, we will summarize the current understanding of isoprostane formation, biochemistry and (patho) physiology in the cardiovascular context. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Auxins action on Glycine max secretory phospholipase A2 is mediated by the interfacial properties imposed by the phytohormones.

    PubMed

    Mariani, María Elisa; Madoery, Ricardo Román; Fidelio, Gerardo Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) are soluble enzymes that catalyze the conversion of phospholipids to lysophospholipids and free fatty acids at membrane interfaces. The effect of IAA and IPA auxins over the activity of recombinant sPLA2 isoforms from Glycine max was studied using membrane model systems including mixed micelles and Langmuir lipid monolayers. Both phytohormones stimulate the activity of both plant sPLA2 using DLPC/Triton mixed micelles as substrate. To elucidate the mechanism of action of the phytohormones, we showed that both auxins are able to self-penetrate lipid monolayers and cause an increment in surface pressure and an expansion of lipid/phytohormone mixed interfaces. The stimulating effect of auxins over phospholipase A2 activity was still present when using Langmuir mixed monolayers as organized substrate regardless of sPLA2 source (plant or animal). All the data suggest that the stimulating effect of auxins over sPLA2 is due to a more favorable interfacial environment rather to a direct effect over the enzyme. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Intracellular- and extracellular-derived Ca2+ influence phospholipase A2-mediated fatty acid release from brain phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Angelo O.; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) are found in high concentrations in brain cell membranes and are important for brain function and structure. Studies suggest that AA and DHA are hydrolyzed selectively from the sn-2 position of synaptic membrane phospholipids by Ca2+-dependent cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2), respectively, resulting in increased levels of the unesterified fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Cell studies also suggest that AA and DHA release depend on increased concentrations of Ca2+, even though iPLA2 has been thought to be Ca2+-independent. The source of Ca2+ for activation of cPLA2 is largely extracellular, whereas Ca2+ released from the endoplasmic reticulum can activate iPLA2 by a number of mechanisms. This review focuses on the role of Ca2+ in modulating cPLA2 and iPLA2 activities in different conditions. Furthermore, a model is suggested in which neurotransmitters regulate the activity of these enzymes and thus the balanced and localized release of AA and DHA from phospholipid in brain, depending on the primary source of the Ca2+ signal. PMID:19327408

  9. Destabilization of acrosome and elastase influence mediate the release of secretory phospholipase A2 from human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lessig, Jacqueline; Reibetanz, Uta; Arnhold, Jurgen; Glander, Hans-Jurgen

    2008-11-01

    To determine the cellular distribution of secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)) in dependence on the acrosomal state and under the action of elastase released under inflammatory processes from leukocytes. Acrosome reaction of spermatozoa was triggered by calcimycin. Human leukocyte elastase was used to simulate inflammatory conditions. To visualize the distribution of sPLA(2) and to determine the acrosomal state, immunofluorescence techniques and lectin binding combined with confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry were used. Although sPLA(2) was detected at the acrosome and tail regions in intact spermatozoa, it disappeared from the head region after triggering the acrosome reaction. This release of sPLA(2) was associated with enhanced binding of annexin V-fluoroscein isothiocyanate (FITC) to spermatozoa surfaces, intercalation of ethidium-homodimer I, and binding of FITC-labelled concanavalin A at the acrosomal region. Spermatozoa from healthy subjects treated with elastase were characterized by release of sPLA(2), disturbance of acrosome structure, and loss of vitality. The ability of spermatozoa to release secretory phospholipase A(2) is related to the acrosomal state. Premature destabilization of the acrosome and loss of sPLA(2) can occur during silent inflammations in the male genital tract. The distribution pattern of sPLA(2) in intact spermatozoa might be an additional parameter for evaluating sperm quality. (c) 2008, Asian Journal of Andrology, SIMM and SJTU. All rights reserved.

  10. Phosphorylation on Thr-55 by TAF1 mediates degradation of p53: a role for TAF1 in cell G1 progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng-Hong; Li, Andrew G; Sheppard, Hilary M; Liu, Xuan

    2004-03-26

    The largest subunit of TFIID, TAF1, possesses an intrinsic protein kinase activity and is important for cell G1 progression and apoptosis. Since p53 functions by inducing cell G1 arrest and apoptosis, we investigated the link between TAF1 and p53. We found that TAF1 induces G1 progression in a p53-dependent manner. TAF1 interacts with and phosphorylates p53 at Thr-55 in vivo. Substitution of Thr-55 with an alanine residue (T55A) stabilizes p53 and impairs the ability of TAF1 to induce G1 progression. Furthermore, both RNAi-mediated TAF1 ablation and apigenin-mediated inhibition of the kinase activity of TAF1 markedly reduced Thr-55 phosphorylation. Thus, phosphorylation and the resultant degradation of p53 provide a mechanism for regulation of the cell cycle by TAF1. Significantly, the Thr-55 phosphorylation was reduced following DNA damage, suggesting that this phosphorylation contributes to the stabilization of p53 in response to DNA damage.

  11. Mediated electron transfer in glucose oxidising enzyme electrodes for application to biofuel cells: recent progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Paul; Leech, Dónal

    2013-04-14

    Glucose oxidising enzyme electrodes have long been studied for their application to biosensors and, more recently, anodes in biofuel cells. At a fundamental level, insight into enzyme electron transfer and oxidation current generation at enzyme electrodes can be gained by systematic studies on integration of surfaces, biocatalysts, and artificial substrates (mediators). In this perspective, we present an overview of methods to aid the development of glucose oxidising enzyme electrodes based on mediated electron transfer for application to continuous-use anodes in a biofuel cell. Focus is placed on the rational design of mediators, based on osmium redox complexes, and screening of the activity of such complexes as mediators for glucose oxidising enzymes. An overview of the performance of enzyme electrodes, focused predominantly on crosslinked films of redox polymers and glucose oxidase, for glucose oxidation, is presented and approaches to improve both current output and stability of such enzyme electrodes are discussed.

  12. Adenosine A2A Receptors Mediate Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Electroacupuncture on Synovitis in Mice with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi-hui; Xie, Wen-xia; Li, Xiao-pei; Huang, Ka-te; Du, Zhong-heng; Cong, Wen-jie; Zhou, Long-hua; Ye, Tian-shen; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2015-01-01

    To study the role of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) in mediating the anti-inflammatory effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on synovitis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), C57BL/6 mice were divided into five treatment groups: Sham-control, CIA-control, CIA-EA, CIA-SCH58261 (A2AR antagonist), and CIA-EA-SCH58261. All mice except those in the Sham-control group were immunized with collagen II for arthritis induction. EA treatment was administered using the stomach 36 and spleen 6 points, and stimulated with a continuous rectangular wave for 30 min daily. EA treatment and SCH58261 were administered daily from days 35 to 49 (n = 10). After treatment, X-ray radiography of joint bone morphology was established at day 60 and mouse blood was collected for ELISA determination of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels. Mice were sacrificed and processed for histological examination of pathological changes of joint tissue, including hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry of A2AR expression. EA treatment resulted in significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α concentrations, and bone damage X-ray scores. Importantly, the anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective effect of EA treatment was reversed by coadministration of SCH58261. Thus, EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory effect resulting in significant protection of cartilage by activation of A2AR in the synovial tissue of CIA. PMID:25784951

  13. betagamma Dimers mediate synergy of dopamine D2 and adenosine A2 receptor-stimulated PKA signaling and regulate ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lina; Arolfo, Maria Pia; Dohrman, Douglas P; Jiang, Zhan; Fan, Peidong; Fuchs, Sara; Janak, Patricia H; Gordon, Adrienne S; Diamond, Ivan

    2002-06-14

    Dopamine release is activated by ethanol and addicting drugs, but molecular mechanisms linking dopaminergic signaling to neuronal responses and drinking behavior are poorly understood. We report that dopamine-D2 receptors induce PKA Calpha translocation and increase CRE-regulated gene expression. Ethanol also activates PKA signaling. Subthreshold concentrations of the D2 agonist NPA and ethanol, without effect alone, together cause synergistic PKA translocation and CRE-mediated gene transcription. D2 or adenosine A2 receptor blockade, pertussis toxin, Rp-cAMPS, or overexpression of dominant-negative peptides that sequester betagamma dimers prevent synergy. Importantly, overexpression of a betagamma inhibitor peptide in the nucleus accumbens strikingly reduces sustained alcohol consumption. We propose that synergy of D2 and A2 confers ethanol hypersensitivity and that betagamma dimers are required for voluntary drinking.

  14. NF-κB Is Activated in CD4+ iNKT Cells by Sickle Cell Disease and Mediates Rapid Induction of Adenosine A2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jennifer C.; Ken, Ruey; Neuberg, Donna; Nathan, David G.; Linden, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Reperfusion injury following tissue ischemia occurs as a consequence of vaso-occlusion that is initiated by activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Sickle cell disease (SDC) results in widely disseminated microvascular ischemia and reperfusion injury as a result of vaso-occlusion by rigid and adhesive sickle red blood cells. In mice, iNKT cell activation requires NF-κB signaling and can be inhibited by the activation of anti-inflammatory adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). Human iNKT cells are divided into subsets of CD4+ and CD4- cells. In this study we found that human CD4+ iNKT cells, but not CD4- cells undergo rapid NF-κB activation (phosphorylation of NF-κB on p65) and induction of A2ARs (detected with a monoclonal antibody 7F6-G5-A2) during SCD painful vaso-occlusive crises. These findings indicate that SCD primarily activates the CD4+ subset of iNKT cells. Activation of NF-κB and induction of A2ARs is concordant, i.e. only CD4+ iNKT cells with activated NF-κB expressed high levels of A2ARs. iNKT cells that are not activated during pVOC express low levels of A2AR immunoreactivity. These finding suggest that A2AR transcription may be induced in CD4+ iNKT cells as a result of NF-κB activation in SCD. In order to test this hypothesis further we examined cultured human iNKT cells. In cultured cells, blockade of NF-κB with Bay 11–7082 or IKK inhibitor VII prevented rapid induction of A2AR mRNA and protein upon iNKT activation. In conclusion, NF-κB-mediated induction of A2ARs in iNKT cells may serve as a counter-regulatory mechanism to limit the extent and duration of inflammatory immune responses. As activated iNKT cells express high levels of A2ARs following their activation, they may become highly sensitive to inhibition by A2AR agonists. PMID:24124453

  15. A phospholipid substrate molecule residing in the membrane surface mediates opening of the lid region in group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Burke, John E; Hsu, Yuan-Hao; Deems, Raymond A; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L; Dennis, Edward A

    2008-11-07

    The Group IVA (GIVA) phospholipase A(2) associates with natural membranes in response to an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) along with increases in certain lipid mediators. This enzyme associates with the membrane surface as well as binding a single phospholipid molecule in the active site for catalysis. Employing deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, we have identified the regions of the protein binding the lipid surface and conformational changes upon a single phospholipid binding in the absence of a lipid surface. Experiments were carried out using natural palmitoyl arachidonyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles with the intact GIVA enzyme as well as the isolated C2 and catalytic domains. Lipid binding produced changes in deuterium exchange in eight different regions of the protein. The regions with decreased exchange included Ca(2+) binding loop one, which has been proposed to penetrate the membrane surface, and a charged patch of residues, which may be important in interacting with the polar head groups of phospholipids. The regions with an increase in exchange are all located either in the hydrophobic core underneath the lid region or near the lid and hinge regions from 403 to 457. Using the GIVA phospholipase A(2) irreversible inhibitor methyl-arachidonyl fluorophosphonate, we were able to isolate structural changes caused only by pseudo-substrate binding. This produced results that were very similar to natural lipid binding in the presence of a lipid interface with the exception of the C2 domain and region 466-470. This implies that most of the changes seen in the catalytic domain are due to a substrate-mediated, not interface-mediated, lid opening, which exposes the active site to water. Finally experiments carried out with inhibitor plus phospholipid vesicles showed decreases at the C2 domain as well as charged residues on the putative membrane binding surface of the catalytic domain revealing the binding sites of the enzyme to the lipid surface.

  16. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Chen; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Weiru; Qi, Lin; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Priapism is featured with prolonged and painful penile erection and is prevalent among males with sickle cell disease (SCD). The disorder is a dangerous urological and hematological emergency since it is associated with ischemic tissue damage and erectile disability. Here we report that phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) gene expression and PDE activity is significantly reduced in penile tissues of two independent priapic models: SCD mice and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice. Moreover, using ADA enzyme therapy to reduce adenosine or a specific antagonist to block A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling, we successfully attenuated priapism in both ADA−/− and SCD mice by restoring penile PDE5 gene expression to normal levels. This finding led us to further discover that excess adenosine signaling via ADORA2B activation directly reduces PDE5 gene expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent manner. Overall, we reveal that excess adenosine-mediated ADORA2B signaling underlies reduced penile PDE activity by decreasing PDE5 gene expression in a HIF-1α-dependent manner and provide new insight for the pathogenesis of priapism and novel therapies for the disease.—Ning, C., Wen, J., Zhang, Y., Dai, Y., Wang, W., Zhang, W., Qi, L., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackburn, M. R., Kellems, R. E., Xia, Y. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression. PMID:24614760

  17. Cdc34 C-terminal tail phosphorylation regulates Skp1/cullin/F-box (SCF)-mediated ubiquitination and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Martin; Mawson, Amanda; Baker, Rohan; Sarcevic, Boris

    2007-08-01

    The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 (cell division cycle 34) plays an essential role in promoting the G1-S-phase transition of the eukaryotic cell cycle and is phosphorylated in vivo. In the present study, we investigated if phosphorylation regulates Cdc34 function. We mapped the in vivo phosphorylation sites on budding yeast Cdc34 (yCdc34; Ser207 and Ser216) and human Cdc34 (hCdc34 Ser203, Ser222 and Ser231) to serine residues in the acidic tail domain, a region that is critical for Cdc34's cell cycle function. CK2 (protein kinase CK2) phosphorylates both yCdc34 and hCdc34 on these sites in vitro. CK2-mediated phosphorylation increased yCdc34 ubiquitination activity towards the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sic1 in vitro, when assayed in the presence of its cognate SCFCdc4 E3 ligase [where SCF is Skp1 (S-phase kinase-associated protein 1)/cullin/F-box]. Similarly, mutation of the yCdc34 phosphorylation sites to alanine, aspartate or glutamate residues altered Cdc34-SCFCdc4-mediated Sic1 ubiquitination activity. Similar results were obtained when yCdc34's ubiquitination activity was assayed in the absence of SCFCdc4, indicating that phosphorylation regulates the intrinsic catalytic activity of Cdc34. To evaluate the in vivo consequences of altered Cdc34 activity, wild-type yCdc34 and the phosphosite mutants were introduced into an S. cerevisiae cdc34 deletion strain and, following synchronization in G1-phase, progression through the cell cycle was monitored. Consistent with the increased ubiquitination activity in vitro, cells expressing the phosphosite mutants with higher catalytic activity exhibited accelerated cell cycle progression and Sic1 degradation. These studies demonstrate that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc34 on the acidic tail domain stimulates Cdc34-SCFCdc4 ubiquitination activity and cell cycle progression.

  18. Cigarette Smoke Impairs A2A Adenosine Receptor Mediated Wound Repair through Up-regulation of Duox-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhi; Zhang, Hui; Dixon, Jendayi; Traphagen, Nicole; Wyatt, Todd A.; Kharbanda, Kusum; Simet Chadwick, Samantha; Kolliputi, Narasaiah; Allen-Gipson, Diane S.

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure and intrinsic factors such as the NADPH oxidases produce high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ensuing inflammatory tissue injury. We previously demonstrated that CS-generated ROS, particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), impaired adenosine stimulated wound repair. We hypothesized that CS exposure modulates expression of Dual oxidase 1 (Duox-1), a NADPH oxidases known to generate H2O2. To test this hypothesis, we used human bronchial epithelial cell line Nuli-1 and C57BL/6 mice. Cells were treated with 5% CS extract (CSE) for various periods of time, and mice were exposed to whole body CS for six weeks. Both CSE and CS treatment induced increased expression of Duox-1, and silencing of Doux-1 improved the rate of cell wound repair induced by CSE treatment. Nuli-1 cells pretreated with thapsigargin but not calcium ionophore exhibited increased Duox-1 mRNA expression. CSE treatment stimulated PKCα activation, which was effectively blocked by pretreatment with diphenylene iodonium, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Compared to control, lungs from CS-exposed mice showed a significant increase in PKCα activity and Duox-1 expression. Collectively, the data demonstrated that CS exposure upregulates expression of Duox-1 protein. This further leads to H2O2 production and PKCα activation, inhibiting A2AAR-stimulated wound repair. PMID:28337995

  19. Unique targeting of cytosolic phospholipase A2 to plasma membranes mediated by the NADPH oxidase in phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shmelzer, Zeev; Haddad, Nurit; Admon, Ester; Pessach, Itai; Leto, Thomas L.; Eitan-Hazan, Zahit; Hershfinkel, Michal; Levy, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2)–generated arachidonic acid (AA) has been shown to be an essential requirement for the activation of NADPH oxidase, in addition to its being the major enzyme involved in the formation of eicosanoid at the nuclear membranes. The mechanism by which cPLA2 regulates NADPH oxidase activity is not known, particularly since the NADPH oxidase complex is localized in the plasma membranes of stimulated cells. The present study is the first to demonstrate that upon stimulation cPLA2 is transiently recruited to the plasma membranes by a functional NADPH oxidase in neutrophils and in granulocyte-like PLB-985 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments and double labeling immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated the unique colocalization of cPLA2 and the NADPH oxidase in plasma membranes of stimulated cells, in correlation with the kinetic burst of superoxide production. A specific affinity in vitro binding was detected between GST-p47phox or GST-p67phox and cPLA2 in lysates of stimulated cells. The association between these two enzymes provides the molecular basis for AA released by cPLA2 to activate the assembled NADPH oxidase. The ability of cPLA2 to regulate two different functions in the same cells (superoxide generation and eicosanoid production) is achieved by a novel dual subcellular localization of cPLA2 to different targets. PMID:12913107

  20. AKT1 induces caspase-mediated cleavage of the CDK inhibitor p27Kip1 during cell cycle progression in leukemia cells transformed by FLT3-ITD

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinping; Liu, Suiyang; Kharbanda, Surender; Stone, Richard M

    2011-01-01

    p27Kip1 cleavage and caspase-3 regulate cell cycle in human myeloma cells and B cells however regulation of p27Kip1 cleavage during the cell cycle is not known. In BaF3-FLT3-ITD cells, p27Kip1 undergoes C-terminal cleavage. Inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway is associated with decreased cleavage of p27Kip1 and G1 phase arrest. The caspase-3 inhibitor reduces p27Kip1 cleavage and inhibits cell proliferation. Knockdown shRNA against AKT1 reduces cleavage of p27Kip1, inhibits caspase-3 activation, and is associated with a delay in cell cycle progression. Taken together, these findings indicate that AKT1 induces caspase-mediated cleavage of p27Kip1, required for G1-S progression in FLT3-ITD cells. PMID:22142798

  1. Interleukin-22-Induced Antimicrobial Phospholipase A2 Group IIA Mediates Protective Innate Immunity of Nonhematopoietic Cells against Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yamato; Shiono, Takeru; Yahagi, Ayano; Hamada, Satoru; Umemura, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Goro

    2015-12-07

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen which establishes intracellular parasitism in various cells, including macrophages and nonhematopoietic cells, such as hepatocytes. It has been reported that several proinflammatory cytokines have pivotal roles in innate protection against L. monocytogenes infection. We found that a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin 22 (IL-22), was expressed by CD3(+) CD4(+) T cells at an early stage of L. monocytogenes infection in mice. To assess the influence of IL-22 on L. monocytogenes infection in hepatocytes, cells of a human hepatocellular carcinoma line, HepG2, were treated with IL-22 before L. monocytogenes infection in vitro. Gene expression analysis of the IL-22-treated HepG2 cells identified phospholipase A2 group IIA (PLA2G2A) as an upregulated antimicrobial molecule. Addition of recombinant PLA2G2A to the HepG2 culture significantly suppressed L. monocytogenes infection. Culture supernatant of the IL-22-treated HepG2 cells contained bactericidal activity against L. monocytogenes, and the activity was abrogated by a specific PLA2G2A inhibitor, demonstrating that HepG2 cells secreted PLA2G2A, which killed extracellular L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, colocalization of PLA2G2A and L. monocytogenes was detected in the IL-22-treated infected HepG2 cells, which suggests involvement of PLA2G2A in the mechanism of intracellular killing of L. monocytogenes by HepG2 cells. These results suggest that IL-22 induced at an early stage of L. monocytogenes infection enhances innate immunity against L. monocytogenes in the liver by stimulating hepatocytes to produce an antimicrobial molecule, PLA2G2A.

  2. Biosynthesis of oxidized lipid mediators via lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 hydrolysis of extracellular cardiolipin induces endothelial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Buland, Justin R; Wasserloos, Karla J; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Amoscato, Andrew A; Mallampalli, Rama K; Chen, Bill B; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon; Kagan, Valerian E; Pitt, Bruce R

    2016-08-01

    We (66) have previously described an NSAID-insensitive intramitochondrial biosynthetic pathway involving oxidation of the polyunsaturated mitochondrial phospholipid, cardiolipin (CL), followed by hydrolysis [by calcium-independent mitochondrial calcium-independent phospholipase A2-γ (iPLA2γ)] of oxidized CL (CLox), leading to the formation of lysoCL and oxygenated octadecadienoic metabolites. We now describe a model system utilizing oxidative lipidomics/mass spectrometry and bioassays on cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAECs) to assess the impact of CLox that we show, in vivo, can be released to the extracellular space and may be hydrolyzed by lipoprotein-associated PLA2 (Lp-PLA2). Chemically oxidized liposomes containing bovine heart CL produced multiple oxygenated species. Addition of Lp-PLA2 hydrolyzed CLox and produced (oxygenated) monolysoCL and dilysoCL and oxidized octadecadienoic metabolites including 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic (HODE) acids. CLox caused BPAEC necrosis that was exacerbated by Lp-PLA2 Lower doses of nonlethal CLox increased permeability of BPAEC monolayers. This effect was exacerbated by Lp-PLA2 and partially mimicked by authentic monolysoCL or 9- or 13-HODE. Control mice plasma contained virtually no detectable CLox; in contrast, 4 h after Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection, 34 ± 8 mol% (n = 6; P < 0.02) of circulating CL was oxidized. In addition, molar percentage of monolysoCL increased twofold after P. aeruginosa in a subgroup analyzed for these changes. Collectively, these studies suggest an important role for 1) oxidation of CL in proinflammatory environments and 2) possible hydrolysis of CLox in extracellular spaces producing lysoCL and oxidized octadecadienoic acid metabolites that may lead to impairment of pulmonary endothelial barrier function and necrosis.

  3. Cambrian origin of the CYP27C1-mediated vitamin A1-to-A2 switch, a key mechanism of vertebrate sensory plasticity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morshedian, Ala; Toomery, Matthew B.; Pollock, Gabriel E.; Frederiksen, Rikard; Enright, Jennifer; McCormick, Stephen; Cornwall, M. Carter; Fain, Gordon L.; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    The spectral composition of ambient light varies across both space and time. Many species of jawed vertebrates adapt to this variation by tuning the sensitivity of their photoreceptors via the expression of CYP27C1, an enzyme that converts vitamin A1 into vitamin A2, thereby shifting the ratio of vitamin A1-based rhodopsin to red-shifted vitamin A2-based porphyropsin in the eye. Here, we show that the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a jawless vertebrate that diverged from jawed vertebrates during the Cambrian period (approx. 500 Ma), dynamically shifts its photoreceptor spectral sensitivity via vitamin A1-to-A2 chromophore exchange as it transitions between photically divergent aquatic habitats. We further show that this shift correlates with high-level expression of the lamprey orthologue of CYP27C1, specifically in the retinal pigment epithelium as in jawed vertebrates. Our results suggest that the CYP27C1-mediated vitamin A1-to-A2 switch is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism of sensory plasticity that appeared not long after the origin of vertebrates.

  4. Cambrian origin of the CYP27C1-mediated vitamin A1-to-A2 switch, a key mechanism of vertebrate sensory plasticity.

    PubMed

    Morshedian, Ala; Toomey, Matthew B; Pollock, Gabriel E; Frederiksen, Rikard; Enright, Jennifer M; McCormick, Stephen D; Cornwall, M Carter; Fain, Gordon L; Corbo, Joseph C

    2017-07-01

    The spectral composition of ambient light varies across both space and time. Many species of jawed vertebrates adapt to this variation by tuning the sensitivity of their photoreceptors via the expression of CYP27C1, an enzyme that converts vitamin A1 into vitamin A2, thereby shifting the ratio of vitamin A1-based rhodopsin to red-shifted vitamin A2-based porphyropsin in the eye. Here, we show that the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a jawless vertebrate that diverged from jawed vertebrates during the Cambrian period (approx. 500 Ma), dynamically shifts its photoreceptor spectral sensitivity via vitamin A1-to-A2 chromophore exchange as it transitions between photically divergent aquatic habitats. We further show that this shift correlates with high-level expression of the lamprey orthologue of CYP27C1, specifically in the retinal pigment epithelium as in jawed vertebrates. Our results suggest that the CYP27C1-mediated vitamin A1-to-A2 switch is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism of sensory plasticity that appeared not long after the origin of vertebrates.

  5. The effect of caffeine to increase reaction time in the rat during a test of attention is mediated through antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Guy A; Grzelak, Michael E; Pond, Annamarie J; Cohen-Williams, Mary E; Hodgson, Robert A; Varty, Geoffrey B

    2007-12-11

    Caffeine produces effects on cognitive function particularly relating to aspects of attention such as reaction time. Considering the plasma exposure levels following regular caffeine intake, and the affinity of caffeine for known protein targets, these effects are likely mediated by either the adenosine A(1) or A(2A) receptor. In the present studies, two rat strains [Long-Evans (LE) and CD] were trained to asymptote performance in a test of selective attention, the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT). Next, the effects of caffeine were compared to the selective A(2A) antagonists, SCH 412348 and KW-6002 (Istradefylline), and the A(1) antagonist, DPCPX. Further studies compared the psychostimulant effects of each drug. Finally, we tested the A(2A) agonist, CGS-21680, on 5-CSRTT performance and given the antipsychotic potential of this drug class, studied the interaction between CGS-21680 and amphetamine in this task. Caffeine (3-10mg/kg IP) increased reaction time in both LE and CD rats, with no effect on accuracy, an effect replicated by SCH 412348 (0.1-1mg/kg PO) and KW-6002 (1-3mg/kg PO), but not DPCPX (3-30 mg/kg PO). At least with SCH 412348, these effects were at doses that were not overtly psychostimulant. In contrast, CGS-21680 (0.03-0. 3mg/kg IP) slowed reaction speed and increased omissions. Interestingly, at a comparatively low dose of 0.03 mg/kg, CGS-21680 attenuated the increased premature responding produced by amphetamine (1mg/kg IP). The present results suggest that the attention-enhancing effects of caffeine are mediated through A(2A) receptor blockade, and selective A(2A) receptor antagonists may have potential as therapies for attention-related disorders. Furthermore, the improvement in response control in amphetamine-treated rats following CGS-21680 pretreatment supports the view that A(2A) agonists have potential as novel antipsychotics.

  6. A2B adenosine receptor contributes to penile erection via PI3K/AKT signaling cascade-mediated eNOS activation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiaming; Grenz, Almut; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Xia, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Normal penile erection is under the control of multiple factors and signaling pathways. Although adenosine signaling is implicated in normal and abnormal penile erection, the exact role and the underlying mechanism for adenosine signaling in penile physiology remain elusive. Here we report that shear stress leads to increased adenosine release from endothelial cells. Subsequently, we determined that ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) is a key enzyme required for the production of elevated adenosine from ATP released by shear-stressed endothelial cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that shear stress-mediated elevated adenosine functions through the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) to activate the PI3K/AKT signaling cascade and subsequent increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation. These in vitro studies led us to discover further that adenosine was induced during sustained penile erection and contributes to PI3K/AKT activation and subsequent eNOS phosphorylation via A2BR signaling in intact animal. Finally, we demonstrate that lowering adenosine in wild-type mice or genetic deletion of A2BR in mutant mice significantly attenuated PI3K/AKT activation, eNOS phosphorylation, and subsequent impaired penile erection featured with the reduction of ratio of maximal intracavernosal pressure to systemic arterial pressure from 0.49 ± 0.03 to 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.38 ± 0.04, respectively (both P<0.05). Overall, using biochemical, cellular, genetic, and physiological approaches, our findings reveal that adenosine is a novel molecule signaling via A2BR activation, contributing to penile erection via PI3K/AKT-dependent eNOS activation. These studies suggest that this signaling pathway may be a novel therapeutic target for erectile disorders.—Wen, J., Grenz, A., Zhang, Y., Dai, Y., Kellems, R. E., Blackburn, M. R., Eltzschig, H. K., Xia, Y. A2B adenosine receptor contributes to penile erection via PI3K/AKT signaling cascade-mediated eNOS activation. PMID

  7. Crosstalk between the unfolded protein response and NF-κB-mediated inflammation in the progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mohammed-Ali, Zahraa; Cruz, Gaile L; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The chronic inflammatory response is emerging as an important therapeutic target in progressive chronic kidney disease. A key transcription factor in the induction of chronic inflammation is NF-κB. Recent studies have demonstrated that sustained activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) can initiate this NF-κB signaling phenomenon and thereby induce chronic kidney disease progression. A key factor influencing chronic kidney disease progression is proteinuria and this condition has now been demonstrated to induce sustained UPR activation. This review details the crosstalk between the UPR and NF-κB pathways as pertinent to chronic kidney disease. We present potential tools to study this phenomenon as well as potential therapeutics that are emerging to regulate the UPR. These therapeutics may prevent inflammation specifically induced in the kidney due to proteinuria-induced sustained UPR activation.

  8. The global transcriptional activator of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Gcr1p, mediates the response to glucose by stimulating protein synthesis and CLN-dependent cell cycle progression.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Kristine A; Barbara, Kellie E; Menon, Balaraj B; Moffat, Jason; Andrews, Brenda; Santangelo, George M

    2003-01-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires coordination of cell cycle events (e.g., new cell wall deposition) with constitutive functions like energy generation and duplication of protein mass. The latter processes are stimulated by the phosphoprotein Gcr1p, a transcriptional activator that operates through two different Rap1p-mediated mechanisms to boost expression of glycolytic and ribosomal protein genes, respectively. Simultaneous disruption of both mechanisms results in a loss of glucose responsiveness and a dramatic drop in translation rate. Since a critical rate of protein synthesis (CRPS) is known to mediate passage through Start and determine cell size by modulating levels of Cln3p, we hypothesized that GCR1 regulates cell cycle progression by coordinating it with growth. We therefore constructed and analyzed gcr1delta cln3delta and gcr1delta cln1delta cln2delta strains. Both strains are temperature and cold sensitive; interestingly, they exhibit different arrest phenotypes. The gcr1delta cln3delta strain becomes predominantly unbudded with 1N DNA content (G1 arrest), whereas gcr1delta cln1delta cln2delta cells exhibit severe elongation and apparent M phase arrest. Further analysis demonstrated that the Rap1p/Gcr1p complex mediates rapid growth in glucose by stimulating both cellular metabolism and CLN transcription. PMID:14668361

  9. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA): ensuring future progress by collecting data from a registry.

    PubMed

    Aljama, Pedro; Carracedo, Julia; Madueño, Juan Antonio; Ramirez, Rafael; Martin-Malo, Alejandro; Martin de Francisco, Angel L

    2005-05-01

    The recent emergence of antibody (Ab)-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) resulting from administration of certain erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) has heightened awareness of the potential for this disorder in patients receiving ESAs for anaemia associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The Spanish Society of Nephrology sponsored an independent registry for analysis of patients who developed epoetin-induced, Ab-mediated PRCA in Spain. Twelve patients from 11 regional hospitals were included in the Spanish PRCA registry from November 2000 to December 2002 that met the criteria for Ab-mediated PRCA. Patients were reported using a standardized form specifically developed for PRCA, and serum samples were analysed in a central laboratory at Reina Sofia University Hospital in Cordoba, Spain. The characteristics of these patients, their serological and haematological results, and the outcomes of immunosuppressive therapies are presented. The Spanish PRCA registry serves as a model for establishing an independent global PRCA registry sponsored by the various nephrology societies in European Union countries, and elsewhere and coordinated by key investigators from the respective countries.

  10. miR-200c and phospho-AKT as prognostic factors and mediators of osteosarcoma progression and lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Berlanga, Pablo; Muñoz, Lisandra; Piqueras, Marta; Sirerol, J Antoni; Sánchez-Izquierdo, María Dolors; Hervás, David; Hernández, Miguel; Llavador, Margarita; Machado, Isidro; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio; Cañete, Adela; Castel, Victoria; Font de Mora, Jaime

    2016-08-01

    Lung metastasis is the major cause of death in osteosarcoma patients. However, molecular mechanisms underlying this metastasis remain poorly understood. To identify key molecules related with pulmonary metastasis of pediatric osteosarcomas, we analyzed high-throughput miRNA expression in a cohort of 11 primary tumors and 15 lung metastases. Results were further validated with an independent cohort of 10 primary tumors and 6 metastases. In parallel, we performed immunohistochemical analysis of activated signaling pathways in 36 primary osteosarcomas. Only phospho-AKT associated with lower overall survival in primary tumors, supporting its role in osteosarcoma progression. CTNNB1 expression also associated with lower overall survival but was not strong enough to be considered an independent variable. Interestingly, miR-200c was overexpressed in lung metastases, implicating an inhibitory feed-back loop to PI3K-AKT. Moreover, transfection of miR200c-mimic in U2-OS cells reduced phospho-AKT levels but increased cellular migration and proliferation. Notably, miR-200c expression strongly correlated with miR-141 and with the osteogenic inhibitor miR-375, all implicated in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. These findings contrast epithelial tumors where reduced miR-200c expression promotes metastasis. Indeed, we noted that osteosarcoma cells in the lung also expressed the epithelial marker CDH1, revealing a change in their mesenchymal phenotype. We propose that miR-200c upregulation occurs late in osteosarcoma progression to provide cells with an epithelial phenotype that facilitates their integration in the metastatic lung niche. Thus, our findings identify phospho-AKT in the primary tumor and miR-200c later during tumor progression as prognostic molecules and potential therapeutic targets to prevent progression and metastasis of pediatric osteosarcomas. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Centrally administered histamine evokes the adrenal secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline by brain cyclooxygenase-1- and thromboxane A2-mediated mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Okada, Shoshiro; Yamaguchi, Naoko; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Lu, Lianyi; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2006-07-17

    Plasma adrenaline is originated from adrenal medulla, while plasma noradrenaline reflects the release from sympathetic nerves in addition to the secretion from adrenal medulla. The present study was designed to characterize the source of plasma catecholamines induced by centrally administered histamine, with regard to the brain prostanoids. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (1, 5 and 10 microg/animal) elevated plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline (noradrenalineA(2) synthase) (250 and 500 microg/animal, i.c.v.), and abolished by acute bilateral adrenalectomy. These results suggest that centrally administered histamine evokes plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline from adrenal medulla by brain cyclooxygenase-1- and thromboxane A(2)-mediated mechanisms in rats.

  12. A widespread sequence-specific mRNA decay pathway mediated by hnRNPs A1 and A2/B1

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Rene; Simkin, Alfred; Floss, Doreen; Patel, Ravi; Fogarty, Elizabeth A.; Scheller, Jürgen; Grimson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) specify post-transcriptional fates of mammalian messenger RNAs (mRNAs), yet knowledge of the underlying sequences and mechanisms is largely incomplete. Here, we identify two related novel 3′ UTR motifs in mammals that specify transcript degradation. These motifs are interchangeable and active only within 3′ UTRs, where they are often preferentially conserved; furthermore, they are found in hundreds of transcripts, many encoding regulatory proteins. We found that degradation occurs via mRNA deadenylation, mediated by the CCR4–NOT complex. We purified trans factors that recognize the motifs and identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) A1 and A2/B1, which are required for transcript degradation, acting in a previously unknown manner. We used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to confirm hnRNP A1 and A2/B1 motif-dependent roles genome-wide, profiling cells depleted of these factors singly and in combination. Interestingly, the motifs are most active within the distal portion of 3′ UTRs, suggesting that their role in gene regulation can be modulated by alternative processing, resulting in shorter 3′ UTRs. PMID:27151978

  13. Increased expression of platelet-derived growth factor associated protein-1 is associated with PDGF-B mediated glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vinay Kumar; Singh, Anand; Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Kumar, Vignesh; Gardi, Nilesh Laxman; Nalwa, Aasma; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Yadav, Savita

    2016-09-01

    The current treatment therapies available for malignant gliomas are inadequate. There is an urgent need to develop more effective therapies by characterizing the molecular pathogenesis of the disease. Over expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) ligands and receptors have been reported in malignant gliomas. Platelet-derived growth factor associated protein-1 (PDAP-1) is reported to modulate the mitogenic activity of PDGF ligands, but to date, there is no information concerning its role in PDGF-mediated glioma cell proliferation. This study aimed to characterize the role of PDAP-1 in PDGF-mediated glioma proliferation. The expression of PDAP-1 was observed to be significantly increased (p<0.05) in grade IV glioma tissue and cell lines compared to grade III. siRNA-mediated knockdown of PDAP-1 reduced the expression of PDGF-B and its downstream genes (Akt1/Protein kinase B (PKB) and phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) by up to 50%. In PDAP-1 knockdown glioma cells, more than a twofold reduction was also observed in the level of phosphorylated Akt. Interestingly, knockdown of PDAP-1 in combination with PDGF-B antibody inhibited glioma cell proliferation through activation of Caspase 3/7 and 9. We also demonstrate that PDAP-1 co-localizes with PDGF-B in the cytoplasm of glioma cells, and an interaction between both of the proteins was established. Collectively, these findings suggest that the expression of PDAP-1 is associated with disease malignancy, and its inhibition reduced the proliferation of malignant glioma cells through down-regulation of PDGF-B/Akt/PDK1 signaling. Thus, this study establishes PDAP-1 as an effecter of PDGF signaling in glioma cells and suggests that it could also be a promising therapeutic target.

  14. Secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} mediates progression of acute liver injury in the absence of sufficient cyclooxygenase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Bhave, Vishakha S.; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Latendresse, John R.; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-04-15

    Previous studies have shown that injury initiated by toxicants progresses even after most of the toxicant is eliminated from the body. One mechanism of progression of injury is the extracellular appearance of hydrolytic enzymes following leakage or upon cell lyses. Under normal conditions, after exposure to low to moderate doses of toxicants, secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} (sPLA{sub 2}) and other hydrolytic enzymes are known to appear in the extracellular spaces in order to cleanup the post-necrotic debris in tissues. We tested the hypothesis that sPLA{sub 2} contributes to progression of toxicant-initiated liver injury because of hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids of hepatocytes in the perinecrotic areas in the absence of sufficient cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered either a moderately hepatotoxic dose (MD, 2 ml CCl{sub 4}/kg, ip) or a highly hepatotoxic dose (HD, 3 ml CCl{sub 4}/kg, ip) of CCl{sub 4}. After MD, liver sPLA{sub 2} and COX-2 were co-localized in the necrotic and perinecrotic areas and their activities in plasma and liver increased before decreasing in tandem with liver injury (ALT and histopathology) leading to 100% survival. In contrast, after the HD, high extracellular and hepatic sPLA{sub 2} activities were accompanied by minimal COX-2 activity and localization in the liver throughout the time course. This led to progression of liver injury and 70% mortality. These data suggested a destructive role of sPLA{sub 2} in the absence of sufficient COX-2. Time- and dose-dependent destruction of hepatocytes by sPLA{sub 2} in isolated hepatocyte incubations confirmed the destructive ability of sPLA{sub 2} when present extracellularly, suggesting its ability to spread injury in vivo. These findings suggest that sPLA{sub 2}, secreted for cleanup of necrotic debris upon initiation of hepatic necrosis, requires the co-presence of sufficiently induced COX-2 activity to prevent the run-away destructive action of sPLA{sub 2

  15. Apoptotic Mediators are Upregulated in the Skeletal Muscle of Chronic/Progressive Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Erekat, Nour S

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). Parkinson disease is characterized by skeletal muscle abnormalities. The aim of this study is to illustrate the impact of PD induction on the expression of apoptotic mediators. Twenty normal albino mice were randomly selected and equally divided in control and PD groups. Chronic Parkinsonism was induced in the PD group using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and probenecid (MPTP/p). After that, samples from gastrocnemius muscles were evaluated by immunohistochemistry to examine the expression of p53 and active caspase-3 in the two groups of animals. P53 and active caspase-3 expression was significantly higher in gastrocnemius skeletal muscle in PD mice compared with that in the control mice (P value <0.01). Furthermore, we show PD gastrocnemius muscle atrophy measured by significant reduction (P < 0.01) in the muscle fiber cross-sectional area. Thus, our present data suggest that PD induction increased the expression of the apoptotic mediators p53 and active caspase-3 in gastrocnemius muscle, indicating the induction of apoptosis, which was correlative with gastrocnemius muscle atrophy subsequent to the induction of PD.

  16. BDNF mediated TrkB activation contributes to the EMT progression and the poor prognosis in human salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, Sen; Wang, Weixi; Hu, Zhiqiang; Shan, Chun; Wang, Lei; Wu, Baolei; Yang, Zihui; Yang, Xinjie; Lei, Delin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its receptor Tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) is correlated with the clinical progression of salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) and whether the BDNF/TrkB axis is associated with the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in SACC cells. The expression of BDNF, TrkB, and E-cadherin (an EMT biomarker) in 76 primary SACC specimens and 20 normal salivary gland tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Additionally, the expression of BDNF, TrkB, and E-cadherin in SACC cell lines (SACC-83 and SACC-LM) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The biological role of the BDNF/TrkB axis in the EMT progression of SACC was evaluated after treatment with increased levels of BDNF and by inhibiting TrkB activity in SACC-83 cell line. The progression of SACC cells through EMT was assessed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, photography, migration and invasion assays. Elevated expression of TrkB (92.1%) and BDNF (89.5%), and downregulated expression of E-cadherin (47.4%) was found in SACC specimens, which was significantly correlated with the invasion and metastasis in SACC (P<0.05). The high expression of TrkB and the low expression of E-cadherin was significantly correlated with the poor prognosis of SACC patients (P<0.05). The expression of TrkB was inversely correlated with the expression of E-cadherin in both SACC cases and cell lines (P<0.05). Increasing BDNF levels after treatment with exogenous recombinant human BDNF (rhBDNF) at 100 ng/ml significantly promoted the activation of TrKB and the progression of EMT in SACC cells. While obstruction of TrkB by its inhibitor, k252a (100 nM), significantly inhibited the EMT progression of SACC cells. These results suggest that BDNF-mediated TrkB activation contributes to the EMT progression and the poor prognosis in SACC. The present study demonstrated that the BDNF/TrkB axis promotes the

  17. Taiwan cobra phospholipase A2 suppresses ERK-mediated ADAM17 maturation, thus reducing secreted TNF-α production in human leukemia U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Jung; Lin, Hui-Chen; Chen, Ku-Chung; Lin, Shinne-Ren; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the signaling pathway regulating the processing of proADAM17 into ADAM17 in Taiwan cobra phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-treated human leukemia U937 cells. PLA2 induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-elicited p38 MAPK activation and ERK inactivation in U937 cells. Catalytically inactive bromophenacylated PLA2 (BPB-PLA2) and PLA2 mutants evoked Ca(2+)-mediated p38 MAPK activation, and the level of phosphorylated ERK remained unchanged. PLA2 treatment reduced mature ADAM17 expression and secreted TNF-α (sTNF-α) production. Co-treatment of SB202190 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) and catalytically inactive PLA2 increased ERK phosphorylation, ADAM17 maturation and sTNF-α production. Nevertheless, mRNA levels of ADAM17 and TNF-α were insignificantly altered after PLA2 and SB202190/BPB-PLA2 treatment. ADAM17 activity assay and knock-down of ADAM17 revealed that ADAM17 was involved in sTNF-α production. Restoration of ERK activation increased the processing of proADAM17 into ADAM17 in PLA2-treated cells, while inactivation of ERK reduced ADAM17 maturation in untreated and SB202190/BPB-PLA2-treated cells. Removal of cell surface heparan sulfate abrogated PLA2 and SB202190/BPB-PLA2 effect on ADAM17 maturation. Taken together, the present data reveal that PLA2 suppresses ERK-mediated ADAM17 maturation, thus reducing sTNF-α production in U937 cells. Moreover, the binding with heparan sulfate is crucial for the PLA2 effect.

  18. NO synthase inhibition attenuates EDHF-mediated relaxation induced by TRPV4 channel agonist GSK1016790A in the rat pulmonary artery: Role of TxA2.

    PubMed

    Addison, M Pule; Singh, Thakur Uttam; Parida, Subhashree; Choudhury, Soumen; Kasa, Jaya Kiran; Sukumaran, Susanth V; Darzi, Sajad Ahmad; Kandasamy, Kannan; Singh, Vishakha; Kumar, Dinesh; Mishra, Santosh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the concomitant activation of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) pathways by TRPV4 channel agonist GSK1016790A in the rat pulmonary artery and explore the mechanism by which NO synthase inhibition attenuates EDHF-mediated relaxation in endothelium-intact rat pulmonary artery. Tension experiments were conducted on the pulmonary artery from male Wistar rats. TRPV4 channel agonist GSK1016790A (GSK) caused concentration-dependent relaxation (Emax 86.9±4.6%; pD2 8.7±0.24) of the endothelium-intact rat pulmonary artery. Combined presence of apamin and TRAM-34 significantly attenuated the relaxation (Emax 61.1±6.0%) to GSK. l-NAME (100μM) significantly attenuated (8.2±2.9%) the relaxation response to GSK that was resistant to apamin plus TRAM-34. However, presence of ICI192605 or furegrelate alongwith l-NAME revealed the GSK-mediated EDHF-response (Emax of 28.5±5.2%; Emax 24.5±4.3%) in this vessel, respectively. Further, these two TxA2 modulators (ICI/furegrelate) alongwith l-NAME had no effect on SNP-induced endothelium-independent relaxation in comparison to l-NAME alone. This EDHF-mediated relaxation was sensitive to inhibition by K(+) channel blockers apamin and TRAM-34 or 60mMK(+) depolarizing solution. Further, combined presence of apamin and TRAM-34 in U46619 pre-contracted pulmonary arterial rings significantly reduced the maximal relaxation (Emax 71.6±6.9%) elicited by GSK, but had no effect on the pD2 (8.1±0.03) of the TRPV4 channel agonist in comparison to controls (Emax, 92.4±4.3% and pD2, 8.3±0.06). The present study suggests that NO and EDHF are released concomitantly and NO synthase inhibition attenuates GSK-induced EDHF response through thromboxane pathway in the rat pulmonary artery. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Adenosine Generated in the Bone Marrow Niche Through a CD38-Mediated Pathway Correlates With Progression of Human Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, Alberto L; Quarona, Valeria; Toscani, Denise; Costa, Federica; Chillemi, Antonella; Pistoia, Vito; Giuliani, Nicola; Malavasi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Human myeloma cells express CD38 at high levels and grow in hypoxic niches inside the bone marrow. Myeloma cells respond to hypoxia with metabolic changes leading to aerobic glycolysis, thus reducing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and increasing NAD+. Our hypothesis is that these conditions favor the enzymatic pathways involved in the production of adenosine in the niche. Within the niche, NAD+ is able to activate a discontinuous adenosinergic pathway that relies upon CD38, CD203a and CD73 or TRACP, according to the environmental pH. The observed variability in adenosine concentrations in bone marrow aspirates is a result of the interactions taking place among myeloma and other cells in the bone marrow niche. A pilot study showed that adenosine profiles differ during disease progression. Adenosine levels were significantly higher in the bone marrow plasma of patients with symptomatic myeloma and correlated with ISS staging, suggesting that adenosine is produced in the myeloma niche at micromolar levels by an ectoenzymatic network centered on CD38. Adenosine levels increase with disease aggressiveness, a finding that supports adenosine as a potential marker of myeloma progression. PMID:27761584

  20. PCAF-mediated acetylation of transcriptional factor HOXB9 suppresses lung adenocarcinoma progression by targeting oncogenic protein JMJD6

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Junhu; Xu, Weizhi; Zhan, Jun; Ma, Ji; Li, Xueying; Xie, Yuping; Wang, Jiadong; Zhu, Wei-guo; Luo, Jianyuan; Zhang, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    HOXB9 is a homeobox domain-containing transcription factor, playing an important role in embryonic development and cancer progression. However, the precise post-translational modifications (PTMs) of HOXB9 and the corresponding roles are unclear. Here, we report that acetyltransferase p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) interacts with and acetylates HOXB9 both in vivo and in vitro. Conversely, the acetylation of HOXB9 can be reversed by deacetylase SIRT1. Furthermore, we found that HOXB9 is acetylated at lysine 27 (AcK27). Functionally, in contrast to the wild type HOXB9, AcK27-HOXB9 decreased its capacity in promoting lung cancer cell migration and tumor growth in mice. Mechanistically, AcK27-HOXB9 suppresses the transcription of its target gene Jumonji domain-containing protein 6 (JMJD6) by direct occupying the promoter of JMJD6 gene. For clinical relevance, elevated HOXB9 acetylation at K27 predicts a better prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients. Taken together, we identified the first PTM of HOXB9 by demonstrating that HOXB9 can be acetylated and AcK27-HOXB9 counteracts the role of the wild-type HOXB9 in regulating lung adenocarcinoma progression. PMID:27613418

  1. Selective proteolysis of apolipoprotein B-100 by Arg-gingipain mediates atherosclerosis progression accelerated by bacterial exposure.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Munetaka; Kadowaki, Tomoko; Tsukuba, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2006-11-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest the association of periodontal infections with atherosclerosis, however, the mechanism underlying this association remains poorly understood. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the primary etiologic agent of adult periodontitis and produces a unique class of cysteine proteinases consisting of Arg-gingipain (Rgp) and Lys-gingipain (Kgp). To elucidate key mechanisms for progression of atherosclerosis by P. gingivalis infection, we tested the effects of the disruption of genes encoding Rgp and/or Kgp and inhibitors specific for the respective enzymes on atherosclerosis progression in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. Repeated intravenous injection of wild-type P. gingivalis resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesions as well as an increase in the serum LDL cholesterol and a decrease of HDL cholesterol in these animals. LDL particles in P. gingivalis-injected animals were modified as a result of selective proteolysis of apoB-100 in LDL particles. This modification of LDL by P. gingivalis resulted in an increase in LDL uptake by macrophages and consequent foam cell formation in vitro. The atherosclerotic changes induced by P. gingivalis infection were attenuated by disruption of Rgp-encoding genes or by an Rgp-specific inhibitor. Our results indicate that degradation of apoB-100 by Rgp plays a crucial role in the promotion of atherosclerosis by P. gingivalis infection.

  2. Lentivirus-Mediated Silencing of Myosin VI Inhibits Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progression in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Zhu, Zhenghong; Chang, Jianhua; Wang, Jialei; Shen, Xiaoyong

    2015-10-01

    Myosin VI (MYO6) is a unique actin motor, which moves toward the pointed ends of actin filaments. In this study, we found that MYO6 is overexpressed in lung cancer tissues and associated with lung cancer progression, particularly lymph node metastasis. To investigate its functions in lung cancer cells, we generated recombinant lentivirus taking shRNA of MYO6. Using two lung cancer cell lines, A549 and 95D, we found that Lv-shMYO6 could infect lung cancer cells with high efficiency and downregulate MYO6 on both mRNA and protein levels. After knockdown of MYO6, the proliferation rates of lung cancer cells were decreased significantly. The colony-formation ability of MYO6-silenced lung cancer cells was also impaired with reduced colony numbers and fewer cells per colony. Flow cytometry showed that cell cycle progression was stuck at the G0 /G1 phase, especially at the sub-G1 phase, which represents apoptotic cells. Moreover, knockdown of MYO6 downregulated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Further experiments using another shRNA of MYO6 confirmed the above results. These results suggest that MYO6 is crucial in maintaining cell cycle and cell growth of lung cancer cells. MYO6 may serve as a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer treatment.

  3. gp130-mediated Stat3 activation in enterocytes regulates cell survival and cell-cycle progression during colitis-associated tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bollrath, Julia; Phesse, Toby J; von Burstin, Vivian A; Putoczki, Tracy; Bennecke, Moritz; Bateman, Trudie; Nebelsiek, Tim; Lundgren-May, Therese; Canli, Ozge; Schwitalla, Sarah; Matthews, Vance; Schmid, Roland M; Kirchner, Thomas; Arkan, Melek C; Ernst, Matthias; Greten, Florian R

    2009-02-03

    Although gastrointestinal cancers are frequently associated with chronic inflammation, the underlying molecular links have not been comprehensively deciphered. Using loss- and gain-of-function mice in a colitis-associated cancer model, we establish here a link comprising the gp130/Stat3 transcription factor signaling axis. Mutagen-induced tumor growth and multiplicity are reduced following intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific Stat3 ablation, while its hyperactivation promotes tumor incidence and growth. Conversely, IEC-specific Stat3 deficiency enhances susceptibility to chemically induced epithelial damage and subsequent mucosal inflammation, while excessive Stat3 activation confers resistance to colitis. Stat3 has the capacity to mediate IL-6- and IL-11-dependent IEC survival and to promote proliferation through G1 and G2/M cell-cycle progression as the common tumor cell-autonomous mechanism that bridges chronic inflammation to tumor promotion.

  4. Downregulation of miR-382 by propranolol inhibits the progression of infantile hemangioma via the PTEN-mediated AKT/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongfan; Li, Peng; Guo, Zhengtuan; Wang, Huaijie; Pan, Weikang

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 10% of infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common vascular tumors affecting children and are characterized by rapid growth, and can have destructive, disfiguring and even life-threatening consequences. Currently, propranolol is considered to be a safe and effective treatment option for problematic proliferating IHs. Recent studies have also revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) play important roles in the regulation of angiogenesis. In this study, XPTS‑1 cells were used as a hemangioma-derived endothelial cell line constructed in our laboratory. Through a series of experiments, we discovered that miR‑382 is a novel miRNA associated with IHs, which was overexpressed in XPTS‑1 cells and was conversely downregulated by treatment with propranolol. In addition, we found that miR‑382 contributes to the progression of IHs. Our results revealed that propranolol inhibited XPTS‑1 cell migration and proliferation, and promoted apoptosis, and these effects were reversed by the restoration of miR‑382 expression by transfection of the cells with an miR‑382 overexpression vector. Further experiments revealed that the above-mentioned effects were associated with the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-mediated AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. The expression of PTEN was upregulated, while that of p-AKT, p-mTOR and p-p70S6K was downregulated by propranolol; these effects were partly reversed by the overexpression of miR‑382. On the whole, our study identified that the downregulation of miR‑382 by propranolol inhibits the progression of IHs via the PTEN-mediated AKT/mTOR pathway.

  5. CD147 promotes liver fibrosis progression via VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signalling-mediated cross-talk between hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhaoyong; Qu, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Qichao; Qu, Ping; Xu, Xinsen; Yuan, Peng; Huang, Xiaojun; Shao, Yongping; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Hongxin; Xing, Jinliang

    2015-10-01

    Although previous evidence indicates close involvement of CD147 in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, the underlying molecular mechanisms and its therapeutic value remain largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the biological roles of CD147 in liver fibrosis and assessed its therapeutic value as a target molecule in the CCl4-induced liver fibrosis mouse model. We found that CD147 was highly expressed in both hepatocytes and SECs (sinusoidal endothelial cells) in fibrotic liver tissues. Additionally, it was significantly associated with the fibrosis stage. TGF-β1 (transforming growth factor β1) was found to be mainly responsible for the up-regulation of CD147. Bioinformatic and experimental data suggest a functional link between CD147 expression and VEGF-A (vascular endothelial growth factor A)/VEGR-2 (VEGF receptor 2) signalling-mediated angiogenesis in fibrotic liver tissues. Furthermore, we observed that the CD147-induced activation of the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt signalling pathway promotes the production of VEGF-A in hepatocytes and expression of VEGFR-2 in SECs, which was found to enhance the angiogenic capability of SECs. Finally, our data indicate that blocking of CD147 using an mAb (monoclonal antibody) attenuated liver fibrosis progression via inhibition of VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 signalling and subsequent amelioration of microvascular abnormality in the CCl4-induced mouse model. Our findings suggest a novel functional mechanism that CD147 may promote liver fibrosis progression via inducing the VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 signalling pathway-mediated cross-talk between hepatocytes and SECs. New strategies based on the intervention of CD147 can be expected for prevention of liver fibrosis.

  6. Involvement of FOS-mediated miR-181b/miR-21 signalling in the progression of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Tao, Tao; Wang, Yingyi; Luo, Hui; Yao, Lei; Wang, Lin; Wang, Jiajia; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Junxia; Wang, Huibo; Shi, Yan; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Tao; Kang, Chunsheng; Liu, Ning; You, Yongping

    2013-09-01

    Recently, a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) were shown to be dysregulated in gliomas, and involved in glioma development. However, the effect of miRNA-miRNA functional networks on gliomas is poorly understood. In this study, we identified that FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS)-mediated miR-181b/miR-21 signalling was critical for glioma progression. Using microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), we found increased FOS in high grade gliomas. FOS depletion (via FOS-shRNA), inhibited invasion and promoted apoptosis in glioma cells. Using microarrays, combined with Pearson correlation analysis, we found FOS positively correlated with miR-21 expression. Reduction of FOS inhibited miR-21 expression by binding to the miR-21 promoter using luciferase reporter assays. Introduction of miR-21 abrogated FOS knockdown-induced cell invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assays showed that miR-181b modulated FOS expression by directly targeting the binding site within the 3'UTR. Expression of FOS with a FOS cDNA lacking 3'UTR overrided miR-181b-induced miR-21 expression and cell function. Finally, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridisation (ISH) analysis revealed a significant correlation in miR-181b, FOS and miR-21 expression in nude mouse tumour xenograft and human glioma tissues. To our knowledge, it is the first time to demonstrate that miR-181b/FOS/miR-21 signalling plays a critical role in the progression of gliomas, providing important clues for understanding the key roles of transcription factor mediated miRNA-miRNA functional network in the regulation of gliomas.

  7. Vitamin B12 and Progression of White Matter Lesions. A 2-Year Follow-Up Study in First-Ever Lacunar Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Overbeek, Ellen C.; Staals, Julie; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    In cross-sectional studies periventricular white matter lesions (WML) were related to low plasma levels of vitamin B12. Whether low vitamin B12 levels are also related to progression of WML is still unknown. We studied baseline vitamin B12 levels and its association with progression of WML over 2 years of follow-up in first-ever lacunar stroke patients. In 107 first-ever lacunar stroke patients in whom baseline brain MRI and vitamin B12 status were available, we obtained a follow-up brain MRI after 2 years. We assessed progression of periventricular WML (pWML) and deep WML (dWML) using a visual WML change scale. We studied the relationship between baseline levels of plasma vitamin B12 and progression of WML after 2 years of follow-up by binary logistic regression analyses. Vitamin B12 deficiency was more frequent in patients with progression of pWML compared to those without progression (41.9% and 19.7% respectively, p = 0.02). Corrected for sex and age, progression of pWML was associated with lower baseline levels of vitamin B12 (OR 1.42 per 50 unit decrease, 95% CI 1.00-1.92). Vitamin B12 levels were not associated with progression of dWML. In conclusion progression of pWML after 2 years of follow-up relates to low levels of vitamin B12 at baseline in first-ever lacunar stroke patients. Whether this population could benefit from vitamin B12 supplementation is unknown and requires further investigation. PMID:24155983

  8. Vitamin B12 and progression of white matter lesions. A 2-year follow-up study in first-ever lacunar stroke patients.

    PubMed

    van Overbeek, Ellen C; Staals, Julie; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    In cross-sectional studies periventricular white matter lesions (WML) were related to low plasma levels of vitamin B12. Whether low vitamin B12 levels are also related to progression of WML is still unknown. We studied baseline vitamin B12 levels and its association with progression of WML over 2 years of follow-up in first-ever lacunar stroke patients. In 107 first-ever lacunar stroke patients in whom baseline brain MRI and vitamin B12 status were available, we obtained a follow-up brain MRI after 2 years. We assessed progression of periventricular WML (pWML) and deep WML (dWML) using a visual WML change scale. We studied the relationship between baseline levels of plasma vitamin B12 and progression of WML after 2 years of follow-up by binary logistic regression analyses. Vitamin B12 deficiency was more frequent in patients with progression of pWML compared to those without progression (41.9% and 19.7% respectively, p = 0.02). Corrected for sex and age, progression of pWML was associated with lower baseline levels of vitamin B12 (OR 1.42 per 50 unit decrease, 95% CI 1.00-1.92). Vitamin B12 levels were not associated with progression of dWML. In conclusion progression of pWML after 2 years of follow-up relates to low levels of vitamin B12 at baseline in first-ever lacunar stroke patients. Whether this population could benefit from vitamin B12 supplementation is unknown and requires further investigation.

  9. Efficacy of a randomized controlled self-regulation based physical activity intervention for chronic fatigue: Mediation effects of physical activity progress and self-regulation skills.

    PubMed

    Marques, M M; de Gucht, V; Leal, I; Maes, S

    2017-03-01

    Examine the medium-term effects of a brief physical activity (PA) self-regulation (SR) based intervention (4-STEPS program) for chronic fatigue, and explore the mediating effects of PA related variables and SR skills. A two-arm randomized controlled trial (Usual Care vs 4-STEPS) was carried out. The 4-STEPS program consisted of Motivational Interviewing and SR-skills training. Fatigue severity (primary outcome) and impact, PA, health-related quality of life (HrQoL), and somatic and psychological distress were assessed at baseline, post-treatment (12weeks) and 12months follow-up. Ninety-one patients (45 intervention and 46 controls) were included. At follow-up, there were significant treatment effects on fatigue severity (g=0.72) and fatigue impact, leisure-time PA, and physical and psychological HrQoL. No significant effects were found for number of daily steps and somatic and psychological distress. Fatigue severity at follow-up was partially mediated by post-treatment progress on a personal PA goal (effect ratio=18%). Results suggest that a brief intervention, focusing on the formulation and pursuit of personal PA goals and the use of SR skills, produces sustained benefits for fatigue severity. Despite these promising results, dropout was high and the intervention was not beneficial for all secondary outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid Steroid Hormone Actions Initiated at the Cell Surface and the Receptors that Mediate Them with an Emphasis on Recent Progress in Fish Models

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the classic genomic mechanism of steroid action mediated by activation of intracellular nuclear receptors, there is now extensive evidence that steroids also activate receptors on the cell surface to initiate rapid intracellular signaling and biological responses that are often nongenomic. Recent progress in our understanding of rapid, cell surface-initiated actions of estrogens, progestins, androgens and corticosteroids and the identities of the membrane receptors that act as their intermediaries is briefly reviewed with a special emphasis on studies in teleost fish. Two recently discovered novel proteins with seven-transmembrane domains, G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), and membrane progestin receptors (mPRs) have the ligand binding and signaling characteristics of estrogen and progestin membrane receptors, respectively, but their functional significance is disputed by some researchers. GPR30 is expressed on the cell surface of fish oocytes and mediates estrogen inhibition of oocyte maturation. mPRα is also expressed on the oocyte cell surface and is the intermediary in progestin induction of oocyte maturation in fish. Recent results suggest there is cross-talk between these two hormonal pathways and that there is reciprocal down-regulation of GPR30 and mPRα expression by estrogens and progestins at different phases of oocyte development to regulate the onset of oocyte maturation. There is also evidence in fish that mPRs are involved in progestin induction of sperm hypermotility and anti-apoptotic actions in ovarian follicle cells. Nonclassical androgen and corticosteroid actions have also been described in fish models but the membrane receptors mediating these actions have not been identified. PMID:22154643

  11. The intracellular juxtamembrane domain of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is essential for receptor activation and DDR2-mediated cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; Ko, Panseon; You, Eunae; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2014-12-01

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDRs) are unusual receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that are activated by fibrillar collagens instead of soluble growth factors. DDRs play an important role in various cellular functions and disease processes, including malignant progression. Compared to other RTKs, DDRs have relatively long juxtamembrane domains, which are believed to contribute to receptor function. Despite this possibility, the function and mechanism of the juxtamembrane domain of DDRs have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane 2 (JM2) region of DDR2 contributed to receptor dimerization, which is critical for receptor activation in response to collagen stimulation. A collagen-binding assay showed that JM2 was required for efficient binding of collagen to the discoidin (DS) domain. Immunohistochemical analysis of DDR2 expression using a tissue microarray demonstrated that DDR2 was overexpressed in several carcinoma tissues, including bladder, testis, lung, kidney, prostate and stomach. In H1299 cells, inhibition of DDR2 activity by overexpressing the juxtamembrane domain containing JM2 suppressed collagen-induced colony formation, cell proliferation and invasion via the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Taken together, our results suggest that JM2-mediated dimerization is likely to be essential for DDR2 activation and cancer progression. Thus, inhibition of DDR2 function using a JM2-containing peptide might be a useful strategy for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancers.

  12. CCND1–CDK4–mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E.; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1–CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1–CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1–CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis. PMID:26150472

  13. Non-hematopoietic PAR-2 is essential for matriptase-driven pre-malignant progression and potentiation of ras-mediated squamous cell carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Friis, Stine; Konkel, Joanne E.; Godiksen, Sine; Hatakeyama, Marcia; Hansen, Karina K.; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Szabo, Roman; Vogel, Lotte K.; Chen, Wanjun; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Bugge, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored serine protease, matriptase, is consistently dysregulated in a range of human carcinomas, and high matriptase activity correlates with poor prognosis. Furthermore, matriptase is unique among tumor-associated proteases in that epithelial stem cell expression of the protease suffices to induce malignant transformation. Here, we use genetic epistasis analysis to identify proteinase-activated receptor (PAR)-2-dependent inflammatory signaling as an essential component of matriptase-mediated oncogenesis. In cell-based assays, matriptase was a potent activator of PAR-2, and PAR-2 activation by matriptase caused robust induction of NFκB through Gαi. Importantly, genetic elimination of PAR-2 from mice completely prevented matriptase-induced pre-malignant progression, including inflammatory cytokine production, inflammatory cell recruitment, epidermal hyperplasia, and dermal fibrosis. Selective ablation of PAR-2 from bone marrow-derived cells did not prevent matriptase-driven pre-malignant progression, indicating that matriptase activates keratinocyte stem cell PAR-2 to elicit its pro-inflammatory and pro-tumorigenic effects. When combined with previous studies, our data suggest that dual induction of PAR-2-NFκB inflammatory signaling and PI3K-Akt-mTor survival/proliferative signaling underlies the transforming potential of matriptase and may contribute to pro-tumorigenic signaling in human epithelial carcinogenesis. PMID:24469043

  14. Andrographolide protects liver cells from H2O2 induced cell death by upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1 mediated via adenosine A2a receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Smriti P K; Khole, Swati; Jagadish, Nidhi; Ghosh, Debjani; Gadgil, Vijay; Sinkar, Vilas; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S

    2016-11-01

    Andrographolide, principle constituent of Andrographis paniculata Nees is used in traditional medicine in Southeast Asia and is known to exhibit various biological activities. Its antioxidant activity is due to its ability to activate one of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which is regulated transcriptionally through Nrf-2. However, molecular mechanism underlying activation of Nrf-2/HO-1 has not yet been clearly understood. Protective effect of andrographolide against H2O2 induced cell death, reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation was observed in HepG2 cells. Ability of andrographolide to modulate G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) mediated signalling was determined using in silico docking and gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR, confocal microscopy and western blot analysis. We clearly show that andrographolide via adenosine A2A receptor signalling leads to activation of p38 MAP kinase, resulting in upregulation of Nrf-2, its translocation to nucleus and activation of HO-1. Additionally, it activates adenylate cyclase resulting in cAMP formation which in turn activates protein kinase A leading to inhibition of GSK-3β by phosphorylation. Inactivated GSK-3β leads to retention of Nrf-2 in the nucleus leading to sustained expression of HO-1 by binding to its antioxidant response element (ARE). Thus, andrographolide probably by binding to adenosine A2a receptor activates Nrf-2 transcription and also inhibits its exclusion from the nucleus by inactivating GSK-3β, together resulting in activation of HO-1. We speculate that andrographolide can be used as a therapeutic drug to combat oxidative stress implicated in pathogenesis of various diseases such as diabetes, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases etc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Centrally administered N-methyl-d-aspartate evokes the adrenal secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline by brain thromboxane A2-mediated mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Okada, Shoshiro; Yamaguchi-Shima, Naoko; Shimizu, Takahiro; Arai, Junichi; Yorimitsu, Mieko; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2008-05-31

    Plasma adrenaline mainly originated from adrenaline-containing cells in the adrenal medulla, while plasma noradrenaline reflects the release from sympathetic nerves in addition to the secretion from noradrenaline-containing cells in the adrenal medulla. The present study was undertaken to characterize the source of plasma catecholamines induced by centrally administered N-methyl-d-aspartate with regard to the brain prostanoid, using urethane-anesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered N-methyl-d-aspartate (1.0, 5.0, 10.0 nmol/animal) dose-dependently elevated plasma levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (5.0 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of both catecholamines was reduced by dizocilpine maleate (5 nmol/animal, i.c.v.), a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist. Indomethacin (0.6 and 1.2 micromol/animal, i.c.v.), an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, dose-dependently reduced the N-methyl-d-aspartate (5.0 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of both catecholamines. The N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced response was dose-dependently attenuated by furegrelate (0.9 and 1.8 micromol/animal, i.c.v.), an inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthase. Furthermore, the acute bilateral adrenalectomy abolished the N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced responses, indicating that the source of increase in plasma noradrenaline evoked by N-methyl-d-aspartate is due to secretion from the adrenal gland and not due to release from sympathetic nerve terminals. These results suggest that centrally administered N-methyl-d-aspartate induces the secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline from adrenal medulla by the brain thromboxane A2-mediated mechanisms in rats.

  16. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chen; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Weiru; Qi, Lin; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2014-06-01

    Priapism is featured with prolonged and painful penile erection and is prevalent among males with sickle cell disease (SCD). The disorder is a dangerous urological and hematological emergency since it is associated with ischemic tissue damage and erectile disability. Here we report that phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) gene expression and PDE activity is significantly reduced in penile tissues of two independent priapic models: SCD mice and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice. Moreover, using ADA enzyme therapy to reduce adenosine or a specific antagonist to block A(2B) adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling, we successfully attenuated priapism in both ADA(-/-) and SCD mice by restoring penile PDE5 gene expression to normal levels. This finding led us to further discover that excess adenosine signaling via ADORA2B activation directly reduces PDE5 gene expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent manner. Overall, we reveal that excess adenosine-mediated ADORA2B signaling underlies reduced penile PDE activity by decreasing PDE5 gene expression in a HIF-1α-dependent manner and provide new insight for the pathogenesis of priapism and novel therapies for the disease.

  17. rAAV2/7 vector-mediated overexpression of alpha-synuclein in mouse substantia nigra induces protein aggregation and progressive dose-dependent neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alpha-synuclein is a key protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is the main component of the Lewy bodies, a cardinal neuropathological feature in the disease. In addition, whole locus multiplications and point mutations in the gene coding for alpha-synuclein lead to autosomal dominant monogenic PD. Over the past decade, research on PD has impelled the development of new animal models based on alpha-synuclein. In this context, transgenic mouse lines have failed to reproduce several hallmarks of PD, especially the strong and progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration over time that occurs in the patients. In contrast, viral vector-based models in rats and non-human primates display prominent, although highly variable, nigral dopaminergic neuron loss. However, the few studies available on viral vector-mediated overexpression of alpha-synuclein in mice report a weak neurodegenerative process and no clear Lewy body-like pathology. To address this issue, we performed a comprehensive comparative study of alpha-synuclein overexpression by means of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors serotype 2/7 (rAAV2/7) at different doses in adult mouse substantia nigra. Results We noted a significant and dose-dependent alpha-synucleinopathy over time upon nigral viral vector-mediated alpha-synuclein overexpression. We obtained a strong, progressive and dose-dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, reaching a maximum of 82% after 8 weeks. This effect correlated with a reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum. Moreover, behavioural analysis revealed significant motor impairments from 12 weeks after injection on. In addition, we detected the presence of alpha-synuclein-positive aggregates in the remaining surviving neurons. When comparing wild-type to mutant A53T alpha-synuclein at the same vector dose, both induced a similar degree of cell death. These data were supported by a biochemical

  18. rAAV2/7 vector-mediated overexpression of alpha-synuclein in mouse substantia nigra induces protein aggregation and progressive dose-dependent neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Oliveras-Salvá, Marusela; Van der Perren, Anke; Casadei, Nicolas; Stroobants, Stijn; Nuber, Silke; D'Hooge, Rudi; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2013-11-25

    Alpha-synuclein is a key protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is the main component of the Lewy bodies, a cardinal neuropathological feature in the disease. In addition, whole locus multiplications and point mutations in the gene coding for alpha-synuclein lead to autosomal dominant monogenic PD. Over the past decade, research on PD has impelled the development of new animal models based on alpha-synuclein. In this context, transgenic mouse lines have failed to reproduce several hallmarks of PD, especially the strong and progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration over time that occurs in the patients. In contrast, viral vector-based models in rats and non-human primates display prominent, although highly variable, nigral dopaminergic neuron loss. However, the few studies available on viral vector-mediated overexpression of alpha-synuclein in mice report a weak neurodegenerative process and no clear Lewy body-like pathology. To address this issue, we performed a comprehensive comparative study of alpha-synuclein overexpression by means of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors serotype 2/7 (rAAV2/7) at different doses in adult mouse substantia nigra. We noted a significant and dose-dependent alpha-synucleinopathy over time upon nigral viral vector-mediated alpha-synuclein overexpression. We obtained a strong, progressive and dose-dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, reaching a maximum of 82% after 8 weeks. This effect correlated with a reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum. Moreover, behavioural analysis revealed significant motor impairments from 12 weeks after injection on. In addition, we detected the presence of alpha-synuclein-positive aggregates in the remaining surviving neurons. When comparing wild-type to mutant A53T alpha-synuclein at the same vector dose, both induced a similar degree of cell death. These data were supported by a biochemical analysis that showed

  19. Progress in Aptamer-Mediated Drug Delivery Vehicles for Cancer Targeting and Its Implications in Addressing Chemotherapeutic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Huang, He; Dong, Shiwu; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are novel oligonucleotides with flexible three-dimensional configurations that recognize and bind to their cognate targets, including tumor surface receptors, in a high-affinity and highly specific manner. Because of their unique intrinsic properties, a variety of aptamer-mediated nanovehicles have been developed to directionally transport anti-cancer drugs to tumor sites to minimize systemic cytotoxicity and to enhance permeation by these tumoricidal agents. Despite advances in the selection and synthesis of aptamers and in the conjugation and self-assembly of nanotechnologies, current chemotherapy and drug delivery systems face great challenges. These challenges are due to the limitations of aptamers and vehicles and because of complicated tumor mechanisms, including heterogeneity, anti-cancer drug resistance, and hypoxia-induced aberrances. In this review, we will summarize current approaches utilizing tumor surface hallmarks and aptamers and their roles and mechanisms in therapeutic nanovehicles targeting tumors. Delivery forms include nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanogels, aptamer-drug conjugates, and novel molecular trains. Moreover, the obstacles posed by the aforementioned issues will be highlighted, and possible solutions will be acknowledged. Furthermore, future perspectives will be presented, including cutting-edge integration with RNA interference nanotechnology and personalized chemotherapy, which will facilitate innovative approaches to aptamer-based therapeutics. PMID:25057317

  20. Glioma progression through the prism of heat shock protein mediated extracellular matrix remodeling and epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Y; Biswas, Angana; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2017-10-15

    Glial tumor is one of the intrinsic brain tumors with high migratory and infiltrative potential. This essentially contributes to the overall poor prognosis by circumvention of conventional treatment regimen in glioma. The underlying mechanism in gliomagenesis is bestowed by two processes- Extracellular matrix (ECM) Remodeling and Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Heat Shock Family of proteins (HSPs), commonly known as "molecular chaperons" are documented to be upregulated in glioma. A positive correlation also exists between elevated expression of HSPs and invasive capacity of glial tumor. HSPs overexpression leads to mutational changes in glioma, which ultimately drive cells towards EMT, ECM modification, malignancy and invasion. Differential expression of HSPs - a factor providing cytoprotection to glioma cells, also contributes towards its radioresistance /chemoresistance. Various evidences also display upregulation of EMT and ECM markers by various heat shock inducing proteins e.g. HSF-1. The aim of this review is to study in detail the role of HSPs in EMT and ECM leading to radioresistance/chemoresistance of glioma cells. The existing treatment regimen for glioma could be enhanced by targeting HSPs through immunotherapy, miRNA and exosome mediated strategies. This could be envisaged by better understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying glial tumorigenesis in relation to EMT and ECM remodeling under HSPs influence. Our review might showcase fresh potential for the development of next generation therapeutics for effective glioma management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional relevance of "seed" and "non-seed" sequences in microRNA-mediated promotion of C. elegans developmental progression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huibin; Artiles, Karen L; Fire, Andrew Z

    2015-11-01

    The founding heterochronic microRNAs, lin-4 and let-7, together with their validated targets and well-characterized phenotypes in C. elegans, offer an opportunity to test functionality of microRNAs in a developmental context. In this study, we defined sequence requirements at the microRNA level for these two microRNAs, evaluating lin-4 and let-7 mutant microRNAs for their ability to support temporal development under conditions where the wild-type lin-4 and let-7 gene products are absent. For lin-4, we found a strong requirement for seed sequences, with function drastically affected by several central mutations in the seed sequence, while rescue was retained by a set of mutations peripheral to the seed. let-7 rescuing activity was retained to a surprising degree by a variety of central seed mutations, while several non-seed mutant effects support potential noncanonical contributions to let-7 function. Taken together, this work illustrates both the functional partnership between seed and non-seed sequences in mediating C. elegans temporal development and a diversity among microRNA effectors in the contributions of seed and non-seed regions to activity.

  2. HnRNP-L mediates bladder cancer progression by inhibiting apoptotic signaling and enhancing MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lv, Daojun; Wu, Huayan; Xing, Rongwei; Shu, Fangpeng; Lei, Bin; Lei, Chengyong; Zhou, Xumin; Wan, Bo; Yang, Yu; Zhong, Liren; Mao, Xiangming; Zou, Yaguang

    2017-01-11

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP-L) is a promoter of various kinds of cancers, but its actions in bladder cancer (BC) are unclear. In this study, we investigated the function and the underlying mechanism of hnRNP-L in bladder carcinogenesis. Our results demonstrated that enhanced hnRNP-L expression in BC tissues was associated with poor overall survival of BC patients. Depletion of hnRNP-L significantly suppressed cell proliferation in vitro and inhibited xenograft tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, downregulation of hnRNP-L resulted in G1-phase cell cycle arrest and enhanced apoptosis accompanied by inhibition of EMT and cell migration. All these cellular changes were reversed by ectopic expression of hnRNP-L. Deletion of hnRNP-L resulted in decreased expression of Bcl-2, enhanced expression of caspases-3, -6 and -9 and inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway. These findings demonstrate that hnRNP-L contributes to poor prognosis and tumor progression of BC by inhibiting the intrinsic apoptotic signaling and enhancing MAPK signaling pathways.

  3. Reactive oxygen species-mediated switching expression of MMP-3 in stromal fibroblasts and cancer cells during prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Ling; Liu, Che-Ming; Chen, Hsin-An; Yang, Shun-Tai; Shigemura, Katsumi; Kitagawa, Koichi; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Fujisawa, Masato; Liu, Yun-Ru; Lee, Wei-Hua; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Shen, Chia-Ning; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Chung, Leland W K; Sung, Shian-Ying

    2017-08-22

    Studies on the aberrant control of extracellular matrices (ECMs) have mainly focused on the role of malignant cells but less on that of stromal fibroblasts during cancer development. Herein, by using paired normal and prostate cancer-associated stromal fibroblasts (CAFs) derived from a coculture cell model and clinical patient samples, we demonstrated that although CAFs promoted prostate cancer growth, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) was lower in CAFs but elevated in prostate cancer cells relative to their normal counterparts. Furthermore, hydrogen peroxide was characterized as the central modulator for altered MMP-3 expression in prostate cancer cells and CAFs, but through different regulatory mechanisms. Treatment of CAFs but not prostate cancer cells with hydrogen peroxide directly inhibited mmp-3 promoter activity with concomitant nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), indicating that NF-κB is the downstream pathway for the transcriptional repression of MMP-3 in CAFs. Hydrogen peroxide reduced thrombospondin 2 (an MMP-3 suppressor) expression in prostate cancer cells by upregulating microRNA-128. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the crucial role of reactive oxygen species in the switching expression of MMP-3 in stromal fibroblasts and prostate cancer cells during tumor progression, clarifying how the tumor microenvironment modulates ECM homeostasis control.

  4. The scaffold protein p140Cap limits ERBB2-mediated breast cancer progression interfering with Rac GTPase-controlled circuitries

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Silvia; Chapelle, Jennifer; Salemme, Vincenzo; Aramu, Simona; Russo, Isabella; Vitale, Nicoletta; Verdun di Cantogno, Ludovica; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Castellano, Isabella; Amici, Augusto; Centonze, Giorgia; Sharma, Nanaocha; Lunardi, Serena; Cabodi, Sara; Cavallo, Federica; Lamolinara, Alessia; Stramucci, Lorenzo; Moiso, Enrico; Provero, Paolo; Albini, Adriana; Sapino, Anna; Staaf, Johan; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Bertalot, Giovanni; Pece, Salvatore; Tosoni, Daniela; Confalonieri, Stefano; Iezzi, Manuela; Di Stefano, Paola; Turco, Emilia; Defilippi, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The docking protein p140Cap negatively regulates tumour cell features. Its relevance on breast cancer patient survival, as well as its ability to counteract relevant cancer signalling pathways, are not fully understood. Here we report that in patients with ERBB2-amplified breast cancer, a p140Cap-positive status associates with a significantly lower probability of developing a distant event, and a clear difference in survival. p140Cap dampens ERBB2-positive tumour cell progression, impairing tumour onset and growth in the NeuT mouse model, and counteracting epithelial mesenchymal transition, resulting in decreased metastasis formation. One major mechanism is the ability of p140Cap to interfere with ERBB2-dependent activation of Rac GTPase-controlled circuitries. Our findings point to a specific role of p140Cap in curbing the aggressiveness of ERBB2-amplified breast cancers and suggest that, due to its ability to impinge on specific molecular pathways, p140Cap may represent a predictive biomarker of response to targeted anti-ERBB2 therapies. PMID:28300085

  5. Small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 is involved in hepatocellular carcinoma progression via mediating p65 nuclear translocation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Tao, Xiaofang; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Peng; Sha, Manqi; Ma, Yong; Geng, Xiaoping; Feng, Lijie; Shen, Yujun; Yu, Yifan; Wang, Siying; Fang, Shengyun; Shen, Yuxian

    2016-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins participate in a post-translational modification called SUMOylation and regulate a variety of intracellular processes, such as targeting proteins for nuclear import. The nuclear transport of p65 results in the activation of NF-κB, and p65 contains several SUMO interacting motifs (SIMs). However, the relationship between p65 and SUMO1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated the potential roles of SUMO1 in HCC via the regulation of p65 subcellular localization. We found that either SUMO1- or p65-positive immunoreactivity was remarkably increased in the nuclei of tumor tissues in HCC patients compared with non-tumor tissues, and further analysis suggested a correlation between SUMO1- and nuclear p65-positive immunoreactivities (R = 0.851, P = 0.002). We also verified the interaction between p65 and SUMO1 in HCC by co-immunoprecipitation. TNF-α and hypoxia increased SUMO1 protein levels and enhanced SUMO1-modified p65 SUMOylation. Moreover, the knockdown of SUMO1 decreased p65 nuclear translocation and inhibited NF-κB transcriptional activity. Further the results of this study revealed that the knockdown of SUMO1 suppressed the proliferation and migration of hepatoma cells. These results suggest that SUMO1 contributes to HCC progression by promoting p65 nuclear translocation and regulating NF-κB activity. PMID:26993772

  6. 14-3-3ζ Orchestrates Mammary Tumor Onset and Progression via miR221-Mediated Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wyszomierski, Shannon L.; Wang, Qingfei; Li, Ping; Sahin, Ozgur; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Siyuan; Xiong, Yan; Yang, Jun; Wang, Hai; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Jitao D.; Medina, Daniel; Muller, William J.; Yu, Dihua

    2013-01-01

    14-3-3ζ is overexpressed in over 40% of breast cancers but its pathophysiological relevance to tumorigenesis has not been established. Here we show that 14-3-3ζ overexpression is sufficient to induce tumorigenesis in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer. MMTV-LTR promoter driven HA-14-3-3ζ transgenic mice (MMTV-HA-14-3-3ζ) developed mammary tumors whereas control mice did not. Whey acidic protein promoter driven HA-14-3-3ζ transgenic mice (WAP-HA-14-3-3ζ) developed hyperplastic lesions and showed increased susceptibility to carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. When crossed with MMTV-neu transgenic mice, 14-3-3ζ.neu transgenic mice exhibited accelerated mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis compared to MMTV-neu mice. Mechanistically, 14-3-3ζ overexpression enhanced MAPK/c-Jun signaling leading to increased miR-221 transcription, which inhibited p27 CDKI translation, and consequently, promoted cell proliferation. Importantly, this 14-3-3ζ/miR-221/p27/proliferation axis is also functioning in patients' breast tumors and associates with high grade cancers. Taken together, our findings show that 14-3-3ζ overexpression has a causal role in mammary tumorigenesis and progression, acting through miR-221 in cooperation with known oncogenic events to drive neoplastic cell proliferation. PMID:24197133

  7. SCF-mediated Cdh1 degradation defines a negative feedback system that coordinates cell-cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hidefumi; Ogura, Kohei; Wan, Lixin; Lu, Ying; Li, Victor; Gao, Daming; Liu, Pengda; Lau, Alan W; Wu, Tao; Kirschner, Marc W; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Wei, Wenyi

    2013-08-29

    Proper cell-cycle transitions are driven by waves of ubiquitin-dependent degradation of key regulators by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) and Skp1-Cullin1-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes. But precisely how APC and SCF activities are coordinated to regulate cell-cycle progression remains largely unclear. We previously showed that APC/Cdh1 earmarks the SCF component Skp2 for degradation. Here, we continue to report that SCF(β-TRCP) reciprocally controls APC/Cdh1 activity by governing Cdh1 ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Furthermore, we define both cyclin A and Plk1, two well-known Cdh1 substrates, as upstream modifying enzymes that promote Cdh1 phosphorylation to trigger Cdh1 ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by SCF(β-TRCP). Thus, our work reveals a negative repression mechanism for SCF to control APC, thereby illustrating an elegant dual repression system between these two E3 ligase complexes to create the ordered cascade of APC and SCF activities governing timely cell-cycle transitions.

  8. SENP1-mediated NEMO deSUMOylation in adipocytes limits inflammatory responses and type-1 diabetes progression.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lan; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Zhang, Haifeng; Qin, Lingfeng; Hwa, John; Yun, Zhong; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2015-11-24

    Adipocyte dysfunction correlates with the development of diabetes. Here we show that mice with a adipocyte-specific deletion of the SUMO-specific protease SENP1 gene develop symptoms of type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), including hyperglycaemia and glucose intolerance with mild insulin resistance. Peri-pancreatic adipocytes from SENP1-deficient mice exhibit heightened NF-κB activity and production of proinflammatory cytokines, which induce CCL5 expression in adjacent pancreatic islets and direct cytotoxic effects on pancreatic islets. Mechanistic studies show that SENP1 deletion in adipocytes enhances SUMOylation of the NF-κB essential molecule, NEMO, at lysine 277/309, leading to increased NF-κB activity, cytokine production and pancreatic inflammation. We further show that NF-κB inhibitors could inhibit pre-diabetic cytokine production, β-cell damages and ameliorate the T1DM phenotype in SENP1-deficient mice. Feeding a high-fat diet augments both type-1 and type-2 diabetes phenotypes in SENP1-deficient mice, consistent with the effects on adipocyte-derived NF-κB and cytokine signalling. Our study reveals previously unrecognized mechanism regulating the onset and progression of T1DM associated with adipocyte dysfunction.

  9. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Witman, Melissa A H; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-03-15

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13-52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while L-NMMA and L-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P < 0.01). NOS inhibition blunted BA vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm.

  10. Evidence for a human-specific mechanism for diet and antibody-mediated inflammation in carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Maria; Padler-Karavani, Vered; Varki, Nissi M.; Varki, Ajit

    2008-01-01

    Patients with cancer have circulating heterophile antibodies that agglutinate animal red cells via recognition of the mammalian cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), which was long considered an oncofetal antigen in humans. However, humans are genetically deficient in Neu5Gc production and instead metabolically accumulate Neu5Gc from dietary sources, particularly red meats and milk products. Moreover, mice with a human-like defect showed no alternate pathway for Neu5Gc synthesis and even normal humans express anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. We show here that human tumors accumulate Neu5Gc that is covalently attached to multiple classes of glycans. The paradox of human tumor Neu5Gc accumulation in the face of circulating anti-Neu5Gc antibodies was hypothesized to be due to facilitation of tumor progression by the resulting low-grade chronic inflammation. Indeed, murine tumors expressing human-like levels of Neu5Gc show accelerated growth in syngeneic mice with a human-like Neu5Gc deficiency, coincident with the induction of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies and increased infiltration of inflammatory cells. Transfer of polyclonal monospecific syngeneic mouse anti-Neu5Gc serum also enhanced growth of transplanted syngeneic tumors bearing human-like levels of Neu5Gc, with tumors showing evidence for antibody deposition, enhanced angiogenesis and chronic inflammation. These effects were suppressed by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, a drug type known to reduce human carcinoma risk. Finally, affinity-purified human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies also accelerate growth of Neu5Gc-containing tumors in Neu5Gc-deficient mice. Taken together, the data suggest that the human propensity to develop diet-related carcinomas is contributed to by local chronic inflammation, resulting from interaction of metabolically-accumulated dietary Neu5Gc with circulating anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. PMID:19017806

  11. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13–52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while l-NMMA and l-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P < 0.01). NOS inhibition blunted BA vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm. PMID:26801312

  12. Effects of Prednisolone on Disease Progression in Antiretroviral-Untreated HIV Infection: A 2-Year Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kasang, Christa; Kalluvya, Samuel; Majinge, Charles; Kongola, Gilbert; Mlewa, Mathias; Massawe, Irene; Kabyemera, Rogatus; Magambo, Kinanga; Ulmer, Albrecht; Klinker, Hartwig; Gschmack, Eva; Horn, Anne; Koutsilieri, Eleni; Preiser, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Daniela; Hain, Johannes; Müller, Andreas; Dölken, Lars; Weissbrich, Benedikt; Rethwilm, Axel; Stich, August; Scheller, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-disease progression correlates with immune activation. Here we investigated whether corticosteroid treatment can attenuate HIV disease progression in antiretroviral-untreated patients. Methods Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial including 326 HIV-patients in a resource-limited setting in Tanzania (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01299948). Inclusion criteria were a CD4 count above 300 cells/μl, the absence of AIDS-defining symptoms and an ART-naïve therapy status. Study participants received 5 mg prednisolone per day or placebo for 2 years. Primary endpoint was time to progression to an AIDS-defining condition or to a CD4-count below 200 cells/μl. Results No significant change in progression towards the primary endpoint was observed in the intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis (19 cases with prednisolone versus 28 cases with placebo, p = 0.1407). In a per-protocol (PP)-analysis, 13 versus 24 study participants progressed to the primary study endpoint (p = 0.0741). Secondary endpoints: Prednisolone-treatment decreased immune activation (sCD14, suPAR, CD38/HLA-DR/CD8+) and increased CD4-counts (+77.42 ± 5.70 cells/μl compared to -37.42 ± 10.77 cells/μl under placebo, p < 0.0001). Treatment with prednisolone was associated with a 3.2-fold increase in HIV viral load (p < 0.0001). In a post-hoc analysis stratifying for sex, females treated with prednisolone progressed significantly slower to the primary study endpoint than females treated with placebo (ITT-analysis: 11 versus 21 cases, p = 0.0567; PP-analysis: 5 versus 18 cases, p = 0.0051): No changes in disease progression were observed in men. Conclusions This study could not detect any significant effects of prednisolone on disease progression in antiretroviral-untreated HIV infection within the intent-to-treat population. However, significant effects were observed on CD4 counts, immune activation and HIV viral load. This study contributes to a better understanding of the role of immune

  13. Regulation of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2 Expression by Adrenoceptors and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-Potential Crosstalk Between Sterol and Glycerophospholipid Mediators.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wee-Siong; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) is an 85-kDa enzyme that releases docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from glycerophospholipids. DHA can be metabolized to resolvins and neuroprotectins that have anti-inflammatory properties and effects on neural plasticity. Recent studies show an important role of prefrontal cortical iPLA2 in hippocampo-prefrontal cortical LTP and antidepressant-like effect of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI) antidepressant, maprotiline. In this study, we elucidated the cellular mechanisms through which stimulation of adrenergic receptors could lead to increased iPLA2 expression. Treatment of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with maprotiline, another tricyclic antidepressant with noradrenaline reuptake inhibiting properties, nortriptyline, and the adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, resulted in increased iPLA2β mRNA expression. This increase was blocked by inhibitors to alpha-1 adrenergic receptor, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Maprotiline and phenylephrine induced binding of SREBP-2 to sterol regulatory element (SRE) region on the iPLA2 promoter, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Together, results indicate that stimulation of adrenoreceptors causes increased iPLA2 expression via MAP kinase/ERK 1/2 and SREBP, and suggest a possible mechanism for effect of CNS noradrenaline on neural plasticity and crosstalk between sterol and glycerophospholipid mediators, that may play a role in physiological or pathophysiological processes in the brain and other organs.

  14. Cellular mechanisms mediating the stimulation of ovine endometrial secretion of prostaglandin F2 alpha in response to oxytocin: role of phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Silvia, W J

    1994-06-01

    Four experiments were conducted to determine whether phospholipase (PL) A2 mediates the stimulatory effect of oxytocin on the release of prostaglandin (PG) F2 alpha from ovine endometrial tissue. Caruncular endometrial tissue was collected from ovariectomized ewes on the day after a steroid replacement protocol had been completed. The replacement protocol consisted of progesterone for 10 days (12 mg/day) followed by oestradiol on days 10 and 11 (100 micrograms/day) and had been shown previously to provide endometrial tissue that would release PGF2 alpha in response to oxytocin in vitro. In experiment 1, oxytocin (10(-7) M) and melittin (1.76 x 10(-6) M; a stimulator of PLA2) stimulated release of PGF2 alpha from tissue explants (P < 0.05). Aristolochic acid (10(-4) M; an inhibitor of PLA2) decreased oxytocin- and melittin-induced release of PGF2 alpha by 77% and 71% respectively (P < 0.05). Experiment 2 was conducted to establish the minimum inhibitory dose of aristolochic acid. Basal release of PGF2 alpha was inhibited at 10(-5) M aristolochic acid, but 10(-4) M was required to block the stimulatory effect of oxytocin. Experiment 3 was carried out to identify the precise intracellular locus at which aristolochic acid was exerting its effect. Oxytocin (10(-7) M), AlF4- (5 x 10(-2) M NaF, 10(-5) M AlCl3), melittin (1.76 x 10(-6) M) and arachidonic acid (AA; 20 micrograms/ml) stimulated release of PGF2 alpha (P < 0.05). Aristolochic acid (10(-4) M) blocked the release of PGF2 alpha stimulated by oxytocin, AlF4- or melittin by > 80% (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Phospholipase A(2) activation by poultry particulate matter is mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase in lung epithelial cells: regulation of interleukin-8 release.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sainath R; Piper, Melissa G; Patel, Rishi B; Sliman, Sean; Malireddy, Smitha; Zhao, Lingying; Baran, Christopher P; Nana-Sinkam, Patrick S; Wewers, Mark D; Romberger, Debra; Marsh, Clay B; Parinandi, Narasimham L

    2013-11-01

    The mechanisms of poultry particulate matter (PM)-induced agricultural respiratory disorders are not thoroughly understood. Hence, it is hypothesized in this article that poultry PM induces the release of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by lung epithelial cells that is regulated upstream by the concerted action of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). To test this hypothesis, the widely used cultured human lung epithelial cells (A549) were chosen as the model system. Poultry PM caused a significant activation of PLA2 in A549 cells, which was attenuated by AACOCF3 (cPLA2 inhibitor) and PD98059 (ERK-1/2 upstream inhibitor). Poultry PM induced upstream ERK-1/2 phosphorylation and downstream cPLA2 serine phosphorylation, in a concerted fashion, in cells with enhanced association of ERK-1/2 and cPLA2. The poultry PM-induced cPLA2 serine phosphorylation and IL-8 release were attenuated by AACOCF3, PD98059, and by transfection with dominant-negative ERK-1/2 DNA in cells. The poultry PM-induced IL-8 release by the bone marrow-derived macrophages of cPLA2 knockout mice was significantly lower. For the first time, this study demonstrated that the poultry PM-induced IL-8 secretion by human lung epithelial cells was regulated by cPLA2 activation through ERK-mediated serine phosphorylation, suggesting a mechanism of airway inflammation among poultry farm workers.

  16. Thromboxane A2 mediates iron-overload cardiomyopathy in mice through calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng; Li, Hsiao-Fen; Lian, Wei-Shiung; Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Lan, Yi-Fan; Lai, Pei-Fang; Cheng, Ching-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that iron overload could enhance the production of arachidonic acid and prostanoid, suggesting a causal connection between these signals and iron-overload cardiomyopathy. However, information regarding the downstream signaling is limited. Because thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and prostacyclin are the 2 major prostanoids in the cardiovascular system, and TXA2 plays a major role in vascular atherosclerosis and has pro-inflammatory characteristics, we intended to elucidate the role of TXA2 in iron-overload cardiomyopathy. A 4-week iron loading protocol was instituted for both TXAS gene-deleted (TXAS(-/-)) mice and wild-type (WT) mice, with less severe cardiac fibrosis and preserved normal left ventricular contraction in the TXAS(-/-) mice. Inflammatory profiles, including MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-6, ICAM-1, and myeloperoxidase activity were also lower in the TXAS(-/-) as compared with WT littermates. TXAS supplement to the iron-injured TXAS(-/-) mice re-aggravated cardiac inflammation. Using a TXA2 analog, U46619, for NFAT reporter luciferase activity on cardiomyoctes, and intraperitonal injection of U46619 into nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-luciferase transgenic mice demonstrated that U46619 increase NFAT expression, and this expression, as well as TNF-α expression, can be blocked by TXA2 receptor antagonist (SQ29548), NFAT-SiRNA, calcineurin inhibitor, or calcium chelator. Finally, intraperitoneal injection of the TNF-α antibody, infliximab, into iron-injured mice decreased TXAS expression and attenuated cardiac fibrosis. TXA2 mediates iron-overload cardiomyopathy through the TNF-α-associated calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway. 

  17. Effect of Retinoic Acid on Gene Expression in Human Conjunctival Epithelium: Secretory phospholipase A2 mediates retinoic acid induction of MUC16.

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Yuichi; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra J.; Russo, Cindy Leigh; Argüeso, Pablo; Gipson, Ilene K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. How vitamin A contributes to the maintenance of the wet-surfaced phenotype at the ocular surface is not well understood. We sought to identify vitamin A responsive genes in ocular surface epithelia using gene microarray analysis of cultures of a human conjunctival epithelial cell line (HCjE) grown with all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). The analysis showed that secretory phospholipase A2 Group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was the gene most upregulated by RA, followed by the membrane-associated mucin MUC16 at a later time point. Since eicosanoids, the product of arachidonic acid generated by the phospholipase A2 family, have been shown to increase mucin production, we sought to determine if sPLA2 mediates the RA induction of MUC16. Methods. HCjE cells were cultured with or without RA for 3, 6, 24 and 48 hours. Complementary RNA prepared from RNA of the HCjE cells was hybridized to human gene chips (HG-U133A; Affymetrix) and analyzed using Rosetta Resolver software. Microarray data on mucin expression were validated by real-time PCR. To investigate whether sPLA2 is associated with RA-induced MUC16 upregulation, HCjE cells were incubated with RA and the broad spectrum PLA2 inhibitor, aristolochic acid (ArA) or the specific sPLA2-IIA inhibitor LY315920, followed by analysis of MUC16 mRNA and protein by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Results. After RA addition, 28 transcripts were upregulated and 6 downregulated by over 2.0-fold (p < 0.01) at both 3 and 6 hours (early phase). Eighty gene transcripts were upregulated and 45 downregulated at both 24 and 48 hours (late phase). Group IIA sPLA2, significantly upregulated by 24 hours, and MUC16 were the most upregulated RNAs by RA at 48 hours. sPLA2 upregulation by RA was confirmed by Western blot analysis. When HCjE cells were incubated with RA plus ArA or specific inhibitor of sPLA2-IIA, LY315920, the RA-induced MUC16 mRNA was significantly reduced (p < 0.01). Conclusion. The retinoic acid-associated upregulation of

  18. Caffeine Inhibits the Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Acetaldehyde via Adenosine A2A Receptor Mediated by the cAMP/PKA/SRC/ERK1/2/P38 MAPK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanzhi; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis. Evidence suggests that adenosine aggravates liver fibrosis via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). Caffeine, which is being widely consumed during daily life, inhibits the action of adenosine. In this study, we attempted to validate the hypothesis that caffeine influences acetaldehyde-induced HSC activation by acting on A2AR. Acetaldehyde at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM significantly increased HSC-T6 cells proliferation, and cell proliferation reached a maximum at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. Caffeine and the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased the cell viability and inhibited the expression of procollagen type I and type III in acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells. In addition, the inhibitory effect of caffeine on the expression of procollagen type I was regulated by A2AR-mediated signal pathway involving cAMP, PKA, SRC, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, caffeine’s inhibitory effect on the expression of procollagen type III may depend upon the A2AR-mediated P38 MAPK-dependent pathway. Conclusions: Caffeine significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells activation by distinct A2AR mediated signal pathway via inhibition of cAMP-PKA-SRC-ERK1/2 for procollagen type I and via P38 MAPK for procollagen type III. PMID:24682220

  19. Temporal association of HLA-B*81:01- and HLA-B*39:10-mediated HIV-1 p24 sequence evolution with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Ntale, R S; Chopera, D R; Ngandu, N K; Assis de Rosa, D; Zembe, L; Gamieldien, H; Mlotshwa, M; Werner, L; Woodman, Z; Mlisana, K; Abdool Karim, S; Gray, C M; Williamson, C

    2012-11-01

    HLA-B*81:01 and HLA-B*39:10 alleles have been associated with viremic control in HIV-1 subtype C infection. Both alleles restrict the TL9 epitope in p24 Gag, and cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated escape mutations in this epitope have been associated with an in vitro fitness cost to the virus. We investigated the timing and impact of mutations in the TL9 epitope on disease progression in five B*81:01- and two B*39:10-positive subtype C-infected individuals. Whereas both B*39:10 participants sampled at 2 months postinfection had viruses with mutations in the TL9 epitope, in three of the five (3/5) B*81:01 participants, TL9 escape mutations were only detected 10 months after infection, taking an additional 10 to 15 months to reach fixation. In the two remaining B*81:01 individuals, one carried a TL9 escape variant at 2 weeks postinfection, whereas no escape mutations were detected in the virus from the other participant for up to 33 months postinfection, despite CTL targeting of the epitope. In all participants, escape mutations in TL9 were linked to coevolving residues in the region of Gag known to be associated with host tropism. Late escape in TL9, together with coevolution of putative compensatory mutations, coincided with a spontaneous increase in viral loads in two individuals who were otherwise controlling the infection. These results provide in vivo evidence of the detrimental impact of B*81:01-mediated viral evolution, in a single Gag p24 epitope, on the control of viremia.

  20. Depression of Complement Regulatory Factors in Rat and Human Renal Grafts Is Associated with the Progress of Acute T-Cell Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Kakuta, Yoichi; Miyagawa, Shuji; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Kato, Taigo; Abe, Toyofumi; Imamura, Ryoichi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Maeda, Akira; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Mizuno, Masashi; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of complement with the progression of acute T cell mediated rejection (ATCMR) is not well understood. We investigated the production of complement components and the expression of complement regulatory proteins (Cregs) in acute T-cell mediated rejection using rat and human renal allografts. Methods We prepared rat allograft and syngeneic graft models of renal transplantation. The expression of Complement components and Cregs was assessed in the rat grafts using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunofluorescent staining. We also administered anti-Crry and anti-CD59 antibodies to the rat allograft model. Further, we assessed the relationship between the expression of membrane cofactor protein (MCP) by immunohistochemical staining in human renal grafts and their clinical course. Results qRT-PCR results showed that the expression of Cregs, CD59 and rodent-specific complement regulator complement receptor 1-related gene/protein-y (Crry), was diminished in the rat allograft model especially on day 5 after transplantation in comparison with the syngeneic model. In contrast, the expression of complement components and receptors: C3, C3a receptor, C5a receptor, Factor B, C9, C1q, was increased, but not the expression of C4 and C5, indicating a possible activation of the alternative pathway. When anti-Crry and anti-CD59 mAbs were administered to the allograft, the survival period for each group was shortened. In the human ATCMR cases, the group with higher MCP expression in the grafts showed improved serum creatinine levels after the ATCMR treatment as well as a better 5-year graft survival rate. Conclusions We conclude that the expression of Cregs in allografts is connected with ATCMR. Our results suggest that controlling complement activation in renal grafts can be a new strategy for the treatment of ATCMR. PMID:26928779

  1. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav 1.7 promotes gastric cancer progression through MACC1-mediated upregulation of NHE1.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianling; Huang, Na; Huang, Hongxiang; Sun, Li; Dong, Shaoting; Su, Jinyu; Zhang, Jingwen; Wang, Lin; Lin, Li; Shi, Min; Bin, Jianping; Liao, Yulin; Li, Nailin; Liao, Wangjun

    2016-12-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), which are aberrantly expressed in several human cancers, affect cancer cell behavior; however, their role in gastric cancer (GC) and the link between these channels and tumorigenic signaling remain unclear. The aims of this study were to determine the clinicopathological significance and role of the VGSC Nav 1.7 in GC progression and to investigate the associated mechanisms. Here, we report that the SCN9A gene encoding Nav 1.7 was the most abundantly expressed VGSC subtype in GC tissue samples and two GC cell lines (BGC-823 and MKN-28 cells). SCN9A expression levels were also frequently found to be elevated in GC samples compared to nonmalignant tissues by real-time PCR. In the 319 GC specimens evaluated by immunohistochemistry, Nav 1.7 expression was correlated with prognosis, and transporter Na(+) /H(+) exchanger-1 (NHE1) and oncoprotein metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) expression. Nav 1.7 suppression resulted in reduced voltage-gated sodium currents, decreased NHE1 expression, increased extracellular pH and decreased intracellular pH, and ultimately, reduced invasion and proliferation rates of GC cells and growth of GC xenografts in nude mice. Nav 1.7 inhibition led to reduced MACC1 expression, while MACC1 inhibition resulted in reduced NHE1 expression in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, the suppression of Nav 1.7 decreased NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation via p38 activation, thus reducing MACC1 expression. Downregulation of MACC1 decreased c-Jun phosphorylation and subsequently reduced NHE1 expression, whereas the addition of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a c-Met physiological ligand, reversed the effect. These results indicate that Nav 1.7 promotes GC progression through MACC1-mediated upregulation of NHE1. Therefore, Nav 1.7 is a potential prognostic marker and/or therapeutic target for GC.

  2. CD36 upregulation mediated by intranasal LV-NRF2 treatment mitigates hypoxia-induced progression of Alzheimer's-like pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Wang, Zhan-You; Xie, Jing-Wei; Cai, Jian-Hui; Wang, Tao; Xu, Ye; Wang, Xu; An, Li

    2014-12-01

    There is extensive evidence that oxidative stress induces cellular dysfunction in the brain and plays a critical role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Hypoxia increases factors involved in oxidative stress injury and contributes to the onset and progression of AD. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a major component regulating antioxidant response, is attenuated in the AD brain. Importantly, NRF2 directly regulates the alternative first exons of CD36, an important participant in oxidative and inflammatory processes. To explore the effects of hypoxia-induced deterioration of AD-like pathogenesis and investigate the correlation between hypoxia-induced NRF2 signal alterations and CD36 expression, we examined the NRF2 signaling, CD36, and oxidative stress events in hypoxia-treated APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice brain. We observed that hypoxia treatment increased oxidative stress, exacerbated inflammation, and aggravated learning defects in aged APP/PS1 mice. Microglia from hypoxia-treated mice brain exhibited marked reduction in CD36 expression and inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ) degradation. Accordingly, hypoxia treatment caused a decrease in transactivation of NRF2 target genes in the aging mouse brain. Intranasal administration with a lentiviral vector encoding human NRF2 increased CD36 expression, ameliorated the weak antioxidant response triggered by hypoxia, diminished Aβ deposition, and improved spatial memory defects. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that NRF2 intranasal treatment-induced increases of CD36 could enhance Aβ clearance in AD transgenic mouse. These results suggest that targeting NRF2-mediated CD36 expression might provide a beneficial intervention for cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in AD progression.

  3. Mecp2-mediated Epigenetic Silencing of miR-137 Contributes to Colorectal Adenoma-Carcinoma Sequence and Tumor Progression via Relieving the Suppression of c-Met

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Cai, Shi-Lun; Li, Jian; Qi, Zhi-Peng; Li, Xu-Quan; Ye, Le-Chi; Xie, Xiao-Feng; Hou, Ying-Yong; Yao, Li-Qing; Xu, Mei-Dong; Zhou, Ping-Hong; Xu, Jian-Min; Zhong, Yun-Shi

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying colorectal cancer (CRC) development remain elusive. In this study, we examined the miRNA and mRNA expressions in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence (ACS), a critical neoplastic progression in CRC development. We found that miR-137 was down-regulated in all adenoma and carcinoma tissues. Low miR-137 levels were correlated negatively with tumor progression and metastasis. Then we identified the inhibition effect of the miR-137 in CRC development, both in CRC cell lines and mouse models. MiR-137 was shown to control CRC cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion and to control tumor growth and metastasis. We further confirmed the negative association between miR-137 and c-Met expression and thus validated this important oncogene as the target of miR-137 in CRC. In addition, we found a DNA methyl-CpG-binding protein, Mecp2, was up-regulated in ACS tissues via mRNA sequencing. Further experiment showed that miR-137 expression in CRC was subjected to epigenetic regulation mediated by Mecp2. We also confirmed c-Met expression can be up-regulated by silencing of miR-137 and suppressed by coexpression of Mecp2 and miR-137. These findings highlight the critical role of miR-137-c-Met nexus in CRC development and reveal Mecp2-regulated epigenetic silence causes the downregulation of miR-137 in colorectal adenoma and carcinoma. PMID:28291253

  4. Integrated Analysis of Thyroid Cancer Public Datasets Reveals Role of Post-Transcriptional Regulation on Tumor Progression by Targeting of Immune System Mediators.

    PubMed

    Geraldo, Murilo V; Kimura, Edna T

    2015-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is a well-differentiated thyroid tumor that accounts for approximately 80% of thyroid cancer cases. On other hand, anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a less frequent, but aggressive subtype, with poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, have emerged as potent post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, which modulate the expression of cancer-related genes. Computational analyses estimate that a single miRNA may modulate hundreds of mRNA targets and, at the same time, cooperate with others to regulate one single mRNA transcript. Due to the large number of predicted targets and possible interactions, only a small number of miRNAs have characterized biological roles, and the panorama of miRNA-mediated regulation in thyroid cancer remains to be understood. Taking into consideration the large amount of gene expression data deposited in public databases we aligned miRNA target prediction and gene expression data from public PTC and ATC datasets to construct a network of post-transcriptional regulation in thyroid cancer. After a gene set enrichment analysis we identified signaling pathways and biological processes potentially modulated by the miRNAs deregulated in PTC and ATC. Our results show miRNA-mRNA interaction that could contribute with the de-regulation of key tumor-host mediators, such as extra-cellular matrix molecules, interleukins and interleukin receptors, which could drive a more aggressive behavior and tumor progression. Moreover, our analysis through The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database revealed that aberrant expression of ECM and cytokines genes is frequent in PTC and is associated with aggressive behavior and decreased overall survival rate. In conclusion, we shed light on the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid cancers, revealing a potential role of miRNAs in modulation of tumor-host interaction molecules, particularly ECM

  5. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daehwan; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Lee, Kangseok; Bae, Jeehyeon; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2015-08-21

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer. - Highlights: • TM-JM1/2 peptides are efficiently delivered into cells by AuNP-Apt-conjugates. • TM-JM1/2 peptides loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates inhibit DDR2 activation. • Inhibition of DDR2 activation by TM-JM1/2 peptides decreases tumor progression.

  6. Phosphorylation and activation of Ca(2+)-sensitive cytosolic phospholipase A2 in MCII mast cells mediated by high-affinity Fc receptor for IgE.

    PubMed Central

    Currie, S; Roberts, E F; Spaethe, S M; Roehm, N W; Kramer, R M

    1994-01-01

    In the present study we examined the activation of Ca(2+)-sensitive cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) after aggregation of cell-surface high-affinity Fc receptors for IgE (Fc epsilon RI) on mast cells. MCII mast cells (a factor-dependent bone-marrow-derived murine mast cell line) produce significant amounts of leukotriene C4 (LTC4) (70 ng/10(6) cells) on cross-linking of Fc epsilon RI. Using enzymic and immunochemical analysis we found that cPLA2 is the predominant form of this enzyme in MCII mast cells (0.2 micrograms/mg of total protein) and other forms (i.e. secretory PLA2 or Ca2+ independent cytosolic PLA2) could not be detected. Therefore MCII mast cells represent an excellent cellular model for the study of the biochemical mechanism(s) responsible for Fc epsilon RI-induced activation of cPLA2 and the involvement of cPLA2 in Fc epsilon RI-mediated production of LTC4. After activation of Fc epsilon RI by cross-linking, cPLA2 in MCII mast cells exhibited a decreased electrophoretic mobility and its enzyme activity was increased 3-fold. Treatment with phosphatase reversed both the altered electrophoretic mobility and the enhanced enzyme activity demonstrating that they were the result of Fc epsilon RI-induced phosphorylation. On cross-linking of Fc epsilon RI, cPLA2 was phosphorylated within 30 s and appeared to be an early substrate for Fc epsilon RI-activated protein kinases in MCII mast cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation may be a critical component in this process, as genistein, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, blocked the activation of cPLA2. Using anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies we observed that the activating phosphorylation was not on tyrosine residues of cPLA2, indicating that tyrosine kinases participate upstream in the signalling cascade that couples Fc epsilon RI to cPLA2. We conclude that in MCII mast cells cPLA2 is activated by kinase-dependent mechanisms and may be responsible for Fc epsilon RI-induced mobilization of arachidonic acid for the

  7. Group IB secretory phospholipase A2 promotes matrix metalloproteinase-2-mediated cell migration via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ae; Lim, Hyung-Kyu; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Lee, Chu-Hee; Kim, Young-Jo; Kang, Shin-Sung; Baek, Suk-Hwan

    2004-08-27

    Secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), abundantly expressed in various cells including fibroblasts, is able to promote proliferation and migration. Degradation of collagenous extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) plays a role in the pathogenesis of various destructive disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Here we show that group IB PLA(2) increased pro-MMP-2 activation in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. MMP-2 activity was stimulated by group IB PLA(2) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Consistent with MMP-2 activation, sPLA(2) decreased expression of type IV collagen. These effects are due to the reduction of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and the activation of the membrane type1-MMP (MT1-MMP). The decrease of TIMP-2 levels in conditioned media and the increase of MT1-MMP levels in plasma membrane were observed. In addition, treatment of cells with decanoyl Arg-Val-Lys-Arg-chloromethyl ketone, an inhibitor of pro-MT1-MMP, suppressed sPLA(2)-mediated MMP-2 activation, whereas treatment with bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of H(+)-ATPase, sustained MMP-2 activation by sPLA(2). The involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt in the regulation of MMP-2 activity was further suggested by the findings that PI3K and Akt were phosphorylated by sPLA(2). Expression of p85alpha and Akt mutants, or pretreatment of cells with LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, attenuated sPLA(2)-induced MMP-2 activation and migration. Taken together, these results suggest that sPLA(2) increases the pro-MMP-2 activation and migration of fibroblasts via the PI3K and Akt-dependent pathway. Because MMP-2 is an important factor directly involved in the control of cell migration and the turnover of extracellular matrix, our study may provide a mechanism for sPLA(2)-promoted fibroblasts migration.

  8. PCaAnalyser: A 2D-Image Analysis Based Module for Effective Determination of Prostate Cancer Progression in 3D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lovitt, Carrie J.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro cell based assays for Prostate Cancer (PCa) research are rapidly becoming the preferred alternative to that of conventional 2D monolayer cultures. 3D assays more precisely mimic the microenvironment found in vivo, and thus are ideally suited to evaluate compounds and their suitability for progression in the drug discovery pipeline. To achieve the desired high throughput needed for most screening programs, automated quantification of 3D cultures is required. Towards this end, this paper reports on the development of a prototype analysis module for an automated high-content-analysis (HCA) system, which allows for accurate and fast investigation of in vitro 3D cell culture models for PCa. The Java based program, which we have named PCaAnalyser, uses novel algorithms that allow accurate and rapid quantitation of protein expression in 3D cell culture. As currently configured, the PCaAnalyser can quantify a range of biological parameters including: nuclei-count, nuclei-spheroid membership prediction, various function based classification of peripheral and non-peripheral areas to measure expression of biomarkers and protein constituents known to be associated with PCa progression, as well as defining segregate cellular-objects effectively for a range of signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, PCaAnalyser architecture is highly flexible, operating as a single independent analysis, as well as in batch mode; essential for High-Throughput-Screening (HTS). Utilising the PCaAnalyser, accurate and rapid analysis in an automated high throughput manner is provided, and reproducible analysis of the distribution and intensity of well-established markers associated with PCa progression in a range of metastatic PCa cell-lines (DU145 and PC3) in a 3D model demonstrated. PMID:24278197

  9. PCaAnalyser: a 2D-image analysis based module for effective determination of prostate cancer progression in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Windus, Louisa C E; Lovitt, Carrie J; Avery, Vicky M

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro cell based assays for Prostate Cancer (PCa) research are rapidly becoming the preferred alternative to that of conventional 2D monolayer cultures. 3D assays more precisely mimic the microenvironment found in vivo, and thus are ideally suited to evaluate compounds and their suitability for progression in the drug discovery pipeline. To achieve the desired high throughput needed for most screening programs, automated quantification of 3D cultures is required. Towards this end, this paper reports on the development of a prototype analysis module for an automated high-content-analysis (HCA) system, which allows for accurate and fast investigation of in vitro 3D cell culture models for PCa. The Java based program, which we have named PCaAnalyser, uses novel algorithms that allow accurate and rapid quantitation of protein expression in 3D cell culture. As currently configured, the PCaAnalyser can quantify a range of biological parameters including: nuclei-count, nuclei-spheroid membership prediction, various function based classification of peripheral and non-peripheral areas to measure expression of biomarkers and protein constituents known to be associated with PCa progression, as well as defining segregate cellular-objects effectively for a range of signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, PCaAnalyser architecture is highly flexible, operating as a single independent analysis, as well as in batch mode; essential for High-Throughput-Screening (HTS). Utilising the PCaAnalyser, accurate and rapid analysis in an automated high throughput manner is provided, and reproducible analysis of the distribution and intensity of well-established markers associated with PCa progression in a range of metastatic PCa cell-lines (DU145 and PC3) in a 3D model demonstrated.

  10. Expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers GRP78 and CHOP induced by oxidative stress in blue light-mediated damage of A2E-containing retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jingyang; Chen, Xunjie; Sun, Xiangjun; Wang, Fenghua; Sun, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Age-related lipofuscin N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E) accumulated in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells confers susceptibility to blue light-mediated damage, which represents one pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration. This study investigated the expression of 2 best-characterized endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, glucose-related protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), as well as their regulation by oxidative stress after blue light-mediated damage of A2E-containing RPE cells. ARPE-19 cells were incubated with A2E (10, 25, 50 μM) for 2 h and exposed to blue light for 20 min. A2E distributions in RPE cells were assessed via laser scanning confocal microscope and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Cell viability was measured by a Cell Titer 96 Aqueous One Solution cell proliferation assay. The quantity of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected by dihydroethidium fluorescence using flow cytometry. Expressions of GRP78 and CHOP were measured at both mRNA and protein levels. To examine the role of oxidative stress in regulating GRP78 and CHOP expression, RPE cells were pretreated with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for 2 h. RNA interference of GRP78 performed by short hairpin RNA was used to evaluate the effect of GRP78 in blue light-mediated damage of RPE cells. After blue light exposure, A2E-treated RPE cells showed a gradual decrease in cell viability and a particular increase in ROS levels. Meanwhile, the expressions of GRP78 and CHOP in A2E-treated RPE cells were significantly increased at different time points after illumination. Pretreatment with NAC attenuated the expression of 2 ER stress markers, especially CHOP in A2E and blue light-treated RPE cells. Silencing of GRP78 by RNA interference upregulated CHOP and caspase-12 expression as well as aggravated the blue light-mediated damage of A2E-laden RPE cells. RPE cells exhibited ROS accumulation and subsequent elevation of

  11. Cannabinoids ameliorate disease progression in a model of multiple sclerosis in mice, acting preferentially through CB1 receptor-mediated anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    de Lago, Eva; Moreno-Martet, Miguel; Cabranes, Ana; Ramos, José A; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier

    2012-06-01

    spinal cord, but not in the brainstem. Regarding to inflammatory responses, EAE mice showed a marked up-regulation in mRNA levels for COX-2, inducible NOS and TNF-α in the spinal cord and the brainstem, these responses being attenuated after the treatment with WIN55,212-2. We also observed the presence of cell aggregates in the spinal cord of EAE mice that were significantly attenuated by the treatment with WIN55,212-2. Immunohistochemical analysis (with Iba-1 and Cd11b) of these aggregates indicated that they corresponded to microglia (resident macrophages) and peripheral macrophages. Lastly, experiments conducted with selective antagonists for the CB(1) (e.g. rimonabant) or CB(2) (e.g. AM-630) receptors revealed that WIN55,212-2 effects in EAE mice were mediated by the activation of CB(1) but not CB(2) receptors, as reflected the reversion of positive effects of this cannabinoid on neurological decline, TNF-α generation and accumulation of cell aggregates in the spinal cord with rimonabant, but not with AM-630. This was concordant with the lack of positive effects on neurological decline observed in EAE mice when they received HU-308, a selective CB(2) receptor agonist, instead WIN55,212-2. In summary, the treatment of EAE mice with the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,512-2 reduced their neurological disability and the progression of the disease. This effect was exerted through the activation of CB(1) receptors, which would exert a positive influence in the reduction of inflammatory events linked to the pathogenesis of this disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. CYP2E1-dependent and leptin-mediated hepatic CD57 expression on CD8 + T cells aid progression of environment-linked nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, Ratanesh Kumar; Das, Suvarthi; Kumar, Ashutosh; Chanda, Anindya; Kadiiska, Maria B.; Michelotti, Gregory; Manautou, Jose; Diehl, Anna Mae; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Environmental toxins induce a novel CYP2E1/leptin signaling axis in liver. This in turn activates a poorly characterized innate immune response that contributes to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) progression. To identify the relevant subsets of T-lymphocytes in CYP2E1-dependent, environment-linked NASH, we utilized a model of diet induced obese (DIO) mice that are chronically exposed to bromodichloromethane. Mice deficient in CYP2E1, leptin (ob/ob mice), or both T and B cells (Pfp/Rag2 double knockout (KO) mice) were used to delineate the role of each of these factors in metabolic oxidative stress-induced T cell activation. Results revealed that elevated levels of lipid peroxidation, tyrosyl radical formation, mitochondrial tyrosine nitration and hepatic leptin as a consequence of metabolic oxidative stress caused increased levels of hepatic CD57, a marker of peripheral blood lymphocytes including NKT cells. CD8 + CD57 + cytotoxic T cells but not CD4 + CD57 + cells were significantly decreased in mice lacking CYP2E1 and leptin. There was a significant increase in the levels of T cell cytokines IL-2, IL-1β, and IFN-γ in bromodichloromethane exposed DIO mice but not in mice that lacked CYP2E1, leptin or T and B cells. Apoptosis as evidenced by TUNEL assay and levels of cleaved caspase-3 was significantly lower in leptin and Pfp/Rag2 KO mice and highly correlated with protection from NASH. The results described above suggest that higher levels of oxidative stress-induced leptin mediated CD8 + CD57 + T cells play an important role in the development of NASH. It also provides a novel insight of immune dysregulation and may be a key biomarker in NASH. - Highlights: • Metabolic oxidative stress caused increased levels of hepatic CD57 expression. • CD8+ CD57+ cytotoxic T cells were decreased in mice lacking CYP2E1 and leptin. • There was a significant increase in T cell cytokines in toxin-treated mice. • Apoptosis was significantly lower in leptin and Pfp

  13. Ageing is a process where the growth effect of neuronal noradrenaline changes progressively in favour of the flow mediated, neurodegenerative and inflammatory effect of plasma noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Crotty, T P

    2016-08-01

    The noradrenaline stimulus has two components, one excitor, the other inhibitory. Neuronal noradrenaline is the excitor component and plasma noradrenaline is the inhibitory. The balance of effect between the two, the noradrenergic balance, is the controlled variable of the sympathetic system and determines the effect of noradrenaline. Neuronal noradrenaline stimulates tissues by diffusion from their sympathetic nerve endings, plasma noradrenaline does so by diffusion from their microcirculations. Changes in microcirculatory flow, by altering the flow mediated effect of plasma noradrenaline, are mainly responsible for altering the noradrenergic balance in the peripheral tissues; changes in CSF flow are speculated to be mainly responsible for doing the same in the brain, by altering the balance between synaptic noradrenaline in the brain and nonsynaptic noradrenaline in the subarachnoid CSF. When plasma noradrenaline alters the noradrenergic balance it triggers afferent sympathetic activity that alerts hypothalamic neurons to the event and they restore the balance and tissue homeostasis, within milliseconds, by adjusting the level of efferent sympathetic activity they project back to the affected tissue. Because the restoration is so rapid the effect of plasma noradrenaline is normally unobservable and dismissed as not having occurred. Because the hypothalamus is not involved with the responses of isolated canine lateral saphenous vein segments to noradrenaline, the effects of plasma noradrenaline in that preparation are not countered by reactive efferent activity and, consequently, are readily apparent in it. Quantitatively, they have been found to be a function of microcirculatory flow and noradrenaline concentration and, qualitatively, to be inhibitory, dilator, pro inflammatory and neurodegenerative. In life, due to a progressive increase in plasma noradrenaline concentration and, more so, in microcirculatory flow, the noradrenergic balance moves progressively in

  14. Extracellular signal regulated kinase and SMAD signaling both mediate the angiotensin II driven progression towards overt heart failure in homozygous TGR(mRen2)27.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Rudolf A; Pokharel, Saraswati; Flesch, Markus; van Kampen, Derk A; Suurmeijer, Albert J H; Boomsma, Frans; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Pinto, Yigal M

    2004-10-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II is a key player in left ventricular (LV) remodeling and cardiac fibrosis. Its effects are thought to be transferred at least in part by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1, and the Smad pathway. In this study we sought to elucidate whether Ang II related effects on LV dysfunction and fibrosis in vivo are mediated via MAPK or rather via Smad stimulation. We treated homozygous REN2 rats (7-11 weeks) with placebo, Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker or tyrphostin A46 (TYR), an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase that blocks extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity. REN2 rats had LV hypertrophy (LVH) and LV dysfunction that progressed to heart failure between 10 and 13 weeks. Blood pressure normalized over time. Renin, N-terminal atrial natriuretic peptide (N-ANP), and ERK were activated while p38 MAPK was not. Treatment with AT1 receptor blockade prevented LVH and right ventricular hypertrophy, normalized systolic and diastolic d P/d t, N-ANP levels, and reduced collagen apposition. Similarly, TYR reduced LVH, N-ANP levels, and collagen apposition. Myocardial ERK activation did not depend on AT1 receptor signaling as it was not affected by AT1 receptor blockade. TYR abolished myocardial ERK activity. Smad2 activation was inhibited by AT1 receptor blockade but was unaltered by TYR. Ang II induced LV remodeling and fibrosis are dependent on both ERK and Smad2 activation. This process is prevented by both AT1 receptor blockade and TYR, and therefore inhibition of either pathway is equally efficacious in restoring LV function and architecture.

  15. The Effect of Combination Therapy with Rituximab and Intravenous Immunoglobulin on the Progression of Chronic Antibody Mediated Rejection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jintak; Khvan, Marina; Park, Cheol Whee; Choi, Yeong Jin; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2014-01-01

    The treatment for chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) remains controversial. We investigated the efficacy of rituximab (RTX) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) for CAMR. Eighteen patients with CAMR were treated with RTX (375 mg/m2) and IVIg (0.4 g/kg) for 4 days. The efficacy of RTX/IVIg combination therapy (RIT) was assessed by decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate per month (ΔeGFR) before and after RIT. Patients were divided into responder and nonresponder groups based on decrease and no decrease in ΔeGFR, respectively, and their clinical and histological characteristics were compared. Response rate to RIT was 66.7% (12/18), and overall ΔeGFR decreased significantly to 0.4 ± 1.7 mL·min−1 ·1.73 m−2 per month 6 months after RIT compared to that observed 6 months before RIT (1.8 ± 1.0, P < 0.05). Clinical and histological features between the 12 responders and the 6 nonresponders were not significantly different, but nonresponders had a significantly higher proteinuria levels at the time of RIT (2.5 ± 2.5 versus 7.0 ± 3.5 protein/creatinine (g/g), P < 0.001). The effect of the RIT on ΔeGFR had dissipated in all patients by 1 year post-RIT. Thus, RIT delayed CAMR progression, and baseline proteinuria level was a prognostic factor for response to RIT. PMID:24741626

  16. The human sodium-dependent ascorbic acid transporters SLC23A1 and SLC23A2 do not mediate ascorbic acid release in the proximal renal epithelial cell

    PubMed Central

    Eck, Peter; Kwon, Oran; Chen, Shenglin; Mian, Omar; Levine, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Sodium-dependent ascorbic acid membrane transporters SLC23A1 and SLC23A2 mediate ascorbic acid (vitamin C) transport into cells. However, it is unknown how ascorbic acid undergoes cellular release, or efflux. We hypothesized that SLC23A1 and SLC23A2 could serve a dual role, mediating ascorbic acid cellular efflux as well as uptake. Renal reabsorption is required for maintaining systemic vitamin C concentrations. Because efflux from nephron cells is necessary for reabsorption, we studied whether SLC23A1 and SLC23A2 mediate efflux of ascorbic acid in the human renal nephron. We found high gene expression of SLC23A1 but no expression of SLC23A2 in the proximal convoluted and straight tubules of humans. These data rule out SLC23A2 as the ascorbic acid release protein in the renal proximal tubular epithelia cell. We utilized a novel dual transporter-based Xenopus laevis oocyte system to investigate the function of the SLC23A1 protein, and found that no ascorbate release was mediated by SLC23A1. These findings were confirmed in mammalian cells overexpressing SLC23A1. Taken together, the data for SLC23A1 show that it too does not have a role in cellular release of ascorbic acid across the basolateral membrane of the proximal tubular epithelial cell, and that SLC23A1 alone is responsible for ascorbic acid uptake across the apical membrane. These findings reiterate the physiological importance of proper functioning of SLC23A1 in maintaining vitamin C levels for health and disease prevention. The ascorbate efflux mechanism in the proximal tubule of the kidney remains to be characterized. PMID:24400138

  17. Antagonism of triazolam self-administration in rhesus monkeys responding under a progressive-ratio schedule: In vivo apparent pA2 analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Bradford D.; Platt, Donna M.; Rallapalli, Sundari K.; Namjoshi, Ojas A.; Cook, James M.; Rowlett, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional benzodiazepines bind non-selectively to GABAA receptors containing α1, α2, α3, and α5 subunits (α1GABAA, α2GABAA, α3GABAA, and α5GABAA receptors, respectively), and the role of these different GABAA receptor subtypes in the reinforcing effects of benzodiazepines has not been characterized fully. We used a pharmacological antagonist approach with available subtype-selective ligands to evaluate the role of GABAA receptor subtypes in the reinforcing effects of the non-selective conventional benzodiazepine, triazolam. Methods Rhesus monkeys (n = 4) were trained under a progressive-ratio schedule of intravenous midazolam delivery and dose–response functions were determined for triazolam, in the absence and presence of flumazenil (non-selective antagonist), βCCT and 3-PBC (α1GABAA-preferring antagonists), and XLi-093 (α5GABAA-selective antagonist). Results Flumazenil, βCCT and 3-PBC shifted the dose–response functions for triazolam to the right in a surmountable fashion, whereas XLi-093 was ineffective. Schild analyses revealed rank orders of potencies of flumazenil = βCCT > 3-PBC. Comparison of potencies between self-administration and previous binding studies with human cloned GABAA receptor subtypes suggested that the potencies for βCCT and 3-PBC were most consistent with binding at α2GABAA and α3GABAA receptors, but not α1GABAA or α5GABAA receptor subtypes. Conclusions Our findings were not entirely consistent with blockade of α1GABAA receptors and are consistent with the possibility of α2GABAA and/or α3GABAA subtype involvement in antagonism of the reinforcing effects of triazolam. The α5GABAA receptor subtype likely does not play a substantial role in self-administration under these conditions. PMID:26596587

  18. A2A adenosine-receptor-mediated facilitation of noradrenaline release in rat tail artery involves protein kinase C activation and betagamma subunits formed after alpha2-adrenoceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Fresco, Paula; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Kunc, Filip; Soares, Ana Sofia; Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Gonçalves, Jorge; Diniz, Carmen

    2007-07-01

    This work aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of alpha2-adrenoceptors and adenosine A2A-receptor-mediated facilitation of noradrenaline release in rat tail artery, namely the type of G-protein involved in this effect and the step or steps where the signalling cascades triggered by alpha2-adrenoceptors and A2A-receptors interact. The selective adenosine A2A-receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxy ethyl) phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680; 100 nM) enhanced tritium overflow evoked by trains of 100 pulses at 5 Hz. This effect was abolished by the selective adenosine A2A-receptor antagonist 5-amino-7-(2-phenyl ethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo [1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH 58261; 20 nM) and by yohimbine (1 microM). CGS 21680-mediated effects were also abolished by drugs that disrupted G(i/o)-protein coupling with receptors, PTX (2 microg/ml) or NEM (40 microM), by the anti-G(salpha) peptide (2 microg/ml) anti-G(betagamma) peptide (10 microg/ml) indicating coupling of A2A-receptors to G(salpha) and suggesting a crucial role for G(betagamma) subunits in the A(2A)-receptor-mediated enhancement of tritium overflow. Furthermore, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 1 microM) or forskolin (1 microM), direct activators of protein kinase C and of adenylyl cyclase, respectively, also enhanced tritium overflow. In addition, PMA-mediated effects were not observed in the presence of either yohimbine or PTX. Results indicate that facilitatory adenosine A2A-receptors couple to G(salpha) subunits which is essential, but not sufficient, for the release facilitation to occur, requiring the involvement of G(i/o)-protein coupling (it disappears after disruption of G(i/o)-protein coupling, PTX or NEM) and/or G(betagamma) subunits (anti-G(betagamma)). We propose a mechanism for the interaction in study suggesting group 2 AC isoforms as a plausible candidate for the interaction site, as these isoforms can integrate inputs from G

  19. Dose-dependent effects of calorie restriction on gene expression, metabolism, and tumor progression are partially mediated by insulin-like growth factor-1.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Leticia M; Lavigne, Jackie A; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Lui, Huaitian; Barrett, J Carl; Hursting, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity, an established risk and progression factor for breast and many other cancer types, remains very high in the United States and throughout the world. Calorie restriction (CR), a reduced-calorie dietary regimen typically involving a 20-40% reduction in calorie consumption, prevents or reverses obesity, and inhibits mammary and other types of cancer in multiple tumor model systems. Unfortunately, the mechanisms underlying the tumor inhibitory effects of CR are poorly understood, and a better understanding of these mechanisms may lead to new intervention targets and strategies for preventing or controlling cancer. We have previously shown that the anticancer effects of CR are associated with decreased systemic levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), the primary source of which is liver. We have also reported that CR strongly suppresses tumor development and growth in multiple mammary cancer models. To identify CR-responsive genes and pathways, and to further characterize the role of IGF-1 as a mediator of the anticancer effects of CR, we assessed hepatic and mammary gland gene expression, hormone levels and growth of orthotopically transplanted mammary tumors in control and CR mice with and without exogenous IGF-1. C57BL/6 mice were fed either control AIN-76A diet ad libitum (AL), subjected to 20%, 30%, or 40% CR plus placebo timed-release pellets, or subjected to 30% or 40% CR plus timed-release pellets delivering murine IGF-1 (mIGF-1, 20 μg/day). Compared with AL-fed controls, body weights were decreased 14.3% in the 20% CR group, 18.5% in the 30% CR group, and 38% in the 40% CR group; IGF-1 infusion had no effect on body weight. Hepatic transcriptome analyses indicated that compared with 20% CR, 30% CR significantly modulated more than twice the number of genes and 40% CR more than seven times the number of genes. Many of the genes specific to the 40% CR regimen were hepatic stress-related and/or DNA damage-related genes. Exogenous

  20. Striatal adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors form functional heteromeric complexes that mediate the motor effects of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Carriba, Paulina; Ortiz, Oskar; Patkar, Kshitij; Justinova, Zuzana; Stroik, Jessica; Themann, Andrea; Müller, Christa; Woods, Anima S; Hope, Bruce T; Ciruela, Francisco; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I; Lluis, Carme; Goldberg, Steven R; Moratalla, Rosario; Franco, Rafael; Ferré, Sergi

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of action responsible for the motor depressant effects of cannabinoids, which operate through centrally expressed cannabinoid CB1 receptors, is still a matter of debate. In the present study, we report that CB1 and adenosine A2A receptors form heteromeric complexes in co-transfected HEK-293T cells and rat striatum, where they colocalize in fibrilar structures. In a human neuroblastoma cell line, CB1 receptor signaling was found to be completely dependent on A2A receptor activation. Accordingly, blockade of A2A receptors counteracted the motor depressant effects produced by the intrastriatal administration of a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist. These biochemical and behavioral findings demonstrate that the profound motor effects of cannabinoids depend on physical and functional interactions between striatal A2A and CB1 receptors.

  1. Comparative evaluation of cow β-casein variants (A1/A2) consumption on Th2-mediated inflammatory response in mouse gut.

    PubMed

    Ul Haq, Mohammad Raies; Kapila, Rajeev; Sharma, Rohit; Saliganti, Vamshi; Kapila, Suman

    2014-06-01

    Recently, apprehension has been raised regarding "A1/A2 hypothesis" suggesting relationship between consumption of A1 "like" variants of cow β-casein and various physiological disorders. The information available is based on either the human epidemiological data of milk consumption or in vitro trials on cell lines with β-casomorphin peptides. The direct scientific evidence establishing the link between consumption of A1/A2 "like" milk and health is scanty. Thus, under present investigation, in vivo trials in mice were undertaken to study the effect of feeding three genetic variants (A1A1, A1A2 and A2A2) of cow β-casein milk on gastrointestinal immune system as it is the first and foremost site of immunological interactions. Animals were divided into four groups for feeding with basal diet (control) and β-casein isolated from milk of genotyped (A1A1, A1A2 and A2A2) dairy animals, respectively. Gut immune response was analyzed by spectrophotometric assessment of MPO activity, quantitative sandwich ELISA of inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1 and IL-4), antibodies (total IgE, IgG, sIgA, IgG1 and IgG2a) and qRT-PCR of mRNA expression for toll-like receptors (TLR-2 and TLR-4). Histological enumeration of goblet cells, total leukocytes and IgA(+) cells was also carried out. It was observed that consumption of A1 "like" variants (A1A1 and A1A2) significantly increased (p < 0.01) the levels of MPO, MCP-1, IL-4, total IgE, IgG, IgG1, IgG2a and leukocyte infiltration in intestine. TLR-2 and TLR-4 mRNA expression was also up-regulated (p < 0.01) on administration of A1 "like" variants. However, no changes in sIgA, IgA(+) and goblet cell numbers were recorded on consumption of any of the β-casein variants. It is reasonable to conclude that consumption of A1 "like" variants of β-casein induced inflammatory response in gut by activating Th2 pathway as compared to A2A2 variants. The present study thus supports the purported deleterious impacts of consumption of A1 "like

  2. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Retinoic acid homeostasis through aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 mediates meiotic entry in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruijuan; Fang, Lingling; Cheng, Yunying; He, Xue; Jiang, Wentao; Dong, Ranran; Shi, Hongjuan; Jiang, Dongneng; Sun, Lina; Wang, Deshou

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis is a process unique to the differentiation of germ cells. Retinoic acid (RA) is the key factor controlling the sex-specific timing of meiotic initiation in tetrapods; however, the role of RA in meiotic initiation in teleosts has remained unclear. In this study, the genes encoding RA synthase aldh1a2, and catabolic enzyme cyp26a1 were isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a species without stra8. The expression of aldh1a2 was up-regulated and expression of cyp26a1 was down-regulated before the meiotic initiation in ovaries and in testes. Treatment with RA synthase inhibitor or disruption of Aldh1a2 by CRISPR/Cas9 resulted in delayed meiotic initiation, with simultaneous down-regulation of cyp26a1 and up-regulation of sycp3. By contrast, treatment with an inhibitor of RA catabolic enzyme and disruption of cyp26a1 resulted in earlier meiotic initiation, with increased expression of aldh1a2 and sycp3. Additionally, treatment of XY fish with estrogen (E2) and XX fish with fadrozole led to sex reversal and reversion of meiotic initiation. These results indicate that RA is indispensable for meiotic initiation in teleosts via a stra8 independent signaling pathway where both aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 are critical. In contrast to mammals, E2 is a major regulator of sex determination and meiotic initiation in teleosts. PMID:25976364

  4. Retinoic acid homeostasis through aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 mediates meiotic entry in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruijuan; Fang, Lingling; Cheng, Yunying; He, Xue; Jiang, Wentao; Dong, Ranran; Shi, Hongjuan; Jiang, Dongneng; Sun, Lina; Wang, Deshou

    2015-05-15

    Meiosis is a process unique to the differentiation of germ cells. Retinoic acid (RA) is the key factor controlling the sex-specific timing of meiotic initiation in tetrapods; however, the role of RA in meiotic initiation in teleosts has remained unclear. In this study, the genes encoding RA synthase aldh1a2, and catabolic enzyme cyp26a1 were isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a species without stra8. The expression of aldh1a2 was up-regulated and expression of cyp26a1 was down-regulated before the meiotic initiation in ovaries and in testes. Treatment with RA synthase inhibitor or disruption of Aldh1a2 by CRISPR/Cas9 resulted in delayed meiotic initiation, with simultaneous down-regulation of cyp26a1 and up-regulation of sycp3. By contrast, treatment with an inhibitor of RA catabolic enzyme and disruption of cyp26a1 resulted in earlier meiotic initiation, with increased expression of aldh1a2 and sycp3. Additionally, treatment of XY fish with estrogen (E2) and XX fish with fadrozole led to sex reversal and reversion of meiotic initiation. These results indicate that RA is indispensable for meiotic initiation in teleosts via a stra8 independent signaling pathway where both aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 are critical. In contrast to mammals, E2 is a major regulator of sex determination and meiotic initiation in teleosts.

  5. Diversity of signaling underlying responses mediated by selective activation of the platelet thromboxane A2 (TXA2) receptor; pharmacological and kinetic studies in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maayani, Saul; Schwarz, Todd E; Patel, Nayana D; Craddock-Royal, Barbara D; Tagliente, Thomas M

    2003-09-01

    Selective activation of the platelet TXA2 receptor is sufficient to mediate concurrent aggregation, deaggregation and shape change (SC) responses without activation of known Gi-coupled receptors (Platelets 2003; 14: 89). However, Gi-coupled receptor activation strongly influences the hemostasis response in vivo. This study investigated the modulatory effects of two signaling pathways related to Gi-coupled receptor activation, stimulation of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) and inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC), on the aggregation, deaggregation and SC components of the platelet activation response. A novel turbidimetric approach was applied to separate these responses and to characterize their pharmacology and kinetics. The SC response was more sensitive to TXA2 receptor activation (lower EC50 value) but less sensitive to a TXA2 receptor antagonist (higher Kd value) than the net aggregation response. Epinephrine and sulprostone, agonists of the Gi-coupled alpha2A-adrenoceptor and EP3 receptor, respectively, amplified the SC, decelerated deaggregation and enhanced net aggregation responses. SQ22536 and 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, inhibitors of AC activity, elicited smaller but qualitatively similar effects. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin did not affect the SC response but accelerated deaggregation and inhibited net aggregation. These data are consistent with a differential modulation of the platelet SC response by each pathway associated with Gi-coupled receptor activation, while both pathways cooperatively enhance the net aggregation response by decelerating deaggregation. We propose that the TXA2 receptor mediated concurrent platelet aggregation and SC responses, that are differentially modulated by different signaling pathways, provide a model for studying the underlying cellular pharmacology of platelet physiology.

  6. Histamine H3 Receptor Activation Counteracts Adenosine A2A Receptor-Mediated Enhancement of Depolarization-Evoked [3H]-GABA Release from Rat Globus Pallidus Synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High levels of histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are found in the globus pallidus (GP), a neuronal nucleus in the basal ganglia involved in the control of motor behavior. By using rat GP isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes), we studied whether H3R activation modified the previously reported enhancing action of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) stimulation on depolarization-evoked [3H]-GABA release. At 3 and 10 nM, the A2AR agonist CGS-21680 enhanced [3H]-GABA release induced by high K+ (20 mM) and the effect of 3 nM CGS-21680 was prevented by the A2AR antagonist ZM-241385 (100 nM). The presence of presynaptic H3Rs was confirmed by the specific binding of N-α-[methyl-3H]-histamine to membranes from GP synaptosomes (maximum binding, Bmax, 1327 ± 79 fmol/mg protein; dissociation constant, Kd, 0.74 nM), which was inhibited by the H3R ligands immepip, clobenpropit, and A-331440 (inhibition constants, Ki, 0.28, 8.53, and 316 nM, respectively). Perfusion of synaptosomes with the H3R agonist immepip (100 nM) had no effect on K+-evoked [3H]-GABA release, but inhibited the stimulatory action of A2AR activation. In turn, the effect of immepip was blocked by the H3R antagonist clobenpropit, which had no significant effect of its own on K+-induced [3H]-GABA release. These data indicate that H3R activation selectively counteracts the facilitatory action of A2AR stimulation on GABA release from striato-pallidal projections. PMID:24884070

  7. Inhibition of Cytochrome P450 1A2-Mediated Metabolism and Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rat Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Reed, James R.; Cawley, George F.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2011-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in most cell types by many forms of environmental stress and is believed to play a protective role in cells exposed to oxidative stress. Metabolism by cytochromes P450 (P450) is highly inefficient as the oxidation of substrate is associated with the production of varying proportions of hydrogen peroxide and/or superoxide. This study tests the hypothesis that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a protective role against oxidative stress by competing with P450 for binding to the common redox partner, the NADPH P450 reductase (CPR) and in the process, diminishing P450 metabolism and the associated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Liver microsomes were isolated from uninduced rats and rats that were treated with cadmium and/or β-napthoflavone (BNF) to induce HO-1 and/or CYP1A2. HO-1 induction was associated with slower rates of metabolism of the CYP1A2-specific substrate, 7-ethoxyresorufin. Furthermore, HO-1 induction also was associated with slower rates of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical production by microsomes from rats induced for CYP1A2. The inhibition associated with HO-1 induction was not dependent on the addition of heme to the microsomal incubations. The effects of HO-1 induction were less dramatic in the absence of substrate for CYP1A2, suggesting that the enzyme was more effective in inhibiting the CYP1A2-related activity than the CPR-related production of superoxide (that dismutates to form hydrogen peroxide). PMID:20942796

  8. Toll-like receptors, NF-κB, and IL-27 mediate adenosine A2A receptor signaling in BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf)/J mice.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sheikh F; Ansari, Mushtaq A; Nadeem, Ahmed; Bakheet, Saleh A; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Yousef; Attia, Sabry M

    2017-10-03

    Autism is a predominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired communication, social deficits, and repetitive behaviors. Recent research has proposed that the impairment of innate immunity may play an important role in autism. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are potential therapeutic targets against neuroinflammation. The BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf/)J (BTBR) mouse is a well-known model of autism, showing repetitive behaviors such as cognitive inflexibility and increased grooming as compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) signaling is involved in inflammation, brain injury, and lymphocyte infiltration into the CNS, but the role of A2AR in autism remains unknown. We investigated the effect of A2AR antagonist SCH 5826 (SCH) and agonist CGS 21680 (CGS) on the expression levels of TLRs, IL-27, NF-κB p65, and IκBα in BTBR mice. Treatment of BTBR mice with SCH increased the percentage of splenic CD14(+)TLR2(+) cells, CD14(+)TLR3(+) cells, CD14(+)TLR4(+) cells, and decreased the percentage of CD14(+)IL-27(+) cells, as compared to the untreated BTBR mice. Our results reveal that BTBR mice treated with CGS had reversal of SCH-induced immunological responses. Moreover, mRNA and protein expression analyses confirmed increased expression of TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and NF-κB p65 in brain tissue, and decreased IL-27 and IκBα expression following SCH treatment, as compared to the untreated-BTBR and CGS-treated BTBR mice. Together, these results suggest that the A2AR agonist corrects neuroimmune dysfunction observed in BTBR mice, and thus has the potential as a therapeutic approach in autism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. PacCYP707A2 negatively regulates cherry fruit ripening while PacCYP707A1 mediates drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Chen, Pei; Dai, Shengjie; Sun, Yufei; Yuan, Bing; Kai, Wenbin; Pei, Yuelin; He, Suihuan; Liang, Bin; Zhang, Yushu; Leng, Ping

    2015-07-01

    Sweet cherry is a non-climacteric fruit and its ripening is regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) during fruit development. In this study, four cDNAs (PacCYP707A1-4) encoding 8'-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in the oxidative catabolism of ABA, were identified in sweet cherry fruits using tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and particle bombardment approaches. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed significant down-regulation of target gene transcripts in VIGS-treated cherry fruits. In PacCYP707A2-RNAi-treated fruits, ripening and fruit colouring were promoted relative to control fruits, and both ABA accumulation and PacNCED1 transcript levels were up-regulated by 140%. Silencing of PacCYP707A2 by VIGS significantly altered the transcripts of both ABA-responsive and ripening-related genes, including the ABA metabolism-associated genes NCED and CYP707A, the anthocyanin synthesis genes PacCHS, PacCHI, PacF3H, PacDFR, PacANS, and PacUFGT, the ethylene biosynthesis gene PacACO1, and the transcription factor PacMYBA. The promoter of PacMYBA responded more strongly to PacCYP707A2-RNAi-treated fruits than to PacCYP707A1-RNAi-treated fruits. By contrast, silencing of PacCYP707A1 stimulated a slight increase in fruit colouring and enhanced resistance to dehydration stress compared with control fruits. These results suggest that PacCYP707A2 is a key regulator of ABA catabolism that functions as a negative regulator of fruit ripening, while PacCYP707A1 regulates ABA content in response to dehydration during fruit development. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. A chimera carrying the functional domain of the orphan protein SLC7A14 in the backbone of SLC7A2 mediates trans-stimulated arginine transport.

    PubMed

    Jaenecke, Isabel; Boissel, Jean-Paul; Lemke, Matthias; Rupp, Johanna; Gasnier, Bruno; Closs, Ellen I

    2012-08-31

    In human skin fibroblasts, a lysosomal transport system specific for cationic amino acids has been described and named system c. We asked if SLC7A14 (solute carrier family 7 member A14), an orphan protein assigned to the SLC7 subfamily of cationic amino acid transporters (CATs) due to sequence homology, may represent system c. Fusion proteins between SLC7A14 and enhanced GFP localized to intracellular vesicles, co-staining with the lysosomal marker LysoTracker(®). To perform transport studies, we first tried to redirect SLC7A14 to the plasma membrane (by mutating putative lysosomal targeting motifs) but without success. We then created a chimera carrying the backbone of human (h) CAT-2 and the protein domain of SLC7A14 corresponding to the so-called "functional domain" of the hCAT proteins, a protein stretch of 81 amino acids that determines the apparent substrate affinity, sensitivity to trans-stimulation, and (as revealed in this study) pH dependence. The chimera mediated arginine transport and exhibited characteristics similar but not identical to hCAT-2A (the low affinity hCAT-2 isoform). Western blot and microscopic analyses confirmed localization of the chimera in the plasma membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes. Noticeably, arginine transport by the hCAT-2/SLC7A14 chimera was pH-dependent, trans-stimulated, and inhibited by α-trimethyl-L-lysine, properties assigned to lysosomal transport system c in human skin fibroblasts. Expression analysis showed strong expression of SLC7A14 mRNA in these cells. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that SLC7A14 is a lysosomal transporter for cationic amino acids.

  11. Group V secreted phospholipase A2 is upregulated by IL-4 in human macrophages and mediates phagocytosis via hydrolysis of ethanolamine phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Julio M; Rodríguez, Juan P; Gil-de-Gómez, Luis; Guijas, Carlos; Balboa, María A; Balsinde, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Studies on the heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophage populations led to the identification of two major polarization states: classically activated macrophages or M1, induced by IFN-γ plus LPS, and alternatively activated macrophages, induced by IL-4. We studied the expression of multiple phospholipase A2 enzymes in human macrophages and the effect that polarization of the cells has on their levels. At least 11 phospholipase A2 genes were found at significant levels in human macrophages, as detected by quantitative PCR. None of these exhibited marked changes after treating the cells with IFN-γ plus LPS. However, macrophage treatment with IL-4 led to strong upregulation of the secreted group V phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-V), both at the mRNA and protein levels. In parallel with increasing sPLA2-V expression levels, IL-4-treated macrophages exhibited increased phagocytosis of yeast-derived zymosan and bacteria, and we show that both events are causally related, because cells deficient in sPLA2-V exhibited decreased phagocytosis, and cells overexpressing the enzyme manifested higher rates of phagocytosis. Mass spectrometry analyses of lipid changes in the IL-4-treated macrophages suggest that ethanolamine lysophospholipid (LPE) is an sPLA2-V-derived product that may be involved in regulating phagocytosis. Cellular levels of LPE are selectively maintained by sPLA2-V. By supplementing sPLA2-V-deficient cells with LPE, phagocytosis of zymosan or bacteria was fully restored in IL-4-treated cells. Collectively, our results show that sPLA2-V is required for efficient phagocytosis by IL-4-treated human macrophages and provide evidence that sPLA2-V-derived LPE is involved in the process.

  12. Modulation of dopamine-mediated facilitation at the neuromuscular junction of Wistar rats: A role for adenosine A1/A2A receptors and P2 purinoceptors.

    PubMed

    Elnozahi, Neveen A; AlQot, Hadir E; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; Bistawroos, Azza E; Abou Zeit-Har, Mohamed S

    2016-06-21

    This study aims to understand how dopamine and the neuromodulators, adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) modulate neuromuscular transmission. Adenosine and ATP are well-recognized for their regulatory effects on dopamine in the central nervous system. However, if similar interactions occur at the neuromuscular junction is unknown. We hypothesize that the activation of adenosine A1/A2A and/or P2 purinoceptors may influence the action of dopamine on neuromuscular transmission. Using the rat phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm, we assessed the influence of dopamine, adenosine and ATP on the height of nerve-evoked muscle twitches. We investigated how the selective blockade of adenosine A1 receptors (2.5nM DPCPX), adenosine A2A receptors (50nM CSC) and P2 purinoceptors (100μM suramin) modified the effects of dopamine. Dopamine alone increased indirect muscle contractions while adenosine and ATP either enhanced or depressed nerve-evoked muscle twitches in a concentration-dependent manner. The facilitatory effects of 256μM dopamine were significantly reduced to 29.62±2.79% or 53.69±5.45% in the presence of DPCPX or CSC, respectively, relative to 70.03±1.57% with dopamine alone. Alternatively, the action of 256μM dopamine was potentiated from 70.03±1.57, in the absence of suramin, to 86.83±4.36%, in the presence of suramin. It can be concluded that the activation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and P2 purinoceptors potentially play a central role in the regulation of dopamine effects at the neuromuscular junction. Clinically this study offers new insights for the indirect manipulation of neuromuscular transmission for the treatment of disorders characterized by motor dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Association with actin mediates the EGTA-resistant binding of cytosolic phospholipase A2-alpha to the plasma membrane of activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Ann D; Herbert, Shane P; Gawler, Debra; Walker, John H

    2009-01-01

    The association of cytosolic phospholipase A(2)-alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) with intracellular membranes is central to the generation of free arachidonic acid and thromboxane A(2) in activated platelets. Despite this, the site and nature of this membrane association has not been fully characterised upon platelet activation. High resolution imaging showed that cPLA(2)alpha was distributed in a partly structured manner throughout the resting platelet. Upon glass activation or thrombin stimulation, cPLA(2)alpha relocated to a peripheral region corresponding to the platelet plasma membrane. Upon thrombin stimulation of platelets a major pool of cPLA(2)alpha was associated with the plasma membrane in an EGTA-resistant manner. EGTA-resistant membrane binding was abolished upon de-polymerisation of actin filaments by DNase I and furthermore, cPLA(2)alpha co-immunoprecipitated with actin upon thrombin stimulation of platelets. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that, upon platelet activation, cPLA(2)alpha and actin co-localised at the plasma membrane. Thus we have identified a novel mechanism for the interaction of cPLA(2)alpha with its membrane substrate via interaction with actin.

  14. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B. )

    1991-02-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism.

  15. HER-2/neu mediated down-regulation of MHC class I antigen processing prevents CTL-mediated tumor recognition upon DNA vaccination in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Vertuani, Simona; Triulzi, Chiara; Roos, Anna Karin; Charo, Jehad; Norell, Håkan; Lemonnier, François; Pisa, Pavel; Seliger, Barbara; Kiessling, Rolf

    2009-05-01

    To study DNA vaccination directed against human HER-2 in the HHD mouse Tg strain, we created a novel HER-2-expressing syngeneic tumor transplantation model. We found that a DNA vaccine encoding the full length HER-2 DNA protected HHD mice from HER-2(+) tumor challenge by a CTL independent mechanism. A more efficient approach to induce HLA-A2 restricted CTLs, through immunization with a multi-epitope DNA vaccine expressing the HLA-A2 restricted HER-2 369-377, 435-443 and 689-697 epitopes, resulted in high numbers of peptide specific T cells but failed to induce tumor protection. Subsequently we discovered that HER-2 transfected tumor cells down-regulated MHC class I antigen expression and exhibited a series of defects in the antigen processing pathway which impaired the capacity to produce and display MHC class I peptide-ligands to specific CTLs. Our data demonstrate that HER-2 transfection is associated with defects in the MHC class I presentation pathway, which may be the underlying mechanism behind the inability of CTLs to recognize tumors in this HLA-A2 transgenic model. As defective MHC class I presentation may be a common characteristic of HER-2 expressing tumors, vaccines targeting HER-2 should aim at inducing an integrated immune response where also CD4(+) T cells and antibodies are important components.

  16. Modulation by salt intake of the vascular response mediated through adenosine A(2A) receptor: role of CYP epoxygenase and soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Nayeem, Mohammed A; Zeldin, Darryl C; Boegehold, Matthew A; Morisseau, Christophe; Marowsky, Anne; Ponnoth, Dovenia S; Roush, Kevin P; Falck, John R

    2010-07-01

    High-salt intake can change the effect of adenosine on arterial tone in mice. The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism by which this occurs. Using aortas from mice fed a 4% NaCl (HS) or 0.45% NaCl (NS) diet for 4-5 wks, concentration-response curves for ACh, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; adenosine analog) and 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride hydrate [CGS-21680; A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A) AR) agonist] were obtained with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; nitric oxide inhibitor, 10(-4) M), methylsulfonyl-propargyloxyphenylhexanamide [MS-PPOH; a CYP (cytochrome P-450) epoxygenase blocker, 10(-5) M including CYP2J2], 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)dodecanoic acid [AUDA; soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) blocker, 10(-5) M], dibromo-dodecenyl-methylsulfimide [DDMS; CYP omega-hydroxylase (CYP4A blocker), 10(-5) M], glibenclamide (K(ATP) channel blocker; 10(-5) M) and 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD; mitochondrial-K(ATP) channel blocker, 10(-4) M). HS dose response to ACh (10(-7) - 10(-5) M) was not different from NS (P > 0.05). Relaxation to 10(-6) M NECA was greater in the HS group (28.4 +/- 3.9%) than in the NS group (4.1 +/- 2.3%). Relaxation to 10(-6) M CGS-21680 was also greater in HS (27.9 +/- 4.5%) than in NS (4.9 +/- 2.2%). L-NAME was able to block the dose response of ACh (10(-7) - 10(-5) M) equally in both HS and NS (P > 0.05), whereas L-NAME did not block CGS-21680-induced response in HS. In HS the CGS-21680 response was greatly reduced by MS-PPOH (to 4.7 +/- 2.0%) and 5-HD (to 8.9 +/- 2.2%), and also abolished by glibenclamide (-1.0 +/- 5.9%). In NS, the CGS-21680 response was increased by AUDA (to 26.3 +/- 3.4%) and DDMS (to 27.2 +/- 3.0%). Compared with NS, HS vessels showed increased CYP2J2 and A(2A) AR expression (46 and 74% higher, respectively) but decreased sEH, CYP4A, and A(1) AR expression (75, 30, and 55% lower, respectively). These data suggest that in mice fed NS-containing diet

  17. Modulation by salt intake of the vascular response mediated through adenosine A2A receptor: role of CYP epoxygenase and soluble epoxide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Zeldin, Darryl C.; Boegehold, Matthew A.; Morisseau, Christophe; Marowsky, Anne; Ponnoth, Dovenia S.; Roush, Kevin P.; Falck, John R.

    2010-01-01

    High-salt intake can change the effect of adenosine on arterial tone in mice. The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism by which this occurs. Using aortas from mice fed a 4% NaCl (HS) or 0.45% NaCl (NS) diet for 4–5 wks, concentration-response curves for ACh, 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; adenosine analog) and 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride hydrate [CGS-21680; A2A adenosine receptor (A2A AR) agonist] were obtained with Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; nitric oxide inhibitor, 10−4 M), methylsulfonyl-propargyloxyphenylhexanamide [MS-PPOH; a CYP (cytochrome P-450) epoxygenase blocker, 10−5 M including CYP2J2], 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)dodecanoic acid [AUDA; soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) blocker, 10−5 M], dibromo-dodecenyl-methylsulfimide [DDMS; CYP ω-hydroxylase (CYP4A blocker), 10−5 M], glibenclamide (KATP channel blocker; 10−5 M) and 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD; mitochondrial-KATP channel blocker, 10−4 M). HS dose response to ACh (10−7 − 10−5 M) was not different from NS (P > 0.05). Relaxation to 10−6 M NECA was greater in the HS group (28.4 ± 3.9%) than in the NS group (4.1 ± 2.3%). Relaxation to 10−6 M CGS-21680 was also greater in HS (27.9 ± 4.5%) than in NS (4.9 ± 2.2%). l-NAME was able to block the dose response of ACh (10−7 − 10−5 M) equally in both HS and NS (P > 0.05), whereas l-NAME did not block CGS-21680-induced response in HS. In HS the CGS-21680 response was greatly reduced by MS-PPOH (to 4.7 ± 2.0%) and 5-HD (to 8.9 ± 2.2%), and also abolished by glibenclamide (−1.0 ± 5.9%). In NS, the CGS-21680 response was increased by AUDA (to 26.3 ± 3.4%) and DDMS (to 27.2 ± 3.0%). Compared with NS, HS vessels showed increased CYP2J2 and A2A AR expression (46 and 74% higher, respectively) but decreased sEH, CYP4A, and A1 AR expression (75, 30, and 55% lower, respectively). These data suggest that in mice fed NS-containing diet, upregulation of

  18. The infarct-sparing effect of IB-MECA against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice is mediated by sequential activation of adenosine A3 and A 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yikui; Marshall, Melissa; French, Brent A; Linden, Joel; Yang, Zequan

    2015-03-01

    Conflicting results exist regarding the role of A3 adenosine receptors (A3ARs) in mediating cardioprotection during reperfusion following myocardial infarction. We hypothesized that the effects of the A3AR agonist IB-MECA to produce cardioprotection might involve activation of other adenosine receptor subtypes. C57Bl/6 (B6), A3AR KO, A2AAR KO, and A2AAR KO/WT bone marrow chimeric mice were assigned to 12 groups undergoing either hemodynamic studies or 45 min of LAD occlusion and 60 min of reperfusion. IB-MECA (100 μg/kg) or vehicle was administered by iv bolus 5 min before reperfusion. Radioligand binding assays showed that IB-MECA has high affinity for the mouse A3AR (K i = 0.17 ± 0.05 nM), but also can bind with lower affinity to the A1AR (9.0 ± 2.4 nM) or the A2AAR (56.5 ± 10.2 nM). IB-MECA caused bi-phasic hemodynamic changes, which were completely absent in A3AR KO mice and were modified by A2AAR blockade or deletion. IB-MECA stimulated histamine release, increased heart rate, and significantly reduced IF size in B6 mice from 61.5 ± 1.4 to 48.6 ± 2.4% of risk region (RR; 21% reduction, p < 0.05) but not in A3AR KO mice. Compared to B6, A3AR KO mice had significantly reduced IF size (p < 0.05). In B6/B6 bone marrow chimeras, IB-MECA caused a 47% reduction of IF size (from 47.3 ± 3.9 to 24.7 ± 4.5, p < 0.05). However, no significant cardioprotective effect of IB-MECA was observed in A2AARKO/B6 mice, which lacked A2AARs only on their bone marrow-derived cells. Activation of A3ARs induces a bi-phasic hemodynamic response, which is partially mediated by activation of A2AARs. The cardioprotective effect of IB-MECA is due to the initial activation of A3AR followed by activation of A2AARs in bone marrow-derived cells.

  19. AirSR, a [2Fe-2S] cluster-containing two-component system, mediates global oxygen sensing and redox signaling in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Ji, Quanjiang; Jones, Marcus B; Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Frank, Bryan; Telser, Joshua; Peterson, Scott N; Bae, Taeok; He, Chuan

    2012-01-11

    Oxygen sensing and redox signaling significantly affect bacterial physiology and host-pathogen interaction. Here we show that a Staphylococcus aureus two-component system, AirSR (anaerobic iron-sulfur cluster-containing redox sensor regulator, formerly YhcSR), responds to oxidation signals (O(2), H(2)O(2), NO, etc) by using a redox-active [2Fe-2S] cluster in the sensor kinase AirS. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that the [2Fe-2S] cluster is essential for the kinase activity of AirS. We have also discovered that a homologue of IscS (SA1450) in S. aureus is active as a cysteine desulfurase, which enables the in vitro reconstitution of the [2Fe-2S] cluster in AirS. Phosphorylation assays show that the oxidized AirS with a [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster is the fully active form of the kinase but not the apo-AirS nor the reduced AirS possessing a [2Fe-2S](+) cluster. Overoxidation by prolonged exposure to O(2) or contact with H(2)O(2) or NO led to inactivation of AirS. Transcriptome analysis revealed that mutation of airR impacts the expression of ~355 genes under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, the mutant strain displayed increased resistance toward H(2)O(2), vancomycin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin under anaerobic conditions. Together, our results show that S. aureus AirSR is a redox-dependent global regulatory system that plays important roles in gene regulation using a redox active Fe-S cluster under O(2)-limited conditions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Effect of naturally random allocation to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol on the risk of coronary heart disease mediated by polymorphisms in NPC1L1, HMGCR, or both: a 2 × 2 factorial Mendelian randomization study.

    PubMed

    Ference, Brian A; Majeed, Faisal; Penumetcha, Raju; Flack, John M; Brook, Robert D

    2015-04-21

    Considerable uncertainty exists as to whether lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) by inhibiting the Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) receptor with ezetimibe, either alone or in combination with a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) inhibitor (statin), will reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). This study evaluated the effect of naturally random allocation to lower LDL-C mediated by polymorphisms in the NPC1L1 gene (target of ezetimibe), the HMGCR gene (target of statins), or both (target of combination therapy) on the risk of CHD. We constructed NPC1L1 and HMGCR genetic LDL-C scores to naturally randomize participants into 4 groups: reference, lower LDL-C mediated by NPC1L1 polymorphisms, lower LDL-C mediated by HMGCR polymorphisms, or lower LDL-C mediated by polymorphisms in both NPC1L1 and HMGCR. We compared the risk of CHD (fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction) among each group using a 2 × 2 factorial mendelian randomization study design. A total of 108,376 persons (10,464 CHD events) from 14 studies were included. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics among the 4 groups, thus confirming that allocation was random. Compared to the reference group, the NPC1L1 group had 2.4 mg/dl lower LDL-C and 4.8% lower risk of CHD (odds ratio [OR]: 0.952, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.920 to 0.985); whereas the HMGCR group had 2.9 mg/dl lower LDL-C and a similar 5.3% lower risk of CHD (OR: 0.947, 95% CI: 0.909 to 0.986). The group with lower LDL-C mediated by both NPC1L1 and HMGCR polymorphisms had 5.8 mg/dl additively lower LDL-C and a 10.8% log-linearly additive lower risk of CHD (OR: 0.892, 95% CI: 0.854 to 0.932). The effect of lower LDL-C on the risk of CHD mediated by polymorphisms in NPC1L1, HMGCR, or both is approximately the same per unit lower LDL-C and log-linearly proportional to the absolute exposure to lower LDL-C. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation

  1. Potential involvement of miR-375 in the premalignant progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma mediated via transcription factor KLF5.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen; Yang, Jing; Li, Siyuan; Shan, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiaosong; Hua, Hong; Zhao, Chuanke; Feng, Zhendong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Lihe; Zhou, Demin

    2015-11-24

    To elucidate the genetic effect involved in the premalignant progression of chronic inflammation to cancer, we performed microRNA and mRNA profiling in oral lichen planus (OLP), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and normal tissue from the same patients. We demonstrate the involvement of a suppressive microRNA, miR-375, in the regulation of this premalignant progression via KLF5, a transcription factor that modulates the expression of genes contributing to proliferation and apoptosis. We found that miR-375 abundance decreased in tissues with progression from the normal state to OLP and subsequently to OSCC. Restoration of miR-375 by transduction of a synthetic mimic into OSCC cells repressed cellular proliferation and promoted apoptosis, with concomitant down-regulation of KLF5, and vice versa. The direct binding of miR-375 to the 3'-untranslated region of KLF5 was further confirmed. Additionally, Survivin (BIRC5), a target of KLF5, was also regulated by miR-375, explaining the susceptibility of miR-375-mimic transfected cells to apoptosis. Further analysis of clinical specimens suggested that expression of KLF5 and BIRC5 is up-regulated during the progression from inflammation to cancer. Our findings provide novel insights into the involvement of microRNAs in progression of inflammation to carcinoma and suggest a potential early-stage biomarker or therapy target for oral carcinoma.

  2. Dependence of P2-nucleotide receptor agonist-mediated endothelium-independent relaxation on ectonucleotidase activity and A2A-receptors in rat portal vein

    PubMed Central

    Guibert, Christelle; Loirand, Gervaise; Vigne, Paul; Savineau, Jean-Pierre; Pacaud, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of action of P2 nucleotide receptor agonists that produce endothelium-independent relaxation and the influence of ecto-ATPase activity on this relaxing effect have been investigated in rat portal vein smooth muscle.At 25°C, ATP, 2-methylthioATP (2-MeSATP) and 2-chloroATP (2-ClATP), dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous contractile activity of endothelium-denuded muscular strips from rat portal vein. The rank order of agonist potency defined from the half-inhibitory concentrations was 2-ClATP (2.7±0.5 μM, n=7)>ATP (12.9±1.1 μM, n=9)⩾2-MeSATP (21.9±4.8 μM, n=4). In the presence of αβ-methylene ATP (αβ-MeATP, 200 μM) which itself produced a transient contractile effect, the relaxing action of ATP and 2-MeSATP was completely abolished and that of 2-ClATP strongly inhibited.The non-selective P2-receptor antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulphonic acid (PPADS, 100 μM) did not affect the relaxation induced by ATP, 2-MeSATP, and 2-ClATP.The A2A-adenosine receptor antagonist ZM 241385 inhibited the ATP-induced relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner (1–100 nM). In the presence of 100 nM ZM 241385, the relaxing effects of 2-MeSATP and 2-ClATP were also inhibited.ADP, AMP and adenosine also produced concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous contractions. The relaxing effects of AMP and adenosine were insensitive to αβ-MeATP (200 μM) but were inhibited by ZM 241385 (100 nM).Simultaneous measurements of contraction and ecto-ATPase activity estimated by the degradation of [γ-32P]-ATP showed that muscular strips rapidly (10–60 s) hydrolyzed ATP. This ecto-ATPase activity was abolished in the presence of EDTA and was inhibited by 57±11% (n=3) by 200 μM αβ-MeATP.These results suggest that ATP and other P2-receptor agonists are relaxant in rat portal vein smooth muscle, because ectonucleotidase activity leads to the formation of adenosine which activates A2A-receptors. PMID

  3. α-Synuclein-induced synapse damage in cultured neurons is mediated by cholesterol-sensitive activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun

    2015-03-09

    The accumulation of aggregated forms of the α-synuclein (αSN) is associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Dementia with Lewy Bodies. The loss of synapses is an important event in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Here we show that aggregated recombinant human αSN, but not βSN, triggered synapse damage in cultured neurons as measured by the loss of synaptic proteins. Pre-treatment with the selective cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) inhibitors AACOCF3 and MAFP protected neurons against αSN-induced synapse damage. Synapse damage was associated with the αSN-induced activation of synaptic cPLA2 and the production of prostaglandin E2. The activation of cPLA2 is the first step in the generation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and PAF receptor antagonists (ginkgolide B or Hexa-PAF) also protect neurons against αSN-induced synapse damage. αSN-induced synapse damage was also reduced in neurons pre-treated with the cholesterol synthesis inhibitor (squalestatin). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that αSN triggered synapse damage via hyperactivation of cPLA2. They also indicate that αSN-induced activation of cPLA2 is influenced by the cholesterol content of membranes. Inhibitors of this pathway that can cross the blood brain barrier may protect against the synapse damage seen during PD.

  4. Activation of mitochondrial calcium-independent phospholipase A2γ (iPLA2γ) by divalent cations mediating arachidonate release and production of downstream eicosanoids.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Ho; Jenkins, Christopher M; Liu, Xinping; Guan, Shaoping; Mancuso, David J; Gross, Richard W

    2012-04-27

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A(2)γ (iPLA(2)γ) (PNPLA8) is the predominant phospholipase activity in mammalian mitochondria. However, the chemical mechanisms that regulate its activity are unknown. Here, we utilize iPLA(2)γ gain of function and loss of function genetic models to demonstrate the robust activation of iPLA(2)γ in murine myocardial mitochondria by Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ions. Calcium ion stimulated the production of 2-arachidonoyl-lysophosphatidylcholine (2-AA-LPC) from 1-palmitoyl-2-[(14)C]arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine during incubations with wild-type heart mitochondrial homogenates. Furthermore, incubation of mitochondrial homogenates from transgenic myocardium expressing iPLA(2)γ resulted in 13- and 25-fold increases in the initial rate of radiolabeled 2-AA-LPC and arachidonic acid (AA) production, respectively, in the presence of calcium ion. Mass spectrometric analysis of the products of calcium-activated hydrolysis of endogenous mitochondrial phospholipids in transgenic iPLA(2)γ mitochondria revealed the robust production of AA, 2-AA-LPC, and 2-docosahexaenoyl-LPC that was over 10-fold greater than wild-type mitochondria. The mechanism-based inhibitor (R)-(E)-6-(bromomethylene)-3-(1-naphthalenyl)-2H-tetrahydropyran-2-one (BEL) (iPLA(2)γ selective), but not its enantiomer, (S)-BEL (iPLA(2)β selective) or pyrrolidine (cytosolic PLA(2)α selective), markedly attenuated Ca(2+)-dependent fatty acid release and polyunsaturated LPC production. Moreover, Ca(2+)-induced iPLA(2)γ activation was accompanied by the production of downstream eicosanoid metabolites that were nearly completely ablated by (R)-BEL or by genetic ablation of iPLA(2)γ. Intriguingly, Ca(2+)-induced iPLA(2)γ activation was completely inhibited by long-chain acyl-CoA (IC(50) ∼20 μm) as well as by a nonhydrolyzable acyl-CoA thioether analog. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial iPLA(2)γ is activated by divalent cations and inhibited by acyl

  5. Activation of Mitochondrial Calcium-independent Phospholipase A2γ (iPLA2γ) by Divalent Cations Mediating Arachidonate Release and Production of Downstream Eicosanoids*♦

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung Ho; Jenkins, Christopher M.; Liu, Xinping; Guan, Shaoping; Mancuso, David J.; Gross, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2γ (iPLA2γ) (PNPLA8) is the predominant phospholipase activity in mammalian mitochondria. However, the chemical mechanisms that regulate its activity are unknown. Here, we utilize iPLA2γ gain of function and loss of function genetic models to demonstrate the robust activation of iPLA2γ in murine myocardial mitochondria by Ca2+ or Mg2+ ions. Calcium ion stimulated the production of 2-arachidonoyl-lysophosphatidylcholine (2-AA-LPC) from 1-palmitoyl-2-[14C]arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine during incubations with wild-type heart mitochondrial homogenates. Furthermore, incubation of mitochondrial homogenates from transgenic myocardium expressing iPLA2γ resulted in 13- and 25-fold increases in the initial rate of radiolabeled 2-AA-LPC and arachidonic acid (AA) production, respectively, in the presence of calcium ion. Mass spectrometric analysis of the products of calcium-activated hydrolysis of endogenous mitochondrial phospholipids in transgenic iPLA2γ mitochondria revealed the robust production of AA, 2-AA-LPC, and 2-docosahexaenoyl-LPC that was over 10-fold greater than wild-type mitochondria. The mechanism-based inhibitor (R)-(E)-6-(bromomethylene)-3-(1-naphthalenyl)-2H-tetrahydropyran-2-one (BEL) (iPLA2γ selective), but not its enantiomer, (S)-BEL (iPLA2β selective) or pyrrolidine (cytosolic PLA2α selective), markedly attenuated Ca2+-dependent fatty acid release and polyunsaturated LPC production. Moreover, Ca2+-induced iPLA2γ activation was accompanied by the production of downstream eicosanoid metabolites that were nearly completely ablated by (R)-BEL or by genetic ablation of iPLA2γ. Intriguingly, Ca2+-induced iPLA2γ activation was completely inhibited by long-chain acyl-CoA (IC50 ∼20 μm) as well as by a nonhydrolyzable acyl-CoA thioether analog. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial iPLA2γ is activated by divalent cations and inhibited by acyl-CoA modulating the generation of

  6. ROCK2/ras(Ha) co-operation induces malignant conversion via p53 loss, elevated NF-κB and tenascin C-associated rigidity, but p21 inhibits ROCK2/NF-κB-mediated progression.

    PubMed

    Masre, S F; Rath, N; Olson, M F; Greenhalgh, D A

    2017-05-04

    To study ROCK2 activation in carcinogenesis, mice expressing 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4HT)-activated ROCK2 (K14.ROCK(er)) were crossed with mice expressing epidermal-activated ras(Ha) (HK1.ras(1205)). At 8 weeks, 4HT-treated K14.ROCK(er)/HK1.ras(1205) cohorts exhibited papillomas similar to HK1.ras(1205) controls; however, K14.ROCK(er)/HK1.ras(1205) histotypes comprised a mixed papilloma/well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (wdSCC), exhibiting p53 loss, increased proliferation and novel NF-κB expression. By 12 weeks, K14.ROCK(er)/HK1.ras(1205) wdSCCs exhibited increased NF-κB and novel tenascin C, indicative of elevated rigidity; yet despite continued ROCK2 activities/p-Mypt1 inactivation, progression to SCC required loss of compensatory p21 expression. K14.ROCK(er)/HK1.ras(1205) papillomatogenesis also required a wound promotion stimulus, confirmed by breeding K14.ROCK(er) into promotion-insensitive HK1.ras(1276) mice, suggesting a permissive K14.ROCK(er)/HK1.ras(1205) papilloma context (wound-promoted/NF-κB(+)/p53(-)/p21(+)) preceded K14.ROCK(er)-mediated (p-Mypt1/tenascin C/rigidity) malignant conversion. Malignancy depended on ROCK(er)/p-Mypt1 expression, as cessation of 4HT treatment induced disorganized tissue architecture and p21-associated differentiation in wdSCCs; yet tenascin C retention in connective tissue extracellular matrix suggests the rigidity laid down for conversion persists. Novel papilloma outgrowths appeared expressing intense, basal layer p21 that confined endogenous ROCK2/p-Mypt1/NF-κB to supra-basal layers, and was paralleled by restored basal layer p53. In later SCCs, 4HT cessation became irrelevant as endogenous ROCK2 expression increased, driving progression via p21 loss, elevated NF-κB expression and tenascin C-associated rigidity, with p-Mypt1 inactivation/actinomyosin-mediated contractility to facilitate invasion. However, p21-associated inhibition of early-stage malignant progression and the intense expression in papilloma

  7. Using a modified Learning Potential Assessment Device and Mediated Learning Experiences to Assess Minority Student Progress and Program Goals in an Undergraduate Research Based Geoscience Program Serving American Indians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, L. W.

    2002-12-01

    During the initiation of a new program at the University of North Dakota designed to promote American Indians to engage in geoscience research and complete geoscience related degrees, an evaluation procedure utilizing a modified Learning Potential Assessment Device (LPAD) and Mediated Learning Experiences (MLE) to assess minority student progress was implemented. The program, called Indians Into Geosciences (INGEOS), utilized a modified form of the Learning Potential Assessment Device first to assess cultural factors, determination, and other baseline information, and second, utilized a series of Mediated Learning Experiences to enhance minority students' opportunities in a culturally appropriate, culturally diverse, and scientifically challenging manner in an effort to prepare students for competitive research careers in the geosciences. All of the LPADs and MLEs corresponded directly to the three goals or eight objectives of INGEOS. The three goals of the INGEOS program are: 1) increasing the number of American Indians earning degrees at all levels, 2) engaging American Indians in challenging and technically based scientific research, and 3) preparing American Indians for successful geoscience careers through multicultural community involvement. The eight objectives of the INGEOS program, called the Eight Points of Success, are: 1) spiritual health, 2) social health, 3) physical health, 4) mental health, 5) financial management, 6) research involvement, 7) technical exposure, and 8) multicultural community education. The INGEOS program goals were evaluated strictly quantitatively utilizing a variety of data sources such as grade point averages, number of credits earned, research project information, and developed products. The INGEOS Program goals reflected a combined quantitative score of all participants, whereas the objectives reflected qualitative measures and are specific for each INGEOS participant. Initial results indicate that those participants which

  8. Decrease in self-esteem mediates the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression in middle adolescence in a sex-specific manner: a 2-year follow-up of a prospective population cohort study.

    PubMed

    Väänänen, Juha-Matti; Isomaa, Rasmus; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Fröjd, Sari; Helminen, Mika; Marttunen, Mauri

    2014-03-19

    Social phobia and depression are common, highly comorbid disorders in middle adolescence. The mechanism underlying this comorbidity, however, is unclear. Decrease in self-esteem caused by the initial disorder might play a decisive role in the development of the subsequent disorder. The present study aimed to determine whether the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression is mediated by decrease in self-esteem in mid-adolescent girls and boys. As a part of the prospective Adolescent Mental Health Cohort (AMCH), subjects of this study were 9th grade pupils (mean age, 15.5) responding to a survey conducted in 2002-2003 (T1) and to a 2-year follow-up survey in 2004-2005 (T2) (N = 2070, mean age 17.6 years, 54.5% girls). Symptoms of social phobia without symptoms of depression at age 15 and symptoms of depression at age 17 were associated only among boys, and this association was mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Symptoms of depression without symptoms of social phobia at age 15 and symptoms of social phobia at age 17 were associated only among girls, and this association was partially mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Decrease in self-esteem plays a decisive role in the association between social phobia and depression. Self-esteem should be a key focus in interventions for adolescents suffering from social phobia or depression. Efficient intervention for the first disorder might help to prevent the decline in self-esteem and thus the incidence of the subsequent disorder. These findings are based on a sample of Finnish adolescents and should be confirmed in other jurisdictions or in more ethnically diverse samples.

  9. Decrease in self-esteem mediates the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression in middle adolescence in a sex-specific manner: a 2-year follow-up of a prospective population cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Social phobia and depression are common, highly comorbid disorders in middle adolescence. The mechanism underlying this comorbidity, however, is unclear. Decrease in self-esteem caused by the initial disorder might play a decisive role in the development of the subsequent disorder. The present study aimed to determine whether the association between symptoms of social phobia and depression is mediated by decrease in self-esteem in mid-adolescent girls and boys. Methods As a part of the prospective Adolescent Mental Health Cohort (AMCH), subjects of this study were 9th grade pupils (mean age, 15.5) responding to a survey conducted in 2002–2003 (T1) and to a 2-year follow-up survey in 2004–2005 (T2) (N = 2070, mean age 17.6 years, 54.5% girls). Results Symptoms of social phobia without symptoms of depression at age 15 and symptoms of depression at age 17 were associated only among boys, and this association was mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Symptoms of depression without symptoms of social phobia at age 15 and symptoms of social phobia at age 17 were associated only among girls, and this association was partially mediated by decrease in self-esteem. Conclusions Decrease in self-esteem plays a decisive role in the association between social phobia and depression. Self-esteem should be a key focus in interventions for adolescents suffering from social phobia or depression. Efficient intervention for the first disorder might help to prevent the decline in self-esteem and thus the incidence of the subsequent disorder. These findings are based on a sample of Finnish adolescents and should be confirmed in other jurisdictions or in more ethnically diverse samples. PMID:24641987

  10. Intrapleural Adenoviral-mediated Endothelial Cell Protein C Receptor Gene Transfer Suppresses the Progression of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Keshava, Shiva; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan; Pendurthi, Usha R.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive thoracic cancer with a high mortality rate as it responds poorly to standard therapeutic interventions. Our recent studies showed that expression of endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) in MPM cells suppresses tumorigenicity. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanism by which EPCR suppresses MPM tumor growth and evaluate whether EPCR gene therapy could suppress the progression of MPM in a mouse model of MPM. Measurement of cytokines from the pleural lavage showed that mice implanted with MPM cells expressing EPCR had elevated levels of IFNγ and TNFα compared to mice implanted with MPM cells lacking EPCR. In vitro studies demonstrated that EPCR expression renders MPM cells highly susceptible to IFNγ + TNFα-induced apoptosis. Intrapleural injection of Ad.EPCR into mice with an established MPM originating from MPM cells lacking EPCR reduced the progression of tumor growth. Ad.EPCR treatment elicited recruitment of macrophages and NK cells into the tumor microenvironment and increased IFNγ and TNFα levels in the pleural space. Ad.EPCR treatment resulted in a marked increase in tumor cell apoptosis. In summary, our data show that EPCR expression in MPM cells promotes tumor cell apoptosis, and intrapleural EPCR gene therapy suppresses MPM progression. PMID:27833109

  11. EGR1 mediates miR-203a suppress the hepatocellular carcinoma cells progression by targeting HOXD3 through EGFR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lumin; Sun, Hongfei; Wang, Xiaofei; Hou, Ni; Zhao, Lingyu; Tong, Dongdong; He, Kang; Yang, Yang; Song, Tusheng; Yang, Jun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    EGR1 plays a critical role in cancer progression. However, its precise role in hepatocellular carcinoma has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that the overexpression of EGR1 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and increases cell apoptosis by binding to the miR-203a promoter sequence. In addition, we investigated the function of miR-203a on progression of HCC cells. We verified that the effect of overexpression of miR-203a is consistent with that of EGR1 in regulation of cell progression. Through bioinformatic analysis and luciferase assays, we confirmed that miR-203a targets HOXD3. Silencing HOXD3 could block transition of the G2/M phase, increase cell apoptosis, decrease the expression of cell cycle and apoptosis-related proteins, EGFR, p-AKT, p-ERK, CCNB1, CDK1 and Bcl2 by targeting EGFR through EGFR/AKT and ERK cell signaling pathways. Likewise, restoration of HOXD3 counteracted the effects of miR-203a expression. In conclusion, our findings are the first to demonstrate that EGR1 is a key player in the transcriptional control of miR-203a, and that miR-203a acts as an anti-oncogene to suppress HCC tumorigenesis by targeting HOXD3 through EGFR-related cell signaling pathways. PMID:27244890

  12. The influence of ethnic factors and gender on CYP1A2-mediated drug disposition: a comparative study in Caucasian and Chinese subjects using phenacetin as a marker substrate.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, A; Xiaodong, S; Gatti, G; Cipolla, G; Marchiselli, R; Perucca, E

    1996-10-01

    To assess potential ethnic and gender-related differences in the expression of cytochrome CYP1A2-mediated activity, the pharmacokinetics of phenacetin (a CYP1A2 substrate) and its metabolite paracetamol were compared in 20 Caucasian and 20 Chinese subjects after administration of a single oral 900 mg phenacetin dose. Peak plasma concentrations and apparent oral clearance values for phenacetin did not differ between the two groups (geometric means: 3.4 micrograms/ml and 1.56 ml h-1 kg-1, respectively, for Caucasians vs. 4.7 micrograms/ml and 1.25 ml h-1 kg-1, respectively, for Chinese, after excluding one Caucasian with aberrantly low plasma phenacetin values). Pharmacokinetic parameters for metabolically derived paracetamol were also similar in the two groups. When subjects were divided into subgroups according to gender, phenacetin apparent oral clearance values were found to be lower in Chinese women compared with both Chinese men and Caucasian subjects of either sex. It is concluded that there are no major interethnic differences in the expression of CYP1A2-related activity between Caucasians and Chinese, although Chinese women as a subgroup may exhibit comparatively lower enzyme activity.

  13. Disturbed mitotic progression and genome segregation are involved in cell transformation mediated by nano-TiO2 long-term exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shing; Chueh Pinju; Lin Yunwei; Shih Tungsheng; Chuang Showmei

    2009-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-particles (< 100 nm in diameter) have been of interest in a wide range of applications, such as in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals because of their low toxicity. However, recent studies have shown that TiO2 nano-particles (nano-TiO2) induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in various lines of cultured cells as well as tumorigenesis in animal models. The biological roles of nano-TiO2 are shown to be controversial and no comprehensive study paradigm has been developed to investigate their molecular mechanisms. In this study, we showed that short-term exposure to nano-TiO2 enhanced cell proliferation, survival, ERK signaling activation and ROS production in cultured fibroblast cells. Moreover, long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 not only increased cell survival and growth on soft agar but also the numbers of multinucleated cells and micronucleus (MN) as suggested in confocal microscopy analysis. Cell cycle phase analysis showed G2/M delay and slower cell division in long-term exposed cells. Most importantly, long-term TiO2 exposure remarkably affected mitotic progression at anaphase and telophase leading to aberrant multipolar spindles and chromatin alignment/segregation. Moreover, PLK1 was demonstrated as the target for nano-TiO2 in the regulation of mitotic progression and exit. Notably, a higher fraction of sub-G1 phase population appeared in TiO2-exposed cells after releasing from G2/M synchronization. Our results demonstrate that long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 disturbs cell cycle progression and duplicated genome segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cell transformation.

  14. Fallen Angels or Risen Apes? A Tale of the Intricate Complexities of Imbalanced Immune Responses in the Pathogenesis and Progression of Immune-Mediated and Viral Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ondondo, Beatrice Omusiro

    2014-01-01

    Excessive immune responses directed against foreign pathogens, self-antigens, or commensal microflora can cause cancer establishment and progression if the execution of tight immuno-regulatory mechanisms fails. On the other hand, induction of potent tumor antigen-specific immune responses together with stimulation of the innate immune system is a pre-requisite for effective anti-tumor immunity, and if suppressed by the strong immuno-regulatory mechanisms can lead to cancer progression. Therefore, it is crucial that the inevitable co-existence of these fundamental, yet conflicting roles of immune-regulatory cells is carefully streamlined as imbalances can be detrimental to the host. Infection with chronic persistent viruses is characterized by severe immune dysfunction resulting in T cell exhaustion and sometimes deletion of antigen-specific T cells. More often, this is due to increased immuno-regulatory processes, which are triggered to down-regulate immune responses and limit immunopathology. However, such heightened levels of immune disruption cause a concomitant loss of tumor immune-surveillance and create a permissive microenvironment for cancer establishment and progression, as demonstrated by increased incidences of cancer in immunosuppressed hosts. Paradoxically, while some cancers arise as a consequence of increased immuno-regulatory mechanisms that inhibit protective immune responses and impinge on tumor surveillance, other cancers arise due to impaired immuno-regulatory mechanisms and failure to limit pathogenic inflammatory responses. This intricate complexity, where immuno-regulatory cells can be beneficial in certain immune settings but detrimental in other settings underscores the need for carefully formulated interventions to equilibrate the balance between immuno-stimulatory and immuno-regulatory processes. PMID:24639678

  15. Fallen angels or risen apes? A tale of the intricate complexities of imbalanced immune responses in the pathogenesis and progression of immune-mediated and viral cancers.

    PubMed

    Ondondo, Beatrice Omusiro

    2014-01-01

    Excessive immune responses directed against foreign pathogens, self-antigens, or commensal microflora can cause cancer establishment and progression if the execution of tight immuno-regulatory mechanisms fails. On the other hand, induction of potent tumor antigen-specific immune responses together with stimulation of the innate immune system is a pre-requisite for effective anti-tumor immunity, and if suppressed by the strong immuno-regulatory mechanisms can lead to cancer progression. Therefore, it is crucial that the inevitable co-existence of these fundamental, yet conflicting roles of immune-regulatory cells is carefully streamlined as imbalances can be detrimental to the host. Infection with chronic persistent viruses is characterized by severe immune dysfunction resulting in T cell exhaustion and sometimes deletion of antigen-specific T cells. More often, this is due to increased immuno-regulatory processes, which are triggered to down-regulate immune responses and limit immunopathology. However, such heightened levels of immune disruption cause a concomitant loss of tumor immune-surveillance and create a permissive microenvironment for cancer establishment and progression, as demonstrated by increased incidences of cancer in immunosuppressed hosts. Paradoxically, while some cancers arise as a consequence of increased immuno-regulatory mechanisms that inhibit protective immune responses and impinge on tumor surveillance, other cancers arise due to impaired immuno-regulatory mechanisms and failure to limit pathogenic inflammatory responses. This intricate complexity, where immuno-regulatory cells can be beneficial in certain immune settings but detrimental in other settings underscores the need for carefully formulated interventions to equilibrate the balance between immuno-stimulatory and immuno-regulatory processes.

  16. Adenosine A2A receptor mediated protective effect of 2‐(6‐cyano‐1‐hexyn‐1‐yl)adenosine on retinal ischaemia/reperfusion damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Konno, T; Sato, A; Uchibori, T; Nagai, A; Kogi, K; Nakahata, N

    2006-01-01

    Aims To determine the effect of 2‐(6‐cyano‐1‐hexyn‐1‐yl)adenosine (2‐CN‐Ado), an adenosine A2A receptor agonist, on retinal ischaemia/reperfusion damage in rats. Methods Retinal ischaemia/reperfusion damage was induced by elevating the intraocular pressure of one eye to 130 mm Hg for 60 minutes and returning it to normal. 7 days later, retinal ischaemia/reperfusion damage was histologically quantified by measuring the thickness of retinal layers. Intraocular pressure was measured by pressure transducer. Results Retinal ischaemia/reperfusion caused cell loss in the ganglion cell layer and thinning of the inner plexiform and nuclear layer. Both ocular topical and intravenous administration of 2‐CN‐Ado caused a reduction of retinal ischaemia/reperfusion damage. A selective A2A receptor antagonist, 1,3,7‐trimethyl‐8‐(3‐chlorostyryl) xanthine (CSC), but not a selective A1 receptor antagonist, 8‐cyclopentyl‐1,3‐dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), or a selective A2B receptor antagonist, alloxazine, reduced the protective effect of 2‐CN‐Ado. While ocular topical administration of 2‐CN‐Ado caused a sustained reduction of intraocular pressure, intravenous administration of 2‐CN‐Ado showed a transient ocular hypotensive effect. Conclusions These results suggest that 2‐CN‐Ado attenuates retinal ischaemia/reperfusion damage, and at least some of this protective effect of 2‐CN‐Ado might be mediated via activation of the adenosine A2A receptor. PMID:16613921

  17. Diet-induced obesity links to ER positive breast cancer progression via LPA/PKD-1-CD36 signaling-mediated microvascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liuyi; Yuan, Ye; Opansky, Cynthia; Chen, Yiliang; Aguilera-Barrantes, Irene; Wu, Shiyong; Yuan, Rong; Cao, Qi; Cheng, Yee Chung; Sahoo, Daisy; Silverstein, Roy L; Ren, Bin

    2017-04-04

    Obesity increases cancer risk including breast cancer (BC). However, the direct regulatory mechanisms by which obesity promotes BC progression remain largely unknown. We show that lysophosphatidic acid/protein kinase D1 (LPA/PKD-1)-CD36 signaling is a bona fide breast cancer promoter via stimulating microvascular remodeling in chronic diet-induced obesity (DIO). We observed that the growth of an estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer was markedly increased when compared to the lean control, and specifically accompanied by increased microvascular remodeling in a syngeneic BC model in female DIO mice. The tumor neovessels in DIO mice demonstrated elevated levels of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR 2) and endothelial differentiation gene 2/LPA receptor1 (Edg2/LPA1), enhanced PKD-1 phosphorylation, and reduced CD36 expression. Tumor associated endothelial cells (TAECs) exposed to LPA demonstrated sustained nuclear PKD-1 phosphorylation, and elevated mRNA levels of ephrin B2, and reduced mRNA expression of CD36. TAEC proliferation also increased in response to LPA/PKD-1 signaling. These studies suggest that the LPA/PKD-1-CD36 signaling axis links DIO to malignant progression of BC via stimulation of de novo tumor arteriogenesis through arteriolar remodeling of microvasculature in the tumor microenvironment. Targeting this signaling axis could provide an additional novel therapeutic strategy.

  18. Top1- and Top2-mediated topological transitions at replication forks ensure fork progression and stability and prevent DNA damage checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Rodrigo; Doksani, Ylli; Capra, Thelma; Katou, Yuki-Mori; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Foiani, Marco

    2007-08-01

    DNA topoisomerases solve topological problems during chromosome metabolism. We investigated where and when Top1 and Top2 are recruited on replicating chromosomes and how their inactivation affects fork integrity and DNA damage checkpoint activation. We show that, in the context of replicating chromatin, Top1 and Top2 act within a 600-base-pair (bp) region spanning the moving forks. Top2 exhibits additional S-phase clusters at specific intergenic loci, mostly containing promoters. TOP1 ablation does not affect fork progression and stability and does not cause activation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. top2 mutants accumulate sister chromatid junctions in S phase without affecting fork progression and activate Rad53 at the M-G1 transition. top1 top2 double mutants exhibit fork block and processing and phosphorylation of Rad53 and gamma H2A in S phase. The exonuclease Exo1 influences fork processing and DNA damage checkpoint activation in top1 top2 mutants. Our data are consistent with a coordinated action of Top1 and Top2 in counteracting the accumulation of torsional stress and sister chromatid entanglement at replication forks, thus preventing the diffusion of topological changes along large chromosomal regions. A failure in resolving fork-related topological constrains during S phase may therefore result in abnormal chromosome transitions, DNA damage checkpoint activation, and chromosome breakage during segregation.

  19. miR-34a inhibits pancreatic cancer progression through Snail1-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal transition and the Notch signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Tang, Yong; Cheng, Ying-sheng

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and Notch signaling are important for the growth and invasion of pancreatic cancer, which is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. miR-34a has been shown to play pivotal roles in the progression of several types of cancer. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of miR-34a in pancreatic cancer processes. The aim of this study was to determine whether miR-34a has negative effects on pancreatic cancer and whether these effects are related to EMT and Notch signaling. In vitro, we demonstrated that miR-34a inhibited, while miR-34a inhibitors enhanced, migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cell lines (PANC-1 and SW-1990).These effects were reversed by Snail1 overexpression or Snail1 shRNA. Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic effects of the miR-34a inhibitors in pancreatic cancer cells were abrogated by Notch1 shRNA. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that the Snail1 and Notch1 genes were direct targets of miR-34a. In vivo, we also demonstrated that miR-34a inhibited pancreatic cancer growth by decreasing Snail1 and Notch1 expression. Therefore, our results indicate that miR-34a inhibits pancreatic cancer progression by post-transcriptionally regulating Snail1 and Notch1 expression. PMID:28145431

  20. [Mediation between parents and youth].

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Heiner

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the changing family structures and perceptions of family within our society and its correlative changes within the life of the children and youth. A practical example introduces the reader into the processes of mediation between parents and youth from its progression to the agreement. For the planning of mediation processes it is mandatory that the mediator knows the basics of mediation (progressing steps, methods, techniques) and is also aware of the psychological and legal backgrounds. Apart from the agreement at the end, mediation between parents and youth may serve as a valuable impetus to modify the relationship.

  1. α-SMA-Cre-mediated excision of PDK1 reveals an essential role of PDK1 in regulating morphology of cardiomyocyte and tumor progression in tissue microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Qian, X-J; Li, X-L; Xu, X; Wang, X; Feng, Q-T; Yang, C-J

    2015-04-01

    The phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) - phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)-Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) cascade plays a critical role in cardiovascular development and tumor genesis. But the role of PDK1 in the microenvironment of heart and tumor remains unknown. To clarify the effects of PDK1 on tissue microenvironment in vivo, here, we created α-SMA-Cre-mediated excision of PDK1 mice. And the mice were injected subcutaneously with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. We found PDK1-deficient mice had post-natal praecox dilated cardiomyopathy, decelerated tumor growth and severe tumor metastasis. Histopathological analysis revealed abnormality of vascular microenvironment in heart and primary tumor. In conclusion, PDK1 plays a pivotal role in regulating cardiac function and tumor metastasis by interfering with microenvironment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Lee, Kangseok; Bae, Jeehyeon; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2015-08-21

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer.

  3. Lung cancer-derived galectin-1 contributes to cancer associated fibroblast-mediated cancer progression and immune suppression through TDO2/kynurenine axis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Hung, Jen-Yu; Chiang, Shin-Yi; Jian, Shu-Fang; Wu, Cheng-Ying; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Communication between cancer cells and their microenvironment plays an important role in cancer development, but the precise mechanisms by which cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) impact anti-cancer immunity and cancer progression in lung cancer are poorly understood. Here, we report that lung fibroblasts when activated by lung cancer cells produce tryptophan metabolite kynurenine (Kyn) that inhibits dendritic cells' differentiation and induces cancer growth as well as migration. We identified TDO2 (tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase) as the main enzyme expressed in fibroblasts capable of tryptophan metabolism. Mechanistically, condition medium of CAF or exogenous kynurenine stimulated AKT, with no lysine 1 (WNK1) and cAMP response element-bindingprotein (CREB) phosphorylation in lung cancer cells. Inhibition of the AKT/CREB pathway prevents cancer proliferation, while inhibition of the AKT/ WNK1 reverted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cancer migration induced by kynurenine. Moreover, we also demonstrate that lung cancer-derived galectin-1 contributes to the upregulation of TDO2 in CAF through an AKT-dependent pathway. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer surgical specimens revealed increased TDO2 expression in the fibroblasts adjacent to the cancer. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that administration of TDO2 inhibitor significantly improves DCs function and T cell response, and decreases tumor metastasis in mice. Taken together, our data identify the feedback loop, consisting of cancer-derived galectin-1 and CAF-producing kynurenine, that sustains lung cancer progression. These findings suggest that targeting this pathway may be a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:27050278

  4. Prostaglandins induce early growth response 1 transcription factor mediated microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase up-regulation for colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Jimenez-Martinez, Marta; Jimenez-Segovia, Alba; Chico-Calero, Isabel; Conde, Elisa; Galán-Martínez, Javier; Ruiz, Julia; Pascual, Alejandro; Barrocal, Beatriz; López-Pérez, Ricardo; García-Bermejo, María Laura; Fresno, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase2 (COX2) has been associated with cell growth, invasiveness, tumor progression and metastasis of colorectal carcinomas. However, the downstream prostaglandin (PG)-PG receptor pathway involved in these effects is poorly characterized. We studied the PG-pathway in gene expression databases and we found that PTGS2 (prostaglandin G/H synthase and cyclooxygenase) and PTGES (prostaglandin E synthase) are co-expressed in human colorectal tumors. Moreover, we detected that COX2 and microsomal Prostaglandin E2 synthase 1 (mPGES1) proteins are both up-regulated in colorectal human tumor biopsies. Using colon carcinoma cell cultures we found that COX2 overexpression significantly increased mPGES1 mRNA and protein. This up-regulation was due to an increase in early growth response 1 (EGR1) levels and its transcriptional activity. EGR1 was induced by COX2-generated PGF2α. A PGF2α receptor antagonist, or EGR1 silencing, inhibited the mPGES1 induction by COX2 overexpression. Moreover, using immunodeficient mice, we also demonstrated that both COX2- and mPGES1-overexpressing carcinoma cells were more efficient forming tumors. Our results describe for the first time the molecular pathway correlating PTGS2 and PTGES in colon cancer progression. We demonstrated that in this pathway mPGES1 is induced by COX2 overexpression, via autocrine PGs release, likely PGF2α, through an EGR1-dependent mechanism. This signaling provides a molecular explanation to PTGS2 and PTGES association and contribute to colon cancer advance, pointing out novel potential therapeutic targets in this oncological context. PMID:26498686

  5. Implementing general gauge mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Linda M.; Dine, Michael; Festuccia, Guido; Mason, John D.

    2009-02-01

    Recently there has been much progress in building models of gauge mediation, often with predictions different than those of minimal gauge mediation. Meade, Seiberg, and Shih have characterized the most general spectrum which can arise in gauge-mediated models. We discuss some of the challenges of building models of general gauge mediation, especially the problem of messenger parity and issues connected with R symmetry breaking and CP violation. We build a variety of viable, weakly coupled models which exhibit some or all of the possible low energy parameters.

  6. Non-Lethal Sonodynamic Therapy Inhibits Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression in ApoE-/- Mice and Attenuates ox-LDL-mediated Macrophage Impairment by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Wei; Xu, Haobo; Sun, Yan; Sun, Jing; Jiang, Yongxing; Yao, Jianting; Tian, Ye

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies from our group showed that low-intensity sonodynamic therapy (SDT) has protective effects on atherosclerosis (AS). However, because the intensity of ultrasound passing through tissue is attenuated, the consequences of very low-intensity SDT, referred to as non-lethal SDT (NL-SDT), on atherosclerotic plaques are unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether NL-SDT affects atherosclerotic plaques and to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. An AS model was established using ApoE-/- mice fed a western diet. En face Oil Red O staining was used to measure atherosclerotic plaque size. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining were used to observe plaque morphology and assess the location of macrophages and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in AS plaques were evaluated by real-time PCR and western blotting. Human THP-1 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages were used in this study. Western blotting was used to investigate the expression of cellular proteins after NL-SDT. Macrophage apoptosis was evaluated by TUNEL assays and flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI double staining. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured with 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) and 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl benzimidazolyl carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) staining, respectively. NL-SDT significantly inhibited AS progression and reduced the necrotic core area. NL-SDT induced HO-1 expression in lesional macrophages and in cultured macrophages. NL-SDT activated the protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-related protein kinase (ERK) pathways and the transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2).NL-SDT significantly reduced oxidized LDL (ox-LDL)-induced macrophage MMP collapse, ROS production and cell apoptosis. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a HO-1-specific inhibitor, reversed the protective effects of NL-SDT. NL-SDT inhibits

  7. Activated cytotoxic lymphocytes promote tumor progression by increasing the ability of 3LL tumor cells to mediate MDSC chemoattraction via Fas signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Wei, Yinxiang; Cai, Zhijian; Yu, Lei; Jiang, Lingling; Zhang, Chengyan; Yan, Huanmiao; Wang, Qingqing; Cao, Xuetao; Liang, Tingbo; Wang, Jianli

    2015-01-01

    The Fas/FasL system transmits intracellular apoptotic signaling, inducing cell apoptosis. However, Fas signaling also exerts non-apoptotic functions in addition to inducing tumor cell apoptosis. For example, Fas signaling induces lung cancer tumor cells to produce prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and recruit myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) induce and express high levels of FasL, but the effects of Fas activation initiated by FasL in CTLs on apoptosis-resistant tumor cells remain largely unclear. We purified activated CD8(+) T cells from OT-1 mice, evaluated the regulatory effects of Fas activation on tumor cell escape and investigated the relevant mechanisms. We found that CTLs induced tumor cells to secrete PGE2 and increase tumor cell-mediated chemoattraction of MDSCs via Fas signaling, which was favorable to tumor growth. Our results indicate that CTLs may participate in the tumor immune evasion process. To the best of our knowledge, this is a novel mechanism by which CTLs play a role in tumor escape. Our findings implicate a strategy to enhance the antitumor immune response via reduction of negative immune responses to tumors promoted by CTLs through Fas signaling.

  8. Progression-related loss of stromal Caveolin 1 levels fosters the growth of human PC3 xenografts and mediates radiation resistance

    PubMed Central

    Panic, Andrej; Ketteler, Julia; Reis, Henning; Sak, Ali; Herskind, Carsten; Maier, Patrick; Rübben, Herbert; Jendrossek, Verena; Klein, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Despite good treatment results in localized prostate tumors, advanced disease stages usually have a pronounced resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The membrane protein caveolin-1 (Cav1) functions here as an important oncogene. Therefore we examined the impact of stromal Cav1 expression for tumor growth and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR). Silencing of Cav1 expression in PC3 cells resulted in increased tumor growth and a reduced growth delay after IR when compared to tumors generated by Cav1-expressing PC3 cells. The increased radiation resistance was associated with increasing amounts of reactive tumor stroma and a Cav1 re-expression in the malignant epithelial cells. Mimicking the human situation these results were confirmed using co-implantation of Cav1-silenced PC3 cells with Cav1-silenced or Cav1-expressing fibroblasts. Immunohistochemically analysis of irradiated tumors as well as human prostate tissue specimen confirmed that alterations in stromal-epithelial Cav1 expressions were accompanied by a more reactive Cav1-reduced tumor stroma after radiation and within advanced prostate cancer tissues which potentially mediates the resistance to radiation treatment. Conclusively, the radiation response of human prostate tumors is critically regulated by Cav1 expression in stromal fibroblasts. Loss of stromal Cav1 expression in advanced tumor stages may thus contribute to resistance of these tumors to radiotherapy. PMID:28112237

  9. Long noncoding RNA MHENCR promotes melanoma progression via regulating miR-425/489-mediated PI3K-Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangjun; Dong, Hao; Liu, Sha; Yu, Li; Yan, Dexiong; Yao, Xingwei; Sun, Weijing; Han, Dezhi; Gao, Guozhen

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidences demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are frequently dysregulated and have critical roles in many tumors. However, the roles and functional mechanisms of lncRNAs in melanoma remain largely unknown. In this study, we identified a novel lncRNA MHENCR which was upregulated in melanoma tissues and further upregulated in metastatic melanoma. Increased expression of MHENCR indicted poor survival of melanoma patients. Functional experiments revealed that MHENCR knockdown significantly inhibited melanoma cells proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and also attenuated melanoma cells migration in vitro. Furthermore, we identified MHENCR as a competitively endogenous RNA, which specifically bound to miR-425 and miR-489, upregulated their target genes IGF1 and SPIN1 expression, and further activated PI3K-Akt pathway. Statistically significant correlations were observed between MHENCR expression and IGF1 and SPIN1 in melanoma tissues. In vivo functional experiments further confirmed the pro-growth and pro-metastasis roles of MHENCR. Collectively, our findings revealed that MHENCR functions as an oncogene in melanoma via activating miR-425/489-mediated PI3K-Akt pathway, and may be a therapeutic target for melanoma. PMID:28123636

  10. Galectin-1 mediates TGF-β-induced transformation from normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and promotes tumor progression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lingyan; Xu, Cong; Guan, Zhonghai; Su, Xingyun; Xu, Zhenzhen; Cao, Jiang; Teng, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    Rcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major constituent of the tumor microenvironment. Cancer cells can induce the transformation from normal fibroblasts (NFs) into CAFs, reciprocally, CAFs promote tumor invasion and proliferation. TGF-β has been the mostly accepted factor to fuel NFs transformation into CAFs. Galectin-1 (Gal1) is highly upregulated in CAFs of multiple human cancers, and overexpression of Gal1 in CAFs promotes tumor progression. The effect of Gal1 on TGF-β-induced CAFs activation has not yet been established in gastric cancer (GC). In this study, we show that Gal1 expression in stroma is positively related to TGF-β in epithelial cells by retrospective analysis of GC patient samples. Meanwhile, conditioned media (CMs) from gastric cancer cells induce expression of both Gal1 and the CAFs marker alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in NFs via TGF-β secretion. Knockdown of Gal1 prevents TGF-β-induced the conversion of NFs to CAFs. CMs from fibroblasts overexpressing Gal1 inhibits cancer cells apoptosis, promotes migration and invasion in vitro. Thus, Gal1 is significantly involved in the development of tumor-promoting microenvironment by enhancing TGF-β signaling in a positive feedback loop. Targeting Gal1 in tumor stroma should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for GC. PMID:27186290

  11. Extracellular lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) mediates autoimmune disease progression in the NOD model of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    De Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Herren, Suzanne; Graber, Pierre; Vilbois, Francis; Pasquali, Christian; Berney, Claude; Plitz, Thomas; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie H

    2005-05-01

    Treatment (from 5 to 25 weeks of age) with a novel blocking monoclonal antibody, mAb I-10, directed against the plasma membrane (pm) form of LAMP-1, protected against development of autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse. A shorter course of treatment, i.e. from 5 to 12 weeks of age, significantly reduced the occurrence of insulitis as well as disease onset. Interfering with pm-LAMP-1 required continuous treatment as tolerance was not observed when treatment was stopped, and no higher proportion of cells with a T regulatory phenotype (e.g. CD4(+)CD25(+)) were induced. The mechanism appears to involve modulating a proinflammatory cytokine, as the proportion of pancreatic-infiltrating IFN-gamma-positive cells was significantly reduced in the mAb I-10-treated group. These results demonstrate an unexpected role for pm-LAMP-1 in autoimmune disease progression, and suggest that further investigation should be performed to understand how this molecule modulates IFN-gamma-driven responses.

  12. Mulberry leaf diet protects against progression of experimental autoimmune myocarditis to dilated cardiomyopathy via modulation of oxidative stress and MAPK-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Somasundaram; Mito, Sayaka; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Harima, Meilei; Nomoto, Mayumi; Suzuki, Kenji; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2013-12-01

    To examine the protective effects of dietary administration of Mulberry leaves (ML) on postmyocarditis dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) focusing on oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses and adverse myocardial remodeling. In this study, we used a rat model of cardiac myosin-induced experimental autoimmune myocarditis to test the effects of ML diet (MLD) (5%) on various markers of cardiac remodeling and function. After 4 weeks of immunization, the rats were fed with 5% MLD for 4 weeks. By the end of the study, echocardiography was performed to assess the myocardial dimensions. The heart tissue was used for histopathology and Western blotting analyses. Our study showed that the postmyocarditis rats exhibited increased oxidative stress when compared with the control rats. MLD supplementation suppressed this change, compared with vehicle treatment. In addition, postmyocarditis rats showed significant elevation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, which were prevented by the MLD supplementation. Similarly the vehicle-treated rats suffered with the adverse myocardial remodeling in the form of fibrosis as evidenced by the Azan-Mallory staining and immunohistochemistry for collagen-III levels, compared with the control rats. However, MLD treatment not only markedly attenuated cardiac fibrosis, but also improved the left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening. Interestingly, the myocardial levels of endothelin-1, activated members of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were significantly attenuated by MLD, indicating that the antihypertrophic effects of MLD are partially mediated via endothelin-1, MAPK, and VEGF pathway. Collectively, these results suggest that supplementation of rats with 5% MLD has the ability to regulate cardiac remodeling and improves cardiac function and hence contributes to prevent the development of postmyocarditis dilated cardiomyopathy. © 2013 John Wiley

  13. Progressive cell-mediated changes in articular cartilage and bone in mice are initiated by a single session of controlled cyclic compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Ko, Frank C; Dragomir, Cecilia L; Plumb, Darren A; Hsia, Allison W; Adebayo, Olufunmilayo O; Goldring, Steven R; Wright, Timothy M; Goldring, Mary B; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2016-11-01

    We previously showed that repetitive cyclic loading of the mouse knee joint causes changes that recapitulate the features of osteoarthritis (OA) in humans. By applying a single loading session, we characterized the temporal progression of the structural and compositional changes in subchondral bone and articular cartilage. We applied loading during a single 5-minute session to the left tibia of adult (26-week-old) C57Bl/6 male mice at a peak load of 9.0N for 1,200 cycles. Knee joints were collected at times 0, 1, and 2 weeks after loading. The changes in articular cartilage and subchondral bone were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry (caspase-3 and cathepsin K), and microcomputed tomography. At time 0, no change was evident in chondrocyte viability or cartilage or subchondral bone integrity. However, cartilage pathology demonstrated by localized thinning and proteoglycan loss occurred at 1 and 2 weeks after the single session of loading. Transient cancellous bone loss was evident at 1 week, associated with increased osteoclast number. Bone loss was reversed to control levels at 2 weeks. We observed formation of fibrous and cartilaginous tissues at the joint margins at 1 and 2 weeks. Our findings demonstrate that a single session of noninvasive loading leads to the development of OA-like morphological and cellular alterations in articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The loss in subchondral trabecular bone mass and thickness returns to control levels at 2 weeks, whereas the cartilage thinning and proteoglycan loss persist. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1941-1949, 2016.

  14. Inhibitory Effects of Quercetin on Progression of Human Choriocarcinoma Cells Are Mediated Through PI3K/AKT and MAPK Signal Transduction Cascades.

    PubMed

    Lim, Whasun; Yang, Changwon; Park, Sunwoo; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2017-06-01

    As a major dietary flavonol, quercetin mitigates proliferation and progression of cancer due to its anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and apoptotic biological effects on cells. Although its apoptotic effects have been reported for various cancers, little is known of the functional role of quercetin in gestational choriocarcinoma. Results of the present study indicated that quercetin reduced proliferation and induced cell death in two choriocarcinoma cell lines, JAR and JEG3 cells, with an increase in the sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, quercetin induced mitochondrial dysfunction significantly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both JAR and JEG3 cells. Further, quercetin inhibited phosphorylation of AKT, P70S6K and S6 proteins whereas, it increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, P38, JNK and P90RSK proteins in JAR and JEG3 cells. The decrease in viability of choriocarcinoma cells treated with quercetin was confirmed by using combinations of quercetin and pharmacological inhibitors of the PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways. Classical chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin (a platinum-based drug) and paclitaxel (a taxene-based drug), inhibited proliferation of JAR and JEG3 cells, and when combined with quercetin, the antiproliferative effects of cisplatin and paclitaxel were enhanced for both choriocarcinoma cell lines. Collectively, these results suggest that quercetin prevents development of choriocarcinoma and may be a valuable therapeutic agent for treatment of choriocarcinoma through its regulation of PI3K and MAPK signal transduction pathways. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1428-1440, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Impact of the SCF signaling pathway on leukemia stem cell-mediated ATL initiation and progression in an HBZ transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kuribayashi, Wakako; Takizawa, Kazuya; Sugata, Kenji; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Momose, Haruka; Sasaki, Eita; Hiradate, Yuki; Furuhata, Keiko; Asada, Yoshihisa; Iwama, Atsushi; Matsuoka, Masao; Mizukami, Takuo; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a malignant disease caused by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1. In aggressive ATL, the response to chemotherapy is extremely poor. We hypothesized that this poor response is due to the existence of chemotherapy-resistant cells, such as leukemic stem cells. Previously, we successfully identified an ATL stem cell (ATLSC) candidate as the c-kit+/CD38−/CD71− cells in an ATL mouse model using Tax transgenic mice. Here, with a new ATL mouse model using HBZ-transgenic mice, we further discovered that the functional ATLSC candidate, which commonly expresses c-kit, is drug-resistant and has the ability to initiate tumors and reconstitute lymphomatous cells. We characterized the ATLSCs as c-kit+/CD4−/CD8− cells and found that they have a similar gene expression profile as T cell progenitors. Additionally, we found that AP-1 gene family members, including Junb, Jund, and Fosb, were up-regulated in the ATLSC fraction. The results of an in vitro assay showed that ATLSCs cultured with cytokines known to promote stem cell expansion, such as stem cell factor (SCF), showed highly proliferative activity and maintained their stem cell fraction. Inhibition of c-kit–SCF signaling with the neutralizing antibody ACK2 affected ATLSC self-renewal and proliferation. Experiments in Sl/Sld mice, which have a mutation in the membrane-bound c-kit ligand, found that ATL development was completely blocked in these mice. These results clearly suggest that the c-kit–SCF signal plays a key role in ATLSC self-renewal and in ATL initiation and disease progression. PMID:27340921

  16. ShRNA-mediated silencing of the ubiquitin-specific protease 22 gene restrained cell progression and affected the Akt pathway in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Ya-Jing; Liao, Zhi-Wei; Yu, Hong-wei; Song, Xian-Lu; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Xing-Yuan; Lin, Xiao-dan; Zhou, Tong-Chong

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease 22 (USP22) is closely related with poor prognosis of cancer patients. However, the role of USP22 expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has not been determined. The main aim of this study was to determine the role of USP22 in the pathologic processes of NPC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot (WB), and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to measure the expression of USP22 in cell lines and tissues of NPC in comparison with expression in non-cancerous cells and tissues. USP22-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to knock down USP22 expression in the NPC cell line CNE-1 and CNE-2. Furthermore, the impact of USP22 in cellular proliferation, growth, and cell cycle were detected respectively. WB was used to determine the role of USP22 in the AKT/GSK-3/Cyclin signaling pathway. The expression levels of USP22 were remarkably higher in NPC cell lines and tissues. With cell counting and the MTS assay, cellular growth and proliferation progression of USP22 knockdown cell line was shown to be effectively restrained. The USP22 silencing both in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells caused them to accumulate in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. USP22 knockdown was also found to modulate the AKT/GSK-3/Cyclin pathway, resulting in downregulation of p-AKT, p-GSK-3β, and cyclinD1. This study suggests that USP22 plays a critical regulatory role in the pathologic processes of NPC, and that it may be a potential biological treatment target in the future. PMID:25482932

  17. Progressive Motor Deficit is Mediated by the Denervation of Neuromuscular Junctions and Axonal Degeneration in Transgenic Mice Expressing Mutant (P301S) Tau Protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhuoran; Valkenburg, Femke; Hornix, Betty E; Mantingh-Otter, Ietje; Zhou, Xingdong; Mari, Muriel; Reggiori, Fulvio; Van Dam, Debby; Eggen, Bart J L; De Deyn, Peter P; Boddeke, Erik

    2017-02-10

    Tauopathies include a variety of neurodegenerative diseases associated with the pathological aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau, resulting in progressive cognitive decline and motor impairment. The underlying mechanism for motor deficits related to tauopathy is not yet fully understood. Here, we use a novel transgenic tau mouse line, Tau 58/4, with enhanced neuron-specific expression of P301S mutant tau to investigate the motor abnormalities in association with the peripheral nervous system. Using stationary beam, gait, and rotarod tests, motor deficits were found in Tau 58/4 mice already 3 months after birth, which deteriorated during aging. Hyperphosphorylated tau was detected in the cell bodies and axons of motor neurons. At the age of 9 and 12 months, significant denervation of the neuromuscular junction in the extensor digitorum longus muscle was observed in Tau 58/4 mice, compared to wild-type mice. Muscle hypotrophy was observed in Tau 58/4 mice at 9 and 12 months. Using electron microscopy, we observed ultrastructural changes in the sciatic nerve of 12-month-old Tau 58/4 mice indicative of the loss of large axonal fibers and hypomyelination (assessed by g-ratio). We conclude that the accumulated hyperphosphorylated tau in the axon terminals may induce dying-back axonal degeneration, myelin abnormalities, neuromuscular junction denervation, and muscular atrophy, which may be the mechanisms responsible for the deterioration of the motor function in Tau 58/4 mice. Tau 58/4 mice represent an interesting neuromuscular degeneration model, and the pathological mechanisms might be responsible for motor signs observed in some human tauopathies.

  18. In neurons, activity-dependent association of dendritically transported mRNA transcripts with the transacting factor CBF-A is mediated by A2RE/RTS elements.

    PubMed

    Raju, Chandrasekhar S; Fukuda, Nanaho; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Göritz, Christian; Visa, Neus; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2011-06-01

    In neurons certain mRNA transcripts are transported to synapses through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Here we report that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein CBF-A (CArG Box binding Factor A) facilitates dendritic transport and localization of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα) mRNAs. We discovered that, in the adult mouse brain, CBF-A has a broad distribution. In the nucleus, CBF-A was found at active transcription sites and interchromosomal spaces and close to nuclear pores. In the cytoplasm, CBF-A localized to dendrites as well as pre- and postsynaptic sites. CBF-A was found in synaptosomal fractions, associated with Arc, BDNF, and CaMKIIα mRNAs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated a direct interaction mediated via their hnRNP A2 response element (A2RE)/RNA trafficking sequence (RTS) elements located in the 3' untranslated regions. In situ hybridization and microscopy on live hippocampal neurons showed that CBF-A is in dynamic granules containing Arc, BDNF, and CaMKIIα mRNAs. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) postsynaptic receptor stimulation led to CBF-A accumulation in dendrites; increased Arc, BDNF, and CaMKIIα mRNA levels; and increased amounts of transcripts coprecipitating with CBF-A. Finally, CBF-A gene knockdown led to decreased mRNA levels. We propose that CBF-A cotranscriptionally binds RTSs in Arc, BDNF, and CaMKIIα mRNAs and follows the transcripts from genes to dendrites, promoting activity-dependent nuclear sorting of transport-competent mRNAs.

  19. Progression of genotype-specific oral cancer leads to senescence of cancer-associated fibroblasts and is mediated by oxidative stress and TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Yazan; Cirillo, Nicola; Lim, Kue Peng; Herman, Andrew; Mellone, Max; Thomas, Gareth J; Pitiyage, Gayani N; Parkinson, E Ken; Prime, Stephen S

    2013-06-01

    Keratinocyte senescence acts as a barrier to tumor progression but appears to be lost in late pre-malignancy to yield genetically unstable oral squamous cell carcinomas (GU-OSCC); a subset of OSCC possessing wild-type p53 and are genetically stable (GS-OSCC). In this study, fibroblasts from GU-OSCC were senescent relative to fibroblasts from GS-OSCC, epithelial dysplastic tissues or normal oral mucosa, as demonstrated by increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-Gal) activity and overexpression of p16(INK4A). Keratinocytes from GU-OSCC produced high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and this was associated with an increase in the production of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and TGF-β2 in stromal fibroblasts. Treatment of normal fibroblasts with keratinocyte conditioned media (CM) from GU-OSCC, but not GS-OSCC or dysplastic keratinocytes with dysfunctional p53, induced fibroblast senescence. This phenomenon was inhibited by antioxidants and anti-TGF-β antibodies. Fibroblast activation by TGF-β1 preceded cellular senescence and was associated with increased ROS levels; antioxidants inhibited this reaction. Senescent fibroblasts derived from GU-OSCC or normal fibroblasts treated with CM from GU-OSCC or hydrogen peroxide, but not non-senescent fibroblasts derived from GS-OSCC, promoted invasion of keratinocytes in vitro. Epithelial invasion was stimulated by fibroblast activation and amplified further by fibroblast senescence. The data demonstrate that malignant keratinocytes from GU-OSCC, but not their pre-malignant counterparts, produce high levels of ROS, which, in turn, increase TGF-β1 expression and induce fibroblast activation and senescence in a p5-independent manner. Fibroblasts from GU-OSCC were particularly susceptible to oxidative DNA damage because of high levels of ROS production, downregulation of antioxidant genes and upregulation of pro-oxidant genes. The results demonstrate the functional diversity of cancer

  20. A potential contribution of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 by the mediation of monocyte differentiation in the development and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsin-Ying; Huang, Chun-Yao; Shih, Chun-Ming; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Chein-Sung; Lin, Feng-Yen; Shih, Chun-Che

    2017-10-01

    expression of DPP-4 as compared with SAA mice. Increased plasma DPP-4 activity may correlate with aneurysmal development. CD26 on monocytes plays a critical role in cell differentiation, possibly mediated by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2-p21 axis signaling pathways and cytoskeletal proteins reassembly. Exploring the role of DPP-4 further may yield potential therapeutic insights. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of subtilisin-like proprotein convertase PACE4 by E2F: possible role of E2F-mediated upregulation of PACE4 in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Keizo; Suzue, Kaori; Nagahama, Masami; Matsuda, Yoshiko; Tsuji, Akihiko

    2007-11-01

    PACE4, a member of the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase (SPC) family, is expressed at high levels in certain tumor cells and plays a role in metastatic progression through activation of matrix metalloproteinases. The mechanism leading to overexpression of PACE4 in tumor cells remains unclear. In this study, we show that the E2F1 transcription factor, which is implicated in carcinoma invasiveness, upregulates the expression of PACE4. HT1080 (highly tumorigenic and invasive) cells expressed much higher levels of PACE4 and E2F family (E2F1 and E2F2) transcripts than IMR90 (normal fibroblast) cells. Expression levels of other SPCs (furin and PC6) remained unchanged in these cells. Promoter analysis indicated that two E2F consensus binding sites (-117/-110 and -86/-79) in the 5'-flanking region of the human PACE4 gene function as positive regulatory elements. Mutation of these sites abolished PACE4 promoter response to E2F1 as well as binding of E2F1 in electrophoretic mobility-shift assays. Other E2F members, E2F2 and E2F3, also activated PACE4 expression, as in the case of E2F1. These results indicate a novel mechanism for E2F family-mediated promotion of carcinoma invasiveness through PACE4.

  2. Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, David P.; Fairchild, Amanda J.; Fritz, Matthew S.

    2010-01-01

    Mediating variables are prominent in psychological theory and research. A mediating variable transmits the effect of an independent variable on a dependent variable. Differences between mediating variables and confounders, moderators, and covariates are outlined. Statistical methods to assess mediation and modern comprehensive approaches are described. Future directions for mediation analysis are discussed. PMID:16968208

  3. Sensitization of lung cancer cells to cisplatin by β-elemene is mediated through blockade of cell cycle progression: antitumor efficacies of β-elemene and its synthetic analogs.

    PubMed

    Li, Q Quentin; Wang, Gangduo; Huang, Furong; Li, Jueli M; Cuff, Christopher F; Reed, Eddie

    2013-03-01

    The development of effective agents for overcoming platinum chemoresistance in lung carcinoma continues to have high priority. We have demonstrated recently that β-elemene, a novel antitumor compound, enhances cisplatin activity by triggering lung cancer cell death via apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether β-elemene acts synergistically with cisplatin to inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression. β-Elemene substantially increased the suppressive effect of cisplatin on cell growth and proliferation in the NSCLC cell lines H460 and A549. Furthermore, β-elemene augmented cisplatin in the cell cycle arrest of NSCLC cells at G(2)/M. This was associated with upregulated checkpoint kinase (CHK2) expression and reduced CDC2 activity (i.e., increased phosphorylation of CDC2 on Tyr-15 and decreased phosphorylation of CDC2 on Thr-161). Moreover, β-elemene and cisplatin in combination clearly decreased the protein levels of cyclin B1 and CDC25C and increased the levels of p21(Cip1/Waf1), p27(Kip1), and GADD45 in these cells, compared with the effects of either agent alone at the same concentration. These results suggest that the β-elemene-enhanced inhibitory effect of cisplatin on lung carcinoma cell proliferation is regulated by a CHK2-mediated CDC25C/CDC2/cyclin B1 signaling pathway and leads to the blockade of cell cycle progression at G(2)/M. A comparison of the cytotoxic efficacies of β-elemene and three synthetic analogs (β-elemenol, β-elemenal, and β-elemene fluoride) in the two lung cancer cell lines revealed that β-elemenol and β-elemene fluoride had the same antitumor efficacy as β-elemene, whereas β-elemenal was appreciably more potent than β-elemene. Thus, although all three synthetic analogs of β-elemene considerably suppressed NSCLC cell growth and proliferation, β-elemenal may have greater potential as an anticancer alternative to β-elemene in treating lung cancer and other tumors.

  4. Coagulation factor VIIa-mediated protease-activated receptor 2 activation leads to β-catenin accumulation via the AKT/GSK3β pathway and contributes to breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Roy, Abhishek; Ansari, Shabbir A; Das, Kaushik; Prasad, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Anindita; Mallik, Suman; Mukherjee, Ashis; Sen, Prosenjit

    2017-08-18

    Cell migration and invasion are very characteristic features of cancer cells that promote metastasis, which is one of the most common causes of mortality among cancer patients. Emerging evidence has shown that coagulation factors can directly mediate cancer-associated complications either by enhancing thrombus formation or by initiating various signaling events leading to metastatic cancer progression. It is well established that, apart from its distinct role in blood coagulation, coagulation factor FVIIa enhances aggressive behaviors of breast cancer cells, but the underlying signaling mechanisms still remain elusive. To this end, we investigated FVIIa's role in the migration and invasiveness of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Consistent with previous observations, we observed that FVIIa increased the migratory and invasive potential of these cells. We also provide molecular evidence that protease-activated receptor 2 activation followed by PI3K-AKT activation and GSK3β inactivation is involved in these processes and that β-catenin, a well known tumor-regulatory protein, contributes to this signaling pathway. The pivotal role of β-catenin was further indicated by the up-regulation of its downstream targets cyclin D1, c-Myc, COX-2, MMP-7, MMP-14, and Claudin-1. β-Catenin knockdown almost completely attenuated the FVIIa-induced enhancement of breast cancer migration and invasion. These findings provide a new perspective to counteract the invasive behavior of breast cancer, indicating that blocking PI3K-AKT pathway-dependent β-catenin accumulation may represent a potential therapeutic approach to control breast cancer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to Review To highlight the pathological features and clinical aspects of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). To highlight results of clinical trial experience to date and review ongoing clinical trials and perspective new treatment options. Explain the challenges of clinical trial design in PMS. Recent Findings MS has been identified as a chronic immune mediated disease, and the progressive phase of the disease appears to have significant neurodegenerative mechanisms. The classification of the course of PMS has been re-organized into categories of active vs. inactive inflammatory disease and the presence vs. absence of gradual disease progression. This differentiation allows clearer conceptualization of PMS and possibly even more efficient recruitment of PMS subjects into clinical trials. Clinical trial experience to date in PMS has been negative with anti-inflammatory medications used in relapsing MS. Simvastatin was recently tested in a phase II trial and showed a 43% reduction on annualized atrophy progression in secondary progressive MS. Ongoing PMS trials are currently being conducted with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor ibudilast, S1P modulator siponimod, and anti-B-cell therapy ocrelizumab. Several efforts for development of outcome measures in PMS are ongoing. Summary PMS represents a significant challenge, as the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, no validated outcome metrics have been established, and clinical trial experience to date has been disappointing. Advances in the understanding of the disease and lessons learned in previous clinical trials are paving the way for successful development of disease modifying agents for this disease. PMID:25887766

  6. Flexible Mediation Analysis With Multiple Mediators.

    PubMed

    Steen, Johan; Loeys, Tom; Moerkerke, Beatrijs; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2017-07-15

    The advent of counterfactual-based mediation analysis has triggered enormous progress on how, and under what assumptions, one may disentangle path-specific effects upon combining arbitrary (possibly nonlinear) models for mediator and outcome. However, current developments have largely focused on single mediators because required identification assumptions prohibit simple extensions to settings with multiple mediators that may depend on one another. In this article, we propose a procedure for obtaining fine-grained decompositions that may still be recovered from observed data in such complex settings. We first show that existing analytical approaches target specific instances of a more general set of decompositions and may therefore fail to provide a comprehensive assessment of the processes that underpin cause-effect relationships between exposure and outcome. We then outline conditions for obtaining the remaining set of decompositions. Because the number of targeted decompositions increases rapidly with the number of mediators, we introduce natural effects models along with estimation methods that allow for flexible and parsimonious modeling. Our procedure can easily be implemented using off-the-shelf software and is illustrated using a reanalysis of the World Health Organization's Large Analysis and Review of European Housing and Health Status (WHO-LARES) study on the effect of mold exposure on mental health (2002-2003). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Causal Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, R M; De Stavola, B L; Cousens, S N; Vansteelandt, S

    2015-01-01

    In diverse fields of empirical research—including many in the biological sciences—attempts are made to decompose the effect of an exposure on an outcome into its effects via a number of different pathways. For example, we may wish to separate the effect of heavy alcohol consumption on systolic blood pressure (SBP) into effects via body mass index (BMI), via gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and via other pathways. Much progress has been made, mainly due to contributions from the field of causal inference, in understanding the precise nature of statistical estimands that capture such intuitive effects, the assumptions under which they can be identified, and statistical methods for doing so. These contributions have focused almost entirely on settings with a single mediator, or a set of mediators considered en bloc; in many applications, however, researchers attempt a much more ambitious decomposition into numerous path-specific effects through many mediators. In this article, we give counterfactual definitions of such path-specific estimands in settings with multiple mediators, when earlier mediators may affect later ones, showing that there are many ways in which decomposition can be done. We discuss the strong assumptions under which the effects are identified, suggesting a sensitivity analysis approach when a particular subset of the assumptions cannot be justified. These ideas are illustrated using data on alcohol consumption, SBP, BMI, and GGT from the Izhevsk Family Study. We aim to bridge the gap from “single mediator theory” to “multiple mediator practice,” highlighting the ambitious nature of this endeavor and giving practical suggestions on how to proceed. PMID:25351114

  8. HLA-A2 Supertype-Restricted Cell-Mediated Immunity by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Derived from Malian Children with Severe or Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria and Healthy Controls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-25

    into a study evaluating risk and protective factors for severe malaria. The study site of Bandiagara (population, 13,600) is located in Mali, West...the healthy controls. Responses to individual peptide pools were limited. These studies confirm the presence of adaptive cell-mediated immunity to...epitopes. However, whether these immune responses to TRAP, CSP, and Exp-1 malarial proteins play a substantial role in protection remains a matter of

  9. Differential cellular expression of organic anion transporting peptides OATP1A2 and OATP2B1 in the human retina and brain: implications for carrier-mediated transport of neuropeptides and neurosteriods in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Vavricka, Stephan R; Meier, Peter J; Stieger, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are polyspecific organic anion transporters, which are expressed in the blood-brain barrier, the choroid plexus, and other organs. The physiologic function of OATPs in extrahepatic tissues remains ambiguous. In rat retina, members of the OATP family are expressed. We therefore investigated the human retina for the expression of OATP1A2 and OATP2B1 and extended the study to human brain. Furthermore, we searched for peptide neurotransmitters as novel OATP substrates. OATP1A2 displayed a broad expression pattern in human retina as assessed by immunofluorescence localization. It is expressed in photoreceptor bodies and somas of amacrine cells. OATP1B2 expression is restricted to the inner nuclear layer and to the inner plexiform layer. Using paraffin sections from human cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus, OATP1A2 was localized to neurons and neuronal processes, while OATP2B1 is expressed in endothelial cells of brain capillaries. Substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide were identified as substrates for OATP1A2 and OATP2B1. Double-labeling immunofluorescence of human retina demonstrated the presence of substance P and of vasoactive intestinal peptides in neurons expressing OATP1A2 and OATP2B1, respectively. The expression of OATP1A2 and OATP2B1 in retinal neurons implies a role of these transporters in the reuptake of peptide neurotransmitters released from retinal neurons. The abundant expression of OATP1A2 in brain neurons points to the possibility that OATP1A2 could be involved in the homeostasis of neurosteroids. The high expression of OATP2B1 in brain capillaries supports an important function of OATPs in substance penetration across the blood-brain barrier.

  10. Mediating Ebonics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Robin R. Means; Daniel, Jack L.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that Ebonics has been mediated in ways that clearly reveal American racial politics, which remain hostile to African Americans, describing the dominant strategies used to mediate Ebonics and locating those media strategies within the cultural context of racist circumstances, the racist political history of African Americans, and African…

  11. Role of A2B adenosine receptor signaling in adenosine-dependent pulmonary inflammation and injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chun-Xiao; Zhong, Hongyan; Mohsenin, Amir; Morschl, Eva; Chunn, Janci L.; Molina, Jose G.; Belardinelli, Luiz; Zeng, Dewan; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In vitro studies suggest that activation of the A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR) results in proinflammatory and profibrotic effects relevant to the progression of lung diseases; however, in vivo data supporting these observations are lacking. Adenosine deaminase–deficient (ADA-deficient) mice develop pulmonary inflammation and injury that are dependent on increased lung adenosine levels. To investigate the role of the A2BAR in vivo, ADA-deficient mice were treated with the selective A2BAR antagonist CVT-6883, and pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, and airspace integrity were assessed. Untreated and vehicle-treated ADA-deficient mice developed pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, and enlargement of alveolar airspaces; conversely, CVT-6883–treated ADA-deficient mice showed less pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, and alveolar airspace enlargement. A2BAR antagonism significantly reduced elevations in proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines as well as mediators of fibrosis and airway destruction. In addition, treatment with CVT-6883 attenuated pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in wild-type mice subjected to bleomycin-induced lung injury. These findings suggest that A2BAR signaling influences pathways critical for pulmonary inflammation and injury in vivo. Thus in chronic lung diseases associated with increased adenosine, antagonism of A2BAR-mediated responses may prove to be a beneficial therapy. PMID:16841096

  12. A DELLA gene, RhGAI1, is a direct target of EIN3 and mediates ethylene-regulated rose petal cell expansion via repressing the expression of RhCesA2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Ma, Nan; Pei, Haixia; Chen, Jiwei; Li, Jing; Gao, Junping

    2013-11-01

    Ethylene plays an important role in organ growth. In Arabidopsis, ethylene can inhibit root elongation by stabilizing DELLA proteins. In previous work, it was found that ethylene suppressed cell expansion in rose petals, and five unisequences of DELLA genes are induced by ethylene. However, the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of DELLA genes by ethylene is still not clear. The results showed that the expression of RhGAI1 was induced in both ethylene-treated and ETR gene-silenced rose petals, and the promoter activity of RhGAI1 was strongly induced by RhEIN3-3 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. What is more, RhEIN3-3 could bind to the promoter of RhGAI1 directly in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Cell expansion was suppressed in RhGAI1-Δ17-overexpressed Arabidopsis petals and promoted in RhGAI1-silenced rose petals. Moreover, in RhGAI1-silenced petals, the expression of nine cell expansion-related genes was clearly changed, and RhGAI1 can bind to the promoter of RhCesA2 in an EMSA. These results suggested that RhGAI1 was regulated by ethylene at the transcriptional level, and RhGAI1 was a direct target of RhEIN3-3. Also, RhGAI1 was shown to be involved in cell expansion partially through regulating the expression of cell expansion-related genes. Furthermore, RhCesA2 was a direct target of RhGAI1. This work uncovers the transcriptional regulation of RhGAI1 by ethylene and provides a better understanding of how ethylene regulates petal expansion in roses.

  13. A DELLA gene, RhGAI1, is a direct target of EIN3 and mediates ethylene-regulated rose petal cell expansion via repressing the expression of RhCesA2

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Junping

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene plays an important role in organ growth. In Arabidopsis, ethylene can inhibit root elongation by stabilizing DELLA proteins. In previous work, it was found that ethylene suppressed cell expansion in rose petals, and five unisequences of DELLA genes are induced by ethylene. However, the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of DELLA genes by ethylene is still not clear. The results showed that the expression of RhGAI1 was induced in both ethylene-treated and ETR gene-silenced rose petals, and the promoter activity of RhGAI1 was strongly induced by RhEIN3-3 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. What is more, RhEIN3-3 could bind to the promoter of RhGAI1 directly in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Cell expansion was suppressed in RhGAI1-Δ17-overexpressed Arabidopsis petals and promoted in RhGAI1-silenced rose petals. Moreover, in RhGAI1-silenced petals, the expression of nine cell expansion-related genes was clearly changed, and RhGAI1 can bind to the promoter of RhCesA2 in an EMSA. These results suggested that RhGAI1 was regulated by ethylene at the transcriptional level, and RhGAI1 was a direct target of RhEIN3-3. Also, RhGAI1 was shown to be involved in cell expansion partially through regulating the expression of cell expansion-related genes. Furthermore, RhCesA2 was a direct target of RhGAI1. This work uncovers the transcriptional regulation of RhGAI1 by ethylene and provides a better understanding of how ethylene regulates petal expansion in roses. PMID:24014864

  14. Functions, dysfunctions and possible therapeutic relevance of adenosine A2A receptors in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Patrizia; Blum, David; Martire, Alberto; Ledent, Catherine; Ceruti, Stefania; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize and critically discuss the complex role played by adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) in Huntington's disease (HD). Since A(2A)Rs are mainly localized on the neurons, which degenerate early in HD, and given their ability to stimulate glutamate outflow and inflammatory gliosis, it was hypothesized that they could be involved in the pathogenesis of HD, and that A(2A)R antagonists could be neuroprotective. This was further sustained by the demonstration that A(2A)Rs and underlying signaling systems undergo profound changes in cellular and animal models of HD. More recently, however, the equation A(2A) receptor blockade=neuroprotection has appeared too simplistic. First, it is now definitely clear that, besides mediating 'bad' responses (for example, stimulation of glutamate outflow and excessive glial activation), A(2A)Rs also promote 'good' responses (such as trophic and antinflammatory effects). This implies that A(2A)R blockade results either in pro-toxic or neuroprotective effects according to the mechanisms involved in a given experimental model. Second, since HD is a chronically progressive disease, the multiple mechanisms involving A(2A)Rs may play different relative roles along the degenerative process. Such different mechanisms can be influenced by A(2A)R activation or blockade in different ways, even leading to opposite outcomes depending on the time of agonist/antagonist administration. The number, and the complexity, of the possible scenarios is further increased by the influence of mutant Huntingtin on both the expression and functions of A(2A)Rs, and by the strikingly different effects mediated by A(2A)Rs expressed by different cell populations within the brain.

  15. Autonomy Support and Intrinsic Goal Progress Expectancy and Its Links to Longitudinal Study Effort and Subjective Wellbeing: The Differential Mediating Effect of Intrinsic and Identified Regulations and the Moderator Effects of Effort and Intrinsic Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waaler, Rune; Halvari, Halgeir; Skjesol, Knut; Bagoien, Tor Egil

    2013-01-01

    The authors tested a self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000) process model of subjective wellbeing among students at Norwegian Folk High Schools. In this model the authors hypothesized that students' intrinsic goal progress expectancy in the chosen study activity and perceived autonomy support from teachers would be positively associated…

  16. Autonomy Support and Intrinsic Goal Progress Expectancy and Its Links to Longitudinal Study Effort and Subjective Wellbeing: The Differential Mediating Effect of Intrinsic and Identified Regulations and the Moderator Effects of Effort and Intrinsic Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waaler, Rune; Halvari, Halgeir; Skjesol, Knut; Bagoien, Tor Egil

    2013-01-01

    The authors tested a self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000) process model of subjective wellbeing among students at Norwegian Folk High Schools. In this model the authors hypothesized that students' intrinsic goal progress expectancy in the chosen study activity and perceived autonomy support from teachers would be positively associated…

  17. Structure and Function of HLA-A*02-Restricted Hantaan Virus Cytotoxic T-Cell Epitope That Mediates Effective Protective Responses in HLA-A2.1/Kb Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying; Cheng, Linfeng; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Yusi; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhang, Yun; Tang, Kang; Zhuang, Ran; Chen, Lihua; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Fanglin; Jin, Boquan

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus infections cause severe emerging diseases in humans and are associated with high mortality rates; therefore, they have become a global public health concern. Our previous study showed that the CD8+ T-cell epitope aa129–aa137 (FVVPILLKA, FA9) of the Hantaan virus (HTNV) nucleoprotein (NP), restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*02, induced specific CD8+ T-cell responses that controlled HTNV infection in humans. However, the in vivo immunogenicity of peptide FA9 and the effect of FA9-specific CD8+ T-cell immunity remain unclear. Here, based on a detailed structural analysis of the peptide FA9/HLA-A*0201 complex and functional investigations using HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic (Tg) mice, we found that the overall structure of the peptide FA9/HLA-A*0201 complex displayed a typical MHC class I fold with Val2 and Ala9 as primary anchor residues and Val3 and Leu7 as secondary anchor residues that allow peptide FA9 to bind tightly with an HLA-A*0201 molecule. Residues in the middle portion of peptide FA9 extruding out of the binding groove may be the sites that allow for recognition by T-cell receptors. Immunization with peptide FA9 in HLA-A2.1/Kb Tg mice induced FA9-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses characterized by the induction of high expression levels of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, granzyme B, and CD107a. In an HTNV challenge trial, significant reductions in the levels of both the antigens and the HTNV RNA loads were observed in the liver, spleen, and kidneys of Tg mice pre-vaccinated with peptide FA9. Thus, our findings highlight the ability of HTNV epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell immunity to control HTNV and support the possibility that the HTNV-NP FA9 peptide, naturally processed in vivo in an HLA-A*02-restriction manner, may be a good candidate for the development HTNV peptide vaccines. PMID:27551282

  18. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Coppi, Elisabetta; Dettori, Ilaria; Maraula, Giovanna; Cellai, Lucrezia; Melani, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes). Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke. PMID:25165414

  19. Glutamine preferentially inhibits T-helper type 2 cell-mediated airway inflammation and late airway hyperresponsiveness through the inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) activity in a murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Ko, H M; Kang, N I; Kim, Y S; Lee, Y M; Jin, Z W; Jung, Y J; Im, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, Y H; Cho, B H; Lee, H K

    2008-02-01

    The non-essential amino acid, l-glutamine (Gln), is abundant in the human body. Gln exhibits beneficial effects on endotoxic shock through the inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) activity. cPLA(2) has been reported to be implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, but the effects of Gln on asthma have not yet been defined. To investigate the effects of Gln on allergic bronchial inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and to determine the possible action mechanisms of Gln in a murine model of asthma. cPLA(2) phosphorylation was assessed by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Smears of bronchoalveolar lavage cells were stained with Diff-Quik solution for differential cell counting. Airway levels of the proteins [T-helper type-1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines, and mucin] were measured by ELISA. mRNA expression of cytokines was assessed by real-time RT-PCR. AHR was assessed as a change in airway resistance (RL). Histological studies were performed to assess the levels of mucin and pulmonary inflammation. Systemic Gln administration inhibited cPLA(2) phosphorylation and its enzymatic activity in the lungs. Additionally, Gln effectively suppressed the key features of Th2-dependent asthmatic features, such as airway eosinophilia, mucus formation, and airway type 2 cytokine production, as well as late AHR. Gln was found to be effective in the suppression of Th2-dependent phenotypes and late AHR, and this effect of Gln appeared to be at least partially attributable to its ability to suppress cLPA(2) activity in the airway. Our results suggest that clinical use of Gln for patients with asthma may be beneficial.

  20. Progressive Response Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, V. J.; Swiler, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Response surface functions are often used as simple and inexpensive replacements for computationally expensive computer models that simulate the behavior of a complex system over some parameter space. Progressive response surfaces are ones that are built up progressively as global information is added from new sample points in the parameter space. As the response surfaces are globally upgraded based on new information, heuristic indications of the convergence of the response surface approximation to the exact (fitted) function can be inferred. Sampling points can be incrementally added in a structured fashion, or in an unstructured fashion. Whatever the approach, at least in early stages of sampling it is usually desirable to sample the entire parameter space uniformly. At later stages of sampling, depending on the nature of the quantity being resolved, it may be desirable to continue sampling uniformly over the entire parameter space (Progressive response surfaces), or to switch to a focusing/economizing strategy of preferentially sampling certain regions of the parameter space based on information gained in early stages of sampling (Adaptive response surfaces). Here we consider Progressive response surfaces where a balanced indication of global response over the parameter space is desired.We use a variant of Moving Least Squares to fit and interpolate structured and unstructured point sets over the parameter space. On a 2-D test problem we compare response surface accuracy for three incremental sampling methods: Progressive Lattice Sampling; Simple-Random Monte Carlo; and Halton Quasi-Monte-Carlo sequences. We are ultimately after a system for constructing efficiently upgradable response surface approximations with reliable error estimates.

  1. Mediator deathwork.

    PubMed

    Walter, Tony

    2005-06-01

    The most discussed and analyzed form of deathwork is the dyadic therapist--client relationship, but this far from exhausts the various types of professional work involving the dead. Mediator deathwork is where the professional gleans or constructs information about the dead, edits and polishes it, and publicly presents the edited version in a public rite; this entails a triadic flow of information: the dead--the mediator--public rite. Examples include pathologists, coroners, American funeral directors, funeral celebrants, obituary writers, spiritualist mediums, and museum curators. Other types include barrier deathwork (in which the professional insulates the living from the dead--the dead | the living--as in British funeral directing), and intercessory deathwork in which priests send prayers the other way, from the living to, or on behalf of, the dead: mourner--priest--the dead. The article focuses on mediator deathwork because, though it is the most widespread form of deathwork, it is the least discussed and analyzed.

  2. Silencing of CD40 in vivo reduces progression of experimental atherogenesis through an NF-κB/miR-125b axis and reveals new potential mediators in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hueso, Miguel; De Ramon, Laura; Navarro, Estanislao; Ripoll, Elia; Cruzado, Josep M; Grinyo, Josep M; Torras, Joan

    2016-12-01

    CD40/CD40L signaling exerts a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators in vascular inflammation and plaque formation. In this work, we investigated mRNA/miRNA expression during progression of atherosclerotic lesions through CD40 silencing. We silenced CD40 with a specific siRNA in ApoE(-/-) mice and compared expression of mRNA/miRNA in ascending aorta with scrambled treated mice. siRNA-CD40 treated mice significantly reduced the extension and severity of atherosclerotic lesions, as well as the number of F4/80(+), galectin-3(+) macrophages and NF-κB(+) cells in the intima. Genome-wide mRNA/miRNA profiling allowed the identification of transcripts, which were significantly upregulated during atherosclerosis; among them, miR-125b and miR-30a, Xpr1, a regulator of macrophage differentiation, Taf3, a core transcription factor and the NF-κB activator Ikkβ, whereas, the NF-κB inhibitor Ikbα was downregulated during disease progression. All those changes were reversed upon CD40 silencing. Interestingly, TAF3, XPR1 and miR-125b were also overexpressed in human atherosclerotic plaques. Murine Taf3 and Xpr1 were detected in the perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT), and Taf3 also in intimal foam cells. Finally, expression of miR-125b was regulated by the CD40-NF-κB signaling axis in RAW264.7 macrophages. CD40 silencing with a specific siRNA ameliorates progression of experimental atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice, and evidences a role for NF-κB, Taf3, Xpr1, and miR-125b in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mediator Deathwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The most discussed and analyzed form of deathwork is the dyadic "therapist" [double arrow] "client" relationship, but this far from exhausts the various types of professional work involving the dead. Mediator deathwork is where the professional gleans or constructs information about the dead, edits and polishes it, and publicly…

  4. Mediator Deathwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The most discussed and analyzed form of deathwork is the dyadic "therapist" [double arrow] "client" relationship, but this far from exhausts the various types of professional work involving the dead. Mediator deathwork is where the professional gleans or constructs information about the dead, edits and polishes it, and publicly…

  5. Effect of caffeine on the expression of cytochrome P450 1A2, adenosine A2A receptor and dopamine transporter in control and 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine treated mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Seema; Singh, Kavita; Gupta, Satya Prakash; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2009-08-04

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relationship between coffee consumption and susceptibility to PD. Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) is involved in caffeine metabolism and its clearance. Caffeine, on the other hand, antagonizes adenosine A(2A) receptor and regulates dopamine signaling through dopamine transporter (DAT). The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression of CYP1A2, adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT in mouse striatum and to assess their levels in 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropryridine (MPTP) treated mouse striatum with and without caffeine treatment. The animals were treated intraperitoneally daily with caffeine (20 mg/kg) for 8 weeks, followed by MPTP (20 mg/kg)+caffeine (20 mg/kg) for 4 weeks or vice versa, along with respective controls. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, levels of dopamine and 1-methyl 4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+)), expressions of CYP1A2, adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT and CYP1A2 catalytic activity were measured in control and treated mouse brain. Caffeine partially protected MPTP-induced neurodegenerative changes and modulated MPTP-mediated alterations in the expression and catalytic activity of CYP1A2, expression of adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT. The results demonstrate that caffeine alters the striatal CYP1A2, adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT expressions in mice exposed to MPTP.

  6. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis

  7. Primary Progressive Aphasia

    MedlinePlus

    Primary progressive aphasia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Primary progressive aphasia (uh-FAY-zhuh) is a rare nervous system (neurological) syndrome ... your ability to communicate. People with primary progressive aphasia can have trouble expressing their thoughts and understanding ...

  8. MicroRNA-H4-5p encoded by HSV-1 latency-associated transcript promotes cell proliferation, invasion and cell cycle progression via p16-mediated PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in SHSY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiliang; Zhang, Chunying; Hou, Guangjun; Song, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) microRNAs (miRNAs) mostly located in transcription-associated transcript (LAT) region have been identified that play critical roles in the intricate host-pathogen interaction networks. Increasing evidences throw new insight into the role of miRNA-mediated miRNA-mRNA cross-talk in HSV-1 latent or acute infection. In the present study, we found that hsv-1 miR-H4-5p (here termed as miR-H4b) can down-regulate the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A, p16) in neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cell lines. Decreased expression of miR-H4b was directly related to attenuated cell proliferation and invasion as well as malfunction of cell cycle in recombinant SHSY5Y cells that stably expressing miR-H4b. Bioinformatics analysis and luciferase assays demonstrated miR-H4b can directly target p16 mRNA. MiR-H4b exerts its pro-proliferation function through inhibition of the p16-related PI3K-Akt pathways. Our findings provide, for the first time, significant clues regarding the role of herpesvirus-encoded miRNAs as a viral modulator to host cells. PMID:26221296

  9. Intrastriatal rAAV-Mediated Delivery of Anti-huntingtin shRNAs Induces Partial Reversal of Disease Progression in R6/1 Huntington’s Disease Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Lebron, Edgardo; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M.; Nash, Kevin; Lewin, Alfred S.; Mandel, Ronald J.

    2008-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by the presence of an abnormally expanded polyglutamine domain in the N-terminus of huntingtin. We developed a recombinant adeno-associated viral serotype 5 (rAAV5) gene transfer strategy to posttranscriptionally suppress the levels of striatal mutant huntingtin (mHtt) in the R6/1 HD transgenic mouse via RNA interference. Transient cotransfection of HEK293 cells with plasmids expressing a portion of human mHtt derived from R6/1 transgenic HD mice and a short-hairpin RNA directed against the 5′ UTR of the mHtt mRNA (siHUNT-1) resulted in reduction in the levels of mHtt mRNA (−75%) and protein (−60%). Long-term in vivo rAAV5-mediated expression of siHUNT-1 in the striatum of R6/1 mice reduced the levels of mHtt mRNA (−78%) and protein (−28%) as determined by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The reduction in mHtt was concomitant with a reduction in the size and number of neuronal intranuclear inclusions and a small but significant normalization of the steady-state levels of preproenkephalin and dopamine- and cAMP-responsive phosphoprotein 32 kDa mRNA. Finally, bilateral expression of rAAV5-siHUNT-1 resulted in delayed onset of the rear paw clasping phenotype exhibited by the R6/1 mice. These results suggest that a reduction in the levels of striatal mHtt can ameliorate the HD phenotype of R6/1 mice. PMID:16019264

  10. Immune Suppression Mediated by Myeloid and Lymphoid Derived Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment Facilitates Progression of Thyroid Cancers Driven by HrasG12V and Pten Loss

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Lee Ann; Massoll, Nicole; Franco, Aime T

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and is predicted to be the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer by 2030. Approximately one-half of follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC) contain genetic alterations in RAS family members. Furthermore, Cowden's disease, which is characterized by loss of PTEN, predisposes for the development of FTC in humans. We have shown that thyroid specific expression of HrasG12V at endogenous levels and Pten inactivation (HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-cre mice) leads to the development of FTCs that closely recapitulate human disease, with complete penetrance at one year. In patients, FTCs metastasize via the bloodstream to distant sites, frequently the lungs, bones and brain. The first objective of the study was to determine if these mice developed de novo metastasis to relevant sites. Indeed, spontaneous metastasis to the lungs was observed in 56% of HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-cre mice. We next sought to identify the cellular components within the tumor microenvironment (TME) of FTC that contribute to tumor progression and metastasis via FACS analysis. Surprisingly, a large amount of immune infiltrate was observed. HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-Cre thyroid tumors were comprised of 68.5 ± 11.79% CD45+ cells, in stark contrast to wild-type (WT) thyroids which were comprised of 17.6% CD45+ cells. Further, 53.1 ± 10.9% of the CD45+ cells from HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-Cre thyroid tumors were of myeloid-lineage (CD11b+), consisting of macrophages (F4/80+Gr-1−) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (F4/80−Gr-1+). Further, HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-cre tumors contained Arginase-1 positive cells as determined by immunohistochemical analysis, supporting an immunosuppressive TME in HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-Cre thyroid tumors. We next evaluated whether or not cytotoxic (CD8+) or helper T cells (CD4+) were recruited to HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-Cre tumors. The majority of T cells in these tumors were double positive for CD4 and CD25, markers of

  11. Progression of hypertension and kidney disease in aging fawn-hooded rats is mediated by enhanced influence of renin-angiotensin system and suppression of nitric oxide system and epoxyeicosanoids.

    PubMed

    Doleželová, Šárka; Jíchová, Šárka; Husková, Zuzana; Vojtíšková, Alžběta; Kujal, Petr; Hošková, Lenka; Kautzner, Josef; Sadowski, Janusz; Červenka, Luděk; Kopkan, Libor

    The fawn-hooded hypertensive (FHH) rat serves as a genetic model of spontaneous hypertension associated with glomerular hyperfiltration and proteinuria. However, the knowledge of the natural course of hypertension and kidney disease in FHH rats remains fragmentary and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are unclear. In this study, over the animals' lifetime, we followed the survival rate, blood pressure (telemetry), indices of kidney damage, the activity of renin-angiotensin (RAS) and nitric oxide (NO) systems, and CYP450-epoxygenase products (EETs). Compared to normotensive controls, no elevation of plasma and renal RAS was observed in prehypertensive and hypertensive FHH rats; however, RAS inhibition significantly reduced systolic blood pressure (137 ± 9 to 116 ± 8, and 159 ± 8 to 126 ± 4 mmHg, respectively) and proteinuria (62 ± 2 to 37 ± 3, and 132 ± 8 to 87 ± 5 mg/day, respectively). Moreover, pharmacological RAS inhibition reduced angiotensin (ANG) II and increased ANG 1-7 in the kidney and thereby may have delayed the progression of kidney disease. Furthermore, renal NO and EETs declined in the aging FHH rats but not in the control strain. The present results, especially the demonstration of exaggerated vascular responsiveness to ANG II, indicate that RAS may contribute to the development of hypertension and kidney disease in FHH rats. The activity of factors opposing the development of hypertension and protecting the kidney declined with age in this model. Therefore, therapeutic enhancement of this activity besides RAS inhibition could be attempted in the therapy of human hypertension associated with kidney disease.

  12. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy occurring with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Hsu, C Y; Garen, P D; Goust, J M; Biggs, P J

    1984-08-01

    A 33-year-old homosexual man with symptoms and signs of a focal brain process was subsequently found to have an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) with biopsy-proven progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This report reemphasizes the association of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with AIDS and probably is best viewed as another example of an opportunistic CNS infection complicating deficient cell-mediated immunity.

  13. Arithmetic Progressions on Conics.

    PubMed

    Ciss, Abdoul Aziz; Moody, Dustin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we look at long arithmetic progressions on conics. By an arithmetic progression on a curve, we mean the existence of rational points on the curve whose x-coordinates are in arithmetic progression. We revisit arithmetic progressions on the unit circle, constructing 3-term progressions of points in the first quadrant containing an arbitrary rational point on the unit circle. We also provide infinite families of three term progressions on the unit hyperbola, as well as conics ax(2) + cy(2) = 1 containing arithmetic progressions as long as 8 terms.

  14. Cancer cachexia: mediators, signaling, and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Fearon, Kenneth C H; Glass, David J; Guttridge, Denis C

    2012-08-08

    Cancer cachexia is characterized by a significant reduction in body weight resulting predominantly from loss of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Cachexia causes reduced cancer treatment tolerance and reduced quality and length of life, and remains an unmet medical need. Therapeutic progress has been impeded, in part, by the marked heterogeneity of mediators, signaling, and metabolic pathways both within and between model systems and the clinical syndrome. Recent progress in understanding conserved, molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle atrophy/hypertrophy has provided a downstream platform for circumventing the variations and redundancy in upstream mediators and may ultimately translate into new targeted therapies.

  15. Semi materialized mediator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Soukaina; Zellou, Ahmed; Idri, Ali

    2015-02-01

    With the technological progress experienced by the world throughout the past two decades, a large number of applications and information sources have emerged. These sources are characterized by high heterogeneity making access to information scattered between these different sources, a very difficult task. In this context, the integration of information presents itself as a reliable solution for querying data uniformly present and spread over several independent, heterogeneous, distributed and scalable sources. This article is a first step in positioning our research in the context of data integration in a system of mediation. An overview of the technologies that have been developed in recent years are briefly presented and the challenge of integrating different data sources is exposed. Indeed, we will look later at integration system based on mediator. To facilitate and accelerate research in such a system, we propose in this paper a new indexing approach based on the MapReduce technology. A brief overview of this new approach and a proposed architecture are presented in this direction.

  16. Knowledge-mediated retrieval of laboratory observations.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, C.; Goldberg, H. S.

    1999-01-01

    Intelligent medical applications including agents, clinical decision support systems, and expert systems can benefit from components that expose the meanings of medical concepts. We have endeavored to create an ontology for laboratory observations and to make the ontology accessible in a distributed environment through a knowledge mediator offering several services. To date we have created two such services, one service to mediate the retrieval of laboratory observations and an auxiliary service to facilitate the mapping of units of measure to LOINC property-types. We report progress and insights on the development of our ontology and related knowledge mediator. Images Figure 3 PMID:10566472

  17. GPR56 in cancer progression: current status and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liquan; Xu, Lei

    2012-04-01

    Cell adhesion is a critical process during cancer progression and is mediated by transmembrane receptors. Recently, GPR56, a member of the adhesion family of G protein-coupled receptors, was established as a new type of adhesion receptor that binds to extracellular matrix proteins and shown to play inhibitory roles in melanoma progression. Further studies revealed that the extracellular portion and the seven transmembrane domains of GPR56 function antagonistically to regulate VEGF production and angiogenesis via a signaling pathway mediated by PKCα. Tissue transglutaminase was identified as the first extracellular matrix protein that binds to GPR56. It is a crosslinking enzyme in the extracellular matrix but is also expressed in the cytosol. Tissue transglutaminase plays pleiotropic roles in cancer progression. Whether and how it might mediate GPR56-regulated cancer progression awaits further investigation.

  18. A2A Adenosine Receptor (A2AAR) as a Therapeutic Target in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; El-shishtawy, Mamdouh M.; Zhang, Wenbo; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Liou, Gregory I.

    2011-01-01

    In diabetic retinopathy (DR), abnormalities in vascular and neuronal function are closely related to the local production of inflammatory mediators whose potential source is microglia. A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties that have not been studied in DR. Here, we evaluate the role of A2AAR and its underlying signaling in retinal complications associated with diabetes. Initial studies in wild-type mice revealed that the treatment with the A2AAR agonist resulted in marked decreases in hyperglycemia-induced retinal cell death and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release. To further assess the role of A2AAR in DR, we studied the effects of A2AAR ablation on diabetes-induced retinal abnormalities. Diabetic A2AAR−/− mice had significantly more terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive cells, TNF-α release, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression compared with diabetic wild-type mice. To explore a potential mechanism by which A2AAR signaling regulates inflammation in DR, we performed additional studies using microglial cells treated with Amadori-glycated albumin, a risk factor in diabetic disorders. The results showed that activation of A2AAR attenuated Amadori-glycated albumin-induced TNF-α release in a cAMP/exchange protein directly activated by cAMP-dependent mechanism and significantly repressed the inflammatory cascade, C-Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), in activated microglia. Collectively, this work provides pharmacological and genetic evidence for A2AAR signaling as a control point of cell death in DR and suggests that the retinal protective effect of A2AAR is mediated by abrogating the inflammatory response that occurs in microglia via interaction with C-Raf/ERK pathway. PMID:21514428

  19. Reconstructing Progressive Education